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1

Ecological Modelling 143 (2001) 227243 A globally applicable model of daily solar irradiance  

E-print Network

Ecological Modelling 143 (2001) 227­243 A globally applicable model of daily solar irradiance at many ground stations, the total daily solar irradiance (Rs) received at the earth's surface to measured solar irradiance. In a global comparison for the year 1987, VP-RAD-estimated and satellite

Hunt Jr., E. Raymond

2

Eugene, Or. 1998 Daily Global Irradiance 1 31 61 91 121 151 181 211 241 271 301 331 361  

E-print Network

Eugene, Or. 1998 Daily Global Irradiance 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 1 31 61 91 121 151 181 211 241 271 301 331 361 Year Day GlobalIrradianceWhr/m2 perDay Eugene, Or. 1998 Daily Beam Day BeamIrradianceWhr/m2 perDay #12;Eugene, Or. 1998 Daily Diffuse Irradiance 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8

Oregon, University of

3

Automated forecasts of daily global solar energy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a joint effort, the Techniques Development Laboratory (TDL) of the National Weather Service and the Air Resources Laboratories (ARL) of the Environmental Research Laboratories have developed a method for producing daily forecasts of incoming global solar energy for periods one to two days in advance. Statistical regression was used to relate measurements of solar radiation to National Weather Service

Jensenius

1983-01-01

4

Reconstruction of daily solar UV irradiation from 1893 to 2002 in Potsdam, Germany.  

PubMed

Long-term records of solar UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface are scarce. Radiative transfer calculations and statistical models are two options used to reconstruct decadal changes in solar UV radiation from long-term records of measured atmospheric parameters that contain information on the effect of clouds, atmospheric aerosols and ground albedo on UV radiation. Based on earlier studies, where the long-term variation of daily solar UV irradiation was derived from measured global and diffuse irradiation as well as atmospheric ozone by a non-linear regression method [Feister et al. (2002) Photochem Photobiol 76:281-293], we present another approach for the reconstruction of time series of solar UV radiation. An artificial neural network (ANN) was trained with measurements of solar UV irradiation taken at the Meteorological Observatory in Potsdam, Germany, as well as measured parameters with long-term records such as global and diffuse radiation, sunshine duration, horizontal visibility and column ozone. This study is focussed on the reconstruction of daily broad-band UV-B (280-315 nm), UV-A (315-400 nm) and erythemal UV irradiation (ER). Due to the rapid changes in cloudiness at mid-latitude sites, solar UV irradiance exhibits appreciable short-term variability. One of the main advantages of the statistical method is that it uses doses of highly variable input parameters calculated from individual spot measurements taken at short time intervals, which thus do represent the short-term variability of solar irradiance. PMID:17318610

Junk, Jürgen; Feister, Uwe; Helbig, Alfred

2007-08-01

5

Relative Accuracy of 1-Minute and Daily Total Solar Radiation Data for 12 Global and 4 Direct Beam Solar Radiometers  

SciTech Connect

We evaluated the relative performance of 12 global and four direct beam solar radiometers deployed at a single site over a 12-month period. Test radiometer irradiances were compared with a reference irradiance consisting of either an absolute cavity radiometer (during calibrations) or a low uncertainty thermopile pyrheliometer (during the evaluation period) for pyrheliometers; and for pyranometers a reference global irradiance computed from the reference pyrheliometer and diffuse irradiance from a shaded pyranometer. One minute averages of 3-second data for 12 months from the test instrument measurements were compared with the computed reference data set. Combined uncertainty in the computed reference irradiance is 1.8% {+-} 0.5%. Total uncertainty in the pyranometer comparisons is {+-}2.5%. We show mean percent difference between reference global irradiance and test pyranometer 1 minute data as a function of zenith angle, and percent differences between daily totals for the reference and test irradiances as a function of day number. We offer no explicit conclusion about the performance of instrument models, as a general array of applications with a wide range of instrumentation and accuracy requirements could be addressed with any of the radiometers.

Myers, D.; Wilcox, S. M.

2009-01-01

6

Downscaling of global solar irradiation in R  

E-print Network

A methodology for downscaling solar irradiation from satellite-derived databases is described using R software. Different packages such as raster, parallel, solaR, gstat, sp and rasterVis are considered in this study for improving solar resource estimation in areas with complex topography, in which downscaling is a very useful tool for reducing inherent deviations in satellite-derived irradiation databases, which lack of high global spatial resolution. A topographical analysis of horizon blocking and sky-view is developed with a digital elevation model to determine what fraction of hourly solar irradiation reaches the Earth's surface. Eventually, kriging with external drift is applied for a better estimation of solar irradiation throughout the region analyzed. This methodology has been implemented as an example within the region of La Rioja in northern Spain, and the mean absolute error found is a striking 25.5% lower than with the original database.

Antonanzas-Torres, F; Antonanzas, J; Perpiñán, O

2013-01-01

7

An Overview of the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily Database  

E-print Network

1 An Overview of the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily Database Matthew J. Menne, Imke, NC USA Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology* *This paper is currently "in press". An early climate dataset is described. The dataset, called the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) Daily

8

Online Evaluation of Satellite-derived Global Daily Precipitation Products  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Precipitation is hard to measure and difficult to predict. Each year droughts and floods cause severe property damages and human casualties around the world. Accurate measurement and forecast are important for mitigation and preparedness efforts. Significant progress has been made over the past decade in satellite precipitation product development. In particular, products' spatial and temporal resolutions as well as timely availability have been improved by blended techniques. Their resulting products are widely used in various research and applications. However biases and uncertainties are common among precipitation products and an obstacle exists in quickly gaining knowledge of product quality, biases and behavior at a local or regional scale, namely user defined areas or points of interest. Current online inter-comparison and validation services have not addressed this issue adequately. To expedite the use of satellite precipitation products, the obstacle needs to be removed. We have developed a prototype to address this issue. Despite its limited functionality and datasets, users can use this tool to generate customized plots within the United States for 2005. In addition, users can download customized data for further analysis, e.g. comparing their gauge data. To meet increasing demands, we have increased the temporal coverage and expanded the spatial coverage from the United States to the globe. More products have been added as well. Examples of using the system will be presented. The future plans include integrating IPWG (International Precipitation Working Group) Validation Algorithms/statistics, allowing users to generate customized plots and data. In addition, we will expand the current daily products to monthly and their climatology products. Whenever the TRMM science team changes their product version number, users would like to know the differences by inter-comparing both versions of TRMM products in their areas of interest. Making this service available to users will help them to better understand associated changes. We plan to implement this inter-comparison in TRMM standard monthly products with the IPWG algorithms. The plans outlined above will complement and accelerate the existing and ongoing validation activities in the community as well as enhance data services for TRMM and the future Global Precipitation Mission (GPM).

Liu, Z.; Yu, G.

2011-12-01

9

Longitudinal Patterns of Daily Affect and Global Mood during Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined grade and sex patterns in real-time measures of daily mood using Ecological Momentary Assessments via palmtop computers among 8th (N=296) and 10th graders (N=266) for 1 year using a three-wave longitudinal design. Participants responded to five to seven random prompts/day for 7 consecutive days; when prompted, participants…

Weinstein, Sally M.; Mermelstein, Robin J.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Hedeker, Donald; Flay, Brian R.

2007-01-01

10

Study of the division of global irradiance into direct beam and diffuse irradiance at seven Canadian sites  

SciTech Connect

Canadian hourly global and diffuse irradiation data and associated daily surface meterological data of humidity, temperature and snow depth for the years 1977-1984 are analyzed. These data have been measured at Edmonton, Goose Bay, Montreal, Port Hardy, Resolute, Toronto and Winnipeg. Hourly values of the clearness index k{sub t} and diffuse index k{sub d} are sorted into bivariate histograms according to their numerical values. Different histograms are established for different ranges of the three variables: solar elevation, atmospheric precipitable water, and snow depth for each station. Properties of the different histograms are compared using standard statistical procedures. It is found that the division of global irradiation into direct beam and diffuse irradiation is correlated with the four variables k{sub t}, precipitable water, solar elevation, and snow depth. It is also found that many, but not all, of the differences between data from the same station at different times and between different stations can be attributed to conditions associated with differences in these four variables. The data show evidence that the division of global irradiation into direct and diffuse irradiation can depend upon the properties of the clouds beyond how these clouds are characterized by the four variables. 37 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

Garrison, J.; Sahami, K. [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States)] [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States)

1995-12-31

11

Determination of Semivariogram Models to Krige Hourly and Daily Solar Irradiance in Western Nebraska(.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, linear and spherical semivariogram models were determined for use in kriging hourly and daily solar irradiation for every season of the year. The data used to generate the models were from 18 weather stations in western Nebraska. The models generated were tested using cross validation. The performance of the spherical and linear semivariogram models were compared with each other and also with the semivariogram models based on the best fit to the sample semivariogram of a particular day or hour. There were no significant differences in the performance of the three models. This result and the comparable errors produced by the models in kriging indicated that the linear and spherical models could be used to perform kriging at any hour and day of the year without deriving an individual semivariogram model for that day or hour.The seasonal mean absolute errors associated with kriging, within the network, when using the spherical or the linear semivariograms models were between 10% and 13% of the mean irradiation for daily irradiation and between 12% and 20% for hourly irradiation. These errors represent an improvement of 1%-2% when compared with replacing data at a given site with the data of the nearest weather station.

Merino, G. G.; Jones, D.; Stooksbury, D. E.; Hubbard, K. G.

2001-06-01

12

Global observed changes in daily climate extremes of temperature and precipitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A suite of climate change indices derived from daily temperature and precipitation data, with a primary focus on extreme events, were computed and analyzed. By setting an exact formula for each index and using specially designed software, analyses done in different countries have been combined seamlessly. This has enabled the presentation of the most up-to-date and comprehensive global picture of

L. V. Alexander; X. Zhang; T. C. Peterson; J. Caesar; B. Gleason; A. M. G. Klein Tank; M. Haylock; D. Collins; B. Trewin; F. Rahimzadeh; A. Tagipour; K. Rupa Kumar; J. Revadekar; G. Griffiths; L. Vincent; D. B. Stephenson; J. Burn; E. Aguilar; M. Brunet; M. Taylor; M. New; P. Zhai; M. Rusticucci; J. L. Vazquez-Aguirre

2006-01-01

13

Daily estimates of the Earth's pole position with the global positioning system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Daily estimates of the Earth's pole position have been obtained with measurements from a worldwide network of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, obtained during the three week GIG'91 experiment in January- February, 1991. For this short-term study, the GPS based polar motion series agrees with the other space based geodetic techniques (Very Long Baseline Interferometry and Satellite Laser Ranging) to

Ulf J. Lindqwister; Adam P. Freedman; Geoffrey Blewitt

1992-01-01

14

Global changes in seasonal means and extremes of precipitation from daily climate model data  

E-print Network

Global changes in seasonal means and extremes of precipitation from daily climate model data Simone; published 12 January 2012. [1] We investigate simulated changes of seasonal precipitation maxima and means the seasonal precipitation maximum and the seasonal mean. Modeled precipitation data appear consistent

Stoffelen, Ad

15

Adaptive radiotherapy based on the daily regression of a tumor in carbon-ion beam irradiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a new application of adaptive radiotherapy using a scanning beam, taking into account the daily regression of a tumor. No patient-specific hardware (such as collimators and compensating filters) is needed for the scanning technique; thus, it allows re-planning immediately before each fractional irradiation using the sophisticated conformations of dose distributions. We retrospectively modeled the tumor volume regression curves as a function of the dose from the CT images which were taken three times during the treatment course. The daily shape of the tumor was mathematically interpolated assuming constant continuity of the tumor deformation. We simulated the adaptive radiotherapy by optimizing the dose distribution on the estimated daily tumor volume for every fraction. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) for the organ at risk in the adaptive radiotherapy was compared with that of the current clinical protocol. We performed analysis using the CT images of cervical cancer patients who received carbon-ion radiotherapy in broad-beam irradiation. The DVH for the rectum and the sigmoid colon was improved by adaptive radiotherapy considering the inter-fractional tumor regression. The result shows that this approach has possible advantages.

Nagano, Ai; Minohara, Shinichi; Kato, Shingo; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Ando, Ken

2012-12-01

16

Automated daily process for global ionospheric total electron content maps and satellite ocean altimeter ionospheric calibration based on Global Positioning System data  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accuracy of single-frequency ocean altimeters benefits from calibration of the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere below the satellite. Data from a global network of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers provides timely, continuous, and globally well-distributed measurements of ionospheric electron content. For several months we have been running a daily automatic Global Ionospheric Map process which inputs global

B. A. Iijima; I. L. Harris; C. M. Ho; U. J. Lindqwister; A. J. Mannucci; X. Pi; M. J. Reyes; L. C. Sparks; B. D. Wilson

1999-01-01

17

Spatio-temporal interpolation of daily temperatures for global land areas at 1 km resolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Combined Global Surface Summary of Day and European Climate Assessment and Dataset daily meteorological data sets (around 9000 stations) were used to build spatio-temporal geostatistical models and predict daily air temperature at ground resolution of 1 km for the global land mass. Predictions in space and time were made for the mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures using spatio-temporal regression-kriging with a time series of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 8 day images, topographic layers (digital elevation model and topographic wetness index), and a geometric temperature trend as covariates. The accuracy of predicting daily temperatures was assessed using leave-one-out cross validation. To account for geographical point clustering of station data and get a more representative cross-validation accuracy, predicted values were aggregated to blocks of land of size 500×500 km. Results show that the average accuracy for predicting mean, maximum, and minimum daily temperatures is root-mean-square error (RMSE) =±2°C for areas densely covered with stations and between ±2°C and ±4°C for areas with lower station density. The lowest prediction accuracy was observed at high altitudes (>1000 m) and in Antarctica with an RMSE around 6°C. The model and predictions were built for the year 2011 only, but the same methodology could be extended for the whole range of the MODIS land surface temperature images (2001 to today), i.e., to produce global archives of daily temperatures (a next-generation http://WorldClim.org repository) and to feed various global environmental models.

Kilibarda, Milan; Hengl, Tomislav; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.; Gräler, Benedikt; Pebesma, Edzer; Per?ec Tadi?, Melita; Bajat, Branislav

2014-03-01

18

Forecasting Plant Productivity and Health Using Diffuse-to-Global Irradiance Ratios Extracted from the OMI Aerosol Product  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Atmospheric aerosols are a major contributor to diffuse irradiance. This Candidate Solution suggests using the OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) aerosol product as input into a radiative transfer model, which would calculate the ratio of diffuse to global irradiance at the Earth s surface. This ratio can significantly influence the rate of photosynthesis in plants; increasing the ratio of diffuse to global irradiance can accelerate photosynthesis, resulting in greater plant productivity. Accurate values of this ratio could be useful in predicting crop productivity, thereby improving forecasts of regional food resources. However, disagreements exist between diffuse-to-global irradiance values measured by different satellites and ground sensors. OMI, with its unique combination of spectral bands, high resolution, and daily global coverage, may be able to provide more accurate aerosol measurements than other comparable sensors.

Knowlton, Kelly; Andrews, Jane C.; Ryan, Robert E.

2007-01-01

19

Global Precipitation at One-Degree Daily Resolution From Multi-Satellite Observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The One-Degree Daily (1DD) technique is described for producing globally complete daily estimates of precipitation on a 1 deg x 1 deg lat/long grid from currently available observational data. Where possible (40 deg N-40 deg S), the Threshold-Matched Precipitation Index (TMPI) provides precipitation estimates in which the 3-hourly infrared brightness temperatures (IR T(sub b)) are thresholded and all "cold" pixels are given a single precipitation rate. This approach is an adaptation of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Precipitation Index (GPI), but for the TMPI the IR Tb threshold and conditional rain rate are set locally by month from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)-based precipitation frequency and the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) satellite-gauge (SG) combined monthly precipitation estimate, respectively. At higher latitudes the 1DD features a rescaled daily Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS) Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) precipitation. The frequency of rain days in the TOVS is scaled down to match that in the TMPI at the data boundaries, and the resulting non-zero TOVS values are scaled locally to sum to the SG (which is a globally complete monthly product). The time series of the daily 1DD global images shows good continuity in time and across the data boundaries. Various examples are shown to illustrate uses. Validation for individual grid -box values shows a very high root-mean-square error but, it improves quickly when users perform time/space averaging according to their own requirements.

Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Morrissey, Mark M.; Curtis, Scott; Joyce, Robert; McGavock, Brad; Susskind, Joel

2000-01-01

20

Prediction of monthly mean daily global solar radiation using Artificial Neural Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, a multilayer feed forward (MLFF) neural network based on back propagation algorithm was developed, trained, and tested to predict monthly mean daily global radiation in Tamil Nadu, India. Various geographical, solar and meteorological parameters of three different locations with diverse climatic conditions were used as input parameters. Out of 565 available data, 530 were used for training and the rest were used for testing the artificial neural network (ANN). A 3-layer and a 4-layer MLFF networks were developed and the performance of the developed models was evaluated based on mean bias error, mean absolute percentage error, root mean squared error and Student's t-test. The 3-layer MLFF network developed in this study did not give uniform results for the three chosen locations. Hence, a 4-layer MLFF network was developed and the average value of the mean absolute percentage error was found to be 5.47%. Values of global radiation obtained using the model were in excellent agreement with measured values. Results of this study show that the designed ANN model can be used to estimate monthly mean daily global radiation of any place in Tamil Nadu where measured global radiation data are not available.

Sivamadhavi, V.; Selvaraj, R. Samuel

2012-12-01

21

Daily global fire radiative power fields estimation from one or two MODIS instruments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fires are important emitters of aerosol and trace gases and as such need to be taken into account in any atmospheric composition modeling enterprise. One method to estimate these emissions is to convert Fire Radiative Power (FRP) analysis to dry matter burnt and emissions of smoke constituents using land cover dependent conversion factors. Inventories like the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) follow this approach by calculating daily global smoke emissions from FRP observed by the MODIS instruments on-board of the Terra and Aqua satellites. Observations with different overpass times systematically sample fires at different stages in the strong diurnal fire cycle. For some time periods, observations are available from only one instrument, which leads to a bias in the observed average FRP. We develop a method to correct this bias in daily FRP observations from any Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite, so that the budget of daily smoke emissions remains independent of the number of satellites from which FRP observations are taken into account. This ensures the possibility of running, e.g., GFAS in case of a default of one of the MODIS instruments. It also enables the extension GFAS to 2000-2002 and the inclusion of FRP observations from upcoming satellite missions. The correction combines linear and non-linear regressions and uses an adaptive regionalization algorithm. It removes the bias in daily average FRP observations from Terra and Aqua nearly entirely. Errors are larger for Terra than for Aqua, are generally relatively small at a global scale, but can be important at a local scale. The correction algorithm is applied to Terra observations from 25 February 2000 to 31 December 2002, when Aqua observations were not available. The database of fire emissions GFASv1.0 is extended correspondingly.

Remy, S.; Kaiser, J. W.

2014-08-01

22

Global Mapping of Underwater UV Irradiances and DNA-Weighted Exposures using TOMS and SeaWiFS Data Products  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The global stratospheric ozone-layer depletion results In an increase in biologically harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the surface and penetrating to ecologically significant depths in natural waters. Such an increase can be estimated on a global scale by combining satellite estimates of UV irradiance at the ocean surface from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) satellite instrument with the SeaWIFS satellite ocean-color measurements in the visible spectral region. In this paper we propose a model of seawater optical properties in the UV spectral region based on the Case I water model in the visible range. The inputs to the model are standard monthly SeaWiFS products: chlorophyll concentration and the diffuse attenuation coefficient at 490nm. Penetration of solar UV radiation to different depths in open ocean waters is calculated using the RT (radiative transfer) quasi-single scattering approximation (QSSA). The accuracy of the QSSA approximation in the water is tested using more accurate codes. The sensitivity study of the underwater UV irradiance to atmospheric and oceanic optical properties have shown that the main environmental parameters controlling the absolute levels of the UVB (280-320nm) and DNA-weighted irradiance underwater are: solar-zenith angle, cloud transmittance, water optical properties, and total ozone. Weekly maps of underwater UV irradiance and DNA-weighted exposure are calculated using monthly-mean SeaWiFS chlorophyll and diffuse attenuation coefficient products, daily SeaWiFS cloud fraction data, and the TOMS-derived surface UV irradiance daily maps. The final products include global maps of weekly-average UVB irradiance and DNA-weighted daily exposures at 3m and 10m, and depths where the UVB irradiance and DNA-weighted dose rate at local noon are equal to 10% of their surface values.

Vasilkov, Alexander; Krotkov, Nickolay; Herman, Jay; McClain, Charles; Arrigo, Kevin; Robinson, Wayne

1999-01-01

23

A Temperature-Based Model for Estimating Monthly Average Daily Global Solar Radiation in China  

PubMed Central

Since air temperature records are readily available around the world, the models based on air temperature for estimating solar radiation have been widely accepted. In this paper, a new model based on Hargreaves and Samani (HS) method for estimating monthly average daily global solar radiation is proposed. With statistical error tests, the performance of the new model is validated by comparing with the HS model and its two modifications (Samani model and Chen model) against the measured data at 65 meteorological stations in China. Results show that the new model is more accurate and robust than the HS, Samani, and Chen models in all climatic regions, especially in the humid regions. Hence, the new model can be recommended for estimating solar radiation in areas where only air temperature data are available in China. PMID:24605046

Li, Huashan; Cao, Fei; Wang, Xianlong; Ma, Weibin

2014-01-01

24

Sub-daily resolution of earth rotation variations with Global Positioning System measurements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data from a worldwide Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking experiment have been used to determine variations in earth rotation (UT1-UTC) over a time period of three weeks. Kalman filtering and smoothing enabled changes in UT1-UTC over intervals of 2 to 24 hrs to be detected with the GPS data. Internal consistency checks and comparisons with other solutions from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and satellite laser ranging (SLR) indicate that the GPS UT1-UTC estimates are accurate to about 2 cm. Comparison of GPS-estimated variations in UT1-UTC with 2-hr time resolution over 4 days with predicted variations computed from diurnal and semidiurnal oceanic tidal contributions strongly suggests that the observed periodic sub-daily variations of about 0.1 msec are largely of tidal origin.

Lichten, Stephen M.; Marcus, Steven L.; Dickey, Jean O.

1992-01-01

25

Modeling daylight availability and irradiance components from direct and global irradiance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the latest versions of several models developed by the authors to predict short time-step solar energy and daylight availability quantities needed by energy system modelers or building designers. The modeled quantities are global, direct and diffuse daylight illuminance, diffuse irradiance and illuminance impinging on tilted surfaces of arbitrary orientation, sky zenith luminance and sky luminance angular distribution.

R. Perez; P. Ineichen; R. Seals; J. Michalsky; R. Stewart

1990-01-01

26

Effect of Estimated Daily Global Solar Radiation Data on the Results of Crop Growth Models  

PubMed Central

The results of previous studies have suggested that estimated daily global radiation (RG) values contain an error that could compromise the precision of subsequent crop model applications. The following study presents a detailed site and spatial analysis of the RG error propagation in CERES and WOFOST crop growth models in Central European climate conditions. The research was conducted i) at the eight individual sites in Austria and the Czech Republic where measured daily RG values were available as a reference, with seven methods for RG estimation being tested, and ii) for the agricultural areas of the Czech Republic using daily data from 52 weather stations, with five RG estimation methods. In the latter case the RG values estimated from the hours of sunshine using the Ångström-Prescott formula were used as the standard method because of the lack of measured RG data. At the site level we found that even the use of methods based on hours of sunshine, which showed the lowest bias in RG estimates, led to a significant distortion of the key crop model outputs. When the Ångström-Prescott method was used to estimate RG, for example, deviations greater than ±10 per cent in winter wheat and spring barley yields were noted in 5 to 6 per cent of cases. The precision of the yield estimates and other crop model outputs was lower when RG estimates based on the diurnal temperature range and cloud cover were used (mean bias error 2.0 to 4.1 per cent). The methods for estimating RG from the diurnal temperature range produced a wheat yield bias of more than 25 per cent in 12 to 16 per cent of the seasons. Such uncertainty in the crop model outputs makes the reliability of any seasonal yield forecasts or climate change impact assessments questionable if they are based on this type of data. The spatial assessment of the RG data uncertainty propagation over the winter wheat yields also revealed significant differences within the study area. We found that RG estimates based on diurnal temperature range or its combination with daily total precipitation produced a bias of to 30 per cent in the mean winter wheat grain yields in some regions compared with simulations in which RG values had been estimated using the Ångström-Prescott formula. In contrast to the results at the individual sites, the methods based on the diurnal temperature range in combination with daily precipitation totals showed significantly poorer performance than the methods based on the diurnal temperature range only. This was due to the marked increase in the bias in RG estimates with altitude, longitude or latitude of given region. These findings in our view should act as an incentive for further research to develop more precise and generally applicable methods for estimating daily RG based more on the underlying physical principles and/or the remote sensing approach.

Trnka, Miroslav; Eitzinger, Josef; Kapler, Pavel; Dubrovsky, Martin; Semeradova, Daniela; Zalud, Zden ek; Formayer, Herbert

2007-01-01

27

Prediction of global solar irradiance based on time series analysis: Application to solar thermal power plants energy production planning  

SciTech Connect

Due to strong increase of solar power generation, the predictions of incoming solar energy are acquiring more importance. Photovoltaic and solar thermal are the main sources of electricity generation from solar energy. In the case of solar thermal energy plants with storage energy system, its management and operation need reliable predictions of solar irradiance with the same temporal resolution as the temporal capacity of the back-up system. These plants can work like a conventional power plant and compete in the energy stock market avoiding intermittence in electricity production. This work presents a comparisons of statistical models based on time series applied to predict half daily values of global solar irradiance with a temporal horizon of 3 days. Half daily values consist of accumulated hourly global solar irradiance from solar raise to solar noon and from noon until dawn for each day. The dataset of ground solar radiation used belongs to stations of Spanish National Weather Service (AEMet). The models tested are autoregressive, neural networks and fuzzy logic models. Due to the fact that half daily solar irradiance time series is non-stationary, it has been necessary to transform it to two new stationary variables (clearness index and lost component) which are used as input of the predictive models. Improvement in terms of RMSD of the models essayed is compared against the model based on persistence. The validation process shows that all models essayed improve persistence. The best approach to forecast half daily values of solar irradiance is neural network models with lost component as input, except Lerida station where models based on clearness index have less uncertainty because this magnitude has a linear behaviour and it is easier to simulate by models. (author)

Martin, Luis; Marchante, Ruth; Cony, Marco [Investigaciones y Recursos Solares Avanzados (IrSOLaV), Tres Cantos 2 8045 (Spain); Zarzalejo, Luis F.; Polo, Jesus; Navarro, Ana [Energy Department, CIEMAT, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

2010-10-15

28

Daily ozone cycle in the stratosphere: global, regional and seasonal behaviour modelled with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) is utilised to study the daily ozone cycle and underlying photochemical and dynamical processes. The analysis is focused on the daily ozone cycle in the middle stratosphere at 5 hPa where satellite-based trend estimates of stratospheric ozone are most biased by diurnal sampling effects and drifting satellite orbits. The simulated ozone cycle shows a minimum after sunrise and a maximum in the late afternoon. Further, a seasonal variation of the daily ozone cycle in the stratosphere was found. Depending on season and latitude, the peak-to-valley difference of the daily ozone cycle varies mostly between 3 and 5% (0.4 ppmv) with respect to the midnight ozone volume mixing ratio. The maximal variation of 15% (0.8 ppmv) is found at the polar circle in summer. The global pattern of the strength of the daily ozone cycle is mainly governed by the solar zenith angle and the sunshine duration. In addition, we find synoptic-scale variations in the strength of the daily ozone cycle. These variations are often anti-correlated to regional temperature anomalies and are due to the temperature dependence of the rate coefficients k2 and k3 of the Chapman cycle reactions. Further, the NOx catalytic cycle counteracts the accumulation of ozone during daytime and leads to an anti-correlation between anomalies in NOx and the strength of the daily ozone cycle. Similarly, ozone recombines with atomic oxygen which leads to an anti-correlation between anomalies in ozone abundance and the strength of the daily ozone cycle. At higher latitudes, an increase of the westerly (easterly) wind cause a decrease (increase) in the sunshine duration of an air parcel leading to a weaker (stronger) daily ozone cycle.

Schanz, A.; Hocke, K.; Kämpfer, N.

2014-07-01

29

Relative Accuracy of 1-Minute and Daily Total Solar Radiation Data for 12 Global and 4 Direct Beam Solar Radiometers: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the relative performance of 12 global and four direct beam solar radiometers deployed at a single site over a 12-month period. Test radiometer irradiances were compared with a reference irradiance consisting of either an absolute cavity radiometer (during calibrations) or a low uncertainty thermopile pyrheliometer (during the evaluation period) for pyrheliometers; and for pyranometers a reference global irradiance computed from the reference pyrheliometer and diffuse irradiance from a shaded pyranometer.

Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S. M.

2009-03-01

30

A NEW ADAPTIVE METHODOLGY OF GLOBAL-TO-DIRECT IRRADIANCE BASED ON CLUSTERING AND  

E-print Network

have been used. Concretely, topics of measure theory, cluster methods and kernel machines learning registers in a concrete emplacement, into beam irradiance data. In front of classical global to direct of ground measurements of Beam and Global irradiance were available and different mathematical techniques

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

31

Estimation of 5-min solar global irradiation on tilted planes by ANN method in Bouzareah, Algeria  

E-print Network

Estimation of 5-min solar global irradiation on tilted planes by ANN method in Bouzareah, Algeria K irradiation data of Bouzareah (Algeria). The ANN is developed and optimized on the basis of two years of solar is around 8% for the nRMSE. Keywords- Solar irradiation; Artificial Neural Network; Estimation I

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

32

Daily global maps of carbon monoxide from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the first observations of tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. AIRS daily coverage of ~70% of the planet represents a significant evolutionary advance in satellite trace gas remote sensing. Tropospheric CO abundances are retrieved from AIRS 4.55 mum spectral region using the full AIRS retrieval algorithm run in a research

W. W. McMillan; C. Barnet; L. Strow; M. T. Chahine; M. L. McCourt; J. X. Warner; P. C. Novelli; S. Korontzi; E. S. Maddy; S. Datta

2005-01-01

33

Global Horizontal Irradiance Anomalies in Long Term Series Over India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

India has a high potential for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource potential. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation (GHI) and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of GHI measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of GHI using anomalies techniques over ten different sites over India. Besides, techniques of linear trends have been applied for to show the evolution over this period. The analysis of anomalies has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the anomalies observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative anomalies. The results exhibit a decreasing trend and negative anomalies confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. This observation is also consequent with solar dimming effect, apparently increased during the last two decades due to the increase of aerosol loading in the atmosphere. These results remark the important of having accurate knowledge of atmospheric aerosol loading and its dynamics over India with high spatial resolution in the framework of solar energy deployment in the country. It is worth to mention that greater anomalies and a noticeable decreasing trend found in Calcutta could be correlated with the highly population rate, and thus the greater the population density of the area the greater the negative anomalies and the decreasing trend of solar irradiation monthly means.

Cony, Marco; Liria, Juan; Weisenberg, Ralf; Serrano, Enrique

2014-05-01

34

Daily and Hourly Variability in Global Fire Emissions and Consequences for Atmospheric Model Predictions of Carbon Monoxide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attribution of the causes of atmospheric trace gas and aerosol variability often requires the use of high resolution time series of anthropogenic and natural emissions inventories. Here we developed an approach for representing synoptic- and diurnal-scale temporal variability in fire emissions for the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3). We distributed monthly GFED3 emissions during 2003-2009 on a daily time step using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived measurements of active fires from Terra and Aqua satellites. In parallel, mean diurnal cycles were constructed from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) active fire observations. We found that patterns of daily variability in fires varied considerably across different biomes, with short but intense periods of daily emissions in boreal ecosystems and lower intensity (but more continuous) periods of bunting in savannas. On diurnal timescales, our analysis of the GOES active fires indicated that fires in savannas, grasslands, and croplands occurred earlier in the day as compared to fires in nearby forests. Comparison with Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) column CO observations provided evidence that including daily variability in emissions moderately improved atmospheric model simulations, particularly during the fire season and near regions with high levels of biomass burning. The high temporal resolution estimates of fire emissions developed here may ultimately reduce uncertainties related to fire contributions to atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Important future directions include reconciling top-down and bottom up estimates of fire radiative power and integrating burned area and active fire time series from multiple satellite sensors to improve daily emissions estimates.

Mu, M.; Randerson, J. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; Giglio, L.; Kasibhatla, P.; Morton, D.; Collatz, G. J.; DeFries, R. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Prins, E. M.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Wunch, D.; Toon, G. C.; Sherlock, V.; Wennberg, P. O.

2011-01-01

35

Daily and 3-hourly Variability in Global Fire Emissions and Consequences for Atmospheric Model Predictions of Carbon Monoxide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attribution of the causes of atmospheric trace gas and aerosol variability often requires the use of high resolution time series of anthropogenic and natural emissions inventories. Here we developed an approach for representing synoptic- and diurnal-scale temporal variability in fire emissions for the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3). We disaggregated monthly GFED3 emissions during 2003.2009 to a daily time step using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ]derived measurements of active fires from Terra and Aqua satellites. In parallel, mean diurnal cycles were constructed from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA) active fire observations. Daily variability in fires varied considerably across different biomes, with short but intense periods of daily emissions in boreal ecosystems and lower intensity (but more continuous) periods of burning in savannas. These patterns were consistent with earlier field and modeling work characterizing fire behavior dynamics in different ecosystems. On diurnal timescales, our analysis of the GOES WF_ABBA active fires indicated that fires in savannas, grasslands, and croplands occurred earlier in the day as compared to fires in nearby forests. Comparison with Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) column CO observations provided evidence that including daily variability in emissions moderately improved atmospheric model simulations, particularly during the fire season and near regions with high levels of biomass burning. The high temporal resolution estimates of fire emissions developed here may ultimately reduce uncertainties related to fire contributions to atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Important future directions include reconciling top ]down and bottom up estimates of fire radiative power and integrating burned area and active fire time series from multiple satellite sensors to improve daily emissions estimates.

Mu, M.; Randerson, J. T.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Giglio, L.; Kasibhatla, P.; Morton, D.; Collatz, G. J.; DeFries, R. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Prins, E. M.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Wunch, D.; Toon, G. C.; Sherlock, V.; Wennberg, P. O.

2011-01-01

36

Optimal Normal Tissue Sparing in Craniospinal Axis Irradiation Using IMRT With Daily Intrafractionally Modulated Junction(s)  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a treatment technique for craniospinal irradiation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with improved dose homogeneity at the field junction(s), increased target volume conformity, and minimized dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: Five patients with high-risk medulloblastoma underwent CT simulation in supine position. For each patient, an IMRT plan with daily intrafractionally modulated junction(s) was generated, as well as a treatment plan based on conventional three-dimensional planning (3DCRT). A dose of 39.6 Gy in 22 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy was prescribed. Dose-volume parameters for target volumes and OARs were compared for the two techniques. Results: The maximum dose with IMRT was <107% in all patients. V{sub <95} and V{sub >107} were <1 cm{sup 3} for IMRT compared with 3-9 cm{sup 3} for the craniospinal and 26-43 cm{sup 3} for the spinal-spinal junction with 3DCRT. These observations corresponded with a lower homogeneity index and a higher conformity index for the spinal planning target volume with IMRT. IMRT provided considerable sparing of acute and late reacting tissues. V{sub 75} for the esophagus, gastroesophageal junction, and intestine was 81%, 81%, and 22% with 3DCRT versus 5%, 0%, and 1% with IMRT, respectively. V{sub 75} for the heart and thyroid was 42% and 32% vs. 0% with IMRT. Conclusion: IMRT with daily intrafractionally modulated junction results in a superior target coverage and junction homogeneity compared with 3DCRT. A significant dose reduction can be obtained for acute as well as late-reacting tissues.

Kusters, Johannes M.A.M.; Louwe, Rob J.W.; Kollenburg, Peter G.M. van; Kunze-Busch, Martina C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gidding, Corrie E.M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Janssens, Geert O.R.J., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2011-12-01

37

33 Years of Near-Global Daily Precipitation from Multisatellite Observations and its Application to Drought Monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PERSIANN Climate Data Record (PERSIANN-CDR) is a new retrospective satellite-based precipitation data set that is constructed for long-term hydrological and climate studies. The PERSIANN-CDR is a near-global (60°S-60°N) long-term (1980-2012), multi-satellite, high-resolution precipitation product that provides rain rate estimates at 0.25° and daily spatiotemporal resolution. PERSIANN-CDR is aimed at addressing the need for a consistent, long-term, high resolution precipitation data set for studying the spatial and temporal variations and changes of precipitation patterns, particularly in a scale relevant to climate extremes at the global scale. PERSIANN-CDR is generated from the PERSIANN algorithm using GridSat-B1 infrared data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). PERSIANN-CDR is adjusted using the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) monthly precipitation to maintain consistency of two data sets at 2.5° monthly scale throughout the entire reconstruction period. PERSIANN-CDR daily precipitation data demonstrates considerable consistency with both GPCP monthly and GPCP 1DD precipitation products. Verification studies over Hurricane Katrina show that PERSIANN-CDR has a good agreement with NCEP Stage IV radar data, noting that PERSIANN-CDR has better spatial coverage. In addition, the Probability Density Function (PDF) of PERSIANN-CDR over the contiguous United States was compared with the PDFs extracted from CPC gauge data and the TMPA precipitation product. The experiment also shows good agreement of the PDF of PERSIANN-CDR with the PDFs of TMPA and CPC gauge data. The application of PERSIANN-CDR in regional and global drought monitoring is investigated. Consisting of more than three decades of high-resolution precipitation data, PERSIANN-CDR makes us capable of long-term assessment of droughts at a higher resolution (0.25°) than previously possible. The results will be presented at the meeting.

Ashouri, H.; Hsu, K.; Sorooshian, S.; Braithwaite, D.; Knapp, K. R.; Cecil, L. D.

