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Sample records for glioma tumor volume

  1. [Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) in adult gliomas].

    PubMed

    Kantor, G; Loiseau, H; Vital, A; Mazeron, J J

    2001-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiform and astrocytoma are the most frequent primary cancer of the central nervous system of adult. Definitions of gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are based on the confrontation of clinical presentation (age, performance status, neurologic symptoms...), histological type and imaging aspects. For glioblastoma multiform, the GTV can be defined by the area of contrast enhancement observed on the CT scan or MRI. Definition of the CTV can be more difficult and have to take into account the risk of presence of isolated malignant cells in the oedema surrounding the tumor or in the adjacent brain structures. The classical concept of GTV plus a safety margin of 2 cm around is discussed with a CTV containing at least all the oedematous area and eventually adjacent brain structures (nuclei, corpus callosum or other long associative fibers...). For low grade astrocytoma, the definition of GTV can be difficult if the tumoral infiltration is diffuse without nodular visible tumor. CTV corresponds to at least T2 MRI hypersignal area when visible. For postoperative tumor, technical considerations are important for the detection of residual tumor. A safety margin around the resected area is designed according to the risk of presence of isolated cells or involvement of adjacent brain structures. PMID:11715309

  2. Tumor Metabolism of Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Peng; Williams, Terence M.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Guo, Deliang

    2013-01-01

    Constitutively activated oncogenic signaling via genetic mutations such as in the EGFR/PI3K/Akt and Ras/RAF/MEK pathways has been recognized as a major driver for tumorigenesis in most cancers. Recent insights into tumor metabolism have further revealed that oncogenic signaling pathways directly promote metabolic reprogramming to upregulate biosynthesis of lipids, carbohydrates, protein, DNA and RNA, leading to enhanced growth of human tumors. Therefore, targeting cell metabolism has become a novel direction for drug development in oncology. In malignant gliomas, metabolism pathways of glucose, glutamine and lipid are significantly reprogrammed. Moreover, molecular mechanisms causing these metabolic changes are just starting to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent studies revealing critical gene alterations that lead to metabolic changes in malignant gliomas, and also discuss promising therapeutic strategies via targeting the key players in metabolic regulation. PMID:24217114

  3. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for gliomas:dosimetric effects of changes in gross tumor volume on organs at risk and healthy brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Zijian; Wang, Xia; Hu, Yongmei; Lyu, Zhiping; Huo, Lei; Wei, Rui; Fu, Jun; Hong, Jidong

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to explore the effects of changes in the gross tumor volume (GTV) on dose distribution in organs at risk (OARs) and healthy brain tissue in patients with gliomas. Methods Eleven patients suffering from gliomas with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans treated with a simultaneous integrated boost technique planned before therapy (initial plans) were prospectively enrolled. At the end of radiotherapy, patients underwent repeat computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and IMRT was replanned. The GTV and dosimetric parameters between the initial and replanned IMRT were compared using the Wilcoxon two-related-sample test, and correlations between the initial GTV and the replanned target volumes were assessed using the bivariate correlation test. Results The volume of the residual tumor did not change significantly (P>0.05), the volume of the surgical cavity decreased significantly (P<0.05), and the GTV and target volumes decreased significantly at the end of IMRT (all P<0.05). The near-maximum dose to OARs and volumes of healthy brain tissue receiving total doses of 10–50 Gy were lower in the replanned IMRT than in the initial IMRT (all P<0.05). The GTV in the initial plan was significantly positively correlated with the changes in the GTV and planning target volume 1 that occurred during IMRT (all P<0.05). Conclusion The reduction in the GTV in patients with gliomas resulted from shrinkage of the surgical cavity during IMRT, leading to decreased doses to the OARs and healthy brain tissue. Such changes appeared to be most meaningful in patients with large initial GTV values. PMID:27366091

  4. Evaluating changes in tumor volume using magnetic resonance imaging during the course of radiotherapy treatment of high-grade gliomas: Implications for conformal dose-escalation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, Christina . E-mail: ctsien@umich.edu; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel C.; Junck, L.; Chenevert, T.L.; Lawrence, T.

    2005-06-01

    Objective: To determine whether changes in tumor volume occur during the course of conformal 3D radiotherapy of high-grade gliomas by use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during treatment and whether these changes had an impact on tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: Between December 2000 and January 2004, 21 patients with WHO Grades 3 to 4 supratentorial malignant gliomas treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (median dose, 70 Gy) were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. All patients underwent T1-weighted contrast-enhancing and T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at approximately 1 to 2 weeks before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy (Weeks 1 and 3), and at routine intervals thereafter. All MRI scans were coregistered to the treatment-planning CT. Gross tumor volume (GTV Pre-Rx) was defined from a postoperative T1-weighted contrast-enhancing MRI performed 1 to 2 weeks before start of radiotherapy. A second GTV (GTV Week 3) was defined by use of an MRI performed during Week 3 of radiotherapy. A uniform 0.5 cm expansion of the respective GTV, PTV (Pre-Rx), and PTV (Week 3) was applied to the final boost plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to analyze any potential adverse changes in tumor coverage based on Week 3 MRI. Results: All MRI scans were reviewed independently by a neuroradiologist (DGH). Two patients were noted to have multifocal disease at presentation and were excluded from analysis. In 19 cases, changes in the GTV based on MRI at Week 3 during radiotherapy were as follows: 2 cases had an objective decrease in GTV ({>=}50%); 12 cases revealed a slight decrease in the rim enhancement or changes in cystic appearance of the GTV; 2 cases showed no change in GTV; and 3 cases demonstrated an increase in tumor volume. Both cases with objective decreases in GTV during treatment were Grade 3 tumors. No cases of tumor progression were noted in Grade 3 tumors during treatment. In comparison, three of 12 Grade 4

  5. Residual Tumor Volume as Best Outcome Predictor in Low Grade Glioma - A Nine-Years Near-Randomized Survey of Surgery vs. Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Roelz, Roland; Strohmaier, David; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Kraeutle, Rainer; Egger, Karl; Coenen, Volker A; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Reinacher, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse low grade gliomas (DLGG) are continuously progressive primary brain neoplasms that lead to neurological deficits and death. Treatment strategies are controversial. Randomized trials establishing the prognostic value of surgery do not exist. Here, we report the results of a nine-year near-randomized patient distribution between resection and biopsy. Until 2012, the Department of Neurosurgery and the Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery at the University Medical Center Freiburg were organized as separate administrative units both coordinating DLGG patient treatment independently. All consecutive adult patients with a new diagnosis of DLGG by either stereotactic biopsy or resection were included. Pre- and post-operative tumor volumetry was performed. 126 patients, 87 men (69%), 39 women (31%), median age 41 years, were included. 77 (61%) were initially managed by biopsy, 49 (39%) by resection. A significant survival benefit was found for patients with an initial management by resection (5-year OS 82% vs. 54%). The survival benefit of patients with initial resection was reserved to patients with a residual tumor volume of less than 15 cm(3). Maximum safe resection is the first therapy of choice in DLGG patients if a near-complete tumor removal can be achieved. Accurate prediction of the extent-of-resection is required for selection of surgical candidates. PMID:27574036

  6. Residual Tumor Volume as Best Outcome Predictor in Low Grade Glioma – A Nine-Years Near-Randomized Survey of Surgery vs. Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Roelz, Roland; Strohmaier, David; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Kraeutle, Rainer; Egger, Karl; Coenen, Volker A.; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Reinacher, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse low grade gliomas (DLGG) are continuously progressive primary brain neoplasms that lead to neurological deficits and death. Treatment strategies are controversial. Randomized trials establishing the prognostic value of surgery do not exist. Here, we report the results of a nine-year near-randomized patient distribution between resection and biopsy. Until 2012, the Department of Neurosurgery and the Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery at the University Medical Center Freiburg were organized as separate administrative units both coordinating DLGG patient treatment independently. All consecutive adult patients with a new diagnosis of DLGG by either stereotactic biopsy or resection were included. Pre- and post-operative tumor volumetry was performed. 126 patients, 87 men (69%), 39 women (31%), median age 41 years, were included. 77 (61%) were initially managed by biopsy, 49 (39%) by resection. A significant survival benefit was found for patients with an initial management by resection (5-year OS 82% vs. 54%). The survival benefit of patients with initial resection was reserved to patients with a residual tumor volume of less than 15 cm3. Maximum safe resection is the first therapy of choice in DLGG patients if a near-complete tumor removal can be achieved. Accurate prediction of the extent-of-resection is required for selection of surgical candidates. PMID:27574036

  7. Tumor initiating cells in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; Van Meir, Erwin G.

    2009-01-01

    A rare subpopulation of cells within malignant gliomas, which shares canonical properties with neural stem cells (NSCs), may be integral to glial tumor development and perpetuation. These cells, also known as tumor initiating cells (TICs), have the ability to self-renew, develop into any cell in the overall tumor population (multipotency), and proliferate. A defining property of TICs is their ability to initiate new tumors in immunocompromised mice with high efficiency. Mounting evidence suggests that TICs originate from the transformation of NSCs and their progenitors. New findings show that TICs may be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation than the bulk of tumor cells, thereby permitting recurrent tumor formation and accounting for the failure of conventional therapies. The development of new therapeutic strategies selectively targeting TICs while sparing NSCs may provide for more effective treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:19189072

  8. BmKCT toxin inhibits glioma proliferation and tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shaozhong; Sun, Zhengbo; Jiang, Dahe; Dai, Chao; Ma, Yibao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Liu, Hui; Wu, Yingliang; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin

    2010-05-28

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors associated with significant morbidity and mortality. How to target the tumor in situ, and inhibit tumor cell proliferation and invasion is the key for therapy. Gliomas express a glioma-specific chloride ion channel that is sensitive to toxins including BmKCT. In the current study, the inhibitory effect of BmKCT on glioma growth was observed in vivo using the glioma/SD rat model. Furthermore, BmKCT prevented the metastasis of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, biodistribution experiments with (l3l)I-labeled or Cy5.5-conjugated BmKCT revealed that BmKCT selectively targeted the glioma in situ. Our data suggest that BmKCT could be exploited as a potential therapeutic for glioma diagnosis and therapy. PMID:19906483

  9. Fibulin-3 is uniquely upregulated in malignant gliomas and promotes tumor cell motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi K; Sim, Hosung; Viapiano, Mariano S

    2009-11-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly invasive tumors with an almost invariably rapid and lethal outcome. Surgery and chemoradiotherapy fail to remove resistant tumor cells that disperse within normal tissue, which are a major cause for disease progression and therapy failure. Infiltration of the neural parenchyma is a distinctive property of malignant gliomas compared with other solid tumors. Thus, glioma cells are thought to produce unique molecular changes that remodel the neural extracellular matrix and form a microenvironment permissive for their motility. Here, we describe the unique expression and proinvasive role of fibulin-3, a mesenchymal matrix protein specifically upregulated in gliomas. Fibulin-3 is downregulated in peripheral tumors and is thought to inhibit tumor growth. However, we found fibulin-3 highly upregulated in gliomas and cultured glioma cells, although the protein was undetectable in normal brain or cultured astrocytes. Overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that fibulin-3 did not seem to affect glioma cell morphology or proliferation, but enhanced substrate-specific cell adhesion and promoted cell motility and dispersion in organotypic cultures. Moreover, orthotopic implantation of fibulin-3-overexpressing glioma cells resulted in diffuse tumors with increased volume and rostrocaudal extension compared with controls. Tumors and cultured cells overexpressing fibulin-3 also showed elevated expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases, such as MMP-2/MMP-9 and ADAMTS-5. Taken together, our results suggest that fibulin-3 has a unique expression and protumoral role in gliomas, and could be a potential target against tumor progression. Strategies against this glioma-specific matrix component could disrupt invasive mechanisms and restrict the dissemination of these tumors. PMID:19887559

  10. NDRG1 overexpressing gliomas are characterized by reduced tumor vascularization and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Wüstner, Marie; Harms, Christoph; Stange, Lena; Blaes, Jonas; Thomé, Carina; Harms, Ulrike; Mueller, Susanne; Weiler, Markus; Wick, Wolfgang; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia-regulated molecules play an important role in vascular resistance to antiangiogenic treatment. N-myc downstream-regulated-gene 1 (NDRG1) is significantly upregulated during hypoxia in glioma. It was the aim of the present study to analyze the role of NDRG1 on glioma angiogenesis and on antiangiogenic treatment. Orthotopically implanted NDRG1 glioma showed reduced tumor growth and vessel density compared to controls. RT-PCR gene array analysis revealed a 30-fold TNFSF15 increase in NDRG1 tumors. Consequently, the supernatant from NDRG1 transfected U87MG glioma cells resulted in reduced HUVEC proliferation, migration and angiogenic response in tube formation assays in vitro. This effect was provoked by increased TNFSF15 promoter activity in NDRG1 cells. Mutations in NF-κB and AP-1 promoter response elements suppressed TNFSF15 promoter activity. Moreover, U87MG glioma NDRG1 knockdown supernatant contained multiple proangiogenic proteins and increased HUVEC spheroid sprouting. Sunitinib treatment of orhotopically implanted mice reduced tumor volume and vessel density in controls; in NDRG1 overexpressing cells no reduction of tumor volume or vessel density was observed. NDRG1 overexpression leads to reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis in experimental glioma via upregulation of TNFSF15. In NDRG1 overexpressing glioma antiangiogenic treatment does not yield a therapeutic response. PMID:26297987

  11. Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Glioma: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Benjamin C.; Showers, Christopher R.; Anderson, David E.; Anderson, Lisa; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Anderson, Richard C. E.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) contribute substantially to the tumor mass of gliomas and have been shown to play a major role in the creation of a tumor microenvironment that promotes tumor progression. Shortcomings of attempts at antiglioma immunotherapy may result from a failure to adequately address these effects. Emerging evidence supports an independent categorization of glioma TAMs as alternatively activated M2-type macrophages, in contrast to classically activated proinflammatory M1-type macrophages. These M2-type macrophages exert glioma-supportive effects through reduced anti-tumor functions, increased expression of immunosuppressive mediators, and nonimmune tumor promotion through expression of trophic and invasion-facilitating substances. Much of our work has demonstrated these features of glioma TAMs, and together with the supporting literature will be reviewed here. Additionally, the dynamics of glioma cell-TAM interaction over the course of tumor development remain poorly understood; our efforts to elucidate glioma cell-TAM dynamics are summarized. Finally, the molecular pathways which underlie M2-type TAM polarization and gene expression similarly require further investigation, and may present the most potent targets for immunotherapeutic intervention. Highlighting recent evidence implicating the transcription factor STAT3 in immunosuppressive tumorigenic glioma TAMs, we advocate for gene array-based approaches to identify yet unappreciated expression regulators and effector molecules important to M2-type glioma TAMs polarization and function within the glioma tumor microenvironment. PMID:23737783

  12. Brain tumor modeling: glioma growth and interaction with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaem, Hossein Y.; Ahmadian, Alireza; Saberi, Hooshangh; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Khodadad, Davood

    2011-10-01

    In last decade increasingly mathematical models of tumor growths have been studied, particularly on solid tumors which growth mainly caused by cellular proliferation. In this paper we propose a modified model to simulate the growth of gliomas in different stages. Glioma growth is modeled by a reaction-advection-diffusion. We begin with a model of untreated gliomas and continue with models of polyclonal glioma following chemotherapy. From relatively simple assumptions involving homogeneous brain tissue bounded by a few gross anatomical landmarks (ventricles and skull) the models have been expanded to include heterogeneous brain tissue with different motilities of glioma cells in grey and white matter. Tumor growth is characterized by a dangerous change in the control mechanisms, which normally maintain a balance between the rate of proliferation and the rate of apoptosis (controlled cell death). Result shows that this model closes to clinical finding and can simulate brain tumor behavior properly.

  13. Metabolic approach for tumor delineation in glioma surgery: 3D MR spectroscopy image-guided resection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Lin, Ching-Po; Wang, Tian-Liang; Qin, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Jin-Song

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The extent of resection is one of the most essential factors that influence the outcomes of glioma resection. However, conventional structural imaging has failed to accurately delineate glioma margins because of tumor cell infiltration. Three-dimensional proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) can provide metabolic information and has been used in preoperative tumor differentiation, grading, and radiotherapy planning. Resection based on glioma metabolism information may provide for a more extensive resection and yield better outcomes for glioma patients. In this study, the authors attempt to integrate 3D (1)H-MRS into neuronavigation and assess the feasibility and validity of metabolically based glioma resection. METHODS Choline (Cho)-N-acetylaspartate (NAA) index (CNI) maps were calculated and integrated into neuronavigation. The CNI thresholds were quantitatively analyzed and compared with structural MRI studies. Glioma resections were performed under 3D (1)H-MRS guidance. Volumetric analyses were performed for metabolic and structural images from a low-grade glioma (LGG) group and high-grade glioma (HGG) group. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurological assessments were performed immediately after surgery and 1 year after tumor resection. RESULTS Fifteen eligible patients with primary cerebral gliomas were included in this study. Three-dimensional (1)H-MRS maps were successfully coregistered with structural images and integrated into navigational system. Volumetric analyses showed that the differences between the metabolic volumes with different CNI thresholds were statistically significant (p < 0.05). For the LGG group, the differences between the structural and the metabolic volumes with CNI thresholds of 0.5 and 1.5 were statistically significant (p = 0.0005 and 0.0129, respectively). For the HGG group, the differences between the structural and metabolic volumes with CNI thresholds of 0.5 and 1.0 were statistically significant (p = 0.0027 and 0

  14. Histogram analysis reveals a better delineation of tumor volume from background in 18F-FET PET compared to CBV maps in a hybrid PET-MR studie in gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filss, Christian P.; Stoffels, Gabriele; Galldiks, Norbert; Sabel, Michael; Wittsack, Hans J.; Coenen, Heinz H.; Shah, Nadim J.; Herzog, Hans; Langen, Karl-Josef

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently the method of first choice for diagnostic investigation of glial tumors. However, different MR sequences may over- or underestimate tumor size and thus it may not be possible to delineate tumor from adjacent brain. In order to compensate this confinement additonal MR sequences like perfusion weighted MRI (PWI) with regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) or positron emission tomography (PET) with aminoacids are used to gain further information. Recent studies suggest that both of theses image modalities provide similar diagnostic information. For comparison tumor to brain ratios (TBR) with mean and maximum values are frequently used but results from different studies can often not be checked against each other. Furthermore, especially the maximum TBR in rCBV is at risk to be falsified by artifacts (e.g. blood vessels). These confinements are reduced by the use of histograms since all information of the VOIs are equally displayed. In this study we measured and compared the intersection of tumor and reference tissue histograms in 18F-FET PET and rCBV maps in glioma patients.

  15. Tumor infiltrating immune cells in gliomas and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Miranda, David; Ruiz, Laura; Sousa, Pablo; Ciudad, Juana; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells are part of a complex microenvironment that promotes and/or regulates tumor development and growth. Depending on the type of cells and their functional interactions, immune cells may play a key role in suppressing the tumor or in providing support for tumor growth, with relevant effects on patient behavior. In recent years, important advances have been achieved in the characterization of immune cell infiltrates in central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but their role in tumorigenesis and patient behavior still remain poorly understood. Overall, these studies have shown significant but variable levels of infiltration of CNS tumors by macrophage/microglial cells (TAM) and to a less extent also lymphocytes (particularly T-cells and NK cells, and less frequently also B-cells). Of note, TAM infiltrate gliomas at moderate numbers where they frequently show an immune suppressive phenotype and functional behavior; in contrast, infiltration by TAM may be very pronounced in meningiomas, particularly in cases that carry isolated monosomy 22, where the immune infiltrates also contain greater numbers of cytotoxic T and NK-cells associated with an enhanced anti-tumoral immune response. In line with this, the presence of regulatory T cells, is usually limited to a small fraction of all meningiomas, while frequently found in gliomas. Despite these differences between gliomas and meningiomas, both tumors show heterogeneous levels of infiltration by immune cells with variable functionality. In this review we summarize current knowledge about tumor-infiltrating immune cells in the two most common types of CNS tumors-gliomas and meningiomas-, as well as the role that such immune cells may play in the tumor microenvironment in controlling and/or promoting tumor development, growth and control. PMID:26216710

  16. TRAIL conjugated to nanoparticles exhibits increased anti-tumor activities in glioma cells and glioma stem cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Perlstein, Benny; Finniss, Susan A.; Miller, Cathie; Okhrimenko, Hana; Kazimirsky, Gila; Cazacu, Simona; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lemke, Nancy; Brodie, Shlomit; Umansky, Felix; Rempel, Sandra A.; Rosenblum, Mark; Mikklesen, Tom; Margel, Shlomo; Brodie, Chaya

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are characterized by resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and therefore, alternative therapeutic approaches are needed. TRAIL induces apoptosis in cancer but not in normal cells and is considered to be a promising anti-tumor agent. However, its short in vivo half-life and lack of efficient administration modes are serious impediments to its therapeutic efficacy. Nanoparticles (NP) have been used as effective delivery tools for various anticancer drugs. TRAIL was conjugated to magnetic ferric oxide NP by binding the TRAIL primary amino groups to activated double bonds on the surface of the NP. The effect of NP-TRAIL was examined on the apoptosis of glioma cells and self-renewal of glioma stem cells (GSCs). In addition, the ability of the NP-TRAIL to track U251 cell–derived glioma xenografts and to affect cell apoptosis, tumor volume, and survival among xenografted rats was also examined. Conjugation of TRAIL to NP increased its apoptotic activity against different human glioma cells and GSCs, as compared with free recombinant TRAIL. Combined treatment with NP-TRAIL and γ-radiation or bortezomib sensitized TRAIL-resistant GSCs to NP-TRAIL. Using rhodamine-labeled NP and U251 glioma cell–derived xenografts, we demonstrated that the NP-TRAIL were found in the tumor site and induced a significant increase in glioma cell apoptosis, a decrease in tumor volume, and increased animal survival. In summary, conjugation of TRAIL to NP increased its apoptotic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, NP-TRAIL represents a targeted anticancer agent with more efficient action for the treatment of GBM and the eradication of GSCs. PMID:23144078

  17. Withania somnifera Suppresses Tumor Growth of Intracranial Allograft of Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Hardeep; Kumar, Sushil; Chaudhary, Harshita; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2016-08-01

    Gliomas are the most frequent type of primary brain tumor in adults. Their highly proliferative nature, complex cellular composition, and ability to escape therapies have confronted investigators for years, hindering the advancement toward an effective treatment. Agents that are safe and can be administered as dietary supplements have always remained priority to be most feasible for cancer therapy. Withania somnifera (ashwagandha) is an essential ingredient of Ayurvedic preparations and is known to eliminate cancer cells derived from a variety of peripheral tissues. Although our previous studies have addressed the in vitro anti-proliferative and differentiation-inducing properties of ashwagandha on neuronal cell lines, in vivo studies validating the same are lacking. While exploring the mechanism of its action in vitro, we observed that the ashwagandha water extract (ASH-WEX) induced the G2/M phase blockade and caused the activation of multiple pro-apoptotic pathways, leading to suppression of cyclin D1, bcl-xl, and p-Akt, and reduced the expression of polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) as well as the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. ASH-WEX reduced the intracranial tumor volumes in vivo and suppressed the tumor-promoting proteins p-nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p-Akt, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), PSA-NCAM, and cyclin D1 in the rat model of orthotopic glioma allograft. Reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and upregulation of mortalin and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) expression specifically in tumor-bearing tissue further indicated the anti-glioma efficacy of ASH-WEX in vivo. Combining this enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms of ASH-WEX in glioma with in vivo model system offers new opportunities to develop therapeutic strategy for safe, specific, and effective formulations for treating brain tumors. PMID:26208698

  18. Tipifarnib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Progressive High-Grade Glioma, Medulloblastoma, Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor, or Brain Stem Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma

  19. Expression of CDC5L is associated with tumor progression in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjuan; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yan; Sun, Jie; Wang, Donglin; Fan, Shaochen; Ban, Na; Zhu, Junya; Ji, Bin; Wang, Yuchan

    2016-03-01

    Cell division cycle 5-like (CDC5L) protein is a cell cycle regulator of the G2/M transition and has been reported to participate in the catalytic step of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing and DNA damage repair. Recently, it was also found to act as a candidate oncogene in osteosarcoma and cervical tumors. However, the role of CDC5L expression in tumor biology was still unclear. Here, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of CDC5L in gliomas. The expression of CDC5L in fresh glioma tissues and paraffin-embedded slices was evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We found that CDC5L was highly expressed in glioma tissues. The expression of CDC5L was significantly associated with glioma pathology grade and Ki-67 expression. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that high CDC5L expression was an independent prognostic factor for glioma patients' survival. To determine whether CDC5L could regulate the proliferation of glioma cells, we transfected glioma cells with interfering RNA target CDC5L, then investigated cell proliferation with cell counting kit (CCK)-8, flow cytometry assays and colony formation analyses. Our results indicated that knockdown of CDC5L would inhibit proliferation of glioma cells. Besides, reduced expression of CDC5L could induce the apoptosis of glioma cells. These findings suggested that CDC5L might play an important role in glioma and thus be a promising therapeutic target of glioma. PMID:26490980

  20. IGFBP2 promotes glioma tumor stem cell expansion and survival

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, David; Hsieh, Antony; Stea, Baldassarre; Ellsworth, Ron

    2010-06-25

    IGFBP2 is overexpressed in the most common brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM), and its expression is inversely correlated to GBM patient survival. Previous reports have demonstrated a role for IGFBP2 in glioma cell invasion and astrocytoma development. However, the function of IGFBP2 in the restricted, self-renewing, and tumorigenic GBM cell population comprised of tumor-initiating stem cells has yet to be determined. Herein we demonstrate that IGFBP2 is overexpressed within the stem cell compartment of GBMs and is integral for the clonal expansion and proliferative properties of glioma stem cells (GSCs). In addition, IGFBP2 inhibition reduced Akt-dependent GSC genotoxic and drug resistance. These results suggest that IGFBP2 is a selective malignant factor that may contribute significantly to GBM pathogenesis by enriching for GSCs and mediating their survival. Given the current dearth of selective molecular targets against GSCs, we anticipate our results to be of high therapeutic relevance in combating the rapid and lethal course of GBM.

  1. HOXB1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Regulated by miR-3175 in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liang; Liu, Dehua; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Nan; Han, Ziwu; Wang, Guang; Fu, Yao; Guo, Zhigang; Zhu, Zifeng

    2015-01-01

    The HOXB1 gene plays a critical role as an oncogene in diverse tumors. However, the functional role of HOXB1 and the mechanism regulating HOXB1 expression in glioma are not fully understood. A preliminary bioinformatics analysis showed that HOXB1 is ectopically expressed in glioma, and that HOXB1 is a possible target of miR-3175. In this study, we investigated the function of HOXB1 and the relationship between HOXB1 and miR-3175 in glioma. We show that HOXB1 expression is significantly downregulated in glioma tissues and cell lines, and that its expression may be closely associated with the degree of malignancy. Reduced HOXB1 expression promoted the proliferation and invasion of glioma cells, and inhibited their apoptosis in vitro, and the downregulation of HOXB1 was also associated with worse survival in glioma patients. More importantly, HOXB1 was shown experimentally to be a direct target of miR-3175 in this study. The downregulated expression of miR-3175 inhibited cell proliferation and invasion, and promoted apoptosis in glioma. The oncogenicity induced by low HOXB1 expression was prevented by an miR-3175 inhibitor in glioma cells. Our results suggest that HOXB1 functions as a tumor suppressor, regulated by miR-3175 in glioma. These results clarify the pathogenesis of glioma and offer a potential target for its treatment. PMID:26565624

  2. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  3. Temozolomide/PLGA microparticles plus vatalanib inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis in an orthotopic glioma model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Hui; Yue, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, He; Tang, Gu-Sheng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Jian-Min

    2010-11-01

    Temozolomide (TM) has anti-tumor activity in patients with malignant glioma. Implantable poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticles of TM (TM-MS) have been developed, enhancing the cytotoxicity of TM to Glioma C6 cells. Vatalanib, as anti-angiogenic agent, has also shown anti-tumor activity with malignant gliomas. We examined the combined effects of TM-MS and vatalanib in a rat orthotopic glioma model and found TM-MS offered a greater tumor inhibition than TM, and combination treatment with both of them improved the survival time versus single agent therapy. The combination treatment also demonstrated an inhibition to rat glioma tumors, a significant decrease in cell proliferation, an increase in apoptosis, and a lower microvessel density within the glioma tumors. The results suggest that TM-MS can more effectively inhibit tumor than TM, and combination treatment with TM-MS and vatalanib inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis and may prove to be a promising therapy for malignant gliomas. PMID:20816959

  4. Glioma Groups Based on 1p/19q, IDH, and TERT Promoter Mutations in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Decker, Paul A.; Sicotte, Hugues; Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matt L.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Sarkar, Gobinda; Caron, Alissa A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Praska, Corinne E.; Chada, Anisha R.; Halder, Chandralekha; Hansen, Helen M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Bracci, Paige M.; Marshall, Roxanne; Zheng, Shichun; Reis, Gerald F.; Pico, Alexander R.; O’Neill, Brian P.; Buckner, Jan C.; Giannini, Caterina; Huse, Jason T.; Perry, Arie; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Jenkins, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prediction of clinical behavior, response to therapy, and outcome of infiltrative glioma is challenging. On the basis of previous studies of tumor biology, we defined five glioma molecular groups with the use of three alterations: mutations in the TERT promoter, mutations in IDH, and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion). We tested the hypothesis that within groups based on these features, tumors would have similar clinical variables, acquired somatic alterations, and germline variants. METHODS We scored tumors as negative or positive for each of these markers in 1087 gliomas and compared acquired alterations and patient characteristics among the five primary molecular groups. Using 11,590 controls, we assessed associations between these groups and known glioma germline variants. RESULTS Among 615 grade II or III gliomas, 29% had all three alterations (i.e., were triplepositive), 5% had TERT and IDH mutations, 45% had only IDH mutations, 7% were triple-negative, and 10% had only TERT mutations; 5% had other combinations. Among 472 grade IV gliomas, less than 1% were triple-positive, 2% had TERT and IDH mutations, 7% had only IDH mutations, 17% were triple-negative, and 74% had only TERT mutations. The mean age at diagnosis was lowest (37 years) among patients who had gliomas with only IDH mutations and was highest (59 years) among patients who had gliomas with only TERT mutations. The molecular groups were independently associated with overall survival among patients with grade II or III gliomas but not among patients with grade IV gliomas. The molecular groups were associated with specific germline variants. CONCLUSIONS Gliomas were classified into five principal groups on the basis of three tumor markers. The groups had different ages at onset, overall survival, and associations with germline variants, which implies that they are characterized by distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:26061753

  5. Characterization of highly proliferative secondary tumor clusters along host blood vessels in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, TING-CHUNG; CHENG, CHUN-YU; YANG, WEI-HSUN; CHEN, WEN-CHENG; CHANG, PEY-JIUM

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the extensive invasion of tumor cells into normal brain tissue, a life-threatening feature of malignant gliomas. How invasive tumor cells migrate into normal brain tissue and form a secondary tumor structure remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the morphological and phenotypic changes of glioma cells during invasion in a C6 glioma model were investigated. C6 glioma cells were stereotactically injected into the right putamen region of adult Sprague-Dawley rats. The brain tissue sections were then subjected to hematoxylin and eosin, immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent staining. High magnification views of the tissue sections revealed that C6 cells formed tumor spheroids following implantation and marked invasion was observed shortly after spheroid formation. In the later stages of invasion, certain tumor cells invaded the perivascular space and formed small tumor clusters. These small tumor clusters exhibited certain common features, including tumor cell multilayers surrounding an arteriole, which occurred up to several millimeters away from the primary tumor mass; a high proliferation rate; and similar gene expression profiles to the primary tumor. In conclusion, the present study revealed that invading tumor cells are capable of forming highly proliferative cell clusters along arterioles near the tumor margin, which may be a possible cause of the recurrence of malignant glioma. PMID:26299849

  6. Fructus ligustri lucidi extracts induce human glioma cell death through regulation of Akt/mTOR pathway in vitro and reduce glioma tumor growth in U87MG xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Cheon; Kim, Jin Won; Kwon, Chae Hwa; Kim, Thae Hyun; Kim, Yong Keun

    2011-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of Fructus ligustri lucidi (FLL) extracts on glioma cell growth and to determine the underlying mechanism by which FLL extracts exert anticancer properties in human U87MG glioma cells. The FLL extracts resulted in cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Western blot analysis showed that treatment with FLL extracts caused down-regulation of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Overexpression of Akt prevented the cell death induced by the FLL extracts. The FLL extracts caused a decrease in the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the FLL extract-induced cell death was increased by the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. The FLL extracts decreased the expression of survivin. Oral administration of FLL extracts in subcutaneous U87MG xenograft models reduced the glioma tumor volume. These findings indicate that the FLL extracts resulted in glioma cell death through regulation of the Akt/mTOR/survivin pathway in vitro and inhibited glioma tumor growth in vivo. These data suggest that the FLL extracts may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for malignant human gliomas. PMID:20737659

  7. Pro-neural miR-128 is a glioma tumor suppressor that targets mitogenic kinases

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannakopoulos, T; Friedmann-Morvinski, D; Neveu, P; Dugas, JC; Gill, RM; Huillard, E; Liu, C; Zong, H; Rowitch, DH; Barres, BA; Verma, IM; Kosik, KS

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) carry out post-transcriptional control of a multitude of cellular processes. Aberrant expression of miRNA can lead to diseases, including cancer. Gliomas are aggressive brain tumors that are thought to arise from transformed glioma-initiating neural stem cells (giNSCs). With the use of giNSCs and human glioblastoma cells, we investigated the function of miRNAs in gliomas. We identified pro-neuronal miR-128 as a candidate glioma tumor suppressor miRNA. Decreased expression of miR-128 correlates with aggressive human glioma subtypes. With a combination of molecular, cellular and in vivo approaches, we characterize miR-128’s tumor suppressive role. miR-128 represses giNSC growth by enhancing neuronal differentiation. miR-128 represses growth and mediates differentiation by targeting oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) epithelial growth factor receptor and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α. Using an autochthonous glioma mouse model, we demonstrated that miR-128 repressed gliomagenesis. We identified miR-128 as a glioma tumor suppressor that targets RTK signaling to repress giNSC self-renewal and enhance differentiation. PMID:21874051

  8. Glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems, as well as changes in behavior and personality, are also fairly common in mixed glioma patients. ... Cerebri: Symptoms are often nonspecific and can include personality and behavioral changes, memory disturbance, increased intracranial pressure ...

  9. Oridonin inhibits tumor growth in glioma by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X-H; Liu, Y-X; Jia, M; Han, J-S; Zhao, M; Ji, S-P; Li, A-M

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most common malignant intracranial tumors. Despite newly developed therapies, these treatments mainly target oncogenic signals, and unfortunately, fail to provide enough survival benefit in both human patients and mouse xenograft models, especially the first-generation therapies. Oridonin is purified from the Chinese herb Rabdosia rubescens and considered to exert extensive anti-cancer effects on human tumorigenesis. In this study, we systemically investigated the role of Oridonin in tumor growth and the underlying mechanisms in human glioma. We found that Oridonin inhibited cell proliferations in a dose- and time-dependent manner in both glioma U87 and U251 cells. Moreover, these anti-cancer effects were also confirmed in a mouse model bearing glioma. Furthermore, cell cycle arrest in S phase was observed in Oridonin-mediated growth inhibition by flow cytometry. Cell cycle arrest in S phase led to eventual cell apoptosis, as revealed by Hoechst 33342 staining and annexin V/PI double-staining. The cell apoptosis might be accomplished through a mitochondrial manner. In all, we were the first to our knowledge to report that Oridonin could exert anti-cancer effects on tumor growth in human glioma by inducing cell cycle arrest and eventual cell apoptosis. The identification of Oridonin as a critical mediator of glioma growth may potentiate Oridonin as a novel therapeutic strategies in glioma treatments. PMID:25553351

  10. Functional Response of Tumor Vasculature to PaCO2: Determination of Total and Microvascular Blood Volume by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Scott D; Mandeville, Joseph B; Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Ikeda, Keiro; Terada, Kinya; Niloff, Stephanie; Chiocca, E Antonio; Rosen, Bruce R; Marota, John J A

    2003-01-01

    Abstract In order to identify differences in functional activity, we compared the reactivity of glioma vasculature and the native cerebral vasculature to both dilate and constrict in response to altered PaCO2. Gliomas were generated by unilateral implantation of U87MGdEGFR human glioma tumor cells into the striatum of adult female athymic rats. Relative changes in total and microvascular cerebral blood volume were determined by steady state contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for transitions from normocarbia to hypercarbia and hypocarbia. Although hypercarbia induced a significant increase in both total and microvascular blood volume in normal brain and glioma, reactivity of glioma vasculature was significantly blunted in comparison to normal striatum; glioma total CBV increased by 0.6±0.1% / mm Hg CO2 whereas normal striatum increased by 1.5±0.2%/ mm Hg CO2, (P < .0001, group t-test). Reactivity of microvascular blood volume was also significantly blunted. In contrast, hypocarbia decreased both total and microvascular blood volumes more in glioma than in normal striatum. These results indicate that cerebral blood vessels derived by tumor-directed angiogenesis do retain reactivity to CO2. Furthermore, reduced reactivity of tumor vessels to a single physiological perturbation, such as hypercarbia, should not be construed as a generalized reduction of functional activity of the tumor vascular bed. PMID:14511404

  11. Tumor targeting using magnetic nanoparticle Hsp70 conjugate in a model of C6 glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Maxim A.; Yakovleva, Ludmila Y.; Nikolaev, Boris P.; Marchenko, Yaroslav Y.; Dobrodumov, Anatolii V.; Onokhin, Kirill V.; Onokhina, Yana S.; Selkov, Sergey A.; Mikhrina, Anastasiia L.; Guzhova, Irina V.; Martynova, Marina G.; Bystrova, Olga A.; Ischenko, Alexander M.; Margulis, Boris A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), due to their unique magnetic properties, have the ability to function both as magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents, and can be used for thermotherapy. SPIONs conjugated to the heat shock protein Hsp70 that selectively binds to the CD40 receptor present on glioma cells, could be used for MR contrast enhancement of experimental C6 glioma. Methods The magnetic properties of the Hsp70-SPIONs were measured by NMR relaxometry method. The uptake of nanoparticles was assessed on the C6 glioma cells by confocal and electron microscopes. The tumor selectivity of Hsp70-SPIONs being intravenously administered was analyzed in the experimental model of C6 glioma in the MRI scanner. Results Hsp70-SPIONs relaxivity corresponded to the properties of negative contrast agents with a hypointensive change of resonance signal in MR imaging. A significant accumulation of the Hsp70-SPIONs but not the non-conjugated nanoparticles was observed by confocal microscopy within C6 cells. Negative contrast tumor enhancement in the T2-weighted MR images was higher in the case of Hsp70-SPIONs in comparison to non-modified SPIONs. Histological analysis of the brain sections confirmed the retention of the Hsp70-SPIONs in the glioma tumor but not in the adjacent normal brain tissues. Conclusion The study demonstrated that Hsp70-SPION conjugate intravenously administered in C6 glioma model accumulated in the tumors and enhanced the contrast of their MR images. PMID:24305705

  12. Human and rat glioma growth, invasion, and vascularization in a novel chick embryo brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Cretu, Alexandra; Fotos, Joseph S; Little, Brian W; Galileo, Deni S

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the insidiously invasive nature of malignant gliomas are poorly understood, and their study would be facilitated by an in vivo model that is easy to manipulate and inexpensive. The developing chick embryo brain was assessed as a new xenograft model for the production, growth, and study of human and rat glioma cell lines. Three established glioma lines (U-87 MG, C6, and 9L) were injected into chick embryo brain ventricles on embryonic day (E) 5 and brains were examined after several days to two weeks after injection. All glioma lines survived, produced vascularized intraventricular tumors, and invaded the brain in a manner similar to that in rodents. Rat C6 glioma cells spread along vasculature and also invaded the neural tissue. Human U-87 glioma cells migrated along vasculature and exhibited slight invasion of neural tissue. Rat 9L gliosarcoma cells were highly motile, but migrated only along the vasculature. A derivative of 9L cells that stably expressed the cell surface adhesion molecule NgCAM/L1 was produced and also injected into chick embryo brain ventricles to see if this protein could facilitate tumor cell migration away from the vasculature into areas such as axonal tracts. 9L/NgCAM cells, however, did not migrate away from the vasculature and, thus, this protein alone cannot be responsible for diffuse invasiveness of some gliomas. 9L/NgCAM cell motility was assessed in vitro using sophisticated time-lapse microscopy and quantitative analysis, and was significantly altered compared to parental 9L cells. These studies demonstrate that the chick embryo brain is a successful and novel xenograft model for mammalian gliomas and demonstrate the potential usefulness of this new model for studying glioma tumor cell growth, vascularization, and invasiveness. PMID:16158250

  13. Metabolomics profiling in plasma samples from glioma patients correlates with tumor phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Heimberger, Amy B.; Lu, Zhimin; Wu, Xifeng; Hodges, Tiffany R.; Song, Renduo; Shen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor-based molecular biomarkers have redefined in the classification gliomas. However, the association of systemic metabolomics with glioma phenotype has not been explored yet. Methods In this study, we conducted two-step (discovery and validation) metabolomic profiling in plasma samples from 87 glioma patients. The metabolomics data were tested for correlation with glioma grade (high vs low), glioblastoma (GBM) versus malignant gliomas, and IDH mutation status. Results Five metabolites, namely uracil, arginine, lactate, cystamine, and ornithine, significantly differed between high- and low-grade glioma patients in both the discovery and validation cohorts. When the discovery and validation cohorts were combined, we identified 29 significant metabolites with 18 remaining significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Those 18 significant metabolites separated high- from low-grade glioma patients with 91.1% accuracy. In the pathway analysis, a total of 18 significantly metabolic pathways were identified. Similarly, we identified 2 and 6 metabolites that significantly differed between GBM and non-GBM, and IDH mutation positive and negative patients after multiple comparison adjusting. Those 6 significant metabolites separated IDH1 mutation positive from negative glioma patients with 94.4% accuracy. Three pathways were identified to be associated with IDH mutation status. Within arginine and proline metabolism, levels of intermediate metabolites in creatine pathway were all significantly lower in IDH mutation positive than in negative patients, suggesting an increased activity of creatine pathway in IDH mutation positive tumors. Conclusion Our findings identified metabolites and metabolic pathways that differentiated tumor phenotypes. These may be useful as host biomarker candidates to further help glioma molecular classification. PMID:26967252

  14. Lower expression of Nrdp1 in human glioma contributes tumor progression by reducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hengliang; Du, Jin; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Bao; Gong, Hui; Wu, Yuxuan; Tang, Yuan; Gao, Yong; Yu, Rutong

    2014-10-01

    Ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1 (neuregulin receptor degradation protein 1) plays important roles in multiple physiological process because it can ubiquitinate various substrates such as ErbB3, BRUCE, MyD88, C/EBPβ, and Parkin, and so forth. In addition to the physiological function, it was also found to be involved in tumor progression. It has been shown that loss of Nrdp1 enhances breast cancer cell growth. Up to now, the role of Nrdp1 in glioma has not been elucidated. Here, we reported that Nrdp1 as well as cleaved caspase 3 was lower expressed in human glioma tissues comparing with the nontumorous. And then we found that the expression of Nrdp1 and cleaved caspase 3 was increased in the treatment of Temozolomide (TMZ), a drug for glioma chemotherapy. Further investigation indicated that transient transfection of Nrdp1 significantly promoted cell apoptosis by aggravating the degradation of BRUCE and activation of caspase 3. In addition, overexpression of Nrdp1 augmented TMZ induced apoptosis by evaluating the degradation of BRUCE and the activation of caspase 3, while silencing of Nrdp1 reduced the sensitivity to the TMZ by inhibiting the degradation of BRUCE and the activation of caspase 3 in human glioma cells. These observations show that Nrdp1 is a pro-apoptotic protein in human glioma and lower expression of Nrdp1 in human glioma may promote tumor progression by reducing apoptosis, suggesting that Nrdp1 may be an important regulator in the development of human glioma. PMID:25355637

  15. Altered expression of connexin43 and phosphorylation connexin43 in glioma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin-Yun; Jiang, Qiu-Hua; Hong, Tao; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Rui-Jin; Huang, Jin-Qing; Hu, Kun; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to evaluate the connexin (Cx43) and phosphorylation Cx43 (p-Cx43) expression of human glioma tumors and correlate their expression with degrees of malignancy and proliferation, apoptosis, and migration activity of tumors. Cx43 and p-Cx43 expression were examined by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining. The U251 cell viability was measured by MTT analysis. The apoptosis and migration were also evaluated by flow cytometric analysis and fluoroblok transwell chambers, respectively. We found that the Cx43 expression were significantly downregulated in in malignant glioma (WHO grade III and IV), compared to the malignant glioma (WHO grade I and II) and the p-Cx43 expression levels of malignant glioma (WHO grade III and IV) were significantly increased (P<0.05), compared to the malignant glioma (WHO grade I and II) at immunohistochemical analysis. After treatment of cells with a specific inhibitor of PKC, MAPK, and PTK inhibitors, the cell viability and migration were significantly decreased, while the apoptosis was slightly induced. In conclusion, the Cx43 expression level is inversely correlated with the tumor grade and proliferation and migration activity of tumor. Higher p-Cx43 expression level in high tumor grade suggests that a complex mechanism is involved in the suppression of tumor growth by connexins. PMID:26191122

  16. Glioma Cells in the Tumor Periphery Have a Stem Cell Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Munthe, Sune; Petterson, Stine Asferg; Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard; Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are highly infiltrative tumors incurable with surgery. Although surgery removes the bulk tumor, tumor cells in the periphery are left behind resulting in tumor relapses. The aim of the present study was to characterize the phenotype of tumor cells in the periphery focusing on tumor stemness, proliferation and chemo-resistance. This was investigated in situ in patient glioma tissue as well as in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts. We identified 26 gliomas having the R132 mutation in Isocitrate DeHydrogenase 1 (mIDH1). A double immunofluorescence approach identifying mIDH1 positive tumor cells and a panel of markers was used. The panel comprised of six stem cell-related markers (CD133, Musashi-1, Bmi-1, Sox-2, Nestin and Glut-3), a proliferation marker (Ki-67) as well as a chemo-resistance marker (MGMT). Computer-based automated classifiers were designed to measure the mIDH1 positive nucleus area-fraction of the chosen markers. Moreover, orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts from five different patient-derived spheroid cultures were obtained and the tumor cells identified by human specific immunohistochemical markers. The results showed that tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas expressed stem cell markers, however for most markers at a significantly lower level than in the tumor core. The Ki-67 level was slightly reduced in the periphery, whereas the MGMT level was similar. In orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts all markers showed similar levels in the core and periphery. In conclusion tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas have a stem cell phenotype, although it is less pronounced than in the tumor core. Novel therapies aiming at preventing recurrence should therefore take tumor stemness into account. Migrating cells in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts preserve expression and stem cell markers. The orthotopic model therefore has a promising translational potential. PMID:27171431

  17. Glioma Cells in the Tumor Periphery Have a Stem Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Munthe, Sune; Petterson, Stine Asferg; Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard; Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are highly infiltrative tumors incurable with surgery. Although surgery removes the bulk tumor, tumor cells in the periphery are left behind resulting in tumor relapses. The aim of the present study was to characterize the phenotype of tumor cells in the periphery focusing on tumor stemness, proliferation and chemo-resistance. This was investigated in situ in patient glioma tissue as well as in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts. We identified 26 gliomas having the R132 mutation in Isocitrate DeHydrogenase 1 (mIDH1). A double immunofluorescence approach identifying mIDH1 positive tumor cells and a panel of markers was used. The panel comprised of six stem cell-related markers (CD133, Musashi-1, Bmi-1, Sox-2, Nestin and Glut-3), a proliferation marker (Ki-67) as well as a chemo-resistance marker (MGMT). Computer-based automated classifiers were designed to measure the mIDH1 positive nucleus area-fraction of the chosen markers. Moreover, orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts from five different patient-derived spheroid cultures were obtained and the tumor cells identified by human specific immunohistochemical markers. The results showed that tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas expressed stem cell markers, however for most markers at a significantly lower level than in the tumor core. The Ki-67 level was slightly reduced in the periphery, whereas the MGMT level was similar. In orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts all markers showed similar levels in the core and periphery. In conclusion tumor cells in the periphery of patient gliomas have a stem cell phenotype, although it is less pronounced than in the tumor core. Novel therapies aiming at preventing recurrence should therefore take tumor stemness into account. Migrating cells in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts preserve expression and stem cell markers. The orthotopic model therefore has a promising translational potential. PMID:27171431

  18. Ablation of Neuropilin 1 from glioma-associated microglia and macrophages slows tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Jeremy T; Chen, Danling; Choi, Matthew; Nissen, Jillian C; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Djordevic, Snezana; Zachary, Ian C; Selwood, David; Tsirka, Stella E

    2016-03-01

    Gliomas are the most commonly diagnosed primary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Median times of survival are dismal regardless of the treatment approach, underlying the need to develop more effective therapies. Modulation of the immune system is a promising strategy as innate and adaptive immunity play important roles in cancer progression. Glioma associated microglia and macrophages (GAMs) can comprise over 30% of the cells in glioma biopsies. Gliomas secrete cytokines that suppress the anti-tumorigenic properties of GAMs, causing them to secrete factors that support the tumor's spread and growth. Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) is a transmembrane receptor that in mice both amplifies pro-angiogenic signaling in the tumor microenvironment and affects behavior of innate immune cells. Using a Cre-lox system, we generated mice that lack expression of Nrp1 in GAMs. We demonstrate, using an in vivo orthotopic glioma model, that tumors in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs exhibit less vascularity, grow at a slower pace, and are populated by increased numbers of anti-tumorigenic GAMs. Moreover, glioma survival times in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs were significantly longer. Treating wild-type mice with a small molecule inhibitor of Nrp1's b1 domain, EG00229, which we show here is selective for Nrp1 over Nrp2, yielded an identical outcome. Nrp1-deficient or EG00229-treated wild-type microglia exhibited a shift towards anti-tumorigenicity as evident by altered inflammatory marker profiles in vivo and decreased SMAD2/3 activation when conditioned in the presence of glioma-derived factors. These results provide support for the proposal that pharmacological inhibition of Nrp1 constitutes a potential strategy for suppressing glioma progression. PMID:26755653

  19. Ablation of Neuropilin 1 from glioma-associated microglia and macrophages slows tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Jeremy T.; Chen, Danling; Choi, Matthew; Nissen, Jillian C.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Djordevic, Snezana; Zachary, Ian C.; Selwood, David; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most commonly diagnosed primary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Median times of survival are dismal regardless of the treatment approach, underlying the need to develop more effective therapies. Modulation of the immune system is a promising strategy as innate and adaptive immunity play important roles in cancer progression. Glioma associated microglia and macrophages (GAMs) can comprise over 30% of the cells in glioma biopsies. Gliomas secrete cytokines that suppress the anti-tumorigenic properties of GAMs, causing them to secrete factors that support the tumor's spread and growth. Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) is a transmembrane receptor that in mice both amplifies pro-angiogenic signaling in the tumor microenvironment and affects behavior of innate immune cells. Using a Cre-lox system, we generated mice that lack expression of Nrp1 in GAMs. We demonstrate, using an in vivo orthotopic glioma model, that tumors in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs exhibit less vascularity, grow at a slower pace, and are populated by increased numbers of anti-tumorigenic GAMs. Moreover, glioma survival times in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs were significantly longer. Treating wild-type mice with a small molecule inhibitor of Nrp1's b1 domain, EG00229, which we show here is selective for Nrp1 over Nrp2, yielded an identical outcome. Nrp1-deficient or EG00229-treated wild-type microglia exhibited a shift towards anti-tumorigenicity as evident by altered inflammatory marker profiles in vivo and decreased SMAD2/3 activation when conditioned in the presence of glioma-derived factors. These results provide support for the proposal that pharmacological inhibition of Nrp1 constitutes a potential strategy for suppressing glioma progression. PMID:26755653

  20. Over-expression of tetraspanin 8 in malignant glioma regulates tumor cell progression

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Si-Jian; Wu, Yue-Bing; Cai, Shang; Pan, Yi-Xin; Liu, Wei; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang

    2015-03-13

    Tumor cell invasion and proliferation remain the overwhelming causes of death for malignant glioma patients. To establish effective therapeutic methods, new targets implied in these processes have to be identified. Tetraspanin 8 (Tspn8) forms complexes with a large variety of trans-membrane and/or cytosolic proteins to regulate several important cellular functions. In the current study, we found that Tspn8 was over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues, and its expression level correlated with the grade of tumors. Tspn8 expression in malignant glioma cells (U251MG and U87MG lines) is important for cell proliferation and migration. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Tspn8 markedly reduced in vitro proliferation and migration of U251MG and U87MG cells. Meanwhile, Tspn8 silencing also increased the sensitivity of temozolomide (TMZ), and significantly increased U251MG or U87MG cell death and apoptosis by TMZ were achieved with Tspn8 knockdown. We observed that Tspn8 formed a complex with activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in both human malignant glioma tissues and in above glioma cells. This complexation appeared required for FAK activation, since Tspn8 knockdown inhibited FAK activation in U251MG and U87MG cells. These results provide evidence that Tspn8 contributes to the pathogenesis of glioblastoma probably by promoting proliferation, migration and TMZ-resistance of glioma cells. Therefore, targeting Tspn8 may provide a potential therapeutic intervention for malignant glioma. - Highlights: • Tspn8 is over-expressed in multiple clinical malignant glioma tissues. • Tspn8 expression is correlated with the grade of malignant gliomas. • Tspn8 knockdown suppresses U251MG/U87MG proliferation and in vitro migration. • Tspn8 knockdown significantly increases TMZ sensitivity in U251MG/U87MG cells. • Tspn8 forms a complex with FAK, required for FAK activation.

  1. Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticles across the blood-brain tumor barrier into malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Hemant; Kanevsky, Ariel S; Wu, Haitao; Brimacombe, Kyle R; Fung, Steve H; Sousa, Alioscka A; Auh, Sungyoung; Wilson, Colin M; Sharma, Kamal; Aronova, Maria A; Leapman, Richard D; Griffiths, Gary L; Hall, Matthew D

    2008-01-01

    Background Effective transvascular delivery of nanoparticle-based chemotherapeutics across the blood-brain tumor barrier of malignant gliomas remains a challenge. This is due to our limited understanding of nanoparticle properties in relation to the physiologic size of pores within the blood-brain tumor barrier. Polyamidoamine dendrimers are particularly small multigenerational nanoparticles with uniform sizes within each generation. Dendrimer sizes increase by only 1 to 2 nm with each successive generation. Using functionalized polyamidoamine dendrimer generations 1 through 8, we investigated how nanoparticle size influences particle accumulation within malignant glioma cells. Methods Magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging probes were conjugated to the dendrimer terminal amines. Functionalized dendrimers were administered intravenously to rodents with orthotopically grown malignant gliomas. Transvascular transport and accumulation of the nanoparticles in brain tumor tissue was measured in vivo with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Localization of the nanoparticles within glioma cells was confirmed ex vivo with fluorescence imaging. Results We found that the intravenously administered functionalized dendrimers less than approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter were able to traverse pores of the blood-brain tumor barrier of RG-2 malignant gliomas, while larger ones could not. Of the permeable functionalized dendrimer generations, those that possessed long blood half-lives could accumulate within glioma cells. Conclusion The therapeutically relevant upper limit of blood-brain tumor barrier pore size is approximately 11.7 to 11.9 nm. Therefore, effective transvascular drug delivery into malignant glioma cells can be accomplished by using nanoparticles that are smaller than 11.7 to 11.9 nm in diameter and possess long blood half-lives. PMID:19094226

  2. The Value of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid in Low-grade Gliomas and High-grade Gliomas Lacking Glioblastoma Imaging Features: An Analysis Based on Fluorescence, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 18F-Fluoroethyl Tyrosine Positron Emission Tomography, and Tumor Molecular Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Mohammed; Wölfer, Johannes; Ewelt, Christian; Holling, Markus; Hasselblatt, Martin; Niederstadt, Thomas; Zoubi, Tarek; Weckesser, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 20% of grade II and most grade III gliomas fluoresce after 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) application. Conversely, approximately 30% of nonenhancing gliomas are actually high grade. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify preoperative factors (ie, age, enhancement, 18F-fluoroethyl tyrosine positron emission tomography [18F-FET PET] uptake ratios) for predicting fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastomas imaging features and to determine whether fluorescence will allow prediction of tumor grade or molecular characteristics. METHODS: Patients harboring gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features were given 5-ALA. Fluorescence was recorded intraoperatively, and biopsy specimens collected from fluorescing tissue. World Health Organization (WHO) grade, Ki-67/MIB-1 index, IDH1 (R132H) mutation status, O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status, and 1p/19q co-deletion status were assessed. Predictive factors for fluorescence were derived from preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-FET PET. Classification and regression tree analysis and receiver-operating-characteristic curves were generated for defining predictors. RESULTS: Of 166 tumors, 82 were diagnosed as WHO grade II, 76 as grade III, and 8 as glioblastomas grade IV. Contrast enhancement, tumor volume, and 18F-FET PET uptake ratio >1.85 predicted fluorescence. Fluorescence correlated with WHO grade (P < .001) and Ki-67/MIB-1 index (P < .001), but not with MGMT promoter methylation status, IDH1 mutation status, or 1p19q co-deletion status. The Ki-67/MIB-1 index in fluorescing grade III gliomas was higher than in nonfluorescing tumors, whereas in fluorescing and nonfluorescing grade II tumors, no differences were noted. CONCLUSION: Age, tumor volume, and 18F-FET PET uptake are factors predicting 5-ALA-induced fluorescence in gliomas without typical glioblastoma imaging features. Fluorescence was associated with an increased

  3. Malignant glioma following radiotherapy for unrelated primary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Marus, G.; Levin, C.V.; Rutherfoord, G.S.

    1986-08-15

    Four cases are documented where a glioma was histologically verified in the irradiation field of a previously treated malignancy of a different cell line. Radiation-induced neoplasia in the central nervous system now has been established in the induction of meningioma and sarcoma. The association between therapeutic irradiation and glioma in the reported cases lends to the evidence that a causal relation does exist. This incidence is small and does not detract from the overall benefit of irradiation as a therapeutic modality.

  4. Overexpression of CAP1 and its significance in tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion in glioma.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yue-Chao; Cui, Chen-Chen; Zhu, Yi-Shuo; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Meng; Yu, Jin-Song; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2016-09-01

    Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1), a protein related to the regulation of actin filaments and the Ras/cAMP pathway, is associated with tumor progression. Nevertheless, the expression level and effects of CAP1 in regards to glioma have not been reported. In the present study, we examined the expression of CAP1 in glioma and tumor adjacent normal brain tissues by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that CAP1 was overexpressed in glioma tissues in comparison with that noted in the tumor adjacent normal brain tissues and increased staining of CAP1 was found to be correlated with WHO stage. In addition, we discovered that knockdown of CAP1 by specific RNA interference markedly inhibited cell growth and caused downregulation of the proliferation markers, PCNA and cyclin A. We further demonstrated that knockdown of CAP1 inhibited cell metastatic abilities by downregulating N-cadherin and vimentin and upregulating E-cadherin. These findings revealed that CAP1 expression is markedly increased in human glioma and that downregulation of CAP1 in tumors may serve as a treatment for glioma patients. PMID:27432289

  5. Tumor Restrictive Suicide Gene Therapy for Glioma Controlled by the FOS Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiliang; Song, Weijian; Luo, Jie; Jiang, Shan; Yan, Fei; Zhai, Baojin

    2015-01-01

    Effective suicide gene delivery and expression are crucial to achieving successful effects in gene therapy. An ideal tumor-specific promoter expresses therapeutic genes in tumor cells with minimal normal tissue expression. We compared the activity of the FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog) promoter with five alternative tumor-specific promoters in glioma cells and non-malignant astrocytes. The FOS promoter caused significantly higher transcriptional activity in glioma cell lines than all alternative promoters with the exception of CMV. The FOS promoter showed 13.9%, 32.4%, and 70.8% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in three glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373). Importantly, however, the FOS promoter showed only 1.6% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in normal astrocytes. We also tested the biologic activity of recombinant adenovirus containing the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) driven by the FOS promoter, including selective killing efficacy in vitro and tumor inhibition rate in vivo. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of the HSV-tk gene controlled by the FOS promoter conferred a cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that use of the FOS-tk adenovirus system is a promising strategy for glioma-specific gene therapy but still much left for improvement. PMID:26571389

  6. Effective Treatment of Established GL261 Murine Gliomas through Picornavirus Vaccination-Enhanced Tumor Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Renner, Danielle N; Jin, Fang; Litterman, Adam J; Balgeman, Alexis J; Hanson, Lisa M; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Chae, Michael; Carlson, Brett L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Parney, Ian F; Ohlfest, John R; Pirko, Istvan; Pavelko, Kevin D; Johnson, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is among the most invasive and lethal of cancers, frequently infiltrating surrounding healthy tissue and giving rise to rapid recurrence. It is therefore critical to establish experimental model systems and develop therapeutic approaches that enhance anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, we have employed a newly developed murine glioma model to assess the efficacy of a novel picornavirus vaccination approach for the treatment of established tumors. The GL261-Quad system is a variation of the GL261 syngeneic glioma that has been engineered to expresses model T cell epitopes including OVA257-264. MRI revealed that both GL261 and GL261-Quad tumors display characteristic features of human gliomas such as heterogeneous gadolinium leakage and larger T2 weighted volumes. Analysis of brain-infiltrating immune cells demonstrated that GL261-Quad gliomas generate detectable CD8+ T cell responses toward the tumor-specific Kb:OVA257-264 antigen. Enhancing this response via a single intracranial or peripheral vaccination with picornavirus expressing the OVA257-264 antigen increased anti-tumor CD8+ T cells infiltrating the brain, attenuated progression of established tumors, and extended survival of treated mice. Importantly, the efficacy of the picornavirus vaccination is dependent on functional cytotoxic activity of CD8+ T cells, as the beneficial response was completely abrogated in mice lacking perforin expression. Therefore, we have developed a novel system for evaluating mechanisms of anti-tumor immunity in vivo, incorporating the GL261-Quad model, 3D volumetric MRI, and picornavirus vaccination to enhance tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses and track their effectiveness at eradicating established gliomas in vivo. PMID:25933216

  7. The effects of sequential treatments on hippocampal volumes in malignant glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Nolen, Shantell C; Lee, Brian; Shantharam, Shruti; Yu, Hon J; Su, Lydia; Billimek, John; Bota, Daniela A

    2016-09-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are very aggressive tumors. In an effort to improve the outcome, the patients receive multi-modal therapies such as surgery, radiation and chemotherapy (temozolomide followed in many cases by bevacizumab). The survivors are affected by multiple learning and memory deficits. Greater deterioration over time in hippocampal specific cognitive tasks was shown in patients receiving bevacizumab in addition to radiation and temozolomide for a longer period of time (RTOG 0825). The rate of hippocampal atrophy in patients treated with radiation and temozolomide followed by bevacizumab is not yet determined, and is the goal of the present study. We used the serial MRIs obtained as parts of standard clinical care in patients with MG. Measurements were done using the Medical Image Processing, Analysis and Visualization (MIPAV) software. The hippocampus in the contralateral hemisphere was manually traced and measured, to avoid morphological structure changes induced by the tumor, radiation fields or surgical markers. We determined a longitudinal progression of hippocampal atrophy-with the maximum volume loss (33.26 %) for the patients that were on treatment for 5 years. There was no detectable hippocampal atrophy during the chemo-radiation followed by adjuvant temozolomide. A significant decrease in the absolute hippocampus volume was noted after 6 months of continuous bevacizumab treatment (p < 0.05). The hippocampal volume loss progressed over the next 3 years, and was higher than the one previously reported in Alzheimer disease patients. The hippocampal volume loss is minimal during the 1 month after diagnosis, when the patients receive chemo-radiation and adjuvant temozolomide. However, prolonged treatment including bevacizumab is associated with a significant rate of hippocampal volume loss. PMID:27393350

  8. Characterization of a canine glioma cell line as related to established experimental brain tumor models.

    PubMed

    Rainov, N G; Koch, S; Sena-Esteves, M; Berens, M E

    2000-07-01

    A large animal tumor model for anaplastic glioma has been recently developed using immunotolerant allogeneic Beagle dogs and an established canine glioma cell line, J3T. This model offers advantages in terms of tumor morphology and similarity to human anaplastic glioma. The present study was aimed at evaluating the biological characteristics of the J3T canine glioma cell line as related to experimental gene therapy studies. Furthermore, development and morphology of canine brain tumors in a xenogeneic immunodeficient SCID mouse model was investigated. It was demonstrated that cultured J3T cells can be efficiently infected by adenovirus (AV), herpes-simplex type I (HSV), or retrovirus (RV) vectors, as well as by non-virus vectors such as cationic liposome/DNA complexes. Thus, in terms of infectability and transfectability, J3T cells seem to be closer to human glioma than the 9L rodent gliosarcoma. Cytotoxicity of selection antibiotics such as G418, puromycin, and hygromycin on J3T cells essentially resemble cytotoxicity seen with other established glioma lines, for example, 9L, U87, or U343. RV-mediated HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy demonstrated comparable LD50 for TK-expressing and control (non-expressing) J3T and 9L cells treated with Ganciclovir. Further, it was proven that J3T cells are tumorigenic and may grow heterotopically and orthotopically in a xenogeneic immunodeficient host, the SCID mouse, although morphology and growth pattern of these xenogeneic tumors differ from the demonstrated invasive phenotype in the Beagle dog. PMID:10901232

  9. Canine intracranial gliomas: Relationship between magnetic resonance imaging criteria and tumor type and grade

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, R.T.; Ober, C.P.; Anderson, K.L.; Feeney, D.A.; Naughton, J.F.; Ohlfest, J.R.; O’Sullivan, M.G.; Miller, M.A.; Constable, P.D.; Pluhar, G.E.

    2013-01-01

    Limited information is available to assist in the ante-mortem prediction of tumor type and grade for dogs with primary brain tumors. The objective of the current study was to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria related to the histopathological type and grade of gliomas in dogs. A convenience sample utilizing client-owned dogs (n=31) with gliomas was used. Medical records of dogs with intracranial lesions admitted to two veterinary referral hospitals were reviewed and cases with a complete brain MRI and definitive histopathological diagnosis were retrieved for analysis. Each MRI was independently interpreted by five investigators who were provided with standardized grading instructions and remained blinded to the histopathological diagnosis. Mild to no contrast enhancement, an absence of cystic structures (single or multiple), and a tumor location other than the thalamo-capsular region were independently associated with grade II tumors compared to higher grade tumors. In comparison to oligodendrogliomas, astrocytomas were independently associated with the presence of moderate to extensive peri-tumoral edema, a lack of ventricular distortion, and an isointense or hyperintense T1W-signal. When clinical and MRI features indicate that a glioma is most likely, certain MRI criteria can be used to inform the level of suspicion for low tumor grade, particularly poor contrast enhancement. Information obtained from the MRI of such dogs can also assist in predicting an astrocytoma or an oligodendroglioma, but no single imaging characteristic allows for a particular tumor type to be ruled out. PMID:24051197

  10. Intraoperative vascular DIVA surgery reveals angiogenic hotspots in tumor zones of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.; Hore, Nirjhar; Fan, Zheng; Buslei, Rolf; Merkel, Andreas; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas belong to the most threatening tumor entities and are hallmarked by rapid proliferation, hypervascularization and an invasive growth pattern. The primary obstacle in surgical treatment lies in differentiation between healthy and pathological tissue at the tumor margins, where current visualization methods reach their limits. Here, we report on a novel technique (vascular dual intraoperative visualization approach - vDIVA) enabling visualization of different tumor zones (TZ I–III) on the basis of angiogenic hotspots. We investigated glioblastoma patients who underwent 5-ALA fluorescence-guided surgery with simultaneous intraoperative ICG fluorescence angiography. This vDIVA technique revealed hypervascularized areas which were further histologically investigated. Neuropathological assessments revealed tissue areas at the resection margins corresponding to TZ II, and postoperative CD34- and Map2 immunostaining confirmed these angiogenic hotspots to be occupied by glioma cells. Hence, the vascular architecture in this transitional zone could be well differentiated from both primary tumor bulk and healthy brain parenchyma. These data demonstrate that ICG fluorescence angiography improves state-of-the-art glioma surgery techniques and facilitates the future characterization of polyclonal attributes of malignant gliomas. PMID:25609379

  11. Identification of RNA-Binding Protein LARP4B as a Tumor Suppressor in Glioma.

    PubMed

    Koso, Hideto; Yi, Hungtsung; Sheridan, Paul; Miyano, Satoru; Ino, Yasushi; Todo, Tomoki; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2016-04-15

    Transposon-based insertional mutagenesis is a valuable method for conducting unbiased forward genetic screens to identify cancer genes in mice. We used this system to elucidate factors involved in the malignant transformation of neural stem cells into glioma-initiating cells. We identified an RNA-binding protein, La-related protein 4b (LARP4B), as a candidate tumor-suppressor gene in glioma. LARP4B expression was consistently decreased in human glioma stem cells and cell lines compared with normal neural stem cells. Moreover, heterozygous deletion of LARP4B was detected in nearly 80% of glioblastomas in The Cancer Genome Atlas database. LARP4B loss was also associated with low expression and poor patient survival. Overexpression of LARP4B in glioma cell lines strongly inhibited proliferation by inducing mitotic arrest and apoptosis in four of six lines as well as in two patient-derived glioma stem cell populations. The expression levels of CDKN1A and BAX were also upregulated upon LARP4B overexpression, and the growth-inhibitory effects were partially dependent on p53 (TP53) activity in cells expressing wild-type, but not mutant, p53. We further found that the La module, which is responsible for the RNA chaperone activity of LARP4B, was important for the growth-suppressive effect and was associated with BAX mRNA. Finally, LARP4B depletion in p53 and Nf1-deficient mouse primary astrocytes promoted cell proliferation and led to increased tumor size and invasiveness in xenograft and orthotopic models. These data provide strong evidence that LARP4B serves as a tumor-suppressor gene in glioma, encouraging further exploration of the RNA targets potentially involved in LARP4B-mediatd growth inhibition. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2254-64. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26933087

  12. MGMT promoter methylation in serum and cerebrospinal fluid as a tumor-specific biomarker of glioma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHENG; JIANG, WEI; WANG, YAHONG; GUO, YANG; CONG, ZHENG; DU, FANGFANG; SONG, BIN

    2015-01-01

    O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation is a conventional technique to predict the prognosis or individualized treatment of glioma in tumor tissue following surgery or biopsy. However, the technique cannot be applied in those glioma patients with concomitant neurological dysfunctions or advanced age. The present study aimed to find a new minimally invasive and efficient alternative method for the detection of MGMT promoter methylation. The expression of MGMT promoter methylation was assessed in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and compared to the corresponding tumor tissue from glioma patients. The 89 patients in the study [32 World Health Organization (WHO) grade II, 19 WHO grade III and 38 WHO grade IV) were pathologically-diagnosed glioma and received radiation therapy following sample collection. The resected glioma tumor tissue (89), corresponding serum (89) and CSF (78) samples were collected for the detection of MGMT promoter methylation using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting MGMT promoter methylation in CSF and serum were compared. Among the tumor tissue samples, 51/89 (57.3%) showed MGMT promoter methylation. The specificity of the detection in the CSF and serum samples reached 100%. The sensitivity of MGMT promoter methylation detection in CSF and serum were 26/40 (65.0%) and 19/51 (37.3%), respectively (P<0.05). In the WHO II, III and IV subgroups, the sensitivities of MGMT promoter methylation detection using CSF were 8/12 (66.7%), 11/18 (61.1%) and 7/10 (70.0%), respectively, which were significantly higher than the sensitivities using serum (7/21, 33.3%; 7/19, 36.8%; and 5/11, 45.5%, respectively P<0.05). Among patients with residual postoperative tumors, the sensitivities of detecting MGMT promoter methylation using CSF and serum were 18/25 (72.0%) and 10/24 (41.7%), respectively, both of which were significantly higher than the corresponding values

  13. Metabolomic Screening of Tumor Tissue and Serum in Glioma Patients Reveals Diagnostic and Prognostic Information

    PubMed Central

    Mörén, Lina; Bergenheim, A. Tommy; Ghasimi, Soma; Brännström, Thomas; Johansson, Mikael; Antti, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Glioma grading and classification, today based on histological features, is not always easy to interpret and diagnosis partly relies on the personal experience of the neuropathologists. The most important feature of the classification is the aimed correlation between tumor grade and prognosis. However, in the clinical reality, large variations exist in the survival of patients concerning both glioblastomas and low-grade gliomas. Thus, there is a need for biomarkers for a more reliable classification of glioma tumors as well as for prognosis. We analyzed relative metabolite concentrations in serum samples from 96 fasting glioma patients and 81 corresponding tumor samples with different diagnosis (glioblastoma, oligodendroglioma) and grade (World Health Organization (WHO) grade II, III and IV) using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS). The acquired data was analyzed and evaluated by pattern recognition based on chemometric bioinformatics tools. We detected feature patterns in the metabolomics data in both tumor and serum that distinguished glioblastomas from oligodendrogliomas (ptumor = 2.46 × 10−8, pserum = 1.3 × 10−5) and oligodendroglioma grade II from oligodendroglioma grade III (ptumor = 0.01, pserum = 0.0008). Interestingly, we also found patterns in both tumor and serum with individual metabolite features that were both elevated and decreased in patients that lived long after being diagnosed with glioblastoma compared to those who died shortly after diagnosis (ptumor = 0.006, pserum = 0.004; AUROCCtumor = 0.846 (0.647–1.000), AUROCCserum = 0.958 (0.870–1.000)). Metabolic patterns could also distinguish long and short survival in patients diagnosed with oligodendroglioma (ptumor = 0.01, pserum = 0.001; AUROCCtumor = 1 (1.000–1.000), AUROCCserum = 1 (1.000–1.000)). In summary, we found different metabolic feature patterns in tumor tissue and serum for glioma diagnosis, grade and survival, which indicates that, following

  14. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth.

    PubMed

    Solga, Anne C; Pong, Winnie W; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J; Toonen, Joseph A; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H; Mardis, Elaine R; Gutmann, David H

    2015-10-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies. PMID:26585233

  15. Astroblastoma: beside being a tumor entity, an occasional phenotype of astrocytic gliomas?

    PubMed Central

    Mellai, Marta; Piazzi, Angela; Casalone, Cristina; Grifoni, Silvia; Melcarne, Antonio; Annovazzi, Laura; Cassoni, Paola; Denysenko, Tetyana; Valentini, Maria Consuelo; Cistaro, Angelina; Schiffer, Davide

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of astroblastoma is based on a typical histological aspect with perivascular distribution of cells sending cytoplasmic extensions to the vessels and vascular hyalinization. These criteria are useful for standardizing the identification of the tumor, but, in spite of this, there are discrepancies in the literature concerning the age distribution and the benign or malignant nature of the tumor. Three cases are discussed in this study: Case 1 was a typical high-grade astroblastoma; Case 2 was an oligodendroglioma at the first intervention and an oligoastrocytoma at the second intervention with typical perivascular arrangements in the astrocytic component; Case 3 was a gemistocytic glioma with malignant features and typical perivascular arrangements. Genetic analysis showed genetic alterations that are typical of gliomas of all malignancy grades. Using the neurosphere assay, neurospheres and adherent cells were found to have developed in Case 1, while adherent cells only developed in Case 2, in line with the stemness potential of the tumors. The cases are discussed in relation to their diagnostic assessment as astroblastoma, and it is hypothesized that the typical perivascular distribution of cells may not indicate a separate and unique tumor entity, but may be a peculiarity that can be acquired by astrocytic gliomas when an unknown cause from the tumor microenvironment influences the relationship between vessels and tumor cells. PMID:25737639

  16. Marked inhibition of tumor growth in a malignant glioma tumor model by a novel synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor AG3340.