2013-12-01

38

Analysis of daily, monthly, and annual burned area using the fourth-generation global fire emissions database (GFED4)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract We describe the fourth generation of the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Fire Emissions Database (GFED4) burned area data set, which provides <span class="hlt">global</span> monthly burned area at 0.25° spatial resolution from mid-1995 through the present and <span class="hlt">daily</span> burned area for the time series extending back to August 2000. We produced the full data set by combining 500 m MODIS burned area maps with active fire data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) family of sensors. We found that the <span class="hlt">global</span> annual area burned for the years 1997 through 2011 varied from 301 to 377Mha, with an average of 348Mha. We assessed the interannual variability and trends in burned area on the basis of a region-specific definition of fire years. With respect to trends, we found a gradual decrease of 1.7Mhayr - 1 ( - 1.4%yr - 1) in Northern Hemisphere Africa since 2000, a gradual increase of 2.3Mhayr - 1 (+1.8%yr - 1) in Southern Hemisphere Africa also since 2000, a slight increase of 0.2Mhayr - 1 (+2.5%yr - 1) in Southeast Asia since 1997, and a rapid decrease of approximately 5.5Mhayr - 1 ( - 10.7%yr - 1) from 2001 through 2011 in Australia, followed by a major upsurge in 2011 that exceeded the annual area burned in at least the previous 14 years. The net trend in <span class="hlt">global</span> burned area from 2000 to 2012 was a modest decrease of 4.3Mhayr - 1 ( - 1.2%yr - 1). We also performed a spectral analysis of the <span class="hlt">daily</span> burned area time series and found no vestiges of the 16 day MODIS repeat cycle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giglio, Louis; Randerson, James T.; Werf, Guido R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">39</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ThApC.115..197B"> <span id="translatedtitle">A simplified calibrated model for estimating <span class="hlt">daily</span> <span class="hlt">global</span> solar radiation in Madinah, Saudi Arabia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solar radiation is the most important parameter in defining the energy budget at the surface thereby influencing the hydroclimate. Several empirical models based on air temperature are developed and used in several decision-making needs such as agriculture and energy sector. However, a calibration against direct observations is a priori for implementing such models. A calibrated model is developed for Saudi Arabia (Madinah) based on observations during 2007-2011. The model is used to estimate <span class="hlt">daily</span> solar radiation and results show a correlation coefficient of 0.94. The calibrated model outperforms the uncalibrated model available for this location. To increase the confidence, the calibrated model is also compared with a simple artificial neural network.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benghanem, M.; Mellit, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">40</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/44485133"> <span id="translatedtitle">A New Perspective on Recent <span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming: Asymmetric Trends of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Maximum and Minimum Temperature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Monthly mean maximum and minimum temperatures for over 50% (10%) of the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere landmass, accounting for 37% of the <span class="hlt">global</span> landmass, indicate that the rise of the minimum temperature has occurred at a rate three times that of the maximum temperature during the period 1951-90 (0.84°C versus 0.28°C). The decrease of the diurnal temperature range is approximately equal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Philip D. Jones; Richard W. Knight; George Kukla; Neil Plummer; Vyacheslav Razuvayev; Kevin P. Gallo; Janette Lindseay; Robert J. Charlson; Thomas C. Peterson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">41</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.4373T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Numerical computations of diffuse fraction of <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> on an hourly basis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solar Energy is the feedstock for various applications of renewable energy sources, thus, the necessity of using <span class="hlt">global</span> tilted <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> is acknowledged for the computations of the performance and monitoring of PV Parks and solar energy applications. In general, <span class="hlt">global</span> tilted <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> is computed as the sum of the beam component of direct <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> on the tilted surface, diffuse tilted and reflected <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. These three components can be computed using only the values of <span class="hlt">Global</span> horizontal and diffuse <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. However, although for some locations both <span class="hlt">global</span> and diffuse <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> are measured, in most locations, the data comprise measurements of only <span class="hlt">global</span> horizontal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, either measured on-site or determined from satellite data. This research is based on a numerical analysis and the development of empirical correlations for the computation of the hourly diffuse fraction, based on the measurements of the clearness index. The solar altitude is included as a parameter in the computations in order to reduce the error in the computations, since it embraces the effect of the different time and date in the computations. The derived numerical equations are presented in terms of the solar altitude in steps of 5 degrees and are validated using data from the meteorological station of Athalassa, Cyprus, for a ten year period (2001-2010). The statistical analysis from the comparison (in terms of R-squared and RMSE) showed better results for higher elevation angles, compared to the lower elevation angles that represent the early morning or late afternoon times.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tapakis, Rogiros; Charalambides, Alexandros G.; Michaelides, Silas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">42</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920055252&hterms=global+positioning+system&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3D%2522global%2Bpositioning%2Bsystem%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> estimates of the earth's pole position with the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Positioning System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> estimates of the earth's pole position have been obtained with measurements from a worldwide network of GPS receivers, obtained during the three week GIG '91 experiment in January-February 1991. For this short-term study, the GPS based polar motion series agrees with the other space based geodetic techniques (Very Long Baseline Interferometry and Satellite Laser Ranging) to about 0.4 mas rms, after the removal of mean biases of order 1-3 mas. The small error in day-to-day variability is not sensitive to the fiducial strategy used, nor are fiducial sites even necessary for monitoring high frequency pole position variability. The small biases indicate that the applied reference frames of the three geodetic techniques are nearly aligned, that the GPS fiducial errors are small, and that systematic errors in GPS are also small (of order 5 ppb). A well determined reference frame is necessary for monitoring the long-term stability of polar motion and for separating it from other long-term signals such as tectonic motion and internal systematic errors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lindqwister, Ulf J.; Freedman, Adam P.; Blewitt, Geoffrey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">43</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1359K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sub-<span class="hlt">daily</span> periodicities in the results of local monitoring using <span class="hlt">global</span> navigation satellite systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nowadays the more attention is focused on the continuous monitoring by using of <span class="hlt">global</span> navigation satellite systems (GNSS) in the study and control of stability of engineering structures and natural objects. The diurnal and semi-diurnal oscillations take place in high frequency GNSS observation. These waves are caused by the presence of the high frequency periodicities in changes of all geospheres, but also in systematic errors of GNSS techniques. Thus the diurnal variations are already found in the coordinates of <span class="hlt">global</span> and regional networks of CORS stations. They are often related with the influence of Earth's diurnal tides. The purpose of this study is to examine the periodic variations in coordinate increments of local monitoring networks of engineering structures and the earth's surface. But in this case the tidal changes have a small influence because of the relative proximity of the network control points. Results of static GNSS observations in the local network with the control vectors baselines from 170 m to 4.3 km of length were used for the analysis of periodicities. The hourly time series of baseline components of the length of two months were analyzed. Three qualitatively different methods were applied: wavelet transformation (Morlet wavelet function), fast Fourier transformation (FFT), and sequential analysis of the dominant harmonics (dominant analysis) for the more sure detection of hidden periodicities. The results of determination of oscillation spectrum were obtained by the three methods mentioned above. For all baselines their good mutual agreement were obtained. Diurnal and semi-diurnal waves are mainly and the most vividly appeared in the horizontal components, in the height’s component there are also other periodicity of the high and low frequencies. The oscillation’s amplitude reaches 4 mm. It is necessary to clarify the nature of the observed oscillations, which will be the main subject of the following more detailed studies. It is important, since the cause of the detected periodic oscillations can be the real changes, such as temperature deformation of engineering structures as well as the changes connected with the influence of systematic errors of GNSS measurements for example. The obtained results lead to the following conclusions. - In the results of GNSS geodynamic monitoring of engineering structures and objects on the earth surface the stable oscillatory components with periods of 1 and 0.5 days, and amplitudes up to 4 mm are found. - Further analysis of the reasons of identified oscillations that may be caused by the real change of monitored objects and as well as systematic errors of measurement GNSS is required.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaftan, Vladimir; Ustinov, Alexander</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">44</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38..137W"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> surface solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> product derived from SCIAMACHY FRESCO cloud fraction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The FRESCO cloud retrieval algorithm has been developed as a simple but fast and efficient algorithm for GOME and SCIAMACHY (Koelemeijer et al., 2001; Fournier et al., 2006; Wang et al., 2008). FRESCO employs the O2 A band at 760 nm to retrieve the effective cloud fraction and cloud pressure using a simple Lambertian cloud model. The effective cloud fraction is a combination of geometric cloud fraction and cloud optical thickness, which yield the same reflectance at the top of the atmosphere as the cloud in the scene. It is well-known that clouds reduce the surface solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. Therefore the all-sky <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> can be derived from the clear-sky <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> with a scaling factor related to the cloud index. The cloud index is very similar to the effective cloud fraction by definition. The MAGIC (Mesoscale Atmospheric <span class="hlt">Global</span> <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> Code) software converts the cloud index to the surface solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> using the Heliosat method (Mueller et al. 2009). The MAGIC algorithm is also used by the CM-SAF surface solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> product for clear sky cases. We applied the MAGIC software to FRESCO effective cloud fraction with slight modifications. In this presentation we will show the FRESCO-SSI monthly mean product and the comparison with the BSRN <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> data at Cabauw, the Netherlands and surface solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> measurement at Tibetan plateau in China.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Ping; Stammes, Piet; Müller, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">45</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ruby.fgcu.edu/courses/twimberley/EnviroPhilo/Reid.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar total <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> variations and the <span class="hlt">global</span> sea surface temperature record</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The record of <span class="hlt">globally</span> averaged sea surface temperature (SST) over the past 130 years shows a highly significant correlation with the envelope of the 11-year cycle of solar activity over the same period. This correlation could be explained by a variation in the sun's total <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (the solar constant) that is in phase with the solar-cycle envelope, supporting and updating</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">George C. Reid</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">46</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26543226"> <span id="translatedtitle">Verification of some very simple clear and cloudy sky models to evaluate <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several very simple clear sky and cloudy sky <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> models were tested under the climate and latitudes of Romania (Eastern Europe). The very simple clear sky models do not require meteorological data while the very simple cloudy sky models need only data on the total cloud amount. Three slightly more complex cloudy sky models which use additional meteorological inputs</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Viorel Badescu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">47</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010045819&hterms=Sea+surface+temperature&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3D%253A%2522Sea%2Bsurface%2Btemperature%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simulation Study of Effects of Solar <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> and Sea Surface Temperature on Monsoons and <span class="hlt">Global</span> Circulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A recent version of the GEOS 2 GCM was used to isolate the roles of the annual cycles of solar <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> and/or sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) on the simulated circulation and rainfall. Four 4-year long integrations were generated with the GCM. The first integration, called Control Case, used <span class="hlt">daily</span>-interpolated SSTs from a 30 year monthly SST climatology that was obtained from the analyzed SST-data, while the solar <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> at the top of the atmosphere was calculated normally at hourly intervals. The next two cases prescribed the SSTs or the incoming solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> at the top of the atmosphere at their annual mean values, respectively while everything else was kept the same as in the Control Case. In this way the influence of the annual cycles of both external forcings was isolated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Mehta, V.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">48</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010081063&hterms=solar+irradiance&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dsolar%2Birradiance"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantitative Assessment of the Integrated Response in <span class="hlt">Global</span> Heat and Moisture Budgets to Changing Solar <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Earlier, we found time sequences of basin- and <span class="hlt">global</span>-average upper ocean temperature (that is, diabatic heat storage above the main pycnocline) for 40 years from 1955-1994 and of sea surface temperature for 95 years from 1900-1994 associated with changes in the Sun's radiative forcing on decadal and interdecadal timescales, lagging by 10 deg.- 30 deg. of phase and confined to the upper 60-120 m. Yet, the observed changes in upper ocean temperature (approx. 0.1 K) were approximately twice those expected from the Stefan-Boltzmann black-body radiation law for the Earth's surface, with phase lags (0 deg. to 30 deg. of phase) much shorter than the 90 deg. phase shift expected as well. Moreover, White et al. (1997, 1998) found the Earth's <span class="hlt">global</span> decadal mode in covarying SST and SLP anomalies phase locked to the decadal signal in the Sun's <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. Yet, Allan (2000) found this decadal signal also characterized by patterns similar to those observed on biennial and interannual time scales; that is, the Troposphere Biennial Oscillation (TBO) and the El Nino and the Southern Oscillation (ENSO). This suggested that small changes in the Sun's total <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> could excite this <span class="hlt">global</span> decadal mode in the Earth's ocean-atmosphere-terrestrial system similar to those excited internally on biennial and interannual period scales. This is a significant finding, proving that energy budget models (that is, models based on <span class="hlt">globally</span>-averaged radiation balances) yield unrealistic responses. Thus, the true response must include positive and negative feedbacks in the Earth's ocean-atmosphere-terrestrial system as its internal mode (that is, the natural mode of the system) respond in damped resonance to quasi-periodic decadal changes in the Sun's <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. Moreover, these responses are not much different from those occurring internally on biennial and interannual period scales.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">White, Warren B.; Cayan, Daniel R.; Dettinger, Michael; Sharber, James (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">49</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..117.2204N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Approaches to partitioning the <span class="hlt">global</span> UVER <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> into its direct and diffuse components in Valencia, Spain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper explores methods of partitioning the hourly average UV erythemal flux into its direct and diffuse components for Valencia, Spain. It is shown that the cloud modification factor, the ratio of measured to cloudless erythemal flux relates linearly to the fraction of the measured <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> that is diffuse. This relationship was developed further into two simple models- a linear and nonlinear one. The models are characterized by an effective cloud cover to partition the <span class="hlt">global</span> erythemal flux. The diffuse fraction increases linearly with cloud cover in the linear model, but exponentially in the nonlinear one. The models may be used to partition the direct and diffuse <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> with RMS errors values ranging from 5.7 to 6.8 mWm-2 and 6.0-7.7 mWm-2 for direct and diffuse, respectively, with the nonlinear model performing best overall.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">NuñEz, Manuel; Utrillas, M. Pilar; MartíNez-Lozano, Jose A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">50</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5513457"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar total <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> variations and the <span class="hlt">global</span> sea surface temperature record</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The record of <span class="hlt">globally</span> averaged sea surface temperature (SST) over the past 130 years shows a highly significant correlation with the envelope of the 11-year cycle of solar activity over the same period. This correlation could be explained by a variation in the sun's total <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (the solar constant) that is in phase with the solar-cycle envelope, supporting and updating an earlier conclusion by Eddy (1976) that such variations could have played a major role in climate change over the past millennium. Measurements of the total <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> from spacecraft, rockets, and balloons over the past 25 years have provided evidence of long-term variations and have been used to develop a simple linear relationship between <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> and the envelope of the sunspot cycle. This relationship has been used to force a one-dimensional model of the thermal structure of the ocean, consisting of a 100-m mixed layer coupled to a deep ocean and including a thermohaline circulation. The model was started in the mid-seventeenth century, at the time of the Maunder Minimum of solar activity, and mixed-layer temperatures were calculated at 6-month intervals up to the present. The total range of <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> values during the period was about 1%, and the total range of SST was about 1C. Cool periods, when temperatures were about 0.5C below present-day values, were found in the early decades of both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The results can be taken as indicating that solar variability has been an important contributor to <span class="hlt">global</span> climate variations in recent decades. The growing atmospheric burden of greenhouse gases may well have played an important role in the immediate past.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reid, G.C. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (USA) Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-02-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">51</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.A11H0188E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal and geographical variation of Linke turbidity factor and its effect on <span class="hlt">global</span> horizontal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> estimation: UAE case study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a clear-sky condition, solar radiation travelling through the Earth's atmosphere encounters atmospheric attenuation caused by several factors. Scattering of solar radiation is mainly caused by air molecules, water vapor, water droplets and dust. On the other hand, the absorption of solar radiation is usually related to the presence of O3, water vapor and CO2 layers in the upper atmosphere. Linke turbidity factor (TL) is commonly used to model the attenuation of solar radiation in the atmosphere. TL is the key parameter used in the Heliosat model, which is developed to estimate the <span class="hlt">global</span> horizontal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (GHI) at the surface of the earth. TL is calculated by the following equation: T_L=?/?_R where ? is the optical thickness of the whole atmosphere, and ?R is the optical thickness of the Rayleigh atmosphere, i.e. the clear and dry atmosphere. The problem with TL is its dependence on the air mass (m). Therefore, TL is normalized to an air mass of 2 in order to reduce the <span class="hlt">daily</span> variance. In this study, the monthly TL(m=2) is computed over 7 ground-based stations available in the UAE (figure 1). Spatial and temporal analysis was performed to assess the seasonal and the geographical distribution of TL over the UAE. The computed TL(m=2) values are then applied in the Heliosat model to compare between the measured and modeled GHI values. The model treats the atmospheric and cloud transmittances separately. First, clear-sky direct normal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (DNI) and diffused horizontal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (DHI) values are computed using TL(m=2), solar zenith angle, air mass, sun-earth distance correction, solar constant and the Rayleigh optical depth, from that the clear-sky GHI is determined. Next, the cloud index is derived from the HRV channel available from the SEVIRI instrument, and from that the cloud transmission is computed. The product of the cloud transmission and the clear-sky GHI produces the modeled GHI. The comparison between TL calculated over the seven stations show higher turbidity for the 4 inland stations (stations 4-7) in the summer compared to coastal and near-coastal stations (stations 1-3). This difference could be explained by the high dust generation in desert areas surrounding inland stations, in summer dry and hot weather. A preliminary comparison has been performed between the modeled and the measured GHI values over four inland stations (stations 4-7). The obtained results show RMSE and r2 values ranging between 16.7-18% and 0.95-0.96, respectively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eissa, Y. A.; Ghedira, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">52</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.B33L..07D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Identifying crop specific signals for <span class="hlt">global</span> agricultural monitoring based on the stability of <span class="hlt">daily</span> multi-angular MODIS reflectance time series</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> agricultural monitoring requires satellite Earth Observation systems that maximize the observation revisit frequency over the largest possible geographical coverage. Such compromise has thus far resulted in using a spatial resolution that is often coarser than desired. As a consequence, for many agricultural landscapes across the world, crop status can only be inferred from a mixed signal of the landscape (with a pixel size typically close to 1 km), composed of reflectance from neighbouring fields with potentially different crops, variable phenological behaviours and distinct management practices. MODIS has been providing, since 2000, a higher spatial resolution (~250m) that is closer to the size of individual fields in many agro-ecological landscapes. However, the challenge for operational crop specific monitoring remains to identify in time where a given crop has been sown during the current growing season. An innovative use of MODIS <span class="hlt">daily</span> data is proposed for crop identification based on the stability of the multi-angular signal. MODIS is a whiskbroom sensor with a large swath. For any given place, consecutive MODIS observations are made with considerably different viewing angles according to the <span class="hlt">daily</span> change in orbit. Consequently, the footprint of the observation varies considerably, thereby sampling the vicinity around the centre of the grid cell in which the time series is ultimately recorded in. If the consecutive observations that have sampled the vicinity provide similar NDVI values (for which BRDF effects are reduced), the resulting temporal signal is relatively stable. This stability indicated that the signal comes from a spatially homogeneous surface, such as a single large field covered by the same crop with similar agro-management practices. If the resulting temporal signal is noisy, it is probable that the consecutive <span class="hlt">daily</span> observations have sampled different land uses, thus contaminating the signal. Such time series can therefore be discarded as they are much more difficult to interpret for crop specific monitoring. The approach is demonstrated over different agro-ecological landscapes in Europe and America at regional level. Stable crop temporal signals are first identified automatically and then undergo an unsupervised classification. Clusters exhibiting the expected temporal behaviour of the dominant crops can then be labelled based on knowledge of the landscape. Such crop specific signals can then be related to official crop yield estimates at regional scale for operational yield forecasting during the remaining time life of MODIS. But more importantly, it could serve as a basis to develop a crop specific <span class="hlt">global</span> archive of crop specific signals since 2000, which could be used as a reference for future satellite Earth observation systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Duveiller, G.; Lopez-Lozano, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">53</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.3277W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of the effect of contrails on <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> and solar energy production</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the present study we investigate the effect of contrails on <span class="hlt">global</span> shortwave radiation and on Photovoltaic module performance. This investigation is performed using continuous hemispherical fish eye photographs of the sky, diffuse and direct shortwave measurements and short circuit current measurements of a-Si, c-Si and CdTe PV modules. These measurements have been performed at the solar observatory Kanzelhöhe (1540 m.a.s.l) located in the southern part of Austria during a period of one and half year. The time resolution of the measurements is one minute, which allows to accurately follow the formation-eventually the disappearance- or the movement of the contrails in the sky. Using the fish eye photographs we identified clear sky days with a high contrail persistence. We especially look at situations where the contrails were shading the sun. Results show that contrails shading the sun may reduce the <span class="hlt">global</span> radiation by up to 60%. In general we however observe that during days with a high contrail persistence the diffuse <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> is slightly increased. Finally a statistic of the contrail persistence during the period of measurement is presented and conclusions as to the relevance for the solar energy production are drawn.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weihs, Philipp; Rennhofer, Marcus; Baumgartner, Dietmar; Wagner, Jochen; Laube, Wolfgang; Gadermaier, Josef</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">54</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22149558"> <span id="translatedtitle">External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast <span class="hlt">Irradiation</span> Using 32 Gy in 8 Twice-<span class="hlt">Daily</span> Fractions: 5-Year Results of a Prospective Study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: External beam accelerated partial breast <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> (APBI) is an increasingly popular technique for treatment of patients with early stage breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery. Here we present 5-year results of a prospective trial. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 through November 2005, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were enrolled in the first dose step (32 Gy delivered in 8 twice-<span class="hlt">daily</span> fractions) of a prospective, multi-institutional, dose escalation clinical trial of 3-dimensional conformal external beam APBI (3D-APBI). Median age was 61 years; median tumor size was 0.8 cm; 89% of tumors were estrogen receptor positive; 10% had a triple-negative phenotype; and 1% had a HER-2-positive subtype. Median follow-up was 71 months (range, 2-88 months; interquartile range, 64-75 months). Results: Five patients developed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial IBTR rate of 5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1%-10%). Three of these cases occurred in patients with triple-negative disease and 2 in non-triple-negative patients, for 5-year actuarial IBTR rates of 33% (95% CI, 0%-57%) and 2% (95% CI, 0%-6%; P<.0001), respectively. On multivariable analysis, triple-negative phenotype was the only predictor of IBTR, with borderline statistical significance after adjusting for tumor grade (P=.0537). Conclusions: Overall outcomes were excellent, particularly for patients with estrogen receptor-positive disease. Patients in this study with triple-negative breast cancer had a significantly higher IBTR rate than patients with other receptor phenotypes when treated with 3D-APBI. Larger, prospective 3D-APBI clinical trials should continue to evaluate the effect of hormone receptor phenotype on IBTR rates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pashtan, Itai M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brachtel, Elena [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Abi-Raad, Rita F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); D'Alessandro, Helen A. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Levy, Antonin; Wo, Jennifer Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hirsch, Ariel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goldberg, Saveli [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michelle; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">55</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.alz.org/care/alzheimers-dementia-daily-plan.asp"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Care</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... in <span class="hlt">daily</span> life . Help the person remain as independent as possible. Offer opportunities for choice. Establish a familiar routine . Sign up for our e-Newsletter for care tips and news. ALZConnected ® Connect with our online caregiver community at ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">56</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GMD.....7..249K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Methodological aspects of a pattern-scaling approach to produce <span class="hlt">global</span> fields of monthly means of <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum and minimum temperature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A Climate Pattern-Scaling Model (CPSM) that simulates <span class="hlt">global</span> patterns of climate change, for a prescribed emissions scenario, is described. A CPSM works by quantitatively establishing the statistical relationship between a climate variable at a specific location (e.g. <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum surface temperature, Tmax) and one or more predictor time series (e.g. <span class="hlt">global</span> mean surface temperature, Tglobal) - referred to as the "training" of the CPSM. This training uses a regression model to derive fit coefficients that describe the statistical relationship between the predictor time series and the target climate variable time series. Once that relationship has been determined, and given the predictor time series for any greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenario, the change in the climate variable of interest can be reconstructed - referred to as the "application" of the CPSM. The advantage of using a CPSM rather than a typical atmosphere-ocean <span class="hlt">global</span> climate model (AOGCM) is that the predictor time series required by the CPSM can usually be generated quickly using a simple climate model (SCM) for any prescribed GHG emissions scenario and then applied to generate <span class="hlt">global</span> fields of the climate variable of interest. The training can be performed either on historical measurements or on output from an AOGCM. Using model output from 21st century simulations has the advantage that the climate change signal is more pronounced than in historical data and therefore a more robust statistical relationship is obtained. The disadvantage of using AOGCM output is that the CPSM training might be compromised by any AOGCM inadequacies. For the purposes of exploring the various methodological aspects of the CPSM approach, AOGCM output was used in this study to train the CPSM. These investigations of the CPSM methodology focus on monthly mean fields of <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature extremes (Tmax and Tmin). The methodological aspects of the CPSM explored in this study include (1) investigation of the advantage gained in having five predictor time series over having only one predictor time series, (2) investigation of the time dependence of the fit coefficients and (3) investigation of the dependence of the fit coefficients on GHG emissions scenario. Key conclusions are (1) overall, the CPSM trained on simulations based on the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 emissions scenario is able to reproduce AOGCM simulations of Tmax and Tmin based on predictor time series from an RCP 4.5 emissions scenario; (2) access to hemisphere average land and ocean temperatures as predictors improves the variance that can be explained, particularly over the oceans; (3) regression model fit coefficients derived from individual simulations based on the RCP 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5 emissions scenarios agree well over most regions of the globe (the Arctic is the exception); (4) training the CPSM on concatenated time series from an ensemble of simulations does not result in fit coefficients that explain significantly more of the variance than an approach that weights results based on single simulation fits; and (5) the inclusion of a linear time dependence in the regression model fit coefficients improves the variance explained, primarily over the oceans.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kremser, S.; Bodeker, G. E.; Lewis, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">57</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GMDD....6.4833K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Methodological aspects of a pattern-scaling approach to produce <span class="hlt">global</span> fields of monthly means of <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum and minimum temperature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A Climate Pattern-Scaling Model (CPSM) that simulates <span class="hlt">global</span> patterns of climate change, for a prescribed emissions scenario, is described. A CPSM works by quantitatively establishing the statistical relationship between a climate variable at a specific location (e.g. <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum surface temperature, Tmax) and one or more predictor time series (e.g. <span class="hlt">global</span> mean surface temperature, Tglobal) - referred to as the "training" of the CPSM. This training uses a regression model to derive fit-coefficients that describe the statistical relationship between the predictor time series and the target climate variable time series. Once that relationship has been determined, and given the predictor time series for any greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenario, the change in the climate variable of interest can be reconstructed - referred to as the "application" of the CPSM. The advantage of using a CPSM rather than a typical atmosphere-ocean <span class="hlt">global</span> climate model (AOGCM) is that the predictor time series required by the CPSM can usually be generated quickly using a simple climate model (SCM) for any prescribed GHG emissions scenario and then applied to generate <span class="hlt">global</span> fields of the climate variable of interest. The training can be performed either on historical measurements or on output from an AOGCM. Using model output from 21st century simulations has the advantage that the climate change signal is more pronounced than in historical data and therefore a more robust statistical relationship is obtained. The disadvantage of using AOGCM output is that the CPSM training might be compromised by any AOGCM inadequacies. For the purposes of exploring the various methodological aspects of the CPSM approach, AOGCM output was used in this study to train the CPSM. These investigations of the CPSM methodology focus on monthly mean fields of <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature extremes (Tmax and Tmin). Key conclusions are: (1) overall, the CPSM trained on simulations based on the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 emissions scenario is able to reproduce AOGCM simulations of Tmax and Tmin based on predictor time series from an RCP 4.5 emissions scenario; (2) access to hemisphere average land and ocean temperatures as predictors improves the variance that can be explained, particularly over the oceans; (3) regression model fit-coefficients derived from individual simulations based on the RCP 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5 emissions scenarios agree well over most regions of the globe (the Arctic is the exception); (4) training the CPSM on concatenated time series from an ensemble of simulations does not result in fit-coefficients that explain significantly more of the variance than an approach that weights results based on single simulation fits; and (5) the inclusion of a linear time dependence in the regression model fit-coefficients improves the variance explained, primarily over the oceans.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kremser, S.; Bodeker, G. E.; Lewis, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">58</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4029700"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spatial Estimation of Sub-Hour <span class="hlt">Global</span> Horizontal <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> Based on Official Observations and Remote Sensors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study was motivated by the need to improve densification of <span class="hlt">Global</span> Horizontal <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> (GHI) observations, increasing the number of surface weather stations that observe it, using sensors with a sub-hour periodicity and examining the methods of spatial GHI estimation (by interpolation) with that periodicity in other locations. The aim of the present research project is to analyze the goodness of 15-minute GHI spatial estimations for five methods in the territory of Spain (three geo-statistical interpolation methods, one deterministic method and the HelioSat2 method, which is based on satellite images). The research concludes that, when the work area has adequate station density, the best method for estimating GHI every 15 min is Regression Kriging interpolation using GHI estimated from satellite images as one of the input variables. On the contrary, when station density is low, the best method is estimating GHI directly from satellite images. A comparison between the GHI observed by volunteer stations and the estimation model applied concludes that 67% of the volunteer stations analyzed present values within the margin of error (average of ±2 standard deviations). PMID:24732102</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gutierrez-Corea, Federico-Vladimir; Manso-Callejo, Miguel-Angel; Moreno-Regidor, Maria-Pilar; Velasco-Gomez, Jesus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">59</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21350412"> <span id="translatedtitle">Validation of the NSRDB-SUNY <span class="hlt">global</span> horizontal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> in California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Satellite derived <span class="hlt">global</span> horizontal solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (GHI) from the SUNY modeled dataset in the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) was compared to measurements from 27 weather stations in California during the years 1998-2005. The statistics of spatial and temporal differences between the two datasets were analyzed and related to meteorological phenomena. Overall mean bias errors (MBE) of the NSRDB-SUNY indicated a GHI overprediction of 5%, which is smaller than the sensor accuracy of ground stations. However, at coastal sites, year-round systematic positive MBEs in the NSRDB-SUNY data up to 18% were observed and monthly MBEs increased up to 54% in the summer months during the morning. These differences were explained by a tendency for the NSRDB-SUNY model to overestimate GHI under cloudy conditions at the coast during summer mornings. A persistent positive evening MBE which was independent of site location and cloudiness occurred at all stations and was explained by an error in the time-shifting method applied in the NSRDB-SUNY. A correction method was derived for these two errors to improve the accuracy of the NSRDB-SUNY data in California. (author)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nottrott, Anders; Kleissl, Jan [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">60</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/~menut/pp/i1520-0477-90-1-73.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Advanced chemistry-transport modeling and observing systems allow <span class="hlt">daily</span> air quality observations, short-term forecasts, and real-time analyses of air quality at the <span class="hlt">global</span> and</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Advanced chemistry-transport modeling and observing systems allow <span class="hlt">daily</span> air quality observations, short-term forecasts, and real-time analyses of air quality at the <span class="hlt">global</span> and European scales control measures that could be taken for managing such episodes, European-scale air quality forecasting</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Menut, Laurent</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#" 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showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">61</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1411706G"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">globally</span> calibrated aerosol optical depth gridded dataset for improved solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> predictions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The shortwave direct normal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (DNI), as well as the diffuse and <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, all depend on aerosol optical depth (AOD). Recent investigations have shown that many existing modeled DNI datasets were severely biased over areas with large and variable AOD, due to errors in the latter data. Unbiased historical DNI data are of crucial importance for the siting, design and financing of large solar power projects, particularly those using concentrators. This requires unbiased AOD data at any site where such projects can be potentially built. Until now, only sunphotometer stations could provide such unbiased data, but these stations are scarce and their records are generally short. For <span class="hlt">global</span> coverage, gridded AOD data from satellite observations may be used, but their bias is often significant. Moreover, multiwavelength AOD satellite records only exist since 2000 and are not complete over all areas. In this contribution, a method is developed to optimally combine sources of gridded data from various satellites, calibrate them against ground truth on a regional and seasonal basis, and fill missing data points with an appropriate climatology. The monthly satellite data from MODIS (Terra and Aqua, collection 5.1), generated with or without the Deep Blue retrieval algorithm, and from MISR (version 31), are obtained at 0.5x0.5° resolution using appropriate Digital Elevation Models and scale-height corrections of AOD at 550 nm. The ground-truth data originates from networks such as Aeronet. All monthly ground-truth data points are subjected to a scale-height correction for elevation (so that they can be directly compared to the corresponding satellite data), and to a wavelength correction to obtain AOD at 550 nm. This process is undertaken separately for summer and winter, owing to the varying magnitude of AOD, and possible seasonal variations in aerosol composition. For the same reasons, it is also undertaken on a regional basis. The importance of this is confirmed by the uneven results obtained over adjacent areas. In North America, for instance, the MISR dataset and the various MODIS datasets exhibit relatively low bias over most of the continent, but an extremely high bias over the southwestern USA and northern Mexico, possibly due to higher elevation, lower AOD, and more reflective ground. The satellite data calibration (or "debiasing") is performed by applying appropriate scaling factors on a seasonal and regional basis, after comparison with ground truth. To remove all missing data points during the period 2000-2011, an appropriate climatology is selected from existing sources (including chemical transport models), and is subjected to an identical calibration method. A similar methodology is applied to obtain a complete, gridded dataset of the mean monthly Ångström exponent (AE) over the same period of 144 months. The AOD and AE <span class="hlt">global</span> datasets thus obtained still contain significant random errors, but their regional bias is considerably reduced compared to existing satellite data. Overall, the combination of AOD and AE from these calibrated datasets can significantly improve the derivation of 12-year time series of DNI, which is demonstrated with a few examples.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gueymard, C. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">62</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N20030032979"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of Total Solar <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> with NASA/NSO Spectromagnetograph Data in Solar Cycles 22 and 23.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Accurate understanding of <span class="hlt">global</span> solar variability is of clear astrophysical interest and is also vital to distinguish natural from anthropogenic causes of long-term changes in terrestrial climate. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> averages of total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (TSI) observatio...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. P. Jones, D. D. Branston, P. B. Jones, M. D. Popescu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">63</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.3303O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimation of confidence intervals of <span class="hlt">global</span> horizontal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> obtained from a weather prediction model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many photovoltaic (PV) systems have been installed in Japan after the introduction of the Feed-in-Tariff. For an energy management of electric power systems included many PV systems, the forecast of the PV power production are useful technology. Recently numerical weather predictions have been applied to forecast the PV power production while the forecasted values invariably have forecast errors for each modeling system. So, we must use the forecast data considering its error. In this study, we attempted to estimate confidence intervals for hourly forecasts of <span class="hlt">global</span> horizontal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (GHI) values obtained from a mesoscale model (MSM) de-veloped by the Japan Meteorological Agency. In the recent study, we found that the forecasted values of the GHI of the MSM have two systematical forecast errors; the first is that forecast values of the GHI are depended on the clearness indices, which are defined as the GHI values divided by the extraterrestrial solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. The second is that forecast errors have the seasonal variations; the overestimation of the GHI forecasts is found in winter while the underestimation of those is found in summer. The information of the errors of the hourly GHI forecasts, that is, confidence intervals of the forecasts, is of great significance for planning the energy management included a lot of PV systems by an electric company. On the PV systems, confidence intervals of the GHI forecasts are required for a pinpoint area or for a relatively large area control-ling the power system. For the relatively large area, a spatial-smoothing method of the GHI values is performed for both the observations and forecasts. The spatial-smoothing method caused the decline of confidence intervals of the hourly GHI forecasts on an extreme event of the GHI forecast (a case of large forecast error) over the relatively large area of the Tokyo electric company (approximately 68 % than for a pinpoint forecast). For more credible estimation of the confidence intervals, it is required to consider the location of the installed PV systems or its capacity over the region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ohtake, Hideaki; Gari da Silva Fonseca, Joao, Jr.; Takashima, Takumi; Oozeki, Takashi; Yamada, Yoshinori</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">64</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AMTD....2.1537T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between the NO2 photolysis frequency and the solar <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Representative values of the atmospheric NO2 photolysis frequency, (j(NO2)), are required for the adequate calculation and interpretation of NO and NO2 concentrations and exchange fluxes near the surface. Direct measurements of j(NO2) at ground level are often not available in field studies. In most cases, modeling approaches involving complex radiative transfer calculations are used to estimate j(NO2) and other photolysis frequencies for air chemistry studies. However, important input parameters for accurate modeling are often missing, most importantly with regard to the radiative effects of clouds. On the other hand, solar <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> ("<span class="hlt">global</span> radiation", G) is nowadays measured as a standard parameter in most field experiments and in many meteorological observation networks around the world. A linear relationship between j(NO2) and G was reported in previous studies and has been used to estimate j(NO2) from G in the past 30 years. We have measured j(NO2) using spectro- or filter radiometers and G using pyranometers side-by-side at several field sites. Our results cover a solar zenith angle range of 0-90°, and are based on nine field campaigns in temperate, subtropical and tropical environments during the period 1994-2008. We show that a second-order polynomial function (intercept=0): j(NO2)=(1+?)×(B1×G+B2×G2), with ? defined as the site-dependent UV-A surface albedo and the polynomial coefficients (including uncertainty ranges): B1=(1.47±0.03)×10-5 W-1 m2 s-1 and B2=(-4.84±0.31)×10-9 W-2 m4 s-1 can be used to estimate ground-level j(NO2) directly from G, independent of solar zenith angle under all atmospheric conditions. The absolute j(NO2)? residual of the empirical function is ±6×10-4 s-1 (95.45% confidence level). The relationship is valid for sites below 800 m a.s.l. and under low background albedo conditions. It is not valid in alpine regions, above snow or ice and sandy or dry soil surfaces. Our function can be applied to estimate chemical life times of the NO2 molecule with respect to photolysis, and is useful for surface-atmosphere exchange and photochemistry studies close to the ground, e.g., above fields with short vegetation and above forest canopies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trebs, I.; Bohn, B.; Ammann, C.; Rummel, U.; Blumthaler, M.; Koenigstedt, R.; Meixner, F. X.; Fan, S.; Andreae, M. O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">65</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AMT.....2..725T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relationship between the NO2 photolysis frequency and the solar <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Representative values of the atmospheric NO2 photolysis frequency j(NO2) are required for the adequate calculation and interpretation of NO and NO2 concentrations and exchange fluxes near the surface. Direct measurements of j(NO2) at ground level are often not available in field studies. In most cases, modeling approaches involving complex radiative transfer calculations are used to estimate j(NO2) and other photolysis frequencies for air chemistry studies. However, important input parameters for accurate modeling are often missing, most importantly with regard to the radiative effects of clouds. On the other hand, solar <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> ("<span class="hlt">global</span> radiation", G) is nowadays measured as a standard parameter in most field experiments and in many meteorological observation networks around the world. Previous studies mainly reported linear relationships between j(NO2) and G. We have measured j(NO2) using spectro- or filter radiometers and G using pyranometers side-by-side at several field sites. Our results cover a solar zenith angle range of 0-90°, and are based on nine field campaigns in temperate, subtropical and tropical environments during the period 1994-2008. We show that a second-order polynomial function (intercept = 0): j(NO2)=(1+?)× (B1×G+B2×G2), with ? defined as the site-dependent UV-A surface albedo and the polynomial coefficients: B1=(1.47± 0.03)×10-5 W-1 m2 s-1 and B2=(-4.84±0.31)×10-9 W-2 m4 s-1 can be used to estimate ground-level j(NO2) directly from G, independent of solar zenith angle under all atmospheric conditions. The absolute j(NO2) residual of the empirical function is ±6×10-4 s-1(2?). The relationship is valid for sites below 800 m a.s.l. and with low surface albedo (?<0.2). It is not valid in high mountains, above snow or ice and sandy or dry soil surfaces.