    PubMed

    Price, A; Shi, Q; Morris, D; Wilcox, M E; Brasher, P M; Rewcastle, N B; Shalinsky, D; Zou, H; Appelt, K; Johnston, R N; Yong, V W; Edwards, D; Forsyth, P

    1999-04-01

    Synthetic matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors have activity against a variety of tumors in preclinical models but have not been studied in gliomas. We determined the effect of AG3340, a novel synthetic MMP inhibitor with Ki values against gelatinases in the low picomolar range, on the growth of a human malignant glioma cell line (U87) in SCID-NOD mice. Mice were injected s.c. with U87 cells. Tumors were allowed to grow to a size of approximately 0.5 x 0.5 cm (after about 3 weeks), and the mice were randomized to receive either: (a) 100 mg/kg AG3340 in vehicle; or (b) vehicle control (0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose, 0.1% pluronic F68), both given daily i.p. Tumor area was measured twice weekly, and animals were sacrificed when moribund, or earlier if premorbid histology was examined. In vivo inhibition of tumor growth was profound, with AG3340 decreasing tumor size by 78% compared with controls after 31 days (when controls were sacrificed; P < 0.01, Wilcoxon test). Control animals survived 31 days after the i.p. injections began, and AG3340 mice survived 71 days, representing a >2-fold increase in survival associated with tumor growth delay. Histological examination found that AG3340-treated tumors were smaller, had lower rates of proliferation, and significantly less invasion than control-treated tumors. Hepatic or pulmonary metastases were not seen in either group. In a separate experiment, the tumors were smaller and sampled after a shorter duration of treatment; the changes in proliferation were more marked and occurred earlier than differences in tumor invasion between the two groups. Furthermore, in vitro cell growth was not inhibited at AG3340 concentrations of <1 mM. AG3340 plasma concentrations in vivo, 1 h after administration, ranged from 67 to 365 nM. Thus, AG3340 produced a profound inhibition of glioma tumor growth and invasion. AG3340 markedly increased survival in this in vivo glioma model. Treatment with AG3340 may be potentially useful in

  17. FTIR spectro-imaging of collagen scaffold formation during glioma tumor development.

    PubMed

    Noreen, Razia; Chien, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Bobroff, Vladimir; Moenner, Michel; Javerzat, Sophie; Hwu, Yeukuang; Petibois, Cyril

    2013-11-01

    Evidence has recently emerged that solid and diffuse tumors produce a specific extracellular matrix (ECM) for division and diffusion, also developing a specific interface with microvasculature. This ECM is mainly composed of collagens and their scaffolding appears to drive tumor growth. Although collagens are not easily analyzable by UV-fluorescence means, FTIR imaging has appeared as a valuable tool to characterize collagen contents in tissues, specially the brain, where ECM is normally devoid of collagen proteins. Here, we used FTIR imaging to characterize collagen content changes in growing glioma tumors. We could determine that C6-derived solid tumors presented high content of triple helix after 8-11 days of growth (typical of collagen fibrils formation; 8/8 tumor samples; 91 % of total variance), and further turned to larger α-helix (days 12-15; 9/10 of tumors; 94 % of variance) and β-turns (day 18-21; 7/8 tumors; 97 % of variance) contents, which suggest the incorporation of non-fibrillar collagen types in ECM, a sign of more and more organized collagen scaffold along tumor progression. The growth of tumors was also associated to the level of collagen produced (P < 0.05). This study thus confirms that collagen scaffolding is a major event accompanying the angiogenic shift and faster tumor growth in solid glioma phenotypes. PMID:24068168

  18. Phase II Study of Aflibercept in Recurrent Malignant Glioma: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, John F.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Aldape, Kenneth; Yao, Jun; Jackson, Edward F.; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lassman, Andrew B.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Chen, Alice; Prados, Michael D.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy is a promising treatment approach for patients with recurrent glioblastoma. This single-arm phase II study evaluated the efficacy of aflibercept (VEGF Trap), a recombinantly produced fusion protein that scavenges both VEGF and placental growth factor in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Patients and Methods Forty-two patients with glioblastoma and 16 patients with anaplastic glioma who had received concurrent radiation and temozolomide and adjuvant temozolomide were enrolled at first relapse. Aflibercept 4 mg/kg was administered intravenously on day 1 of every 2-week cycle. Results The 6-month progression-free survival rate was 7.7% for the glioblastoma cohort and 25% for patients with anaplastic glioma. Overall radiographic response rate was 24% (18% for glioblastoma and 44% for anaplastic glioma). The median progression-free survival was 24 weeks for patients with anaplastic glioma (95% CI, 5 to 31 weeks) and 12 weeks for patients with glioblastoma (95% CI, 8 to 16 weeks). A total of 14 patients (25%) were removed from the study for toxicity, on average less than 2 months from treatment initiation. The main treatment-related National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria grades 3 and 4 adverse events (38 total) included fatigue, hypertension, and lymphopenia. Two grade 4 CNS ischemias and one grade 4 systemic hemorrhage were reported. Aflibercept rapidly decreases permeability on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular analysis of baseline tumor tissue identified tumor-associated markers of response and resistance. Conclusion Aflibercept monotherapy has moderate toxicity and minimal evidence of single-agent activity in unselected patients with recurrent malignant glioma. PMID:21606416

  19. Olig2-Dependent Reciprocal Shift in PDGF and EGF Receptor Signaling Regulates Tumor Phenotype and Mitotic Growth in Malignant Glioma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fanghui; Chen, Ying; Zhao, Chuntao; Wang, Haibo; He, Danyang; Xu, Lingli; Wang, Jincheng; He, Xuelian; Deng, Yaqi; Lu, Ellen E; Liu, Xue; Verma, Ravinder; Bu, Hong; Drissi, Rachid; Fouladi, Maryam; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Burns, Dennis; Xin, Mei; Rubin, Joshua B; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Canoll, Peter; Holland, Eric C; Lu, Q Richard

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas exhibit extensive heterogeneity and poor prognosis. Here we identify mitotic Olig2-expressing cells as tumor-propagating cells in proneural gliomas, elimination of which blocks tumor initiation and progression. Intriguingly, deletion of Olig2 resulted in tumors that grow, albeit at a decelerated rate. Genome occupancy and expression profiling analyses reveal that Olig2 directly activates cell-proliferation machinery to promote tumorigenesis. Olig2 deletion causes a tumor phenotypic shift from an oligodendrocyte precursor-correlated proneural toward an astroglia-associated gene expression pattern, manifest in downregulation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α and reciprocal upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Olig2 deletion further sensitizes glioma cells to EGFR inhibitors and extends the lifespan of animals. Thus, Olig2-orchestrated receptor signaling drives mitotic growth and regulates glioma phenotypic plasticity. Targeting Olig2 may circumvent resistance to EGFR-targeted drugs. PMID:27165742

  20. Chlorotoxin: a helpful natural scorpion peptide to diagnose glioma and fight tumor invasion.

    PubMed

    Dardevet, Lucie; Rani, Dipti; Aziz, Tarek Abd El; Bazin, Ingrid; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Fadl, Mahmoud; Brambilla, Elisabeth; De Waard, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Chlorotoxin is a small 36 amino-acid peptide identified from the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus. Initially, chlorotoxin was used as a pharmacological tool to characterize chloride channels. While studying glioma-specific chloride currents, it was soon discovered that chlorotoxin possesses targeting properties towards cancer cells including glioma, melanoma, small cell lung carcinoma, neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. The investigation of the mechanism of action of chlorotoxin has been challenging because its cell surface receptor target remains under questioning since two other receptors have been claimed besides chloride channels. Efforts on chlorotoxin-based applications focused on producing analogues helpful for glioma diagnosis, imaging and treatment. These efforts are welcome since gliomas are very aggressive brain cancers, close to impossible to cure with the current therapeutic arsenal. Among all the chlorotoxin-based strategies, the most promising one to enhance patient mean survival time appears to be the use of chlorotoxin as a targeting agent for the delivery of anti-tumor agents. Finally, the discovery of chlorotoxin has led to the screening of other scorpion venoms to identify chlorotoxin-like peptides. So far several new candidates have been identified. Only detailed research and clinical investigations will tell us if they share the same anti-tumor potential as chlorotoxin. PMID:25826056

  1. Chlorotoxin: A Helpful Natural Scorpion Peptide to Diagnose Glioma and Fight Tumor Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Dardevet, Lucie; Rani, Dipti; Abd El Aziz, Tarek; Bazin, Ingrid; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Fadl, Mahmoud; Brambilla, Elisabeth; De Waard, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Chlorotoxin is a small 36 amino-acid peptide identified from the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus. Initially, chlorotoxin was used as a pharmacological tool to characterize chloride channels. While studying glioma-specific chloride currents, it was soon discovered that chlorotoxin possesses targeting properties towards cancer cells including glioma, melanoma, small cell lung carcinoma, neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. The investigation of the mechanism of action of chlorotoxin has been challenging because its cell surface receptor target remains under questioning since two other receptors have been claimed besides chloride channels. Efforts on chlorotoxin-based applications focused on producing analogues helpful for glioma diagnosis, imaging and treatment. These efforts are welcome since gliomas are very aggressive brain cancers, close to impossible to cure with the current therapeutic arsenal. Among all the chlorotoxin-based strategies, the most promising one to enhance patient mean survival time appears to be the use of chlorotoxin as a targeting agent for the delivery of anti-tumor agents. Finally, the discovery of chlorotoxin has led to the screening of other scorpion venoms to identify chlorotoxin-like peptides. So far several new candidates have been identified. Only detailed research and clinical investigations will tell us if they share the same anti-tumor potential as chlorotoxin. PMID:25826056

  2. Obesity and Risk for Brain/CNS Tumors, Gliomas and Meningiomas: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sergentanis, Theodoros N.; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Perlepe, Christina; Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis; Tzanninis, Ioannis-Georgios; Sergentanis, Ioannis N.; Psaltopoulou, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Objective This meta-analysis aims to examine the association between being overweight/obese and risk of meningiomas and gliomas as well as overall brain/central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Study Design Potentially eligible publications were sought in PubMed up to June 30, 2014. Random-effects meta-analysis and dose-response meta-regression analysis was conducted. Cochran Q statistic, I-squared and tau-squared were used for the assessment of between-study heterogeneity. The analysis was performed using Stata/SE version 13 statistical software. Results A total of 22 studies were eligible, namely 14 cohort studies (10,219 incident brain/CNS tumor cases, 1,319 meningioma and 2,418 glioma cases in a total cohort size of 10,143,803 subjects) and eight case-control studies (1,009 brain/CNS cases, 1,977 meningioma cases, 1,265 glioma cases and 8,316 controls). In females, overweight status/obesity was associated with increased risk for overall brain/CNS tumors (pooled RR = 1.12, 95%CI: 1.03–1.21, 10 study arms), meningiomas (pooled RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.13–1.43, 16 study arms) and gliomas (pooled RR = 1.17, 95%CI: 1.03–1.32, six arms). Obese (BMI>30 kg/m2) females seemed particularly aggravated in terms of brain/CNS tumor (pooled RR = 1.19, 95%CI: 1.05–1.36, six study arms) and meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.48, 95%CI: 1.28–1.71, seven arms). In males, overweight/obesity status correlated with increased meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.58, 95%CI: 1.22–2.04, nine study arms), whereas the respective association with overall brain/CNS tumor or glioma risk was not statistically significant. Dose-response meta-regression analysis further validated the findings. Conclusion Our findings highlight obesity as a risk factor for overall brain/CNS tumors, meningiomas and gliomas among females, as well as for meningiomas among males. PMID:26332834

  3. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  4. Hsa-miR-495 acts as a tumor suppressor gene in glioma via the negative regulation of MYB.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Benping; Yuan, Fei; Liu, Jie; Li, Yang; Zhou, Fucheng; Liu, Xuanxi; Hao, Zhen; Li, Qingsong; Zheng, Yongri; Wang, Weizhi

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have reported that there are causative links between the abnormal regulation of miRNAs and cancer development. Hsa‑miR‑495 has previously been demonstrated to be downregulated, and to function as a tumor suppressor, in numerous types of human cancer. However, the function and molecular mechanism of hsa‑miR‑495 in glioma remains unclear. In the current study, the expression and effects of hsa‑miR‑495 on glioma were evaluated. It was identified that the expression levels of hsa-miR-495 were downregulated in glioma tissues and cell lines. Furthermore, restoration of hsa-miR-495 inhibited glioma cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. Notably, a luciferase reporter assay revealed that hsa‑miR‑495 was able to directly target v‑myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (MYB) in glioma cells. In addition, an RNA interference assay indicated that MYB knockdown inhibited glioma cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that hsa‑miR‑495 may act as a tumor suppressor gene in glioma by directly inhibiting MYB expression, which may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of glioma. PMID:27220777

  5. ADAM9 Expression Is Associate with Glioma Tumor Grade and Histological Type, and Acts as a Prognostic Factor in Lower-Grade Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xing; Wang, Yongheng; Zhang, Chuanbao; Liu, Li; Yang, Sen; Wang, Yinyan; Liu, Xing; Qian, Zenghui; Fang, Shengyu; Qiao, Hui; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 9 (ADAM9) protein has been suggested to promote carcinoma invasion and appears to be overexpressed in various human cancers. However, its role has rarely been investigated in gliomas and, thus, in the current study we have evaluated ADAM9 expression in gliomas and examined the relevance of its expression in the prognosis of glioma patients. Clinical characteristics, RNA sequence data, and the case follow-ups were reviewed for 303 patients who had histological, confirmed gliomas. The ADAM9 expression between lower-grade glioma (LGG) and glioblastoma (GBM) patients was compared and its association with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed to evaluate its prognostic value. Our data suggested that GBM patients had significantly higher expression of ADAM9 in comparison to LGG patients (p < 0.001, t-test). In addition, among the LGG patients, aggressive astrocytic tumors displayed significantly higher ADAM9 expression than oligodendroglial tumors (p < 0.001, t-test). Moreover, high ADAM9 expression also correlated with poor clinical outcome (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, log-rank test, for PFS and OS, respectively) in LGG patients. Further, multivariate analysis suggested ADAM9 expression to be an independent marker of poor survival (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, for PFS and OS, respectively). These results suggest that ADAM9 mRNA expression is associated with tumor grade and histological type in gliomas and can serve as an independent prognostic factor, specifically in LGG patients. PMID:27571068

  6. Profound tumor-specific Th2 bias in patients with malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vaccination against tumor-associated antigens is one promising approach to immunotherapy against malignant gliomas. While previous vaccine efforts have focused exclusively on HLA class I-restricted peptides, class II-restricted peptides are necessary to induce CD4+ helper T cells and sustain effective anti-tumor immunity. In this report we investigated the ability of five candidate peptide epitopes derived from glioma-associated antigens MAGE and IL-13 receptor α2 to detect and characterize CD4+ helper T cell responses in the peripheral blood of patients with malignant gliomas. Methods Primary T cell responses were determined by stimulating freshly isolated PBMCs from patients with primary glioblastoma (GBM) (n = 8), recurrent GBM (n = 5), meningioma (n = 7), and healthy controls (n = 6) with each candidate peptide, as well as anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and an immunodominant peptide epitope derived from myelin basic protein (MBP) serving as positive and negative controls, respectively. ELISA was used to measure IFN-γ and IL-5 levels, and the ratio of IFN-γ/IL-5 was used to determine whether the response had a predominant Th1 or Th2 bias. Results We demonstrate that novel HLA Class-II restricted MAGE-A3 and IL-13Rα2 peptides can detect T cell responses in patients with GBMs as well as in healthy subjects. Stimulation with a variety of peptide antigens over-expressed by gliomas is associated with a profound reduction in the IFN-γ/IL-5 ratio in GBM patients relative to healthy subjects. This bias is more pronounced in patients with recurrent GBMs. Conclusions Therapeutic vaccine strategies to shift tumor antigen-specific T cell response to a more immunostimulatory Th1 bias may be needed for immunotherapeutic trials to be more successful clinically. PMID:23186108

  7. The tumor microenvironment underlies acquired resistance to CSF-1R inhibition in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Quail, Daniela F; Bowman, Robert L; Akkari, Leila; Quick, Marsha L; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Huse, Jason T; Holland, Eric C; Sutton, James C; Joyce, Johanna A

    2016-05-20

    Macrophages accumulate with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) progression and can be targeted via inhibition of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) to regress high-grade tumors in animal models of this cancer. However, whether and how resistance emerges in response to sustained CSF-1R blockade is unknown. We show that although overall survival is significantly prolonged, tumors recur in >50% of mice. Gliomas reestablish sensitivity to CSF-1R inhibition upon transplantation, indicating that resistance is tumor microenvironment-driven. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activity was elevated in recurrent GBM, driven by macrophage-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and tumor cell IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R). Combining IGF-1R or PI3K blockade with CSF-1R inhibition in recurrent tumors significantly prolonged overall survival. Our findings thus reveal a potential therapeutic approach for treating resistance to CSF-1R inhibitors. PMID:27199435

  8. Toward Distinguishing Recurrent Tumor From Radiation Necrosis: DWI and MTC in a Gamma Knife–Irradiated Mouse Glioma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Torres, Carlos J.; Engelbach, John A.; Cates, Jeremy; Thotala, Dinesh; Yuan, Liya; Schmidt, Robert E.; Rich, Keith M.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Accurate noninvasive diagnosis is vital for effective treatment planning. Presently, standard anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is incapable of differentiating recurring tumor from delayed radiation injury, as both lesions are hyperintense in both postcontrast T1- and T2-weighted images. Further studies are therefore necessary to identify an MRI paradigm that can differentially diagnose these pathologies. Mouse glioma and radiation injury models provide a powerful platform for this purpose. Methods and Materials: Two MRI contrasts that are widely used in the clinic were chosen for application to a glioma/radiation-injury model: diffusion weighted imaging, from which the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is obtained, and magnetization transfer contrast, from which the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) is obtained. These metrics were evaluated longitudinally, first in each lesion type alone–glioma versus irradiation – and then in a combined irradiated glioma model. Results: MTR was found to be consistently decreased in all lesions compared to nonlesion brain tissue (contralateral hemisphere), with limited specificity between lesion types. In contrast, ADC, though less sensitive to the presence of pathology, was increased in radiation injury and decreased in tumors. In the irradiated glioma model, ADC also increased immediately after irradiation, but decreased as the tumor regrew. Conclusions: ADC is a better metric than MTR for differentiating glioma from radiation injury. However, MTR was more sensitive to both tumor and radiation injury than ADC, suggesting a possible role in detecting lesions that do not enhance strongly on T1-weighted images.

  9. Induction of Selective Blood-Tumor Barrier Permeability and Macromolecular Transport by a Biostable Kinin B1 Receptor Agonist in a Glioma Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Jérôme; Bovenzi, Veronica; Savard, Martin; Dubuc, Céléna; Fortier, Audrey; Neugebauer, Witold; Tremblay, Luc; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Tsanaclis, Ana-Maria; Lepage, Martin; Fortin, David; Gobeil, Fernand

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of malignant glioma with chemotherapy is limited mostly because of delivery impediment related to the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). B1 receptors (B1R), inducible prototypical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) can regulate permeability of vessels including possibly that of brain tumors. Here, we determine the extent of BTB permeability induced by the natural and synthetic peptide B1R agonists, LysdesArg9BK (LDBK) and SarLys[dPhe8]desArg9BK (NG29), in syngeneic F98 glioma-implanted Fischer rats. Ten days after tumor inoculation, we detected the presence of B1R on tumor cells and associated vasculature. NG29 infusion increased brain distribution volume and uptake profiles of paramagnetic probes (Magnevist and Gadomer) at tumoral sites (T1-weighted imaging). These effects were blocked by B1R antagonist and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, but not by B2R antagonist and non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Consistent with MRI data, systemic co-administration of NG29 improved brain tumor delivery of Carboplatin chemotherapy (ICP-Mass spectrometry). We also detected elevated B1R expression in clinical samples of high-grade glioma. Our results documented a novel GPCR-signaling mechanism for promoting transient BTB disruption, involving activation of B1R and ensuing production of COX metabolites. They also underlined the potential value of synthetic biostable B1R agonists as selective BTB modulators for local delivery of different sized-therapeutics at (peri)tumoral sites. PMID:22629405

  10. The Presence of IL-17A and T Helper 17 Cells in Experimental Mouse Brain Tumors and Human Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Derek A.; Sengupta, Sadhak; Han, Yu; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, CD4+IL-17A+ T helper 17 (Th17) cells were identified and reported in several diseased states, including autoimmunity, infection and various peripheral nervous system tumors. However, the presence of Th17 in glia-derived tumors of the central nervous system has not been studied. Methodology/Principal Findings In this report, we demonstrate that mRNA expression for the Th17 cell cytokine IL-17A, as well as Th17 cells, are present in human glioma. The mRNA expression for IL-17A in glioma was recapitulated in an immunocompetent mouse model of malignant glioma. Furthermore, the presence of Th17 cells was confirmed in both human and mouse glioma. Interestingly, some Th17 cells present in mouse glioma co-expressed the Th1 and Th2 lineage markers, IFN-γ and IL-4, respectively, but predominantly co-expressed the Treg lineage marker FoxP3. Conclusions These data confirm the presence of Th17 cells in glia-derived CNS tumors and provide the rationale for further investigation into the role of Th17 cells in malignant glioma. PMID:21060663

  11. Endothelial Differentiation of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Glioma Tumors: Implications for Cell-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagó, Juli R; Alieva, Maria; Soler, Carolina; Rubio, Núria; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent human adipose tissue mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs) are promising therapy vehicles with tumor-homing capacity that can be easily modified to deliver cytotoxicity activating systems in the proximity of tumors. In a previous work, we observed that hAMSCs are very effective delivering cytotoxicity to glioma tumors. However, these results were difficult to reconcile with the relatively few hAMSCs surviving implantation. We use a bioluminescence imaging (BLI) platform to analyze the behavior of bioluminescent hAMSCs expressing HSV-tTK in a U87 glioma model and gain insight into the therapeutic mechanisms. Tumor-implanted hAMSCs express the endothelial marker PECAM1(CD31), integrate in tumor vessels and associate with CD133-expressing glioma stem cells (GSC). Inhibition of endothelial lineage differentiation in hAMSCs by Notch1 shRNA had no effect on their tumor homing and growth-promoting capacity but abolished the association of hAMSCs with tumor vessels and CD133+ tumor cells and significantly reduced their tumor-killing capacity. The current strategy allowed the study of tumor/stroma interactions, showed that tumor promotion and tumor-killing capacities of hAMSCs are based on different mechanisms. Our data strongly suggest that the therapeutic effectiveness of hAMSCs results from their association with special tumor vascular structures that also contain GSCs. PMID:23760448

  12. PID1 (NYGGF4), a new growth-inhibitory gene in embryonal brain tumors and gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Erdreich-Epstein, Anat; Robison, Nathan; Ren, Xiuhai; Zhou, Hong; Xu, Jingying; Davidson, Tom B.; Schur, Mathew; Gilles, Floyd H.; Ji, Lingyun; Malvar, Jemily; Shackleford, Gregory M.; Margol, Ashley S.; Krieger, Mark D.; Judkins, Alexander R.; Jones, David T.W.; Pfister, Stefan; Kool, Marcel; Sposto, Richard; Asgharazadeh, Shahab

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We present here the first report of PID1 (Phosphotyrosine Interaction Domain containing 1; NYGGF4) in cancer. PID1 was identified in 2006 as a gene that modulates insulin signaling and mitochondrial function in adipocytes and muscle cells. Experimental Design and Results Using four independent medulloblastoma datasets, we show that mean PID1 mRNA levels were lower in unfavorable medulloblastomas (Groups 3 and 4, and anaplastic histology) compared with favorable medulloblastomas (SHH and WNT groups, and desmoplastic/nodular histology) and with fetal cerebellum. In two large independent glioma datasets PID1 mRNA was lower in glioblastomas (GBMs), the most malignant gliomas, compared to other astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and non-tumor brains. Neural and proneural GBM subtypes had higher PID1 mRNA compared to classical and mesenchymal GBM. Importantly, overall survival and radiation-free progression-free survival were longer in medulloblastoma patients with higher PID1 mRNA (univariate and multivariate analyses). Higher PID1 mRNA also correlated with longer overall survival in glioma and GBM patients. In cell culture, overexpression of PID1 inhibited colony formation in medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) and GBM cell lines. Increasing PID1 also increased cell death and apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, induced mitochondrial depolarization, and decreased serum-mediated phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in medulloblastoma, ATRT and/or GBM cell lines, whereas siRNA to PID1 diminished mitochondrial depolarization. Conclusions These data are the first to link PID1 to cancer and suggest that PID1 may have a tumor inhibitory function in these pediatric and adult brain tumors. PMID:24300787

  13. Glioma Surgical Aspirate: A Viable Source of Tumor Tissue for Experimental Research

    PubMed Central

    Day, Bryan W.; Stringer, Brett W.; Wilson, John; Jeffree, Rosalind L.; Jamieson, Paul R.; Ensbey, Kathleen S.; Bruce, Zara C.; Inglis, Po; Allan, Suzanne; Winter, Craig; Tollesson, Gert; Campbell, Scott; Lucas, Peter; Findlay, Wendy; Kadrian, David; Johnson, David; Robertson, Thomas; Johns, Terrance G.; Bartlett, Perry F.; Osborne, Geoffrey W.; Boyd, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Brain cancer research has been hampered by a paucity of viable clinical tissue of sufficient quality and quantity for experimental research. This has driven researchers to rely heavily on long term cultured cells which no longer represent the cancers from which they were derived. Resection of brain tumors, particularly at the interface between normal and tumorigenic tissue, can be carried out using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator (CUSA) that deposits liquid (blood and irrigation fluid) and resected tissue into a sterile bottle for disposal. To determine the utility of CUSA-derived glioma tissue for experimental research, we collected 48 CUSA specimen bottles from glioma patients and analyzed both the solid tissue fragments and dissociated tumor cells suspended in the liquid waste fraction. We investigated if these fractions would be useful for analyzing tumor heterogeneity, using IHC and multi-parameter flow cytometry; we also assessed culture generation and orthotopic xenograft potential. Both cell sources proved to be an abundant, highly viable source of live tumor cells for cytometric analysis, animal studies and in-vitro studies. Our findings demonstrate that CUSA tissue represents an abundant viable source to conduct experimental research and to carry out diagnostic analyses by flow cytometry or other molecular diagnostic procedures. PMID:24216981

  14. Tumor suppressive miR-148a is silenced by CpG island hypermethylation in IDH1 mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sichen; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Liu, Fei; Chou, Arthur P.; Li, Tie; Mody, Reema R.; Lou, Jerry J.; Chen, Weidong; Reiss, Jean; Soto, Horacio; Prins, Robert; Liau, Linda M.; Mischel, Paul S.; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L.; Yong, William H.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Lai, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose IDH1/2 mutant gliomas harbor a distinct CpG island methylation profile (G-CIMP) that may promote the initiation and progression of secondary pathway gliomas by silencing tumor suppressive genes. The potential role of tumor suppressive miRNAs in this process is not understood. Experimental Design To identify potential tumor suppressive microRNAs hypermethylated in glioma, the methylation profiles of IDH1/2WT gliomas (n=11) and IDH1MUT glioma (n=20) were compared by using massively parallel reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS). The methylation status of selected miRNA was validated by using targeted bisulfite sequencing (BiSEQ) in a large cohort of glioma tissue samples including 219 IDH1WT and 72 IDH1/2MUT samples. The expression of selected miRNAs was determined by using TaqMan qPCR. Functional analyses of miRNA-148a were conducted and target genes were identified. Results We identify miR-148a as a novel, G-CIMP associated miRNA whose methylation is tightly correlated with IDH1 mutation and associated with improved survival in malignant glioma patients. We confirm that down-regulation of miR-148a can occur via DNA methylation. We demonstrate that IDH1 mutation provides a mechanism of miR-148a methylation and downregulation, and that restoration of miR-148a reduced tumorigenic properties of glioma cells, possibly by targeting DNMT1. Conclusions We identify miR-148a as a novel G-CIMP associated miRNA, and provide results suggesting that miR-148a restoration may have therapeutic implications. PMID:25224277

  15. Expression of PRMT5 correlates with malignant grade in gliomas and plays a pivotal role in tumor growth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong; Zhang, Wenbin; Yang, Xiuhua; Wheeler, Crystal G.; Friedman, Gregory K.; Province, Paula; Ding, Qiang; You, Zhiying; Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Zhao, Xinyang; King, Peter H.; Nabors, L. Burt

    2014-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) catalyzes the formation of ω-NG,N'G-symmetric dimethylarginine residues on histones as well as other proteins. These modifications play an important role in cell differentiation and tumor cell growth. However, the role of PRMT5 in human glioma cells has not been characterized. In this study, we assessed protein expression profiles of PRMT5 in control brain, WHO grade II astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) by immunohistochemistry. PRMT5 was low in glial cells in control brain tissues and low grade astrocytomas. Its expression increased in parallel with malignant progression, and was highly expressed in GBM. Knockdown of PRMT5 by small hairpin RNA caused alterations of p-ERK1/2 and significantly repressed the clonogenic potential and viability of glioma cells. These findings indicate that PRMT5 is a marker of malignant progression in glioma tumors and plays a pivotal role in tumor growth. PMID:24664369

  16. Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Mohamad R.; Samuels, Stuart E.; Bellile, Emily; Shalabi, Firas L.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Wolf, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC) have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP), composite nodal volumes (GTVN) and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC) had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance. PMID:26569309

  17. Intra-Tumor Distribution and Test-Retest Comparisons of Physiological Parameters quantified by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Rat U251 Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Madhava P.; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N.; Brown, Stephen L.; Lu, Mei; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Ding, Guangliang; Panda, Swayamprava; Keenan, Kelly; Cabral, Glauber; Mikkelsen, Tom; Ewing, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) parametric estimates in a rat U251 glioma model was analyzed. Using Magnevist as contrast agent (CA), 17 nude rats implanted with U251 cerebral glioma were studied by DCE-MRI twice in a 24 h interval. A data-driven analysis selected one of three models to estimate either: 1) CA plasma volume (vp), 2) vp and forward volume transfer constant (Ktrans; or 3) vp, Ktrans, and interstitial volume fraction (ve), constituting Models 1, 2 and 3, respectively. CA interstitial distribution volume (VD) was estimated in Model 3 regions by Logan plots. Regions of interest (ROIs) were selected by model. In the Model 3 ROI, descriptors of parameter distributions – mean, median, variance and skewness – were calculated and compared between the two time points for repeatability. All distributions of parametric estimates in Model 3 ROIs were positively skewed. Test-retest differences between population summaries for any parameter were not significant (p≥0.10; Wilcoxon signed-rank and paired t tests). This and similar measures of parametric distribution and test-retest variance from other tumor models can be used to inform the choice of biomarkers that best summarize tumor status and treatment effects. PMID:25125367

  18. Arsenic trioxide disrupts glioma stem cells via promoting PML degradation to inhibit tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenchao; Cheng, Lin; Shi, Yu; Ke, Susan Q.; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Chu, Cheng-wei; Xie, Qi; Bian, Xiu-wu; Rich, Jeremy N.; Bao, Shideng

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor. Tumor relapse in GBM is inevitable despite maximal therapeutic interventions. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been found to be critical players in therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Therapeutic drugs targeting GSCs may significantly improve GBM treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide (As2O3) effectively disrupted GSCs and inhibited tumor growth in the GSC-derived orthotopic xenografts by targeting the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML). As2O3 treatment induced rapid degradation of PML protein along with severe apoptosis in GSCs. Disruption of the endogenous PML recapitulated the inhibitory effects of As2O3 treatment on GSCs both in vitro and in orthotopic tumors. Importantly, As2O3 treatment dramatically reduced GSC population in the intracranial GBM xenografts and increased the survival of mice bearing the tumors. In addition, As2O3 treatment preferentially inhibited cell growth of GSCs but not matched non-stem tumor cells (NSTCs). Furthermore, As2O3 treatment or PML disruption potently diminished c-Myc protein levels through increased poly-ubiquitination and proteasome degradation of c-Myc. Our study indicated a potential implication of As2O3 in GBM treatment and highlighted the important role of PML/c-Myc axis in the maintenance of GSCs. PMID:26510911

  19. Reirradiation of Large-Volume Recurrent Glioma With Pulsed Reduced-Dose-Rate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; Tome, Wolfgang; Seo, Songwon; Richards, Gregory M.; Robins, H. Ian; Rassmussen, Karl; Welsh, James S.; Mahler, Peter A.; Howard, Steven P.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Pulsed reduced-dose-rate radiotherapy (PRDR) is a reirradiation technique that reduces the effective dose rate and increases the treatment time, allowing sublethal damage repair during irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with recurrent glioma underwent reirradiation using PRDR (86 considered to have Grade 4 at PRDR). PRDR was delivered using a series of 0.2-Gy pulses at 3-min intervals, creating an apparent dose rate of 0.0667 Gy/min to a median dose of 50 Gy (range, 20-60) delivered in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. The mean treatment volume was 403.5 {+-} 189.4 cm{sup 3} according to T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and a 2-cm margin. Results: For the initial or upgraded Grade 4 cohort (n = 86), the median interval from the first irradiation to PRDR was 14 months. Patients undergoing PRDR within 14 months of the first irradiation (n = 43) had a median survival of 21 weeks. Those treated {>=}14 months after radiotherapy had a median survival of 28 weeks (n = 43; p = 0.004 and HR = 1.82 with a 95% CI ranging from 1.25 to 3.10). These data compared favorably to historical data sets, because only 16% of the patients were treated at first relapse (with 46% treated at the second relapse, 32% at the third or fourth relapse, and 4% at the fourth or fifth relapse). The median survival since diagnosis and retreatment was 6.3 years and 11.4 months for low-grade, 4.1 years and 5.6 months for Grade 3, and 1.6 years and 5.1 months for Grade 4 tumors, respectively, according to the initial histologic findings. Multivariate analysis revealed age at the initial diagnosis, initial low-grade disease, and Karnofsky performance score of {>=}80 to be significant predictors of survival after initiation of PRDR. Conclusion: PRDR allowed for safe retreatment of larger volumes to high doses with palliative benefit.

  20. Radiotherapy to volumes defined by metabolic imaging in gliomas: time to abandon monstrous margins?

    PubMed Central

    Susheela, Sridhar P.

    2016-01-01

    The survival in patients with high grade gliomas (HGG) remains poor even after the adoption post-operative radiotherapy (RT) to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based volumes. Despite delivery of ‘standardized’ doses of radiation, recurrence is the norm, rather than the exception. Recurrences occur both within, and outside of the volume of irradiation, leading us to two questions—firstly concerning the adequacy of the dose of radiation used, and secondly about the current methods of treatment volume delineation. The emergence of newer radiopharmaceuticals for use in positron emission tomography (PET) have kindled the hope of more precise volume localizations for post-operative RT, and it is likely that these new radiopharmaceuticals can help us define accurate areas at highest risk of recurrence and thus allow us to use increased doses of radiation with confidence. PMID:26904577

  1. Exosomal levels of miRNA-21 from cerebrospinal fluids associated with poor prognosis and tumor recurrence of glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rui; Wang, Pei-Yin; Li, Xin-Yi; Chen, Jian-Xin; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xin-Zhong; Zhang, Chen-Guang; Jiang, Tao; Li, Wen-Bin; Ding, Wei; Cheng, Shu-Jun

    2015-09-29

    Glioma is a most common type of primary brain tumors. Extracellular vesicles, in the form of exosomes, are known to mediate cell-cell communication by transporting cell-derived proteins and nucleic acids, including various microRNAs (miRNAs). Here we examined the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with recurrent glioma for the levels of cancer-related miRNAs, and evaluated the values for prognosis by comparing the measures of CSF-, serum-, and exosome-contained miR-21 levels. Samples from seventy glioma patients following surgery were compared with those from brain trauma patients as a non-tumor control group. Exosomal miR-21 levels in the CSF of glioma patients were found significantly higher than in the controls; whereas no difference was detected in serum-derived exosomal miR-21 expression. The CSF-derived exosomal miR-21 levels correlated with tumor spinal/ventricle metastasis and the recurrence with anatomical site preference. From additional 198 glioma tissue samples, we verified that miR-21 levels associated with tumor grade of diagnosis and negatively correlated with the median values of patient overall survival time. We further used a lentiviral inhibitor to suppress miR-21 expression in U251 cells. The results showed that the levels of miR-21 target genes of PTEN, RECK and PDCD4 were up-regulated at protein levels. Therefore, we concluded that the exosomal miR-21 levels could be demonstrated as a promising indicator for glioma diagnosis and prognosis, particularly with values to predict tumor recurrence or metastasis. PMID:26284486

  2. Pc 4 photodynamic therapy of U87 (human glioma) orthotopic tumor in nude rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David; George, John E., III; Ahmad, Yusra; Wolfe, Michael S.; Lilge, Lothar; Morris, Rachel L.; Peterson, Allyn; Lust, W. D.; Totonchi, Ali; Varghai, Davood; Li, Xiaolin; Hoppel, Charles L.; Sun, Jiayang; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2005-04-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for Barrett"s esophagus, advanced esophageal cancer, and both early and late inoperable lung carcinoma is now FDA-approved using the first generation photosensitizer PhotofrinTM (Axcan Pharma, Birmingham, AL). Photofrin-mediated PDT of glioma is now in Phase III clinical trials. A variety of second generation photosensitizers have been developed to provide improved: (1) specificity for the target tissue, (2) tumoricidal capability, and (3) rapid clearance the vascular compartment, skin, and eyes. The phthalocyanine Pc 4 is a second generation photosensitizer that is in early phase I clinical trials for skin cancer. We have undertaken a preclinical study that seeks to determine if Pc 4-mediated PDT can be of benefit for the intra-operative localization and treatment of glioma. Methods: Using a stereotactic frame, 250,000 U87 cells were injected via Hamilton syringe through a craniotomy, and the dura, 1-2 mm below the cortical surface of nude (athymic) rat brains (N=91). The craniotomy was filled with a piece of surgical PVC and the scalp closed. After two weeks of tumor growth, the animals received 0.5 mg/kg Pc 4 via tail vein injection. One day later the scalp was re-incised, and the PVC removed. The tumor was then illuminated with either 5 or 30 Joule/cm2 of 672-nm light from a diode laser at 50 mW/cm2. The animals were sacrificed one day later and the brain was cold-perfused with formaldehyde. Two thirds of the explanted brains are now being histologically surveyed for necrosis after staining with hematoxylin and eosin and for apoptosis via immunohistochemistry (i.e., TUNEL assay). The other third were analyzed by HPLC-mass spectrometry for the presence of drug in tumor, normal brain, and plasma at sacrifice. Initial histological results show PDT-induced apoptosis and necrosis confined to the growing (live) portion of the tumor. Preliminary analysis shows an average selectivity of Pc 4 uptake in the bulk tumor to be 3

  3. ATRX loss promotes tumor growth and impairs nonhomologous end joining DNA repair in glioma.

    PubMed

    Koschmann, Carl; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Nunez, Felipe J; Mackay, Alan; Fazal-Salom, Janet; Thomas, Daniel; Mendez, Flor; Kamran, Neha; Dzaman, Marta; Mulpuri, Lakshman; Krasinkiewicz, Johnathon; Doherty, Robert; Lemons, Rosemary; Brosnan-Cashman, Jacqueline A; Li, Youping; Roh, Soyeon; Zhao, Lili; Appelman, Henry; Ferguson, David; Gorbunova, Vera; Meeker, Alan; Jones, Chris; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2016-03-01

    Recent work in human glioblastoma (GBM) has documented recurrent mutations in the histone chaperone protein ATRX. We developed an animal model of ATRX-deficient GBM and showed that loss of ATRX reduces median survival and increases genetic instability. Further, analysis of genome-wide data for human gliomas showed that ATRX mutation is associated with increased mutation rate at the single-nucleotide variant (SNV) level. In mouse tumors, ATRX deficiency impairs nonhomologous end joining and increases sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents that induce double-stranded DNA breaks. We propose that ATRX loss results in a genetically unstable tumor, which is more aggressive when left untreated but is more responsive to double-stranded DNA-damaging agents, resulting in improved overall survival. PMID:26936505

  4. Macrophage Ablation Reduces M2-Like Populations and Jeopardizes Tumor Growth in a MAFIA-Based Glioma Model12

    PubMed Central

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Hossain, Mohammad B.; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Fan, Xuejun; Kaminska, Bozena; Marini, Frank C.; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an influential component of the glioma microenvironment. However, understanding their diversity and plasticity constitute one of the most challenging areas of research due to the paucity of models to study these cells' inherent complexity. Herein, we analyzed the role of monocytes/macrophages in glioma growth by using a transgenic model that allows for conditional ablation of this cell population. We modeled glioma using intracranial GL261-bearing CSF-1R–GFP+ macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic mice. Conditional macrophage ablation was achieved by exposure to the dimerizer AP20187. Double immunofluorescence was used to characterize M1- and M2-like monocytes/macrophages during tumor growth and after conditional ablation. During glioma growth, the monocyte/macrophage population consisted predominantly of M2 macrophages. Conditional temporal depletion of macrophages reduced the number of GFP+ cells, targeting mainly the repopulation of M2-polarized cells, and altered the appearance of M1-like monocytes/macrophages, which suggested a shift in the M1/M2 macrophage balance. Of interest, compared with control-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had a lower tumor mitotic index, microvascular density, and reduced tumor growth. These results demonstrated the possibility of studying in vivo the role and phenotype of macrophages in gliomas and suggested that transitory depletion of CSF-1R+ population influences the reconstitutive phenotypic pool of these cells, ultimately suppressing tumor growth. The MAFIA model provides a much needed advance in defining the role of macrophages in gliomas. PMID:25925380

  5. Macrophage Ablation Reduces M2-Like Populations and Jeopardizes Tumor Growth in a MAFIA-Based Glioma Model.

    PubMed

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Hossain, Mohammad B; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Fan, Xuejun; Kaminska, Bozena; Marini, Frank C; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2015-04-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an influential component of the glioma microenvironment. However, understanding their diversity and plasticity constitute one of the most challenging areas of research due to the paucity of models to study these cells' inherent complexity. Herein, we analyzed the role of monocytes/macrophages in glioma growth by using a transgenic model that allows for conditional ablation of this cell population. We modeled glioma using intracranial GL261-bearing CSF-1R-GFP(+) macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic mice. Conditional macrophage ablation was achieved by exposure to the dimerizer AP20187. Double immunofluorescence was used to characterize M1- and M2-like monocytes/macrophages during tumor growth and after conditional ablation. During glioma growth, the monocyte/macrophage population consisted predominantly of M2 macrophages. Conditional temporal depletion of macrophages reduced the number of GFP(+) cells, targeting mainly the repopulation of M2-polarized cells, and altered the appearance of M1-like monocytes/macrophages, which suggested a shift in the M1/M2 macrophage balance. Of interest, compared with control-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had a lower tumor mitotic index, microvascular density, and reduced tumor growth. These results demonstrated the possibility of studying in vivo the role and phenotype of macrophages in gliomas and suggested that transitory depletion of CSF-1R(+) population influences the reconstitutive phenotypic pool of these cells, ultimately suppressing tumor growth. The MAFIA model provides a much needed advance in defining the role of macrophages in gliomas. PMID:25925380

  6. [The role of age and tumor grade in the choice of fractionation regimen in patients with high-grade gliomas].

    PubMed

    Izmaĭlov, T R; Pan'shin, G A; Datsenko, P V

    2012-01-01

    There are currently no conventional guidelines for radiotherapy in gliomas. The treatment program is mainly formed in accordance with tumor morphology and the "golden standard" of irradiation is still the traditional mode of fractionation with a single focal dose of 2 Gy and total focal dose (TFD) of 60 Gy. In this report the treatment results of 396 patients with morphologically verified grade 3-4 malignant brain tumors receiving conventional irradiation regimen and irradiation by medium-sized fractions were analyzed to form institutional guidelines. The standard fractionation mode with a single focal dose of 2 Gy is preferable in patients with grade 3 glioma or elderly patients (over 60 years). TFD increase to 60-62 Gy in grade 4 gliomas and 54-56 Gy in grade 3 gliomas grants a significant improve in overall survival. An increase of a single irradiation fraction to 3 Gy may be used for patients younger than 60 years. In these cases it is advisable to use the TFD of 45 Gy or more (TFD of equivalent regimen with a dose greater than 54 Gy). The mentioned fractionation regimens could be recommended for the use in clinical practice to improve the results of high-grade gliomas treatment. PMID:22888654

  7. Decreased expression of miR-378 correlates with tumor invasiveness and poor prognosis of patients with glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Wang, Yilin; Li, Shiting; He, Hua; Sun, Fengbin; Wang, Chunlin; Lu, Yicheng; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Tao, Bangbao

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that play important roles in a variety of biological process. It has been reported that dysregulation of miRNA is always associated with cancer progression and development, and miR-378 aberrant expression has been found in some types of cancers. However, the association of miR-378 and glioma has not been evaluated. In this work, we measured the expression of miR-378 in glioma tissues and non-neoplastic brain tissues was measured using real-time PCR, and found that miRNA-378 expression level was significantly lower in glioma tissues compared with non-neoplastic brain tissues. Patients with lower miR-378 expression level had significantly poorer overall survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that miR-378 expression was an independent prognostic factor for 5-year overall survival. Over-expression of miR-378 inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our results indicated that miR-378 may serve as a tumor suppressor and play an important role in inhibiting tumor migration and invasion. Our work implicates the potential effect of miR-378 on the prognosis of glioma. PMID:26261592

  8. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of translationally controlled tumor protein induces apoptosis, and inhibits growth and invasion in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    JIN, HUA; ZHANG, XUEXIN; SU, JUN; TENG, YUEQIU; REN, HUAN; YANG, LIZHUANG

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a highly conserved, growth-associated and small molecule protein, which is highly expressed in various types of tumor cell. TCTP can promote the growth and suppress apoptosis of tumor cels. However, few studies have reported the effects of TCTP in gliomas. In the present study, a glioma cell line was established, which was stably transfected with TCTP short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA), to investigate the impact of downregulated expression of TCTP on the proliferation, apoptosis and invasion of glioma cells. Western blot and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated that TCTP shRNA effectively reduced the expression of TCTP in the U251 glioma cell line. MTT and colony formation assays revealed that downregulated expression of TCTP significantly inhibited glioma cell proliferation. Cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry revealed that the cells in the pRNA-H1.1-TCTP group were arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Western blot analysis detected downregulated expression levels of cyclins, including Cyclin D1, Cyclin E and Cyclin B. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide and Hoechst staining demonstrated that the apoptotic rate of the cells in the pRNA-H1.1-TCTP group was significantly higher than that of the cells in the pRNA-H1.1-control group, with upregulated expression levels of B-cell-associated X protein and cleaved-caspase-3 and downregulated expression of B-cell lmyphoma-2 in the apoptotic process. Wound healing and Transwell assays revealed that downregulated expression of TCTP significantly inhibited the migration and invasiveness of the glioma cells; and the expression levels and activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were also significantly affected. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that downregulated expression of TCTP significantly inhibited proliferation and invasion, and induced apoptosis in the glioma

  9. XuefuZhuyu Tang exerts antitumor effects by inhibiting glioma cell metastasis and invasion via regulating tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianmin; Zhang, Ji; Huang, Liangwen; Zhu, Xuhong; Chen, Wei; Hu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background XuefuZhuyu Tang (XZT) is a traditional Chinese herb used for destagnation and is currently being used for oncotherapy. This study was intended to assess the effects of XZT on glioma along with its anticancer mechanism. Materials and methods U251 cells were divided into five groups: CNC (cells were cultured with normal saline), TSC (cells were treated with TaohongSiwu Tang [TST]), XSC (cells were treated with XZT), THC (cells were treated with homogenate of TST), and XHC (cells were treated with homogenate of XZT). The mRNA and protein expression of VEGF/VEGFR, CXCR4/CXCL12, and TIMP1/MMP9/MMP2 were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. Moreover, MTT assay, transwell assay, wound-healing assay, and flow cytometry were conducted to assess the cell viability, cell migration and invasion, cell motility, and cell apoptosis of U251 cells, respectively. In vivo, three mice models (group CNM, gavaging saline; group TSM, gavaging TST; group XZM, gavaging XZT) were constructed after establishing xenograft mice models. Then, models were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, RT-PCR, and Western blotting. Results In vitro, XZT significantly upregulated TIMP1 expression and downregulated the expression of VEGF, VEGFR, CXCR4, CXCL12, MMP9, and MMP2 in U251 cells (all P<0.05). In addition, XZT inhibited cell proliferation, invasion, and migration and induced cell apoptosis. In vivo, the average expression level of VEGF, CXCL12, MMP9, and MMP2 was downregulated in the XZM group compared with the control and TSM groups (all P<0.05). Tumor volumes in the XZM group were significantly lower than those in the CNM and TSM groups (all P<0.05). Conclusion XZT may suppress glioma growth and decrease expression levels of VEGF, CXCL12, MMP9, and MMP2. We speculate that XZT may be a potential therapeutic herb for curing glioma. PMID:27382298

  10. Trends and Outcomes in the Treatment of Gliomas Based on Data during 2001–2004 from the Brain Tumor Registry of Japan

    PubMed Central

    NARITA, Yoshitaka; SHIBUI, Soichiro

    2015-01-01

    The committee of Brain Tumor Registry of Japan (BTRJ) was founded in 1973 and conducts surveys and analyses of incidence, therapeutic methods, and treatment outcomes of primary and metastatic brain tumors with the cooperation of the Japan Neurosurgical Society members. Newly diagnosed 3,000–4,000 primary brain tumors and 600–1,000 brain metastases patients were enrolled in each year. This report describes the trends and treatment outcomes of gliomas from BTRJ volume 13, including 13,431 patients with primary brain tumors who newly started treatment from 2001 to 2004. Data from 382 diffuse astrocytomas (DAs), 121 oligodendrogliomas (OLs), 90 oligoastrocytomas (OAs), 513 anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs), 126 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs), 106 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas (AOAs), and 1,489 glioblastomas (GBMs) were analyzed for overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) depending on age, symptoms, Karnofsky performance status, location of the tumor, extent of resection (EOR), initial radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The 5-year PFS rates of the patients with DA, OL + OA, AA, AO + AOA, and GBM were 57.0%, 74.6%, 28.7%, 54.0%, and 9.2%, and the 5-year OS rates were 75.0%, 90.0%, 41.1%, 68.2%, and 10.1%, respectively. Higher EOR ≥ 75% in DA and OL + OA and that ≥ 50% in AA, AO + AOA, and GBM significantly prolonged OS. Complications and cause of death were also reported. BTRJ had been edited for all the patients, researchers, and especially for clinicians at bedside to give useful information about brain tumors and to contribute to the advances in brain tumor treatment. This report revealed various clinical problematic issues pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of gliomas. PMID:25797780

  11. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Anne C.; Pong, Winnie W.; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J.; Toonen, Joseph A.; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L.; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies. PMID:26585233

  12. Glioma-secreted soluble factors stimulate microglial activation: The role of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ji-Sun; Jung, Eun-Hye; Kwon, Mi-Youn; Han, Inn-Oc

    2016-09-15

    We aimed to elucidate the effect of soluble factors secreted by glioma on microglial activation. Conditioned medium (CM) from glioma cells, CRT-MG and C6, significantly induced nitric oxide (NO) production and stimulated the mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in BV2 cells. Glioma CM stimulated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, and a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, suppressed CM-induced NO production in BV2 cells. In addition, CM stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) DNA binding and transcriptional activity, which was repressed by SB203580. Gliomas displayed higher mRNA expression and release of TNF-α and IL-1β than primary astrocyte cells. Neutralization of TNF-α and IL-1β in C6-CM using a neutralizing antibody inhibited NO/iNOS expression in BV-2 cells. These results indicate potential contribution of diffusible tumor-derived factors to regulate microglial activation and subsequent tumor microenvironment. PMID:27609291

  13. Angiocentric glioma from a perspective of A-B-C classification of epilepsy associated tumors.

    PubMed

    Adamek, D; Siwek, G P; Chrobak, A A; Herman-Sucharska, I; Kwiatkowski, S; Morga, R; Radwańska, E; Urbanowicz, B

    2016-01-01

    Angiocentric glioma (AG) is a newly-classified, very rare, WHO grade I central nervous system (CNS) lesion, occurring usually in children and young adults. Only 52 patients with AG have been reported so far, making it one of the rarest neuropathological entities. Hereby we present two new cases of AG in young subjects with detailed neuropathological investigations and a neuroradiological picture along with a brief summary of all already published literature reports of this tumor. Histopathological examination of the resected tissue from both cases revealed similar changes characteristic of AG. The tumors were composed of spindle-like, elongated cells, forming characteristic pseudorosettes around vessels and diffusively infiltrating surrounding tissue, trapping neurons between tumor cells. Noticeably, some neoplastic cells encrusting vessels extended far beyond the main tumor mass. Hypothetically, this may be responsible for the recurrence of the tumor even in the case of apparently total excision. In immunohistochemistry, AG cells were glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin positive, also exhibiting a strikingly significant epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) dot-like staining pattern. In one of the cases, electron microscopy revealed ependymal differentiation features such as microvilli and cilia. Taken together, all these data strongly confirm a dual astroglial-ependymal nature of the tumor. Follow up corroborates benign character of this neoplasm. Both AGs reported here were immunonegative for the product of the mutated IDH-1 gene what, according to our best knowledge, has never been reported so far. It may suggest that in their pathogenesis AGs differ from grade II astrocytomas, which in most cases harbor a mutation of IDH-1. Noteworthy, neuroimaging in our cases was relatively characteristic but not conclusive, therefore biopsy (at least) is mandatory. A newly proposed so called "A-B-C" classification of long-term epilepsy-associated tumors (LEATs

  14. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  15. Diffusion and Perfusion MRI to Differentiate Treatment-Related Changes Including Pseudoprogression from Recurrent Tumors in High-Grade Gliomas with Histopathologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Prager, A.J.; Martinez, N.; Beal, K.; Omuro, A.; Zhang, Z.; Young, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Treatment-related changes and recurrent tumors often have overlapping features on conventional MR imaging. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of DWI and DSC perfusion imaging alone and in combination to differentiate treatment-related effects and recurrent high-grade gliomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS We retrospectively identified 68 consecutive patients with high-grade gliomas treated by surgical resection followed by radiation therapy and temozolomide, who then developed increasing enhancing mass lesions indeterminate for treatment-related changes versus recurrent tumor. All lesions were diagnosed by histopathology at repeat surgical resection. ROI analysis was performed of the enhancing lesion on the ADC and DSC maps. Measurements made by a 2D ROI of the enhancing lesion on a single slice were recorded as ADCLesion and rCBVLesion, and measurements made by the most abnormal small fixed diameter ROI as ADCROI and rCBVROI. Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon rank sum tests with P = .05. RESULTS Ten of the 68 patients (14.7%) had treatment-related changes, while 58 patients (85.3%) had recurrent tumor only (n = 19) or recurrent tumor mixed with treatment effect (n = 39). DWI analysis showed higher ADCLesion in treatment-related changes than in recurrent tumor (P = .003). DSC analysis revealed lower relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV)Lesion and rCBVROI in treatment-related changes (P=.003 andP=.011, respectively). Subanalysis of patients with suspected pseudoprogression also revealed higher ADCLesion (P = .001) and lower rCBVLesion (P = .028) and rCBVROI (P = .032) in treatment-related changes. Applying a combined ADCLesion and rCBVLesion model did not outperform either the ADC or rCBV metric alone. CONCLUSIONS Treatment-related changes showed higher diffusion and lower perfusion than recurrent tumor. Similar correlations were found for patients with suspected pseudoprogression. PMID:25593202

  16. Resonant Raman spectra of grades of human brain glioma tumors reveal the content of tryptophan by the 1588 cm-1 mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Zhou, Lixin; Zhu, Ke; Liu, Yulong; Zhang, Lin; Boydston-White, Susie; Cheng, Gangge; Pu, Yang; Bidyut, Das; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    RR spectra of brain normal tissue, gliomas in low grade I and II, and malignant glioma tumors in grade III and IV were measured using a confocal micro Raman spectrometer. This report focus on the relative contents of tryptophan (W) in various grades of brain glioma tumors by the intrinsic molecular resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy method using the 1588cm-1 of tryptophan mode by 532 nm excitation. The RR spectra of key fingerprints of tryptophan, with a main vibrational mode at 1588cm-1 (W8b), were observed. It was found that tryptophan contribution was accumulated in grade I to IV gliomas and the mode of 1588cm-1 in grade III and IV malignant gliomas were enhanced by resonance.

  17. 3 Tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy: cerebral gliomas vs. metastatic brain tumors. Our experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Caivano, R; Lotumolo, A; Rabasco, P; Zandolino, A; D'Antuono, F; Villonio, A; Lancellotti, M I; Macarini, L; Cammarota, A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to report about the value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in differentiating brain metastases, primary high-grade gliomas (HGG) and low-grade gliomas (LGG). MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and MRS were performed in 60 patients with histologically verified brain tumors: 32 patients with HGG (28 glioblastomas multiforme [GBM] and 4 anaplastic astrocytomas), 14 patients with LGG (9 astrocytomas and 5 oligodendrogliomas) and 14 patients with metastatic brain tumors. The Cho/Cr (choline-containing compounds/creatine-phosphocreatine complex), Cho/NAA (N-acetyl aspartate) and NAA/Cr ratios were assessed from spectral maps in the tumoral core and peritumoral edema. The differences in the metabolite ratios between LGG, HGG and metastases were analyzed statistically. Lipids/lactate contents were also analyzed. Significant differences were noted in the tumoral and peritumoral Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA and NAA/Cr ratios between LGG, HGG and metastases. Lipids and lactate content revealed to be useful for discriminating gliomas and metastases. The results of this study demonstrate that MRS can differentiate LGG, HGG and metastases, therefore diagnosis could be allowed even in those patients who cannot undergo biopsy. PMID:23390934

  18. BAFF, APRIL, TWEAK, BCMA, TACI and Fn14 Proteins Are Related to Human Glioma Tumor Grade: Immunohistochemistry and Public Microarray Data Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pelekanou, Vassiliki; Notas, George; Kampa, Marilena; Tsentelierou, Eleftheria; Stathopoulos, Efstathios N.; Tsapis, Andreas; Castanas, Elias

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are common and lethal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Genetic alterations, inflammatory and angiogenic processes have been identified throughout tumor progression; however, treatment still remains palliative for most cases. Biological research on parameters influencing cell survival, invasion and tumor heterogeneity identified several cytokines interfering in CNS inflammation, oxidative stress and malignant transformation, including TNF-superfamily (TNFSF) members. In this report we performed a meta-analysis of public gene-array data on the expression of a group of TNFSF ligands (BAFF, APRIL, TWEAK) and their receptors (BAFF-R, TACI, BCMA, Fn14) in gliomas. In addition, we investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) the tumor cells' expression of these ligands and receptors in a series of 56 gliomas of different grade. We show that in IHC, BAFF and APRIL as well as their cognate receptors (BCMA, TACI) and Fn14 expression correlate with tumor grade. This result was not evidenced in micro-arrays meta-analysis. Finally, we detected for the first time Fn14, BAFF, BCMA and TACI in glioma-related vascular endothelium. Our data, combined with our previous report in glioma cell lines, suggest a role for these receptors and ligands in glioma biology and advance these molecules as potential markers for the classification of these tumors to the proliferative, angiogenic or stem-like molecular subtype. PMID:24376672

  19. Detection of Human Herpesvirus-6 Variants in Pediatric Brain Tumors: Association of Viral Antigen in Low Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, John R.; Santi, Maria R.; Thorarinsdottir, Halldora K.; Cornelison, Robert; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Zhang, Huizhen; Yao, Karen; Jacobson, Steven; MacDonald, Tobey J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) has been associated with a diverse spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) diseases and reported glial tropism. Objective To determine if HHV-6 is present in a series of pediatric brain tumors. Study Design Pediatric gliomas from 88 untreated patients represented in a tissue microarray (TMA) were screened for HHV-6 by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in situ hybridization (ISH), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and compared to non glial tumors (N=22) and control brain (N=32). Results were correlated with tumor grade and overall survival. Results HHV-6 U57 was detected by nested PCR in 68/120 (57%) tumors and 7/32 (22%) age-matched non-tumor brain (P=0.001). HHV-6 U31 was positive in 73/120 (61%) tumors and 11/32 (34%) controls (P=0.019). Seventy-two percent (43/60) of tumors were HHV-6 Variant A. HHV-6 U57 was confirmed by ISH in 83/150 (54%) tumors and 10/32 (31%) controls (P=0.021), revealing a non-lymphocytic origin of HHV-6. HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 late antigen was detected by IHC in 50/124 (40%) tumors and 6/32 (18%) controls (P=0.013). Interestingly, 58% of low grade gliomas (N=67) were IHC positive compared to 19% of high grade gliomas (N=21, P=0.002) and 25% of non gliomas (N=36; P=0.001). HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 antigen co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein, confirming the astrocytic origin of antigen. Overall, there was no primary association between HHV-6A/B gp116/64/54 antigen detection and survival (P=0.861). Conclusions We provide the first reported series of HHV-6 detection in pediatric brain tumors. The predominance of HHV-6 in glial tumors warrants further investigation into potential neurooncologic disease mechanisms. PMID:19505845

  20. The Human Fn14 Receptor Gene Is Up-Regulated in Migrating Glioma Cells in Vitro and Overexpressed in Advanced Glial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nhan L.; McDonough, Wendy S.; Donohue, Patrick J.; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Berens, Theresa J.; Ross, Kristen R.; Hoelzinger, Dominique B.; Beaudry, Christian; Coons, Stephen W.; Berens, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme comprises the majority of human brain tumors. Patients with glioblastoma multiforme have poor survival rates, with an average life expectancy of <1 year. To assess possible mechanisms and to potentially target invasive glioma cells, we previously measured the gene expression profiles of glioma cells under migration-activated or passive states. One of the genes identified was Fn14, which encodes a cell surface receptor for the tumor necrosis factor superfamily member named TWEAK. In this study, we show that Fn14 gene expression is induced in migration-activated glioma cells in vitro and significantly increases according to tumor grade in vivo (P < 0.01), with highest levels in glioblastoma tissue specimens. The in situ expression pattern of Fn14 mRNA and protein was confined to primary glioma cells and the vascular endothelium, with no detection in adjacent normal brain. Conversely, TWEAK mRNA levels are low in glioblastoma samples relative to normal brain tissue. In addition, activation of the Fn14 receptor by addition of recombinant TWEAK resulted in increased glioma cell migration in vitro. These results suggest a positive role for TWEAK and Fn14 in glioma progression and indicate that Fn14 gene expression may serve as a marker for invasive glioma cells. PMID:12651623

  1. Combination of vatalanib and a 20-HETE synthesis inhibitor results in decreased tumor growth in an animal model of human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Adarsh; Borin, Thaiz F; Iskander, Asm; Varma, Nadimpalli RS; Achyut, Bhagelu R; Jain, Meenu; Mikkelsen, Tom; Guo, Austin M; Chwang, Wilson B; Ewing, James R; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Arbab, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the hypervascular nature of glioblastoma (GBM), antiangiogenic treatments, such as vatalanib, have been added as an adjuvant to control angiogenesis and tumor growth. However, evidence of progressive tumor growth and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment has been observed. To counter the unwanted effect of vatalanib on GBM growth, we have added a new agent known as N-hydroxy-N′-(4-butyl-2 methylphenyl)formamidine (HET0016), which is a selective inhibitor of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthesis. The aims of the studies were to determine 1) whether the addition of HET0016 can attenuate the unwanted effect of vatalanib on tumor growth and 2) whether the treatment schedule would have a crucial impact on controlling GBM. Methods U251 human glioma cells (4×105) were implanted orthotopically. Two different treatment schedules were investigated. Treatment starting on day 8 (8–21 days treatment) of the tumor implantation was to mimic treatment following detection of tumor, where tumor would have hypoxic microenvironment and well-developed neovascularization. Drug treatment starting on the same day of tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment) was to mimic cases following radiation therapy or surgery. There were four different treatment groups: vehicle, vatalanib (oral treatment 50 mg/kg/d), HET0016 (intraperitoneal treatment 10 mg/kg/d), and combined (vatalanib and HET0016). Following scheduled treatments, all animals underwent magnetic resonance imaging on day 22, followed by euthanasia. Brain specimens were equally divided for immunohistochemistry and protein array analysis. Results Our results demonstrated a trend that HET0016, alone or in combination with vatalanib, is capable of controlling the tumor growth compared with that of vatalanib alone, indicating attenuation of the unwanted effect of vatalanib. When both vatalanib and HET0016 were administered together on the day of the tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment), tumor

  2. 18F FDOPA PET/CT or PET/MRI in Measuring Tumors in Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Recurrent Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-22

    Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Glioblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Recurrent Childhood Gliosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Recurrent Childhood Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Protoplasmic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Untreated Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Untreated Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Diffuse Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Fibrillary Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Gemistocytic Astrocytoma; Untreated Childhood Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Glioblastoma; Untreated Childhood Gliomatosis Cerebri; Untreated Childhood Gliosarcoma; Untreated Childhood

  3. Stem-like tumor initiating cells isolated from IL13Rα2-expressing gliomas are targeted and killed by IL13-zetakine redirected T cells

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christine E.; Starr, Renate; Aguilar, Brenda; Shami, Andrew F.; Martinez, Catalina; D’Apuzzo, Massimo; Barish, Michael E.; Forman, Stephen J.; Jensen, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate IL13Rα2 as an immunotherapeutic target for eliminating glioma stem-like initiating cells (GSC) of high-grade gliomas, with particular focus on the potential of genetically engineered IL13Rα2-specific primary human CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (IL13-zetakine+ CTL) to target this therapeutically resistant glioma subpopulation. Experimental Design A panel of low-passage GSC tumor sphere and serum-differentiated glioma lines were expanded from patient glioblastoma specimens. These glioblastoma lines were evaluated for expression of IL13Rα2 and for susceptibility to IL13-zetakine+ CTL-mediated killing in vitro and in vivo. Results We observed that while glioma IL13Rα2 expression varies between patients, for IL13Rα2pos cases this antigen was detected on both GSCs and more differentiated tumor cell populations. IL13-zetakine+ CTL were capable of efficient recognition and killing of both IL13Rα2pos GSC and IL13Rα2pos differentiated cells in vitro, as well as eliminating glioma initiating activity in an orthotopic mouse tumor model. Furthermore, intracranial administration of IL13-zetakine+ CTL displayed robust anti-tumor activity against established IL13Rα2pos GSC tumor sphere-initiated orthotopic tumors in mice. Conclusions Within IL13Rα2-expressing high-grade gliomas, this receptor is expressed by GSCs and differentiated tumor populations, rendering both targetable by IL13-zetakine+ CTLs. Thus, our results support the potential utility of IL13Rα2-directed immunotherapeutic approaches for eradicating therapeutically resistant GSC populations. PMID:22407828

  4. Pharmacokinetic and Tumor Distribution Characteristics of Temsirolimus in Patients with Recurrent Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, John G.; Chang, Susan M.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Greenberg, Harry; Schiff, David; Conrad, Charles; Fink, Karen L.; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh; DeAngelis, Lisa; Raizer, Jeffrey; Hess, Kenneth; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Dancey, Janet; Prados, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the pharmacokinetics of temsirolimus and its major metabolite, sirolimus, in patients receiving enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAED) compared with patients receiving non-EIAEDs. An additional objective was to determine whether concentrations of temsirolimus or sirolimus were achieved in brain tumor tissue. Experimental Design Patients with recurrent malignant gliomas not receiving EIAEDs initially received temsirolimus weekly at a dose of 250 mg i.v. The dose was subsequently reduced to 170 mg due to intolerable side effects. For patients taking EIAEDs, the starting dose of temsirolimus was 250 mg with standard dose escalation until the maximal tolerated dose was established. Ten whole blood samples were obtained over a period of 24 h after administration of temsirolimus for pharmacokinetic assessments. Patients eligible for cytoreductive surgery received temsirolimus before tumor resection. Whole blood and tumor tissue were obtained for analysis. Results Significant differences in the pharmacokinetic variables for temsirolimus and sirolimus were observed between the two patient groups at a comparable dose level of 250 mg. For patients receiving EIAEDs, the systemic exposure to temsirolimus was lower by 1.5-fold. Likewise, peak concentrations and exposure to sirolimus were lower by 2-fold. Measurable concentrations of temsirolimus and sirolimus were observed in brain tumor specimens. The average tissue to whole blood ratio for temsirolimus was 1.43 and 0.84 for sirolimus. Conclusions Drugs that induce cytochrome P450 3A4, such as EIAEDs, significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of temsirolimus and its active metabolite, sirolimus. Total exposure to temsirolimus and sirolimus was lower in the EIAED group at the maximum tolerated dose of 250 mg compared with the non-EIAED group at the maximum tolerated dose of 170 mg. However, brain tumor tissue concentrations of temsirolimus and sirolimus were relatively comparable in both groups of

  5. Tumor tropic delivery of doxorubicin-polymer conjugates using mesenchymal stem cells for glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Yao, Sen; Liu, Chang; Jiang, Yanyan

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess inherent tropism to malignant cells and home to disseminated tumor foci, making MSCs an ideal candidate as targeting vehicle for drug delivery. Our previously synthesized doxorubicin (DOX)-polymer conjugates (PPCD) modified by RGD (RGD-PPCD) harness tremendous potential with active targeting and sustained release. To further enhance the conjugates penetrability and tumor tracking capability, MSCs-mediated RGD-/PPCD delivery system was created and constructed by spontaneous incorporation. The present study investigated the anti-tumor activities of MSCs loaded with RGD-/PPCD (MSCsRGD-/PPCD), compared to their corresponding RGD-/PPCD and MSCs loaded with DOX (MSCsDOX), especially. MTT assay demonstrated that although RGD-/PPCD could inhibit MSCs proliferation, there was no direct cytotoxicity to MSCs. After optimization, maximum drug loading amount was obtained by incubating MSCs for 12 h at the drug concentration of 50 μg/mL (DOX-equiv.). Further drug release and intracellular retention proved that, compared to MSCsDOX, MSCsRGD-/PPCD delayed the release peak to 12-48 h with continuous drug liberation more than 5 days, declaring the time dependent release behavior and lasting stability of conjugates in MSCs for cell-directed tumoritropic delivery. For MSCsRGD-/PPCD, intrinsic cell functions without compromise were verified by cell cycle analysis, transmigration assay and tumor penetration, while MSCsDOX showed observable but not significant suppression. As for in vivo studies, among all groups, mice intracranially administrated with MSCsPPCD and MSCsRGD-PPCD acquired the longest survival time with median being 41 and 45 days, and increased life span with 34% and 46.8% versus RGD-PPCD treatment group, respectively. Additionally, MSCsRGD-/PPCD exhibited more extensive penetration and enhanced tumor cell apoptosis than MSCsDOX. As proof of the concept, without any genetic manipulation and chemical modification, a novel modality

  6. Knocking down nucleolin expression in gliomas inhibits tumor growth and induces cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Joshi, Neel; Agarwal, Ashima; Dahiya, Sonika; Bittner, Patrice; Smith, Erin; Taylor, Sara; Piwnica-Worms, David; Weber, Jason; Leonard, Jeffrey R

    2012-05-01

    Nucleolin is a multifunctional protein whose expression often correlates with increased cellular proliferation. While the expression of nucleolin is often elevated in numerous cancers, its expression in normal human brain and in astrocytomas has not been previously reported. Using paraffin-embedded sections from normal adult autopsy specimens and glioma resection specimens, we demonstrate that nucleolin expression is limited in the normal human brain specifically to mature neurons, ependymal cells, and granular cells of the dentate gyrus. While astrocytes in the normal human brain do not express nucleolin at significant levels, glioblastoma cell lines and primary human astrocytoma cells exhibit considerable nucleolin expression. Reduction of nucleolin expression through siRNA-mediated knockdown in the U87MG glioblastoma cell line caused a dramatic decrease in cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in vitro. Moreover, conditional siRNA knockdown of nucleolin expression in U87MG intracranial xenografts in nude mice caused dramatic reduction in tumor size. Taken together, these results implicate nucleolin in the regulation of human astrocytoma proliferation in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo and suggest that nucleolin may represent a potential novel therapeutic target for astrocytomas. PMID:22382782

  7. 5-azacytidine reduces methylation, promotes differentiation and induces tumor regression in a patient-derived IDH1 mutant glioma xenograft.

    PubMed

    Borodovsky, Alexandra; Salmasi, Vafi; Turcan, Sevin; Fabius, Armida W M; Baia, Gilson S; Eberhart, Charles G; Weingart, Jon D; Gallia, Gary L; Baylin, Stephen B; Chan, Timothy A; Riggins, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    Somatic mutations in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequent in low grade and progressive gliomas and are characterized by the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) from α-ketoglutarate by the mutant enzyme. 2-HG is an "oncometabolite" that competitively inhibits α-KG dependent dioxygenases resulting in various widespread cellular changes including abnormal hypermethylation of genomic DNA and suppression of cellular differentiation. Despite the growing understanding of IDH mutant gliomas, the development of effective therapies has proved challenging in part due to the scarcity of endogenous mutant in vivo models. Here we report the generation of an endogenous IDH1 anaplastic astrocytoma model which rapidly grows in vivo, produces 2-HG and exhibits DNA hypermethylation. Using this model, we have demonstrated the preclinical efficacy and mechanism of action of the FDA approved demethylating drug 5-azacytidine in vivo. Long term administration of 5-azacytidine resulted in reduction of DNA methylation of promoter loci, induction of glial differentiation, reduction of cell proliferation and a significant reduction in tumor growth. Tumor regression was observed at 14 weeks and subsequently showed no signs of re-growth at 7 weeks despite discontinuation of therapy. These results have implications for clinical trials of demethylating agents for patients with IDH mutated gliomas. PMID:24077805

  8. 5-azacytidine reduces methylation, promotes differentiation and induces tumor regression in a patient-derived IDH1 mutant glioma xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Borodovsky, Alexandra; Salmasi, Vafi; Turcan, Sevin; Fabius, Armida W. M.; Baia, Gilson S.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Weingart, Jon D.; Gallia, Gary L.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Chan, Timothy A.; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutations in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are frequent in low grade and progressive gliomas and are characterized by the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) from α-ketoglutarate by the mutant enzyme. 2-HG is an “oncometabolite” that competitively inhibits α-KG dependent dioxygenases resulting in various widespread cellular changes including abnormal hypermethylation of genomic DNA and suppression of cellular differentiation. Despite the growing understanding of IDH mutant gliomas, the development of effective therapies has proved challenging in part due to the scarcity of endogenous mutant in vivo models. Here we report the generation of an endogenous IDH1 anaplastic astrocytoma model which rapidly grows in vivo, produces 2-HG and exhibits DNA hypermethylation. Using this model, we have demonstrated the preclinical efficacy and mechanism of action of the FDA approved demethylating drug 5-azacytidine in vivo. Long term administration of 5-azacytidine resulted in reduction of DNA methylation of promoter loci, induction of glial differentiation, reduction of cell proliferation and a significant reduction in tumor growth. Tumor regression was observed at 14 weeks and subsequently showed no signs of re-growth at 7 weeks despite discontinuation of therapy. These results have implications for clinical trials of demethylating agents for patients with IDH mutated gliomas. PMID:24077805

  9. Differential Expression of Adenosine P1 Receptor ADORA1 and ADORA2A Associated with Glioma Development and Tumor-Associated Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Chen, Ming-Na; Du, Juan; Liu, Hao; He, Yu-Jiao; Li, Guo-Liang; Li, Shu-Yu; Liu, Wei-Ping; Long, Xiao-Yan

    2016-07-01

    Level of adenosine, an endogenous astrocyte-based neuromodulator, is primarily regulated by adenosine P1 receptors. This study assessed expression of adenosine P1 receptors, ADORA1 (adenosine A1 receptor) and ADORA2A (adenosine A2a receptor) and their association with glioma development and epilepsy in glioma patients. Expression of ADORA1/ADORA2A was assessed immunohistochemically in 65 surgically removed glioma tissue and 21 peri-tumor tissues and 8 cases of normal brain tissues obtained from hematoma patients with cerebral trauma. Immunofluorescence, Western blot, and qRT-PCR were also used to verify immunohistochemical data. Adenosine P1 receptor ADORA1 and ADORA2A proteins were localized in the cell membrane and cytoplasm and ADORA1/ADORA2A immunoreactivity was significantly stronger in glioma and peri-tumor tissues that contained infiltrating tumor cells than in normal brain tissues (p < 0.05). The World Health Organization (WHO) grade III gliomas expressed even higher level of ADORA1 and ADORA2A. Western blot and qRT-PCR confirmed immunohistochemical data. Moreover, higher levels of ADORA1 and ADORA2A expression occurred in high-grade gliomas, in which incidence of epilepsy were lower (p < 0.05). In contrast, a lower level of ADORA1/ADORA2A expression was found in peri-tumor tissues with tumor cell presence from patients with epilepsy compared to patients without epilepsy (p < 0.05). The data from the current study indicates that dysregulation in ADORA1/ADORA2A expression was associated with glioma development, whereas low level of ADORA1/ADORA2A expression could increase susceptibility of tumor-associated epilepsy. PMID:27038930

  10. Standardized orthotopic xenografts in zebrafish reveal glioma cell-line-specific characteristics and tumor cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Welker, Alessandra M.; Jaros, Brian D.; Puduvalli, Vinay K.; Imitola, Jaime; Kaur, Balveen; Beattie, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly brain cancer, for which few effective drug treatments are available. Several studies have used zebrafish models to study GBM, but a standardized approach to modeling GBM in zebrafish was lacking to date, preventing comparison of data across studies. Here, we describe a new, standardized orthotopic xenotransplant model of GBM in zebrafish. Dose-response survival assays were used to define the optimal number of cells for tumor formation. Techniques to measure tumor burden and cell spread within the brain over real time were optimized using mouse neural stem cells as control transplants. Applying this standardized approach, we transplanted two patient-derived GBM cell lines, serum-grown adherent cells and neurospheres, into the midbrain region of embryonic zebrafish and analyzed transplanted larvae over time. Progressive brain tumor growth and premature larval death were observed using both cell lines; however, fewer transplanted neurosphere cells were needed for tumor growth and lethality. Tumors were heterogeneous, containing both cells expressing stem cell markers and cells expressing markers of differentiation. A small proportion of transplanted neurosphere cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or vimentin, markers of more differentiated cells, but this number increased significantly during tumor growth, indicating that these cells undergo differentiation in vivo. By contrast, most serum-grown adherent cells expressed GFAP and vimentin at the earliest times examined post-transplant. Both cell types produced brain tumors that contained Sox2+ cells, indicative of tumor stem cells. Transplanted larvae were treated with currently used GBM therapeutics, temozolomide or bortezomib, and this resulted in a reduction in tumor volume in vivo and an increase in survival. The standardized model reported here facilitates robust and reproducible analysis of glioblastoma tumor cells in real time and provides a platform for

  11. Efficacy of salvage stereotactic radiotherapy for recurrent glioma: impact of tumor morphology and method of target delineation on local control

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Kengo; Mizowaki, Takashi; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Miyamoto, Susumu; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the efficacy of salvage stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for recurrent glioma. From August 2008 to December 2012, 30 patients with recurrent glioma underwent salvage SRT. The initial histological diagnoses were World Health Organization (WHO) grades II, III, and IV in 6, 9, and 15 patients, respectively. Morphologically, the type of recurrence was classified as diffuse or other. Two methods of clinical target delineation were used: A, a contrast-enhancing tumor; or B, a contrast-enhancing tumor with a 3–10-mm margin and/or surrounding fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) high-intensity areas. The prescribed dose was 22.5–35 Gy delivered in five fractions at an isocenter using a dynamic conformal arc technique. The overall survival (OS) and local control probability (LCP) after SRT were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. A univariate analysis was used to test the effect of clinical variables on OS/LCP. The median follow-up period was 272 days after SRT. The OS and LCP were 83% and 56% at 6 months after SRT, respectively. Morphologically, the tumor type correlated significantly with both OS and LCP (P = 0.006 and <0.001, respectively). The method of target delineation also had a significant influence on LCP (P = 0.016). Grade 3 radiation necrosis was observed in two patients according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. Salvage SRT was safe and effective for recurrent glioma, especially non-diffuse recurrences. Improved local control might be obtained by adding a margin to contrast-enhancing tumors or including increased FLAIR high-intensity areas. PMID:24403268

  12. Retro-inverso bradykinin opens the door of blood-brain tumor barrier for nanocarriers in glioma treatment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zuoxu; Shen, Qing; Xie, Cao; Lu, Weiyue; Peng, Chunmei; Wei, Xiaoli; Li, Xue; Su, Bingxia; Gao, Chunli; Liu, Min

    2015-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier and the blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB) prevent most drugs entering brain tumors. Complicated preparation procedures of drug delivery systems and damage to normal brain tissue have limited the application of many strategies for the treatment of brain tumor in clinical trials. We have designed a bradykinin analog, retro-inverso bradykinin (RI-BK), which is characterized by resistance to proteolysis and high binding activity with the bradykinin type 2 (B2) receptor. After systemic administration, RI-BK binds to B2 receptors and induces a change in zonula occluden-1 and depolymerization of F-actin to selectively open the BBTB. RI-BK increased the accumulation of drug-loaded nanocarriers in the glioma but not in normal brain. Co-administration with RI-BK enhanced the therapeutic efficiency of drug-loaded nanocarriers for glioma. These findings suggest that RI-BK could be translated into the clinic as an adjunctive treatment for malignant brain tumors. PMID:26282786

  13. GE-01MOLECULAR AND PATHOLOGIC SUBSETS OF LOW GRADE GLIOMAS AND GLIONEURONAL TUMORS IDENTIFIED BY microRNA PROFILING

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Heather; Vizcaino, M. Adelita; Rodriguez, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade (WHO I-II) gliomas represent the most frequent primary tumors of the central nervous system in children. They often have a good prognosis following total resection, however they can create many neurological complications due to mass effect, and may be difficult to resect depending on anatomic location. MicroRNAs have been identified as molecular regulators of protein expression that can repress multiple mRNAs concurrently through base pairing. Specific microRNAs are often suppressed during early cell differentiation to promote the expression of mitogenic proteins that are associated with the maintenance of specific stem cell types, a mechanism for growth and survival that is frequently exploited in cancer cells. Identification of these microRNA signatures present in low grade glioma and glioneuronal tumor sub-types could therefore lead to a wealth of candidate biomarkers. We used NanoString technology to analyze the expression levels of 800 microRNAs in nine low-grade glial and glioneuronal tumor subtypes (n = 45) using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. We then generated hierarchical clusters following evaluation via significant analysis of microarrays (SAMs). Hierarchical clustering separated tumors from non-neoplastic brain. When looking at individual tumors, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGA) clustered sharply together, consistent with a unique microRNA expression signature in this tuberous sclerosis associated tumor subtype, compared to other low grade glial and glioneuronal tumors. Candidate microRNAs were validated using qRT-PCR. In SEGAs, microRNAs miR-219-5p, miR-129-2-3p, miR-338-3p, miR-487b, miR-885-5p, and miR-323-3p were significantly down-regulated by more than 15 fold as compared to normal brain and were also significantly down-regulated as compared to other low grade gliomas. In summary, altered microRNA expression is a feature of low grade glial and glioneuronal tumors. MicroRNA profiling may therefore be useful in

  14. Immunoprotective activity of the galactoside-specific lectin from mistletoe after tumor destructive therapy in glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Lenartz, D; Stoffel, B; Menzel, J; Beuth, J

    1996-01-01

    35 patients suffering from malignant stage III/IV glioma were enrolled into a prospectively randomized clinical trial. All patients were provided with standard oncologic treatment (neurosurgery, radiation, basic clinical care according to protocol and indication) and randomly divided into a) treatment group: receiving subcutaneous injections of a ML (a galactoside-specific lectin from mistletoe) standardized mistletoe extract, 1 ng ML-1/kg BW, twice a week for 3 months, starting on day 1 post surgery, b) control group: without additional complementary treatment. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood leukocytes was done by flow cytometry (pre surgery; day 1, week 1, month 3 and 6 post surgery) to evaluate the immunomodulating capacity of ML-1 standardized mistletoe extract. Standard tumor destructive treatment of glioma proved to be suppressive for peripheral blood lymphocytes, since all subsets tested revealed statistically significant down regulation. Unlike the lymphocyte counts and activities of patients from the control group who gave preoperative values after 3-6 months), mistletoe treatment induced a statistically significant up regulation of cell counts (CD-3, CD4, CD-8 cells) and activities (CD-25, HLA/DR positive cells) after 3 months, as compared to preoperative values. Obviously, a strong immunoprotective/immunostimulatory effect was induced by the treatment of glioma patients with ML-1 standardized mistletoe extract which correlated with an improved quality of life, as determined by a standard questionnaire (Spitzer). PMID:9042260

  15. Tumor-suppressive function of long noncoding RNA MALAT1 in glioma cells by downregulation of MMP2 and inactivation of ERK/MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Y; Wu, Z; Wu, T; Huang, Y; Cheng, Z; Li, X; Sun, T; Xie, X; Zhou, Y; Du, Z

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a type of long noncoding RNA. It is associated with metastasis and is a favorable prognostic factor for lung cancer. Recent studies have shown that MALAT1 plays an important role in other malignancies. But, little is known about the role of MALAT1 in glioma. In this study, quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to demonstrate that the expression of MALAT1 was lower than that in normal brain tissues. Stable RNA interference-mediated knockdown of MALAT1 in human glioma cell lines (U87 and U251) significantly promoted the invasion and proliferation of the glioma cells by in vitro assays. Conversely, overexpression of MALAT1 caused significant reduction in cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, and tumorigenicity in both subcutaneous and intracranial human glioma xenograft models. Furthermore, MALAT1-mediated tumor suppression in glioma cells may be via reduction of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) signaling activity and expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). In conclusion, overall data demonstrated the tumor-suppressive role of MALAT1 in glioma by attenuating ERK/MAPK-mediated growth and MMP2-mediated invasiveness. PMID:26938295

  16. MicroRNA-584-3p, a novel tumor suppressor and prognostic marker, reduces the migration and invasion of human glioma cells by targeting hypoxia-induced ROCK1

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hao; Guo, Xing; Han, Xiao; Yan, Shaofeng; Zhang, Jinsen; Xu, Shugang; Li, Tong; Guo, Xiaofan; Zhang, Ping; Gao, Xiao; Liu, Qinglin; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report that microRNA-584-3p (miR-584-3p) is up-regulated in hypoxic glioma cells and in high-grade human glioma tumors (WHO grades III–IV) relative to normoxic cells and to low-grade tumors (WHO grades I–II), respectively. The postoperative survival time was significantly prolonged in the high-grade glioma patients with high miR-584-3p expression compared with those with low miR-584-3p expression. miR-584-3p may function as a potent tumor suppressor and as a prognostic biomarker for malignant glioma. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these properties remain poorly understood. Our mechanistic studies revealed that miR-584-3p suppressed the migration and invasion of glioma cells by disrupting hypoxia-induced stress fiber formation. Specifically, we have found that ROCK1 is a direct and functionally relevant target of miR-584-3p in glioma cells. Our results have demonstrated a tumor suppressive function of miR-584-3p in glioma, in which it inhibits the migration and invasion of tumor cells by antagonizing hypoxia-induced, ROCK1-dependent stress fiber formation. Our findings have potential implications for glioma gene therapy and suggest that miR-584-3p could represent a prognostic indicator for glioma. PMID:26715733

  17. High-Grade Glioma Radiation Therapy Target Volumes and Patterns of Failure Obtained From Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-FDOPA Positron Emission Tomography Delineations From Multiple Observers

    SciTech Connect

    Kosztyla, Robert; Chan, Elisa K.; Hsu, Fred; Wilson, Don; Ma, Roy; Cheung, Arthur; Zhang, Susan; Moiseenko, Vitali; Benard, Francois; Nichol, Alan

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy with pretreatment delineations of high-grade gliomas from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-phenylalanine ({sup 18}F-FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) using contours delineated by multiple observers. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas underwent computed tomography (CT), gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI, and {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT. The image sets (CT, MRI, and PET/CT) were registered, and 5 observers contoured gross tumor volumes (GTVs) using MRI and PET. Consensus contours were obtained by simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE). Interobserver variability was quantified by the percentage of volume overlap. Recurrent tumor locations after radiation therapy were contoured by each observer using CT or MRI. Consensus recurrence contours were obtained with STAPLE. Results: The mean interobserver volume overlap for PET GTVs (42% ± 22%) and MRI GTVs (41% ± 22%) was not significantly different (P=.67). The mean consensus volume was significantly larger for PET GTVs (58.6 ± 52.4 cm{sup 3}) than for MRI GTVs (30.8 ± 26.0 cm{sup 3}, P=.003). More than 95% of the consensus recurrence volume was within the 95% isodose surface for 11 of 12 (92%) cases with recurrent tumor imaging. Ten (91%) of these cases extended beyond the PET GTV, and 9 (82%) were contained within a 2-cm margin on the MRI GTV. One recurrence (8%) was located outside the 95% isodose surface. Conclusions: High-grade glioma contours obtained with {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET had similar interobserver agreement to volumes obtained with MRI. Although PET-based consensus target volumes were larger than MRI-based volumes, treatment planning using PET-based volumes may not have yielded better treatment outcomes, given that all but 1 recurrence extended beyond the PET GTV and most were contained by a 2-cm

  18. Nuclear microprobe determination of platinum quantitative distribution in rat brain tumors after cisplatin or carboplatin injection for PAT treatment of glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Biston, M.-C.; Devès, G.; Bohic, S.; Carmona, A.