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trebs, I.; Bohn, B.; Ammann, C.; Rummel, U.; Blumthaler, M.; Königstedt, R.; Meixner, F. X.; Fan, S.; Andreae, M. O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">66</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constitution <span class="hlt">Daily</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Everyone could use a bit of the Constitution added to their <span class="hlt">daily</span> lives, and this website more than delivers on its promise to deliver "smart conversation about the Constitution". Constitution <span class="hlt">Daily</span> is an experimental blog edited by the National Constitution Center (NCC) in Philadelphia, and commentary here can include conversations about student privacy rights, the Second Amendment, and the activities of Congress. Visitors can click on the "Issues" section to dive into topic areas that include civility and privacy. After looking at each topic area, visitors can look at an interactive timeline that arranges comments, posts, and discussion on the subject. The site also contains some nice polls, and information about upcoming events at the NCC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">67</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A31F0084G"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Comparison Between Heliosat-2 and Artificial Neural Network Methods for <span class="hlt">Global</span> Horizontal <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> Retrievals over Desert Environments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> horizontal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (GHI) retrievals at the surface of any given location could be used for preliminary solar resource assessments. More accurately, the direct normal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (DNI) and diffuse horizontal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (DHI) are also required to estimate the <span class="hlt">global</span> tilt <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, mainly used for fixed flat plate collectors. Two different satellite-based models for solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> retrievals have been applied over the desert environment of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Both models employ channels of the SEVIRI instrument, onboard the geostationary satellite Meteosat Second Generation, as their main inputs. The satellite images used in this study have a temporal resolution of 15-min and a spatial resolution of 3-km. The objective of this study is to compare between the GHI retrieved using the Heliosat-2 method and an artificial neural network (ANN) ensemble method over the UAE. The high-resolution visible channel of SEVIRI is used in the Heliosat-2 method to derive the cloud index. The cloud index is then used to compute the cloud transmission, while the cloud-free GHI is computed from the Linke turbidity factor. The product of the cloud transmission and the cloud-free GHI denotes the estimated GHI. A constant underestimation is observed in the estimated GHI over the dataset available in the UAE. Therefore, the cloud-free DHI equation in the model was recalibrated to fix the bias. After recalibration, results over the UAE show a root mean square error (RMSE) value of 10.1% and a mean bias error (MBE) of -0.5%. As for the ANN approach, six thermal channels of SEVIRI were used to estimate the DHI and the total optical depth of the atmosphere (?). An ensemble approach is employed to obtain a better generalizability of the results, as opposed to using one single weak network. The DNI is then computed from the estimated ? using the Beer-Bouguer-Lambert law. The GHI is computed from the DNI and DHI estimates. The RMSE for the estimated GHI obtained over an independent dataset over the UAE is 7.2% and the MBE is +1.9%. The results obtained by the two methods have shown that both the recalibrated Heliosat-2 and the ANN ensemble methods estimate the GHI at a 15-min resolution with high accuracy. The advantage of the ANN ensemble approach is that it derives the GHI from accurate DNI and DHI estimates. The DNI and DHI estimates are valuable when computing the <span class="hlt">global</span> tilt <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. Also, accurate DNI estimates are beneficial for preliminary site selection for concentrating solar powered plants.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ghedira, H.; Eissa, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">68</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/ghcn/daily/papers/menne-etal2012.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Overview of the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Historical Climatology Network-<span class="hlt">Daily</span> Database MATTHEW J. MENNE, IMKE DURRE, RUSSELL S. VOSE, BYRON E. GLEASON, AND TAMARA G. HOUSTON</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">temperature, total <span class="hlt">daily</span> pre- cipitation, snowfall, and snow depth; however, about two-thirds of the stations of temperature and pre- cipitation, but the database also contains observations for snowfall, snow depth</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">69</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JASTP.112...47D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> and direct UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> variation in the Nahuel Huapi National Park (Patagonia, Argentina) after the eruption of Puyehue-Cordon Caulle (Chile)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On June 4th, 2011, the Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcanic complex (40°35?25?S 72°07?02?W, Chile) started eruption, sending ash 45,000 feet into the atmosphere. After the initial period, the eruption continued for several months, with less intensity. Changes in <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> in the UV-B and UV-A, and direct <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> and AOD in the UV-A, as consequence of the eruption, were studied. <span class="hlt">Global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> has been permanently measured at the Laboratory of Photobiology (LPh) (41.13S, 71.42W, 804 msl) since 1998. In addition, in the frame of a project to study altitude effect on direct and <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, field campaigns were performed during September 17th to 23rd, 2010 and September 14th to 18th, 2011, in the region of the Nahuel Huapi National Park, near 100 km from the eruption. In those periods, simultaneous measurements of direct and <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> and aerosol optical depth (AOD) were carried out at three sites: Laboratory of Photobiology (LPh), Mt Otto (41.15S, 71.38W, 1386 msl) and Mt Catedral (41.17S, 71.48W, 1930 msl). The analysis of aerosols in 2011, three to four month after the eruption started, showed the presence of larger particles and more variability than in 2010, at all sites. <span class="hlt">Global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, at LPh, also exhibited larger variability, compared to 1999, when no eruption or any other event that could have produced major changes in aerosols occurred. The mean decrease, as consequence of the volcano activity, at LPh, was around 20%, at 305 nm and closed to 10%, at 320 nm. At 380 nm, the decrease was very small and not statistically significant, although in particular days, with large aerosol load, a significant decrease was observed. Direct <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, in the UV-A, showed larger decrease than <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. The effect of the eruption was more pronounced at the low altitude site.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Diaz, S. B.; Paladini, A. A.; Braile, H. G.; Dieguez, M. C.; Deferrari, G. A.; Vernet, M.; Vrsalovic, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">70</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/36/13/70/PDF/MS02-02-08-0014_revised.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geiger M., Diabat L., Mnard L., Wald L., 2002. A web service for controlling the quality of measurements of <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>. Solar Energy, Vol. 73, No 6, pp. 475-480</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">of measurements of <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>. Solar Energy, Vol. 73, No 6, pp. 475-480 Copyright Ecole des Mines de-480" #12;A web service for controlling the quality of <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> Copyright Ecole des Mines de Paris -Armines - UFAE 1 A WEB SERVICE FOR CONTROLLING THE QUALITY OF MEASUREMENTS OF <span class="hlt">GLOBAL</span> SOLAR</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">71</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30410838"> <span id="translatedtitle">Portal imaging for evaluation of <span class="hlt">daily</span> on-line setup errors and off-line organ motion during conformal <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> of carcinoma of the prostate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: To use portal imaging to measure <span class="hlt">daily</span> on-line setup error and off-line prostatic motion in patients treated with conformal radiotherapy to determine an optimum planning target volume (PTV) margin incorporating both setup error and organ motion.Results: A total of 2549 portal images from 33 patients were acquired over the course of the study. Of these patients, 23 were analyzed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hamideh Alasti; M. Peter Petric; Charles N Catton; Padraig R Warde</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">72</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EOSTr..93Q.352B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Warmer <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperatures since 1951</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Days and nights have indeed become warmer over the past 60 years, a new study finds. Although several observation-based studies have shown that <span class="hlt">daily</span> average temperatures as well as <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum and minimum temperatures have increased over the past few decades, controversy has remained as to how the observed trends in extreme and average temperatures are related to each other: Are the warming trends in extreme temperatures a result of a shifting mean climate, or have temperatures become more variable? Using a <span class="hlt">global</span> observational data set of <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperatures, Donat and Alexander compared the probability distributions of <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum and minimum temperatures over two 30-year periods, 1951-1980 and 1981-2010. The authors show that the maximum and minimum <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperatures all over the globe have significantly shifted toward higher values during the latter period. They further show that the distributions have become skewed toward the hotter part of the distribution; changes are greater for <span class="hlt">daily</span> minimum (nighttime) temperatures than for the <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum (daytime) temperatures. The authors conclude that the distribution of <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperatures has indeed become “more extreme” compared to the middle of the twentieth century. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2012GL052459, 2012)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhattacharya, Atreyee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">73</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100003076&hterms=Spectrum+Network+Measurements&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3DSpectrum%2BNetwork%2BMeasurements"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solutions Network Formulation Report. Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor Measurements of Diffuse-to-<span class="hlt">Global</span> <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> Ratio for Improved Forecasting of Plant Productivity and Health</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Studies have shown that vegetation is directly sensitive to changes in the diffuse-to-<span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> ratio and that increased percentage of diffuse <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> can accelerate photosynthesis. Therefore, measurements of diffuse versus <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> could be useful for monitoring crop productivity and overall vegetative health as they relate to the total amount of particulates in the air that result from natural disasters or anthropogenic (manmade) causes. While the components of solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> are measured by satellite and surface sensors and calculated with atmospheric models, disagreement exists between the results, creating a need for more accurate and comprehensive retrievals of atmospheric aerosol parameters. Two satellite sensors--APS and VIIRS--show promise for retrieving aerosol properties at an unprecedented level of accuracy. APS is expected to be launched in December 2008. The planned launch date for VIIRS onboard NPP is September 2009. Identified partners include the USDA s ARS, North Carolina State University, Purdue Climate Change Research Center, and the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere at Colorado State University. Although at present no formal DSSs (decision support systems) require accurate values of diffuse-to-<span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, this parameter is sufficiently important that models are being developed that will incorporate these measurements. This candidate solution is aligned with the Agricultural Efficiency and Air Quality National Applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Knowlton, Kelly; Andrews, Jane C.; Ryan, Robert E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">74</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AtmEn..45.2465S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimation of monthly values of atmospheric turbidity using measured values of <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> and estimated values from CSR and Yang Hybrid models. Study case: Argentina</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">For ten sites in Argentina, monthly average Ångström turbidity coefficient ? values were estimated using mean monthly <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> values measured at these sites from the former Argentinean radiometric network REDSOL. The values of the horizontal direct and diffuse components of the <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> were estimated using the Yang Hybrid model (YHM) and, to determine the representativeness of those results, they were compared to values from the SWERA database which uses the CSR model, developed by NREL, to make estimates. An inconsistency in the estimated values of the diffuse component was detected, therefore a new expression for that component was proposed, generating a corrected version of the YHM (CYHM). The turbidity coefficient ? is considered an independent variable in the equation that estimates the direct transmittance and the values that forces an exact correlation between the measured monthly average <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> values with those estimated with the CYHM are considered representative for each site since the RMSE between the monthly <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> values of SWERA and CYHM is 11.7%, this value being very close to that found by the designers of the CSR model (10%) when they tested it with meteorological data from USA. The monthly average value estimates of turbidity coefficient ? show expected behavior, with values varying according to the season of the year.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salazar, Germán A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">75</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990JCli....3.1485H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Some Effects of the Yellowstone Fire Smoke Cloud on Incident Solar <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The influence of the 1988 Yellowstone National Park fire, smoke cloud on incident broadband and spectral solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> was studied using measurements made at the Solar Energy Research Institute's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, Golden, Colorado.Results indicate that the smoke cloud's optical depth (at 500 nm) on a smoke-affected day was a factor of 6.3 times greater than on a clear day. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> total <span class="hlt">global</span>-horizontal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> on the smoky day was 91 percent of that on the clear day. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> total direct-normal <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> on the smoky day was 63 percent of that on the clear day. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> total diffuse sky <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> on the smoky day was 340 percent of that on the clear day. Analysis of spectral solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> data shows a much more severe attenuation of the shorter wave-lengths (UV-visible) than the infrared region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hulstrom, Roland L.; Stoffel, Thomas L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">76</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24252072"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Second Physical Therapy Summit on <span class="hlt">Global</span> Health: developing an action plan to promote health in <span class="hlt">daily</span> practice and reduce the burden of non-communicable diseases.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Based on indicators that emerged from The First Physical Therapy Summit on <span class="hlt">Global</span> Health (2007), the Second Summit (2011) identified themes to inform a <span class="hlt">global</span> physical therapy action plan to integrate health promotion into practice across the World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT) regions. Working questions were: (1) how well is health promotion implemented within physical therapy practice; and (2) how might this be improved across five target audiences (i.e. physical therapist practitioners, educators, researchers, professional body representatives, and government liaisons/consultants). In structured facilitated sessions, Summit representatives (n?=?32) discussed: (1) within WCPT regions, what is working and the challenges; and (2) across WCPT regions, what are potential directions using World Café(TM) methodology. Commonalities outweighed differences with respect to strategies to advance health-focused physical therapy as a clinical competency across regions and within target audiences. Participants agreed that health-focused practice is a professional priority, and a strategic action plan was needed to develop it as a clinical competency. The action plan and recommendations largely paralleled the principles and objectives of the World Health Organization's non-communicable diseases action plan. A third Summit planned for 2015 will provide a mechanism for follow-up to evaluate progress in integrating health-focused physical therapy within the profession. PMID:24252072</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dean, Elizabeth; de Andrade, Armele Dornelas; O'Donoghue, Grainne; Skinner, Margot; Umereh, Gloria; Beenen, Paul; Cleaver, Shaun; Afzalzada, DelAfroze; Delaune, Mary Fran; Footer, Cheryl; Gannotti, Mary; Gappmaier, Ed; Figl-Hertlein, Astrid; Henderson, Bobbie; Hudson, Megan K; Spiteri, Karl; King, Judy; Klug, Jerry L; Laakso, E-Liisa; LaPier, Tanya; Lomi, Constantina; Maart, Soraya; Matereke, Noel; Meyer, Erna Rosenlund; M'kumbuzi, Vyvienne R P; Mostert-Wentzel, Karien; Myezwa, Hellen; Olsén, Monika Fagevik; Peterson, Cathy; Pétursdóttir, Unnur; Robinson, Jan; Sangroula, Kanchan; Stensdotter, Ann-Katrin; Tan, Bee Yee; Tschoepe, Barbara A; Bruno, Selma; Mathur, Sunita; Wong, Wai Pong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">77</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://nova.stanford.edu/projects/mgs/dmwr.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Martian Weather Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This site from the Mars <span class="hlt">Global</span> Surveyor Radio Science Team features the results of a detailed study of the Martian atmosphere in the form of a <span class="hlt">daily</span> weather report and precise atmospheric measurements for the planet Mars. Atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles which have been archived with NASA's Planetary Data System are also available on this site. These profiles illustrate the vertical structure of the atmosphere of Mars. The site also includes links to many images of Martian atmospheric and weather phenomena (with captions) from the Mars <span class="hlt">Global</span> Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MGS MOC), the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) and the Hubble Space Telescope.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Team, Mars G.; University, Stanford</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">78</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5886..118T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimation of <span class="hlt">global</span> solar UV index from UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> measured with a narrow-band UV-B radiometer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">global</span> solar UV index is an indicator for notifying the level of harmful solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface of the earth and the general public. It was proposed by the WHO/WMO/UNEP/ICNIRP and was standardized by the CIE in 2003. This index is derived from the product of the spectral solar UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> from 250 to 400 nm and the CIE standard of reference erythema spectrum. For calculation of the UV index, the measurement of spectral solar UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> is needed. Spectral radiometry is the best method of measurement of solar UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, however spectral radiometers are cost prohibitive. On the other hand, a narrow-band solar UV-B radiometer is widely used for measurement of solar UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> in the world. The Tokai Solar Radiation Monitoring Network, and the UV Monitoring Network-Japan performed by the National Institute for Environmental Studies are two examples of monitoring networks using narrow-band solar UV-B radiometer in Japan. In this paper an estimation method of the UV index from the measured UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> with the narrow-band UV-B radiometer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takeshita, Shu; Sasaki, Masako</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">79</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22011770"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> practices, consumption and citizenship.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper promotes a reflection on the relationship between <span class="hlt">daily</span> practices and consumption. Understanding how conflicts, resistance and consensus are generated from <span class="hlt">daily</span> consumption practices opens up possibilities for reflecting on the construction of sustainability in the context of diversity, one of the landmarks of the <span class="hlt">globalized</span> world. Within this socio-cultural context, the central issue is: can consumption generate citizenship practices? The concepts of subject and agent help one think about collective action and subjectivation processes and their interferences on the collective consuming behavior. Based on empirical data from a research carried out in the municipality of Estrela in 2007, in the Taquari Valley - Rio Grande do Sul (Southern Brazil) on local reality consumption practices, it was possible to conclude that various reasoning mechanisms and values underlie the <span class="hlt">daily</span> consumption practices. Citizenship construction, based on consumption practices, depends on the subject's reflection capacity on his/her <span class="hlt">daily</span> practices or on what goes through the circulation of environmental information based on sociability spaces. PMID:22011770</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mazzarino, Jane M; Morigi, Valdir J; Kaufmann, Cristine; Farias, Alessandra M B; Fernandes, Diefersom A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">80</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3444216"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headaches</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chronic <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Headache is a descriptive term that includes disorders with headaches on more days than not and affects 4% of the general population. The condition has a debilitating effect on individuals and society through direct cost to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. To successfully manage chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache syndromes it is important to exclude secondary causes with comprehensive history and relevant investigations; identify risk factors that predict its development and recognise its sub-types to appropriately manage the condition. Chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new <span class="hlt">daily</span> persistent headache and medication overuse headache accounts for the vast majority of chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headaches. The scope of this article is to review the primary headache disorders. Secondary headaches are not discussed except medication overuse headache that often accompanies primary headache disorders. The article critically reviews the literature on the current understanding of <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache disorders focusing in particular on recent developments in the treatment of frequent headaches. PMID:23024563</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ahmed, Fayyaz; Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Khalil, Modar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">81</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMGC23A0733S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> composite and their contribution to <span class="hlt">global</span> mean air surface temperature rise</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Herein I discuss and propose updated satellite composites of the total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> covering the period 1978-2008. The composites are compiled from measurements made with the three ACRIM experiments. Measurements from the NIMBUS7/ERB, the ERBS/ERBE satellite experiments and a total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> proxy reconstruction are used to fill the gap from June 1989 to October 1991 between ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 experiments. The result of the analysis does suggests that the total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> did increase from 1980 to 2002. The climate implications of the alternative satellite composites are discussed by using a phenomenological climate model which depends on two characteristics time response at tau1 =0.4 year and tau2=8-12 years, as determined phenomenologically [Scafetta, JGR 2008]. Reconstructions of total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> signature on climate during the last four centuries are discussed. The solar variability appears to have significantly contributed to climate change during the last four centuries, including the last century. Indirectly, the model suggests that the preindustrial climate experienced a large variability which is incompatible with an Hockey Stick temperature graph.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scafetta, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">82</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26544980"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> based on time series analysis: Application to solar thermal power plants energy production planning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Due to strong increase of solar power generation, the predictions of incoming solar energy are acquiring more importance. Photovoltaic and solar thermal are the main sources of electricity generation from solar energy. In the case of solar thermal energy plants with storage energy system, its management and operation need reliable predictions of solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> with the same temporal resolution as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luis Martín; Luis F. Zarzalejo; Jesús Polo; Ana Navarro; Ruth Marchante; Marco Cony</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">83</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.alz.org/i-have-alz/tips-for-daily-life.asp"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tips for <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... chapter Join our online community Tips for <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life Coping skills will help you handle day-to- ... challenges, maximize your independence and live a meaningful life with your diagnosis. Accepting changes Creating a coping ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">84</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/city07.sci.engin.design.daily/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Shaundra Bryant <span class="hlt">Daily</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this video from Science City, Shaundra Bryant <span class="hlt">Daily</span>, an electrical engineer, describes a software program she developed to help girls reflect on their emotions, and how her two passions—science and dance—are connected.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Foundation, Wgbh E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-09-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">85</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/LifeAfterStroke/RegainingIndependence/TipsforDailyLiving/Tips-for-Daily-Living_UCM_308551_SubHomePage.jsp"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tips for <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Living</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Read Stroke Prevention Tips Read Encouraging Messages More Post-Stroke Tips Regaining Independence Technology for People with ... for Improving Fine Motor Skills One-side Neglect Post-Stroke Planning <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Money Management Paying for Long- ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">86</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/g988640727810478.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Loudness in <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Environments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a Acquiring a comprehensive understanding of how people perceive loudness in <span class="hlt">daily</span> environments requires us to take the study\\u000a of loudness out of artificial controlled laboratories and observe the perception of loudness under more ecologically valid\\u000a conditions. In doing so, we find that some assumptions made in the laboratories do not apply to <span class="hlt">daily</span> environments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hugo Fastl; Mary Florentine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">87</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ia.usu.edu/viewproject.php?project=ia:17276"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Food Plan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Students will find <span class="hlt">daily</span> food recommendations based upon their age, weight, height, and activity level. Standard 2 Objective1: a,b,c It is helpful to have a guide that can give us directions on the type and quantity of foods we should eat <span class="hlt">daily</span>. Lets first view the basics of our food groups. Click the Food Group Basics link below and see if you can answer the questions provided. Food Group Basics What is the ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peterson, Mr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110013553&hterms=overhead+transmission+lines&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Doverhead%2Btransmission%2Blines"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Increase in UV <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> during the Past 30 Years (1979-2008) Estimated from Satellite Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Zonal average ultraviolet <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (flux ultraviolet, F(sub uv)) reaching the Earth's surface has significantly increased since 1979 at all latitudes except the equatorial zone. Changes are estimated in zonal average F(sub uv) caused by ozone and cloud plus aerosol reflectivity using an approach based on Beer's law for monochromatic and action spectrum weighted <span class="hlt">irradiances</span>. For four different cases, it is shown that Beer's Law leads to a power law form similar to that applied to erythemal action spectrum weighted <span class="hlt">irradiances</span>. Zonal and annual average increases in F(sub uv) were caused by decreases in ozone amount from 1979 to 1998. After 1998, midlatitude annual average ozone amounts and UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> levels have been approximately constant. In the Southern Hemisphere, zonal and annual average UV increase is partially offset by tropospheric cloud and aerosol transmission decreases (hemispherical dimming), and to a lesser extent in the Northern Hemisphere. Ozone and 340 nm reflectivity changes have been obtained from multiple joined satellite time series from 1978 to 2008. The largest zonal average increases in F(sub uv) have occurred in the Southern Hemisphere. For clear-sky conditions at 50 S, zonal average F(sub uv) changes are estimated (305 nm, 23%; erythemal, 8.5%; 310 nm, 10%; vitamin D production, 12%). These are larger than at 50 N (305 nm, 9%; erythemal, 4%; 310 nm, 4%; vitamin D production, 6%). At the latitude of Buenos Aires, Argentina (34.6 S), the clear-sky Fuv increases are comparable to the increases near Washington, D. C. (38.9 N): 305 nm, 9% and 7%; erythemal, 6% and 4%; and vitamin D production, 7% and 5%, respectively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Herman, Jay R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26543924"> <span id="translatedtitle">Technical and economical system comparison of photovoltaic and concentrating solar thermal power systems depending on annual <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiation</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Concentrating solar thermal power and photovoltaics are two major technologies for converting sunlight to electricity. Variations of the annual solar <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> depending on the site influence their annual efficiency, specific output and electricity generation cost. Detailed technical and economical analyses performed with computer simulations point out differences of solar thermal parabolic trough power plants, non-tracked and two-axis-tracked PV systems. Therefore,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Volker Quaschning</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950004646&hterms=sapporo+northern+japan&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dsapporo%2Bnorthern%2Bjapan"> <span id="translatedtitle">UV-B radiation amplification factor determined based on the simultaneous observation of total ozone and <span class="hlt">global</span> spectral <span class="hlt">irradiance</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Japan Meteorological Agency started the spectral observation of solar ultraviolet (UV) <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> on 1 January 1990 at Tateno, Aerological Observatory in Tsukuba (35 deg N, 140 deg E). The observation has been carried out using the Brewer spectrophotometer for the wavelengths from 290 to 325 nm with a 0.5 nm interval every hour from 30 minutes before sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset throughout a year. Because of remarkable similarity within observed spectra, an observed spectrum can be expressed by a simple combination of a reference spectrum and two parameters expressing the deformation of the observed spectrum from the reference. By use of the relation between one of the deformation parameters and the total ozone simultaneously observed with the Dobson spectrophotometer, the possible increase of UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> due to ozone depletion is estimated. For damaging UV, the <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> possibly increases about 19 percent with the ozone depletion of 10 percent at noon throughout the year in the northern midlatitudes. DUV at noon on the summer solstice possibly increases about 5.6 percent with the ozone depletion of 10 m atm-cm for all latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ito, T.; Sakoda, Y.; Matsubara, K.; Kajihara, R.; Uekubo, T.; Kobayashi, M.; Shitamichi, M.; Ueno, T.; Ito, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/cru/posters/2000-03-TO-ukprecip.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Changes in the intensity of <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Changes in the intensity of <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation over the UK Timothy J. Osborn Mike Hulme Phil D.J. Hennessy, 1995: Potential impacts of <span class="hlt">global</span> warming on the frequency and magnitude of heavy precipitation of surface temperature and precipitation over Europe in the current and 2xCO2 climates using the UKMO climate</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Feigon, Brooke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JGRD..114.0D08G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Decadal changes in shortwave <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> at the surface in the period from 1960 to 2000 estimated from <span class="hlt">Global</span> Energy Balance Archive Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Decadal changes in shortwave <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> at the Earth's surface are estimated for the period from approximately 1960 through to 2000 from pyranometer records stored in the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Energy Balance Archive. For this observational period, estimates could be calculated for a total of 140 cells of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project grid (an equal area 2.5° × 2.5° grid at the equator) using regression models allowing for station effects. In large regions worldwide, shortwave <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> decreases in the first half of the observational period, recovers from the decrease in the 1980s, and thereafter increases, in line with previous reports. Years of trend reversals are determined for the grid cells which are best described with a second-order polynomial model. This reversal of the trend is observed in the majority of the grid cells in the interior of Europe and in Japan. In China, shortwave <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> recovers during the 1990s in the majority of the grid cells in the southeast and northeast from the decrease observed in the period from 1960 through to 1990. A reversal of the trend in the 1980s or early 1990s is also observed for two grid cells in North America, and for the grid cells containing the Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia), Singapore, Casablanca (Morocco), Valparaiso (Chile) sites, and, noticeably, the remote South Pole and American Samoa sites. Negative trends persist, i.e., shortwave radiation decreases, for the observational period 1960 through to 2000 at the European coasts, in central and northwest China, and for three grid cells in India and two in Africa.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gilgen, H.; Roesch, A.; Wild, M.; Ohmura, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.astro.phys.ethz.ch/papers/fligge/GL264W01.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> since 1874 revisited</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We reconstruct the solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> since 1874 employing an evolved version of previously published models and improved sunspot and facular data. A good correlation between reconstructed <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> and Earth's <span class="hlt">global</span> air temperature on time scales longer than the solar cycle is obtained and, in contrast to many earlier models, solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> does not on average lag behind <span class="hlt">global</span> temperature prior</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. K. Solanki; M. Fligge</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/patientinstructions/000133.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> bowel care program</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... constipation (hard bowel movements). A <span class="hlt">daily</span> bowel care program can help you avoid embarrassment and spend less ... Following a regular bowel program may often help prevent accidents. Learn to be aware of small signs that you need to have a bowel movement ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.choosemyplate.gov/myplate/index.aspx"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Food Plan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... for their age and gender. Height, feet: feet Height, inches: inches Physical Activity: Amount of moderate or vigorous activity (such as brisk walking, jogging, biking, aerobics, or yard work) you do in addition to your normal <span class="hlt">daily</span> routine , most days. Physical Activity:</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fluoride&pg=3&id=EJ471371"> <span id="translatedtitle">Toothbrushing: Do It <span class="hlt">Daily</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Offers a practical guide for promoting <span class="hlt">daily</span> toothbrushing in young children. Discusses the importance of proper dental care, explains the causes of tooth decay, describes proper dental care for infants and young children, recommends materials and teaching methods, and discusses visits to the dentist and the benefits of fluoride for dental health.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Texas Child Care, 1993</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.glaucoma.org/treatment/daily-life.php"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life with Glaucoma</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life with Glaucoma email Send this article to a friend by filling out the fields below: Your name: Your friend's name: Your ... can be useful and comforting. Don't let glaucoma limit your life Don’t let glaucoma limit ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.hpc.ncep.noaa.gov/dailywxmap/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">NOAA <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Weather Maps</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The charts on this website are the principal charts of the former Weather Bureau publication, "<span class="hlt">Daily</span> Weather Map." They are the Surface Weather Map, the 500-Millibar Height Contours chart, the Highest and Lowest Temperatures chart, and the Precipitation Areas and Amounts chart. For each day, simple charts are arranged on a single page. These charts are the surface analysis of pressure and fronts, color shading, in ten degree intervals,of maximum and minimum temperature, 500-Millibar height contours, and color shaded 24-hour total precipitation. These charts act as links to their respective <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Weather Map charts. All charts are derived from the operational weather maps prepared at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Hydrometeorological Prediction Center, National Weather Service.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Center, Hydrometeorological P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://appliedresearch.cancer.gov/diet/screeners/daily.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Food Checklist</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">daily</span> food checklist method is a form of food record. The tool is comprised of a list of foods; over the course of a day, a respondent makes a check beside a food each time she or he eats it. The checklist shares an advantage of other record methods in that it does not rely on memory. In addition, it avoids some disadvantages of complete quantitative food records in that it has relatively low respondent and investigator burden.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18595853"> <span id="translatedtitle">Within-canopy sampling of <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> to describe downwelling light distribution and infer canopy stratification in a broadleaf forest.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A broadleaf mixed forest diversified through partial tree thinning was studied to identify expedient sampling and data analysis procedures to capture the heterogeneous within-canopy downward distribution of instantaneous <span class="hlt">global</span> photosynthetic photon flux (PPF); to extract foliage structural properties from the acquired light values; and to compute statistics descriptive of the within-canopy light and leaf layer distributions. We sampled PPF at 1-m intervals along vertical gradients using a helium-filled balloon as a platform for a light sensor. A random method was used to identify the forest floor locations for the within-canopy balloon ascents. About 400 PPF measurements were recorded per vertical transect. For each PPF value, we computed, by inversion of the Monsi-Saeki model, the number of leaf strata cumulated along the sunbeam direction from the position where the light was measured. Variability in PPF and leaf layer at different vegetation scales was computed by non-parametric statistics. The methods were evaluated as appropriate for intra-canopy PPF sampling, particularly in an undisturbed canopy. The minimum number of vertical PPF profiles required to capture the within-canopy PPF variability was 9-10 (equivalent to about 4000 measurements). The reliability and sensitivity of the inversion of the Monsi-Saeki method were sufficient to capture the canopy structural differences between undisturbed and partially thinned forests. The proposed PPF canopy sampling and data analysis procedures provide a fast, reliable and inexpensive way to characterize tree crown structure, and to predict plant growth and forest dynamics and could be applied whenever vegetation absorbed radiation is a main driving force for forest canopy processes. The experimental light attenuation data and the extracted canopy leaf layer numbers could serve to corroborate canopy mechanistic models of radiative transfer and net primary production. PMID:18595853</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giuliani, Rita; Brown, Kim J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AtmRe.150...69C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of errors made in solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> estimation due to averaging the Angstrom turbidity coefficient</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Even though the monitoring of solar radiation experienced a vast progress in the recent years both in terms of expanding the measurement networks and increasing the data quality, the number of stations is still too small to achieve accurate <span class="hlt">global</span> coverage. Alternatively, various models for estimating solar radiation are exploited in many applications. Choosing a model is often limited by the availability of the meteorological parameters required for its running. In many cases the current values of the parameters are replaced with <span class="hlt">daily</span>, monthly or even yearly average values. This paper deals with the evaluation of the error made in estimating <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> by using an average value of the Angstrom turbidity coefficient instead of its current value. A simple equation relating the relative variation of the <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> and the relative variation of the Angstrom turbidity coefficient is established. The theoretical result is complemented by a quantitative assessment of the errors made when hourly, <span class="hlt">daily</span>, monthly or yearly average values of the Angstrom turbidity coefficient are used at the entry of a parametric solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> model. The study was conducted with data recorded in 2012 at two AERONET stations in Romania. It is shown that the relative errors in estimating <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (GHI) due to inadequate consideration of Angstrom turbidity coefficient may be very high, even exceeding 20%. However, when an hourly or a <span class="hlt">daily</span> average value is used instead of the current value of the Angstrom turbidity coefficient, the relative errors are acceptably small, in general less than 5%. All results prove that in order to correctly reproduce GHI for various particular aerosol loadings of the atmosphere, the parametric models should rely on hourly or <span class="hlt">daily</span> Angstrom turbidity coefficient values rather than on the more usual monthly or yearly average data, if currently measured data is not available.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Calinoiu, Delia-Gabriela; Stefu, Nicoleta; Paulescu, Marius; Trif-Tordai, Gavril?; Mares, Oana; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pop, Nicolina; Pacurar, Angel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.archdaily.com/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Arch<span class="hlt">Daily</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Billed as the "world's most visited architecture website,â Arch<span class="hlt">Daily</span> is a treasure trove of materials on new building projects, architectural trends, design matters, and competitions. Along the top of its homepage, visitors can delve into areas that include News, Articles, Materials, Software, and Interviews. This last area is a great place to start as it includes fabulous conversations with notables such as Jeanne Gang, Jean-Louis Cohen, and Andreas G. Gjertsen. Moving along, the Materials section offers specific technical information on equipment, finishes, installation techniques, and structural work. The Projects area contains information on new and compelling works, such as the Soundcloud Headquarters in Berlin and the Bagnoli Futura in Italy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.learner.org/interactives/dailymath/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Math in <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">What are your odds of hitting it big at the casino? Should you buy or lease a car? How much will you have when you retire? All of these questions involve math, and this latest addition to the Annenberg Media Projects Learner Online site (described in the September 12, 1997 Scout Report) explores the use of basic mathematical concepts in <span class="hlt">daily</span> decision-making. The exhibit is divided into several topical sections exploring probability and gambling, compound interest and credit cards, population growth, geometry in the home, and ratios and recipes. In addition to an overview of the topic, each section offers several links to selected related sites and online tools, and two feature interactive learning activities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3444222"> <span id="translatedtitle">New <span class="hlt">daily</span> persistent headache</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New <span class="hlt">daily</span> persistent headache (NDPH) is a chronic headache developing in a person who does not have a past history of headaches. The headache begins acutely and reaches its peak within 3 days. It is important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and volume. A significant proportion of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment. The condition is best viewed as a syndrome rather than a diagnosis. The headache can mimic chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache, and it is also important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in CSF pressure and volume. A large proportion of NDPH sufferers have migrainous features to their headache and should be managed with treatments used for treating migraine. A small group of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment. PMID:23024565</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tyagi, Alok</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.learner.org/interactives/dailymath/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Math in <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Math in the "real world" happens all the time, and it can involve everything from buying a car to following a simple (or complex) recipe. The "Math in <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life" site offers up a series of interesting ways to get students thinking about how math works in everyday life. Created by Annenberg Media, this set of interactive exercises looks at the manifestation of mathematical principles in areas of life such as home decorating, finances, and of course, cooking. In each section, users will find hands-on exercises that complement well-written essays that help introduce visitors to seven different topical areas. Finally, the site includes a list of relevant websites, including links to The Math Forum, the U.S. Census Bureau, and The Metric Conversion Card.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00876831"> <span id="translatedtitle">An introduction to quiet <span class="hlt">daily</span> geomagnetic fields</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On days that are quiet with respect to solar-terrestrial activity phenomena, the geomagnetic field has variations, tens of gamma in size, with major spectral components at about 24, 12, 8, and 6 hr in period. These quiet <span class="hlt">daily</span> field variations are primarily due to the dynamo currents flowing in the E region of the earth's ionosphere, are driven by the <span class="hlt">global</span> thermotidal wind systems, and are dependent upon the local tensor conductivity and main geomagnetic field vector. The highlights of the behavior and interpretation of these quiet field changes, from their discovery in 1634 until the present, are discussed as an introduction to the special journal issue on Quiet <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Geomagnetic Fields. ?? 1989 Birkha??user Verlag.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Campbell, W. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.utexas.edu/pmcs/documents/DailyTexan_signshop.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Texan October 17, 2013</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Texan October 17, 2013 University sign shop dedicated to quality University Sign Shop to make a sign. On any given day, the University Sign Shop is processing 2 to 10 work orders for the university. Photo Credit: Charlie Pearce | <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Texan Staff Published on October 17, 2013 at 12:55 am Last</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnston, Daniel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17634734"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Evaluation of <span class="hlt">daily</span> quality assurance for proton therapy at National Cancer Center Hospital East.].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is very important for proton therapy to make and carry out a quality assurance (QA) program. Operators and medical personnel have to avoid any trouble during treatment and provide patients with high quality and reliable treatment. A proton therapy machine consists of an accelerator, gantry and various beam modifying devices. Although QA for proton therapy is complicated and difficult, we tried to realize <span class="hlt">daily</span> QA for proton therapy. Two main purposes in <span class="hlt">daily</span> QA are stable operation of the accelerator and reliable control of the <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> system. In order to determine the <span class="hlt">daily</span> QA issues, past problems were considered. We made a <span class="hlt">daily</span> QA program and used it for one year. In this paper, we show the <span class="hlt">daily</span> QA program and report our results. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> QA was clearly effective for stable operation of the accelerator and for controlling quality of the <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> system. PMID:17634734</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kohno, Ryosuke; Nishio, Teiji; Miyagishi, Tomoko; Matsumura, Kazutomo; Saito, Hideki; Uzawa, Naoya; Sasano, Toshinobu; Nakamura, Toshio; Ogino, Takashi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3673164"> <span id="translatedtitle">Unravelling <span class="hlt">daily</span> human mobility motifs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Human mobility is differentiated by time scales. While the mechanism for long time scales has been studied, the underlying mechanism on the <span class="hlt">daily</span> scale is still unrevealed. Here, we uncover the mechanism responsible for the <span class="hlt">daily</span> mobility patterns by analysing the temporal and spatial trajectories of thousands of persons as individual networks. Using the concept of motifs from network theory, we find only 17 unique networks are present in <span class="hlt">daily</span> mobility and they follow simple rules. These networks, called here motifs, are sufficient to capture up to 90 per cent of the population in surveys and mobile phone datasets for different countries. Each individual exhibits a characteristic motif, which seems to be stable over several months. Consequently, <span class="hlt">daily</span> human mobility can be reproduced by an analytically tractable framework for Markov chains by modelling periods of high-frequency trips followed by periods of lower activity as the key ingredient. PMID:23658117</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schneider, Christian M.; Belik, Vitaly; Couronne, Thomas; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Gonzalez, Marta C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040081066&hterms=fashion+trends&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528fashion%2Btrends%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recent Trends in <span class="hlt">Global</span> Ocean Chlorophyll</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent analyses of SeaWiFS data have shown that <span class="hlt">global</span> ocean chlorophyll has increased more than 5% since 1998. The North Pacific ocean basin has increased nearly 19%. To understand the causes of these trends we have applied the newly developed NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Assimilation Model (OBAM), which is driven in mechanistic fashion by surface winds, sea surface temperature, atmospheric iron deposition, sea ice, and surface <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. The mode1 utilizes chlorophyll from SeaWiFS in a <span class="hlt">daily</span> assimilation. The model has in place many of the climatic variables that can be expected to produce the changes observed in SeaWiFS data. Ths enables us to diagnose the model performance, the assimilation performance, and possible causes for the increase in chlorophyll.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gregg, Watson; Casey, Nancy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://police.nku.edu/content/dam/police/docs/safety/dailylogs/2008-2009/2009_DL_09c.