    2005-04-01

    Conventional radiotherapy of high-grade glioma is unsuccessful since less than 50% of patients survive at 6 months, therefore glioma treatment is still challenging. A new radiotherapy procedure has been recently proposed, the photoactivation therapy (PAT), associating synchrotron radiation with a chemotherapy agent, such as cisplatin. PAT aims at using the monochromaticity and the very high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation for selective excitation of a high-Z compound introduced in tumor cell DNA to maximize the photoelectric effect probability, thus increasing local toxicity. Synchrotron irradiation of cisplatin at the platinum absorption K-edge resulted in a dramatic increase in life span relative to median survival time in the F98 glioma model in Fisher rat. In the purpose to optimize the platinum concentration into the tumor, the platinum content of irradiated target needs to be quantified. These results will enable to correlate injected dose to cellular platinum content in the tumor at the time of irradiation, and to study the spatial diffusion and distribution of the platinum into the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissues from the point of injection. Male Fisher 344 rats were inoculated with 103 F98 glioma cells. Thirteen days after stereotactic inoculation, intracerebral injection at the tumor site of 40 μg of carboplatin and 3 or 5 μg of cisplatin was performed. Platinum quantitative distribution in tumors and adjacent brain tissues was determined using μ-PIXE and μ-RBS analysis.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase triggered size-shrinkable gelatin-gold fabricated nanoparticles for tumor microenvironment sensitive penetration and diagnosis of glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shaobo; He, Qin; Gao, Huile

    2015-05-01

    To improve glioma targeting delivery efficiency and to monitor drug delivery and treatment outcome, a novel tumor microenvironment sensitive size-shrinkable theranostic system was constructed and evaluated. The G-AuNPs-DC-RRGD system was constructed by fabricating small sized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) degradable gelatin nanoparticles (GNPs), doxorubicin (DOX) and Cy5.5 were decorated onto AuNPs through a hydrazone bond to enable the system with pH triggered cargoes release, and RRGD, a tandem peptide of RGD and octarginine was surface-modified onto the system to enable it with glioma active targeting ability. In vitro, the size of G-AuNPs-DC-RRGD could effectively shrink from 188.2 nm to 55.9 nm after incubation with MMP-2, while DOX and Cy5.5 were released in a pH dependent manner. Cellular uptake demonstrated that G-AuNPs-DC-RRGD could be effectively taken up by cells with higher intensity than G-AuNPs-DC-PEG. A study of tumor spheroids further demonstrated that the particles with smaller size showed better penetration ability, while RRGD modification could further improve permeability. In vivo, G-AuNPs-DC-RRGD displayed the best glioma targeting and accumulation efficiency, with good colocalization with neovessels. Cy5.5 also was colocalized well with DOX, indicating that Cy5.5 could be used for imaging of DOX delivery.To improve glioma targeting delivery efficiency and to monitor drug delivery and treatment outcome, a novel tumor microenvironment sensitive size-shrinkable theranostic system was constructed and evaluated. The G-AuNPs-DC-RRGD system was constructed by fabricating small sized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) degradable gelatin nanoparticles (GNPs), doxorubicin (DOX) and Cy5.5 were decorated onto AuNPs through a hydrazone bond to enable the system with pH triggered cargoes release, and RRGD, a tandem peptide of RGD and octarginine was surface-modified onto the system to

  20. Bevacizumab Targeting Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: Results of 89Zr-Bevacizumab PET Imaging in Brain Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Marc H A; Lagerweij, Tonny; Sewing, A Charlotte P; Vugts, Danielle J; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Molthoff, Carla F M; Caretti, Viola; Veringa, Susanna J E; Petersen, Naomi; Carcaboso, Angel M; Noske, David P; Vandertop, W Peter; Wesseling, Pieter; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Hulleman, Esther

    2016-09-01

    The role of the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab in the treatment of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is unclear. We aim to study the biodistribution and uptake of zirconium-89 ((89)Zr)-labeled bevacizumab in DIPG mouse models. Human E98-FM, U251-FM glioma cells, and HSJD-DIPG-007-FLUC primary DIPG cells were injected into the subcutis, pons, or striatum of nude mice. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and visualized by MRI. Seventy-two to 96 hours after (89)Zr-bevacizumab injections, mice were imaged by positron emission tomography (PET), and biodistribution was analyzed ex vivo High VEGF expression in human DIPG was confirmed in a publically available mRNA database, but no significant (89)Zr-bevacizumab uptake could be detected in xenografts located in the pons and striatum at an early or late stage of the disease. E98-FM, and to a lesser extent the U251-FM and HSJD-DIPG-007 subcutaneous tumors, showed high accumulation of (89)Zr-bevacizumab. VEGF expression could not be demonstrated in the intracranial tumors by in situ hybridization (ISH) but was clearly present in the perinecrotic regions of subcutaneous E98-FM tumors. The poor uptake of (89)Zr-bevacizumab in xenografts located in the brain suggests that VEGF targeting with bevacizumab has limited efficacy for diffuse infiltrative parts of glial brain tumors in mice. Translating these results to the clinic would imply that treatment with bevacizumab in patients with DIPG is only justified after targeting of VEGF has been demonstrated by (89)Zr-bevacizumab immuno-PET. We aim to confirm this observation in a clinical PET study with patients with DIPG. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2166-74. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325687

  1. High c-Cbl expression in gliomas is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    JING, ZHITAO; LI, LONG; WANG, XIN; WANG, MINGHAO; CAI, YING; JIN, ZI; ZHANG, YE

    2016-01-01

    Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (c-Cbl) expression has been linked to the development of several types of cancer. However, no studies on the association of c-Cbl and glioma have been published thus far. The present study examined glioma samples obtained from 136 patients treated at The First Hospital of China Medical University (Shenyang, China) from January 2007 to December 2009, and the expression levels of c-Cbl in the samples were evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and subjected to Cox regression analysis. The messenger RNA and protein levels of c-Cbl were observed to be upregulated in high-grade glioma, compared with low-grade glioma. A multivariate analysis revealed that the protein levels of c-Cbl were independently associated with overall survival [hazard ratio (HR)=4.923, 95% confidence interval (CI)=3.163–7.662; P<0.001]. Furthermore, the grade of the glioma (according to the World Health Organization criteria) was observed to be independent prognostic factors for progression-free survival and overall survival time (HR=8.842, 95% CI=7.827–9.989; P<0.001, and HR=10.247, 95% CI=9.009–11.655; P<0.001, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test indicated that high protein expression levels of c-Cbl were significantly associated with overall and progression-free survival (P<0.001). To the best of our knowledge, these results provide the first evidence that the overexpression of c-Cbl is correlated with advanced clinicopathological features and poor prognosis in patients with glioma. PMID:27073553

  2. Malignant gliomas with primitive neuroectodermal tumor-like components: a clinicopathologic and genetic study of 53 cases.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Miller, C Ryan; Gujrati, Meena; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Zambrano, Sandro Casavilca; Jost, Sarah C; Raghavan, Ravi; Qian, Jiang; Cochran, Elizabeth J; Huse, Jason T; Holland, Eric C; Burger, Peter C; Rosenblum, Marc K

    2009-01-01

    Central nervous system neoplasms with combined features of malignant glioma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (MG-PNET) are rare, poorly characterized, and pose diagnostic as well as treatment dilemmas. We studied 53 MG-PNETs in patients from 12 to 80 years of age (median = 54 years). The PNET-like component consisted of sharply demarcated hypercellular nodules with evidence of neuronal differentiation. Anaplasia, as seen in medulloblastomas, was noted in 70%. Within the primitive element, N-myc or c-myc gene amplifications were seen in 43%. In contrast, glioma-associated alterations involved both components, 10q loss (50%) being most common. Therapy included radiation (78%), temozolomide (63%) and platinum-based chemotherapy (31%). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dissemination developed in eight patients, with response to PNET-like therapy occurring in at least three. At last follow-up, 27 patients died, their median survival being 9.1 months. We conclude that the primitive component of the MG-PNET: (i) arises within a pre-existing MG, most often a secondary glioblastoma; (ii) may represent a metaplastic process or expansion of a tumor stem/progenitor cell clone; (iii) often shows histologic anaplasia and N-myc (or c-myc) amplification; (iv) has the capacity to seed the CSF; and (v) may respond to platinum-based chemotherapy regimens. PMID:18452568

  3. [Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) in radiotherapy of benign skull base tumors].

    PubMed

    Maire, J P; Liguoro, D; San Galli, F

    2001-10-01

    Skull base tumours represent about 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate; it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimentional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. PMID:11715310

  4. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  5. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  6. Histologically Proven Radiation-Induced Brainstem Glioma 93 Months After External Beam Radiotherapy for Pituitary Macroadenoma: Radiation Treatment Dose and Volume Correlation.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Salim E; Wolansky, Leo J; Manjila, Sunil V; Lo, Simon S; Arafah, Baha M; Selman, Warren R; Couce, Marta E; Rogers, Lisa R

    2015-01-01

    Patient is a 29-year-old with a history of recurrent growth hormone-secreting pituitary macroadenoma diagnosed 12 years prior to presentation. Eight years prior to current presentation, the patient underwent re-resection and received 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy each. Serial postradiation MRIs demonstrated regression in pituitary tumor size. Patient presented with new headaches 7.5 years after completing EBRT. Brain MRI demonstrated new FLAIR hyperintensity and contrast enhancement within the pons and medulla, corresponding to the 36 Gy isodose line of each radiation dose fraction. Differential diagnosis included radiation necrosis and radiation-induced glioma (RIG). The patient's neurologic exam worsened over the following 4 months. MRI showed progressive increase in mass effect, extent of FLAIR hyperintensity, and contrast enhancement in the brainstem. Stereotactic-assisted biopsy showed infiltrating astrocytoma with moderate atypia. A PubMed search showed this is the first case of histologically verified brainstem RIG correlated with 3-dimensional conformational radiation therapy dose and volume planning following EBRT for a pituitary adenoma. The rare occurrence of brainstem RIG after radiation therapy for pituitary tumor supports the need for long-term imaging monitoring of such patients. PMID:25345677

  7. A phase II trial evaluating the effects and intra-tumoral penetration of bortezomib in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Raizer, Jeffrey J; Chandler, James P; Ferrarese, Roberto; Grimm, Sean A; Levy, Robert M; Muro, Kenji; Rosenow, Joshua; Helenowski, Irene; Rademaker, Alfred; Paton, Martin; Bredel, Markus

    2016-08-01

    One resistance mechanism in malignant gliomas (MG) involves nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. Bortezomib prevents proteasomal degradation of NF-κB inhibitor α (NFKBIA), an endogenous regulator of NF-κB signaling, thereby limiting the effects of NF-κB on tumor survival and resistance. A presurgical phase II trial of bortezomib in recurrent MG was performed to determine drug concentration in tumor tissue and effects on NFKBIA. Patients were enrolled after signing an IRB approved informed consent. Treatment was bortezomib 1.7 mg/m(2) IV on days 1, 4 and 8 and then surgery on day 8 or 9. Post-operatively, treatment was Temozolomide (TMZ) 75 mg/m(2) PO on days 1-7 and 14-21 and bortezomib 1.7 mg/m(2) on days 7 and 21 [1 cycle was (1) month]. Ten patients were enrolled (8 M and 2 F) with 9 having surgery. Median age and KPS were 50 (42-64) and 90 % (70-100). The median cycles post-operatively was 2 (0-4). The trial was stopped as no patient had a PFS-6. All patients are deceased. Paired plasma and tumor bortezomib concentration measurements revealed higher drug concentrations in tumor than in plasma; NFKBIA protein levels were similar in drug-treated vs. drug-naïve tumor specimens. Nuclear 20S proteasome was less in postoperative samples. Postoperative treatment with TMZ and bortezomib did not show clinical activity. Bortezomib appears to sequester in tumor but pharmacological effects on NFKBIA were not seen, possibly obscured due to downregulation of NFKBIA during tumor progression. Changes in nuclear 20S could be marker of bortezomib effect on tumor. PMID:27300524

  8. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  9. Antroquinonol Targets FAK-Signaling Pathway Suppressed Cell Migration, Invasion, and Tumor Growth of C6 Glioma.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Tsai, May-Jywan; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor protein tyrosine that is overexpressed in many types of tumors and plays a pivotal role in multiple cell signaling pathways involved in cell survival, migration, and proliferation. This study attempts to determine the effect of synthesized antroquinonol on the modulation of FAK signaling pathways and explore their underlying mechanisms. Antroquinonol significantly inhibits cell viability with an MTT assay in both N18 neuroblastoma and C6 glioma cell lines, which exhibits sub G1 phase cell cycle, and further induction of apoptosis is confirmed by a TUNEL assay. Antroquinonol decreases anti-apoptotic proteins, whereas it increases p53 and pro-apoptotic proteins. Alterations of cell morphology are observed after treatment by atomic force microscopy. Molecular docking results reveal that antroquinonol has an H-bond with the Arg 86 residue of FAK. The protein levels of Src, pSrc, FAK, pFAK, Rac1, and cdc42 are decreased after antroquinonol treatment. Additionally, antroquinonol also regulates the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) proteins. Furthermore, antroquinonol suppresses the C6 glioma growth in xenograft studies. Together, these results suggest that antroquinonol is a potential anti-tumorigenesis and anti-metastasis inhibitor of FAK. PMID:26517117

  10. A North American brain tumor consortium phase II study of poly-ICLC for adult patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas.

    PubMed

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Lee, Bee L; Prados, Michael D; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Abrey, Lauren; Fink, Karen; Lieberman, Frank; Mehta, Minesh; Ian Robins, H; Junck, Larry; Salazar, Andres M; Chang, Susan M

    2009-01-01

    This phase II study was designed to determine the objective response rate and 6-month progression free survival of adult patients with recurrent supratentorial anaplastic glioma when treated with the immune modulator, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized with polylysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC). This was an open-labeled, single arm phase II study. Patients were treated with poly-ICLC alone. Patients may have had treatment for no more than two prior relapses. Treatment with poly-ICLC continued until tumor progression. Fifty five patients were enrolled in the study. Ten were ineligible after central review of pathology. Eleven percent of patients (5 of 45) had a radiographic response. Time to progression was known for 39 patients and 6 remain on treatment. The estimated 6-month progression free survival was 24%. The median survival time was 43 weeks. Poly-ICLC was well tolerated, but there was no improvement in 6-month progression free survival compared to historical database nor was there an encouraging objective radiographic response rate. Based on this study, poly-ICLC does not improve 6moPFS in patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas but may be worth further study in combination with agents such as temozolomide. PMID:18850068

  11. A North American brain tumor consortium phase II study of Poly-ICLC for adult patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Lee, Bee L; Prados, Michael D.; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Abrey, Lauren; Fink, Karen; Lieberman, Frank; Mehta, Minesh; Robins, H. Ian; Junck, Larry; Salazar, Andres M.; Chang, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II study was designed to determine the objective response rate and 6-month progression free survival of adult patients with recurrent supratentorial anaplastic glioma when treated with the immune modulator, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized with polylysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC). Methods and Materials This was an open-labeled, single arm phase II study. Patients were treated with poly-ICLC alone. Patients may have had treatment for no more than two prior relapses. Treatment with poly-ICLC continued until tumor progression. Results 55 patients were enrolled in the study. 10 were ineligible after central review of pathology. 11% of patients (5 of 45) had a radiographic response. Time to progression was known for 39 patients and 6 remain on treatment. The estimated 6-month progression free survival was 24%. The median survival time was 43 weeks. Conclusions Poly-ICLC was well tolerated, but there was no improvement in 6-month progression free survival compared to historical database nor was there an encouraging objective radiographic response rate. Based on this study, poly-ICLC does not improve 6moPFS in patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas but may be worth further study in combination with agents such as temozolomide. PMID:18850068

  12. Tissue pO{sub 2} of Orthotopic 9L and C6 Gliomas and Tumor-Specific Response to Radiotherapy and Hyperoxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Nadeem Li Hongbin; Hou, Huagang; Lariviere, Jean P.; Gladstone, David J.; Demidenko, Eugene; Swartz, Harold M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is a well-known therapeutic problem; however, a lack of methods for repeated measurements of glioma partial pressure of oxygen (pO{sub 2}) limits the ability to optimize the therapeutic approaches. We report the effects of 9.3 Gy of radiation and carbogen inhalation on orthotopic 9L and C6 gliomas and on the contralateral brain pO{sub 2} in rats using a new and potentially widely useful method, multisite in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry. Methods and Materials: Intracerebral 9L and C6 tumors were established in the left hemisphere of syngeneic rats, and electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was successfully used for repeated tissue pO{sub 2} measurements after 9.3 Gy of radiation and during carbogen breathing for 5 consecutive days. Results: Intracerebral 9L gliomas had a pO{sub 2} of 30-32 mm Hg and C6 gliomas were relatively hypoxic, with a pO{sub 2} of 12-14 mm Hg (p < 0.05). The tissue pO{sub 2} of the contralateral brain was 40-45 mm Hg in rats with either 9L or C6 gliomas. Irradiation resulted in a significant increase in pO{sub 2} of the 9L gliomas only. A significant increase in the pO{sub 2} of the 9L and C6 gliomas was observed in rats breathing carbogen, but this effect decreased during 5 days of repeated experiments in the 9L gliomas. Conclusion: These results highlight the tumor-specific effect of radiation (9.3.Gy) on tissue pO{sub 2} and the different responses to carbogen inhalation. The ability of electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry to provide direct repeated measurements of tissue pO{sub 2} could have a vital role in understanding the dynamics of hypoxia during therapy that could then be optimized by scheduling doses at times of improved tumor oxygenation.

  13. Autotaxin and LPA Receptors Represent Potential Molecular Targets for the Radiosensitization of Murine Glioma through Effects on Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Linkous, Amanda G.; Hu, Rong; Leahy, Kathleen M.; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M.; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2011-01-01

    Despite wide margins and high dose irradiation, unresectable malignant glioma (MG) is less responsive to radiation and is uniformly fatal. We previously found that cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is a molecular target for radiosensitizing cancer through the vascular endothelium. Autotaxin (ATX) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors are downstream from cPLA2 and highly expressed in MG. Using the ATX and LPA receptor inhibitor, α-bromomethylene phosphonate LPA (BrP-LPA), we studied ATX and LPA receptors as potential molecular targets for the radiosensitization of tumor vasculature in MG. Treatment of Human Umbilical Endothelial cells (HUVEC) and mouse brain microvascular cells bEND.3 with 5 µmol/L BrP-LPA and 3 Gy irradiation showed decreased clonogenic survival, tubule formation, and migration. Exogenous addition of LPA showed radioprotection that was abrogated in the presence of BrP-LPA. In co-culture experiments using bEND.3 and mouse GL-261 glioma cells, treatment with BrP-LPA reduced Akt phosphorylation in both irradiated cell lines and decreased survival and migration of irradiated GL-261 cells. Using siRNA to knock down LPA receptors LPA1, LPA2 or LPA3 in HUVEC, we demonstrated that knockdown of LPA2 but neither LPA1 nor LPA3 led to increased viability and proliferation. However, knockdown of LPA1 and LPA3 but not LPA2 resulted in complete abrogation of tubule formation implying that LPA1 and LPA3 on endothelial cells are likely targets of BrP-LPA radiosensitizing effect. Using heterotopic tumor models of GL-261, mice treated with BrP-LPA and irradiation showed a tumor growth delay of 6.8 days compared to mice treated with irradiation alone indicating that inhibition of ATX and LPA receptors may significantly improve malignant glioma response to radiation therapy. These findings identify ATX and LPA receptors as molecular targets for the development of radiosensitizers for MG. PMID:21799791

  14. Histologic classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Perry, Arie; Wesseling, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas form a heterogeneous group of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and are traditionally classified based on histologic type and malignancy grade. Most gliomas, the diffuse gliomas, show extensive infiltration in the CNS parenchyma. Diffuse gliomas can be further typed as astrocytic, oligodendroglial, or rare mixed oligodendroglial-astrocytic of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), III (anaplastic), or IV (glioblastoma). Other gliomas generally have a more circumscribed growth pattern, with pilocytic astrocytomas (WHO grade I) and ependymal tumors (WHO grade I, II, or III) as the most frequent representatives. This chapter provides an overview of the histology of all glial neoplasms listed in the WHO 2016 classification, including the less frequent "nondiffuse" gliomas and mixed neuronal-glial tumors. For multiple decades the histologic diagnosis of these tumors formed a useful basis for assessment of prognosis and therapeutic management. However, it is now fully clear that information on the molecular underpinnings often allows for a more robust classification of (glial) neoplasms. Indeed, in the WHO 2016 classification, histologic and molecular findings are integrated in the definition of several gliomas. As such, this chapter and Chapter 6 are highly interrelated and neither should be considered in isolation. PMID:26948349

  15. Synergy of enediyne antibiotic lidamycin and temozolomide in suppressing glioma growth with potentiated apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Qi; Ouyang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Liu, Hong; Shang, Yue; Li, Yi; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2014-08-01

    The present work evaluated the synergistic efficacy of an enediyne antibiotic lidamycin (LDM) plus temozolomide (TMZ) against glioma in vitro and in vivo. LDM plus TMZ inhibited the proliferations of rat glioma C6 cells and human glioma U87 cells more efficiently than the single usage of LDM or TMZ. In addition, LDM also potentiated the apoptosis inductions by TMZ in rat C6 cells and human U87 cells. Meanwhile, the results of TdT-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assay for subcutaneous U87 tumor sections indicated an enhanced apoptosis induction in vivo by LDM plus TMZ, which confirmed the high potency of the combination for glioma therapy. As determined by Western blot, apoptosis signal pathways in C6 cells and U87 cells were markedly affected by the synergistic alteration of P53, bax, procaspase 3, and bcd-2 expression. In both subcutaneous U87 xenograft and C6 intracerebral orthotopic implant model, TMZ-induced glioma growth suppression was dramatically potentiated by LDM. As shown, the combination therapy efficiently reduced the tumor volumes and tumor weights of the human glioma U87 xenograft. Kaplan-Meier assay revealed that LDM plus TMZ dramatically prolonged the life span of C6 intracerebral tumor-bearing rats with decreased tumor size. This study indicates that the combination of LDM with TMZ might be a promising strategy for glioma therapy. PMID:24842385

  16. Adult Brainstem Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Botero, German; Mokhtari, Karima; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Brainstem gliomas are uncommon in adults and account for only 1%–2% of intracranial gliomas. They represent a heterogeneous group of tumors that differ from those found in their pediatric counterparts. In adults, a low-grade phenotype predominates, which is a feature that likely explains their better prognosis compared to that in children. Because biopsies are rarely performed, classifications based on the radiological aspect of magnetic resonance imaging results have been proposed to establish treatment strategies and to determine outcomes: (a) diffuse intrinsic low-grade, (b) enhancing malignant glioma, (c) focal tectal gliomas, and (d) exophytic gliomas. Despite significant advances in neuroradiology techniques, a purely radiological classification remains imperfect in the absence of a histological diagnosis. Whereas a biopsy may often be reasonably avoided in the diffuse nonenhancing forms, obtaining histological proof seems necessary in many contrast-enhanced brainstem lesions because of the wide variety of differential diagnoses in adults. Conventional radiotherapy is the standard treatment for diffuse intrinsic low-grade brainstem gliomas in adults (the median survival is 5 years). In malignant brainstem gliomas, radiotherapy is the standard treatment. However, the possible benefit of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy (temozolomide or other agents) has not been thoroughly evaluated in adults. The role of anti-angiogenic therapies in brainstem gliomas remains to be defined. A better understanding of the biology of these tumors is of primary importance for identifying homogeneous subgroups and for improving therapy options and outcomes. PMID:22382458

  17. Do tumor volume, percent tumor volume predict biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy? A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yang; Li, He; Xu, Peng; Wang, Jia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore the effects of tumor volume (TV) and percent tumor volume (PTV) on biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). An electronic search of Medline, Embase and CENTRAL was performed for relevant studies. Studies evaluated the effects of TV and/or PTV on BCR after RP and provided detailed results of multivariate analyses were included. Combined hazard ratios (HRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects or fixed-effects models. A total of 15 studies with 16 datasets were included in the meta-analysis. Our study showed that both TV (HR 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00-1.07; P=0.03) and PTV (HR 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00-1.02; P=0.02) were predictors of BCR after RP. The subgroup analyses revealed that TV predicted BCR in studies from Asia, PTV was significantly correlative with BCR in studies in which PTV was measured by computer planimetry, and both TV and PTV predicted BCR in studies with small sample sizes (<1000). In conclusion, our meta-analysis demonstrated that both TV and PTV were significantly associated with BCR after RP. Therefore, TV and PTV should be considered when assessing the risk of BCR in RP specimens. PMID:26885209

  18. Tumor location, but not H3.3K27M, significantly influences the blood-brain-barrier permeability in a genetic mouse model of pediatric high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Subashi, Ergys; Cordero, Francisco J; Halvorson, Kyle G; Qi, Yi; Nouls, John C; Becher, Oren J; Johnson, G Allan

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGGs) occur with strikingly different frequencies in infratentorial and supratentorial regions. Although histologically these malignancies appear similar, they represent distinct diseases. Recent genomic studies have identified histone K27M H3.3/H3.1 mutations in the majority of brainstem pHGGs; these mutations are rarely encountered in pHGGs that arise in the cerebral cortex. Previous research in brainstem pHGGs suggests a restricted permeability of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). In this work, we use dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to evaluate BBB permeability in a genetic mouse model of pHGG as a function of location (cortex vs. brainstem, n = 8 mice/group) and histone mutation (mutant H3.3K27M vs. wild-type H3.3, n = 8 mice/group). The pHGG models are induced either in the brainstem or the cerebral cortex and are driven by PDGF signaling and p53 loss with either H3.3K27M or wild-type H3.3. T2-weighted MRI was used to determine tumor location/extent followed by 4D DCE-MRI for estimating the rate constant (K (trans) ) for tracer exchange across the barrier. BBB permeability was 67 % higher in cortical pHGGs relative to brainstem pHGGs (t test, p = 0.012) but was not significantly affected by the expression of mutant H3.3K27M versus wild-type H3.3 (t-test, p = 0.78). Although mice became symptomatic at approximately the same time, the mean volume of cortical tumors was 3.6 times higher than the mean volume of brainstem tumors. The difference between the mean volume of gliomas with wild-type and mutant H3.3 was insignificant. Mean K (trans) was significantly correlated to glioma volume. These results present a possible explanation for the poor response of brainstem pHGGs to systemic therapy. Our findings illustrate a potential role played by the microenvironment in shaping tumor growth and BBB permeability. PMID:26511492

  19. A Comparative Study of Survival Rate in High Grade Glioma Tumors Being Treated by Radiotherapy Alone Versus Chemoradiation With Nitrosourea

    PubMed Central

    Houshyari, Mohammad; Hajalikhani, Farzaneh; Rakhsha, Afshin; Hajian, Parastoo

    2015-01-01

    Background: In adults, malignant glioma (high-grade glioma) is one of the most common brain tumors. In spite of different types of treatment, the outcome is still not likely to be favorable. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between survival rate in adult patients with high grade glioma treated by radiotherapy only and those treated by a combination of radiotherapy and nitrosurea-based chemotherapy. Methods: This study was conducted using the records of 48 patients with grade 3 or 4 of glial brain tumor referred to the radiation-oncology ward of Shohada-e-Tajrish Hospital in Tehran, Iran from 2005 to 2012. The patients had undergone radiotherapy alone or adjuvant chemoradiation with nitrosourea. The median survival of patients after receiving the different types of treatment were evaluated using the Kaplan –Meier method and the log –rank exam. Data were analyzed using univariate analysis for median survival regarding to the patients’ age, gender, extent of surgery, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) with the Kaplan-Meier method, and the log-rank exam. We used the Cox-model for multivariate analysis. Results: Records of 48 patients were studied (34 men and 14 women). The mean survival were 18 months for men and 15.2 months for women (P = 0.05). Around 58% (28 patients) were more than 50 years old, and 42% (20 patients) were less than 50, and mean survival for the two age groups were 13 and 20 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Then, the patients were divided into three groups according to the extent of surgery, i.e., excisional biopsy (11 patients), stereotactic biopsy (22 patients), and resection (15 patients), and the mean survival for the three groups were 14.7, 17.3, and 18.8 months, respectively. There was no significant statistical difference for mean survival between the three groups (P = 0.23). The KPS was greater than 70% in 23 patients and less than 70% in 21 patients, and the mean survival for the former and latter groups were 17

  20. IDH1 mutations at residue p.R132 (IDH1(R132)) occur frequently in high-grade gliomas but not in other solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, Fonnet E; Lamba, Simona; Leenstra, Sieger; Troost, Dirk; Hulsebos, Theo; Vandertop, W Peter; Frattini, Milo; Molinari, Francesca; Knowles, Margaret; Cerrato, Aniello; Rodolfo, Monica; Scarpa, Aldo; Felicioni, Lara; Buttitta, Fiamma; Malatesta, Sara; Marchetti, Antonio; Bardelli, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Systematic sequence profiling of the Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) genome has recently led to the identification of somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene. Interestingly, only the evolutionarily conserved residue R132 located in the substrate binding site of IDH1 was found mutated in GBM. At present, the occurrence and the relevance of p.R132 (IDH1(R132)) variants in tumors other than GBMs is largely unknown. We searched for mutations at position R132 of the IDH1 gene in a panel of 672 tumor samples. These included high-grade glioma, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), melanoma, bladder, breast, colorectal, lung, ovarian, pancreas, prostate, and thyroid carcinoma specimens. In addition, we assessed a panel of 84 cell lines from different tumor lineages. Somatic mutations affecting the IDH1(R132) residue were detected in 20% (23 of 113) high-grade glioma samples. In addition to the previously reported p.R132H and p.R132S alleles, we identified three novel somatic mutations (p.R132C, p.R132G, and p.R132L) affecting residue IDH1(R132) in GBM. Strikingly, no IDH1 mutations were detected in the other tumor types. These data indicate that cancer mutations affecting IDH1(R132) are tissue-specific, and suggest that it plays a unique role in the development of high-grade gliomas. PMID:19117336

  1. The engineered Salmonella typhimurium inhibits tumorigenesis in advanced glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-qiang; Zhan, Yue-fu; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Sheng-nan; Li, Xiang-ying

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the antitumor role of the attenuated Salmonella typhimurium ΔppGpp with inducible cytolysin A (ClyA) in advanced stage of glioma. Materials and methods The C6 rat glioma cells were orthotopically implanted by surgery into the caudate nucleus of rat brains. The rats were then randomly divided into the treatment group (SL + ClyA) (n=12), negative control group (SL) (n=12), and control group (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]) (n=12). In the treatment group, the attenuated S. typhimurium were transformed with the plasmid-encoded antitumor gene ClyA. The expression of ClyA was controlled by the TetR-regulated promoter in response to extracellular doxycycline. The plasmid also contained an imaging gene lux to allow illumination of the tumor infected by the bacteria. The rat glioma C6 cells were implanted into the caudate nucleus of all rats. The engineered S. typhimurium and respective controls were injected intravenously into the rats 21 days after initial tumor implantation. The pathological analysis of the glioma tumor was performed at 21 days and 28 days (7 days after doxycycline treatment) postimplantation. All rats underwent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and bioluminescence study at 21 days and 28 days postimplantation to detect tumor volume. The differences between the three groups in tumor volume and survival time were analyzed. Results Advanced stage glioma was detected at 21 days postimplantation. Bioluminescence showed that the engineered S. typhimurium accumulated in glioma tumors and disappeared in the normal reticuloendothelial tissues 3 days after intravenous injection. MRI showed that the tumor volume in the S. typhimurium with ClyA group were significantly reduced compared to the bacteria alone and no bacteria groups 7 days post-doxycycline treatment (P<0.05), while the necrotic tumor volume in the S. typhimurium with ClyA group and S. typhimurium alone group increased significantly compared to the control group (P<0.01). In

  2. SHMT2 drives glioma cell survival in the tumor microenvironment but imposes a dependence on glycine clearance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohoon; Fiske, Brian P.; Birsoy, Kivanc; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Kami, Kenjiro; Possemato, Richard; Chudnovsky, Yakov; Pacold, Michael E.; Chen, Walter W.; Cantor, Jason R.; Shelton, Laura M.; Gui, Dan Y.; Kwon, Manjae; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Ligon, Keith L.; Kang, Seong Woo; Snuderl, Matija; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer cells adapt their metabolic processes to support rapid proliferation, but less is known about how cancer cells alter metabolism to promote cell survival in a poorly vascularized tumor microenvironment1–3. Here, we identify a key role for serine and glycine metabolism in the survival of brain cancer cells within the ischemic zones of gliomas. In human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT2) and glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) are highly expressed in the pseudopalisading cells that surround necrotic foci. We find that SHMT2 activity limits that of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) and reduces oxygen consumption, eliciting a metabolic state that confers a profound survival advantage to cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions. GLDC inhibition impairs cells with high SHMT2 levels as the excess glycine not metabolized by GLDC can be converted to the toxic molecules aminoacetone and methylglyoxal. Thus, SHMT2 is required for cancer cells to adapt to the tumor environment, but also renders these cells sensitive to glycine cleavage system inhibition. PMID:25855294

  3. Enhancement in blood-tumor barrier permeability and delivery of liposomal doxorubicin using focused ultrasound and microbubbles: evaluation during tumor progression in a rat glioma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Muna; Park, Juyoung; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Effective drug delivery to brain tumors is often challenging because of the heterogeneous permeability of the ‘blood tumor barrier’ (BTB) along with other factors such as increased interstitial pressure and drug efflux pumps. Focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles can enhance the permeability of the BTB in brain tumors, as well as the blood-brain barrier in the surrounding tissue. In this study, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to characterize the FUS-induced permeability changes of the BTB in a rat glioma model at different times after implantation. 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted in both hemispheres in male rats. At day 9, 14, or 17 days after implantation, FUS-induced BTB disruption using 690 kHz ultrasound and definity microbubbles was performed in one tumor in each animal. Before FUS, liposomal doxorubicin was administered at a dose of 5.67 mg kg-1. This chemotherapy agent was previously shown to improve survival in animal glioma models. The transfer coefficient Ktrans describing extravasation of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA was measured via DCE-MRI before and after sonication. We found that tumor doxorubicin concentrations increased monotonically (823  ±  600, 1817  ±  732 and 2432  ±  448 ng g-1) in the control tumors at 9, 14 and 17 d. With FUS-induced BTB disruption, the doxorubicin concentrations were enhanced significantly (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.0001 at days 9, 14, and 17, respectively) and were greater than the control tumors by a factor of two or more (2222  ±  784, 3687  ±  796 and 5658  ±  821 ng g-1) regardless of the stage of tumor growth. The transfer coefficient Ktrans was significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced compared to control tumors only at day 9 but not at day 14 or 17. These results suggest that FUS-induced enhancements in tumor drug delivery are relatively consistent over time, at least in this tumor model. These results are

  4. Visualization of microvascular proliferation as a tumor infiltration structure in rat glioma specimens using the diffraction-enhanced imaging in-plane CT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Seung-Jun; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ando, Masami; Choi, Gi-Hwan; Kim, Hong-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hong; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2012-03-01

    In order to study potent microenvironments of malignant gliomas with a high- resolution x-ray imaging technique, an injection orthotopic glioma model was made using the Sprague-Dawley rat. Total brain tissue, taken out as an ex vivo model, was examined with diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) computed tomography (CT) acquired with a 35 keV monochromatic x-ray. In the convolution-reconstructed 2D/3D images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 × 12.5 × 25 µm, distinction among necrosis, typical ring-shaped viable tumors, edemas and healthy tissues was clearly observed near the frontal lobe in front of the rat's caudate nucleus. Multiple microvascular proliferations (MVPs) were observed surrounding peritumoral edemas as a tumor infiltration structure. Typical dimensions of tubular MVPs were 130 (diameter) ×250 (length) µm with a partial sprout structure revealed in the 3D reconstructed image. Hyperplasia of cells around vessel walls was revealed with tumor cell infiltration along the perivascular space in microscopic observations of mild MVP during histological analysis. In conclusion, DEI-CT is capable of imaging potent tumor-infiltrating MVP structures surrounding high-grade gliomas.

  5. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wenliang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Bin; Chen, Aanjing; He, Ying; Wang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic mimicry. With suspension microarray technology and in vitro tube formation assays, we identified that astrocytes relied on TGF-β1 to enhance vasculogenic mimicry. We also found that vasculogenic mimicry was inhibited by galunisertib, a promising TGF-β1 inhibitor currently being studied in an ongoing trial in glioma patients. The inhibition was partially attributed to a decrease in autophagy after galunisertib treatment. Moreover, we observed a decrease in VE-cadherin and smooth muscle actin-α expression, as well as down-regulation of Akt and Flk phosphorylation in galunisertib-treated glioma cells. By comparing tumor weight and volume in a xenograft model, we acquired promising results to support our theory. This study expands our understanding of the role of astrocytes in gliomas and demonstrates that galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry induced by astrocytes. PMID:26976322

  6. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wenliang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Bin; Chen, Aanjing; He, Ying; Wang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic mimicry. With suspension microarray technology and in vitro tube formation assays, we identified that astrocytes relied on TGF-β1 to enhance vasculogenic mimicry. We also found that vasculogenic mimicry was inhibited by galunisertib, a promising TGF-β1 inhibitor currently being studied in an ongoing trial in glioma patients. The inhibition was partially attributed to a decrease in autophagy after galunisertib treatment. Moreover, we observed a decrease in VE-cadherin and smooth muscle actin-α expression, as well as down-regulation of Akt and Flk phosphorylation in galunisertib-treated glioma cells. By comparing tumor weight and volume in a xenograft model, we acquired promising results to support our theory. This study expands our understanding of the role of astrocytes in gliomas and demonstrates that galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry induced by astrocytes. PMID:26976322

  7. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.; and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  8. Serum IgE, tumor epidermal growth factor receptor expression, and inherited polymorphisms associated with glioma survival.

    PubMed

    Wrensch, Margaret; Wiencke, John K; Wiemels, Joe; Miike, Rei; Patoka, Joe; Moghadassi, Michelle; McMillan, Alex; Kelsey, Karl T; Aldape, Kenneth; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Parsa, Andrew T; Sison, Jennette D; Prados, Michael D

    2006-04-15

    In population-based glioma patients, we examined survival in relation to potentially pertinent constitutive polymorphisms, serologic factors, and tumor genetic and protein alterations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), MDM2, and TP53. Subjects were newly diagnosed adults residing in the San Francisco Bay Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Area during 1991 to 1994 and 1997 to 1999 with central neuropathology review (n = 873). Subjects provided blood for serologic studies of IgE and IgG to four herpes viruses and constitutive specimens for genotyping 22 polymorphisms in 13 genes (n = 471). We obtained 595 of 697 astrocytic tumors for marker studies. We determined treatments, vital status, and other factors using registry, interview, medical record, and active follow-up data. Cox regressions for survival were adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, study series, resection versus biopsy only, radiation, and chemotherapy. Using a stringent P < 0.001, glioma survival was associated with ERCC1 C8092A [hazard ratio (HR), 0.72; 95% confidence limits (95% CL), 0.60-0.86; P = 0.0004] and GSTT1 deletion (HR, 1.64; 95% CL, 1.25-2.16; P = 0.0004); glioblastoma patients with elevated IgE had 9 months longer survival than those with normal or borderline IgE levels (HR, 0.62; 95% CL, 0.47-0.82; P = 0.0007), and EGFR expression in anaplastic astrocytoma was associated with nearly 3-fold poorer survival (HR, 2.97; 95% CL, 1.70-5.19; P = 0.0001). Based on our and others' findings, we recommend further studies to (a) understand relationships of elevated IgE levels and other immunologic factors with improved glioblastoma survival potentially relevant to immunologic therapies and (b) determine which inherited ERCC1 variants or other variants in the 19q13.3 region influence survival. We also suggest that tumor EGFR expression be incorporated into clinical evaluation of anaplastic astrocytoma patients. PMID:16618782

  9. Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor (PEDF) Expression Induced by EGFRvIII Promotes Self-renewal and Tumor Progression of Glioma Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jinlong; Park, Gunwoo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Hong, Jun Hee; Kim, Youn-Jae; Jin, Xiong; Kang, Sangjo; Jung, Ji-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Yub; Yun, Hyeongsun; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Minkyung; Chung, Junho; Kim, Hyunggee; Nakano, Ichiro; Gwak, Ho-Shin; Yoo, Heon; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Jong Heon; Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Jeongwu; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Myung-Jin; Park, Jong Bae

    2015-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been associated with glioma stemness, but the direct molecular mechanism linking the two is largely unknown. Here, we show that EGFRvIII induces the expression and secretion of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), thereby promoting self-renewal and tumor progression of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Mechanistically, PEDF sustained GSC self-renewal by Notch1 cleavage, and the generated intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD) induced the expression of Sox2 through interaction with its promoter region. Furthermore, a subpopulation with high levels of PEDF was capable of infiltration along corpus callosum. Inhibition of PEDF diminished GSC self-renewal and increased survival of orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Together, these data indicate the novel role of PEDF as a key regulator of GSC and suggest clinical implications. PMID:25992628

  10. Living T9 glioma cells expressing membrane macrophage colony-stimulating factor produce immediate tumor destruction by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages via a "paraptosis"-induced pathway that promotes systemic immunity against intracranial T9 gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yijun; Douglass, Thomas; Jeffes, Edward W B; Xu, Qingcheng; Williams, Christopher C; Arpajirakul, Neary; Delgado, Christina; Kleinman, Michael; Sanchez, Ramon; Dan, Qinghong; Kim, Ronald C; Wepsic, H Terry; Jadus, Martin R

    2002-08-15

    Cloned T9-C2 glioma cells transfected with membrane macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mM-CSF) never formed subcutaneous tumors when implanted into Fischer rats, whereas control T9 cells did. The T9-C2 cells were completely killed within 1 day through a mechanism that resembled paraptosis. Vacuolization of the T9-C2 cell's mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum started within 4 hours after implantation. By 24 hours, the dead tumor cells were swollen and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive. Bcl2-transduced T9-C2 cells failed to form tumors in rats. Both T9 and T9-C2 cells produced cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant that recruited the granulocytes into the tumor injection sites, where they interacted with the tumor cells. Freshly isolated macrophages killed the T9-C2 cells in vitro by a mechanism independent of phagocytosis. Nude athymic rats treated with antiasialo GM1 antibody formed T9-C2 tumors, whereas rats treated with a natural killer cell (NK)-specific antibody failed to form tumors. When treated with antipolymorphonuclear leukocyte (anti-PMN) and antimacrophage antibodies, 80% of nude rats formed tumors, whereas only 40% of the rats developed a tumor when a single antibody was used. This suggests that both PMNs and macrophages are involved in the killing of T9-C2 tumor cells. Immunocompetent rats that rejected the living T9-C2 cells were immune to the intracranial rechallenge with T9 cells. No vaccinating effect occurred if the T9-C2 cells were freeze-thawed, x-irradiated, or treated with mitomycin-C prior to injection. Optimal tumor immunization using mM-CSF-transduced T9 cells requires viable tumor cells. In this study optimal tumor immunization occurred when a strong inflammatory response at the injection of the tumor cells was induced. PMID:12149220

  11. The tumoral A genotype of the MGMT rs34180180 single-nucleotide polymorphism in aggressive gliomas is associated with shorter patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Anne; Chautard, Emmanuel; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Pereira, Bruno; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Court, Franck; Biau, Julian; Pinto, Afonso Almeida; Kémény, Jean-Louis; Khalil, Toufic; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie; Verrelle, Pierre; Costa, Bruno Marques; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Grade III and IV gliomas harboring wild-type IDH1/2 are the most aggressive. In addition to surgery and radiotherapy, concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) significantly improves overall survival (OS). The methylation status of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is predictive of TMZ response and a prognostic marker of cancer outcome. However, the promoter regions the methylation of which correlates best with survival in aggressive glioma and whether the promoter methylation status predictive value could be refined or improved by other MGMT-associated molecular markers are not precisely known. In a cohort of 87 malignant gliomas treated with radiotherapy and TMZ-based chemotherapy, we retrospectively determined the MGMT promoter methylation status, genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region and quantified MGMT mRNA expression level. Each of these variables was correlated with each other and with the patients' OS. We found that methylation of the CpG sites within MGMT exon 1 best correlated with OS and MGMT expression levels, and confirmed MGMT methylation as a stronger independent prognostic factor compared to MGMT transcription levels. Our main finding is that the presence of only the A allele at the rs34180180 SNP in the tumor was significantly associated with shorter OS, independently of the MGMT methylation status. In conclusion, in the clinic, rs34180180 SNP genotyping could improve the prognostic value of the MGMT promoter methylation assay in patients with aggressive glioma treated with TMZ. PMID:26717998

  12. Krüppel-Like Factor 8 (KLF8) Is Expressed in Gliomas of Different WHO Grades and Is Essential for Tumor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Oliver; Romagna, Alexander; Jaehnert, Irene; Albrecht, Valerie; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Juerchott, Kathrin; Kretzschmar, Hans; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Schichor, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 8 (KLF8) has only recently been identified to be involved in tumor cell proliferation and invasion of several different tumor entities like renal cell carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and breast cancer. In the present study, we show for the first time the expression of KLF8 in gliomas of different WHO grades and its functional impact on glioma cell proliferation. In order to get information about KLF8-mRNA regulation qPCR was performed and did not reveal any significant difference in samples (n = 10 each) of non-neoplastic brain (NNB), low-grade gliomas (LGG, WHO°II) and glioblastomas (GBM, WHO°IV). Immunohistochemistry of tissue samples (n = 7 LGG, 11 AA and 12 GBM) did not show any significant difference in the fraction of KLF8-immunopositive cells of all analyzed cells in LGG (87%), AA (80%) or GBM (89%). Tissue samples from cerebral breast cancer metastasis, meningiomas but also non-neoplastic brain demonstrated comparable relative cell counts as well. Moreover, there was no correlation between KLF8 expression and the expression pattern of the assumed proliferation marker Ki67, which showed high variability between different tumor grade (9% (LGG), 6% (AA) and 15% (GBM) of Ki67-immunopositive cells). Densitometric analysis of Western blotting revealed that the relative amount of KLF8-protein did also not differ between the highly aggressive and proliferative GBM (1.05) compared to LGG (0.93; p<0.05, studens t-test). As demonstrated for some other non-glial cancer entities, KLF8-knockdown by shRNA in U87-MG cells confirmed its functional relevance, leading to an almost complete loss of tumor cell proliferation. Selective blocking of KLF8 might represent a novel anti-proliferative treatment strategy for malignant gliomas. Yet, its simultaneous expression in non-proliferating tissues could hamper this approach. PMID:22276196

  13. Immunotherapeutic Approaches for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hideho; Kohanbash, Gary; Zhu, Xinmei; Kastenhuber, Edward R.; Hoji, Aki; Ueda, Ryo; Fujita, Mitsugu

    2009-01-01

    The development of effective immunotherapy strategies for glioma requires adequate understanding of the unique immunological microenvironment in the central nervous system (CNS) and CNS tumors. Although the CNS is often considered to be an immunologically privileged site and poses unique challenges for the delivery of effector cells and molecules, recent advances in technology and discoveries in CNS immunology suggest novel mechanisms that may significantly improve the efficacy of immunotherapy against gliomas. In this review, we first summarize recent advances in the CNS and CNS tumor immunology. We address factors that may promote immune escape of gliomas. We also review advances in passive and active immunotherapy strategies for glioma, with an emphasis on lessons learned from recent early-phase clinical trials. We also discuss novel immunotherapy strategies that have been recently tested in non-CNS tumors and show great potential for application to gliomas. Finally, we discuss how each of these promising strategies can be combined to achieve clinical benefit for patients with gliomas. PMID:19348609

  14. Purinergic signaling in glioma progression.

    PubMed

    Braganhol, Elizandra; Wink, Márcia Rosângela; Lenz, Guido; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Among the pathological alterations that give tumor cells invasive potential, purinergic signaling is emerging as an important component. Studies performed in in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo glioma models indicate that alterations in the purinergic signaling are involved in the progression of these tumors. Gliomas have low expression of all E-NTPDases, when compared to astrocytes in culture. Nucleotides induce glioma proliferation and ATP, although potentially neurotoxic, does not evoke cytotoxic action on the majority of glioma cells in culture. The importance of extracellular ATP for glioma pathobiology was confirmed by the reduction in glioma tumor size by apyrase, which degrades extracellular ATP to AMP, and the striking increase in tumor size by over-expression of an ecto-enzyme that degrades ATP to ADP, suggesting the effect of extracellular ATP on the tumor growth depends on the nucleotide produced by its degradation. The participation of purinergic receptors on glioma progression, particularly P2X(7), is involved in the resistance to ATP-induced cell death. Although more studies are necessary, the purinergic signaling, including ectonucleotidases and receptors, may be considered as future target for glioma pharmacological or gene therapy. PMID:22879065

  15. Molecular biology of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; Casado Sáenz, Enrique; Cejas Guerrero, Paloma; Perona, Rosario; González Barón, Manuel

    2006-09-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumours. In keeping with the degree of aggressiveness, gliomas are divided into four grades, with different biological behaviour. Furthermore, as different gliomas share a predominant histological appearance, the final classification includes both, histological features and degree of malignancy. For example, gliomas of astrocytic origin (astrocytomas) are classified into pilocytic astrocytoma (grade I), astrocytoma (grade II), anaplastic astrocytoma (grade III) and glioblastoma multiforme (GMB) (grade IV). Tumors derived from oligodendrocytes include grade II (oliogodendrogliomas) and grade III neoplasms (oligoastrocytoma). Each subtype has a specific prognosis that dictates the clinical management. In this regard, a patient diagnosed with an oligodendroglioma totally removed has 10-15 years of potential survival. On the opposite site, patients carrying a glioblastoma multiforme usually die within the first year after the diagnosis is made. Therefore, different approaches are needed in each case. Obviously, prognosis and biological behaviour of malignant gliomas are closely related and supported by the different molecular background that possesses each type of glioma. Furthermore, the ability that allows several low-grade gliomas to progress into more aggressive tumors has allowed cancer researchers to elucidate several pathways implicated in molecular biology of these devastating tumors. In this review, we describe classical pathways involved in human malignant gliomas with special focus with recent advances, such as glioma stem-like cells and expression patterns from microarray studies. PMID:17005465

  16. Photochemical internalization (PCI) enhanced nonviral transfection of tumor suppressor and pro-drug activating genes; a potential treatment modality for gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Frederick; Zamora, Genesis; Sun, Chung-Ho; Trinidad, Anthony; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen; Kwon, Young Jik; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-03-01

    The overall objective of the research is to investigate the utility of photochemical internalization for the enhanced nonviral transfection of genes into cells. We have examined, in detail, the evaluation of photochemical internalization (PCI) as a method for the non-viral introduction of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN and the PCI mediated transfection of the cytosine deaminase (CD) pro drug activating gene into glioma cell monolayers and multi-cell tumor spheroids. Expression of the CD gene within the target cell produces an enzyme that converts the nontoxic prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), to the toxic metabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU).

  17. Encapsulated therapeutic stem cells implanted in the tumor resection cavity induce cell death in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kauer, Timo M; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Hingtgen, Shawn; Shah, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutically engineered stem cells have shown promise for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) therapy; however, key preclinical studies are urgently needed for their clinical translation. In this study, we investigated a new approach to GBM treatment using therapeutic stem cells encapsulated in biodegradable, synthetic extracellular matrix (sECM) in mouse models of human GBM resection. Using multimodal imaging, we first showed quantitative surgical debulking of human GBM tumors in mice, which resulted in increased survival. Next, sECM encapsulation of engineered stem cells increased their retention in the tumor resection cavity, permitted tumor-selective migration and release of diagnostic and therapeutic proteins in vivo. Simulating the clinical scenario of GBM treatment, the release of tumor-selective S-TRAIL (secretable tumor necrosis factor apoptosis inducing ligand) from sECM-encapsulated stem cells in the resection cavity eradicated residual tumor cells by inducing caspase-mediated apoptosis, delayed tumor regrowth and significantly increased survival of mice. This study demonstrates the efficacy of encapsulated therapeutic stem cells in mouse models of GBM resection and may have implications for developing effective therapies for GBM. PMID:22197831

  18. Sustained Radiosensitization of Hypoxic Glioma Cells after Oxygen Pretreatment in an Animal Model of Glioblastoma and In Vitro Models of Tumor Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Ryon H.; Moosa, Shayan; Anzivino, Matthew; Wang, Yi; Floyd, Desiree Hunt; Purow, Benjamin W.; Lee, Kevin S.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal form of brain cancer and these tumors are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy. Radioresistance is thought to result from a paucity of molecular oxygen in hypoxic tumor regions, resulting in reduced DNA damage and enhanced cellular defense mechanisms. Efforts to counteract tumor hypoxia during radiotherapy are limited by an attendant increase in the sensitivity of healthy brain tissue to radiation. However, the presence of heightened levels of molecular oxygen during radiotherapy, while conventionally deemed critical for adjuvant oxygen therapy to sensitize hypoxic tumor tissue, might not actually be necessary. We evaluated the concept that pre-treating tumor tissue by transiently elevating tissue oxygenation prior to radiation exposure could increase the efficacy of radiotherapy, even when radiotherapy is administered after the return of tumor tissue oxygen to hypoxic baseline levels. Using nude mice bearing intracranial U87-luciferase xenografts, and in vitro models of tumor hypoxia, the efficacy of oxygen pretreatment for producing radiosensitization was tested. Oxygen-induced radiosensitization of tumor tissue was observed in GBM xenografts, as seen by suppression of tumor growth and increased survival. Additionally, rodent and human glioma cells, and human glioma stem cells, exhibited prolonged enhanced vulnerability to radiation after oxygen pretreatment in vitro, even when radiation was delivered under hypoxic conditions. Over-expression of HIF-1α reduced this radiosensitization, indicating that this effect is mediated, in part, via a change in HIF-1-dependent mechanisms. Importantly, an identical duration of transient hyperoxic exposure does not sensitize normal human astrocytes to radiation in vitro. Taken together, these results indicate that briefly pre-treating tumors with elevated levels of oxygen prior to radiotherapy may represent a means for selectively targeting radiation

  19. A Truncated form of CD200 (CD200S) Expressed on Glioma Cells Prolonged Survival in a Rat Glioma Model by Induction of a Dendritic Cell-Like Phenotype in Tumor-Associated Macrophages12

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kana; Yano, Hajime; Umakoshi, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Shirabe; Mise, Ayano; Funahashi, Yu; Ueno, Yoshitomo; Kamei, Yoshiaki; Takada, Yasutsugu; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Ohnishi, Takanori; Tanaka, Junya

    2016-01-01

    CD200 induces immunosuppression in myeloid cells expressing its receptor CD200R, which may have consequences for tumor immunity. We found that human carcinoma tissues express not only full-length CD200 (CD200L) but also its truncated form, CD200S. Although CD200S is reported to antagonize the immunosuppressive actions of CD200L, the role of CD200S in tumor immunity has never been investigated. We established rat C6 glioma cell lines that expressed either CD200L or CD200S; the original C6 cell line did not express CD200 molecules. The cell lines showed no significant differences in growth. Upon transplantation into the neonatal Wistar rat forebrain parenchyma, rats transplanted with C6-CD200S cells survived for a significantly longer period than those transplanted with the original C6 and C6-CD200L cells. The C6-CD200S tumors were smaller than the C6-CD200L or C6-original tumors, and many apoptotic cells were found in the tumor cell aggregates. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in C6-CD200S tumors displayed dendritic cell (DC)-like morphology with multiple processes and CD86 expression. Furthermore, CD3+, CD4+ or CD8+ cells were more frequently found in C6-CD200S tumors, and the expression of DC markers, granzyme, and perforin was increased in C6-CD200S tumors. Isolated TAMs from original C6 tumors were co-cultured with C6-CD200S cells and showed increased expression of DC markers. These results suggest that CD200S activates TAMs to become DC-like antigen presenting cells, leading to the activation of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which induce apoptotic elimination of tumor cells. The findings on CD200S action may provide a novel therapeutic modality for the treatment of carcinomas. PMID:27108386

  20. Molecular Neuropathology of Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Riemenschneider, Markus J.; Reifenberger, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary human brain tumors. They comprise a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms that are histologically classified according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the nervous system. Over the past 20 years the cytogenetic and molecular genetic alterations associated with glioma formation and progression have been intensely studied and genetic profiles as additional aids to the definition of brain tumors have been incorporated in the WHO classification. In fact, first steps have been undertaken in supplementing classical histopathological diagnosis by the use of molecular tests, such as MGMT promoter hypermethylation in glioblastomas or detection of losses of chromosome arms 1p and 19q in oligodendroglial tumors. The tremendous progress that has been made in the use of array-based profiling techniques will likely contribute to a further molecular refinement of glioma classification and lead to the identification of glioma core pathways that can be specifically targeted by more individualized glioma therapies. PMID:19333441

  1. EGFRvIII mCAR-modified T-cell therapy cures mice with established intracerebral glioma and generates host immunity against tumor-antigen loss

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, John H.; Choi, Bryan D.; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Suryadevara, Carter M.; Snyder, David J.; Flores, Catherine T.; Schmittling, Robert J.; Nair, Smita; Reap, Elizabeth A.; Norberg, Pamela K.; Herndon, James E.; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; Morgan, Richard A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Johnson, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) transduced T cells represent a promising immune therapy that has been shown to successfully treat cancers in mice and humans. However, CARs targeting antigens expressed in both tumors and normal tissues have led to significant toxicity. Preclinical studies have been limited by the use of xenograft models that do not adequately recapitulate the immune system of a clinically relevant host. EGFRvIII is a constitutively activated mutant of the naturally occurring epidermal growth factor receptor and is antigenically identical in both human and mouse glioma, but is also completely absent from any normal tissues. Experimental Design We developed a third-generation, EGFRvIII-specific murine CAR (mCAR), and performed tests to determine its efficacy in a fully immune-competent mouse model of malignant glioma. Results At elevated doses, infusion with EGFRvIII mCAR T cells led to cures in all mice with brain tumors. Additionally, antitumor efficacy was found to be dependent on lymphodepletive host conditioning. Selective blockade with EGFRvIII soluble peptide significantly abrogated the activity of EGFRvIII mCAR T cells in vitro and in vivo, and may offer a novel strategy to enhance the safety profile for CAR-based therapy. Lastly, mCAR-treated, cured mice were resistant to rechallenge with EGFRvIIINEG tumors, suggesting generation of host immunity against additional tumor antigens. Conclusion All together, these data support that third-generation, EGFRvIII specific mCARs are effective against gliomas in the brain and highlight the importance of syngeneic, immune-competent models in the preclinical evaluation of tumor immunotherapies. PMID:24352643

  2. Galectins and Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Le Mercier, Marie; Fortin, Shannon; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert; Lefranc, Florence

    2010-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, especially glioblastomas, are associated with a dismal prognosis. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, glioblastoma patients still have a median survival expectancy of only 14 months. This poor prognosis can be at least partly explained by the fact that glioma cells diffusely infiltrate the brain parenchyma and exhibit decreased levels of apoptosis, and thus resistance to cytotoxic drugs. Galectins are a family of mammalian beta-galactoside-binding proteins characterized by a shared characteristic amino acid sequence. They are expressed differentially in normal vs. neoplastic tissues and are known to play important roles in several biological processes such as cell proliferation, death and migration. This review focuses on the role played by galectins, especially galectin-1 and galectin-3, in glioma biology. The involvement of these galectins in different steps of glioma malignant progression such as migration, angiogenesis or chemoresistance makes them potentially good targets for the development of new drugs to combat these malignant tumors. PMID:19371355

  3. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging of Glioma: Update on Current Imaging Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Charlie Chia-Tsong; Watkins, Trevor William; Kwan, Gigi Nga Chi; Haacke, E Mark

    2016-07-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) provides invaluable insight into glioma pathophysiology and internal tumoral architecture. The physical contribution of intratumoral susceptibility signal (ITSS) may correspond to intralesional hemorrhage, calcification, or tumoral neovascularity. In this review, we present emerging evidence of ITSS for assessment of intratumoral calcification, grading of glioma, and factors influencing the pattern of ITSS in glioblastoma. SWI phase imaging assists in identification of intratumoral calcification that aids in narrowing the differential diagnosis. Development of intratumoral calcification posttreatment of glioma serves as an imaging marker of positive therapy response. Grading of tumors with ITSS using information attributed to microhemorrhage and neovascularity in SWI correlates with MR perfusion parameters and histologic grading of glioma and enriches preoperative prognosis. Quantitative susceptibility mapping may provide a means to discriminate subtle calcifications and hemorrhage in tumor imaging. Recent data suggest ITSS patterns in glioblastoma vary depending on tumoral volume and sublocation and correlate with degree of intratumoral necrosis and neovascularity. Increasingly, there is a recognized role of obtaining contrast-enhanced SWI (CE-SWI) for assessment of tumoral margin in high-grade glioma. Significant higher concentration of gadolinium accumulates at the border of the tumoral invasion zone as seen on the SWI sequence; this results from contrast-induced phase shift that clearly delineates the tumor margin. Lastly, absence of ITSS may aid in differentiation between high-grade glioma and primary CNS lymphoma, which typically shows absence of ITSS. We conclude that SWI and CE-SWI are indispensable tools for diagnosis, preoperative grading, posttherapy surveillance, and assessment of glioma. PMID:27227542

  4. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  5. 70-kDa heat shock protein coated magnetic nanocarriers as a nanovaccine for induction of anti-tumor immune response in experimental glioma.

    PubMed

    Shevtsov, Maxim A; Nikolaev, Boris P; Yakovleva, Liudmila Y; Parr, Marina A; Marchenko, Yaroslav Y; Eliseev, Igor; Yudenko, Anna; Dobrodumov, Anatolii V; Zlobina, Olga; Zhakhov, Alexander; Ischenko, Alexander M; Pitkin, Emil; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2015-12-28

    Nanovaccines based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) provide a novel approach to induce the humoral and cell-based immune system to fight cancer. Herein, we increased the immunostimulatory capacity of SPIONs by coating them with recombinant heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) which is known to chaperone antigenic peptides. After binding, Hsp70-SPIONs deliver immunogenic peptides from tumor lysates to dendritiс cells (DCs) and thus stimulate a tumor-specific, CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response. We could show that binding activity of Hsp70-SPIONs to the substrate-binding domain (SBD) is highly dependent on the ATPase activity of its nucleotide-binding domain NBD), as shown by (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Immunization of C6 glioma-bearing rats with DCs pulsed with Hsp70-SPIONs and tumor lysates resulted in a delayed tumor progression (as measured by MRI) and an increased overall survival. In parallel an increased IFNγ secretion were detected in the serum of these animals and immunohistological analysis of subsequent cryosections of the glioma revealed an enhanced infiltration of memory CD45RO+ and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Taken together the study demonstrates that magnetic nanocarriers such as SPIONs coated with Hsp70 can be applied as a platform for boosting anti-cancer immune responses. PMID:26522072

  6. Standard of care and future pharmacological treatment options for malignant glioma: an urgent need for screening and identification of novel tumor-specific antigens

    PubMed Central

    Batich, Kristen A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malignant gliomas (MGs) represent the most common primary brain tumors in adults, the most deadly of which is grade IV glioblastoma. Patients with glioblastoma undergoing current standard-of-care therapy have a median survival of 12 – 15 months. Areas covered Over the past 25 years, there have been modest advancements in the treatment of MGs. Assessment of therapeutic responses has continued to evolve to account for the increasing number of agents being tested in the clinic. Currently approved therapies for primary tumors have been extended for use in the setting of recurrent disease with modest efficacy. Agents initially approved for recurrent gliomas have begun to demonstrate efficacy against de novo tumors but will ultimately need to be evaluated in future studies for scheduling, timing and dosing relative to chemotherapy. Expert opinion Screening and identification of tumor-specific mutations is critical for the advancement of effective therapy that is both safe and precise for the patient. Two unique antigens found in glioblastoma are currently being employed as targets for immunotherapeutic vaccines, one of which has advanced to Phase III testing. Whole genome sequencing of MGs has yielded two other novel mutations that offer great promise for the development of molecular inhibitors. PMID:25139628

  7. Nitroxoline induces apoptosis and slows glioma growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lazovic, Jelena; Guo, Lea; Nakashima, Jonathan; Mirsadraei, Leili; Yong, William; Kim, Hyun J.; Ellingson, Benjamin; Wu, Hong; Pope, Whitney B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nitroxoline is an FDA-approved antibiotic with potential antitumor activity. Here we evaluated whether nitroxoline has antiproliferative properties on glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo using glioma cell lines and a genetically engineered PTEN/KRAS mouse glioma model. Methods The effect of nitroxoline treatment on U87 and/or U251 glioma cell proliferation, cell-cycle arrest, invasion, and ability to induce an apoptotic cascade was determined in vitro. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure glioma volumes in genetically engineered PTEN/KRAS mice prior to and after nitroxoline therapy. Induction of apoptosis by nitroxoline was evaluated at the end of treatment using terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase (TDT)-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results Nitroxoline inhibited the proliferation and invasion of glioblastoma cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner in vitro. Growth inhibition was associated with cell-cycle arrest in G1/G0 phase and induction of apoptosis via caspase 3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. In vivo, nitroxoline-treated mice had no increase in tumor volume after 14 days of treatment, whereas tumor volumes doubled in control mice. Histological examination revealed 15%–20% TUNEL-positive cells in nitroxoline-treated mice, compared with ∼5% in the control group. Conclusion Nitroxoline induces apoptosis and inhibits glioma growth in vivo and in vitro. As an already FDA-approved treatment for urinary tract infections with a known safety profile, nitroxoline could move quickly into clinical trials pending confirmatory studies. PMID:25074541

  8. Cellular Host Responses to Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Barish, Michael E.; Garcia, Elizabeth; Metz, Marianne Z.; Myers, Sarah M.; Gutova, Margarita; Frank, Richard T.; Miletic, Hrvoje; Kendall, Stephen E.; Glackin, Carlotta A.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Aboody, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. Methodology/Principal Findings Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a ‘network’ with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a ‘pair-wise’ manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a) low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats) were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b) high-generation xenografts (fifth passage) had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with ‘glomerulus-like’ microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  9. Impact of tumor location and pathological discordance on survival of children with midline high-grade gliomas treated on Children’s Cancer Group high-grade glioma study CCG-945

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Ian F.; Demers, Alain; Sapp, Mark V.; Lambert, Pascal; Weisfeld-Adams, James D.; Burger, Peter C.; Gilles, Floyd; Davis, Richard L.; Packer, Roger; Boyett, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Children with high-grade glioma (HGG) have a poor prognosis compared to those with low-grade glioma (LGG). Adjuvant chemotherapy may be beneficial, but its optimal use remains undetermined. Histology and extent of resection are important prognostic factors. We tested the hypothesis that patients with midline HGG treated on Children’s Cancer Group Study (CCG) CCG-945 have a worse prognosis compared to the entire group. Of 172 children eligible for analysis, 60 had midline tumors primarily localized to the thalamus, hypothalamus and basal ganglia. Time-to-progression and death were determined from the date of initial diagnosis, and survival curves were calculated. Univariate analyses were undertaken for extent of resection, chemotherapy regimen, anatomic location, histology, proliferation index, MGMT status and p53 over-expression. For the entire midline tumor group, 5-year PFS and OS were 18.3 ± 4.8 and 25 ± 5.4 %, respectively. Many patients only had a biopsy (43.3 %). The sub-groups with near/total resection and hypothalamic location appeared to have better PFS and OS. However, the effect of tumor histology on OS was significant for children with discordant diagnoses on central pathology review of LGG compared to HGG. Proliferative index (MIB-1 > 36 %), MGMT and p53 over-expression correlated with poor outcomes. Children treated on CCG-945 with midline HGG have a worse prognosis when compared to the entire group. The midline location may directly influence the extent of resection. Central pathology review and entry of patients on clinical trials continue to be priorities to improve outcomes for children with HGG. PMID:25431150

  10. Impact of tumor location and pathological discordance on survival of children with midline high-grade gliomas treated on Children's Cancer Group high-grade glioma study CCG-945.

    PubMed

    Eisenstat, David D; Pollack, Ian F; Demers, Alain; Sapp, Mark V; Lambert, Pascal; Weisfeld-Adams, James D; Burger, Peter C; Gilles, Floyd; Davis, Richard L; Packer, Roger; Boyett, James M; Finlay, Jonathan L

    2015-02-01

    Children with high-grade glioma (HGG) have a poor prognosis compared to those with low-grade glioma (LGG). Adjuvant chemotherapy may be beneficial, but its optimal use remains undetermined. Histology and extent of resection are important prognostic factors. We tested the hypothesis that patients with midline HGG treated on Children's Cancer Group Study (CCG) CCG-945 have a worse prognosis compared to the entire group. Of 172 children eligible for analysis, 60 had midline tumors primarily localized to the thalamus, hypothalamus and basal ganglia. Time-to-progression and death were determined from the date of initial diagnosis, and survival curves were calculated. Univariate analyses were undertaken for extent of resection, chemotherapy regimen, anatomic location, histology, proliferation index, MGMT status and p53 over-expression. For the entire midline tumor group, 5-year PFS and OS were 18.3 ± 4.8 and 25 ± 5.4 %, respectively. Many patients only had a biopsy (43.3 %). The sub-groups with near/total resection and hypothalamic location appeared to have better PFS and OS. However, the effect of tumor histology on OS was significant for children with discordant diagnoses on central pathology review of LGG compared to HGG. Proliferative index (MIB-1 > 36 %), MGMT and p53 over-expression correlated with poor outcomes. Children treated on CCG-945 with midline HGG have a worse prognosis when compared to the entire group. The midline location may directly influence the extent of resection. Central pathology review and entry of patients on clinical trials continue to be priorities to improve outcomes for children with HGG. PMID:25431150

  11. Tumor-specific activation of the C-JUN/MELK pathway regulates glioma stem cell growth in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunyu; Banasavadi-Siddegowda, Yeshavanth K; Joshi, Kaushal; Nakamura, Yuko; Kurt, Habibe; Gupta, Snehalata; Nakano, Ichiro

    2013-05-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that glioma stem cells (GSCs) may contribute to therapy resistance in high-grade glioma (HGG). Although recent studies have shown that the serine/threonine kinase maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK) is abundantly expressed in various cancers, the function and mechanism of MELK remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that MELK depletion by shRNA diminishes the growth of GSC-derived mouse intracranial tumors in vivo, induces glial fibrillary acidic protein (+) glial differentiation of GSCs leading to decreased malignancy of the resulting tumors, and prolongs survival periods of tumor-bearing mice. Tissue microarray analysis with 91 HGG tumors demonstrates that the proportion of MELK (+) cells is a statistically significant indicator of postsurgical survival periods. Mechanistically, MELK is regulated by the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling and forms a complex with the oncoprotein c-JUN in GSCs but not in normal progenitors. MELK silencing induces p53 expression, whereas p53 inhibition induces MELK expression, indicating that MELK and p53 expression are mutually exclusive. Additionally, MELK silencing-mediated GSC apoptosis is partially rescued by both pharmacological p53 inhibition and p53 gene silencing, indicating that MELK action in GSCs is p53 dependent. Furthermore, irradiation of GSCs markedly elevates MELK mRNA and protein expression both in vitro and in vivo. Clinically, recurrent HGG tumors following the failure of radiation and chemotherapy exhibit a statistically significant elevation of MELK protein compared with untreated newly diagnosed HGG tumors. Together, our data indicate that GSCs, but not normal cells, depend on JNK-driven MELK/c-JUN signaling to regulate their survival, maintain GSCs in an immature state, and facilitate tumor radioresistance in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:23339114

  12. Calcification on CT is a simple and valuable preoperative indicator of 1p/19q loss of heterozygosity in supratentorial brain tumors that are suspected grade II and III gliomas.

    PubMed

    Saito, Taiichi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Komori, Takashi; Tamura, Manabu; Nitta, Masayuki; Tsuzuki, Shunsuke; Kawamata, Takakazu

    2016-07-01

    Gliomas with 1p/19q loss of heterozygosity (LOH) are known to be associated with longer patient survival and higher sensitivity to treatment than tumors without 1p/19q LOH. This study was designed to clarify whether the preoperative finding of calcification on CT was correlated with 1p/19q LOH in patients with suspected WHO grade II and III gliomas. This study included 250 adult patients who underwent resection for primary supratentorial tumors at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital. The tumors were suspected, based on MRI findings, to be WHO grade II or III gliomas. The presence of calcification on the patients' CT images was qualitatively evaluated before treatment. After surgery, the resected tumors were examined to determine their 1p/19q status and mutations of IDH1 and p53. The presence of calcification was significantly correlated with 1p/19q LOH (P < 0.0001), with a positive predictive value of 91 %. The tumors of all the 78 patients with calcification were diagnosed as oligodendroglial tumors. Seventy of these patients showed classic oligodendroglial features, while 8 patients showed non-classic features. Calcification on CT is a simple and valuable preoperative indicator of 1p/19q LOH in supratentorial brain tumors that are suspected to be WHO grade II and III gliomas. PMID:26849373

  13. The VHL tumor suppressor protein regulates tumorigenicity of U87-derived glioma stem-like cells by inhibiting the JAK/STAT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hiroshi; Sato, Hidemitsu; Yokoyama, Taka-Akira; Yoshizumi, Tetsuya; Yamada, Sachiko

    2013-03-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) factor plays an important role in the tumorigenicity of cancer stem cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of this pathway acting through the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein in glioma cancer stem cells. We isolated floating neurosphere-forming CD133+ cells as glioma stem-like cells (GSLCs) by the MACS method. Furthermore, we examined these cells for their growth rate, ability to form colonies and neurospheres in soft agar, capacity for implantation into SCID mice and expression of CD133, STAT3, JAK2, Elongin A, PTEN and VHL. Furthermore, we transferred the VHL gene, an inhibitor of STAT3, into GSLCs using an adenovirus vector and compared these transfectants with control vector-transfected GSLCs. GSLCs proved to be implantable and formed a tumor in the subcutaneous tissue of SCID mice, the histology of which was similar to that of human glioblastomas. In addition, GSLCs exhibited a high capacity for soft agar colony and neurosphere formation, nearly all of which were CD133 positive. The majority of GSLCs were immunopositive for STAT3, JAK2 and Elongin A, but immunonegative for PTEN and VHL. When the VHL gene was transferred to GSLCs and these cells were transplanted into SCID mice, they did not result in tumor formation. Their capacity for soft agar colony and neurosphere formation was significantly inhibited, although their proliferation was only moderately inhibited. Regarding the expression of various factors, that of CD133 was decreased in the VHL transfectants and those of STAT3, JAK2 and Elongin A were eliminated. However, the expression of PTEN and of VHL was upregulated. These findings suggest that VHL regulated the tumorigenicity and self-renewal ability of glioma cancer stem cells by inhibiting the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. PMID:23338840

  14. Management of multifocal and multicentric gliomas.

    PubMed

    Patil, Chirag G; Eboli, Paula; Hu, Jethro

    2012-04-01

    The diffuse nature of gliomas has long confounded attempts at achieving a definitive cure. The advent of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging made it increasingly apparent that gliomas could have a multifocal or multicentric appearance. Treating these tumors is the summit of an already daunting challenge, because the obstacles that must be surmounted to treat gliomas in general, namely, their heterogeneity, diffuse nature, and ability to insidiously invade normal brain, are more conspicuous in this subset of tumors. PMID:22440877

  15. Cognitive Rehabilitation in Patients with Gliomas and Other Brain Tumors: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, G.; Pambuku, A.; Della Puppa, A.; Bellu, L.; D'Avella, D.; Zagonel, V.

    2016-01-01

    Disease prognosis is very poor in patients with brain tumors. Cognitive deficits due to disease or due to its treatment have an important weight on the quality of life of patients and caregivers. Studies often take into account quality of life as a fundamental element in the management of disease and interventions have been developed for cognitive rehabilitation of neuropsychological deficits with the aim of improving the quality of life and daily-life autonomy of patients. In this literature review, we will consider the published studies of cognitive rehabilitation over the past 20 years. PMID:27493954

  16. Glioma oncoprotein Bcl2L12 inhibits the p53 tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Stegh, Alexander H.; Brennan, Cameron; Mahoney, John A.; Forloney, Kristin L.; Jenq, Harry T.; Luciano, Janina P.; Protopopov, Alexei; Chin, Lynda; DePinho, Ronald A.