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Log 2009 September 2009</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">-00488 Reported: 09/30/09 1530 Occurred: Same Incident: Receiving Stolen Property Location: Off Campus Bookstore Location: Parking Lot I Disposition: Report--Closed Comments: Two vehicle accident; no injuries. #12;<span class="hlt">Daily</span> of breathing problems and vomiting; transported to hospital by ambulance. Report #: 2009-00484 Reported: 09</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyce, Richard L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AtmRe.149...24B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sensitivity of erythemal UV/<span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> ratios to atmospheric parameters: application for estimating erythemal radiation at four sites in Thailand</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Factors affecting the ratio of erythemal UV (UVER) to broadband (G) <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> were investigated in this study. Data from four solar monitoring sites in Thailand, namely Chiang Mai, Ubon Ratchathani, Nakhon Pathom and Songkhla were used to investigate the UVER/G ratio in response to geometric and atmospheric parameters. These comprised solar zenith angle, aerosol load, total ozone column, precipitable water and clearness index. A modeling scheme was developed to isolate and examine the effect of each individual environmental parameter on the ratio. Results showed that all parameters with the exception of solar zenith angle and clearness index influenced the ratios in a linear manner. These results were also used to develop a semi-empirical model for estimating hourly erythemal UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. Data from 2009 to 2010 were used to construct the ratio model while validation was performed using erythemal UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> at the above four sites in 2011. The validation results showed reasonable agreement with a root mean square difference of 13.5% and mean bias difference of - 0.5%, under all sky conditions and 10.9% and - 0.3%, respectively, under cloudless conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Buntoung, Sumaman; Janjai, Serm; Nunez, Manuel; Choosri, Pranomkorn; Pratummasoot, Noppamas; Chiwpreecha, Kulanist</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AtmRe.148...24B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sensitivity of erythemal UV/<span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> ratios to atmospheric parameters: application for estimating erythemal radiation at four sites in Thailand</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Factors affecting the ratio of erythemal UV (UVER) to broadband (G) <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> were investigated in this study. Data from four solar monitoring sites in Thailand, namely Chiang Mai, Ubon Ratchathani, Nakhon Pathom and Songkhla were used to investigate the UVER/G ratio in response to geometric and atmospheric parameters. These comprised solar zenith angle, aerosol load, total ozone column, precipitable water and clearness index. A modeling scheme was developed to isolate and examine the effect of each individual environmental parameter on the ratio. Results showed that all parameters with the exception of solar zenith angle and clearness index influenced the ratios in a linear manner. These results were also used to develop a semi-empirical model for estimating hourly erythemal UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. Data from 2009 to 2010 were used to construct the ratio model while validation was performed using erythemal UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> at the above four sites in 2011. The validation results showed reasonable agreement with a root mean square difference of 13.5% and mean bias difference of - 0.5%, under all sky conditions and 10.9% and - 0.3%, respectively, under cloudless conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Buntoung, Sumaman; Janjai, Serm; Nunez, Manuel; Choosri, Pranomkorn; Pratummasoot, Noppamas; Chiwpreecha, Kulanist</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a000100/a000186/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Lightning Measurements from TRMM: April 1, 1998 through April 29, 1998</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> actual lightning measurements from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on TRMM for the period from April 1, 1998, through April 29, 1998. <span class="hlt">Global</span> data is shown, followed by regional data for North America, North and South America, and Africa.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shirah, Greg; Kummerow, Chris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-05-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/10465948"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of Pinatubo aerosols on the seasonal trends of <span class="hlt">global</span>, direct and diffuse <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> in two northern mid-latitude sites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In June 1991, Mt Pinatubo's eruption in the Philippines ejected a staggering 20 million metric tons of SO2 into the stratosphere which resulted in an aerosol cloud covering most of the Earth within a few months after the eruption. In this article we illustrate how the seasonal trends of <span class="hlt">global</span>, direct and diffuse solar radiation were modified by the eruption</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benoît Molineaux; Pierre Ineichen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51566158"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> earthquake forecasts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have constructed <span class="hlt">daily</span> worldwide long- and short-term earthquake forecasts. These forecasts specify the earthquake rate per unit area, time and magnitude on a 0.5 degree grid for a <span class="hlt">global</span> zone region between 75N and 75S latitude (301 by 720 grid cells). We use both the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Centroid Moment Tensor (GCMT) and Preliminary Determinations of Epicenters (PDE) catalogues. Like our</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yan Y. Kagan; David D. Jackson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013hst..prop13556B"> <span id="translatedtitle">UVIS CCD <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Monitor A</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This program obtains full-frame, four-amp readout bias and dark frames as part of a <span class="hlt">daily</span> monitor of the behavior of the WFC3/UVIS CCD. All images are post-flashed at a level of 12 e-; a separate program {13559} will be used to obtain un-flashed UVIS darks to monitor non-postflashed behavior. The frames from this proposal, in addition to those that are obtained as part of the WFC3/UVIS anneal program {13554}, will be used to create superbias and superdark calibration reference files for the Calibration Database System {CDBS}.This is the first of three <span class="hlt">daily</span> monitoring programs of Cycle 21 {the others are 13557 and 13558}. It covers November 2, 2013 through February 24, 2014. The combination of the three programs provides full coverage of Cycle 21.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bourque, Matthew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013hst..prop13557B"> <span id="translatedtitle">UVIS CCD <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Monitor B</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This program obtains full-frame, four-amp readout bias and dark frames as part of a <span class="hlt">daily</span> monitor of the behavior of the WFC3/UVIS CCD. All images are post-flashed at a level of 12 e-; a separate program {13559} will be used to obtain un-flashed UVIS darks to monitor non-postflashed behavior. The frames from this program, in addition to those that are obtained as part of the WFC3/UVIS anneal program {13554}, will be used to create superbias and superdark calibration reference files for the Calibration Database System {CDBS}.This program is the second of three <span class="hlt">daily</span> monitoring programs of Cycle 21 {the others being 13556 and 13558}. This program spans February 24, 2013 through June 18, 2014. The combination of this and the other programs span the entirety of Cycle 21.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bourque, Matthew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013hst..prop13558B"> <span id="translatedtitle">UVIS CCD <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Monitor C</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This program obtains full-frame, four-amp readout bias and dark frames as part of a <span class="hlt">daily</span> monitor of the behavior of the WFC3/UVIS CCD. All images are post-flashed at a level of 12 e-; a separate program {13559} will be used to obtain un-flashed UVIS darks to monitor non-postflashed behavior. The frames from this program, in addition to those that are obtained as part of the WFC3/UVIS anneal program {13554}, will be used to create superbias and superdark calibration reference files for the Calibration Database System {CDBS}.This program is the second of three <span class="hlt">daily</span> monitoring programs of Cycle 21 {the others being 13556 and 13557}. This program spans June 18, 2013 through November 4, 2014. The combination of this and the other programs span the entirety of Cycle 21.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bourque, Matthew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6082386"> <span id="translatedtitle">Toward cinematizing our <span class="hlt">daily</span> lives</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We introduce a cinematographic video production system to create movie-like attractive footage from our indoor <span class="hlt">daily</span> life.\\u000a Since the system is designed for ordinary users in non-studio environments, it is composed of standard hardware components,\\u000a provides a simple interface, and works in near real-time of 5?~?6 frames\\/sec. The proposed system reconstructs a visual hull\\u000a from acquired multiple videos and then</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hansung Kim; Ryuuki Sakamoto; Itaru Kitahara; Tomoji Toriyama; Kiyoshi Kogure</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> 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onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/fg306874579132k2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gender in Spanish <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Newspapers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this study was to examine the portrayal of women and men in a Spanish <span class="hlt">daily</span> newspaper and to find whether there\\u000a were gender differences among the authors of the articles in said newspaper. A content analysis was conducted of 4,060 articles\\u000a and advertisements from 24 issues of a randomly selected, large-circulation, Spanish newspaper. Men were found to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Pilar Matud; Carmen Rodríguez; Inmaculada Espinosa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47616108"> <span id="translatedtitle">Update on Chronic <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Headache</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Opinion statement  Chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache (CDH), defined as a primary headache occurring at least 15 days per month, is a problem of worldwide\\u000a scope, which is seen in 3% to 5% of the population. Though it has been recognized since ancient times, only recently have\\u000a there been attempts to define and classify it. CDH usually consists of a mixture of migraine and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James R. Couch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AtmRe.137..176A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variability of annual <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum rainfall of Dhaka, Bangladesh</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper deals with a study on rainfall characterises of Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh for the period of 1953 to 2009. Data were collected from Bangladesh Meteorological Department in January 2011 and found 2.84% missing data. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted on annual rainfall, annual <span class="hlt">daily</span> and monthly maximum rainfall. We applied Gumbel distribution function to estimate return periods of extreme rainfall events and found that annual <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum rainfall equal or greater than 425 mm had a return period of 100 years. Normal distribution function was adopted to forecast rainfall variability due to <span class="hlt">global</span> climate change and found that annual <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum rainfall equal or greater than 200 mm might occur in any 12 years during the period of 2010 to 2066. The outcomes of this paper can be used in better understanding rainfall patterns of Dhaka, Bangladesh.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ahammed, Faisal; Hewa, Guna Alankarage; Argue, John R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=global+AND+food+AND+crisis&id=EJ539976"> <span id="translatedtitle">Feeding the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Family.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presents an activity and background information to help students in America's Midwest understand that the world is in the midst of a <span class="hlt">global</span> food crisis. Discusses the view that hunger is a <span class="hlt">daily</span> concern with serious social, political, and economic consequences. (DDR)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wasserman, Pamela; Doyle, Andrea</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=motivation+AND+%22college+students%22++AND+%22self+motivation%22+&pg=3&id=EJ999531"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intent to Quit among <span class="hlt">Daily</span> and Non-<span class="hlt">Daily</span> College Student Smokers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Given the high prevalence of young adult smoking, we examined (i) psychosocial factors and substance use among college students representing five smoking patterns and histories [non-smokers, quitters, native non-<span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers (i.e. never <span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers), converted non-<span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers (i.e. former <span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers) and <span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers] and (ii) smoking…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pinsker, E. A.; Berg, C. J.; Nehl, E. J.; Prokhorov, A. V.; Buchanan, T. S.; Ahluwalia, J. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70013759"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> cycles in coastal dunes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> cycles of summer sea breezes produce distinctive cyclic foreset deposits in dune sands of the Texas and Oregon coasts. In both areas the winds are strong enough to transport sand only during part of the day, reach a peak during the afternoon, and vary little in direction during the period of sand transport. Cyclicity in the foreset deposits is made evident by variations in the type of sedimentary structure, the texture, and the heavy-mineral content of the sand. Some of the cyclic deposits are made up entirely of one basic type of structure, in which the character of the structure varies cyclically; for example, the angle of climb in a climbing-wind-ripple structure may vary cyclically. Other cyclic deposits are characterized by alternations of two or more structural types. Variations in the concentration of fine-grained heavy minerals, which account for the most striking cyclicity, arise mainly because of segregation on wind-rippled depositional surfaces: where the ripples climb at low angles, the coarsegrained light minerals, which accumulate preferentially on ripple crests, tend to be excluded from the local deposit. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> cyclic deposits are thickest and best developed on small dunes and are least recognizable near the bases of large dunes. ?? 1988.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hunter, R.E.; Richmond, B.M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110007072&hterms=albedo&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dalbedo"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhancement of the MODIS <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Snow Albedo Product</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The MODIS <span class="hlt">daily</span> snow albedo product is a data layer in the MOD10A1 snow-cover product that includes snow-covered area and fractional snow cover as well as quality information and other metadata. It was developed to augment the MODIS BRDF/Albedo algorithm (MCD43) that provides 16-day maps of albedo <span class="hlt">globally</span> at 500-m resolution. But many modelers require <span class="hlt">daily</span> snow albedo, especially during the snowmelt season when the snow albedo is changing rapidly. Many models have an unrealistic snow albedo feedback in both estimated albedo and change in albedo over the seasonal cycle context, Rapid changes in snow cover extent or brightness challenge the MCD43 algorithm; over a 16-day period, MCD43 determines whether the majority of clear observations was snow-covered or snow-free then only calculates albedo for the majority condition. Thus changes in snow albedo and snow cover are not portrayed accurately during times of rapid change, therefore the current MCD43 product is not ideal for snow work. The MODIS <span class="hlt">daily</span> snow albedo from the MOD10 product provides more frequent, though less robust maps for pixels defined as "snow" by the MODIS snow-cover algorithm. Though useful, the <span class="hlt">daily</span> snow albedo product can be improved using a <span class="hlt">daily</span> version of the MCD43 product as described in this paper. There are important limitations to the MOD10A1 <span class="hlt">daily</span> snow albedo product, some of which can be mitigated. Utilizing the appropriate per-pixel Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDFs) can be problematic, and correction for anisotropic scattering must be included. The BRDF describes how the reflectance varies with view and illumination geometry. Also, narrow-to-broadband conversion specific for snow on different surfaces must be calculated and this can be difficult. In consideration of these limitations of MOD10A1, we are planning to improve the <span class="hlt">daily</span> snow albedo algorithm by coupling the periodic per-pixel snow albedo from MCD43, with <span class="hlt">daily</span> surface ref|outanoom, In this paper, we compare a <span class="hlt">daily</span> version of MCD43B3 with the <span class="hlt">daily</span> albedo from MOD10A1. and MCD43B3 with a 16-day average of MOD10A1, over Greenland. We also discuss some near-future planned enhancements to MOD10A1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hall, Dorothy K.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Wang, Zhuosen; Riggs, George A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.alsa.org/als-care/resources/products/"> <span id="translatedtitle">Products to Aid in <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Living</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... Products to Aid in <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Living Share Print Products to Aid in <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Living The materials and ... Check back for an update to this message. Product List Product/Services Topics Care Services Information and ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12167846"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contrails reduce <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature range.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The potential of condensation trails (contrails) from jet aircraft to affect regional-scale surface temperatures has been debated for years, but was difficult to verify until an opportunity arose as a result of the three-day grounding of all commercial aircraft in the United States in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001. Here we show that there was an anomalous increase in the average diurnal temperature range (that is, the difference between the daytime maximum and night-time minimum temperatures) for the period 11-14 September 2001. Because persisting contrails can reduce the transfer of both incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation and so reduce the <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature range, we attribute at least a portion of this anomaly to the absence of contrails over this period. PMID:12167846</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Travis, David J; Carleton, Andrew M; Lauritsen, Ryan G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/dp/index.php"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Palette Digital Collection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Every day, the staff members at the <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Palette Digital Collection at the University of Iowa Libraries put up a new artwork by a different Iowa artist. Since the project was launched in 2004, the collection has profiled over 1,000 artists working in the fine arts, literature, video, and the performing arts. Visitors can scroll through the Highlights of Collection section near the bottom of the page for a taste of the very intriguing offerings here. The Subcollections area includes areas like Iowa Writes, Iowa on Stage, and Iowa at 30 Frames per second. This last area has 11 rather intriguing short films, including "Body Beasts," "Back of the Mike," and "Alternative Forms of Energy." Also, Iowa Writes includes over 700 poems, including "Ode to Thresher" and "16th Avenue, Cedar Rapids."</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/env/bulk-material-storage/chemical-bulk-storage/Documents/Daily_Chemical_Bulk_Storage_Inspection_Form.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Chemical Bulk Storage Inspection Form</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Chemical Bulk Storage Inspection Form Chemical Bulk Storage Form Approved by: Paul Jennette, CVM Last revised by: Barbara English Revision date: 3/19/14 <span class="hlt">Daily</span>_Chemical://sp.ehs.cornell.edu/env/bulk-material-storage/chemical-bulk- storage/Documents/<span class="hlt">Daily</span>_Chemical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pawlowski, Wojtek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19936919"> <span id="translatedtitle">Implication of <span class="hlt">global</span> environmental changes on chemical toxicity-effect of water temperature, pH, and ultraviolet B <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> on acute toxicity of several pharmaceuticals in Daphnia magna.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> environmental change poses emerging environmental health challenges throughout the world. One of such threats could be found in chemical safety in aquatic ecosystem. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of several environmental factors, such as water pH, temperature and ultraviolet light on the toxicity of pharmaceutical compounds in water, using freshwater invertebrate Daphnia magna. Seven pharmaceuticals including ibuprofen, acetaminophen, lincomycin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline and sulfathiazole were chosen as test compounds based on their frequent detection in water. The experimental conditions of environmental parameters were selected within the ranges that could be encountered in temperate environment, i.e., water temperature (15, 21, and 25 degrees C), pH (7.4, 8.3, and 9.2), and UV-B light intensity (continuous <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> of 15.0 microW/cm(2)). For acetaminophen, enrofloxacin and sulfathiazole, decrease in water pH generally led to increase of acute lethal toxicity, which could be explained by the unionized fraction of pharmaceuticals. Increase of water temperature enhanced the acute toxicity of the acetaminophen, enrofloxacin and chlortetracycline, potentially due to alteration in toxicokinetics of chemicals as well as impact on physiological mechanisms of the test organism. The presence of UV-B light significantly increased the toxicity of sulfathiazole, which could be explained by photo-modification of this chemical that lead to oxidative stress. Under the UV light, however, acute toxicity of enrofloxacin decreased, which might be due to photo-degradation. Since changing environmental conditions could affect exposure and concentration-response profile of environmental contaminants, such conditions should be identified and evaluated in order to better manage ecosystem health under changing <span class="hlt">global</span> environment. PMID:19936919</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Jungkon; Park, Jeongim; Kim, Pan-Gyi; Lee, Chulwoo; Choi, Kyunghee; Choi, Kyungho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://geography.unt.edu/~fpan/phtml/panff2012_smde.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Surface Soil Moisture Using a <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Diagnostic Soil Moisture Equation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Estimating <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Surface Soil Moisture Using a <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Diagnostic Soil Moisture Equation Feifei Pan1 moisture for scheduling irri- gation: errors in the estimated soil moisture are cumulative and frequent recalibrations are needed. A simple and robust approach to estimation of <span class="hlt">daily</span> soil moisture using a <span class="hlt">daily</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pan, Feifei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14706037"> <span id="translatedtitle">Visual stimuli in <span class="hlt">daily</span> life.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">People of all ages, but especially children and adolescents, are increasingly exposed to visual stimuli. Typical environmental stimuli that can trigger epileptic seizures in susceptible persons are televisions (TVs), computers, videogames (VGs), discothèque lights, venetian blinds, striped walls, rolling stairs (escalators), striped clothing, and sunlight reflected from snow or the sea or interrupted by trees during a ride in a car or train. Less common stimuli are rotating helicopter blades, disfunctioning fluorescent lighting, welding lights, etc. New potentially provocative devices turn up now and then unexpectedly. During the last decades especially, displays have become increasingly dominant in many of our <span class="hlt">daily</span>-life activities. We therefore focus mainly on the characteristics of artificial light and on current and future developments in video displays and videogames. Because VG playing has been shown also to have positive effects, a rating system might be developed for provocativeness to inform consumers about the content. It is important that patients with epilepsy be informed adequately about their possible visual sensitivity. PMID:14706037</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A; van der Beld, Gerrit; Heynderickx, Ingrid; Groen, Paul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3731190"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sedoanalgesia in pediatric <span class="hlt">daily</span> surgery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: The present report was focused on clinical advantages of sedoanalgesia in the pediatric outpatient surgical cases. Method: Sedoanalgesia has been used to sedate patients for a variety of pediatric procedures in our department between 2007 and 2010. This is a retrospective review of 2720 pediatric patients given ketamine for sedation with midazolam premedication. Ketamine was given intravenously (1-2 mg/kg) together with atropine (0.02 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.1 mg/kg) + a local infiltration anesthetic 2 mg/kg 0.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride. Result: Median age of the patients included in the study was 5.76 ± 2.12 (0-16 years). The main indications for ketamine include circumcision (69%), inguinal pathologies (inguinal hernia (17%), orchidopexy (2.68%), hydrocele (3.38%), hypospadias (1.94%), urethral fistula repair (0.33%), urethral dilatation (0.25%), and other conditions. All of our patients were discharged home well. In this regard, we have the largest group of patients ever given ketamine. Conclusion: Sedoanalgesia might be used as a quite effective method for <span class="hlt">daily</span> surgical procedures in children. PMID:23936597</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ozkan, Aybars; Okur, Mesut; Kaya, Murat; Kaya, Ertugrul; Kucuk, Adem; Erbas, Mesut; Kutlucan, Leyla; Sahan, Leyla</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40151446"> <span id="translatedtitle">Maximizing <span class="hlt">daily</span> canopy photosynthesis with respect to the leaf nitrogen allocation pattern in the canopy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A model of <span class="hlt">daily</span> canopy photosynthesis was constructed taking light and leaf nitrogen distribution in the canopy into consideration. It was applied to a canopy of Solidago altissima. Both <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> and nitrogen concentration per unit leaf area decreased exponentially with increasing cumulative leaf area from the top of the canopy. The photosynthetic capacity of a single leaf was evaluated in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Hirose; M. J. A. Werger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2005.11.028"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cokriging estimation of <span class="hlt">daily</span> suspended sediment loads</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> suspended sediment loads (S) were estimated using cokriging (CK) of S with <span class="hlt">daily</span> river discharge based on weekly, biweekly, or monthly sampled sediment data. They were also estimated with ordinary kriging (OK) and a rating curve method. The estimated <span class="hlt">daily</span> loads were compared with the <span class="hlt">daily</span> measured values over a nine-year-period. The results show that the estimated <span class="hlt">daily</span> sediment loads with the CK using the weekly measured data best matched the measured <span class="hlt">daily</span> values. The rating curve method based on the same data provides a fairly good match but it tends to underestimate the peak and overestimate the low values. The CK estimation was better than the rating curve because CK considers the temporal correlation among the data values and honors the measured points whereas the rating curve method does not. For the site studied, weekly sampling may be frequent enough for estimating <span class="hlt">daily</span> sediment loads with CK when <span class="hlt">daily</span> discharge data is available. The estimated <span class="hlt">daily</span> loads with CK were less reliable when the sediment samples were taken less frequently, i.e., biweekly or monthly. The OK estimates using the weekly measured data significantly underestimates the <span class="hlt">daily</span> S because unlike CK and the rating curve, OK makes no use of the correlation of sediment loads with frequently measured river discharge. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Z.; Zhang, Y. -K.; Schilling, K.; Skopec, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/70/12/52/PDF/Deconstructive_Globalization_4-09.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deconstructive <span class="hlt">Globalization</span>: Universalism, <span class="hlt">Globality</span>, Diversity+</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Deconstructive <span class="hlt">Globalization</span>: Universalism, <span class="hlt">Globality</span>, Diversity+ Alain-Marc Rieu* + * Professor of <span class="hlt">Globalization</span> alternative to Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri's perspective in Empire (Cambridge: Harvard the world and opening a major transition. The first process is identified as <span class="hlt">Globalization</span>, it concerns</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ACP....13.3777S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Validation of an hourly resolved <span class="hlt">global</span> aerosol model in answer to solar electricity generation information needs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solar energy applications need <span class="hlt">global</span> aerosol optical depth (AOD) information to derive historic surface solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> databases from geostationary meteorological satellites reaching back to the 1980's. This paper validates the MATCH/DLR model originating in the climate community against AERONET ground measurements. Hourly or <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean AOD model output is evaluated individually for all stations in Europe, Africa and the Middle East - an area highly interesting for solar energy applications being partly dominated by high aerosol loads. Overall, a bias of 0.02 and a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 0.23 are found for <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean AOD values, while the RMSE increases to 0.28 for hourly mean AOD values. Large differences between various regions and stations are found providing a feedback loop for the aerosol modelling community. The difference in using <span class="hlt">daily</span> means versus hourly resolved modelling with respect to hourly resolved observations is evaluated. Nowadays state-of-the-art in solar resource assessment relies on monthly turbidity or AOD climatologies while at least hourly resolved <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> time series are needed by the solar sector. Therefore, the contribution of higher temporally modelled AOD is evaluated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schroedter-Homscheidt, M.; Oumbe, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ACPD...1231917S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Validation of an hourly resolved <span class="hlt">global</span> aerosol model in answer to solar electricity generation information needs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solar energy applications need <span class="hlt">global</span> aerosol optical depth (AOD) information to derive historic surface solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> databases from geostationary meteorological satellites reaching back to the 1980's. This paper validates the MATCH/DLR model originating in the climate community against AERONET ground measurements. Hourly or <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean AOD model output is evaluated individually for all stations in Europe, Africa and the Middle East - an area highly interesting for solar energy applications being partly dominated by high aerosol loads. Overall, a bias of 0.02 and a root mean square error of 0.23 are found for <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean AOD values, while the RMSE increases to 0.28 for hourly mean AOD values. Large differences between various regions and stations are found providing a feedback loop for the aerosol modelling community. The difference in using <span class="hlt">daily</span> means versus hourly resolved modelling with respect to hourly resolved observations is evaluated. Nowadays state of the art in solar resource assessment relies on monthly turbidity or AOD climatologies while at least hourly resolved <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> time series are needed by the solar sector. Therefore, the contribution of higher temporally modelled AOD is evaluated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schroedter-Homscheidt, M.; Oumbe, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> 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<img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920042314&hterms=analysis+variance&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Danalysis%2Bvariance"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimates of tropical analysis differences in <span class="hlt">daily</span> values produced by two operational centers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To assess the uncertainty of <span class="hlt">daily</span> synoptic analyses for the atmospheric state, the intercomparison of three First GARP <span class="hlt">Global</span> Experiment level IIIb datasets is performed. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> values of divergence, vorticity, temperature, static stability, vertical motion, mixing ratio, and diagnosed diabatic heating rate are compared for the period of 26 January-11 February 1979. The spatial variance and mean, temporal mean and variance, 2D wavenumber power spectrum, anomaly correlation, and normalized square difference are employed for comparison.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kasahara, Akira; Mizzi, Arthur P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40211136"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flexibility in <span class="hlt">daily</span> travel routines causes regional variation in bird migration speed</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We used novel <span class="hlt">Global</span> Positioning System-based satellite telemetry to reconstruct <span class="hlt">daily</span> time budgets on travelling days of\\u000a a long-distance migrant, the Osprey Pandion haliaetus, to reveal how landscape affects migratory performance. We compared <span class="hlt">daily</span> travel routines between the Ospreys’ passage of\\u000a Europe and the Sahara. In Europe, where feeding habitat is abundant, Ospreys fed both before–after flights and during interruptions,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raymond H. G. Klaassen; Roine Strandberg; Mikael Hake; Thomas Alerstam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=co-op&id=EJ961917"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mastering Social and Organization Goals: Strategy Use by Two Children with Asperger Syndrome during Cognitive Orientation to <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Occupational Performance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Preliminary data supports the effectiveness of Cognitive Orientation to (<span class="hlt">daily</span>) Occupational Performance (CO-OP) for children with Asperger syndrome (AS). Children with AS often experience social and organizational difficulties spanning <span class="hlt">daily</span> occupations. This case study explored the pattern of <span class="hlt">Global</span> Strategies and Domain-Specific Strategies…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rodger, Sylvia; Vishram, Alysha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=meditation&pg=4&id=EJ995012"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Spiritual Experiences and Prosocial Behavior</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper examines how the <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES) relates to range of prosocial behaviors, using a large, nationally representative U.S. data set. It finds that <span class="hlt">daily</span> spiritual experiences are a statistically and substantively significant predictor of volunteering, charitable giving, and helping individuals one knows personally.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Einolf, Christopher J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=global+AND+leadership&pg=7&id=EJ597527"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Fluency.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Defines <span class="hlt">global</span> fluency as a facility with cultural behaviors that help an organization thrive in an ever-changing <span class="hlt">global</span> business environment; and discusses business culture, <span class="hlt">global</span> culture, an example of a change effort at a <span class="hlt">global</span> company, leadership values, company values, and defining <span class="hlt">global</span> values and practices. (Author/LRW)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tosti, Donald T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11..679S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> streamflow forecasting using PSO-BP neural network</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An artificial neural network (ANN) based on hybrid algorithm combining particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm with back-propagation (BP) algorithm is proposed to forecast the <span class="hlt">daily</span> streamflows in a catchment located in a semiarid region in Morocco. The PSO algorithm was showed to converge rapidly during the initial stages of a <span class="hlt">global</span> search. The BP algorithm, on the contrary, can achieve faster convergent speed around <span class="hlt">global</span> optimum. By combining the PSO with the BP, the hybrid algorithm referred to as BP-PSO algorithm is adopted in this paper. To evaluate the performance of the hybrid algorithm, BP neural network is also involved for a comparison purpose. The results show that the neural network model evolved by PSO-BP algorithm have superior predictions and better convergence performance. The well-trained neural network can be used as a useful tool for streamflow forecasting.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sedki, A.; Ouazar, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005NPGeo..12..471V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-term predictability of mean <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We quantify the long-term predictability of <span class="hlt">global</span> mean <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature data by means of the Rényi entropy of second order K2. We are interested in the yearly amplitude fluctuations of the temperature. Hence, the data are low-pass filtered. The obtained oscillatory signal has a more or less constant frequency, depending on the geographical coordinates, but its amplitude fluctuates irregularly. Our estimate of K2 quantifies the complexity of these amplitude fluctuations. We compare the results obtained for the CRU data set (interpolated measured temperature in the years 1901-2003 with 0.5° resolution, Mitchell et al., 2005)with the ones obtained for the temperature data from a coupled ocean-atmosphere <span class="hlt">global</span> circulation model (AOGCM, calculated at DKRZ). Furthermore, we compare the results obtained by means of K2 with the linear variance of the temperature data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">von Bloh, W.; Romano, M. C.; Thiel, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~nahar/papers/isccfs08-ms.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> of the Earth's Atmosphere Sultana N. Nahar</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">trapped than released, leading to <span class="hlt">global</span> warming and climate change. Depletion of atmospheric ozone by the ABC? Such studies should lead to an improved understanding of <span class="hlt">global</span> warming and climate change;3.1 Chemical Compositions and <span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming <span class="hlt">Global</span> warming is directly related to solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. The earth</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nahar, Sultana Nurun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22288493"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adolescent <span class="hlt">daily</span> and general maladjustment: is there reactivity to <span class="hlt">daily</span> repeated measures methodologies?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present study examined whether repeated exposure to <span class="hlt">daily</span> surveys about negative social experiences predicts changes in adolescents' <span class="hlt">daily</span> and general maladjustment, and whether question content moderates these changes. Across a 2-week period, 6th-grade students (N = 215; mode age = 11) completed 5 <span class="hlt">daily</span> reports tapping experienced or experienced and witnessed negative events, or they completed no <span class="hlt">daily</span> reports. General maladjustment was measured in 2-week intervals before, at the end of, and 2 weeks after the <span class="hlt">daily</span> report study. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> maladjustment either decreased or did not change across the 5 <span class="hlt">daily</span> report exposures. General maladjustment decreased across the three 2-week intervals. Combined, results indicate that short-term <span class="hlt">daily</span> report studies do not place youth at risk for increased maladjustment. PMID:22288493</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nishina, Adrienne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61291072"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> warning, <span class="hlt">global</span> warming</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This book provides insights into the formidable array of issues which, in a warmer world, could impinge upon every facet of readers lives. It examines climatic change and long-term implications of <span class="hlt">global</span> warming for the ecosystem. Topics include the ozone layer and how it works; the greenhouse effect; the dangers of imbalance and its effects on human and animal life;</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benarde</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20850268"> <span id="translatedtitle">Whole-abdomen radiotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma using twice-<span class="hlt">daily</span> fractionation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: To report the tolerability and efficacy of twice-<span class="hlt">daily</span> whole-abdomen <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> (WAI) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Methods and Materials: Of 123 patients treated for NHL with WAI, 37% received previous chemotherapy, 28% received WAI as part of comprehensive lymphatic <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> (CLI), and 32% received WAI for palliation. The median dose to the whole abdomen was 25.0 Gy, followed by a median tumor boost of 9.8 Gy in 58 patients. Fractionation was 1.0 Gy once <span class="hlt">daily</span> (54%) or 0.8 Gy twice <span class="hlt">daily</span> (46%). Blood counts were measured weekly. Results: At a median follow-up of 4.3 years, local control was 72% and overall survival was 55% at 5 years. Median time of WAI was 42 days for once-<span class="hlt">daily</span> treatment and 32 days for twice-<span class="hlt">daily</span> treatment. Patients receiving twice-<span class="hlt">daily</span> WAI did not have a significantly higher rate of acute side effects (e.g., nausea, diarrhea, platelet or red blood cell toxicity). Overall, acute thrombocytopenia was the most frequent side effect of treatment; 24 of 96 patients (25%) with available hematologic data had Grade 3+ toxicity. There was no acute Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and no late small bowel obstruction. Multiple regression indicated that patients with four or less involved sites and disease size {<=}6 cm had improved local control and overall survival. Conclusions: Twice-<span class="hlt">daily</span> WAI using 0.8 Gy/fraction does not appear to have any greater toxicity compared with once-<span class="hlt">daily</span> treatment using 1 Gy/fraction. Small doses per fraction (0.8-1 Gy/fx) are effective, tolerated well in the acute setting, and associated with a low rate of late toxicity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liauw, Stanley L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Yeh, Alexander M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Clarian Health Methodist-IU-Riley Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Morris, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Mendenhall, Nancy Price [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)]. E-mail: mendenan@shands.ufl.edu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/61371"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Globalization</span> Nationalized</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Globalism</span> and <span class="hlt">globalization</span> have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing <span class="hlt">global</span> history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mazlish, Bruce</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://islab.kaist.ac.kr/chungcw/InterConfPapers/fp84-park.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">When <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Deal Services Meet Twitter: Understanding Twitter as a <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Deal Marketing Platform</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">When <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Deal Services Meet Twitter: Understanding Twitter as a <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Deal Marketing Platform, Yuseong-gu Daejeon, Korea +82-42-350-7837 chungcw@kaist.edu ABSTRACT Twitter, a microblogging service Twitter for marketing purpose; <span class="hlt">daily</span> deal providers such as Groupon and LivingSocial are not only engaged</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chung, Chin-Wan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=week&pg=2&id=EJ959374"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adolescent <span class="hlt">Daily</span> and General Maladjustment: Is There Reactivity to <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Repeated Measures Methodologies?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present study examined whether repeated exposure to <span class="hlt">daily</span> surveys about negative social experiences predicts changes in adolescents' <span class="hlt">daily</span> and general maladjustment, and whether question content moderates these changes. Across a 2-week period, 6th-grade students (N = 215; mode age = 11) completed 5 <span class="hlt">daily</span> reports tapping experienced or…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nishina, Adrienne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61370323"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clinical experience with <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> of inflammatory carcinoma of the breast with and without elective chemotherapy. [. gamma. rays; effects of chemotherapy on incidence of late complications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">From 1948 to 1972, 69 patients with inflammatory carcinoma of the breast were treated with <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> alone. Because of a 46% incidence of local-regional failure, twice <span class="hlt">daily</span> fractionated <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> was given in 1972 to 11 patients; a decrease in local-regional failures (27%) was achieved. From 1973 through December 1976, preirradiation multidrug chemotherapy was added to the twice <span class="hlt">daily</span> fractionated <span class="hlt">irradiation</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. L. Barker; E. D. Montague; L. J. Peters</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4002044"> <span id="translatedtitle">Total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> trend during solar cycles 21 and 22</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results from Activity Cavity Radiometer <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> Monitor (ACRIM) experiments show an upward trend in total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> of 0.036 percent per decade between the minima of solar cycles 21 and 22. The trend follows the increasing solar activity of recent decades and, if sustained, could raise <span class="hlt">global</span> temperatures. Trends of total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> near this rate have been implicated as</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. C. Willson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AdSpR..51.1727K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of clear-sky biologically effective erythematic radiation (EER) From <span class="hlt">global</span> solar radiation (250-2800 nm) at Cairo, Egypt</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The hourly and <span class="hlt">daily</span> measured clear-sky <span class="hlt">global</span> solar radiation (G) and biologically important effective erythematic radiation (EER) incident on a horizontal surface at Cairo, Egypt (latitude 30° 05? N & Longitude 31° 15? E), during the period from January 1995 to December 2005 are used in this paper. The relationship between <span class="hlt">daily</span> integrated totals of EER and the <span class="hlt">daily</span> totals of broadband <span class="hlt">global</span> solar radiation (250-2800 nm) is established. The temporal variability of the percentage ratio of the total <span class="hlt">daily</span> erythema to total <span class="hlt">daily</span> broadband solar <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> (EER/G) is determined. The monthly and the seasonal averages of the extraterrestrial UVB solar radiation, Mesurad and estímated UVB solar radiation and clearness index KtUVB of UVB radiation are discussed. The average monthly mean variation of slant ozone (Z) and UVB transmission (KtUVB) at the present work are found. The two variables show an opposite seasonal behavior, and the average monthly of slant ozone column and UVB transmission values shows the relationship between them in a clearer way than those of <span class="hlt">daily</span> values. The estimated values of UVB solar radiation a good agreement with the measured values of the UVB solar radiation, the difference between the estimated and measured values of UVB solar radiation varies from 1.2% to 2.8%. The effect of the annual cycles of solar zenith angle (SZA) and total column ozone (TCO) on the ratios (EER/G) are presented and the correction factors are determined for removal of the ozone cycle. The seasonal variability of EER/G is also discussed. The effect of the annual cycles of solar zenith angle (SZA) and total column ozone (TCO) on the ratios (EER/G) is presented and the correction factors are determined for removal of the ozone cycle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khalil, Samy A.; Shaffie, A. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://police.nku.edu/content/dam/police/docs/safety/dailylogs/2010-2011/2010_Fire_Log_13Dec10.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">2010 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Fire Log Date & Time</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">and transported to Campbell Co. jail. Fire/Smoke/Sprinkler Alarm Log December 2010 Report #: 2010-00571 Reported responded and cleared the scene; subject transported to Campbell County jail. #12;2010 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Fire Log CAD</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyce, Richard L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://police.nku.edu/content/dam/police/docs/safety/dailylogs/2010-2011/2010_DL_06_Updated.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">2010 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Log Report #: 2010-00262</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">of Marijuana Report #: 2010-00256 Reported: 06/17/10 0851 Occurred: Same Incident: Traffic Crash Location: Lot;2010 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Log Report #: 2010-00249 Reported: 06/03/10 1702 Occurred: Same Incident: Medical Emergency</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyce, Richard L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.dps.siu.edu/report/DailyCrimeLog.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Crime Log Wednesday, June 25, 2014</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Crime Log Wednesday, June 25, 2014 8:53:25 AM Calendar Year: 2014 Date/Time Reported Offense) CO A 17-year-old juvenile was issued a Carbondale City notice to appear and released. (140619001) LOT</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> 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Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4cA0QY-DIE"> <span id="translatedtitle">AMSR2 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Arctic Sea Ice - 2014</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html">NASA Video Gallery</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this animation, the <span class="hlt">daily</span> Arctic sea ice and seasonal land cover change progress through time, from March 21, 2014 through the 3rd of August, 2014. Over the water, Arctic sea ice changes from da...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1414019W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Homogenization of Chinese <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Surface Air Temperatures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extreme climate events have large potential of impacts on the society and economy. However, analysis of long-term changes in climate extremes need to use homogeneous time series of high resolution climatic data (e.g., <span class="hlt">daily</span> or sub-<span class="hlt">daily</span>), to diminish non-climatic influences. Thus, more and more attention has been drawn to the development of high quality <span class="hlt">daily</span> climatic data. Since both temporal and spatial variations are much larger in <span class="hlt">daily</span> data than in the corresponding monthly or annual data, it is important and yet more difficult to choose a reference series for homogenization of <span class="hlt">daily</span> data. We tested and compared different methods to select reference series. The reference series that leads to the best match of detected changepoints with metadata information is selected and used to perform homogeneity test for data time series from stations within the grid box. Specifically, we divided the whole country into 2.5-by-2.5 degree lat-long grid boxes. The time series of the averages of observations at all stations in each grid box was considered to be the series representing the climatic variations/changes in each grid box. We calculated the correlation coefficient of annual data series at each station with the average series of annual data in each grid box, and chose the five stations of highest correlations. Then, we obtained the <span class="hlt">daily</span> difference series between each chosen station and the average series in each grid box, and applied the PMTred method to test the homogeneity of the <span class="hlt">daily</span> difference series, We chose the homogeneous station as the reference station for testing inhomogeneities in other station's series in the grid box, using the PMTred method. In addition to testing the <span class="hlt">daily</span> series, we also tested the corresponding annual and monthly series. We adjusted for change points that are identified in both <span class="hlt">daily</span> and monthly/annual series and also supported by metadata. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> maximum and minimum temperatures recorded at 822 Chinese stations were tested in this study. The results show that site relocations are the main source of inhomogeneity. The impacts of inhomogeneities on the estimates of climate trends and extremes were assessed. The resulting <span class="hlt">daily</span> data set is also compared with a previous version of homogenized temperature data set.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wenhui, X.; Quingxiang, L.; Wang, X. L.; Su, Y.; Yani, Z.; Lijuan, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42033692"> <span id="translatedtitle">Climatic change due to solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> changes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> reconstructions back to 1874 are used to estimate the effect of the Sun on <span class="hlt">global</span>-mean temperature. The importance of the history effect of the Sun on <span class="hlt">global</span>-mean temperature. The importance of the history effect, whereby recent temperature changes may be influenced significantly by past forcing changes, is evaluated. Modelled temperature changes are shown to be relatively insensitive to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. M. L. Wigley; S. C. B. Raper</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repettilab.psych.ucla.edu/story%20and%20repetti%202006.