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor characterized by intense apoptosis resistance and extensive necrosis. Bcl2L12 (for Bcl2-like 12) is a cytoplasmic and nuclear protein that is overexpressed in primary GBM and functions to inhibit post-mitochondrial apoptosis signaling. Here, we show that nuclear Bcl2L12 physically and functionally interacts with the p53 tumor suppressor, as evidenced by the capacity of Bcl2L12 to (1) enable bypass of replicative senescence without concomitant loss of p53 or p19Arf, (2) inhibit p53-dependent DNA damage-induced apoptosis, (3) impede the capacity of p53 to bind some of its target gene promoters, and (4) attenuate endogenous p53-directed transcriptomic changes following genotoxic stress. Correspondingly, The Cancer Genome Atlas profile and tissue protein analyses of human GBM specimens show significantly lower Bcl2L12 expression in the setting of genetic p53 pathway inactivation. Thus, Bcl2L12 is a multifunctional protein that contributes to intense therapeutic resistance of GBM through its ability to operate on two key nodes of cytoplasmic and nuclear signaling cascades. PMID:20837658

  17. Molecular classification of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Mischel, Paul S; Reifenberger, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic profiles in different types of gliomas has revealed novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers for refinement of glioma classification and improved prediction of therapy response and outcome. Therefore, the new (2016) World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system breaks with the traditional principle of diagnosis based on histologic criteria only and incorporates molecular markers. This will involve a multilayered approach combining histologic features and molecular information in an "integrated diagnosis". We review the current state of diagnostic molecular markers for gliomas, focusing on isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) gene mutation, α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in adult tumors, as well as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) and H3 histone family 3A (H3F3A) aberrations in pediatric gliomas. We also outline prognostic and predictive molecular markers, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and discuss the potential clinical relevance of biologic glioblastoma subtypes defined by integration of multiomics data. Commonly used methods for individual marker detection as well as novel large-scale DNA methylation profiling and next-generation sequencing approaches are discussed. Finally, we illustrate how advances in molecular diagnostics affect novel strategies of targeted therapy, thereby raising new challenges and identifying new leads for personalized treatment of glioma patients. PMID:26948350

  18. Inhibition of STAT3 and ErbB2 Suppresses Tumor Growth, Enhances Radiosensitivity, and Induces Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptosis in Glioma Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Ling; Li Fengsheng; Dong Bo; Zhang Junquan; Rao Yalan; Cong Yue; Mao Bingzhi; Chen Xiaohua

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and ErbB2 are involved in the pathogenesis of many tumors, including astrocytoma. Inactivation of these molecules is reported to result in radiosensitization. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether inhibition of STAT3, ErbB2, or both could enhance radiotherapy in the human glioma model (U251 and U87 cell lines). Methods and Materials: The RNAi plasmids targeting STAT3 or ErbB2 were constructed, and their downregulatory effects on target proteins were examined by immunoblotting. After combination treatment of RNAi with or without irradiation, the cell viability was determined using 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and clonogenic assays. The in vivo effect of combined treatment was determined using the U251 xenograft model. The apoptosis caused by the inhibition of STAT3 and ErbB2 was detected, and the mechanism involved in the apoptosis was investigated, including increases in caspase proteins, mitochondrial damage, and the expression of key modulating protein of different apoptosis pathways. Results: Transfection of U251 cells with STAT3 or ErbB2 siRNA plasmids specifically reduced their target gene expressions. Inhibition of STAT3 or ErbB2 greatly decreased glioma cell survival after 2, 4, or 6 Gy irradiation. Inhibition of STAT3 and ErbB2 also enhanced radiation-induced tumor growth inhibition in the U251 xenograft model. Furthermore, the suppression of either STAT3 or ErbB2 could induce U251 cell apoptosis, which was related primarily to the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Conclusions: These results indicated that simultaneous inhibition of STAT3 and ErbB2 expression can promote potent antitumor activity and radiosensitizing activity in human glioma.

  19. Pharmacological Doses of Daily Ascorbate Protect Tumors from Radiation Damage after a Single Dose of Radiation in an Intracranial Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah V.; Castro, M. Leticia; Field, Cameron S.; Schleich, Nanette; McConnell, Melanie J.; Herst, Patries M.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumor environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionizing radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitizing GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here, we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy) of radiation combined with a 1 h exposure to ascorbate (5 mM) sensitized murine glioma GL261 cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy) of whole brain radiation combined with daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg) in an intracranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain 8 days after tumor implantation, a second group received daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8–45) after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumor progression, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumor progression. Tumor progression was faster in tumor-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than in those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumors treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumor microenvironment, which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant, or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant. PMID:25566497

  20. Comprehensive management of head and neck tumors, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Thawley, S.E.; Panje, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 14 parts, each containing several papers. The parts are: General Considerations in the Management of Patients with Head and Neck Tumors, Tumors of the Ear, Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses, Tumors of the Oral Cavity, Tumors of the Pharynx, Tumors of the Larynx, Tumors of the Skin, Dental and Jaw Tumors, Tumors of the Thyroid and Parathyroid Glands, Tumors of the Trachea, Tumors of the Eye, Orbit, and Lacrimal Apparatus, and Special Topics.

  1. Estimation of rat mammary tumor volume using caliper and ultrasonography measurements.

    PubMed

    Faustino-Rocha, Ana; Oliveira, Paula A; Pinho-Oliveira, Jacinta; Teixeira-Guedes, Catarina; Soares-Maia, Ruben; da Costa, Rui Gil; Colaço, Bruno; Pires, Maria João; Colaço, Jorge; Ferreira, Rita; Ginja, Mário

    2013-06-01

    Mammary tumors similar to those observed in women can be induced in rats by intraperitoneal administration of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Determining tumor volume is a useful and quantitative way to monitor tumor progression. In this study, the authors measured dimensions of rat mammary tumors using a caliper and using real-time compound B-mode ultrasonography. They then used different formulas to calculate tumor volume from these tumor measurements and compared the calculated tumor volumes with the real tumor volume to identify the formulas that gave the most accurate volume calculations. They found that caliper and ultrasonography measurements were significantly correlated but that tumor volumes calculated using different formulas varied substantially. Mammary tumors seemed to take on an oblate spheroid geometry. The most accurate volume calculations were obtained using the formula V = (W(2) × L)/2 for caliper measurements and the formula V = (4/3) × π × (L/2) × (L/2) × (D/2) for ultrasonography measurements, where V is tumor volume, W is tumor width, L is tumor length and D is tumor depth. PMID:23689461

  2. Circulating glioma biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kros, Johan M.; Mustafa, Dana M.; Dekker, Lennard J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.; Luider, Theo M.; Zheng, Ping-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Validated biomarkers for patients suffering from gliomas are urgently needed for standardizing measurements of the effects of treatment in daily clinical practice and trials. Circulating body fluids offer easily accessible sources for such markers. This review highlights various categories of tumor-associated circulating biomarkers identified in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioma patients, including circulating tumor cells, exosomes, nucleic acids, proteins, and oncometabolites. The validation and potential clinical utility of these biomarkers is briefly discussed. Although many candidate circulating protein biomarkers were reported, none of these have reached the required validation to be introduced for clinical practice. Recent developments in tracing circulating tumor cells and their derivatives as exosomes and circulating nuclear acids may become more successful in providing useful biomarkers. It is to be expected that current technical developments will contribute to the finding and validation of circulating biomarkers. PMID:25253418

  3. AngioMatrix, a signature of the tumor angiogenic switch-specific matrisome, correlates with poor prognosis for glioma and colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Tristan; Arnold, Christiane; van der Heyden, Michaël; Orend, Gertraud; Hussenet, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis represents a rate-limiting step during tumor progression. Targeting angiogenesis is already applied in cancer treatment, yet limits of anti-angiogenic therapies have emerged, notably because tumors adapt and recur after treatment. Therefore, there is a strong need to better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying tumor angiogenesis. Using the RIP1-Tag2 transgenic murine model, we identified 298 genes that are deregulated during the angiogenic switch, revealing an ingression/expansion of specific stromal cell types including endothelial cells and pericytes, but also macrophages and perivascular mesenchymal cells. Canonical TGF-β signaling is up-regulated during the angiogenic switch, especially in tumor-associated macrophages and fibroblasts. The matrisome, comprising extracellular matrix (ECM) and ECM-associated molecules, is significantly enriched, which allowed us to define the AngioMatrix signature as the 110 matrisomal genes induced during the RIP1-Tag2 angiogenic switch. Several AngioMatrix molecules were validated at expression level. Ablation of tenascin-C, one of the most highly induced ECM molecules during the switch, resulted in reduced angiogenesis confirming its important role. In human glioma and colorectal samples, the AngioMatrix signature correlates with the expression of endothelial cell markers, is increased with tumor progression and finally correlates with poor prognosis demonstrating its diagnostic and therapeutic potential. PMID:25301723

  4. Phenotypic Transition as a Survival Strategy of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    ICHIKAWA, Tomotsugu; OTANI, Yoshihiro; KUROZUMI, Kazuhiko; DATE, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Malignant glioma is characterized by rapid proliferation, invasion into surrounding central nervous system tissues, and aberrant vascularization. There is increasing evidence that shows gliomas are more complex than previously thought, as each tumor comprises considerable intratumoral heterogeneity with mixtures of genetically and phenotypically distinct subclones. Heterogeneity within and across tumors is recognized as a critical factor that limits therapeutic progress for malignant glioma. Recent genotyping and expression profiling of gliomas has allowed for the creation of classification schemes that assign tumors to subtypes based on similarity to defined expression signatures. Also, malignant gliomas frequently shift their biological features upon recurrence and progression. The ability of glioma cells to resist adverse conditions such as hypoxia and metabolic stress is necessary for sustained tumor growth and strongly influences tumor behaviors. In general, glioma cells are in one of two phenotypic categories: higher proliferative activity with angiogenesis, or higher migratory activity with attenuated proliferative ability. Further, they switch phenotypic categories depending on the situation. To date, a multidimensional approach has been employed to clarify the mechanisms of phenotypic shift of glioma. Various molecular and signaling pathways are involved in phenotypic shifts of glioma, possibly with crosstalk between them. In this review, we discuss molecular and phenotypic heterogeneity of glioma cells and mechanisms of phenotypic shifts in regard to the glioma proliferation, angiogenesis, and invasion. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypic shifts of glioma may provide new insights into targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:27169497

  5. Tumor response parameters for head and neck cancer derived from tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The main goal of this paper is to reconstruct a distribution of cell survival fractions from tumor-volume variation for a heterogeneous group of head and neck cancer patients and compare this distribution to the data from predictive assays. Methods: To characterize the tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy treatment, the authors use a two-level tumor-volume model of cell population that separates the entire tumor cell population into two subpopulations of viable cells and lethally damaged cells. This parameterized radiobiological model is integrated with a least squares objective function and a simulated annealing optimization algorithm to describe time-dependent tumor-volume variation rates in individual patients. Several constraints have been used in the optimization problem because tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy is described by a sum of exponentials; therefore, the problem of accurately fitting a model to measured data is ill-posed. The model was applied to measured tumor-volume variation curves from a clinical study on tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy for 14 head and neck cancer patients in which an integrated CT/linear particle accelerator (LINAC) system was used for tumor-volume measurements. Results: The two-level cell population tumor-volume modeling is capable of describing tumor-volume variation throughout the entire treatment for 11 of the 14 patients. For three patients, the tumor-volume variation was described only during the initial part of treatment, a fact that may be related to the neglected hypoxia in the two-level approximation. The predicted probability density distribution for the survival fractions agrees with the data obtained using in vitro studies with predictive assays. The mean value 0.35 of survival fraction obtained in this study is larger than the value 0.32 from in vitro studies, which could be expected because of greater repair in vivo. The mean half-life obtained in this study for the head

  6. Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Low Grade Gliomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Melanocytic Lesion; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  7. Risk factors for astrocytic glioma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the brain in young children: a report from the Children's Cancer Group.

    PubMed

    Bunin, G R; Buckley, J D; Boesel, C P; Rorke, L B; Meadows, A T

    1994-01-01

    We conducted a matched case-control study to investigate risk factors for the two most common types of brain tumors in children, astrocytic glioma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). Since the study focused on gestational exposures, we restricted it to young children because these exposures would be expected to act early in life. Parents of 155 astrocytic glioma cases, 166 PNET cases, and controls identified by random digit dialing completed telephone interviews. Few associations occurred with the hypothesized risk factors, which were gestational exposure to alcohol, hair coloring products, farms, and substances containing N-nitroso compounds (passive smoking, makeup, incense, new cars, pacifiers, baby bottles, beer). Of the products studied that contain N-nitroso compounds, only beer was associated with a significantly increased risk of either tumor type [odds ratio (OR) for PNET = 4.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-22.1; P = 0.04]. Elevated ORs for PNET were observed for farm residence of the mother during the pregnancy (OR = 3.7; 95% CI, 0.8-23.9; P = 0.06) and of the child for at least a year (OR = 5.0; 95% CI, 1.1-46.8; P = 0.04). Significant associations with astrocytoma were observed for mother's use of kerosene (OR = 8.9; 95% CI, 1.1-71.1; P = 0.04) and birth by Caesarean section (OR = 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-3.2; P = 0.03). History of miscarriage was associated with a lower risk of PNET (OR = 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9; P = 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8019366

  8. Pediatric gliomas as neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Baker, Suzanne J; Ellison, David W; Gutmann, David H

    2016-06-01

    Brain tumors represent the most common solid tumor of childhood, with gliomas comprising the largest fraction of these cancers. Several features distinguish them from their adult counterparts, including their natural history, causative genetic mutations, and brain locations. These unique properties suggest that the cellular and molecular etiologies that underlie their development and maintenance might be different from those that govern adult gliomagenesis and growth. In this review, we discuss the genetic basis for pediatric low-grade and high-grade glioma in the context of developmental neurobiology, and highlight the differences between histologically-similar tumors arising in children and adults. GLIA 2016;64:879-895. PMID:26638183

  9. Further Confirmation of Germline Glioma Risk Variant rs78378222 in TP53 and Its Implication in Tumor Tissues via Integrative Analysis of TCGA Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoming; Rajaraman, Preetha; Melin, Beatrice S.; Chung, Charles C.; Zhang, Weijia; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Michaud, Dominique; Yeager, Meredith; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Andersson, Ulrika; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Carreón, Tania; Feychting, Maria; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Hallmans, Goran; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Inskip, Peter D.; Kitahara, Cari M.; Le Marchand, Loic; Linet, Martha S.; Li, Shengchao; Peters, Ulrike; Purdue, Mark P.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Stampfer, Meir; Stevens, Victoria L.; Visvanathan, Kala; Wang, Sophia S.; White, Emily; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Hoover, Robert; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Hartge, Patricia; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    We confirmed strong association of rs78378222:A>C (per allele odds ratio [OR] = 3.14; P = 6.48 × 10−11), a germline rare single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in TP53, via imputation of a genome-wide association study of glioma (1,856 cases and 4,955 controls). We subsequently performed integrative analyses on the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data for GBM (glioblastoma multiforme) and LUAD (lung adenocarcinoma). Based on SNP data, we imputed genotypes for rs78378222 and selected individuals carrying rare risk allele (C). Using RNA sequencing data, we observed aberrant transcripts with ~3 kb longer than normal for those individuals. Using exome sequencing data, we further showed that loss of haplotype carrying common protective allele (A) occurred somatically in GBM but not in LUAD. Our bioinformatic analysis suggests rare risk allele (C) disrupts mRNA termination, and an allelic loss of a genomic region harboring common protective allele (A) occurs during tumor initiation or progression for glioma. PMID:25907361

  10. p190RhoGAP can act to inhibit PDGF-induced gliomas in mice: a putative tumor suppressor encoded on human Chromosome 19q13.3

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Rebecca M.; Draghi, Nicole; Liang, Xiquan; Dai, Chengkai; Uhrbom, Lene; Eklöf, Charlotta; Westermark, Bengt; Holland, Eric C.; Resh, Marilyn D.

    2003-01-01

    p190RhoGAP and Rho are key regulators of oligodendrocyte differentiation. The gene encoding p190RhoGAP is located at 19q13.3 of the human chromosome, a locus that is deleted in 50%–80% of oligodendrogliomas. Here we provide evidence that p190RhoGAP may suppress gliomagenesis by inducing a differentiated glial phenotype. Using a cell culture model of autocrine loop PDGF stimulation, we show that reduced Rho activity via p190RhoGAP overexpression or Rho kinase inhibition induced cellular process extension, a block in proliferation, and reduced expression of the neural precursor marker nestin. In vivo infection of mice with retrovirus expressing PDGF and the p190 GAP domain caused a decreased incidence of oligodendrogliomas compared with that observed with PDGF alone. Independent experiments revealed that the retroviral vector insertion site in 3 of 50 PDGF-induced gliomas was within the p190RhoGAP gene. This evidence strongly suggests that p190 regulates critical components of PDGF oncogenesis and can act as a tumor suppressor in PDGF-induced gliomas by down-regulating Rho activity. PMID:12600941

  11. Brain tumor-targeted delivery and therapy by focused ultrasound introduced doxorubicin-loaded cationic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qian; Mao, Kai-Li; Tian, Fu-Rong; Yang, Jing-Jing; Chen, Pian-Pian; Xu, Jie; Fan, Zi-Liang; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Li, Wen-Feng; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Lu, Cui-Tao

    2016-02-01

    Brain tumor lacks effective delivery system for treatment. Focused ultrasound (FUS) can reversibly open BBB without impacts on normal tissues. As a potential drug carrier, cationic liposomes (CLs) have the ability to passively accumulate in tumor tissues for their positive charge. In this study, FUS introduced doxorubicin-loaded cationic liposomes (DOX-CLs) were applied to improve the efficiency of glioma-targeted delivery. Doxorubicin-loaded CLs (DOX-CLs) and quantum dot-loaded cationic liposomes (QD-CLs) were prepared using extrusion technology, and their characterizations were evaluated. With the advantage of QDs in tracing images, the glioma-targeted accumulation of FUS + CLs was evaluated by fluorescence imaging and flow cytometer. Cell survival rate, tumor volume, animal survival time, and brain histology in C6 glioma model were investigated to evaluate the glioma-targeted delivery of FUS + DOX-CLs. DOX-CLs and QD-CLs had suitable nanoscale sizes and high entrapment efficiency. The combined strategy of FUS introduced CLs significantly increased the glioma-targeted accumulation for load drugs. FUS + DOX-CLs showed the strongest inhibition on glioma based on glioma cell in vitro and glioma model in vivo experiments. From MRI and histological analysis, FUS + DOX-CLs group strongly suppressed the glioma progression and extended the animal survival time to 81.2 days. Among all the DOX treatment groups, FUS + DOX-CLs group showed the best cell viability and highest level of tumor apoptosis and necrosis. Combining the advantages of BBB reversible opening by FUS and glioma-targeted binding by CLs, ultrasound introduced cationic liposomes could achieve glioma-targeted delivery, which might be developed as a potential strategy for future brain tumor therapy. PMID:26666650

  12. A Simple, Quantitative Method Using Alginate Gel to Determine Rat Colonic Tumor Volume In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-01-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the ApcPirc/+ rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm3. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained. PMID:24674588

  13. A phase 2 trial of irinotecan (CPT-11) in patients with recurrent malignant glioma: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium study1

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Michael D.; Lamborn, Kathleen; Yung, W.K.A.; Jaeckle, Kurt; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh; Fine, Howard A.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Cloughesy, Timothy; Chang, Susan; Nicholas, M. Kelly; Schiff, David; Greenberg, Harry; Junck, Larry; Fink, Karen; Hess, Ken; Kuhn, John

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the response to CPT-11 administered every three weeks to adults with progressive malignant glioma, treated with or without enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug (EIAED) therapy, at the recommended phase 2 dose determined from a previous phase 1 study. Adult patients age 18 or older with a KPS of 60 or higher who had measurable recurrent grade III anaplastic glioma (AG) or grade IV glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were eligible. No more than one prior chemotherapy was allowed, either as adjuvant therapy or for recurrent disease. The CPT-11 dose was 350 mg/m2 i.v. every three weeks in patients not on EIAED and 750 mg/m2 in patients on EIAED therapy. Patients with stable or responding disease could be treated until tumor progression or a total of 12 months of therapy. The primary end point of the study was to determine whether CPT-11 could significantly delay tumor progression, using the rate of six-month progression-free survival (PFS-6). The trial was sized to be able to discriminate between a 15% and 35% rate for the GBM group alone and between a 20% and 40% rate for the entire cohort. There were 51 eligible patients, including 38 GBM and 13 AG patients, enrolled. The median age was 52 and 42 years, respectively. PFS-6 for the entire cohort was 17.6%. PFS-6 was 15.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07–0.31) for the GBM patients and 23% (95% CI, 0.07–0.52) for AG patients. Toxicity for the group included diarrhea and myelosuppression. We conclude that the recommended phase 2 dose of CPT-11 for patients with or without EIAED was ineffective on this schedule, in this patient population. PMID:16533878

  14. Phase I/II study of erlotinib and temsirolimus for patients with recurrent malignant gliomas: North American Brain Tumor Consortium trial 04-02

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Patrick Y.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Kuhn, John G.; Norden, Andrew D.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Robins, H. Ian; Lieberman, Frank S.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Drappatz, Jan; Groves, Morris D.; Santagata, Sandro; Ligon, Azra H.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Wright, John J.; Dancey, Janet; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Prados, Michael D.; Ligon, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) may have synergistic antitumor effects in high-grade glioma patients. Methods We conducted a phase I/II study of the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib (150 mg/day) and the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. Patients initially received temsirolimus 50 mg weekly, and the dose adjusted based on toxicities. In the phase II component, the primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) among glioblastoma patients. Results Twenty-two patients enrolled in phase I, 47 in phase II. Twelve phase I patients treated at the maximum tolerated dosage were included in the phase II cohort for analysis. The maximum tolerated dosage was 15 mg temsirolimus weekly with erlotinib 150 mg daily. Dose-limiting toxicities were rash and mucositis. Among 42 evaluable glioblastoma patients, 12 (29%) achieved stable disease, but there were no responses, and PFS6 was 13%. Among 16 anaplastic glioma patients, 1 (6%) achieved complete response, 1 (6%) partial response, and 2 (12.5%) stable disease, with PFS6 of 8%. Tumor levels of both drugs were low, and posttreatment tissue in 3 patients showed no reduction in the mTOR target phosphorylated (phospho-)S6S235/236 but possible compensatory increase in phospho-AktS473. Presence of EGFR variant III, phospho-EGFR, and EGFR amplification did not correlate with survival, but patients with elevated phospho–extracellular signal-regulated kinase or reduced phosphatase and tensin homolog protein expression had decreased progression-free survival at 4 months. Conclusion Because of increased toxicity, the maximum tolerated dosage of temsirolimus in combination with erlotinib proved lower than expected. Insufficient tumor drug levels and redundant signaling pathways may partly explain the minimal antitumor activity noted. PMID:24470557

  15. A phase 2 trial of irinotecan (CPT-11) in patients with recurrent malignant glioma: a North American Brain Tumor Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Prados, Michael D; Lamborn, Kathleen; Yung, W K A; Jaeckle, Kurt; Robins, H Ian; Mehta, Minesh; Fine, Howard A; Wen, Patrick Y; Cloughesy, Timothy; Chang, Susan; Nicholas, M Kelly; Schiff, David; Greenberg, Harry; Junck, Larry; Fink, Karen; Hess, Ken; Kuhn, John

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the response to CPT-11 administered every three weeks to adults with progressive malignant glioma, treated with or without enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug (EIAED) therapy, at the recommended phase 2 dose determined from a previous phase 1 study. Adult patients age 18 or older with a KPS of 60 or higher who had measurable recurrent grade III anaplastic glioma (AG) or grade IV glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were eligible. No more than one prior chemotherapy was allowed, either as adjuvant therapy or for recurrent disease. The CPT-11 dose was 350 mg/m(2) i.v. every three weeks in patients not on EIAED and 750 mg/m(2) in patients on EIAED therapy. Patients with stable or responding disease could be treated until tumor progression or a total of 12 months of therapy. The primary end point of the study was to determine whether CPT-11 could significantly delay tumor progression, using the rate of six-month progression-free survival (PFS-6). The trial was sized to be able to discriminate between a 15% and 35% rate for the GBM group alone and between a 20% and 40% rate for the entire cohort. There were 51 eligible patients, including 38 GBM and 13 AG patients, enrolled. The median age was 52 and 42 years, respectively. PFS-6 for the entire cohort was 17.6%. PFS-6 was 15.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07-0.31) for the GBM patients and 23% (95% CI, 0.07-0.52) for AG patients. Toxicity for the group included diarrhea and myelosuppression. We conclude that the recommended phase 2 dose of CPT-11 for patients with or without EIAED was ineffective on this schedule, in this patient population. PMID:16533878

  16. Canine spontaneous glioma: A translational model system for convection-enhanced delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Peter J.; LeCouteur, Richard A.; Higgins, Robert J.; Bringas, John R.; Larson, Richard F.; Yamashita, Yoji; Krauze, Michal T.; Forsayeth, John; Noble, Charles O.; Drummond, Daryl C.; Kirpotin, Dmitri B.; Park, John W.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2010-01-01

    Canine spontaneous intracranial tumors bear striking similarities to their human tumor counterparts and have the potential to provide a large animal model system for more realistic validation of novel therapies typically developed in small rodent models. We used spontaneously occurring canine gliomas to investigate the use of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of liposomal nanoparticles, containing topoisomerase inhibitor CPT-11. To facilitate visualization of intratumoral infusions by real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we included identically formulated liposomes loaded with Gadoteridol. Real-time MRI defined distribution of infusate within both tumor and normal brain tissues. The most important limiting factor for volume of distribution within tumor tissue was the leakage of infusate into ventricular or subarachnoid spaces. Decreased tumor volume, tumor necrosis, and modulation of tumor phenotype correlated with volume of distribution of infusate (Vd), infusion location, and leakage as determined by real-time MRI and histopathology. This study demonstrates the potential for canine spontaneous gliomas as a model system for the validation and development of novel therapeutic strategies for human brain tumors. Data obtained from infusions monitored in real time in a large, spontaneous tumor may provide information, allowing more accurate prediction and optimization of infusion parameters. Variability in Vd between tumors strongly suggests that real-time imaging should be an essential component of CED therapeutic trials to allow minimization of inappropriate infusions and accurate assessment of clinical outcomes. PMID:20488958

  17. Optic glioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... et al. Optic Glioma in Children: A Retrospective Analysis of 101 Cases. American Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2013; 36(3):287-292. Karcioglu ZA, Haik BG. Eye, orbit, and adnexal structures. In: Abeloff MD, Armitage JO, ...

  18. The Art of Intraoperative Glioma Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zoe Z.; Shields, Lisa B. E.; Sun, David A.; Zhang, Yi Ping; Hunt, Matthew A.; Shields, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    A major dilemma in brain-tumor surgery is the identification of tumor boundaries to maximize tumor excision and minimize postoperative neurological damage. Gliomas, especially low-grade tumors, and normal brain have a similar color and texture, which poses a challenge to the neurosurgeon. Advances in glioma resection techniques combine the experience of the neurosurgeon and various advanced technologies. Intraoperative methods to delineate gliomas from normal tissue consist of (1) image-based navigation, (2) intraoperative sampling, (3) electrophysiological monitoring, and (4) enhanced visual tumor demarcation. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed. A combination of these methods is becoming widely accepted in routine glioma surgery. Gross total resection in conjunction with radiation, chemotherapy, or immune/gene therapy may increase the rates of cure in this devastating disease. PMID:26284196

  19. MicroRNA in Human Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengfeng; Li, Jun; Liu, Lei; Li, Wei; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Glioma represents a serious health problem worldwide. Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and targeting therapy, the disease remains one of the most lethal malignancies in humans, and new approaches to improvement of the efficacy of anti-glioma treatments are urgently needed. Thus, new therapeutic targets and tools should be developed based on a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of glioma. In this context, microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, non-coding RNAs, play a pivotal role in the development of the malignant phenotype of glioma cells, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, tumor angiogenesis, and stem cell generation. This review will discuss the biological functions of miRNAs in human glioma and their implications in improving clinical diagnosis, prediction of prognosis, and anti-glioma therapy. PMID:24202447

  20. Tumor Types

    MedlinePlus

    ... acoustic neuroma is also known as a schwannoma, vestibular schwannoma, or neurilemmoma. Characteristics Arises from cells that ... multiple CNS tumors, including neurofibromas, multiple meningiomas, bilateral vestibular schwannomas, optic nerve gliomas, and spinal cord tumors. ...

  1. The Potential of Tetrandrine against Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Tseng, Sheng-Hong

    2010-09-01

    Patients with malignant gliomas have poor prognoses, and the majority of the patients have local tumor recurrence after various treatments including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Thus it is mandatory to develop better therapies for treatment of these malignant brain tumors. Tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid, has antitumor effects against some cancers. Tetrandrine affects the cell cycle, production of reactive oxygen species, mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, and reverses multidrug resistance in various cancer cells. Since tetrandrine is a highly lipid-soluble and hydrophobic molecule with a low molecular weight, it may cross the blood brain barrier; thus, it could be used for the treatment of gliomas. Tetrandrine inhibits the large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and the expression of BK channel has a positive correlation with tumor malignancy grade in human gliomas. Furthermore, tetrandrine also exerts cytotoxic effects, and induces apoptosis and radiosensitization in glioma cells by elimination of radiation-induced cell cycle perturbation. It also has anti-angiogenesis effects in gliomas, and exerts an antitumor effect on subcutaneous and intracerebral gliomas. Tetrandrine is a radiosensitizer and also a multidrug resistance reversing agent. Tetrandrine can probably be combined with radiotherapy or other chemotherapeutic agents to treat gliomas. Nonetheless, it is important to determine the balance between the safety and efficacy of tetrandrine in patients with malignant gliomas before any clinical application. PMID:20879981

  2. SU-E-J-79: Internal Tumor Volume Motion and Volume Size Assessment Using 4D CT Lung Data

    SciTech Connect

    Jurkovic, I; Stathakis, S; Li, Y; Patel, A; Vincent, J; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess internal tumor volume change through breathing cycle and associated tumor motion using the 4DCT data. Methods: Respiration induced volume change through breathing cycle and associated motion was analyzed for nine patients that were scanned during the different respiratory phases. The examined datasets were the maximum and average intensity projections (MIP and AIP) and the 10 phases of the respiratory cycle. The internal target volume (ITV) was delineated on each of the phases and the planning target volume (PTV) was then created by adding setup margins to the ITV. Tumor motion through the phases was assessed using the acquired 4DCT dataset, which was then used to determine if the margins used for the ITV creation successfully encompassed the tumor in three dimensions. Results: Results showed that GTV motion along the superior inferior axes was the largest in all the cases independent of the tumor location and/or size or the use of abdomen compression. The extent of the tumor motion was found to be connected with the size of the GTV. The smallest GTVs exhibited largest motion vector independent of the tumor location. The motion vector size varied through the phases depending on the tumor size and location and it was smallest for phases 20 and 30. The smaller the volume of the delineated GTV, the greater its volume difference through the different respiratory phases was. The average GTV volume change was largest for the phases 60 and 70. Conclusion: Even if GTV is delineated using both AIP and MIP datasets, its motion extent will exceed the used margins especially for the very small GTV volumes. When the GTV size is less than 10 cc it is recommended to use fusion of the GTVs through all the phases to create the planning ITV.

  3. The H3.3 K27M mutation results in a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas than thalamic gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Hao, Shuyu; Pan, Changcun; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting; Yan, Hai; Zhang, Liwei; Wan, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Brainstem and thalamic gliomas are rare, and they are poorly understood in adults. Genetic aberrations that occur in these tumors are still unknown. In this study, we investigated whether thalamic gliomas have different genetic aberrations and clinical outcomes compared with brainstem gliomas in adults. Forty-three glioma samples were selected, including 28 brainstem and 15 thalamic gliomas. The frequency of the K27M mutation in adult midline gliomas was 58.1%. High-grade gliomas in the thalamus were statistically significantly more numerous than brainstem gliomas. Patients with K27M mutant brainstem gliomas had a significantly shorter overall survival than patients with wild-type tumors (P = .020) by Cox regression after adjustment for other independent risk factors. However, there was no statistical tendency toward a poorer overall survival in thalamic gliomas containing the K27M mutation compared with wild-type tumors. The presence of the K27M mutation significantly corresponded with mutations in TP53 in thalamic gliomas. Interestingly, the K27M mutation was mutually exclusive with mutations in IDH1, which was detected only in brainstem gliomas. The microarray data identified 86 differentially expressed genes between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with the K27M mutation. The cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) gene, which plays an important role in cancer pathways, was found to be differentially expressed between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with K27M mutations. Although the K27M mutation was frequently observed in adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, this mutation tended to be associated with a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas but not in thalamic gliomas. Brainstem gliomas may present different genetic aberrations from thalamic gliomas. These differences may provide guidance for therapeutic decisions for the treatment of adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, which may have different molecular targets. PMID:26297251

  4. Phase I Study of Temozolomide and Irinotecan for Recurrent Malignant Gliomas in Patients Receiving Enzyme-Inducing Antiepileptic Drugs: A North American BrainTumor Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Loghin, Monica E.; Prados, Michael D.; Wen, Patrick; Junck, Larry; Lieberman, Frank; Fine, Howard; Fink, Karen L.; Metha, Minesh; Kuhn, John; Lamborn, Kathleen; Chang, Susan M.; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Robins, Ian H.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; AlfredYung, W.K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum tolerated dose of irinotecan when administrated with temozolomide every 28 days, in patients with recurrent malignant glioma who were also receiving CYP450 enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAED), and to characterize the pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and its metabolites. The study was also intended to assess whether temozolomide affects the conversion of irinotecan to SN-38. Design Patients with recurrent malignant glioma received a fixed dose of temozolomide (150 mg/m2) daily for 5 days from days1to 5 every 28 days, and an i.v. infusion of irinotecan on days1and15 of each cycle. The starting dose of irinotecan was 350 mg/m2, which was escalated to 550 mg/m2 in 50-mg/m2 increments. The plasma pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and its active metabolite, SN-38, were determined during the infusion of irinotecan on cycle 1, day 1. Results Thirty-three patients were enrolled into the study and treated. Thirty-one patients were evaluable for both tumor response and toxicity and two patients were evaluable for toxicity only. Common toxicities included neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 diarrhea and nausea/vomiting. The maximum tolerated dose for irinotecan was determined to be 500 mg/m2. Conclusions The recommended phase II dose of irinotecan in combination with temozolomide for patients receiving EIAEDs is 500 mg/m2, administrated every 15 days on a 28-day schedule. This study also confirmed that concomitant administration of EIAEDs increases irinotecan clearance and influences SN-38 disposition. No pharmacokinetic interaction was observed between temozolomide and irinotecan. PMID:18056194

  5. Plerixafor After Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed High Grade Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-21

    Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglial Tumors; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET)

  6. Synergistic antitumor effect with indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase inhibition and temozolomide in a murine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Hanihara, Mitsuto; Kawataki, Tomoyuki; Oh-Oka, Kyoko; Mitsuka, Kentaro; Nakao, Atsuhito; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a key enzyme of tryptophan (Trp) metabolism, is involved in tumor-derived immune suppression through depletion of Trp and accumulation of the metabolite kynurenine, resulting in inactivation of natural killer cells and generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). It has been reported that high expression of IDO in cancer cells is associated with suppression of the antitumor immune response and is consistent with a poor prognosis. Thus, IDO may be a therapeutic target for malignant cancer. The authors have recently shown that IDO expression is markedly increased in human glioblastoma and secondary glioblastoma with malignant change, suggesting that IDO targeting may also have therapeutic potential for patients with glioma. The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of IDO inhibition and to examine the synergistic function of IDO inhibitor and temozolomide (TMZ) in a murine glioma model. METHODS Murine glioma GL261 cells and human glioma U87 cells were included in this study. The authors used 3 mouse models to study glioma cell growth: 1) a subcutaneous ectopic model, 2) a syngeneic intracranial orthotopic model, and 3) an allogenic intracranial orthotopic model. IDO inhibition was achieved via knockdown of IDO in GL261 cells using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and through oral administration of the IDO inhibitor, 1-methyl-l-tryptophan (1-MT). Tumor volume in the subcutaneous model and survival time in the intracranial model were evaluated. RESULTS In the subcutaneous model, oral administration of 1-MT significantly suppressed tumor growth, and synergistic antitumor effects of 1-MT and TMZ were observed (p < 0.01). Mice containing intracranially inoculated IDO knockdown cells had a significantly longer survival period as compared with control mice (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that IDO expression is implicated in immunosuppression and tumor progression in glioma cells. Therefore, combining IDO

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of the MGMT-STP27 Model and Impact of Genetic and Epigenetic Context to Predict the MGMT Methylation Status in Gliomas and Other Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bady, Pierre; Delorenzi, Mauro; Hegi, Monika E

    2016-05-01

    The methylation status of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene is an important predictive biomarker for benefit from alkylating agent therapy in glioblastoma. Our model MGMT-STP27 allows prediction of the methylation status of the MGMT promoter using data from the Illumina's Human Methylation BeadChips (HM-27K and HM-450K) that is publically available for many cancer data sets. Here, we investigate the impact of the context of genetic and epigenetic alterations and tumor type on the classification and report on technical aspects, such as robustness of cutoff definition and preprocessing of the data. The association between gene copy number variation, predicted MGMT methylation, and MGMT expression revealed a gene dosage effect on MGMT expression in lower grade glioma (World Health Organization grade II/III) that in contrast to glioblastoma usually carry two copies of chromosome 10 on which MGMT resides (10q26.3). This implies some MGMT expression, potentially conferring residual repair function blunting the therapeutic effect of alkylating agents. A sensitivity analyses corroborated the performance of the original cutoff for various optimization criteria and for most data preprocessing methods. Finally, we propose an R package mgmtstp27 that allows prediction of the methylation status of the MGMT promoter and calculation of appropriate confidence and/or prediction intervals. Overall, MGMT-STP27 is a robust model for MGMT classification that is independent of tumor type and is adapted for single sample prediction. PMID:26927331

  8. Advanced MR Imaging of Gliomas: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Fong Y.; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of cerebral gliomas have increased the demands on noninvasive neuroimaging for the diagnosis, therapeutic planning, tumor monitoring, and patient outcome prediction. In the meantime, improved magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques have shown much potentials in evaluating the key pathological features of the gliomas, including cellularity, invasiveness, mitotic activity, angiogenesis, and necrosis, hence, further shedding light on glioma grading before treatment. In this paper, an update of advanced MR imaging techniques is reviewed, and their potential roles as biomarkers of tumor grading are discussed. PMID:23862163

  9. Radiation-induced intracranial malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.; Mealey, J. Jr.; Sartorius, C.

    1989-07-01

    The authors present seven cases of malignant gliomas that occurred after radiation therapy administered for diseases different from the subsequent glial tumor. Included among these seven are three patients who were treated with interstitial brachytherapy. Previously reported cases of radiation-induced glioma are reviewed and analyzed for common characteristics. Children receiving central nervous system irradiation appear particularly susceptible to induction of malignant gliomas by radiation. Interstitial brachytherapy may be used successfully instead of external beam radiotherapy in previously irradiated, tumor-free brain, and thus may reduce the risk of radiation necrosis. 31 references.

  10. Evaluation of an Automatic Registration-Based Algorithm for Direct Measurement of Volume Change in Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Saradwata; Johnson, Timothy D.; Ma, Bing; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Bland, Peyton H.; Park, Hyunjin; Schott, Anne F.; Ross, Brian D.; Meyer, Charles R.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Assuming that early tumor volume change is a biomarker for response to therapy, accurate quantification of early volume changes could aid in adapting an individual patient's therapy and lead to shorter clinical trials. We investigated an image registration-based approach for tumor volume change quantification that may more reliably detect smaller changes that occur in shorter intervals than can be detected by existing algorithms. Methods and Materials: Variance and bias of the registration-based approach were evaluated using retrospective, in vivo, very-short-interval diffusion magnetic resonance imaging scans where true zero tumor volume change is unequivocally known and synthetic data, respectively. The interval scans were nonlinearly registered using two similarity measures: mutual information (MI) and normalized cross-correlation (NCC). Results: The 95% confidence interval of the percentage volume change error was (-8.93% to 10.49%) for MI-based and (-7.69%, 8.83%) for NCC-based registrations. Linear mixed-effects models demonstrated that error in measuring volume change increased with increase in tumor volume and decreased with the increase in the tumor's normalized mutual information, even when NCC was the similarity measure being optimized during registration. The 95% confidence interval of the relative volume change error for the synthetic examinations with known changes over {+-}80% of reference tumor volume was (-3.02% to 3.86%). Statistically significant bias was not demonstrated. Conclusion: A low-noise, low-bias tumor volume change measurement algorithm using nonlinear registration is described. Errors in change measurement were a function of tumor volume and the normalized mutual information content of the tumor.

  11. Impact of [18F]-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine PET imaging on target definition for radiation therapy of high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Munck af Rosenschold, Per; Costa, Junia; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Lundemann, Michael J.; Law, Ian; Ohlhues, Lars; Engelholm, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to assess the impact of amino-acid 18F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine (FET) positron emission tomography (PET) on the volumetric target definition for radiation therapy of high-grade glioma versus the current standard using MRI alone. Specifically, we investigated the influence of tumor grade, MR-defined tumor volume, and the extent of surgical resection on PET positivity. Methods Fifty-four consecutive high-grade glioma patients (World Health Organization grades III–IV) with confirmed histology were scanned using FET-PET/CT and T1 and T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery MRI. Gross tumor volume and clinical target volumes (CTVs) were defined in a blinded fashion based on MRI and subsequently PET, and volumetric analysis was performed. The extent of the surgical resection was reviewed using postoperative MRI. Results Overall, for ∼90% of the patients, the PET-positive volumes were encompassed by T1 MRI with contrast-defined tumor plus a 20-mm margin. The tumor volume defined by PET was larger for glioma grade IV (P < .001) and smaller for patients with more extensive surgical resection (P = .004). The margin required to be added to the MRI-defined tumor in order to fully encompass the FET-PET positive volume tended to be larger for grade IV tumors (P = .018). Conclusion With an unchanged CTV margin and by including FET-PET for gross tumor volume definition, the CTV will increase moderately for most patients, and quite substantially for a minority of patients. Patients with grade IV glioma were found to be the primary candidates for PET-guided radiation therapy planning. PMID:25537018

  12. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hormuth, David A., II; Weis, Jared A.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Miga, Michael I.; Rericha, Erin C.; Quaranta, Vito; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    Reaction-diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction-diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction-diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error <8.8%, Dice >0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction-diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions.