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Occupational Stressors and Marital Behavior</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study examined <span class="hlt">daily</span> fluctuations in marital behavior (anger and withdrawal) as a function of same-day job stressors, using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). Forty-three couples provided <span class="hlt">daily</span> diary reports of their workload and negative social interactions at work on 5 consecutive days. Within-subject analyses demonstrate that husbands and wives reported greater marital anger and withdrawal following negative social interactions at</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lisa B. Story; Rena Repetti</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60139590"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measuring Degradation Rates Without <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method to report PV system degradation rates without using <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing <span class="hlt">daily</span> AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found from a statistical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Pulver; D. Cormode; A. Cronin; D. Jordan; S. Kurtz; R. Smith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50963160"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measuring degradation rates without <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method to report photovoltaic (PV) system degradation rates without using <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing <span class="hlt">daily</span> AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found using a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steve Pulver; Daniel Cormode; Alex Cronin; Dirk Jordan; Sarah Kurtz; Ryan Smith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=consumerism&pg=7&id=EJ839706"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Globalization</span> and the Experiences of Aging</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Globalization</span> is a product of urbanization and economic intensification which has escalated since the 1970s. <span class="hlt">Globalized</span> markets have created many of the features of modern life including consumerism, increased cultural homogeneity, increased social polarization, erosion of the sovereignty of nation states, and delocalization of <span class="hlt">daily</span> life. The…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fry, Christine L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MAP...tmp...34A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variability of <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation over Nigeria</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study identified coherent <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation regions in Nigeria by analyzing the spatial and temporal homogeneity of <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation; investigating the dependence of wet day amount (WDAMT) and percentage of wet day (PWD) on latitude, longitude, elevation and distance from the ocean and finally regionalizing the <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation stations. Non-parametric spatial homogeneity test was carried out on <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation over 23 stations in Nigeria between 1992 and 2000 while the temporal analysis was done from 1971 to 2000. Regression analysis was used to determine the dependence of WDAMT and PWD on latitude, longitude, elevation and distance from the ocean. Principal component and cluster analyses were conducted to regionalize the precipitation stations. Seven homogeneous groups of stations were identified. Elevation explains 19.9 and 4.8 % of the variance in WDAMT and PWD, respectively, while latitude explains 76.2 % of variance in PWD. Eight principal components that explain 63.1 % of the variance in the <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation data were retained for cluster analysis. Precipitation in the six <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation regions that emerged from the cluster analysis is influenced by the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone, latitude, distance from ocean and southwesterlies while the northern region alone is influenced by the African Easterly Wave. In addition, precipitation in all the regions is influenced by topography. Low to medium spatial coherence exists in the precipitation regions. The spatial variations of PWD and WDAMT have implications for agricultural productivity and water resources in different parts of the country.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adeniyi, M. O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MAP...126..161A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Variability of <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation over Nigeria</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study identified coherent <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation regions in Nigeria by analyzing the spatial and temporal homogeneity of <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation; investigating the dependence of wet day amount (WDAMT) and percentage of wet day (PWD) on latitude, longitude, elevation and distance from the ocean and finally regionalizing the <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation stations. Non-parametric spatial homogeneity test was carried out on <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation over 23 stations in Nigeria between 1992 and 2000 while the temporal analysis was done from 1971 to 2000. Regression analysis was used to determine the dependence of WDAMT and PWD on latitude, longitude, elevation and distance from the ocean. Principal component and cluster analyses were conducted to regionalize the precipitation stations. Seven homogeneous groups of stations were identified. Elevation explains 19.9 and 4.8 % of the variance in WDAMT and PWD, respectively, while latitude explains 76.2 % of variance in PWD. Eight principal components that explain 63.1 % of the variance in the <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation data were retained for cluster analysis. Precipitation in the six <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation regions that emerged from the cluster analysis is influenced by the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone, latitude, distance from ocean and southwesterlies while the northern region alone is influenced by the African Easterly Wave. In addition, precipitation in all the regions is influenced by topography. Low to medium spatial coherence exists in the precipitation regions. The spatial variations of PWD and WDAMT have implications for agricultural productivity and water resources in different parts of the country.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adeniyi, M. O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3594929"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intent to quit among <span class="hlt">daily</span> and non-<span class="hlt">daily</span> college student smokers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Given the high prevalence of young adult smoking, we examined (i) psychosocial factors and substance use among college students representing five smoking patterns and histories [non-smokers, quitters, native non-<span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers (i.e. never <span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers), converted non-<span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers (i.e. former <span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers) and <span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers] and (ii) smoking category as it relates to readiness to quit among current smokers. Of the 4438 students at six Southeast colleges who completed an online survey, 69.7% (n = 3094) were non-smokers, 6.6% (n = 293) were quitters, 7.1% (n = 317) were native non-<span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers, 6.4% (n = 283) were converted non-<span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers and 10.2% (n = 451) were <span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers. There were differences in sociodemographics, substance use (alcohol, marijuana, other tobacco products) in the past 30 days and psychosocial factors among these subgroups of students (P < 0.001). Among current smokers, there were differences in cigarettes smoked per day, recent quit attempts, self-identification as a smoker, self-efficacy and motivation to quit (P < 0.001). After controlling for important factors, converted non-<span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers were more likely to be ready to quit in the next month versus native non-<span class="hlt">daily</span> smokers (OR = 2.15, CI 1.32–3.49, P = 0.002). Understanding differences among young adults with different smoking patterns and histories is critical in developing interventions targeting psychosocial factors impacting cessation among this population. PMID:23197630</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pinsker, E. A.; Berg, C. J.; Nehl, E. J.; Prokhorov, A. V.; Buchanan, T. S.; Ahluwalia, J. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13600752"> <span id="translatedtitle">Excessive <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> and antioxidant responses of an Antarctic marine diatom exposed to iron limitation and to dynamic <span class="hlt">irradiance</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The synergistic effects of iron limitation and <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> dynamics on growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant activity and excessive PAR (400–700nm) and UV (280–400nm) sensitivity were investigated for the Antarctic marine diatom Chaetoceros brevis. Iron-limited and iron-replete cultures were exposed to identical <span class="hlt">daily</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> levels, supplied as dynamic (20–1350?molm?2s?1) and constant (260?molm?2s?1) <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. After acclimation, growth, maximal quantum yield of PSII (Fv\\/Fm), pigment</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Willem H. van de Poll; P. J. Janknegt; M. A. van Leeuwe; R. J. W. Visser; A. G. J. Buma</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://web.bu.edu/alzresearch/team/faculty/documents/JeffersonBarakatetal2006ObjectperceptionimpairmentspredictIADLs.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Object Perception Impairments Predict Instrumental Activities of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Living Dependence in Alzheimer's Disease</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study examined the contribution of object perception and spatial localization to functional dependence among Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Forty patients with probable AD completed measures assessing verbal recognition memory, working memory, object perception, spatial localization, semantic knowledge, and <span class="hlt">global</span> cognition. Primary caregivers completed a measure of activities of <span class="hlt">daily</span> living (ADLs) that included instrumental and basic self-care subscales (i.e.,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Angela L. Jefferson; Lamia P. Barakat; Tania Giovannetti; Robert H. Paul; Guila Glosser</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51003164"> <span id="translatedtitle">Embedding Self-Awareness into Objects of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life -- The Smart Kettle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intelligent Environments on varying scales and for different purposes are slowly becoming a reality. In the near future, <span class="hlt">global</span> smart world infrastructures will become a commodity that will support various activities of <span class="hlt">daily</span> life at different degrees of realism. Such infrastructures have the potential to offer dedicated, context- and situation-aware information and services by simultaneously providing the next-generation of data</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matthias Baumgarten; Daniel Guldenring; Michael Poland; Chris Nugent; Josef Hallberg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/d58q055316603k08.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neutron activation analysis of uranium in human bone, drinking water and <span class="hlt">daily</span> diet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Uranium in human bone, drinking water and <span class="hlt">daily</span> diet has been determined by neutron activation analysis using the238U(n, ?)239U reaction. An improved scheme for the separation of the239U is proposed; with this scheme, after neutron <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> in a 100 kW TRIGA reactor, a uranium content as low as 5·10?11 g can be determined reliably, rapidly and easily. A wide range</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Nozaki; M. Ichikawa; T. Sasuga; M. Inarida</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24784123"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache: diagnosis and management.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache is defined as the presence of a headache on 15 days or more per month for at least three months. The most common types of chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache are chronic migraines and chronic tension-type headaches. If a red flag for a secondary cause of headache is present, magnetic resonance imaging of the head should be performed. All patients should be asked about medication overuse, which can increase the frequency of headaches. Patients who overuse medications for abortive therapy for headache should be encouraged to stop the medications entirely and consider prophylactic treatment. Several prophylactic treatments for chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache can reduce headache frequency and severity, as well as improve overall quality of life. Nonpharmacologic treatments include relaxation techniques, cognitive behavior therapy, acupuncture, osteopathic manipulation, and cervical exercises. Pharmacologic therapies include amitriptyline, gabapentin, onabotulinumtoxinA, propranolol, tizanidine, topiramate, and valproate. PMID:24784123</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yancey, Joseph R; Sheridan, Richard; Koren, Kelly G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1054296"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Thermal Predictions of the AGR-1 Experiment with Gas Gaps Varying with Time</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new <span class="hlt">daily</span> as-run thermal analysis was performed at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) test experiment number one at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This thermal analysis incorporates gas gaps changing with time during the <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> experiment. The purpose of this analysis was to calculate the <span class="hlt">daily</span> average temperatures of each compact to compare with experimental results. Post <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> examination (PIE) measurements of the graphite holder and fuel compacts showed the gas gaps varying from the beginning of life. The control temperature gas gap and the fuel compact – graphite holder gas gaps were linearly changed from the original fabrication dimensions, to the end of <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> measurements. A steady-state thermal analysis was performed for each <span class="hlt">daily</span> calculation. These new thermal predictions more closely match the experimental data taken during the experiment than previous analyses. Results are presented comparing normalized compact average temperatures to normalized log(R/B) Kr-85m. The R/B term is the measured release rate divided by the predicted birth rate for the isotope Kr-85m. Correlations between these two normalized values are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grant Hawkes; James Sterbentz; John Maki; Binh Pham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.mathmastery.com/dailybrains/"> <span id="translatedtitle">MathMastery.com: <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Brains</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Six days a week, a new math problem is posted on this Web site to intrigue and challenge grade school students. Each <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Brain has a different theme, considering some mathematical perspective of science, history, geography, and more. After solving the problem, or for a little help, students can look at a step-by-step solution that is also posted online. All old <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Brains are kept in an archive, and as of May 2003, they numbered around 400. The problems are mostly intended for students between fourth and sixth grades.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002431.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Irradiated</span> foods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... and reduces the risk of food poisoning . Food <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> is used in many countries. It was first approved in the U.S. to prevent sprouts on white potatoes and for the control of insects on wheat and in certain spices and seasonings.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=berkley&pg=3&id=ED211994"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Education.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The articles in this collection deal with various methods of <span class="hlt">global</span> education--education to prepare students to function as understanding and informed citizens of the world. Topics discussed in the 26 articles include: (1) the necessity of <span class="hlt">global</span> education; (2) <span class="hlt">global</span> education in the elementary school language arts curriculum; (3) science fiction…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berkley, June, Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED309119.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Education.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This issue contains an introduction ("The Promise and Perplexity of <span class="hlt">Globalism</span>," by W. Longstreet) and seven articles dedicated to exploring the meaning of <span class="hlt">global</span> education for today's schools. "<span class="hlt">Global</span> Education: An Overview" (J. Becker) develops possible definitions, identifies objectives and skills, and addresses questions and issues in this…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Longstreet, Wilma S., Ed.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hrm&pg=6&id=ED428216"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> HRD.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document contains four papers from a symposium on <span class="hlt">global</span> human resource development (HRD). "<span class="hlt">Globalization</span> of Human Resource Management (HRM) in Government: A Cross-Cultural Perspective" (Pan Suk Kim) relates HRM to national cultures and addresses its specific functional aspects with a unique dimension in a <span class="hlt">global</span> organization. "An…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">1997</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cgge.aag.org/GlobalEconomy1e/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Economy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This learning module from the Association of American Geographer's Center for <span class="hlt">Global</span> Geography Education looks into the geographic characteristics of the <span class="hlt">global</span> economy and the processes linking economic activities at local, regional, and <span class="hlt">global</span> scales. Four case studies are included in the learning unit, each focusing on a different region (New Zealand, Chile, Central and South America, East/Southeast Asia).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB86152998"> <span id="translatedtitle">Climatology of Solar <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> on Inclined Surfaces 4: Parts 1, 2 and 3.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The following variables were measured (March 1979 to October 1981): <span class="hlt">global</span> solar radiance, various directions (Eppley pyranometer); direct solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> on surface perpendicular to sunbeam (Eppley pyrheliometer); ground reflected solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (Eppl...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. K. M. Verdonschot, G. J. van den Brink, W. H. Slob</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/25129153"> <span id="translatedtitle">Damage to Human Hair Caused by Repeated Bleaching Combined with <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Weathering during <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life Activities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Although it is well known that chemical oxidation with alkaline hydrogen peroxide damages human hair, little is known about the effects of bleaching during <span class="hlt">daily</span> life activities which may alter hair components. Objective: To determine the effects of bleaching combined with <span class="hlt">daily</span> weathering on lipids and amino acids in hair. Methods: Levels of lipids and amino acids were analyzed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. Masukawa; Hisashi Tsujimura; H. Tanamachi; H. Narita; Genji Imokawa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/380996"> <span id="translatedtitle">Examining the spring discontinuity in <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature ranges</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The atmosphere and biosphere both change rapidly throughout midlatitude spring. Many weather variables are modified during this season, including the diurnal temperature range (DTR). The mean DTR trend displays a discontinuity at the onset of spring characterized by a rapid increase for several weeks, followed by an abrupt leveling off. The trend then remains essentially flat throughout the remainder of the warm season. These DTR changes reflect the interactive role many weather variables play with surface-layer processes. Thus, diagnosing the causes of these variations may provide background information for numerous <span class="hlt">global</span> change analyses, as <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature data become increasingly available worldwide. The results of this study suggest that several factors (snow cover loss, more frequent southerly winds, and increased ceiling heights) are responsible for the initial rapid increase in the DTR. The second half of the discontinuity (subsequent leveling off) is connected with increased atmospheric moisture and coincides with the onset of plant transpiration. 14 refs., 5 figs, 2 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schwartz, M.D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10154823"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> temperature and precipitation data for 223 USSR Stations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On- May 23, 1972, the United States and the USSR established a bilateral initiative known as the Agreement on Protection of the Environment. Given recent interest in possible greenhouse gas-induced climate change, Working Group VIII (Influence of Environmental Changes on Climate) has become particularly useful to the scientific communities of both nations. Among its many achievements, Working Group VIII has been instrumental in the exchange of climatological information between the principal climate data centers of each country [i.e., the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina, and the Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information in Obninsk, Russia]. Considering the relative lack of climate records previously available for the USSR, data obtained via this bilateral exchange are particularly valuable to researchers outside the former Soviet Union. To expedite the dissemination of these data, NOAA`s Climate and <span class="hlt">Global</span> Change Program funded the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and NCDC to distribute one of the more useful archives acquired through this exchange: a 223-station <span class="hlt">daily</span> data set covering the period 1881-1989. This data set contains: (1) <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean, minimum, and maximum temperature data; (2) <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation data; (3) station inventory information (WMO No., name, coordinates, and elevation); (4) station history information (station relocation and rain gauge replacement dates); and (5) quality assurance information (i.e., flag codes that were assigned as a result of various data checks). The data set is available, free of charge, as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of 18 data files and a printed document which describes both the data files and the 223-station network in detail.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Razuvaev, V.N.; Apasova, E.G.; Martuganov, R.A. [Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Vose, R.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Steurer, P.M. [National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, NC (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=64896"> <span id="translatedtitle">INTERPOLATING VANCOUVER'S <span class="hlt">DAILY</span> AMBIENT PM 10 FIELD</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this article we develop a spatial predictive distribution for the ambient space- time response field of <span class="hlt">daily</span> ambient PM10 in Vancouver, Canada. Observed responses have a consistent temporal pattern from one monitoring site to the next. We exploit this feature of the field b...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.bom.gov.au/qld/flood/brochures/cape_york/map.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Reporting Rainfall Station CAPE YORK RIVERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Reporting Rainfall Station CAPE YORK RIVERS Manual Heavy Rainfall Station Manual River Station Telemetry Rainfall Station Telemetry River Station Revised: Nov 2011 MAP 919.1 FLOOD WARNING River Pormpuraaw Kowanyama Southwell Croydon Yappar R Blackbull Siding M itchellR StaatenR Dorunda TM</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greenslade, Diana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://faculty.kfupm.edu.sa/COE/radwan/pdf/Peak%20Load%20Paper-11.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling and Forecasting Electric <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Peak Loads</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Modeling and Forecasting Electric <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Peak Loads Using Abductive Networks R. E. Abdel-Aal Department of Computer Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia techniques including neural networks have been used for this purpose. This paper proposes the alternative</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jz/v070/i004/JZ070i004p00801/JZ070i004p00801.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Objective Prediction of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Precipitation and Cloudiness</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The relation between present weather and concurrent <span class="hlt">daily</span> 700-mb circulation is studied for the winter season in the United States. All weather data are averaged within 40 climatologically homogeneous circles and expressed asnumerical index giving the propor- tion of precipitation or cloudiness within each circle at map time. The synoptic climatology of the resulting weather index is analyzed, and schematic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">William H. Klein; Curtis W. Crockett; James F. Andrews</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1965-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApPhA.116.1595B"> <span id="translatedtitle">ion <span class="hlt">irradiation</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fine Co and Pt nanoparticles are nucleated when a silica sample is implanted with 400 keV Co+ and 1370 keV Pt+ ions. At the implanted range, Co and Pt react to form small Co x Pt(1- x) nanoparticles during Si+ ion <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> at 300 °C. Thermal annealing of the pre-implanted silica substrate at 1000 °C results in the formation of spherical nanoparticles of various sizes. When <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> with Si+ ions at 300 °C, particles in the size range of 5-17 nm undergo rod-like shape transformation with an elongation in the direction of the incident ion beam, while those particles in the size range of 17-26 nm turn into elliptical shape. Moreover, it is suspected that very big nanoparticles (size >26 nm) decrease in size, while small nanoparticles (size <5 nm) do not undergo any transformation. During Si+ ion <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>, the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles is preserved. The results are discussed in the light of the thermal spike model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Balaji, S.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Saravanan, K.; David, C.; Amirthapandian, S.; Kalavathi, S.; Nair, K. G. M.; Hübner, René</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5891359"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> ecology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A general description of the earth as a biosphere is presented. Divergent views of near-future world scenarios are presented; the <span class="hlt">Global</span> 2000 report, and the analysis of Simon and Kahn. The basic principles and trends in <span class="hlt">global</span> ecology are outlined, and the basic pollution and environmental degradation problems are discussed. Humanistic considerations which affect <span class="hlt">global</span> ecology (population control, the effects of largescale nuclear war, and third-world socio-economics) are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Southwick, C.H. (ed.)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6849205"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heavy metals in common foodstuff: <span class="hlt">Daily</span> intake</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lately, toxic effects of some heavy metals (Pb, Cd) as well as desirable ones of some others (Ni, Mn, Zn) have been a field of thorough investigation. The main way of human body fortification in metals is through foodchain depending on the kind and quantity of the consumed food, according to dietary habits. The purpose of this study is the calculation of metals <span class="hlt">daily</span> intake through common foodstuff of Greek inhabitants. The calculation is based on results from quantitative analysis of Pb, Cd, Ni, Mn, and Zn in common foodstuff from the market of the city of Thessaloniki. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> food consumption data is derived from three sources: (a) answers to a questionnaire distributed to families of the city of Thessaloniki, (b) nutrition data provided by the Agricultural Bank of Greece and (c) nutrition data according to international bibliography.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsoumbaris, P.; Tsoukali-Papadopoulou, H. (Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JAMDS...4..179L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Continuous Blood Pressure Monitoring in <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Continuous monitoring of blood pressure in <span class="hlt">daily</span> life could improve early detection of cardiovascular disorders, as well as promoting healthcare. Conventional ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) equipment can measure blood pressure at regular intervals for 24 hours, but is limited by long measuring time, low sampling rate, and constrained measuring posture. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method for continuous real-time measurement of blood pressure during <span class="hlt">daily</span> activities. Our method is based on blood pressure estimation from pulse wave velocity (PWV) calculation, which formula we improved to take into account changes in the inner diameter of blood vessels. Blood pressure estimation results using our new method showed a greater precision of measured data during exercise, and a better accuracy than the conventional PWV method.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lopez, Guillaume; Shuzo, Masaki; Ushida, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Keita; Yanagimoto, Shintaro; Imai, Yasushi; Kosaka, Akio; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques; Yamada, Ichiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.globalchallengeaward.org/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Challenge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Challenge, teams of US high school students collaborate with international counterparts from October to May to address <span class="hlt">global</span> climate change and compete for prizes and scholarship awards. Students strengthen skills in math, science, engineering, and critical thinking while learning about <span class="hlt">global</span> business practices. The current <span class="hlt">Global</span> Challenge is to create science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and business solutions that address climate change and the future of energy. Students ages 14-17 who participate in the competition have the opportunity to receive assistance in admissions to colleges and universities and win praise and acclaim as well as awards.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Craig DeLuca, The Arno Group, LLC; Domenico Grasso, College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, University of Vermont</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/9683h05245g86772.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> urinary excretion of bisphenol A</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objectives  Concerns over dietary exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, have been raised because BPA is contained in\\u000a resins and plastics commonly used for the preservation of food and beverages. The purpose of the present study was to assess\\u000a <span class="hlt">daily</span> intake levels of BPA in a group of male subjects by measuring total urinary BPA (free BPA plus BPA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chikako Arakawa; Kayumi Fujimaki; Jun Yoshinaga; Hideki Imai; Shigeko Serizawa; Hiroaki Shiraishi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/w14q315716271205.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The epidemiology of chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache (CDH) is a fairly common but disabling disorder that disproportionately affects women and afflicts\\u000a individuals across all stages of adulthood. It is a dynamic disorder, marked by relatively high rates of remission and incidence.\\u000a To some extent, this may be due to the accepted, but not empirically supported, cut-point of 15 headache days per month. The\\u000a purpose</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lynn A. Midgette; Ann I. Scher</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23424923"> <span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Daily</span> life of an epileptic child].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">daily</span> life of an epileptic child will be affected by the constraints of the medical follow-up, the consequences on the cognitive functions and behaviour, the impact on the schooling and professional activity, recreation, social and family life. If certain factors associated with a less good quality of life have been identified (intellectual disability or handicap associated, drug-resistant epilepsy, combination therapy, low socio-economic level maternal, absence of aetiology identified, number of consultations and hospitalizations in the last few months...), the <span class="hlt">daily</span> life is affected even in cases of epilepsy isolated well stabilized. The challenge of taking account of the impact of epilepsy on the <span class="hlt">daily</span> lives of the first episode and throughout the monitoring is capital in order to best preserve the quality of life of the child and his family. This approach is the subject of a collaborative work with other actors medical and paramedical personnel, and need the constitution of a network. The establishment of therapeutic education projects on the model of diabetes mellitus could be valuable. PMID:23424923</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ville, Dorothée</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/538436"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> variations in TOMS total ozone data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The spatial and seasonal distributions of <span class="hlt">daily</span> fluctuations in total ozone from 60{degree}N to 60{degree}S are analyzed by using 14.5 years of total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) data on a 5{degree} latitude by 15{degree} longitude grid. Root mean square day to day differences maximize near 30 Dobson units (DU) in the midlatitudes of both hemispheres from late fall to early spring. The contributions of these fluctuations due to planetary- and medium-scale waves are analyzed using sinusoidal zonal wave filtering. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> midlatitude variations from planetary-scale waves are smaller than those from medium-scale waves and mainly occur from late fall to early spring, while strong medium-scale variations persist throughout fall, winter, and spring. An exception is the southern hemisphere high latitudes, where contortions and breakup of the polar vortex cause large <span class="hlt">daily</span> variations on planetary scales during September and October. Tropical total ozone fluctuations due to planetary-scale waves are slightly larger than those due to medium-scale waves in all seasons. A climatological table of monthly RMS day to day total ozone changes is provided as a reference.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allen, D.R.; Reck, R.A. [Global Climate Change Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)] [Global Climate Change Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011WRR....47.7535G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Copula-based <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall disaggregation model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall disaggregation model, which uses a copula to model the dependence structure between total depth, total duration of wet periods, and the maximum proportional depth of a wet period, is presented. The wet(1)-dry(0) binary sequence is modeled by the nonrandomized Bartlett-Lewis model with diurnal effect incorporated before superimposing the AR(1) depth process submodel. Unlike previous studies, the model is structured such that all wet day data available are considered in the analysis, without the need to discard any good quality <span class="hlt">daily</span> data embedded in a month having some missing data. This increased the data size, thus improving the modeling process. Further, the <span class="hlt">daily</span> data are classified according to the total duration of wet periods duration within the day. In this way a large proportion of the model parameters become seasonal invariant, the overriding factor being the total duration of wet periods. The potential of the developed model has been demonstrated by disaggregating both the data set used in developing the model parameters and also a 12 year continuous rainfall data set not used in the model parameterization. Gross rainfall statistics of several aggregation levels down to 6 min have been very well reproduced by the disaggregation model. The copula dependence structure and the variation of the depth process submodel parameters with the total duration of wet periods are also very well captured by the presented model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gyasi-Agyei, Yeboah</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16953716"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intraindividual coupling of <span class="hlt">daily</span> stress and cognition.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most psychological theories predict associations among processes that transpire within individuals. However, these theories are often tested by examining relationships at the between-persons (BP) rather than the within-persons (WP) level. The authors examined the WP and BP relationships between <span class="hlt">daily</span> stress and <span class="hlt">daily</span> variability in cognitive performance. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> stress and cognitive performance were assessed on 6 occasions in 108 older adults and 68 young adults. WP variability in stress predicted WP variability in response times (RTs) on a 2-back working memory task in both younger and older adults. That is, RTs were slower on high-stress days compared with low-stress days. There was evidence of an amplified WP stress effect in the older adults on a serial attention task. There was no evidence of stress effects on simple versions of these tasks that placed minimal demands on working memory. These results are consistent with theories that postulate that stress-related cognitive interference competes for attentional resources. PMID:16953716</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sliwinski, Martin J; Smyth, Joshua M; Hofer, Scott M; Stawski, Robert S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/32874510"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hemodynamic comparison of twice <span class="hlt">daily</span> metoprolol tartrate with once <span class="hlt">daily</span> metoprolol succinate in congestive heart failure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">OBJECTIVESTo compare the hemodynamic effects of twice <span class="hlt">daily</span> metoprolol tartrate (MT) and once <span class="hlt">daily</span> metoprolol succinate (MS) in congestive heart failure patients.BACKGROUNDAdverse hemodynamic effects with MT demonstrated during initiation persist with drug readministration during chronic therapy.METHODSPatients were randomly assigned to 6.25 mg MT or 25 mg MS orally and the dose was gradually increased to a target of 50 mg</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marrick L Kukin; Michael M Mannino; Ronald S Freudenberger; Jill Kalman; Cathleen Buchholz-Varley; Ofelia Ocampo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://star.arm.ac.uk/preprints/395.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">COMPARISON OF TOTAL SOLAR <span class="hlt">IRRADIANCE</span> WITH NASA/NATIONAL SOLAR OBSERVATORY SPECTROMAGNETOGRAPH DATA IN SOLAR CYCLES 22 AND 23</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">COMPARISON OF TOTAL SOLAR <span class="hlt">IRRADIANCE</span> WITH NASA/NATIONAL SOLAR OBSERVATORY SPECTROMAGNETOGRAPH DATA with spacecraft measurements of total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (TSI) variations for 8 yr beginning with the declining. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> averages of total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (TSI) observations from several spacecraft radiometers over</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://star.arm.ac.uk/preprints/395.ps"> <span id="translatedtitle">COMPARISON OF TOTAL SOLAR <span class="hlt">IRRADIANCE</span> WITH NASA/NATIONAL SOLAR OBSERVATORY SPECTROMAGNETOGRAPH DATA IN SOLAR CYCLES 22 AND 23</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">COMPARISON OF TOTAL SOLAR <span class="hlt">IRRADIANCE</span> WITH NASA/NATIONAL SOLAR OBSERVATORY SPECTROMAGNETOGRAPH DATA with spacecraft measurements of total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (TSI) variations for 8 yr beginning with the declining in terrestrial climate. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> averages of total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (TSI) observations from several spacecraft</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD748679"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of Computer <span class="hlt">Global</span> Radiation for Areas of High Relief.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The variation over uneven terrain of the <span class="hlt">daily</span> total of incident shortwave (<span class="hlt">global</span>) radiation under cloudless conditions may be estimated by existing methods for calculating direct and diffuse solar radiation on a slope. A computer program for performing ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. T. Andrews, L. D. Williams, R. G. Barry</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1971-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750044107&hterms=global+warming+effects&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dglobal%2Bwarming%2Beffects"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recent advances in satellite observations of solar variability and <span class="hlt">global</span> atmospheric ozone</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A description is given of the temporal behavior of the sun as an ultraviolet variable star in relation to <span class="hlt">daily</span> zonal means of atmospheric ozone from the total amount to that above the 10-mb and 4-mb pressure levels. A significant correlation has been observed between enhancements in the ultraviolet solar <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> and terrestrial passages of the solar magnetic field sector boundary structure. However, it has not yet been possible to separate solar from the dynamical effects on the variability in the zonal means of ozone. Attention is given to <span class="hlt">global</span> changes in ozone which have been derived from the satellite observations in terms of season, solar variability, and major stratospheric disturbances such as stratospheric warmings.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heath, D. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMGC43D1059M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of <span class="hlt">daily</span> versus monthly fire emissions on atmospheric model applications in the tropics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fires are widely used throughout the tropics to create and maintain areas for agriculture, but are also significant contributors to atmospheric trace gas and aerosol concentrations. However, the timing and magnitude of fire activity can vary strongly by year and ecosystem type. For example, frequent, low intensity fires dominate in African savannas whereas Southeast Asian peatland forests are susceptible to huge pulses of emissions during regional El Niño droughts. Despite the potential implications for modeling interactions with atmospheric chemistry and transport, fire emissions have commonly been input into <span class="hlt">global</span> models at a monthly resolution. Recognizing the uncertainty that this can introduce, several datasets have parsed fire emissions to <span class="hlt">daily</span> and sub-<span class="hlt">daily</span> scales with satellite active fire detections. In this study, we explore differences between utilizing the monthly and <span class="hlt">daily</span> <span class="hlt">Global</span> Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) products as inputs into the NASA GISS-E2 composition climate model. We aim to understand how the choice of the temporal resolution of fire emissions affects uncertainty with respect to several common applications of <span class="hlt">global</span> models: atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and climate. Focusing our analysis on tropical ozone, carbon monoxide, and aerosols, we compare modeled concentrations with available ground and satellite observations. We find that increasing the temporal frequency of fire emissions from monthly to <span class="hlt">daily</span> can improve correlations with observations, predominately in areas or during seasons more heavily affected by fires. Differences between the two datasets are more evident with public health applications: <span class="hlt">daily</span> resolution fire emissions increases the number of days exceeding World Health Organization air quality targets.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marlier, M. E.; Voulgarakis, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Shindell, D. T.; DeFries, R. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53433474"> <span id="translatedtitle">Empirical Correlations of <span class="hlt">Global</span> Solar Radiation with Meteorological data for Onne, Nigeria</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Multiple linear regression models were developed to estimate the monthly average <span class="hlt">daily</span> <span class="hlt">global</span> solar radiation using ten parameters during a period of sixteen years (1984 to 1999) for Onne, Nigeria; the extraterrestrial radiation, average <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature, ratio of minimum and maximum <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature, relative humidity, ratio of sunshine duration, solar declination, average soil temperature, average pan evaporimeter, average rain fall</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Louis E. Akpabio; Sunday O. Udo; Sunday E. Etuk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57384032"> <span id="translatedtitle">Instrumental Activities of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Living Impairment Is Associated with Increased Amyloid Burden</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background\\/Aims: Instrumental activities of <span class="hlt">daily</span> living (IADL) impairment in Alzheimer’s disease has been associated with <span class="hlt">global</span> amyloid deposition in postmortem studies. We sought to determine whether IADL impairment is associated with increased cortical Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) retention. Methods: Fifty-five subjects (19 normal older controls, NC, and 36 with mild cognitive impairment, MCI) underwent clinical assessments and dynamic PiB positron</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gad A. Marshall; Lauren E. Olson; Meghan T. Frey; Jacqueline Maye; J. Alex Becker; Dorene M. Rentz; Reisa A. Sperling; Keith A. Johnson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15339218"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> on a marine microecosystem.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose of this work was to study the effect of UV <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> on a microecosystem consisting of several interacting species. The system chosen was of a hypersaline type, where all the species present live at high salt concentration; it comprises different bacteria; a producer, the photosynthetic green alga Dunaliella salina; and a consumer, the ciliated protozoan Fabrea salina, which form a complete food chain. We were able to establish the initial conditions that give rise to a self-sustaining microecosystem, stable for at least 3 weeks. We then determined the effect of UV <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> on this microecosystem under laboratory-controlled conditions, in particular by measuring the critical UV exposure for the two main components of the microecosystem (algae and protozoa) under UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> comparable to those of solar <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>. In our experiments, we varied <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, total dose and spectral composition of the actinic light. The critical doses at <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> of the order of 56 kJ/m(2) (typical average <span class="hlt">daily</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> in a sunny summer day in Pisa), measured for each main component of the microecosystem (algae and ciliates), turned out to be around 70 kJ/m(2) for ciliates and 50 kJ/m(2) for D. salina. By exposing microecosystems to <span class="hlt">daily</span> UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> of the order of 8 kJ/m(2) (typical average <span class="hlt">daily</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> in a sunny winter day in Pisa), we found no effect at total doses of the order of the critical doses at high <span class="hlt">irradiances</span>, showing that the reciprocity law does not hold. We have also measured a preliminary spectral-sensitive curve of the UV effects, which shows an exponential decay with wavelength. PMID:15339218</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marangoni, Roberto; Messina, Nicola; Gioffré, Domenico; Colombetti, Giuliano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.9834A"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> lsa-saf evapotranspiration product</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the framework of the EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSA-SAF), some models have been implemented in view to characterize continental surfaces by using information obtained from MSG and EPS satellites. In this context a method has been developed in order to monitor the flux of water (Evapotranspiration) between the land surface and the atmosphere. The method is based on a physical approach in which radiative data derived from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites together with land-cover information are used to constrain a physical model of energy exchange between the soil-vegetation system and the atmosphere. The implemented algorithm provides instantaneous ET estimates over four regions defined in the MSG FOV (the defined regions cover Europe, Africa and the west of south America), with MSG spatial resolution (3km at sub satellite point) and a temporal time step of 30 minutes. The scope of the method is limited to evaporation from terrestrial surfaces rather than from lakes or oceans. The instantaneous product has been validated over different vegetation cover and climatic conditions, providing evidence that the algorithm is able to reproduce ET estimates with accuracy equivalent to the accuracy of ET obtained from observations. In 2009 the instantaneous ET product has been declared pre-operational by EUMETSAT, allowing the product to be disseminated to a larger community of users (http://landsaf.meteo.pt). In some areas like agriculture, hydrology, water management, ecology and climate studies the main concern is not instantaneous but accumulated values over days, months or longer periods. To encompass the need for these community of users, a <span class="hlt">daily</span> ET product in which <span class="hlt">daily</span> evapotranspiration is obtained as temporal integration of instantaneous values has been developed. In this contribution we will present the methodology used to obtain instantaneous ET estimates and the procedure applied to derive <span class="hlt">daily</span>-cumulated values. Examples at local and regional scale will be presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Arboleda Rodallega, Alirio; Ghilain, Nicolas; Meulenberghs, Francoise</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010005251&hterms=interpolation+eos+tabular&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dinterpolation%2Beos%2Btabular"> <span id="translatedtitle">BOREAS TE-21 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Surface Meteorological Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-21 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the meteorology of boreal forest areas. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> meteorological data were derived from half-hourly BOREAS tower flux (TF) and Automatic Meteorological Station (AMS) mesonet measurements collected in the Southern and Northern Study Areas (SSA and NSA) for the period of 01 Jan 1994 until 31 Dec 1994. The data were stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kimball, John; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.splinterware.com/products/idailydiary.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle">i<span class="hlt">Daily</span>Diary 3.1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The most intimate of all prose may be in fact the world of the personal diary. In the digital age, diaries can be placed online for full disclosure or kept in a secretive file on a computer desktop. With this program, visitors can keep a diary that contains various image files, such as animated GIFs or different icons. Users can also create as many diaries as they want, and they may also enter links to other diary pages. This version of i<span class="hlt">Daily</span>Diary 3.1 is compatible with computers running Windows 95 and newer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2003/01/28/thirsty-for-drought-relief/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Lesson Plan: Thirsty for Drought Relief</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Lesson Plan from the New York Times Learning Network, students explore a variety of drought-related issues and research possible courses of action as part of a "drought preparedness taskforce." Based on New York Times coverage of drought in Arizona (story link provided), this exercise offers an active, interdisciplinary way to learn about water conservation and the ecological and economic effects of drought. Designed for grades 6-8 or 9-12, this exercise can be completed in one class period. The site includes useful Web links and a printer-friendly version of the lesson plan. Free registration is required.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anderson, Bridget.; Chan, Priscilla.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/87139"> <span id="translatedtitle">Safer Food with <span class="hlt">Irradiation</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This publication answers questions about food <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> and how it helps prevent foodborne illnesses. Included are explanations of how <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> works and its benefits. <span class="hlt">Irradiation</span> is a safe method of preserving food quality and ensuring its...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, Britta; Vestal, Andy; Van Laanen, Peggy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ClDy...42.1275W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Record occurrence and record values in <span class="hlt">daily</span> and monthly temperatures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze the occurrence and the values of record-breaking temperatures in <span class="hlt">daily</span> and monthly temperature observations. Our aim is to better understand and quantify the statistics of temperature records in the context of <span class="hlt">global</span> warming. Similar to earlier work we employ a simple mathematical model of independent and identically distributed random variables with a linearly growing expectation value. This model proved to be useful in predicting the increase (decrease) in upper (lower) temperature records in a warming climate. Using both station and re-analysis data from Europe and the United States we further investigate the statistics of temperature records and the validity of this model. The most important new contribution in this article is an analysis of the statistics of record values for our simple model and European reanalysis data. We estimate how much the mean values and the distributions of record temperatures are affected by the large scale warming trend. In this context we consider both the values of records that occur at a certain time and the values of records that have a certain record number in the series of record events. We compare the observational data both to simple analytical computations and numerical simulations. We find that it is more difficult to describe the values of record breaking temperatures within the framework of our linear drift model. Observations from the summer months fit well into the model with Gaussian random variables under the observed linear warming, in the sense that record breaking temperatures are more extreme in the summer. In winter however a significant asymmetry of the <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature distribution hides the effect of the slow warming trends. Therefore very extreme cold records are still possible in winter. This effect is even more pronounced if one considers only data from subpolar regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wergen, G.; Hense, A.; Krug, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.global-investor.com/index.htm"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Investor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Investor was developed by Numa Financial Services. The main feature of the site is the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Investor Directory which contains investment-related sites from around the world. The sites are divided into <span class="hlt">global</span>, regional and country sites and are rated on a five-star scale. Users can also compare the relative performance of the world's stock markets at the site using the currency of their choice. The latest finance news on the Internet can be found in the Finance netWatch section. There is also a list of international American Depositary Receipts (ADRs) for those interested in creating an ADR portfolio.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24173611"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache in the elderly.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Disabling headache disorders are ubiquitous in all age groups, including the elderly, yet they are under-recognized, underdiagnosed and undertreated worldwide. Surveys and clinic-based research reports on headache disorders in elderly populations are extremely limited in number. Chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache (CDH) is an important and growing subtype of primary headache disorders, associated with increased burden and disruption to quality of life. CDH can be divided into two forms, based on headache duration. Common forms of primary headache disorders of long duration (>4 hours) were comprehensively defined in the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta). These include chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new <span class="hlt">daily</span> persistent headache, and hemicrania continua. Rarer short-duration (<4 hours) forms of CDH are chronic cluster headache, chronic paroxysmal hemicrania, SUNCT, and hypnic headache. Accurate diagnosis, management, and relief of the burden of CDH in the elderly population present numerous unique challenges as the "aging world" continues to grow. In order to implement appropriate coping strategies for the elderly, it is essential to establish the correct diagnosis at each step and to exercise caution in differentiating from secondary causes, while always taking into consideration the unique needs and limitations of the aged body. PMID:24173611</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Özge, Aynur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cgge.aag.org/GlobalEconomy1e/ConceptualFramework_Jan10/ConceptualFramework_Jan10_print.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Economy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Module covering the conceptual framework and case studies on economic <span class="hlt">globalization</span>. The module is primarily expositive but includes some interactive sections for checking factual understanding and user submitted interactive projects which are available with a (free) registration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Education, American A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/complexsystems/activities/pattern.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Patterns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This activity supports educators in the use of the activities that accompany the GLOBE Program's Earth System Poster 'Exploring Connections in Year 2007'. Students identify <span class="hlt">global</span> patterns and connections in environmental data that include soil moisture, insolation, surface temperature, cloud fraction, precipitation, world topography/bathymetry, aerosol optical thickness, and biosphere (from different times of the year) with the goal of recognizing patterns and trends in <span class="hlt">global</span> data sets.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raia, Federica; On the Cutting Edge Collection - SERC (Science Education Resource Center)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a 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onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.socsci.uci.edu/globalconnect/webdocs/Intro2Globalization13.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">INTRODUCTION TO <span class="hlt">GLOBALIZATION</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">INTRODUCTION TO <span class="hlt">GLOBALIZATION</span> INTRODUCTION TO <span class="hlt">GLOBALIZATION</span> Workshops of Social Sciences A <span class="hlt">Global</span> Connect Publication University of California, Irvine <span class="hlt">GLOBALIZATION</span> & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Volume 1 ­ Introduction to <span class="hlt">Globalization</span> 1 #12;GLOBALSCOPE <span class="hlt">Globalization</span> & International</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barrett, Jeffrey A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613459P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of synoptic weather patterns on solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> variability in Europe</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solar radiation is important for many aspects of existence on Earth, including the biosphere, the hydrological cycle, and creatures living on the planet. Previous studies have reported decadal trends in observational records of surface shortwave (SW) <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> around the world, too strong to be caused by varying solar output. These observed decadal trends have been dubbed "solar dimming and brightening" and are believed to be related to changes in atmospheric aerosols and cloud cover. Because the observed solar variability coincides with qualitative air pollution histories, the dimming and brightening have become almost synonymous with shortwave attenuation by anthropogenic aerosols. However, there are indications that atmospheric circulation patterns have influenced the dimming and brightening in some regions, e.g., Alaska and Scandinavia. In this work, we focus on the role of atmospheric circulation patterns in modifying shortwave <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. An examination of European SW <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> data from the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) shows that while there are periods of predominantly decreasing (~1970-1985) and increasing (~1985-2007) SW <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, the changes are not spatially uniform within Europe and in a majority of locations not statistically significant. To establish a connection between weather patterns and sunshine, regression models of SW <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> are fitted using a <span class="hlt">daily</span> classification of European weather called Grosswetterlagen (GWL). The GWL reconstructions of shortwave <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> represent the part of the solar variability that is related to large scale weather patterns, which should be effectively separated from the influence of varying anthropogenic aerosol emissions. The correlation (R) between observed and reconstruced SW <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> is between 0.31 and 0.75, depending on station and season, all statistically significant (p<0.05, estimated with a bootstrap test). In central and eastern parts of Europe, the observed decadal SW variability is poorly represented by the GWL models, but in northern Europe, the GWL model recreates observed decadal solar variability well. This finding suggests that natural and/or anthropogenic variations in circulation patterns have influenced solar dimming and brightening to a higher degree in the north than in the rest of Europe.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Parding, Kajsa; Hinkelman, Laura; Liepert, Beate; Ackerman, Thomas; Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Asle Olseth, Jan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol16/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol16-sec75-45.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 75.45 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria. 75.45 Section 75.45 Protection of...Alternative Monitoring Systems § 75.45 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria. The owner or operator shall...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol17-sec75-45.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 75.45 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria. 75.45 Section 75.45 Protection of...Alternative Monitoring Systems § 75.45 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria. The owner or operator shall...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol16/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol16-sec75-45.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 75.45 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria. 75.45 Section 75.45 Protection of...Alternative Monitoring Systems § 75.45 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria. The owner or operator shall...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol17/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol17-sec75-45.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 75.45 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria. 75.45 Section 75.45 Protection of...Alternative Monitoring Systems § 75.45 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> quality assurance criteria. The owner or operator shall...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title27-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title27-vol1-sec19-736.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">27 CFR 19.736 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> production records.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Daily</span> production records. 19.736 Section 19.736...DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Records and Reports Production Account § 19.736 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> production records. (a) Spirits production....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title27-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title27-vol1-sec19-740.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">27 CFR 19.740 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> storage records.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Daily</span> storage records. 19.740 Section 19.740 Alcohol...DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Records and Reports Storage Account § 19.740 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> storage records. (a) General. Proprietors...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1552011"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ozone and <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Mortality in Shanghai, China</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Controversy remains regarding the relationship between ambient ozone and mortality worldwide. In mainland China, the largest developing country, there has been no prior study investigating the acute effect of O3 on death risk. Given the changes in types of air pollution from conventional coal combustion to the mixed coal combustion/motor vehicle emissions in China’s large cities, it is worthwhile to investigate the acute effect of O3 on mortality outcomes in the country. Objectives We conducted a time-series study to investigate the relation between O3 and <span class="hlt">daily</span> mortality in Shanghai using 4 years of <span class="hlt">daily</span> data (2001–2004). Methods We used the generalized additive model with penalized splines to analyze mortality, O3 pollution, and covariate data in warm and cold seasons. We considered <span class="hlt">daily</span> counts of all-cause mortality and several cause-specific subcategories (respiratory and cardiovascular). We also examined these associations among several subpopulations based on age and sex. Results O3 was significantly associated with total and cardiovascular mortality in the cold season but not in the warm season. In the whole-year analysis, an increase of 10 ?g/m3 of 2-day average (lag01) O3 corresponds to 0.45% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.16–0.73%], 0.53% (95% CI, 0.10–0.96%), and 0.35% (95% CI, ?0.40 to 1.09%) increase of total nonaccidental, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality, respectively. In the cold season, the estimates increased to 1.38% (95% CI, 0.68–2.07%), 1.53% (95% CI, 0.54–2.52%), and 0.95% (95% CI, ?0.71 to 2.60%), respectively. In the warm season, we did not observe significant associations for both total and cause-specific mortality. The results were generally insensitive to model specifications such as lag structure of O3 concentrations and degree of freedom for time trend. Multipollutant models indicate that the effect of O3 was not confounded by particulate matter ? 10 ?m in diameter (PM10) or by sulfur dioxide; however, after adding nitrogen dioxide into the model, the association of O3 with total and cardiovascular mortality became statistically insignificant. Conclusions O3 pollution has stronger health effects in the cold than in the warm season in Shanghai. Our analyses also strengthen the rationale for further limiting levels of O3 pollution in outdoor air in the city. PMID:16882530</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Yunhui; Huang, Wei; London, Stephanie J.; Song, Guixiang; Chen, Guohai; Jiang, Lili; Zhao, Naiqing; Chen, Bingheng; Kan, Haidong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014LatJP..51...44B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of <span class="hlt">daily</span> covering material for biocells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bioreactor landfilling, with the acceptance of landfill Directive 1999/31/EC has lost its actuality in European Union; at the same time, this method can still be used for acceleration of biowaste degradation and biogas production. One of the possibilities to reduce the disposal of biowaste is to use biocells for its anaerobic pre-treatment before landfilling. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> filling up of such a cell requires isolation of the main volume to limit gas emissions, reduce smells, etc. Bioprocesses that are of the utmost importance for biocell treatment are often not taken into account in selection of materials to be used as <span class="hlt">daily</span> landfill covers. Based on physical, chemical and biological methods the investigations have been carried out into different covering materials offered in the market, with identification of parameters that are the most important for <span class="hlt">daily</span> covering the biocells. It is found that the materials fitted best this purpose should be of biological origin and consist of small bio-particles with large surface, without the inhibitors of anaerobic processes such as sulphuric compounds. Bioreaktoru pielietošana atkritumu uzglab?šanas sf?r?, sakar? ar Direkt?vas 1999/31/EC pie?emšanu, ir zaud?jusi savu aktualit?ti, ta?u š? metode v?l joproj?m var tikt izmantota bioatkritumu no?rd?šanai un biog?zes ražošanai. Viena no iesp?j?m k? samazin?t bioatkritumu izvietošanu ir bioš?nu izmantošana bioatkritumu anaerobai pirmsapstr?dei pirms to noglab?šanas. Š?nas piepild?šana ikdien? prasa nepieciešam?bu izol?t liel?ko t?s da?u, lai samazin?tu g?zes emisiju, smakas, utt. Materi?li, kas ikdien? tiek izmantoti atkritumu p?rkl?šanai, nepietiekami ietekm? bioprocesus, kas pamat? ir galvenais bioš?nas izmantošanas m?r?is. Šaj? sakar? ir veikta daž?du tirdzniec?b? pieejamu p?rkl?juma materi?lu izp?te, pielietojot virkni fizik?lo, ??misko un biolo?isko metožu, un nosakot svar?g?kos parametrus, kas ir b?tiski šo materi?lu izmantošanai ikdien? k? bioš?nas p?rkl?jumu. P?t?jumu rezult?t? noteikts, ka visatbilstoš?kie ir materi?li ar biolo?isko izcelsmi, sast?voši no maz?m bio da?i??m ar lielu laukumu bez anaerobo procesu inhibitoriem, piem?ram, s?ra komponent?m.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bendere, R.; Smigins, R.; Medne, O.; Berzina-Cimdina, L.; Rugele, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110023008&hterms=west+coast+us&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dwest%2Bcoast%2Bus"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional Model Nesting Within GFS <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Forecasts Over West Africa</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study uses the RM3, the regional climate model at the Center for Climate Systems Research of Columbia University and the NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies (CCSR/GISS). The paper evaluates 30 48-hour RM3 weather forecasts over West Africa during September 2006 made on a 0.5 grid nested within 1 <span class="hlt">Global</span> Forecast System (GFS) <span class="hlt">global</span> forecasts. September 2006 was the Special Observing Period #3 of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA). Archived GFS initial conditions and lateral boundary conditions for the simulations from the US National Weather Service, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration were interpolated four times <span class="hlt">daily</span>. Results for precipitation forecasts are validated against Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite estimates and data from the Famine Early Warning System (FEWS), which includes rain gauge measurements, and forecasts of circulation are compared to reanalysis 2. Performance statistics for the precipitation forecasts include bias, root-mean-square errors and spatial correlation coefficients. The nested regional model forecasts are compared to GFS forecasts to gauge whether nesting provides additional realistic information. They are also compared to RM3 simulations driven by reanalysis 2, representing high potential skill forecasts, to gauge the sensitivity of results to lateral boundary conditions. Nested RM3/GFS forecasts generate excessive moisture advection toward West Africa, which in turn causes prodigious amounts of model precipitation. This problem is corrected by empirical adjustments in the preparation of lateral boundary conditions and initial conditions. The resulting modified simulations improve on the GFS precipitation forecasts, achieving time-space correlations with TRMM of 0.77 on the first day and 0.63 on the second day. One realtime RM3/GFS precipitation forecast made at and posted by the African Centre of Meteorological Application for Development (ACMAD) in Niamey, Niger is shown.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Druyan, Leonard M.; Fulakeza, Matthew; Lonergan, Patrick; Worrell, Ruben</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4228160"> <span id="translatedtitle">Secure Web Application Development and <span class="hlt">Global</span> Regulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The World Wide Web (WWW) has been predominantly responsible for instigating radical paradigm transformations in today's <span class="hlt">global</span> information rich civilizations. Many societies have basic operational economical components that depend on Web enabled systems in order to support <span class="hlt">daily</span> commercial activities. The acceptance of E-commerce as a valid channel for conducting business coupled with societal integration and dependence on Web enabled</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">William Bradley Glisson; L. Milton Glisson; Ray Welland</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://idnc.library.illinois.edu/cgi-bin/illinois?a=cl&cl=CL1&sp=DIL&e=-------en-20--1--txt-txIN-------"> <span id="translatedtitle">Illinois Digital Newspaper Collection: The <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Illini</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The digitization of historically important and interesting newspapers continues apace, and this latest collection is quite a find. The Illinois Digital Newspaper Collection is a project of the History, Philosophy, and Newspaper Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library. Their first project is the digitization of select years from the <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Illini, which is the student newspaper on campus. Currently, visitors can browse and search papers from 1916 to 1936, and there are plans to include the years 1937 to 1945 in the near future. Interested parties can also search by keyword across articles, advertisements and photo captions. One can imagine that this type of archive would be of interest to social historians, journalists, and anyone who wishes to peer into the world of campus life in the Roaring 20s and the not-so-Roaring 30s.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4233117"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> oral iron supplementation during pregnancy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Iron and folic acid supplementation has been the preferred intervention to improve iron stores and prevent anaemia among pregnant women, and it may also improve other maternal and birth outcomes. Objectives To assess the effects of <span class="hlt">daily</span> oral iron supplements for pregnant women, either alone or in conjunction with folic acid, or with other vitamins and minerals as a public health intervention. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (2 July 2012). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (2 July 2012) and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effects of oral preventive supplementation with <span class="hlt">daily</span> iron, iron + folic acid or iron + other vitamins and minerals during pregnancy. Data collection and analysis We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. Main results We included 60 trials. Forty-three trials, involving more than 27,402 women, contributed data and compared the effects of <span class="hlt">daily</span> oral supplements containing iron versus no iron or placebo. Overall, women taking iron supplements were less likely to have low birthweight newborns (below 2500 g) compared with controls (8.4% versus 10.2%, average risk ratio (RR) 0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68 to 0.97, 11 trials, 8480 women) and mean birthweight was 30.81 g greater for those infants whose mothers received iron during pregnancy (average mean difference (MD) 30.81; 95% CI 5.94 to 55.68, 14 trials, 9385 women). Preventive iron supplementation reduced the risk of maternal anaemia at term by 70% (RR 0.30; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.46, 14 trials, 2199 women) and iron deficiency at term by 57% (RR 0.43; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.66, seven trials, 1256 women). Although the difference between groups did not reach statistical significance, women who received iron supplements were more likely than controls to report side effects (25.3% versus 9.91%) (RR 2.36; 95% CI 0.96 to 5.82, 11 trials, 4418 women), particularly at doses 60 mg of elemental iron or higher. Women receiving iron were on average more likely to have higher haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations at term and in the postpartum period, but were at increased risk of Hb concentrations greater than 130g/L during pregnancy and at term. Twenty-three studies were conducted in countries that in 2011 had some malaria risk in parts of the country. In some of these countries/territories, malaria is present only in certain areas or up to a particular altitude. Only two of these reported malaria outcomes. There is no evidence that iron supplementation increases placental malaria. For some outcomes heterogeneity was higher than 50%. Authors’ conclusions Prenatal supplementation with <span class="hlt">daily</span> iron are effective to reduce the risk of low birthweight, and to prevent maternal anaemia and iron deficiency in pregnancy. Associated maternal side effects and particularly high Hb concentrations during pregnancy at currently used doses suggest the need to update recommendations on doses and regimens for routine iron supplementation. PMID:23235616</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pena-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Dowswell, Therese; Viteri, Fernando E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1522..221A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Behaviour of <span class="hlt">daily</span> river flow: Chaotic?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study was conducted to provide evidence of the chaotic behavior of the <span class="hlt">daily</span> river flow data at Lubuk Paku station on the Pahang River in the Pahang River Basin in Malaysia. Four nonlinear dynamic methods are employed: (1) phase space reconstruction; (2) average mutual information algorithm; (3) false nearest neighbors algorithm; and (4) correlation dimension method. First, average mutual information method is used to determine a first minimum of delay time. Second, the sufficient embedding dimension is estimated using the false nearest neighbour algorithm. The time delay and sufficient dimension are used in phase space reconstruction. The presence of chaos in river flow has been analyzed through the correlation dimension method. The correlation dimension is less than 3. Hence, we can conclude that low correlation dimension presence by examined river flow time series data Lubuk Paku station on the Pahang River, Malaysia.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adenan, Nur Hamiza; Md Noorani, Mohd Salmi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23214069"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Thyroid tumors in <span class="hlt">daily</span> clinical settings].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Due to the widespread use of neck ultrasonography, physicians often encounter thyroid nodules in <span class="hlt">daily</span> clinical settings. Most of them are benign such as adenomatous goiter or follicular adenoma; however, some malignant tumors can be contaminated. Thyroid malignancies are classified into several histological varieties including papillary, follicular, anaplastic, medullary thyroid carcinomas and so on. Each histological type of thyroid carcinoma has distinct biological characteristics and should be diagnosed and treated differentially. The majority of thyroid cancers fortunately have a favorable prognosis, while some of them need a multidisciplinary treatment by specialists. In order to minimize patients' anxiety, physicians have to be knowledgeable about these features and discriminate risky tumors from others properly. PMID:23214069</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Toda, Kazuhisa; Sugitani, Iwao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cfr.org/publication/by_type/daily_analysis.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">Council on Foreign Relations: <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Council on Foreign Relations produces an impressive array of background papers, online debates, op-ed pieces, and articles every year. International relations gurus, policy pundits, and members of the public benefit widely from these works, and those persons who haven't looked over the Council's "<span class="hlt">Daily</span> Analysis" yet, may wish to do so now. Here visitors can read analytical briefs written by staff members on issues of the day, complete with links to "the news, analysis, commentary, and primary source materials that put the facts in context." The briefs are arranged chronologically, and recent pieces include "Is Brain Drain Good For Africa?", "China's Olympic Moment", and "Picking Presidents and Foreign Policy". These briefs are a great way to get acquainted with important news developments from around the world, and it's easy to see how educators might want to draw on the site as a resource for political science or international relations courses.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20658885"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cultural differences in <span class="hlt">daily</span> support experiences.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previous research has suggested that Asian Americans (AAs) are less likely to mobilize social support, and find support to be less helpful, when compared with European Americans (EAs). In a 10-day <span class="hlt">daily</span> diary study of AA and EA college students, we hypothesized that AAs would activate support less frequently than EAs for both stressful and positive events, a cultural difference that would be mediated by group harmony values. We also predicted that AAs would find support to be less helpful, and we explored differences in the sources of support used. Results confirmed that cultural differences in support use were partially mediated by the value of maintaining group harmony through emotional restraint. AAs also perceived received support to be less helpful and more frequently used discretionary rather than kinship support sources. Findings suggest that naturalistic support experiences differ markedly for these groups, with implications for help-seeking behavior and mental health services. PMID:20658885</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Shu-wen; Shih, Josephine H; Hu, Alison W; Louie, Jennifer Y; Lau, Anna S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002Natur.418..601T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Climatology: Contrails reduce <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature range</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The potential of condensation trails (contrails) from jet aircraft to affect regional-scale surface temperatures has been debated for years, but was difficult to verify until an opportunity arose as a result of the three-day grounding of all commercial aircraft in the United States in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001. Here we show that there was an anomalous increase in the average diurnal temperature range (that is, the difference between the daytime maximum and night-time minimum temperatures) for the period 11-14 September 2001. Because persisting contrails can reduce the transfer of both incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation and so reduce the <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature range, we attribute at least a portion of this anomaly to the absence of contrails over this period.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Travis, David J.; Carleton, Andrew M.; Lauritsen, Ryan G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A33A0122R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessment and ground-based correction of the Level-3 MODIS <span class="hlt">daily</span> aerosol optical depth: Implications in the context of surface solar radiation prediction and numerical weather modeling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Level-3 MODIS (L3M) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product offers interesting features for surface solar radiation and numerical weather modeling applications. However, most of the validation efforts so far have been focused on Level-2 (L2M) products and only rarely on L3M. We compare the Collection 5.1 L3M AOD (Terra dataset) available since 2000 against observed <span class="hlt">daily</span> AOD values at 550 nm from more than 500 AERONET ground stations. The aim is to check the advisability of this dataset for surface solar radiation calculations using numerical weather models. Overall, the mean error (ME) is 0.03 (17%, relative to the mean observed AOD), with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.14 (73%), albeit these values are found highly dependent on geographical region. For AOD values above about 0.3 the expected error (EE) is found higher than that of the L2M product. We propose specific parameterizations for the EE of the L3M AOD, as well as for both its ME and its standard deviation. We also found that, roughly, half of the uncertainty of the L3M AOD dataset might be attributable to its sub-pixel variability. Finally, we used a radiative transfer model to investigate how the L3M AOD uncertainty propagates into the direct normal (DNI) and <span class="hlt">global</span> horizontal (GHI) <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> evaluation. Overall, for AODs smaller than 0.5, the induced uncertainty in DNI due to AOD alone is below 15% on average, and below 5% for GHI (for a solar zenith angle of 30 degrees). But the uncertainty in AOD is highly spatially variable, so is that in <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. These results suggest the necessity of a correction method to reduce the bias of the L3M AOD. Ground-based AOD measurements can be also used in a data fusion procedure. We present the results of a preliminary study using optimal interpolation of L3M <span class="hlt">daily</span> AOD data based on <span class="hlt">daily</span> AERONET AOD measurements in the US in the period since June to August 2009. The method removes the data gaps in the original dataset, assesses the spatial distribution of uncertainty and corrects the resultant gridded-AOD based on point-wise ground measurements. Overall, based on a cross-validation procedure, the method was able to reduce the ME from 0.013 (9%) to -0.002 (-2%), the RMSE from 0.084 (59%) to 0.070 (49%) and increase the correlation coefficient from 10% to 92%. Fig 1 shows the time series of the mean <span class="hlt">daily</span> AOD for the original (blue) and the data-fused (red) datasets over the study region. The methodology shall allow creating an accurate and long-term gridded-AOD database suitable to be ingested in numerical weather models so that the effect in the atmospheric system of AOD and its <span class="hlt">daily</span> variability can be better assessed. Such a dataset is crucial for DNI calculations at surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruiz-Arias, J. A.; Dudhia, J.; Pozo-Vazquez, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20790722"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ozone and <span class="hlt">daily</span> mortality in Shanghai, China</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Given the changes in types of air pollution from conventional coal combustion to the mixed coal combustion/motor vehicle emissions in China's large cities, it is worthwhile to investigate the acute effect of O{sub 3} on mortality outcomes in the country. We conducted a time-series study to investigate the relation between O{sub 3} and <span class="hlt">daily</span> mortality in Shanghai using 4 years of <span class="hlt">daily</span> data (2001-2004). O{sub 3} was found to be significantly associated with total and cardiovascular mortality in the cold season but not in the warm season. In the whole-year analysis, an increase of 10 pg/m{sup 3} of 2-day average O{sub 3} corresponds to 0.45% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.16-0.73%), 0.53% (95% CI, 0.10-0.96%), and 0.35% (95% CI, -0.40 to 1.09%) increase of total nonaccidental, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality, respectively. In the cold season, the estimates increased to 1.38% (95% CI , 0.68-2.07%), 1.53% (95% CI, 0.54-2.52%), and 0.95% (95% CI, -0.71 to 2.60%), respectively. In the warm season, we did not observe significant associations for both total and causespecific mortality. The results were generally insensitive to model specifications such as lag structure of O{sub 3} concentrations and degree of freedom for time trend. Multipoflutant models indicate that the effect of O{sub 3} was not confounded by particulate matter {<=} 10 {mu} m in diameter (PM10) or by sulfur dioxide; however, after adding nitrogen dioxide into the model, the association of O{sub 3} with total and cardiovascular mortality became statistically insignificant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Y.H.; Huang, W.; London, S.J.; Song, G.X.; Chen, G.H.; Jiang, L.L.; Zhao, N.Q.; Chen, B.H.; Kan, H.D. [NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-08-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/45200771"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental Analysis of a Reduced <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Bluegill Limit in Minnesota</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect of a reduced <span class="hlt">daily</span> limit (from 30 to 10 fish\\/d) on the size structure of bluegills Lepomis macrochirus in eight Minnesota lakes was measured with a controlled and replicated experiment. Bluegills from four treatment lakes (<span class="hlt">daily</span> limit of 10 fish) and four control lakes (<span class="hlt">daily</span> limit of 30 fish) were sampled in 2 years prior to regulation implementation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter C. Jacobson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26542992"> <span id="translatedtitle">Data sampling speed versus energetic measurement errors of <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> monitoring in photovoltaic systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">To measure solar <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> and photovoltaic array output energy a measuring accuracy cannot be guaranteed unless the data sampling interval is appropriately selected. From this viewpoint, actual <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> has been measured by comparatively high speed sampling of 1–4 s for 44 months and the <span class="hlt">daily</span> errors of the numerical integral have been estimated for various step sizes. Approximation formulae of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kosuke Kurokawa; Kosuke</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.asrc.cestm.albany.edu/perez/publications/Solar%20Resource%20Assessment%20and%20Modeling/Papers%20on%20Resource%20Assessment%20and%20Satellites/producing%20satellite-derived%20irradiance%20in%20complex-04.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Submitted for Publication to SOLAR ENERGY PRODUCING SATELLITE-DERIVED <span class="hlt">IRRADIANCES</span> IN COMPLEX ARID TERRAIN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Submitted for Publication to SOLAR ENERGY PRODUCING SATELLITE-DERIVED <span class="hlt">IRRADIANCES</span> IN COMPLEX ARID describes a methodology to correct satellite-derived <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> over complex terrain for models that use recently proposed a new semi-empirical model for deriving <span class="hlt">global</span> and direct <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> from the visible</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Perez, Richard R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.asrc.cestm.albany.edu/perez/publications/Solar%20Resource%20Assessment%20and%20Modeling/More%20Papers%20on%20Resource%20Assessment%20and%20Satellites/solar%20irradiance%20conversion%20model-86.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar Cells, 18 (1986) 213-222 SOLAR <span class="hlt">IRRADIANCE</span> CONVERSION MODELS*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">r, ~ Solar Cells, 18 (1986) 213-222 #12;213 SOLAR <span class="hlt">IRRADIANCE</span> CONVERSION MODELS* RICHARD PEREZ estimating, on an hourly basis, the <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> received by a sloping surface in a given location, depending or transposition models that use available direct and horizontal <span class="hlt">global</span> or diffuse hourly <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> records</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Perez, Richard R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39888352"> <span id="translatedtitle">Implication of <span class="hlt">global</span> environmental changes on chemical toxicity-effect of water temperature, pH, and ultraviolet B <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> on acute toxicity of several pharmaceuticals in Daphnia magna</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> environmental change poses emerging environmental health challenges throughout the world. One of such threats could\\u000a be found in chemical safety in aquatic ecosystem. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of several environmental factors,\\u000a such as water pH, temperature and ultraviolet light on the toxicity of pharmaceutical compounds in water, using freshwater\\u000a invertebrate Daphnia magna. Seven pharmaceuticals including</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jungkon Kim; Pan-Gyi Kim; Chulwoo Lee; Kyunghee Choi; Kyungho Choi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850016429&hterms=Food+safety&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DFood%2Bsafety"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of <span class="hlt">Irradiated</span> Foods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The safety of <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> foods is reviewed. Guidelines and regulations for processing <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> foods are considered. The radiolytic products formed in food when it is <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> and its wholesomeness is discussed. It is concluded that food <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> processing is not a panacea for all problems in food processing but when properly used will serve the space station well.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brynjolfsson, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jd/v103/iD24/98JD01644/98JD01644.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Potential <span class="hlt">global</span> fire monitoring from EOS-MODIS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) plans to launch the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MEDIS) on the polarorbiting Earth Observation System (EeS) providing morning and evening <span class="hlt">global</span> observations in 1999 and afternoon and night observations in 2000. These four MEDIS <span class="hlt">daily</span> fire observations will advance <span class="hlt">global</span> fire monitoring with special 1 km resolution fire channels at 4 and 11</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoram J. Kaufman; Christopher O. Justice; Luke P. Flynn; Jackie D. Kendall; Elaine M. Prins; Louis Giglio; Darold E. Ward; W. Paul Menzel; Alberto W. Setzer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=corruption&pg=4&id=EJ1022674"> <span id="translatedtitle">Children as <span class="hlt">Global</span> Citizens: A Socratic Approach to Teaching Character</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Educators around the world are being challenged to promote positive <span class="hlt">global</span> citizenship skills in the face of <span class="hlt">daily</span> news concerning widespread discord, dissonance, injustice, and corruption. This article describes a Socratic approach to developing <span class="hlt">global</span> citizenship. Recognizing the central role of teachers in educating future generations of a…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Helterbran, Valeri R.; Strahler, Brianna R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.knowitall.org/nasa/pdf/scifiles/redlight_full.pdf#page=63"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Winds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On this worksheet, students examine a diagram of <span class="hlt">global</span> winds and learn the position of the prevailing westerlies, the polar easterlies, the trade winds, the horse latitudes and the doldrums, and that together, the uneven heating of the planet by the Sun and the Coriolis Effect are responsible for the <span class="hlt">global</span> wind belts. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the video, NASA Why Files: The Case of the Mysterious Red Light. Lesson objectives supported by the video, additional resources, teaching tips and an answer sheet are included in the teacher's guide.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.amnh.org/ology/features/globalgrocery/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Grocery</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This fun Web site is part of OLogy, where kids can collect virtual trading cards and create projects with them. Here, they take a behind-the-scenes look at the biodiversity that's part of the many things they eat and use <span class="hlt">daily</span>. The site opens by asking kids a series of questions to get them thinking about the ingredients in common foods and products. Then it takes them to a well-stocked kitchen, where they can mouse over everything from chocolate chip cookies and coffee to cough drops and cold medicine to learn about the origins of key ingredients.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52805973"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neutron <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> of semiconductors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electron <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> GaAs-and Si-crystals were investigated to identify lattice defects, as a preparation for experiments on neutron <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> Si and GaAs. The defects occurring after electron <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> (E = 2MeV) are easier to analyze than after neutron <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>. Moreover, beta emission from neutron transmutated GaAs and Si show effects which are very similar to the case of electron <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>. Using</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. Ossau; U. Steigenberger; G. Landewehr; K. Elliott; P. L. Liu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140002744&hterms=see+you+top&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dsee%2Byou%2Btop"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface <span class="hlt">Irradiances</span> Consistent With CERES-Derived Top-of-Atmosphere Shortwave and Longwave <span class="hlt">Irradiances</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The estimate of surface <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> on a <span class="hlt">global</span> scale is possible through radiative transfer calculations using satellite-retrieved surface, cloud, and aerosol properties as input. Computed top-of-atmosphere (TOA) <span class="hlt">irradiances</span>, however, do not necessarily agree with observation-based values, for example, from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). This paper presents amethod to determine surface <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> using observational constraints of TOA <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> from CERES. A Lagrange multiplier procedure is used to objectively adjust inputs based on their uncertainties such that the computed TOA <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> is consistent with CERES-derived <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> to within the uncertainty. These input adjustments are then used to determine surface <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> adjustments. Observations by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), CloudSat, andModerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) that are a part of the NASA A-Train constellation provide the uncertainty estimates. A comparison with surface observations from a number of sites shows that the bias [root-mean-square (RMS) difference] between computed and observed monthlymean <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> calculated with 10 years of data is 4.7 (13.3) W/sq m for downward shortwave and 22.5 (7.1) W/sq m for downward longwave <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> over ocean and 21.7 (7.8) W m22 for downward shortwave and 21.0 (7.6) W/sq m for downward longwave <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> over land. The bias andRMS error for the downward longwave and shortwave <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> over ocean are decreased from those without constraint. Similarly, the bias and RMS error for downward longwave over land improves, although the constraint does not improve downward shortwave over land. This study demonstrates how synergetic use of multiple instruments (CERES,MODIS, CALIPSO, CloudSat, AIRS, and geostationary satellites) improves the accuracy of surface <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> computations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kato, Seiji; Loeb, Norman G.; Rose, Fred G.; Doelling, David R.; Rutan, David A.; Caldwell, Thomas E.; Yu, Lisan; Weller, Robert A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39435188"> <span id="translatedtitle">A satellite-based climatology of UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> for Antarctic coastal regions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A technique is described to map surface UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (erythemal ultraviolet <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>) for a section of the Antarctic coast bounded by latitudes 54°-69°S; 140°-160°E. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> NOAA\\/AVHRR images have been acquired for this region over four consecutive austral spring, summer and autumn season (November-April), starting in 1990. A model developed by Green et al. is applied to estimate cloudless erythemal <span class="hlt">irradiances</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Manuel Nunez; Kelvin Michael; Darren Turner; Michael Wall; Carl Nilsson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SoPh..257...71W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sources of Solar Total <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> Variations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">daily</span> images and magnetograms acquired by MDI are a rich source of information about the contributions of different types of solar regions to variations in the total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (TSI). These data have been used to determine the temporal variation of the MDI <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, the mean intensity of the solar disk in the continuum at 676.8 nm. The short-term (days to weeks) variations of the MDI <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> and TSI are in excellent agreement with rms differences of 0.011%. This indicates that MDI <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> is an excellent proxy for short-term variations of TSI from the competing <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> contributions of regions causing <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> increases, such as plages and bright network, and regions causing <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> decreases, such as sunspots. However, the long-term or solar cycle variation of the MDI proxy and TSI differ over the 11-year period studied. The results indicate that the primary sources of the long-term (several months or more) variations in TSI are regions with magnetic fields between about 80 and 600 G. The results also suggest that the difference in the long-term variations of the MDI proxy and TSI is due to a component of TSI associated with sectors of the solar spectrum where the contrast in intensity between plages and the quiet Sun is enhanced ( e.g., the UV) compared to the MDI proxy. This is evidence that the long-term variation of TSI is due primarily to solar cycle variations of the <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> from these portions of solar spectrum, a finding consistent with modeling calculations indicating that approximately 60% of the change in TSI between solar minimum and maximum is produced by the UV part of the spectrum shortward of 400 nm (Solanki and Krivova, Space Sci. Rev. 125, 53, 2006).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Withbroe, George L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18829066"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> warming</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">'<span class="hlt">Global</span> warming' is a phrase that refers to the effect on the climate of human activities, in particular the burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and gas) and large-scale deforestation, which cause emissions to the atmosphere of large amounts of 'greenhouse gases', of which the most important is carbon dioxide. Such gases absorb infrared radiation emitted by the Earth's surface</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">John Houghton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=global+AND+cooling&id=EJ484206"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Presents information and data on an experiment designed to test whether different atmosphere compositions are affected by light and temperature during both cooling and heating. Although flawed, the experiment should help students appreciate the difficulties that researchers face when trying to find evidence of <span class="hlt">global</span> warming. (PR)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eichman, Julia Christensen; Brown, Jeff A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/project/misr/gallery/global_composite"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Composite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">article title:  MISR <span class="hlt">Global</span> Images See the Light of Day     View ... 1/2 degree in latitude by 1/2 degree in longitude. The top panel is from MISR's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera and combines data from ... at high latitudes. Forward scattering occurs when you (or MISR) observe an object with the Sun at a point in the sky that is in ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7012939"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> militarization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the titles are: Military Formations and Social Formations: A Structural Analysis; <span class="hlt">Global</span> Conflict Formations: Present Developments and Future Directions; War and the Power of Warmakers in Western Europe and Elsewhere, 1600-1980; and The Urban Type of Society and International War.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wallensteen, P.; Galtung, J.; Portales, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=seer&id=EJ936603"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Seeing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background/Context: This essay is a part of a special issue that emerges from a year-long faculty seminar at Teachers College, Columbia University. The seminar's purpose has been to examine in fresh terms the nexus of <span class="hlt">globalization</span>, education, and citizenship. Participants come from diverse fields of research and practice, among them art…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gaudelli, William</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=global+AND+warming+AND+effects&pg=5&id=EJ391198"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">States the foundations of the theory of <span class="hlt">global</span> warming. Describes methodologies used to measure the changes in the atmosphere. Discusses steps currently being taken in the United States and the world to slow the warming trend. Recognizes many sources for the warming and the possible effects on the earth. (MVL)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hileman, Bette</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40168596"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reconstruction of <span class="hlt">daily</span> solar UV <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> from 1893 to 2002 in Potsdam, Germany</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Long-term records of solar UV radiation reaching the Earth’s surface are scarce. Radiative transfer calculations and statistical\\u000a models are two options used to reconstruct decadal changes in solar UV radiation from long-term records of measured atmospheric\\u000a parameters that contain information on the effect of clouds, atmospheric aerosols and ground albedo on UV radiation. Based\\u000a on earlier studies, where the long-term</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jürgen Junk; Uwe Feister; Alfred Helbig</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55720157"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reconstruction of <span class="hlt">daily</span> solar UV <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> by an artificial neural network (ANN)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Long-term records of solar UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface are scarce. Radiative transfer calculations and statistical models are two options to re-construct decadal changes in solar UV radiation from long-term records of measured atmospheric parameters that contain information on the effect of clouds, atmospheric aerosols and ground albedo on UV radiation. Based on earlier studies, where the long-term variation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Uwe Feister; Jürgen Junk</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12038485"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spore dosimetry of solar UV radiation: applications to monitoring of <span class="hlt">daily</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> and personal exposure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Environmental UV radiation can be quantified using spore dosimetry, which measures the inactivation of repair-deficient Bacillus subtilis spores dried on a membrane filter. The system exhibits highly selective sensitivity to UV radiation, not being affected by various environmental adversities, such as high and low temperature and humidity. Biologically-effective dose rate and cumulative dose of ambient radiation are measurable under various conditions at various places on the earth, including tropical, temperate, and polar sites. Applications to monitor the exposure at the surface of organisms including humans and plants have also been advanced. PMID:12038485</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Munakata, N; Makita, K; Bolsee, D; Gillotay, D; Horneck, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23746068"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kiwifruit: our <span class="hlt">daily</span> prescription for health.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Kiwifruit are unequalled, compared with other commonly consumed fruit, for their nutrient density, health benefits, and consumer appeal. Research into their health benefits has focussed on the cultivars Actinidia deliciosa 'Hayward' (green kiwifruit) and Actinidia chinensis 'Hort 16A', ZESPRI(®) (gold kiwifruit). Compared with other commonly consumed fruit, both green and gold kiwifruit are exceptionally high in vitamins C, E, K, folate, carotenoids, potassium, fibre, and phytochemicals acting in synergy to achieve multiple health benefits. Kiwifruit, as part of a healthy diet, may increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and decrease triglycerides, platelet aggregation, and elevated blood pressure. Consuming gold kiwifruit with iron-rich meals improves poor iron status, and green kiwifruit aids digestion and laxation. As a rich source of antioxidants, they may protect the body from endogenous oxidative damage. Kiwifruit may support immune function and reduce the incidence and severity of cold or flu-like illness in at-risk groups such as older adults and children. However, kiwifruit are allergenic, and although symptoms in most susceptible individuals are mild, severe reactions have been reported. While many research gaps remain, kiwifruit with their multiple health benefits have the potential to become part of our "<span class="hlt">daily</span> prescription for health." PMID:23746068</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stonehouse, Welma; Gammon, Cheryl S; Beck, Kathryn L; Conlon, Cathryn A; von Hurst, Pamela R; Kruger, Rozanne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JHyd..324..383W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forecasting <span class="hlt">daily</span> streamflow using hybrid ANN models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, the classic 'divide and conquer (DAC)' paradigm is applied as a top-down black-box technique for the forecasting of <span class="hlt">daily</span> streamflows from the streamflow records alone, i.e. without employing exogenous variables of the runoff generating process such as rainfall. To this end, three forms of hybrid artificial neural networks (ANNs) are used as univariate time series models, namely, the threshold-based ANN (TANN), the cluster-based ANN (CANN), and the periodic ANN (PANN). For the purpose of comparison of forecasting efficiency, the normal multi-layer perceptron form of ANN (MLP-ANN) is selected as the baseline ANN model. Having first applied the MLP-ANN models without any data-grouping procedure, the influence of various data preprocessing procedures on the MLP-ANN model forecasting performance is then investigated. The preprocessing procedures considered are: standardization, log-transformation, rescaling, deseasonalization, and combinations of these. In the context of the single streamflow series considered, deseasonalization without rescaling was found to be the most effective preprocessing procedure. Some discussions are presented (i) on data preprocessing and (ii) on selection of the best ANN model. Overall, among the three variations of hybrid ANNs tested, the PANN model performed best. Compared with the MLP-ANN fitted to the deseasonalized data, the PANN based on the soft seasonal partitioning performed better for short lead times (?3 days), but the advantage vanishes for longer lead times.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Wen; Gelder, Van Pieter H. A. J. M.; Vrijling, J. K.; Ma, Jun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1002.0076v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chaos and scaling in <span class="hlt">daily</span> river flow</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Adequate knowledge of the nature of river flow process is crucial for proper planning and management of our water resources and environment. This study attempts to detect the salient characteristics of flow dynamics of the Karoon River in Iran. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> discharge series observed over a period of six years (1999-2004) is analyzed to examine the chaotic and scaling characteristics of the flow dynamics. The presence of chaos is investigated through the correlation dimension and Lyapunov exponent methods, while the Hurst exponent and R\\'enyi dimension analyses are performed to explore the scaling characteristics. The low correlation dimension ($2.60 \\pm 0.07$) and the positive largest Lyapunov exponent ($0.014 \\pm 0.001$) suggest the presence of low-dimensional chaos; they also imply that the flow dynamics are dominantly governed by three variables and can be reliably predicted up to 48 days (i.e. prediction horizon). Results from the Hurst exponent and R\\'enyi dimension analyses reveal the multifractal character of the flow dynamics, with persistent and anti-persistent behaviors observed at different time scales.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. De Domenico; M. Ali Ghorbani</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2234191"> <span id="translatedtitle">Molecular insights into human <span class="hlt">daily</span> behavior</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Human beings exhibit wide variation in their timing of <span class="hlt">daily</span> behavior. We and others have suggested previously that such differences might arise because of alterations in the period length of the endogenous human circadian oscillator. Using dermal fibroblast cells from skin biopsies of 28 subjects of early and late chronotype (11 “larks” and 17 “owls”), we have studied the circadian period lengths of these two groups, as well as their ability to phase-shift and entrain to environmental and chemical signals. We find not only period length differences between the two classes, but also significant changes in the amplitude and phase-shifting properties of the circadian oscillator among individuals with identical “normal” period lengths. Mathematical modeling shows that these alterations could also account for the extreme behavioral phenotypes of these subjects. We conclude that human chronotype may be influenced not only by the period length of the circadian oscillator, but also by cellular components that affect its amplitude and phase. In many instances, these changes can be studied at the molecular level in primary dermal cells. PMID:18227513</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brown, Steven A.; Kunz, Dieter; Dumas, Amelie; Westermark, Pal O.; Vanselow, Katja; Tilmann-Wahnschaffe, Amely; Herzel, Hanspeter; Kramer, Achim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22102156"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache in children and adolescents.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache (CDH) may be primary or secondary. Secondary causes can be suspected through "red flags" in the history and examination. With a prevalence of at least 1% and several associations, primary CDH is a common, often complex, chronic pain syndrome in children and adolescents. The intricate associations between stressors, psychiatric disorders (especially anxiety and depression), and CDH can be explained by "the limbically augmented pain syndrome" proposed by Rome and Rome. Disorders of sleep and other pain syndromes also may co-occur. For these reasons, a multiaxial classification is ideal. Many with primary CDH have features of both chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache, contributing to confusion in subtyping. Primary CDH is often transformed from a primary episodic headache type, stressors being most responsible. Genetic factors also may facilitate chronification. Management should be biopsychosocial, family-centered, and often multidisciplinary, drugs being only one component. Treatment is still based on consensus, not evidence. Girls, migraineurs, and those with psychiatric comorbidity, medication overuse, and CDH onset before the age of 13 years and lasting for 2 years or longer, are at high risk for persistence; hence, such patients should be followed up into adult life. A classification for CDH should be included in the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. PMID:22102156</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Seshia, Shashi S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/923436"> <span id="translatedtitle">TRENDS IN ESTIMATED MIXING DEPTH <span class="hlt">DAILY</span> MAXIMUMS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mixing depth is an important quantity in the determination of air pollution concentrations. Fireweather forecasts depend strongly on estimates of the mixing depth as a means of determining the altitude and dilution (ventilation rates) of smoke plumes. The Savannah River United States Forest Service (USFS) routinely conducts prescribed fires at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a heavily wooded Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwest South Carolina. For many years, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided forecasts of weather conditions in support of the fire program, including an estimated mixing depth using potential temperature and turbulence change with height at a given location. This paper examines trends in the average estimated mixing depth <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum at the SRS over an extended period of time (4.75 years) derived from numerical atmospheric simulations using two versions of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This allows for differences to be seen between the model versions, as well as trends on a multi-year time frame. In addition, comparisons of predicted mixing depth for individual days in which special balloon soundings were released are also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Buckley, R; Amy DuPont, A; Robert Kurzeja, R; Matt Parker, M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-11-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4121248"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Converting Tacrolimus Formulation from Twice-<span class="hlt">Daily</span> to Once-<span class="hlt">Daily</span> in Liver Transplantation Recipients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Typically, tacrolimus is administrated twice <span class="hlt">daily</span>. Prolonged-release tacrolimus is the once-<span class="hlt">daily</span> formulation and may be more convenient for patients. Experience with the administration of the once-<span class="hlt">daily</span> formulation is still limited. This study enrolled 210 liver transplant recipients who had stable liver function and converted tacrolimus from a twice-<span class="hlt">daily</span> to once-<span class="hlt">daily</span> formulation on a 1?mg to 1?mg basis. Among 210 patients, seven patients (3.3%) were withdrawn from the once-<span class="hlt">daily</span> formulation due to allergy and fatigue. For the other patients, the trough concentration after converting to the once-<span class="hlt">daily</span> formulation was lower than that of the twice-<span class="hlt">daily</span> formulation. Liver enzymes were mildly elevated in 3 months after formulation conversion and serum creatinine and uric acid were mildly decreased. Seven patients (3.4%) had clinical suspicion of acute rejection after the formulation conversion and three of them were caused by nonadherence. 155 patients (76.4%) experienced a more convenient life with an increase of social activity. Forty-seven patients (23.2%) experienced the convenience of once-<span class="hlt">daily</span> formulation during overseas trips. In conclusion, tacrolimus can be safely converted from the twice-<span class="hlt">daily</span> to the once-<span class="hlt">daily</span> formulation for most stable liver recipients. Acute rejection may occur in a minority of patients during formulation conversion and should be carefully monitored. PMID:25121091</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thorat, Ashok; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Lee, Chen-Fang; Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Wu, Ting-Jung; Lee, Wei-Chen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.3397B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming And Meltwater</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to find new approaches and new ideas for my students to appreciate the importance of science in their <span class="hlt">daily</span> life, I proposed a theme for them to debate. They had to search for <span class="hlt">global</span> warming information and illustrations in the media, and discuss the articles they found in the classroom. This task inspired them to search for new information about this important and timely theme in science. I informed my students that all the best information about <span class="hlt">global</span> warming and meltwater they found would be used in a poster that would help us to update the knowledge base of the Physics laboratory. I guided them to choose the most eloquent images and significant information. Searching and working to create this poster, the students arrived to better appreciate the importance of science in their <span class="hlt">daily</span> life and to critically evaluate scientific information transmitted via the media. In the poster we created, one can find images, photos and diagrams and some interesting information: <span class="hlt">Global</span> warming refers to the rising average temperature of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans and its projected evolution. In the last 100 years, the Earth's average surface temperature increased by about 0.8 °C with about two thirds of the increase occurring over just the last three decades. Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and scientists are more than 90% certain most of it is caused by increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases produced by human activities such as deforestation and burning fossil fuel. They indicate that during the 21st century the <span class="hlt">global</span> surface temperature is likely to rise a further 1.1 to 2.9 °C for the lowest emissions scenario and 2.4 to 6.4 °C for the highest predictions. An increase in <span class="hlt">global</span> temperature will cause sea levels to rise and will change the amount and pattern of precipitation, and potentially result in expansion of subtropical deserts. Warming is expected to be strongest in the Arctic and would be associated with continuing decrease of glaciers, permafrost and sea ice. Other likely effects of the warming include more frequent occurrences of extreme weather events including heat waves, droughts and heavy rainfall events, species extinctions due to shifting temperature regimes, and changes in agricultural yields. Meltwater is the water released by the melting of snow or ice, including glacial ice and ice shelves in the oceans. Meltwater is often found in the ablation zone of glaciers, where the rate of snow cover is reduced. In a report published in June 2007, the United Nations Environment Program estimated that <span class="hlt">global</span> warming could lead to 40% of the world's population being affected by the loss of glaciers, snow and the associated meltwater in Asia. This is one of many activities of the physics laboratory that the students of our high school are involved in.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bratu, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Ge%26Ae..54..248B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal changes in <span class="hlt">daily</span> variations of ELF-VLF atmospherics detected at auroral latitudes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> variations in the intensities of atmospherics at 600 Hz and 6 kHz detected at the Lovozero observatory from June to December 2012 were studied. Under quiet geomagnetic conditions, <span class="hlt">daily</span> variations of atmospherics are shown to be determined by both the waveguide parameters of the Earth's ionosphere and the activity of storm centers. In summer, a broad daytime maximum of atmospherics flow N hr (the number of atmospherics per hour) is detected most likely due to the lightning activity in mid-latitude regions that are nearer to the observatory than the <span class="hlt">global</span> storm centers. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> variations in atmospherics mean amplitudes per hour A hr differ appreciably from the <span class="hlt">daily</span> variations N hr, reflecting largely the changes in lighting conditions along signal propagation paths. The distribution function of the levels of atmospherics can be approximated by the following formula taken from publications: P( X) = [1 + ( X/ X 50) k ]-1, where k is a parameter that changes from 2.2 to 3.2 at f = 600 Hz and from 1.5 to 2 at f = 6 kHz under quiet geomagnetic conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beloglazov, M. I.; Kirillov, V. I.; Pchelkin, V. V.; Galakhov, A. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=internet+AND+things&pg=7&id=EJ834679"> <span id="translatedtitle">Panwapa: <span class="hlt">Global</span> Kids, <span class="hlt">Global</span> Connections</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Panwapa, created by the Sesame Street Workshop of PBS, is an example of an initiative on the Internet designed to enhance students' learning by exposing them to <span class="hlt">global</span> communities. Panwapa means "Here on Earth" in Tshiluba, a Bantu language spoken in the Democratic Republic of Congo. At the Panwapa website, www.panwapa.org, children aged four to…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berson, Ilene R.; Berson, Michael J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.geos.ed.ac.uk/homes/stett2/global_energy_and_global_precipitation.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> energy and <span class="hlt">global</span> precipitation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">through solar radiation management · Aim of Geo-engineering is to balance forcing from Greenhouse gases in <span class="hlt">global</span> mean precipitation of 4%-14%. (if your range is different compute the impact). Geo-engineeringxpre-industrial (1120 ppm) but use geo-engineering (-8 W/m2) to keep the temperature change to zero</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005MmSAI..76.1015N"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> warming: solar variability and energy consumption</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent measurements support evidence for short-term <span class="hlt">global</span> warming of the earth's surface. The average trend of the earth's surface anomaly as a function of the time was fitted by a simple thermodynamical model including short-term variation of the solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> as well as anthropogenic forcing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nigro, A.; Pagano, A.; Zuccarello, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://www.globalintegrity.org/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Integrity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Many of the worldâÂÂs national governments have been plagued by charges of corruption and pervasive malfeasance over the past few decades. As a result, a number of international organizations have been created to provide information on corruption and governance trends for the policy community and the general public. With funding from the World Bank, the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Integrity organization produces the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Integrity Report, which features a number of âÂÂintegrity indicatorsâÂÂ, which analyze openness, governance, and anti-corruption mechanisms for a wide range of countries. Visitors to their site can read the Report in its entirety here, and also browse through a number of media resources designed for journalists. Additionally, visitors can also learn more about the organizationâÂÂs staff members and their various methodologies for compiling reports.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10530699"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> cost of newer glaucoma agents.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this study was to evaluate the drop characteristics of newer glaucoma medicines compared to timolol solution and timolol gel forming solution (Timoptic-XE, Merck). We evaluated latanoprost 0.005% (2.5 ml bottle), brimonidine 0.2%, apraclonidine 0.5%, dorzolamide 2%, timolol solution 0.5% (5 and 10 ml bottles), and timolol gel forming solution 0.5% (5 ml bottle) in 14 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Each patient placed 10 drops onto an analytical scale (one drop every 10 seconds) for all ten preparations. Patients then attempted to instill 10 drops of a tear replacement solution into their ocular cul-de-sac. Medication bottles were weighed before and after patients dispensed from the bottle and then after the bottle was emptied. Weights were converted to volume using the density of the medicine. A statistical difference existed between groups for mean drop volume with latanoprost having the smallest drop volume (.0273 +/- .004 ml) (P<0.005). All manufacturers filled correctly or overfilled their bottles with product and had <10% of medicine wasted. Patients instilled 77.9% of the tear solution correctly. When dosed according to labeling, latanoprost had the lowest cost of therapy at $0.87 <span class="hlt">daily</span> compared to the other newly released medications (range $1.05 to $1.40). Latanoprost was more expensive, however, than timolol maleate solution or gel (range $0.45 to $0.54 per day). Latanoprost therapy is less expensive per day than dorzolamide, brimonidine or apraclonidine, but more expensive than timolol maleate. Cost per day could be further reduced by limiting medicine wastage upon instillation, however. PMID:10530699</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stewart, W C; Hudgins, A C; Pruitt, C A; Sine, C</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Dr.+AND+King&pg=4&id=EJ889844"> <span id="translatedtitle">Going <span class="hlt">Global</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a move to increase its out-of-state and international student enrollment, officials at the University of Iowa are stepping up their <span class="hlt">global</span> recruitment efforts--even in the face of criticism that the school may be losing sight of its mission. The goal is to increase enrollment across the board, with both in-state as well as out-of-state and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boulard, Garry</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/90726"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Predictions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">created every day by the lab and used by the forest service, county commissioners and others. Using computer technology and satellites, the lab currently focuses on three core spatial technologies? GIS, <span class="hlt">global</span> positioning systems (GPS) and remote... Predictions --------------------------------------------- LEFT: Graduate students in the Department of Forest Science use GPS technology in their studies. RIGHT: Jennifer Jacobs, senior research associate, Kim Hart, research assistant, and Zach Vernon...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swyden, Courtney</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a002400/a002484/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Snow Cover from MODIS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provides data in 36 spectral bands, some of which are used in an algorithm to map <span class="hlt">global</span> snow cover. The animation shows the dynamic behavior of the advance and retreat of continental snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere for the winter of 2001-02 from MODIS-derived 8-day composite snow maps with a spatial resolution of about 5 km. A time series of MODIS snow-cover maps of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California, derived from MODIS-derived <span class="hlt">daily</span> snow maps with 500-m resolution, is also shown for the winter and spring of 2001.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Starr, Cindy; Hall, Dorothy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ciese.org/curriculum/tempproj/"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Global</span> Sun Temperature Project</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This website created by Stevens Institute of Technology and the Center for Innovation in Engineering and Science Education (CIESE) allows students from around the world to work together to determine how average <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperatures and hours of sunlight change with distance from the equator. Upper elementary, middle, and high school students can participate in the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Sun Temperature Project from March 18 to June 3, 2005. Educators can find project information, lesson plans, and implementation assistance. Participants can submit their project data, pictures, and final reports. If interested parties miss the May 6th registration deadline, check out the website to discover future runs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/stellent/groups/corporatesite/@sf_international_progs/documents/web_document/wtdv026085.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Health Research | 2 <span class="hlt">Global</span> Health Research</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Health Research | 2 <span class="hlt">Global</span> Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle Health Research #12;<span class="hlt">Global</span> Health Research | 4 We are a <span class="hlt">global</span> charitable foundation dedicated water. Mark Jones #12;5 | <span class="hlt">Global</span> Health Research We support researchers in low- and middle- income</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rambaut, Andrew</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19007910"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced radiation damage in <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> and non-<span class="hlt">irradiated</span> bystander regions by co-exposure to myosmine.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is important to evaluate the health effects of radiation concurrent exposure to chemicals in our <span class="hlt">daily</span> life. Myosmine, an alkaloid in tobacco plants and various edibles and staple foods, has been considered as a co-genotoxic agent in vitro. In the present study, the damage induced by radiation concurrent exposure to myosmine was assessed in human primary cell line AG1522. Myosmine at 5 or 10 mM for 3 h treatment induced a significantly dose-dependent increase in micronucleus (MN) frequencies, but not for 1 mM. However, 1 mM myosmine distinctly enhanced MN frequencies in both <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> and non-<span class="hlt">irradiated</span> bystander regions after different doses (0.2, 1 and 10 cGy) of alpha-particle <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>. Treatment with c-PTIO, a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the induced fractions of MN frequencies were dramatically inhibited both in 1 cGy alpha-particle <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> and non-<span class="hlt">irradiated</span> bystander regions with or without myosmine treatment. Moreover, 1mM myosmine treatment distinctly enhanced gamma-H2AX foci formation in both 1 cGy alpha-particle <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> and non-<span class="hlt">irradiated</span> bystander regions. These data indicated that myosmine effectively enhanced the low dose alpha-particle-induced DNA damage in both <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> and non-<span class="hlt">irradiated</span> bystander regions and nitric oxide played a very important role in such process. PMID:19007910</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jiang, Erkang; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhao, Ye; Zhao, Guoping; Bao, Linzhi; Chen, Shaopeng; Yang, Gen; Wang, Jun; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ITEIS.124.1834K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stochastic Modeling of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Rainfall for Pricing Weather Derivatives</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Weather derivatives are getting to be powerful tools for weather risk hedging. A popular method which draws out valid prices of weather derivatives is a stochastic modeling approach. In the method, expected payoffs of weather derivatives based on stochastic weather models are regarded as their valid prices. Although useful stochastic models of temperature have been shown, stochastic models of <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall are still being developed. Therefore, it is considered that pricing of <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall derivatives is difficult. This paper shows a new stochastic <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall model for pricing <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall options. The new model in which a modified geometric distribution model is applied can express stochastic features of <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall. Furthermore, this paper also shows that the combination model of the Markov chain rainy day model and the new model can express stochastic features and risks of <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall option payoffs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kubo, Osamu; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/34628599"> <span id="translatedtitle">New <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Persistent Headache in Children and Adolescents</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">New <span class="hlt">daily</span> persistent headache (NDPH) is a form of chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache (CDH) that may have features of both migraine and\\u000a tension-type headache. In contrast with other types of CDH, NDPH is characterized by patients recalling the specific date\\u000a their unremitting <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache began. In comparison, chronic tension-type headache and chronic migraine are preceded by\\u000a a gradually increasing frequency of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eric P. Baron; A. David Rothner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/61773"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Method for Calculating Reference Evapotranspiration on <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Time Scales</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measures of reference evapotranspiration are essential for applications of agricultural management and water resources engineering. Using numerous esoteric variables, one can calculate <span class="hlt">daily</span> reference evapotranspiration ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Farmer, William</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title21-vol8-sec890-5050.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 890.5050 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> activity assist device.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> activity assist device. (a) Identification. A...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title21-vol8-sec890-5050.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 890.5050 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> activity assist device.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href=""></a></p> <p class="result-summary">...DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> activity assist device. (a) Identification. A...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title21-vol8-sec890-5050.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 890.5050 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> activity assist device.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> activity assist device. (a) Identification. A...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title21-vol8-sec890-5050.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 890.5050 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> activity assist device.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> activity assist device. (a) Identification. A...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer/biblio/1130373"> <span id="translatedtitle">GSOD Based <span class="hlt">Daily</span> <span class="hlt">Global</span> Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xuan Shi, Dali Wang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52908600"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Time Step Refinement of Optimized Flood Control Rule Curves for a <span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming Scenario</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pacific Northwest temperatures have warmed by 0.8 °C since 1920 and are predicted to further increase in the 21st century. Simulated streamflow timing shifts associated with climate change have been found in past research to degrade water resources system performance in the Columbia River Basin when using existing system operating policies. To adapt to these hydrologic changes, optimized flood control</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Lee; C. Fitzgerald; A. F. Hamlet; S. J. Burges</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.7827N"> <span id="translatedtitle">A stochastic disaggregation algorithm for analysis of change in the sub-<span class="hlt">daily</span> extreme rainfall</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The statistical characteristics of local extreme rainfall, particularly at shorter durations, are among the key design parameters for urban storm water collection systems. Recent observations have provided sufficient evidence that the ongoing climate change alters form, pattern, intensity and frequency of precipitation across various temporal and spatial scales. Quantifying and predicting the resulted changes in the extremes, however, remains as a challenging problem, especially for local and shorter duration events. Most importantly, climate models are still unable to produce the extreme rainfall events at <span class="hlt">global</span> and regional scales. In addition, current simulations of climate models are at much coarser temporal and spatial resolutions than can be readily used in local design applications. Spatial and temporal downscaling methods, therefore, are necessary to bring the climate model simulations into finer scales. To tackle the temporal downscaling problem, we propose a stochastic algorithm, based on the novel notion of Rainfall Distribution Functions (RDFs), to disaggregate the <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall into hourly estimates. In brief, RDFs describe how the historical <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall totals are distributed into hourly segments. By having a set of RDFs, an empirical probability distribution function can be constructed to describe the proportions of <span class="hlt">daily</span> cumulative rainfall at each hourly time step. These hour-by-hour empirical distribution functions can be used for random generation of hourly rainfall given total <span class="hlt">daily</span> values. We used this algorithm for disaggregating the <span class="hlt">daily</span> spring and summer rainfalls in the city of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada and tested the performance of the disaggregation with respect to reproduction of extremes. In particular, the Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves generated based on both historical and reconstructed extremes are compared. The proposed disaggregation scheme is further plugged into an existing <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall generator to provide a fully stochastic spatiotemporal framework for downscaling <span class="hlt">Global</span> Climate Models' (GCMs) outputs. Using future simulations of HadCM3 and CGCM, provided through CMIP5 portal, we realized large ensembles of hourly rainfall for the city of Saskatoon throughout the whole 21st century. The chance of alteration in the extreme rainfall intensities at different durations and return periods are then investigated and discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nazemi, Ali; Elshorbagy, Amin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61398406"> <span id="translatedtitle">Phototherapy <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> chamber</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A phototherapy <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> chamber having substantial uniformity of <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> therewithin comprises an array of vertical fluorescent lamps surrounding the <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> space. Reflectors are located within the array at the top and bottom thereof. The ends of the lamps extend beyond the reflectors. 8 claims.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2140085"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Dosing of Rifapentine Cures Tuberculosis in Three Months or Less in the Murine Model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Availability of an ultra-short-course drug regimen capable of curing patients with tuberculosis in 2 to 3 mo would significantly improve <span class="hlt">global</span> control efforts. Because immediate prospects for novel treatment-shortening drugs remain uncertain, we examined whether better use of existing drugs could shorten the duration of treatment. Rifapentine is a long-lived rifamycin derivative currently recommended only in once-weekly continuation-phase regimens. Moxifloxacin is an 8-methoxyfluoroquinolone currently used in second-line regimens. Methods and Findings Using a well-established mouse model with a high bacterial burden and human-equivalent drug dosing, we compared the efficacy of rifapentine- and moxifloxacin-containing regimens with that of the standard <span class="hlt">daily</span> short-course regimen based on rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide. Bactericidal activity was assessed by lung colony-forming unit counts, and sterilizing activity was assessed by the proportion of mice with culture-positive relapse after 2, 3, 4, and 6 mo of treatment. Here, we demonstrate that replacing rifampin with rifapentine and isoniazid with moxifloxacin dramatically increased the activity of the standard <span class="hlt">daily</span> regimen. After just 2 mo of treatment, mice receiving rifapentine- and moxifloxacin-containing regimens were found to have negative lung cultures, while those given the standard regimen still harbored 3.17 log10 colony-forming units in the lungs (p < 0.01). No relapse was observed after just 3 mo of treatment with <span class="hlt">daily</span> and thrice-weekly administered rifapentine- and moxifloxacin-containing regimens, whereas the standard <span class="hlt">daily</span> regimen required 6 mo to prevent relapse in all mice. Conclusions Rifapentine should no longer be viewed solely as a rifamycin for once-weekly administration. Our results suggest that treatment regimens based on <span class="hlt">daily</span> and thrice-weekly administration of rifapentine and moxifloxacin may permit shortening the current 6 mo duration of treatment to 3 mo or less. Such regimens warrant urgent clinical investigation. PMID:18092886</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosenthal, Ian M; Zhang, Ming; Williams, Kathy N; Peloquin, Charles A; Tyagi, Sandeep; Vernon, Andrew A; Bishai, William R; Chaisson, Richard E; Grosset, Jacques H; Nuermberger, Eric L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010018486&hterms=p1&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dp1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extending the Precipitation Map Offshore Using <span class="hlt">Daily</span> and 3-Hourly Combined Precipitation Estimates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One of the difficulties in studying landfalling extratropical cyclones along the Pacific Coast is the lack of antecedent data over the ocean, including precipitation. Recent research on combining various satellite-based precipitation estimates opens the possibility of realistic precipitation estimates on a <span class="hlt">global</span> 1 deg. x 1 deg. latitude-longitude grid at the <span class="hlt">daily</span> or even 3-hourly interval. The goal in this work is to provide quantitative precipitation estimates that correctly represent the precipitation- related variables in the hydrological cycle: surface accumulations (fresh-water flux into oceans), frequency and duration statistics, net latent heating, etc.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Bolvin, David T.; Curtis, Scott; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4208812"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Effect of Personality on <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life Emotional Processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Personality features are associated with individual differences in <span class="hlt">daily</span> emotional life, such as negative and positive affectivity, affect variability and affect reactivity. The existing literature is somewhat mixed and inconclusive about the nature of these associations. The aim of this study was to shed light on what personality features represent in <span class="hlt">daily</span> life by investigating the effect of the Five Factor traits on different <span class="hlt">daily</span> emotional processes using an ecologically valid method. The Experience Sampling Method was used to collect repeated reports of <span class="hlt">daily</span> affect and experiences from 104 healthy university students during one week of their normal lives. Personality traits of the Five Factor model were assessed using NEO Five Factor Inventory. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze the effect of the personality traits on <span class="hlt">daily</span> emotional processes. Neuroticism predicted higher negative and lower positive affect, higher affect variability, more negative subjective evaluations of <span class="hlt">daily</span> incidents, and higher reactivity to stressors. Conscientiousness, by contrast, predicted lower average level, variability, and reactivity of negative affect. Agreeableness was associated with higher positive and lower negative affect, lower variability of sadness, and more positive subjective evaluations of <span class="hlt">daily</span> incidents. Extraversion predicted higher positive affect and more positive subjective evaluations of <span class="hlt">daily</span> activities. Openness had no effect on average level of affect, but predicted higher reactivity to <span class="hlt">daily</span> stressors. The results show that the personality features independently predict different aspects of <span class="hlt">daily</span> emotional processes. Neuroticism was associated with all of the processes. Identifying these processes can help us to better understand individual differences in <span class="hlt">daily</span> emotional life. PMID:25343494</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Komulainen, Emma; Meskanen, Katarina; Lipsanen, Jari; Lahti, Jari Marko; Jylha, Pekka; Melartin, Tarja; Wichers, Marieke; Isometsa, Erkki; Ekelund, Jesper</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18948012"> <span id="translatedtitle">Excessive <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> and antioxidant responses of an Antarctic marine diatom exposed to iron limitation and to dynamic <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The synergistic effects of iron limitation and <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> dynamics on growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant activity and excessive PAR (400-700 nm) and UV (280-400 nm) sensitivity were investigated for the Antarctic marine diatom Chaetoceros brevis. Iron-limited and iron-replete cultures were exposed to identical <span class="hlt">daily</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> levels, supplied as dynamic (20-1350 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) and constant (260 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. After acclimation, growth, maximal quantum yield of PSII (F(v)/F(m)), pigment composition, and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) were determined. Then, excessive <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> sensitivity was assessed by monitoring pigment composition, F(v)/F(m) and viability loss during a single excessive PAR and UV treatment. Iron limitation reduced growth rates, F(v)/F(m) dynamics, and cellular pigments pools. Cellular pigment concentrations were higher under dynamic <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> than under constant <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> but this difference was less pronounced under iron limitation compared to iron-replete conditions. SOD and APX activities increased during dynamic <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> under iron limitation, suggesting increased radical formation around PSII. Despite these physiological differences, no effects on growth were observed between constant and dynamic <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> cultivation in iron-limited and iron-replete cells. The applied culturing conditions did not affect glutathione reductase activity in C. brevis. F(v)/F(m) and xanthophyll de-epoxidation dynamics during excessive <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> were not different for iron-limited and replete cells and viability loss was not found during excessive <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. This study revealed photoacclimation differences between iron-limited and iron-replete C. brevis cultures that did not affect growth rates and excessive <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> sensitivity after acclimation to constant and dynamic <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. PMID:18948012</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">van de Poll, Willem H; Janknegt, P J; van Leeuwe, M A; Visser, R J W; Buma, A G J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22056202"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interfractional Target Variations for Partial Breast <span class="hlt">Irradiation</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: In this work, we quantify the interfractional variations in the shape of the clinical target volume (CTV) by analyzing the <span class="hlt">daily</span> CT data acquired during CT-guided partial breast <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> (PBI) and compare the effectiveness of various repositioning alignment strategies considered to account for the variations. Methods and Materials: The <span class="hlt">daily</span> CT data for 13 breast cancer patients treated with PBI in either prone (10 patients) or supine (3 patients) with <span class="hlt">daily</span> kV CT guidance using CT on Rails (CTVision, Siemens, Malvern, PA) were analyzed. For approximately 25 points on the surface of the CTV, deformation vectors were calculated by means of deformable image registration and verified by visual inspection. These were used to calculate the distances along surface normals (DSN), which directly related to the required margin expansions for each point. The DSN values were determined for seven alignment methods based on volumetric imaging and also two-dimensional projections (portal imaging). Results: The margin expansion necessary to cover 99% of all points for all days was 2.7 mm when utilizing the alignment method based on deformation field data (the best alignment method). The center-of-mass based alignment yielded slightly worse results (a margin of 4.0 mm), and shifts obtained by operator placement (7.9 mm), two-dimensional-based methods (7.0-10.1 mm), and skin marks (13.9 mm) required even larger margin expansions. Target shrinkage was evident for most days by the negative values of DSN. Even with the best alignment, the range of DSN values could be as high as 7 mm, resulting in a large amount of normal tissue <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>, unless adaptive replanning is employed. Conclusion: The appropriate alignment method is important to minimize the margin requirement to cover the significant interfractional target deformations observed during PBI. The amount of normal tissue unnecessarily <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> is still not insignificant, and can be minimized if adaptive radiotherapy is applied.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ahunbay, Ergun E., E-mail: eahunbay@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Robbins, Jared; Christian, Robert; Godley, Andrew; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/37476545"> <span id="translatedtitle">Capital market efficiency and the predictability of <span class="hlt">daily</span> returns</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Studies of the weak form of the capital market efficiency theorem infer that there are no predictable properties of the time series of prices of traded securities on organized markets. We examine the weak form of the efficient markets hypothesis with respect to <span class="hlt">daily</span> closing prices to indicate evidence that <span class="hlt">daily</span> closing prices have predictable properties. Furthermore, this study of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jeffrey E. Jarrett; Eric Kyper</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.canadianfieldnaturalist.ca/index.php/cfn/article/view/675"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long <span class="hlt">daily</span> movements of wolves (Canis lupus) during pup raising</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wolves, Canis lupus, on Ellesmere Island traveled a <span class="hlt">daily</span> round-trip distance of 40.2 km from their den to a landfill during July 2008, plus an undetermined distance hunting after leaving the landfill. Although long travels by Wolves are well known, this appears to be the first documentation of long <span class="hlt">daily</span> movements by Wolves rearing pups.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mech, L. David; Cluff, H. Dean</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cioss.coas.oregonstate.edu/CIOSS/Documents/Reynolds%20sst-trip-report.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> OI SST Trip Report Richard W. Reynolds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> OI SST Trip Report Richard W. Reynolds National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) Asheville, NC) (henceforth OI.v2) uses optimum interpolation (OI) and is analyzed weekly on a 1o spatial grid. This analysis the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Chelton and Wentz (2005) compared the OI.v2 with a <span class="hlt">daily</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kurapov, Alexander</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://researchspace.csir.co.za/dspace/bitstream/10204/1321/1/Krygsman_2007.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Capturing <span class="hlt">daily</span> urban rhythms: The use of location aware technologies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> activities and travel often follow a natural rhythm or flow that is structured by the fixed spatial and temporal constraints. The work and home location act as pegs that define individual's activity space and it is within these spaces that activities and travel behaviour are believed to be habitual and recurring. Aggregating such individual behaviour leads to so-called <span class="hlt">daily</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stephan Krygsman; Tom de Jong; Peter Schmitz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57471268"> <span id="translatedtitle">Executive Function, Intellectual Decline and <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Living Skills</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Understanding the cognitive changes associated with compromised <span class="hlt">daily</span> living skills in elderly individuals is important for making appropriate recommendations about the capacity for independent functioning. To this end, we retrospectively examined data from 92 elderly individuals presenting with cognitive decline who were administered measures of executive functioning, general intelligence, and <span class="hlt">daily</span> living skills. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert P. Hart; Melanie K. Bean</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=compile+AND+professional+AND+portfolio&id=EJ642896"> <span id="translatedtitle">News Values and Country Non-<span class="hlt">Daily</span> Reporting.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Suggests Australia's country, non-<span class="hlt">daily</span> newspapers present journalism graduates with excellent opportunities to experience a wide range of journalistic responsibilities and compile an impressive portfolio. Argues the need for the news values of these newspapers to be integrated into pedagogical models. Documents the country non-<span class="hlt">daily</span>'s news…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vines, Josie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59184118"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relating the teaching of mathematics to pupils' <span class="hlt">daily</span> life experiences</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In developing countries like Pakistan, learning mathematics in schools is considered to be different from using it in <span class="hlt">daily</span> life situations primarily because, approaches to teaching and learning mathematics sometimes do not encourage pupils to see connections between the two. Therefore, pupils often find it difficult to solve their <span class="hlt">daily</span> life mathematical problems inspite of studying mathematics for several years</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abdul Jahan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24800802"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experiential avoidance and well-being: A <span class="hlt">daily</span> diary analysis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Experiential avoidance (EA) is a regulatory strategy characterised by efforts to control or avoid unpleasant thoughts, feelings and bodily sensations. Most studies of EA have used trait measures without considering the effects of EA on psychological functioning in naturalistic settings. To address this gap, we used <span class="hlt">daily</span> diary methodology to examine the influence of EA of anxiety on everyday well-being. For two weeks, 89 participants provided <span class="hlt">daily</span> reports of EA, positive and negative affect, enjoyment of <span class="hlt">daily</span> events and meaning in life (MIL). <span class="hlt">Daily</span> EA predicted higher negative affect, lower positive affect, less enjoyment of <span class="hlt">daily</span> events (exercising, eating food and listening to music) and less MIL. The effect of EA on positive affect was not accounted for by the amount of negative affect experienced. Our <span class="hlt">daily</span> measure of EA was a stronger predictor of <span class="hlt">daily</span> well-being than a traditional trait measure (The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire). Taken together, results offer insights into the adverse effects of EA on <span class="hlt">daily</span> well-being and suggest that EA is a context-specific regulatory strategy that might be best captured using a state-dependent measure. PMID:24800802</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Machell, Kyla A; Goodman, Fallon R; Kashdan, Todd B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30698572"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> concentrations of air pollution and plasma fibrinogen in London</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">OBJECTIVESThe reason for the association between air pollution and risk of cardiovascular diseases is unknown. The hypothesis was examined that <span class="hlt">daily</span> concentrations of air pollution are associated with <span class="hlt">daily</span> concentrations of fibrinogen, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.METHODSData on concentrations of plasma fibrinogen for 4982 male and 2223 female office workers, collected in a cross sectional survey in London between</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J Pekkanen; E J Brunner; H R Anderson; P Tiittanen; R W Atkinson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Roosevelt+AND+Franklin+AND+D&pg=5&id=ED276992"> <span id="translatedtitle">"<span class="hlt">Daily</span> News" High School Reading Program. Final Evaluation Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To help raise the reading scores and attitudes of selected "at-risk" students from Thomas Jefferson, Springfield Gardens, and Franklin D. Roosevelt High Schools in New York City, a pilot study <span class="hlt">daily</span> provided students with individual copies of the "New York <span class="hlt">Daily</span> News" and integrated the use of the paper into regular instruction. Teachers were…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40720196"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forecasting ozone <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum levels at Santiago, Chile</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In major urban areas, air pollution impact on health is serious enough to include it in the group of meteorological variables that are forecast <span class="hlt">daily</span>. This work focusses on the comparison of different forecasting systems for <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum ozone levels at Santiago, Chile. The modelling tools used for these systems were linear time series, artificial neural networks and fuzzy models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Héctor Jorquera; Ricardo Pérez; Aldo Cipriano; Andrés Espejo; M. Victoria Letelier; Gonzalo Acuña</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.therapyforu.co.uk/documents/Child_Development.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Continuity, Stability, and Change in <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Emotional Experience across Adolescence</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This longitudinal study examined change in adolescents' <span class="hlt">daily</span> range of emotional states between early and late adolescence. A sample of 220 youth provided reports on their <span class="hlt">daily</span> emotions at random times during two 1-week periods. At Time 1 they were in the fifth through eighth grades; 4 years later, at Time 2, they were in the ninth through twelfth grades.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reed W. Larson; Giovanni Moneta; Maryse H. Richards; Suzanne Wilson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/149056"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Modeling System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">.............................................................. 152 7.18 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Naturalized Flow at Control Point Hemp .............................................................. 153 7.19 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Regulated Flow at Control Point Hemp ................................................................ 153 7... .......................... 185 7.39 Monthly Aggregated Instream Flow Targets for Control Point Bryan .......................... 185 7.40 Monthly Aggregated Instream Flow Targets for Control Point Hemp .......................... 185 8.1 PF Record Variables and Descriptions...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wurbs, R.; Hoffpauir, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=consumer+AND+homogeneous&id=ED228680"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rich News: Metropolitan <span class="hlt">Dailies</span> and the Urban Poor.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The migration of people from cities to suburbs, new patterns of advertising, a less homogeneous and unified readership, and increasing competition from other media have produced tremendous pressures on <span class="hlt">daily</span> newspapers. In responding to these pressures, metropolitan <span class="hlt">dailies</span> are turning from "hard" to "soft" news, away from their poorer urban…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Draper, Mary Jo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=assistance+AND+English+AND+teaching&pg=3&id=EJ752764"> <span id="translatedtitle">When Opportunity Knocks: Integrating Language Arts and the <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Calendar</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With <span class="hlt">daily</span> classroom schedules jammed with many concepts and skills to cover, integrating subjects whenever possible offers some relief. Primary classrooms can use their <span class="hlt">daily</span> calendar time to integrate language arts and math. This teaching approach includes the use of word walls, interactive writing, journaling, and other effective teaching…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biddle, Melissa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title26-vol16/pdf/CFR-2012-title26-vol16-sec44-4403-1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">26 CFR 44.4403-1 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> record.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...as will clearly show as to each day's...other wagering medium. For example, in the case of wagers...<span class="hlt">daily</span> record shall show separately the gross...race. Similarly, in the case of the numbers game, the <span class="hlt">daily</span> record shall show the gross...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title26-vol16/pdf/CFR-2010-title26-vol16-sec44-4403-1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">26 CFR 44.4403-1 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> record.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...as will clearly show as to each day's...other wagering medium. For example, in the case of wagers...<span class="hlt">daily</span> record shall show separately the gross...race. Similarly, in the case of the numbers game, the <span class="hlt">daily</span> record shall show the gross...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title26-vol16/pdf/CFR-2011-title26-vol16-sec44-4403-1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">26 CFR 44.4403-1 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> record.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...as will clearly show as to each day's...other wagering medium. For example, in the case of wagers...<span class="hlt">daily</span> record shall show separately the gross...race. Similarly, in the case of the numbers game, the <span class="hlt">daily</span> record shall show the gross...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title26-vol16/pdf/CFR-2013-title26-vol16-sec44-4403-1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">26 CFR 44.4403-1 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> record.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...as will clearly show as to each day's...other wagering medium. For example, in the case of wagers...<span class="hlt">daily</span> record shall show separately the gross...race. Similarly, in the case of the numbers game, the <span class="hlt">daily</span> record shall show the gross...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/38567102"> <span id="translatedtitle">Prednisone as Initial Treatment of Analgesic-Induced <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Headache</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The majority of the patients who seek medical care in tertiary headache centres present with transformed migraine, and convert to <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache, as a result of excessive intake of symptomatic medications (SM). This study aimed to analyse the possibility of using a short course of oral prednisone for detoxifying patients with chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache due to medication overuse in an</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A V Krymchantowski; J S Barbosa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.unh.edu/erg/sites/www.unh.edu.erg/files/media/pdf/2003,%204.