  13. Inter-Fraction Tumor Volume Response during Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Correlated to Patient Variables

    PubMed Central

    Ayan, Ahmet S.; Mo, Xiaokui; Williams, Terence M.; Mayr, Nina A.; Grecula, John C.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Xu-Welliver, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Analyze inter-fraction volumetric changes of lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and determine if the volume changes during treatment can be predicted and thus considered in treatment planning. Methods and Materials Kilo-voltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT) images obtained immediately prior to each fraction were used to monitor inter-fraction volumetric changes of 15 consecutive patients (18 lung nodules) treated with lung SBRT at our institution (45–54 Gy in 3–5 fractions) in the year of 2011–2012. Spearman's (ρ) correlation and Spearman's partial correlation analysis was performed with respect to patient/tumor and treatment characteristics. Multiple hypothesis correction was performed using False Discovery Rate (FDR) and q-values were reported. Results All tumors studied experienced volume change during treatment. Tumor increased in volume by an average of 15% and regressed by an average of 11%. The overall volume increase during treatment is contained within the planning target volume (PTV) for all tumors. Larger tumors increased in volume more than smaller tumors during treatment (q = 0.0029). The volume increase on CBCT was correlated to the treatment planning gross target volume (GTV) as well as internal target volumes (ITV) (q = 0.0085 and q = 0.0039 respectively) and could be predicted for tumors with a GTV less than 22 mL. The volume increase was correlated to the integral dose (ID) in the ITV at every fraction (q = 0.0049). The peak inter-fraction volume occurred at an earlier fraction in younger patients (q = 0.0122). Conclusions We introduced a new analysis method to follow inter-fraction tumor volume changes and determined that the observed changes during lung SBRT treatment are correlated to the initial tumor volume, integral dose (ID), and patient age. Furthermore, the volume increase during treatment of tumors less than 22mL can be predicted during treatment planning. The volume increase remained

  14. Cancer stem cells: the final frontier for glioma virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mahua; Ulasov, Ilya V; Tyler, Matthew A; Sonabend, Adam M; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2011-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are a very small subset of all cancer cells and possess characteristics very similar to normal stem cells, in particular, the capacity for self-renewal, multipotency and relative quiescence. These chemo- and radiation resistant cells are responsible for maintaining tumor volume leading to therapy failure and recurrence. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common primary intracranial malignancy, glioma stem cells have been implicated as one of the key players in treatment failure. Many novel treatment modalities are being investigated to specifically target this small group of cells. In this review, we shed light on one such targeted therapy, specifically, oncolytic virotherapy, and review the literature to highlight the advances and challenges in designing effective oncolytic virotherapy for glioma stem cells. PMID:20237963

  15. Cancer Stem Cells: The Final Frontier for Glioma Virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Mahua; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Tyler, Matthew A.; Sonabend, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are a very small subset of all cancer cells and possess characteristics very similar to normal stem cells, in particular, the capacity for self-renewal, multipotency and relative quiescence. These chemo- and radiation resistant cells are responsible for maintaining tumor volume leading to therapy failure and recurrence. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common primary intracranial malignancy, glioma stem cells have been implicated as one of the key players in treatment failure. Many novel treatment modalities are being investigated to specifically target this small group of cells. In this review, we shed light on one such targeted therapy, specifically, oncolytic virotherapy, and review the literature to highlight the advances and challenges in designing effective oncolytic virotherapy for glioma stem cells. PMID:20237963

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocol Optimization for Delineation of Gross Tumor Volume in Hypopharyngeal and Laryngeal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Verduijn, Gerda M.; Bartels, Lambertus W. Ph.D.; Pameijer, Frank A.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To optimize the use of MRI for delineation of gross tumor volume for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal tumors. Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance images (T1 weighted and T2 weighted) of a healthy volunteer were acquired using a 1.5 T and 3.0 T MR scanner. Various receiver coils were investigated that were compatible with the immobilization mask needed for reliable coregistration with computed tomography data. For the optimal receiver coil, the influence of resolution, slice thickness, and strength of magnetic field on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was studied. Feasibility of the definitive protocol was tested on patients with hypopharyngeal (n = 19) and laryngeal (n = 42) carcinoma. Results: Large differences in SNR were obtained for the various coils. The SNR values obtained using surface coils that were compatible with the immobilization mask were three times higher than those obtained using a standard head-and-neck coil and five times higher than those obtained using a body coil. High-resolution images (0.4 x 0.4 x 4 mm{sup 3}) showed superior anatomic detail and resulted in a 4-min scan time. Image quality at 3.0 T was not significantly better compared with 1.5 T. In 3 patients the MR study could not be performed; for 5 patients images were severely deteriorated by motion artefacts. High-quality MR images were obtained in 53 patients. Conclusions: High-resolution MR images of the hypopharynx and larynx can be obtained in the majority of patients using surface receiver coils in combination with the radiotherapy mask. These MR images can be successfully used for tumor delineation in radiotherapy.

  17. Postirradiation cerebellar glioma. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Raffel, C.; Edwards, M.S.; Davis, R.L.; Ablin, A.R.

    1985-02-01

    A 13-year-old girl developed an anaplastic astrocytoma of the cerebellum 7 years after irradiation of the central nervous system and prophylactic chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The fact that the astrocytoma was anaplastic and infiltrative was unusual for astroglial tumors at this site. It is proposed that this is a radiation-induced glioma.

  18. Assessment of interpatient heterogeneity in tumor radiosensitivity for nonsmall cell lung cancer using tumor-volume variation data

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, Alexei V. Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Mayr, Nina; Yartsev, Slav

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous work, the authors showed that a distribution of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients could be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. In this research study, the authors show that this algorithm can be applied to other tumors, specifically in nonsmall cell lung cancer. This new application includes larger patient volumes and includes comparison of data sets obtained at independent institutions. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage computed tomography. Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} and clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T{sub 1/2} have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population model of tumor response and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Nonsmall cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} for nonsmall cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Conclusions: The data obtained

  19. Glioma targeting and blood-brain barrier penetration by dual-targeting doxorubincin liposomes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Qing; Lv, Qing; Li, Li-Ming; Tang, Xin-Jiang; Li, Fan-Zhu; Hu, Yu-Lan; Han, Min

    2013-07-01

    Effective chemotherapy for glioblastoma requires a carrier that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequently target the glioma cells. Dual-targeting doxorubincin (Dox) liposomes were produced by conjugating liposomes with both folate (F) and transferrin (Tf), which were proven effective in penetrating the BBB and targeting tumors, respectively. The liposome was characterized by particle size, Dox entrapment efficiency, and in vitro release profile. Drug accumulation in cells, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression, and drug transport across the BBB in the dual-targeting liposome group were examined by using bEnd3 BBB models. In vivo studies demonstrated that the dual-targeting Dox liposomes could transport across the BBB and mainly distribute in the brain glioma. The anti-tumor effect of the dual-targeting liposome was also demonstrated by the increased survival time, decreased tumor volume, and results of both hematoxylin-eosin staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling analysis. The dual-targeting Dox liposome could improve the therapeutic efficacy of brain glioma and were less toxic than the Dox solution, showing a dual-targeting effect. These results indicate that this dual-targeting liposome can be used as a potential carrier for glioma chemotherapy. PMID:23628475

  20. Gradient-Based Algorithm for Determining Tumor Volumes in Small Animals Using Planar Fluorescence Imaging Platform

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica P.; Egbulefu, Christopher; Prior, Julie L.; Zhou, Mingzhou; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Planar fluorescence imaging is widely used in biological research because of its simplicity, use of non-ionizing radiation, and high-throughput data acquisition. In cancer research, where small animal models are used to study the in vivo effects of cancer therapeutics, the output of interest is often the tumor volume. Unfortunately, inaccuracies in determining tumor volume from surface-weighted projection fluorescence images undermine the data, and alternative physical or conventional tomographic approaches are prone to error or are tedious for most laboratories. Here, we report a method that uses a priori knowledge of a tumor xenograft model, a tumor-targeting near infrared probe, and a custom-developed image analysis planar view tumor volume algorithm (PV-TVA) to estimate tumor volume from planar fluorescence images. Our algorithm processes images obtained using near infrared light for improving imaging depth in tissue in comparison with light in the visible spectrum. We benchmarked our results against the actual tumor volume obtained from a standard water volume displacement method. Compared with a caliper-based method that has an average deviation from an actual volume of 18% (204.34 ± 115.35 mm3), our PV-TVA average deviation from the actual volume was 9% (97.24 ± 70.45 mm3; P < .001). Using a normalization-based analysis, we found that bioluminescence imaging and PV-TVA average deviations from actual volume were 36% and 10%, respectively. The improved accuracy of tumor volume assessment from planar fluorescence images, rapid data analysis, and the ease of archiving images for subsequent retrieval and analysis potentially lend our PV-TVA method to diverse cancer imaging applications. PMID:27200417

  1. Neurological Impairment Linked with Cortico-Subcortical Infiltration of Diffuse Low-Grade Gliomas at Initial Diagnosis Supports Early Brain Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Anja; Zetterling, Maria; Lundin, Margareta; Melin, Beatrice; Fahlström, Markus; Grabowska, Anna; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGG) are slow-growing brain tumors that in spite of an indolent behavior at onset show a continuous expansion over time and inevitably transform into malignant gliomas. Extensive tumor resections may be performed with preservation of neurological function due to neuroplasticity that is induced by the slow tumor growth. However, DLGG prefer to migrate along subcortical pathways, and white matter plasticity is considerably more limited than gray matter plasticity. Whether signs of functional decompensating white matter that may be found as early as at disease presentation has not been systematically studied. Here, we examined 52 patients who presented with a DLGG at the time of radiological diagnosis. We found a significant correlation between neurological impairment and eloquent cortico-subcortical tumor localization, but not between neurological function and tumor volume. These results suggest that even small tumors invading white matter pathways may lack compensatory mechanisms for functional reorganization already at disease presentation. PMID:26113841

  2. ARPP-19 promotes proliferation and metastasis of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Zhao, Bing; Li, Xiaocan; Wan, Jinghai

    2016-09-01

    Glioma is the most common and aggressive type of human primary brain tumor with a poor outcome. The molecular mechanisms underlying glioma development and progression are still poorly understood. Recent studies have reported a novel role of ARPP-19 in the regulation of cell mitosis and cancer progression. However, no study has been carried out to determine the role of ARPP-19 in human glioma cells and assess the expression and clinical significance of ARPP-19 in human glioma. In this study, we systematically examined the role of ARPP-19 in glioma A172 cells and examined the expression of ARPP-19 and CD147 in 81 cases of human glioma tissue specimens and correlated them to clinicopathological parameters and patient survival. We found that ARPP-19 promoted both proliferation and metastasis of human glioma cells and the expression of ARPP-19 and CD147 in high-grade glioma was significantly higher than that in the low-grade glioma. Patients whose tumors were positive for expression of ARPP-19 or CD147 showed lower relapse-free survival and overall survival than patients whose tumors were negative for ARPP-19 or CD147, respectively. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that there was a statistically significant correlation between ARPP-19 and CD147. Expressions of ARPP-19 and CD147 may serve as biomarkers for high-grade glioma and poor patient survival. PMID:27380244

  3. Constitutive activation of myosin-dependent contractility sensitizes glioma tumor-initiating cells to mechanical inputs and reduces tissue invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sophie Y.; Ulrich, Theresa A.; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; MacKay, Joanna L.; Lin, Jung-Ming G.; Martuscello, Regina T.; Jundi, Musa A.; Reynolds, Brent A.; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) perpetuate tumor growth, enable therapeutic resistance, and drive initiation of successive tumors. Virtually nothing is known about the role of mechanotransductive signaling in controlling TIC tumorigenesis, despite the recognized importance of altered mechanics in tissue dysplasia and the common observation that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness strongly regulates cell behavior. To address this open question, we cultured primary human glioblastoma (GBM) TICs on laminin-functionalized ECMs spanning a range of stiffnesses. Surprisingly, we found that these cells were largely insensitive to ECM stiffness cues, evading the inhibition of spreading, migration, and proliferation typically imposed by compliant ECMs. We hypothesize that this insensitivity may result from insufficient generation of myosin-dependent contractile force. Indeed, we found that both pharmacologic and genetic activation of cell contractility through RhoA GTPase, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) restored stiffness-dependent spreading and motility, with TICs adopting the expected rounded and non-motile phenotype on soft ECMs. Moreover, constitutive activation of RhoA restricted three-dimensional invasion in both spheroid implantation and transwell paradigms. Orthotopic xenotransplantation studies revealed that control TICs formed tumors with classical GBM histopathology including diffuse infiltration and secondary foci, whereas TICs expressing a constitutively active mutant of RhoA produced circumscribed masses and yielded a 30% enhancement in mean survival time. This is the first direct evidence that manipulation of mechanotransductive signaling can alter the tumor-initiating capacity of GBM TICs, supporting further exploration of these signals as potential therapeutic targets and predictors of tumor initiating capacity within heterogeneous tumor cell populations. PMID:25634210

  4. Efficient measurement of total tumor microvascularity ex vivo using a mathematical model to optimize volume subsampling

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Palanisami, Akilan; Zheng, Lei Zak; Blatt, Amy E.; Bryan Sears, R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We introduce immunofluorescence and automated image processing protocols for serial tumor sections to objectively and efficiently quantify tumor microvasculature following antivascular therapy. To determine the trade-off between tumor subsampling and throughput versus microvessel quantification accuracy, we provide a mathematical model that accounts for tumor-specific vascular heterogeneity. This mathematical model can be applied broadly to define tumor volume samplings needed to reach statistical significance, depending on the biomarker in question and the number of subjects. Here, we demonstrate these concepts for tumor microvessel density and total microvascularity (TMV) quantification in whole pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumors ex vivo. The results suggest that TMV is a more sensitive biomarker for detecting reductions in tumor vasculature following antivascular treatment. TMV imaging is a broadly accessible technique that offers robust assessment of antivascular therapies, and it offers promise as a tool for developing high-throughput assays to quantify treatment-induced microvascular alterations for therapeutic screening and development.

  5. Tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography: association with N categories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hang; Chen, Xiao-li; Li, Jun-ru; Li, Zhen-lin; Chen, Tian-wu; Pu, Hong; Yin, Long-lin; Xu, Guo-hui; Li, Zhen-wen; Reng, Jing; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Zhu-zhong; Cao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict the presence of regional lymph node metastasis and could determine N categories. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 202 consecutive patients with gastric adenocarcinoma who had undergone gastrectomy 1 week after contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography were retrospectively identified. The gross tumor volume was evaluated on multidetector computed tomography images. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine whether the gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis, and the Mann-Whitney U test was performed to compare the gross tumor volume among N categories. Additionally, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to identify the accuracy of the gross tumor volume in differentiating N categories. RESULTS: The gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis (p<0.0001) in the univariate analysis, and the multivariate analyses indicated that the gross tumor volume was an independent risk factor for regional lymph node metastasis (p=0.005, odds ratio=1.364). The Mann-Whitney U test showed that the gross tumor volume could distinguish N0 from the N1-N3 categories, N0-N1 from N2-N3, and N0-N2 from N3 (all p<0.0001). In the T1-T4a categories, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 12.3 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 16.6 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24.6 cm3). In the T4a category, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 15.8 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 17.8 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24 cm3). CONCLUSION: The gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict regional lymph node metastasis and N categories. PMID:27166769

  6. Effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and CXCR4 antagonist on tumor growth and angiogenesis in rat glioma model: MRI and protein analysis study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Meser M; Kumar, Sanath; Shankar, Adarsh; Varma, Nadimpalli R S; Iskander, A S M; Janic, Branislava; Chwang, Wilson B; Jain, Rajan; Babajeni-Feremi, Abbas; Borin, Thaiz F; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Brown, Stephen L; Ewing, James R; Arbab, Ali S

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the antiangiogenic efficacy of vatalanib, sunitinib, and AMD3100 in an animal model of human glioblastoma (GBM) by using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and tumor protein expression analysis. Orthotopic GBM-bearing animals were randomly assigned either to control group or vatalanib, sunitinib, and AMD3100 treatment groups. Following 2 weeks of drug treatment, tumor growth and vascular parameters were measured using DCE-MRI. Expression of different angiogenic factors in tumor extracts was measured using a membrane-based human antibody array kit. Tumor angiogenesis and invasion were determined by immunohistochemistry. DCE-MRI showed a significant increase in tumor size after vatalanib treatment. AMD3100-treated group showed a significant decrease in a number of vascular parameters determined by DCE-MRI. AMD3100 significantly decreased the expression of different angiogenic factors compared to sunitinib or vatalanib; however, there were no significant changes in vascular density among the groups. Sunitinib-treated animals showed significantly higher migration of the invasive cells, whereas in both vatalanib- and AMD3100-treated animals the invasive cell migration distance was significantly lower compared to that of control. Vatalanib and sunitinib resulted in suboptimal therapeutic effect, but AMD3100 treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth, permeability, interstitial space volume, and invasion of tumor cells in an animal model of GBM. PMID:24466368

  7. Enhanced detection and comprehensive in situ phenotypic characterization of circulating and disseminated heteroploid epithelial and glioma tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daisy Dandan; Li, Linda; Lin, Peter Ping

    2015-01-01

    Conventional strategy of anti-EpCAM capture and immunostaining of cytokeratins (CKs) to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is limited by highly heterogeneous and dynamic expression or absence of EpCAM and/or CKs in CTCs. In this study, a novel integrated cellular and molecular approach of subtraction enrichment (SE) and immunostaining-FISH (iFISH) was successfully developed. Both large or small size CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) in various biofluid samples including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of cancer patients and patient-derived-xenograft (PDX) mouse models were efficiently enriched and comprehensively identified and characterized by SE-iFISH. Non-hematopoietic CTCs with heteroploid chromosome 8 were detected in 87–92% of lung, esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Characterization of CTCs performed by CK18-iFISH showed that CK18, the dual epithelial marker and tumor biomarker, was strong positive in only 14% of lung and 24% of esophageal CTCs, respectively. Unlike conventional methodologies restricted only to the large and/or both EpCAM and CK positive CTCs, SE-iFISH enables efficient enrichment and performing in situ phenotypic and karyotypic identification and characterization of the highly heterogeneous CTC subtypes classified by both chromosome ploidy and the expression of various tumor biomarkers. Each CTC subtype may possess distinct clinical significance relative to tumor metastasis, relapse, therapeutic drug sensitivity or resistance, etc. PMID:26267323

  8. Targeting different types of human meningioma and glioma cells using a novel adenoviral vector expressing GFP-TRAIL fusion protein from hTERT promoter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of Ad/gTRAIL (an adenoviral vector in which expression of GFP and TRAIL is driven by a human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter, hTERT) on malignant meningiomas and gliomas. Background Gliomas and meningiomas are the two most common types of human brain tumors. Currently there is no effective cure for recurrent malignant meningiomas or for gliomas. Ad/gTRAIL has been shown to be effective in killing selected lung, colon and breast cancer cells, but there have been no studies reporting its antitumor effects on malignant meningiomas. Therefore, we tested the antitumor effect of Ad/gTRAIL for the first time in human malignant meningioma and glioma cell lines, and in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts. Methods Materials and Methods: Human malignant meningioma and glioma cells were infected with adenoviruses, Ad/gTRAIL and Ad/CMV-GFP. Cell viability was determined by proliferation assay. FACS analysis and quantification of TRAIL were used to measure apoptosis in these cells. We injected Ad/gTRAIL viruses in intracranial M6 and U87 xenografts, and measured the brain tumor volume, quantified apoptosis by TUNEL assay in the brain tumor tissue. Results Our studies demonstrate that in vitro/in vivo treatment with Ad/gTRAIL virus resulted in significant increase of TRAIL activity, and elicited a greater tumor cell apoptosis in malignant brain tumor cells as compared to treatment with the control, Ad/CMV-GFP virus without TRAIL activity. Conclusions We showed for the first time that adenovirus Ad/gTRAIL had significant antitumor effects against high grade malignant meningiomas as well as gliomas. Although more work needs to be done, our data suggests that Ad/gTRAIL has the potential to be useful as a tool against malignant brain tumors. PMID:22035360

  9. Rehabilitation of patients with glioma.

    PubMed

    Vargo, Mary; Henriksson, Roger; Salander, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Disabling sequelae occur in a majority of patients diagnosed with brain tumor, including glioma, such as cognitive deficits, weakness, and visual perceptual changes. Often, multiple impairments are present concurrently. Healthcare staff must be aware of the "biographic disruption" the patient with glioma has experienced. While prognostic considerations factor into rehabilitation goals and expectations, regardless of prognosis the treatment team must offer cohesive support, facilitating hope, function, and quality of life. Awareness of family and caregiver concerns plays an important role in the overall care. Inpatient rehabilitation, especially after surgical resection, has been shown to result in functional improvement and homegoing rates on a par with individuals with other neurologic conditions, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury. Community integration comprises a significant element of life satisfaction, as has been shown in childhood glioma survivors. Employment is often affected by the glioma diagnosis, but may be ameliorated, when appropriate, by addressing modifiable factors such as depression, fatigue, or sleep disturbance, or by workplace accommodations. Further research is needed into many facets of rehabilitation in the setting of glioma, including establishing better care models for consistently identifying and addressing functional limitations in this population, measuring outcomes of various levels of rehabilitation care, identifying optimal physical activity strategies, delineating the long-term effects of rehabilitation interventions, and exploring impact of rehabilitation interventions on caregiver burden. The effective elements of cognitive rehabilitation, including transition of cognitive strategies to everyday living, need to be better defined. PMID:26948361

  10. Glial Progenitors as Targets for Transformation in Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ilkanizadeh, Shirin; Lau, Jasmine; Huang, Miller; Foster, Daniel J.; Wong, Robyn; Frantz, Aaron; Wang, Susan; Weiss, William A.; Persson, Anders I.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor and arises throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent focus on stem-like glioma cells has implicated neural stem cells (NSCs), a minor precursor population restricted to germinal zones, as a potential source of gliomas. In this review, we will focus on the relationship between oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), the largest population of cycling glial progenitors in the postnatal brain, and gliomas. Recent studies suggest that OPCs can give rise to gliomas. Furthermore, signaling pathways often associated with NSCs also play key roles during OPC lineage development. Recent advances suggesting that gliomas can undergo a switch from progenitor- to stem-like phenotype after therapy, implicating that an OPC-origin is more likely than previously recognized. Future in-depth studies of OPC biology may shed light on the etiology of OPC-derived gliomas and reveal new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24889528

  11. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Suryadevara, Carter M.; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A.; Choi, Bryan D.; Fecci, Peter E.; Sampson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12–15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM. PMID:25722935

  12. Neurocognitive functioning in patients with glioma of the left and right temporal lobes.

    PubMed

    Noll, Kyle R; Ziu, Mateo; Weinberg, Jeffrey S; Wefel, Jeffrey S

    2016-06-01

    Patients with glioma frequently suffer from deficits of neurocognitive functioning (NCF), though few studies have assessed NCF in localized glioma patients prior to surgery. One hundred and three patients (M age = 52.0; M education = 14.6 years) with histologically confirmed glioma in the right (RTL: n = 30; 57 % glioblastoma) or left temporal lobe (LTL: n = 73; 49 % glioblastoma) completed presurgical neuropsychological assessment. Impairment of NCF was identified in 75 % of all patients. Notably, patients with RTL glioma were most frequently impaired on measures of verbal memory and executive functioning, and at similar rates as the LTL group. Nonetheless, χ(2) tests revealed that impairment rates were significantly higher in the LTL group on attention and object naming tests (p ≤ .05). Independent-samples t-tests revealed that mean performances of patients with LTL glioma were also significantly below RTL patients on measures of attention (p = .01), verbal learning and memory (p = .05), and language (p < .03). A trend was observed in which anterior LTL tumors were associated with reduced verbal learning and medial LTL lesions with delayed recall problems, though patients with lesions involving multiple LTL regions exhibited the greatest difficulty across all verbal memory measures. Significant group differences in NCF performances remained so after controlling for FLAIR volume and tumor histology. These findings indicate that temporal lobe glioma frequently present with impaired NCF, though impairments are often milder in RTL compared to LTL patients. Nonetheless, the relatively frequent verbal memory impairment in the RTL group underscores the bilaterality of verbal memory processes. PMID:27022915

  13. Use of the functional imaging modalities, f MRI r CBV and PET FDG, alters radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning in patients with malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzek, M.; Pardo, F.S.; Busierre, M.

    1995-12-31

    Malignant gliomas present one of the most difficult challenges to definitive radiation therapy, not only with respect to local control, but also with respect to clinical functional status. While tumor target volume definitions for malignant gliomas are often based on CT and conventional MRI, the functional imaging modalities, echo planar rCBV (regional cerebral blood volume mapping) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET, are more sensitive modalities for the detection of neovascularization, perhaps one of the earliest signs of glial tumor initiation and progression. In order to address the clinical utility of functional imaging in radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning, we compared tumor target volume definitions and overall dosimetry in patients either undergoing co-registration of conventional Gadolinium-enhanced MRI, or co-registration of functional imaging modalities, prior to radiation therapy 3-D treatment planning.

  14. Tumor Volume Is a Prognostic Factor in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Brian M.; Othus, Megan; Caglar, Hale B.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether primary tumor and nodal volumes defined on radiotherapy planning scans are correlated with outcome (survival and recurrence) after combined-modality treatment. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiation at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute from 2000 to 2006 was performed. Tumor and nodal volume measurements, as computed by Eclipse (Varian, Palo Alto, CA), were used as independent variables, along with existing clinical factors, in univariate and multivariate analyses for association with outcomes. Results: For patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy, both nodal volume (hazard ratio [HR], 1.09; p < 0.01) and tumor volume (HR, 1.03; p < 0.01) were associated with overall survival on multivariate analysis. Both nodal volume (HR, 1.10; p < 0.01) and tumor volume (HR, 1.04; p < 0.01) were also associated with local control but not distant metastases. Conclusions: In addition to traditional surgical staging variables, disease burden, measured by primary tumor and nodal metastases volume, provides information that may be helpful in determining prognosis and identifying groups of patients for which more aggressive local therapy is warranted.

  15. Multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes for treating brain glioma along with eliminating glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Tao; Tang, Wei; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-Min; Wang, Yan-Hong; Cheng, Lan; Meng, Xian-Sheng

    2016-04-26

    Malignant brain glioma is the most lethal and aggressive type of cancer. Surgery and radiotherapy cannot eliminate all glioma stem cells (GSCs) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the movement of antitumor drugs from blood to brain, thus leading to the poor prognosis with high recurrence rate. In the present study, the targeting conjugates of cholesterol polyethylene glycol polyethylenimine (CHOL-PEG2000-PEI) and D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate vapreotide (TPGS1000-VAP) were newly synthesized for transporting drugs across the BBB and targeting glioma cells and GSCs. The multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes were constructed by modifying the targeting conjugates. The studies were undertaken on BBB model, glioma cells, GSCs, and glioma-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes with suitable physicochemical property could enhance the transport drugs across the BBB, increase the intracellular uptake, inhibit glioma cells and GSCs, penetrate and destruct the GSCs spheroids, and induce apoptosis via activating related apoptotic proteins. In vivo results demonstrated that multifunctional targeting drugs-loaded liposomes could significantly accumulate into brain tumor location, show the specificity to tumor sites, and result in a robust overall antitumor efficacy in glioma-bearing mice. These data suggested that the multifunctional targeting vinorelbine plus tetrandrine liposomes could offer a promising strategy for treating brain glioma. PMID:27029055

  16. Overexpression of TREM2 enhances glioma cell proliferation and invasion: a therapeutic target in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Qiang; Tao, Bang-Bao; Li, Bin; Wang, Xu-Hui; Zhang, Wen-Chuan; Wan, Liang; Hua, Xu-Ming; Li, Shi-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and aggressive type of primary adult brain tumors. Although TREM2 mutation is reported to be related to Nasu-Hakola disease and Alzheimer's disease, little is known about the association between TREM2 and gliomas. Here, we reported that TREM2 was significantly overexpressed in glioma tissues compared with non-tumorous brain tissues. Furthermore, TREM2 expression was closely related to pathological grade and overall survival of patients with gliomas. Down-regulation of TREM2 in two glioma cell lines, U87 and U373, resulted in a significant reduction in cell proliferation, migration and invasion and a dramatic increase in S phase arrest and apoptosis. In vivo tumorigenesis experiment also revealed that depletion of TREM2 expression inhibited U87 cell proliferation. Moreover, based on gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset, we found that TREM2 was positive related to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) apoptosis, Cromer metastasis and KEGG chemokine pathways, which was further validated by western blot in TREM2 knockdown glioma cells and indicated a possible mechanism underlying its effects on glioma. In summary, our study suggests that TREM2 may work as an oncogene and a new effective therapeutic target for glioma treatment. PMID:26506595

  17. Preclinical Pharmacological Evaluation of Letrozole as a Novel Treatment for Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Nimita; Chow, Lionel M.L.; Gudelsky, Gary A.; LaSance, Kathleen; Qi, Xiaoyang; Desai, Pankaj B.

    2015-01-01

    We present data that letrozole, an extensively used aromatase inhibitor in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast tumors in postmenopausal women, may be potentially used in the treatment of glioblastomas. First, we measured the in vitro cytotoxicity of letrozole and aromatase (CYP19A1) expression and activity in human LN229, T98G, U373MG, U251MG, and U87MG, and rat C6 glioma cell lines. Estrogen receptor (ER)positive MCF-7 and ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells served as controls. Cytotoxicity was determined employing the MTT assay, and aromatase activity using an immunoassay that measures the conversion of testosterone to estrogen. Second, in vivo activity of letrozole was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats orthotopically implanted with C6 gliomas. The changes in tumor volume with letrozole treatment (4 mg/kg/day) were assessed employing μPET/CT imaging, employing [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (F18-FDG) as the radiotracer. Brain tissues were collected for histologic evaluations. All glioma cell lines included here expressed CYP19A1 and letrozole exerted considerable cytotoxicity and decrease in aromatase activity against these cells (IC50, 0.1–3.5 μmol/L). Imaging analysis employing F18-FDG μPET/CT demonstrated a marked reduction of active tumor volume (>75%) after 8 days of letrozole treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed marked reduction in aromatase expression in tumoral regions of the brain after letrozole treatment. Thus, employing multifaceted tools, we demonstrate that aromatase may be a novel target for the treatment of gliomas and that letrozole, an FDA-approved drug with an outstanding record of safety may be repurposed for the treatment of such primary brain tumors, which currently have few therapeutic options. PMID:25695958

  18. Ménage à trois: Sustained therapeutic anti-tumor immunity requires multiple partners in malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Derek A; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain cancer. Given our interest in novel immunotherapies, we have recently shown that inhibiting CTLA-4, PD-L1 and IDO results in a dramatic survival advantage in mice with brain tumors. Our preclinical study supports the rapid translation of this approach into phase I clinical trial. PMID:25057450

  19. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Lulla, Rishi R; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  20. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Rishi R.; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  1. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    Glioblastoma multiforme - children; Ependymoma - children; Glioma - children; Astrocytoma - children; Medulloblastoma - children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children)

  2. Oncolytic adenoviruses: A thorny path to glioma cure

    PubMed Central

    Ulasov, I.V.; Borovjagin, A.V.; Schroeder, B.A.; Baryshnikov, A.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is a rapidly progressing brain tumor. Despite the relatively low percentage of cancer patients with glioma diagnoses, recent statistics indicate that the number of glioma patients may have increased over the past decade. Current therapeutic options for glioma patients include tumor resection, chemotherapy, and concomitant radiation therapy with an average survival of approximately 16 months. The rapid progression of gliomas has spurred the development of novel treatment options, such as cancer gene therapy and oncolytic virotherapy. Preclinical testing of oncolytic adenoviruses using glioma models revealed both positive and negative sides of the virotherapy approach. Here we present a detailed overview of the glioma virotherapy field and discuss auxiliary therapeutic strategies with the potential for augmenting clinical efficacy of GBM virotherapy treatment. PMID:25685829

  3. Targeted Radiolabeled Compounds in Glioma Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Dominik; Krolicki, Leszek; Morgenstern, Alfred; Merlo, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Malignant gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grades II-IV represent the largest entity within the group of intrinsic brain tumors and are graded according to their pathophysiological features with survival times between more than 10 years (WHO II) and only several months (WHO IV). Gliomas arise from astrocytic or oligodendrocytic precursor cells and exhibit an infiltrative growth pattern lacking a clearly identifiable tumor border. The development of effective treatment strategies of the invasive tumor cell front represents the main challenge in glioma therapy. The therapeutic standard consists of surgical resection and, depending on the extent of resection and WHO grade, adjuvant external beam radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. Within the last decades, there has been no major improvement of the prognosis of patients with glioma. The consistent overexpression of neurokinin type 1 receptors in gliomas WHO grades II-IV has been used to develop a therapeutic substance P-based targeting system. A substance P-analogue conjugated to the DOTA or DOTAGA chelator has been labeled with different alpha-particle or beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted glioma therapy. The radiopharmaceutical has been locally injected into the tumors or the resection cavity. In several clinical studies, the methodology has been examined in adjuvant and neoadjuvant clinical settings. Although no large controlled series have so far been generated, the results of radiolabeled substance P-based targeted glioma therapy compare favorably with standard therapy. Recently, labeling with the alpha particle emitting Bi-213 has been found to be promising due to the high linear energy transfer and the very short tissue range of 0.08mm. Further development needs to focus on the improvement of the stability of the compound and the application by dedicated catheter systems to improve the intratumoral distribution of the radiopharmaceutical within the prognostically critical infiltrative

  4. Use of EF5 to Measure the Oxygen Level in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  5. Treatment Planning and Volumetric Response Assessment for Yttrium-90 Radioembolization: Semiautomated Determination of Liver Volume and Volume of Tumor Necrosis in Patients with Hepatic Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Monsky, Wayne L.; Garza, Armando S.; Kim, Isaac; Loh, Shaun; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Li Chinshang; Fisher, Jerron; Sandhu, Parmbir; Sidhar, Vishal; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Lin, Frank; Deutsch, Larry-Stuart; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility for novel semiautomated measurements of hepatic volume used for Yttrium-90 dose calculations as well as whole-liver and necrotic-liver (hypodense/nonenhancing) tumor volume after radioembolization. The secondary aim was to provide initial comparisons of tumor volumetric measurements with linear measurements, as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, and survival outcomes. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 23 consecutive radioembolization procedures were performed for 14 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 cases of hepatic metastases. Baseline and follow-up computed tomography obtained 1 month after treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Three observers measured liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volumes twice using semiautomated software. Results: Good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility was demonstrated (intraclass correlation [ICC] > 0.9) for tumor and liver volumes. Semiautomated measurements of liver volumes were statistically similar to those obtained with manual tracing (ICC = 0.868), but they required significantly less time to perform (p < 0.0001, ICC = 0.088). There was a positive association between change in linear tumor measurements and whole-tumor volume (p < 0.0001). However, linear measurements did not correlate with volume of necrosis (p > 0.05). Dose, change in tumor diameters, tumor volume, and necrotic volume did not correlate with survival (p > 0.05 in all instances). However, Kaplan-Meier curves suggest that a >10% increase in necrotic volume correlated with survival (p = 0.0472). Conclusion: Semiautomated volumetric analysis of liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volume can be performed with good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility. In this small retrospective study, measurements of tumor necrosis were suggested to correlate with survival.

  6. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  7. Advanced 3D-Sonographic Imaging as a Precise Technique to Evaluate Tumor Volume

    PubMed Central

    Pflanzer, R.; Hofmann, M.; Shelke, A.; Habib, A.; Derwich, W.; Schmitz-Rixen, T.; Bernd, A.; Kaufmann, R.; Bereiter-Hahn, J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of tumor volume in subcutaneously inoculated xenograft models is a standard procedure for clinical and preclinical evaluation of tumor response to treatment. Practitioners frequently use a hands-on caliper method in conjunction with a simplified formula to assess tumor volume. Non-invasive and more precise techniques as investigation by MR or (μ)CT exist but come with various adverse effects in terms of radiation, complex setup or elevated cost of investigations. Therefore, we propose an advanced three-dimensional sonographic imaging technique to determine small tumor volumes in xenografts with high precision and minimized observer variability. We present a study on xenograft carcinoma tumors from which volumes and shapes were calculated with the standard caliper method as well as with a clinically available three-dimensional ultrasound scanner and subsequent processing software. Statistical analysis reveals the suitability of this non-invasive approach for the purpose of a quick and precise calculation of tumor volume in small rodents. PMID:25500076

  8. TGF-β signaling and its targeting for glioma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jianfeng; Alvarez-Breckenridge, Christopher A; Wang, Qi-En; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic cytokine, secreted by a variety of cells including immune cells, tumor cells, and stromal cells. TGF-β signaling is dysregulated in cancer patients, and this aberrant signaling at least in part contributes to initiation and progression of many cancers including glioma. The dysregulated signaling components provide molecular targets for the treatment of glioma. In this article, we review TGF-β signaling and its targeting in glioma. PMID:26045979

  9. OKN-007 decreases VEGFR-2 levels in a preclinical GL261 mouse glioma model

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Patricia Coutinho; Smith, Nataliya; Pody, Richard; He, Ting; Njoku, Charity; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea; Meek, Bill; Chen, Hong; Dong, Yunzhou; Saunders, Debra; Orock, Albert; Hodges, Erik; Colijn, Sarah; Mamedova, Nadezda; Towner, Rheal A

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential to tumor progression, and the precise imaging of the angiogenic marker vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) may provide an accurate evaluation for angiogenesis during a therapeutic response. With the use of molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI), an in vitro cell assay indicated significantly decreased T1 relaxation values when tumor endothelial cells (TEC), which positively expressed VEGFR-2 (Western blot), were in the presence of the VEGFR-2 probe compared to TEC alone (P < 0.001). For in vivo mMRI evaluations, we assessed VEGFR-2 levels in untreated and OKN-007-treated GL261 mouse gliomas. Regarding treatment response, OKN-007 was also able to significantly decrease tumor volumes (P < 0.01) and increase survival (P < 0.001) in treated animals. Regarding in vivo detection of VEGFR-2, OKN-007 was found to significantly decrease the amount of VEGFR-2 probe (P < 0.05) compared to an untreated control group. Fluorescence imaging for the VEGFR-2 probe indicated that there was colocalization with the endothelial marker CD31 in an untreated tumor bearing mouse and decreased levels for an OKN-007-treated animal. Immuno-fluorescence imaging for VEGFR-2 indicated that OKN-007 treatment significantly decreased VEGFR-2 levels (P < 0.0001) when compared to untreated tumors. Immuno-electron microscopy was used with gold-labeled anti-biotin to detect the anti-VEGFR-2 probe within the plasma membrane of GL261 tumor endothelial cells. This is the first attempt at detecting in vivo levels of VEGFR-2 in a mouse GL261 glioma model and assessing the anti-angiogenic capability of an anticancer nitrone. The results indicate that OKN-007 treatment substantially decreased VEGFR-2 levels in a GL261 glioma model, and can be considered as an anti-angiogenic therapy in human gliomas. PMID:26269774

  10. Biomarker-driven diagnosis of diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Appin, Christina L; Brat, Daniel J

    2015-11-01

    The diffuse gliomas are primary central nervous system tumors that arise most frequently in the cerebral hemispheres of adults. They are currently classified as astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas or oligoastrocytomas and range in grade from II to IV. Glioblastoma (GBM), grade IV, is the highest grade and most common form. The diagnosis of diffuse gliomas has historically been based primarily on histopathologic features, yet these tumors have a wide range of biological behaviors that are only partially explained by morphology. Biomarkers have now become an established component of the neuropathologic diagnosis of gliomas, since molecular alterations aid in classification, prognostication and prediction of therapeutic response. Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations are frequent in grades II and III infiltrating gliomas of adults, as well as secondary GBMs, and are a major discriminate of biologic class. IDH mutant infiltrating astrocytomas (grades II and III), as well as secondary GBMs, are characterized by TP53 and ATRX mutations. Oligodendrogliomas are also IDH mutant, but instead are characterized by 1p/19q co-deletion and mutations of CIC, FUBP1, Notch1 and the TERT promoter. Primary GBMs typically lack IDH mutations and demonstrate EGFR, PTEN, TP53, PDGFRA, NF1 and CDKN2A/B alterations and TERT promoter mutations. Pediatric gliomas differ in their spectrum of disease from those in adults; high grade gliomas occurring in children frequently have mutations in H3F3A, ATRX and DAXX, but not IDH. Circumscribed, low grade gliomas, such as pilocytic astrocytoma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma and ganglioglioma, need to be distinguished from diffuse gliomas in the pediatric population. These gliomas often harbor mutations or activating gene rearrangements in BRAF. PMID:26004297