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Predicting <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Predicting <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Net Radiation Using Minimum Climatological Data1 S. Irmak, M.ASCE2 ; A. Irmak3 ; J for predicting <span class="hlt">daily</span> Rn have been widely used. However, when the paucity of detailed climatological data with National Weather Service climatological datasets that only record Tmax and Tmin on a regular basis. DOI: 10</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23000443"> <span id="translatedtitle">Low-dose gamma <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> of food protein increases its allergenicity in a chronic oral challenge.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Few chronic food protein models have described the relationship between allergenicity and the molecular structure of food protein after physical processing. The effect of ?-radiation on the structure of food protein was measured by fluorescence, circular dichroism and microcalorimetry. BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally sensitized and then given non-<span class="hlt">irradiated</span> and <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> Con-A by <span class="hlt">daily</span> gavage for 28days. The tendency to form insoluble amorphous aggregates and partially unfolded species was observed after <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>. The administration of non-<span class="hlt">irradiated</span> and <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> samples at low-dose significantly increased weight loss as well as plasma levels of eotaxin in animals repeatedly exposed to Con-A. Significant lymphocytic infiltrate filling completely the stroma of microvilli and tubular glands was observed in the small intestinal of the group given Con-A <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> at a low dose. This phenotype was not observed in animals treated with Con-A <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> at a high dose. PMID:23000443</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vaz, A F M; Souza, M P; Medeiros, P L; Melo, A M M A; Silva-Lucca, R A; Santana, L A; Oliva, M L V; Perez, K R; Cuccovia, I M; Correia, M T S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://environment.yale.edu/climate-communication/files/Global-Warming-Six-Indias.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">global</span> warming's six indias</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">global</span> warming's six indias: An Audience Segmentation Analysis #12;<span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming's Six Indias 1............................................................................................................................................20 2. <span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming Beliefs and Attitudes................................................................................ 21 Knowledge about <span class="hlt">global</span> warming varies widely by group</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haller, Gary L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMGC23C0925I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using <span class="hlt">Daily</span> GCM Rainfall for Crop Yield Predictions: Advances and Challenges</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> climate models (GCMs) are promising for crop yield predictions not only because of their ability to simulate seasonal climate in advance of the growing season but also of their ability to simulate long-term climate changes. Despite this potential, a lot of challenges exist in using directly raw GCM data to crop models. First, because of the spatial scale mismatch between GCMs and crop models (10^2 km vs. 10^1 m), and second, due to biases and temporal structure mismatches in <span class="hlt">daily</span> GCM rainfall relative to station observations. Crop growth is very sensitive to <span class="hlt">daily</span> variations of rainfall thus any mismatch in <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall statistics could adversely impact simulation of crop yields. In view of this, a lot of efforts have been made to correct biases in <span class="hlt">daily</span> GCM rainfall relative to the climatology of a station or set of stations, and recently on some attempts to correct time structure in climate model rainfall. Here, we will present some advances in tailoring <span class="hlt">daily</span> GCM rainfall for crop yield predictions and discuss some challenges underlying those methods. Specifically, we will present an improved nested GCM bias correction-stochastic disaggregation (BC-DisAg) method for improving the use of <span class="hlt">daily</span> GCM rainfall for crop simulations and show some testing and evaluation results in different regions (Northeastern Kenya, Uruguay, Southern and Northeast Brazil). We also examined several ways of weighting GCM grid cells to better summarize their information contents for the nested approach, including inverse-distance weighting, arithmetic averaging, multiple linear regression and genetic algorithms. Finally, we will show a comparison between the GCM bias correction and Model Output Statistics (MOS)-correction downscaling in one of the selected sites at Katumani, Kenya. Our results showed that there is a significant improvement in the simulation of yields if the GCM bias correction (BC) is nested with stochastic disaggregation than just BC alone because of the improvements made on dry spell lengths simulations due to improved time structure of <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall. The skill of the GCM however is still the final determinant for the overall success of the approach.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ines, A. M.; Hansen, J. W.; Robertson, A. W.; Baethgen, W.; Sun, L.; Indeje, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMED42A..03S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> teaching of <span class="hlt">global</span> seismology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our recent textbook, Introduction to Seismology, Earthquakes, & Earth Structure (Blackwell, 2003) is used in many countries. Part of the reason for this may be our deliberate attempt to write the book for an international audience. This effort appears in several ways. We stress seismology's long tradition of <span class="hlt">global</span> data interchange. Our brief discussions of the science's history illustrate the contributions of scientists around the world. Perhaps most importantly, our discussions of earthquakes, tectonics, and seismic hazards take a <span class="hlt">global</span> view. Many examples are from North America, whereas others are from other areas. Our view is that non-North American students should be exposed to North American examples that are type examples, and that North American students should be similarly exposed to examples elsewhere. For example, we illustrate how the Euler vector geometry changes a plate boundary from spreading, to strike-slip, to convergence using both the Pacific-North America boundary from the Gulf of California to Alaska and the Eurasia-Africa boundary from the Azores to the Mediterranean. We illustrate diffuse plate boundary zones using western North America, the Andes, the Himalayas, the Mediterranean, and the East Africa Rift. The subduction zone discussions examine Japan, Tonga, and Chile. We discuss significant earthquakes both in the U.S. and elsewhere, and explore hazard mitigation issues in different contexts. Both comments from foreign colleagues and our experience lecturing overseas indicate that this approach works well. Beyond the specifics of our text, we believe that such a <span class="hlt">global</span> approach is facilitated by the international traditions of the earth sciences and the world youth culture that gives students worldwide common culture. For example, a video of the scene in New Madrid, Missouri that arose from a nonsensical earthquake prediction in 1990 elicits similar responses from American and European students.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stein, S.; Wysession, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRA..119.2090J"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> ionospheric total electron contents (TECs) during the last two solar minimum periods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">last solar minimum period was anomalously extended and low in EUV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> compared with previous solar minima. It can readily be expected that the thermosphere and the ionosphere must be correspondingly affected by this low solar activity. While there have been unanimous reports on the thermospheric changes, being cooler and lower in its density as expected, the ionospheric responses to low solar activity in previous studies were not consistent with each other, probably due to the limited ionospheric observations used for them. In this study, we utilized the measurements of total electron content (TEC) from TOPEX and JASON-1 satellites during the periods of 1992 to 2010, which includes both the last two solar minimum periods, in order to investigate how the ionosphere responded to the extremely low solar activity during the last solar minimum compared with previous solar minimum. Although the <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean TECs show negligible differences between the two solar minimum periods, the <span class="hlt">global</span> TEC maps reveal that there are significant systematic differences ranging from about -30% to +50% depending on local time, latitude, and season. The systematic variations of the ionospheric responses seem to mainly result from the relative effects of reduced solar EUV production and reduced recombination rate due to thermospheric changes during the last solar minimum period.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jee, Geonhwa; Lee, Han-Byul; Solomon, Stanley C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040081225&hterms=Climatic+patterns&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DClimatic%2Bpatterns"> <span id="translatedtitle">Patterns and Variability in <span class="hlt">Global</span> Ocean Chlorophyll: Satellite Observations and Modeling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent analyses of SeaWiFS data have shown that <span class="hlt">global</span> ocean chlorophyll has increased more than 4% since 1998. The North Pacific ocean basin has increased nearly 19%. These trend analyses follow earlier results showing decadal declines in <span class="hlt">global</span> ocean chlorophyll and primary production. To understand the causes of these changes and trends we have applied the newly developed NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Assimilation Model (OBAM), which is driven in mechanistic fashion by surface winds, sea surface temperature, atmospheric iron deposition, sea ice, and surface <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>. The model utilizes chlorophyll from SeaWiFS in a <span class="hlt">daily</span> assimilation. The model has in place many of the climatic variables that can be expected to produce the changes observed in SeaWiFS data. This enables us to diagnose the model performance, the assimilation performance, and possible causes for the increase in chlorophyll. A full discussion of the changes and trends, possible causes, modeling approaches, and data assimilation will be the focus of the seminar.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gregg, Watson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AtmEn..65...69W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short-term effects of <span class="hlt">daily</span> air pollution on mortality</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">daily</span> variations of air pollutants in the Klang Valley, Malaysia, which includes Kuala Lumpur were investigated for its association with mortality counts using time series analysis. This study located in the tropic with much less seasonal variation than typically seen in more temperate climates. Data on <span class="hlt">daily</span> mortality for the Klang Valley (2000-2006), <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean concentrations of air pollutants of PM10, SO2, CO, NO2, O3, <span class="hlt">daily</span> maximum O3 and meteorological conditions were obtained from Malaysian Department of Environment. We examined the association between pollutants and <span class="hlt">daily</span> mortality using Poisson regression while controlling for time trends and meteorological factors. Effects of the pollutants (Relative Risk, RR) on current-day (lag 0) mortality to seven previous days (lag 7) and the effects of the pollutants from the first two days (lag 01) to the first eight days (lag 07) were determined. We found significant associations in the single-pollutant model for PM10 and the <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean O3 with natural mortality. For the <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean O3, the highest association was at lag 05 (RR = 1.0215, 95% CI = 1.0013-1.0202). CO was found not significantly associated with natural mortality, however the RR's of CO were found to be consistently higher than PM10. In spite of significant results of PM10, the magnitude of RR's of PM10 was not important for natural mortality in comparison with either <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean O3 or CO. There is an association between <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean O3 and natural mortality in a two-pollutants model after adjusting for PM10. Most pollutants except SO2, were significantly associated with respiratory mortality in a single pollutant model. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> mean O3 is also important for respiratory mortality, with over 10% of mortality associated with every IQR increased. These findings are noteworthy because seasonal confounding is unlikely in this relatively stable climate, by contrast with more temperate regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wan Mahiyuddin, Wan Rozita; Sahani, Mazrura; Aripin, Rasimah; Latif, Mohd Talib; Thach, Thuan-Quoc; Wong, Chit-Ming</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989EOSTr..70..748V"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> paleopoles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In July 1987, Phil McFadden of th e Australian Bureau of Mineral Resources wrote to Rob Van der Voo at the University of Michigan and to several other paleomagnetists in the U.S. suggesting that the time had come for construction of a paleomagnetic data base. He added that Mike McElhinny was thinking of retiring from BMR and might be interested in the project. He thought funding for the project could perhaps be sought from organizations such as the National Science Foundation. To make a long story short we are now, nearly two years later, well on the way with at least one large component of this suggestion: a <span class="hlt">global</span> paleomagnetic pole data base being constructed by Mike McElhinny for thr entire world.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Van der Voo, Rob; McElhinny, Michael W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JQSRT.122..194B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Field measurement of clear-sky solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> in Badain Jaran Desert of Northwestern China</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL) sponsored and conducted an intensive field campaign on dust aerosols in Badain Jaran Desert of Northwestern China from April 20 to June 20, 2010. A set of state-of-the-art broadband radiometers and sun/sky photometers were deployed along with launched radiosonde. In this paper, we compared the simulated solar <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> by using the SBDART radiative transfer model with those from the ground-based measurements for 69 selected cases of 7 days. It was shown that the averaged aerosol optical depth at 500nm (AOD500) is 0.18±0.09 with AOD500 less than 0.5 for all cases. The single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor at 675nm are 0.928±0.035, 0.712±0.023, respectively. The AODs retrieved from the CIMEL sun photometer at various wavelengths agree well with those from the PREDE sky radiometer, and the columnar water vapor contents from CIMEL also agree well with radiosonde observations. In the radiative closure experiment, we used a collocated thermopile pyrgeometer with a shadow and ventilator to correct the thermal dome offset of diffuse <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> measurement. The mean differences between model and measurements are -9.1Wm-2 (-2.6%) for the direct <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, +3.1Wm-2 (+2.8%) for diffuse <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, and -6.0Wm-2 (-1.3%) for <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, which indicates an excellent radiative closure. Aerosol shortwave direct radiative forcing (ARF) and radiative heating rate are also investigated. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> mean ARF ranges from -4.8 to +0.4Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere, -5.2 to -15.6Wm-2 at the surface, and 5.2 to 10.8Wm-2 in the atmosphere. The corresponding radiative heating rates for the whole atmosphere due to dust aerosols are 0.07, 0.11, 0.14, 0.11, 0.10, 0.08, and 0.07K/day for the 7 selected cloudless days. These solar radiative forcing can be considered as the representative impact of background dust aerosol in Northwestern China.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bi, Jianrong; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang; Ge, Jinming; Shi, Jinsen; Zhou, Tian; Zhang, Wu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/40/50/54/PDF/GJ_Executive_Summary_.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Jurist The <span class="hlt">Global</span> Legal Standards Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Jurist The <span class="hlt">Global</span> Legal Standards Report Volume 9, Issue 3 2009 Article 1 AT THE END OF THE END OF HISTORY. <span class="hlt">GLOBAL</span> LEGAL STANDARDS. PART OF THE SOLUTION OR PART OF THE PROBLEM? Executive Summary - IUC Independent Policy Report: At the End of the End of History IUC <span class="hlt">Global</span> Legal Standards Research</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/40/48/95/PDF/At_the_End_of_the_End_of_History.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Jurist The <span class="hlt">Global</span> Legal Standards Report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Jurist The <span class="hlt">Global</span> Legal Standards Report Volume 9, Issue 3 2009 Article 2 AT THE END OF THE END OF HISTORY. <span class="hlt">GLOBAL</span> LEGAL STANDARDS. PART OF THE SOLUTION OR PART OF THE PROBLEM? IUC Independent Policy Report: At the End of the End of History - <span class="hlt">Global</span> Legal Standards: Part of the Solution or Part</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4168648"> <span id="translatedtitle">Making Each Other's <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life: Nurse Assistants' Experiences and Knowledge on Developing a Meaningful <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life in Nursing Homes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: In a larger action research project, guidelines were generated for how a meaningful <span class="hlt">daily</span> life could be developed for older persons. In this study, we focused on the nurse assistants’ (NAs) perspectives, as their knowledge is essential for a well-functioning team and quality of care. The aim was to learn from NAs’ experiences and knowledge about how to develop a meaningful <span class="hlt">daily</span> life for older persons in nursing homes and the meaning NAs ascribe to their work. Methods: The project is based on Participatory and Appreciative Action and Reflection. Data were generated through interviews, participating observations and informal conversations with 27 NAs working in nursing homes in Sweden, and a thematic analysis was used. Result: NAs developed a meaningful <span class="hlt">daily</span> life by sensing and finding the “right” way of being (Theme 1). They sense and read the older person in order to judge how the person was feeling (Theme 2). They adapt to the older person (Theme 3) and share their <span class="hlt">daily</span> life (Theme 4). NAs use emotional involvement to develop a meaningful <span class="hlt">daily</span> life for the older person and meaning in their own work (Theme 5), ultimately making each other’s <span class="hlt">daily</span> lives meaningful. Conclusion: It was obvious that NAs based the development of a meaningful <span class="hlt">daily</span> life on different forms of knowledge: the oreticaland practical knowledge, and practical wisdom, all of which are intertwined. These results could be used within the team to constitute a meaningful <span class="hlt">daily</span> life for older persons in nursing homes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James, Inger; Fredriksson, Carin; Wahlstrom, Catrin; Kihlgren, Annica; Blomberg, Karin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=stress+AND+results&pg=6&id=EJ936186"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adaptation to <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Stress among Mothers of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Positive Affect</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Raising a child with an autism spectrum disorder is a challenging experience that can impact maternal well-being. Using a <span class="hlt">daily</span> diary methodology, this study investigates (1) the relationship between stress and negative affect, and (2) the role of <span class="hlt">daily</span> positive affect as a protective factor in the stress and negative affect relationship. Results…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ekas, Naomi V.; Whitman, Thomas L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SGeo...35.1251Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> GRACE Gravity Field and Numerical Water Storage Models for De-aliasing of Satellite Gravimetry Observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Reducing aliasing effects of insufficiently modelled high-frequent, non-tidal mass variations of the atmosphere, the oceans and the hydrosphere in gravity field models derived from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission is the topic of this study. The signal content of the <span class="hlt">daily</span> GRACE gravity field model series (ITG-Kalman) is compared to high-frequency bottom pressure variability and terrestrially stored water variations obtained from recent numerical simulations from an ocean circulation model (OMCT) and two hydrological models (WaterGAP <span class="hlt">Global</span> Hydrology Model, Land Surface Discharge Model). Our results show that <span class="hlt">daily</span> estimates of ocean bottom pressure from the most recent OMCT simulations and the <span class="hlt">daily</span> ITG-Kalman solutions are able to explain up to 40 % of extra-tropical sea-level variability in the Southern Ocean. In contrast to this, the <span class="hlt">daily</span> ITG-Kalman series and simulated continental total water storage variability largely disagree at periods below 30 days. Therefore, as long as no adequate hydrological model will become available, the <span class="hlt">daily</span> ITG-Kalman series can be regarded as a good initial proxy for high-frequency mass variations at a <span class="hlt">global</span> scale. As a second result of this study, based on monthly solutions as well as <span class="hlt">daily</span> observation residuals, it is shown that applying this GRACE-derived de-aliasing model supports the determination of the time-variable gravity field from GRACE data and the subsequent geophysical interpretation. This leads us to the recommendation that future satellite concepts for determining mass variations in the Earth system should be capable of observing higher frequeny signals with sufficient spatial resolution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zenner, L.; Bergmann-Wolf, I.; Dobslaw, H.; Gruber, T.; Güntner, A.; Wattenbach, M.; Esselborn, S.; Dill, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=434169"> <span id="translatedtitle">Randomized Comparison of Serum Teicoplanin Concentrations following <span class="hlt">Daily</span> or Alternate <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Dosing in Healthy Adults</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Trough serum teicoplanin concentrations were compared in healthy adults following intravenous administration of one of two regimens: (i) 12 mg/kg of body weight every 12 h for 3 doses and then 15 mg/kg every 48 h for 4 doses (n = 16 subjects) or (ii) 6 mg/kg every 12 h for 2 doses and then 6 mg/kg every 24 h for 9 doses (n = 8 subjects). The mean ± standard deviation trough concentrations in serum on day 11 (24 and 48 h after administration of the last dose for the <span class="hlt">daily</span> and alternate-day dosing schedules, respectively) were 16.0 ± 2.1 and 17.9 ± 3.5 mg/liter for subjects receiving the two regimens, respectively, by a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. The limits of the 95% confidence interval of the difference (?0.2, 3.6 mg/liter) determined by a nonparametric test were situated above the ?1.3-mg/liter maximum set difference and indicated a noninferiority of the alternate-day dosing to the <span class="hlt">daily</span> dosing. Throughout the study the individual trough concentrations in serum in the alternate-day dosing group constantly exceeded 10 mg/liter, the presently recommended target concentration for the treatment of severe infections. The trough concentrations in the sera of all subjects were bactericidal for six Staphylococcus aureus strains for which teicoplanin MICs are between 0.5 and 4 mg/liter. The bactericidal activity of serum was related to total teicoplanin (protein bound and unbound). In conclusion, an alternate-day dosing schedule (15 mg/kg on alternate days following administration of a 12-mg/kg loading dose three times every 12 h) could be considered for further efficacy and safety studies. PMID:15215086</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rouveix, Bernard; Jehl, Francois; Drugeon, Henri; Brumpt, Ivan; Caulin, Evelyne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26543065"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> before and during a Harmattan dust spell</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements of the ground-level spectral distributions of the direct, diffuse and <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> between 300 and 1100 nm were made at Akure (7.15°N, 5.5°E), Nigeria, in December 1991 before and during a Harmattan dust spell employing a spectroradiometer (LICOR LI-1800) with 6 nm resolution. The direct spectral solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> which was initially reduced before the dust storm was further</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Z. Debo Adeyefa; Björn Holmgren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003SPIE.5156..403S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of UV synthetic spectra with broadband and spectral <span class="hlt">irradiances</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Converting discreet narrowband filter radiometer <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> measurements into continuous allows the construction of weighted doses such as an erythemal and plant action spectra. Synthetic spectra were retrieved from 7 UV narrowband channels using a fast 5 parameter fit. The synthetic spectra are compared with measurements from a collocated spectroradiometer and the erythemally weighted doses from the synthetic spectra are compared with <span class="hlt">daily</span> erythemal doses from a collocated broadband radiometer. The agreement in spectral data ranges generally from 0.75 to 1.25 depending upon wavelength and solar zenith angle. Agreement between <span class="hlt">daily</span> erythemal doses are generally between 0.70 and 0.90.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Slusser, James R.; Bigelow, Dennis; Gao, Wei; Scott, Gwendolyn R.; Olson, Becky</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23685370"> <span id="translatedtitle">Domestic water uses: characterization of <span class="hlt">daily</span> cycles in the north region of Portugal.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nowadays, there is an increasing discussion among specialists about water use efficiency and the best measures to improve it. In Portugal, there have been a few attempts to expand the implementation of in situ water reuse projects. However, there is a lack of information about indoor water uses and how they are influenced by sociodemographic characteristics. There are several studies that investigate per capita <span class="hlt">global</span> water usage, but the partitioning of this volume per domestic device and <span class="hlt">daily</span> cycles is yet unknown. Identified as one of the key questions in sustainable building design, the water end-use is of primary importance to the design of hydraulic networks in buildings. In order to overcome this lack, a quantitative characterization of <span class="hlt">daily</span> water uses for each domestic device was performed, based on a weekly monitoring program in fifty-two different dwellings in the northern region of Portugal (Vila Real, Valpaços and Oporto). For forty of them, each water usage of different domestic devices of each dwelling was recorded. At the same time, the remaining twelve dwellings were also monitored in order to register the volume of water consumed in each utilization of each domestic device. This paper presents the results of this complete monitoring program, using collected data to establish indoor water use patterns for each domestic device, aiming to support a more realistic approach to residential water use. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> cycles in the different cities, where the monitoring program was performed, are also presented, in order to evaluate possible influences of sociodemographic characteristics. PMID:23685370</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matos, Cristina; Teixeira, Carlos A; Duarte, A A L S; Bentes, I</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6144858"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plant responses to UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> are modified by UV-A <span class="hlt">irradiation</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The increasing UV-B radiation (0.28-0.32 [mu]m) reaching the earth's surface is an important concern. Plant response in artificial UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> studies has been difficult to assess, especially regarding photosynthetic pigments, because the fluorescent lamps also produce UV-A (0.32-0.40[mu]m) radiation which is involved with blue light in pigment synthesis. Both UV-A and UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> were controlled in two glasshouse experiments conducted under relatively high PPFD (> 1300[mu]mol m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]) at two biologically effective <span class="hlt">daily</span> UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> (10.7 and 14.1 kJ m[sup [minus]2]); UV-A <span class="hlt">irradiances</span> were matched in Controls ([approximately]5, 9 kJ m[sup [minus]2]). Normal, chlorophyll-deficient, and flavonoid-deficient isolines of soybean cultivar, Clark, were utilized. Many growth/ pigment variables exhibited a statistically significant interaction between light quality and quantity: in general, UV-A radiation moderated the damaging effects of UV-B radiation. Regression analyses demonstrated that a single negative function related photosynthetic efficiency to carotenoid Content (r[sup 2] =0.73, P[le]0.001), implying a [open quotes]cost[close quotes] in maintaining carotenoids for photoprotection. A stomatal limitation to photosynthesis was verified and carotenoid content was correlated with UV-B absorbing compound levels, in UV-B <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> plants.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Middleton, E.M.; Teramura, A.H. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States) Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24809488"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling and forecasting <span class="hlt">daily</span> movement of ambient air mean PM?.? concentration based on the elliptic orbit model with weekly quasi-periodic extension: a case study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nowadays, the issue of air pollution has continuously been a <span class="hlt">global</span> public health concern. Modeling and forecasting <span class="hlt">daily</span> movement of ambient air mean PM2.5 concentration is an increasingly important task as it is intimately associated with human health that the air pollution has unignorable negative effects in reducing air quality, damaging environment, even causing serious harm to health. It is demonstrated that <span class="hlt">daily</span> movement of mean PM?.? concentration approximately exhibits weekly cyclical variations as <span class="hlt">daily</span> particle pollution in the air is largely influenced by human <span class="hlt">daily</span> activities. Then, based on weekly quasi-periodic extension for <span class="hlt">daily</span> movement of mean PM?.? concentration, the called elliptic orbit model is proposed to describe its movement. By mapping <span class="hlt">daily</span> movement of mean PM?.? concentration as one time series into the polar coordinates, each 7-day movement is depicted as one elliptic orbit. Experimental result and analysis indicate workability and effectiveness of the proposed method. Here we show that with the weekly quasi-periodic extension, <span class="hlt">daily</span> movements of mean PM?.? concentration at the given monitoring stations in Xiangtan of China are well described by the elliptic orbit model, which provides a vivid description for modeling and prediction <span class="hlt">daily</span> movement of mean PM?.? concentration in a concise and intuitive way. PMID:24809488</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Zong-chang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3875935"> <span id="translatedtitle">Three-Times <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Ultrafractionated Radiation Therapy, A Novel and Promising Regimen for Glioblastoma Patients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Glioblastomas are considered to be one of the most radio resistant tumors. Despite new therapies, the prognosis of this disease remains dismal. Also, the mechanisms of radiation resistance in mammalian cells are more complex than once believed. Experimental studies have indicated that some human cell lines are sensitive to low radiation doses of <1 Gy. This phenomenon has been termed low-dose hyper-radio-sensitivity (HRS), and is more apparent in radio resistant cell lines, such as glioblastoma cells. Sensitivity may result from the inability of low dose radiation to efficiently induce repair mechanisms, whereas higher doses cause enough damage to trigger repair responses for radio resistance. In vitro studies have demonstrated this phenomenon using various human malignant glioma cell lines: (1) <span class="hlt">daily</span> repeated <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> of cells with low doses compared to <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> using a single biologically equivalent dose resulted in significantly higher cell killing; (2) experiments conducted on glioma xenografts demonstrated that repeated <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> with low doses was more effective for inhibiting tumor growth than a single dose. In order to confirm and validate these promising studies on HRS, a few phase II trials were developed. For translating the experimental observations into the clinic, ultra fractionation protocols (with three <span class="hlt">daily</span> doses) were tested in glioblastoma patients. Tolerance and toxicity were the primary endpoints, with overall survival as a secondary endpoint. These protocols were initiated before concomitant radio chemotherapy became the standard of care. For these trials, patients with an unfavorable clinical prognostic factor of newly unresectable GBM were included. When comparing the results of these trials with international literature using multivariate analysis for both progression free survival and overall survival, ultra fractionated <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> showed superiority over radiotherapy alone. In addition, it was found to be equivalent to treatment using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Therefore, ultra fractionated protocols may prolong survival of glioblastoma patients. In this review, we describe the main experimental data regarding low-dose hypersensitivity as well as the findings of clinical trials that have investigated this new radiotherapy regimen. PMID:24202441</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beauchesne, Patrick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://scout.wisc.edu/Reports/NSDL/LifeSci/2004/ls-041112#TopicInDepth"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Biodiversity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nations around the world have recognized biodiversity as one of the most pressing ecological issues of our time. Declining biodiversity over recent decades has prompted the formation of international coalitions and national biodiversity programs. This Topic in Depth explores the work of both international and national efforts to increase <span class="hlt">global</span> biodiversity. The first site presents an archived report from the Convention on Biological Diversity, an international organization formed by many world nations after the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. This first edition of the <span class="hlt">Global</span> Biodiversity Outlook report, published in 2001, was created to provide a status summary, and an analysis of Convention objectives. It is expected that a second edition will be published this year presenting more recent data and analysis (1). Explore Biodiversity is an innovative project involving a team of scientists and filmmakers working to document the diminishing biological diversity of our planet. The hip Explore website shares beautiful images, videos, and information from expeditions to Hawaii, Mexico, and Alaska (2). The third site, from the Australian Government's Department of the Environment and Heritage, discusses biodiversity in Australia. The site contains sections regarding Migratory Species; Conservation and Regional Planning; Invasive Species; and Biodiversity Hotspots--to name a few (3). The fourth website presents the Belgian Biodiversity Platform (4), which is "an integrated network of people and institutions funded by the Belgian Federal Science Policy to facilitate dialogue and collaboration between scientists in Belgium and abroad, in the field of biological diversity." From the Nepalese Government's Ministry of Forests and Soil Conservation, the fifth site presents information about biodiversity programs in Nepal. The site contains sections about Forests, National Parks, Plant Resources, and the Ministry's National Biodiversity Unit (5). The final website presents the Centre for Marine Biodiversity (CMB), a Canada-based organization that was established in 2000 to promote scientific support of marine biodiversity. The CMB website contains research reports, links to several databases, links to various identification guides, and a photo gallery with some nice underwater images (6).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/37257"> <span id="translatedtitle">Moral purpose, economic incentive and <span class="hlt">global</span> trade : why new business models are needed</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Globalization</span> has occurred in various forms over the past century, yet only recently has it become <span class="hlt">daily</span> news. This evolving process has created numerous underlying tensions that are not well understood. While western ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Samel, Hiram M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://journals.tubitak.gov.tr/physics/issues/fiz-03-27-2/fiz-27-2-9-0207-1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relationship Between <span class="hlt">Global</span> Solar Radiation and Sunshine Duration for Onne, Nigeria</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements of <span class="hlt">global</span> solar radiation and sunshine duration data during the period from 1984 to 1999 at Onne (within the rainforest climatic zone of southern Nigeria) were used to establish an Angstrom-type correlation equation. Five other commonly used correlations between <span class="hlt">global</span> solar radia- tion and sunshine duration were also used to estimate <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> for Onne and their results</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Louis E. AKPABIO; Sunday E. ETUK</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/ETD-TAMU-1967-THESIS-D456"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effects of continuous prenatal and postnatal low dose gamma <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> on the hemopoietic system of immature Spanish goats</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Absolute Number of Granulocytes 67 <span class="hlt">Irradiation</span> period Post-<span class="hlt">irradiation</span> period 67 69 S CARY BIBLIOGRAPHY APPENDIX 71 73 79 LIST OF PIGURES Figure Page Weekly Average Erythrocyte Count (RBC cells/mm ) of Spanish Kid Goats Which Exposed to <span class="hlt">Daily</span>... Doses of 0, 2 r or 7 Day of Gamma <span class="hlt">Irradiation</span> From Time of Until 60 Days Post-Parturition X 10 Have Been r/20 Hour Fertilization 29 Weekly Average Hematocrit of Spanish Kid Goats Which Have Been Exposed to <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Doses of 0, 2 r or 7 r/ 20 Hour...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DeShaw, James Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24402404"> <span id="translatedtitle">New <span class="hlt">daily</span> persistent headache and potential new therapeutic agents.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New <span class="hlt">daily</span> persistent headache is a form of a chronic <span class="hlt">daily</span> headache with a unique temporal profile. Patients can recall the exact day when their headache started. It can be one of the most refractory types of headache to treat. Recent publications have highlighted different subtypes and heterogeneity in presentation. Referring to it as a syndrome versus a distinct disorder has also been suggested. Several different classes of medications have been used for the treatment, with mixed results. The underlying pathophysiology of new <span class="hlt">daily</span> persistent headache is unclear, but tumor necrosis factor may play a role. The clinical features, differential diagnosis and potential new therapeutic agents will be discussed. PMID:24402404</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joshi, Shivang G; Mathew, Paul G; Markley, Herbert G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IJBm..tmp...96K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contribution of <span class="hlt">daily</span> and seasonal biorhythms to obesity in humans</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While the significance of obesity as a serious health problem is well recognized, little is known about whether and how biometerological factors and biorhythms causally contribute to obesity. Obesity is often associated with altered seasonal and <span class="hlt">daily</span> rhythmicity in food intake, metabolism and adipose tissue function. Environmental stimuli affect both seasonal and <span class="hlt">daily</span> rhythms, and the latter are under additional control of internal molecular oscillators, or body clocks. Modifications of clock genes in animals and changes to normal <span class="hlt">daily</span> rhythms in humans (as in shift work and sleep deprivation) result in metabolic dysregulation that favours weight gain. Here, we briefly review the potential links between biorhythms and obesity in humans.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kanikowska, Dominika; Sato, Maki; Witowski, Janusz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22269367"> <span id="translatedtitle">[<span class="hlt">Daily</span> recovery and well-being: an overview].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this article is to provide a literature review on <span class="hlt">daily</span> recovery and its effects on well-being. Specifically, we will discuss theories that help us understand the process of recovery and we will clarify how recovery and its potential outcomes have been conceptualized so far. Subsequently, we present empirical findings of diary studies addressing the activities that may facilitate or hinder <span class="hlt">daily</span> recovery. We conclude with an overall framework from which recovery can be understood, claiming that <span class="hlt">daily</span> recovery is an important moderator in the buffering process of the negative effects of job demands. PMID:22269367</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Demerouti, Evangelia; Sanz Vergel, Ana Isabel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...22020716H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Making The <span class="hlt">Daily</span>-updated Synoptic Map Of HMI Line-of-sight Magnetogram Cooperating With The HARP module</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The synoptic map of the magnetogram is widely used for the <span class="hlt">global</span> coronal modeling, and the <span class="hlt">daily</span> or more frequently updated maps help enhance understanding of the solar corona and interplanetary space, especially the space weather related topics. The <span class="hlt">daily</span>-updated synoptic map is made by superimposing the latest meridional bin of the full disk data to the map. In the HMI data pipeline, the width of the bin is chosen 80 degrees in longitude around the central meridian. A problem occurs when the boundary of the bin happens to separate the bipolar pair of the strong field: The updated part of the synoptic map may have magnetic flux unbalanced, then, the <span class="hlt">global</span> map will have unbalanced flux and the models of the <span class="hlt">global</span> corona, such as the PFSS, will give wrong solution. To avoid this problem, one choice is to include all (or exclude all) of the bipolar pair. The HARP, HMI Active Region Patch, will be automatically and routinely monitoring the HMI magnetogram data and recognizing the Active Region, therefore, the HARP will help minimize such unbalance of the magnetic field. In this presentation, we will show the <span class="hlt">daily</span> updated maps and the outputs of the coronal models, the PFSS and MHD, with the new maps,compare with the other coronal observations such as SDO/AIA images.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Y.; Sun, X.; Turmon, M. J.; HMI Team</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920006214&hterms=Search+Worldwide&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DSearch%2BWorldwide%2BR%2526D"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> trends</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measuring trends in ozone, and most other geophysical variables, requires that a small systematic change with time be determined from signals that have large periodic and aperiodic variations. Their time scales range from the day-to-day changes due to atmospheric motions through seasonal and annual variations to 11 year cycles resulting from changes in the sun UV output. Because of the magnitude of all of these variations is not well known and highly variable, it is necessary to measure over more than one period of the variations to remove their effects. This means that at least 2 or more times the 11 year sunspot cycle. Thus, the first requirement is for a long term data record. The second related requirement is that the record be consistent. A third requirement is for reasonable <span class="hlt">global</span> sampling, to ensure that the effects are representative of the entire Earth. The various observational methods relevant to trend detection are reviewed to characterize their quality and time and space coverage. Available data are then examined for long term trends or recent changes in ozone total content and vertical distribution, as well as related parameters such as stratospheric temperature, source gases and aerosols.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Megie, G.; Chanin, M.-L.; Ehhalt, D.; Fraser, P.; Frederick, J. F.; Gille, J. C.; Mccormick, M. P.; Schoebert, M.; Bishop, L.; Bojkov, R. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://globalvoicesonline.org/"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Voices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Former CNN Beijing and Tokyo Bureau Chief Rebecca MacKinnon and Africa expert Ethan Zuckerman started <span class="hlt">Global</span> Voices while they were both fellows at Harvard. The website is a community of over 300 bloggers and translators from around the world whose aim is "to redress some of the inequities in media attention by leveraging the power of citizens' media." The website has "featured stories" and "latest stories" on the homepage, as well as "Updates" and "Special Coverage", such as "Gabon Unrest 2011", "Nigeria Elections 2011", and the "Death of Osama Bin Laden". The site can also be searched by "Countries", "Topics" and "Contributors". The "Countries" link contains an extensive list of countries that visitors can peruse at their leisure. There is also a monthly archive that shows the number of posts for that country, and they date all the way back to August 2005. A look at Algeria allows visitors to read the post "Arab World: Tears Spilled on the Break Up of Sudan", which shows the reaction of Arab netizens on Twitter to South Sudan's Independence referendum. The tweets have been translated from the Arabic into English, which is particularly useful for those persons who do not speak Arabic.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17841800"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> cooling?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The world's inhabitants, including Scientists, live primarily in the Northern Hemisphere. It is quite natural to be concerned about events that occur close to home and neglect faraway events. Hence, it is not surprising that so little attention has been given to the Southern Hemisphere. Evidence for <span class="hlt">global</span> cooling has been based, in large part, on a severe cooling trend at high northern latitudes. This article points out that the Northern Hemisphere cooling trend appears to be out of phase with a warming trend at high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. The data are scanty. We cannot be sure that these temperature fluctuations are be not the result of natural causes. How it seems most likely that human activity has already significantly perturbed the atmospheric weather system. The effect of particulate matter pollution should be most severe in the highly populated and industrialized Northern Hemisphere. Because of the rapid diffusion of CO(2) molecules within the atmosphere, both hemispheres will be subject to warming due to the atmospheric (greenhouse) effect as the CO(2) content of the atmosphere builds up from the combustion of fossil fuels. Because of the differential effects of the two major sources of atmospheric pollution, the CO(2) greenhouse effect warming trend should first become evident in the Southern Hemisphere. The socioeconomic and political consequences of climate change are profound. We need an early warning system such as would be provided by a more intensive international world weather watch, particularly at high northern and southern latitudes. PMID:17841800</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Damon, P E; Kunen, S M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42528602"> <span id="translatedtitle">Burned data time series for Tropical Africa (1981-2000) with the <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Tile NOAA\\/NASA Pathfinder AVHRR 8-km Land dataset</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The NOAA\\/NASA Pathfinder AVHRR 8?km Land (PAL) dataset provides an invaluable source of data for researching <span class="hlt">global</span> changes on the Earth's surface due to its long time and spatial scales. However, because of errors, the original <span class="hlt">Global</span> <span class="hlt">Daily</span> PAL data (1981–1994) have been reprocessed into a tiled time series file configuration. Reprocessing involved calculating the correct solar zenith angles and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. A. Moreno-Ruiz; J. Baron-Martinez; J. Sagrado-Martinez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990RaPC...36..603O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermoluminescence of <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> foodstuffs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements have been made of the thermoluminescent response of a number of foodstuffs, namely spices, chicken bone, eggshell and strawberries. From the results, <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> samples can be clearly distinguished from unirradiated ones for several weeks after <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> of 5-10 kGy, or in the case of some spices for up to 20 months. It is concluded that measurement of thermoluminescence is a promising technique for detecting the <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> of foodstuffs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oduko, J. M.; Spyrou, N. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1792324"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quality assurance in <span class="hlt">daily</span> treatment procedure: patient movement during tangential fields treatment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fifteen women undergoing breast radiotherapy following wide local excision of an early stage breast cancer were submitted to repeated measurements of surface landmarks to check the reproducibility of patient positioning, and to portal imaging using a megavoltage imaging device. When the patient is being set-up the mean rise and fall of a lateral skin mark (tattoo) was within 4 mm in 95 observations of 15 patients. At the end of the lateral field exposure, the mean displacement of the lateral tattoo was close to zero, with only 15/95 (16%) observations falling outside the range +/- 2 mm. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> measurements of lung thickness fell above and below the simulated lung thickness, consistent with random fluctuations. Eighty-eight percent of lung thickness measurements were within +/- 5 mm of the simulator position. A tentative conclusion is made that more sophisticated immobilisation and imaging devices may be unnecessary for breast <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> with a high degree of reproducibility. PMID:1792324</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Westbrook, C; Gildersleve, J; Yarnold, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.huli.group.shef.ac.uk/scientist2013.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sign In or Register The Scientist News & Opinion <span class="hlt">Daily</span> News</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sign In or Register The Scientist » News & Opinion » <span class="hlt">Daily</span> News Four generations of women and girls was built, the variation in individuals' relative fitness has fallen. This should mean that natural</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lummaa, Virpi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.isse.ucar.edu/staff/katz/docs/pdf/wrrwill.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> spatiotemporal precipitation simulation using latent and transformed Gaussian processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> spatiotemporal precipitation simulation using latent and transformed Gaussian processes is described. The methodology relies on a latent Gaussian process to drive precipitation occurrence precipitation generator that yields spatially consistent gridded quantitative precipitation realizations</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Katz, Richard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://bio.kuleuven.be/ento/pdfs_media/TheScientist2014.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sign In or Register The Scientist News & Opinion <span class="hlt">Daily</span> News</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sign In or Register The Scientist » News & Opinion » <span class="hlt">Daily</span> News Buff-tailed bumblebee WIKIPEDIA-tailed bumblebee (Bombus terrestris), and the common wasp (Vespula vulgaris). These species have been separated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wenseleers, Tom</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gk&pg=7&id=EJ260859"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anorexia Nervosa in the Context of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Experience.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study investigated the anorectic's experience in <span class="hlt">daily</span> living using the Experience Sampling Method. Results suggest that anorectics spend more time alone and experience lower average affect than other young single women. (Author/GK)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larson, Reed; Johnson, Craig</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_147711.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Aspirin May Help Prevent Cancer, Study Shows</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Aspirin May Help Prevent Cancer, Study Shows Taking low- ... Cancer WEDNESDAY, Aug. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Taking aspirin every day appears to reduce the odds of ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://fishbull.noaa.gov/953/hettler.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> variability in abundance of larval fishes inside Beaufort Inlet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">. Species of interest were Brevoortia tyrannus, Lagodon rhomboides, Leio- stomus xanthurus, Micropogonias- mental variables. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> collections ofB. tyrannus larvae provided otoliths (n=1,341) showing that a large</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title30-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title30-vol1-sec77-1403.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">30 CFR 77.1403 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> examination of hoisting equipment.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...of hoisting equipment. Hoists and elevators shall be examined <span class="hlt">daily</span> and such examinations...limited to, the following: (a) Elevators. (1) A visual examination of...sheaves; (2) An examination of the elevator for loose, missing or defective...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6596938"> <span id="translatedtitle">Use of local allograft <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> following renal transplantation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Over a 10 year period, 67 recipients of 71 renal allografts received graft <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> following the diagnosis of rejection. The majority of kidneys were treated with a total dose of 600 rad, 150 rad per fraction, in 4 <span class="hlt">daily</span> fractions. Fifty-three kidneys were <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> following the failure of standard systemic immunosuppression and maximally tolerated antirejection measures to reverse an episode of acute rejection. Twenty-two (42%) of these allografts were noted to have stable (i.e. no deterioration) or improved function 1 month following the treatment with <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>. Eleven (21%) of these allografts maintained function 1 year following transplantation. Biopsies were obtained of 41 allografts. Of the 24 renal allografts with predominantly cellular rejection, 10 (42%) had the process reversed or stabilized at 1 month following <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>. Five (21%) of these allografts were functioning at 1 year following <span class="hlt">irradiation</span>. Rejection was reversed or stabilized in 6 of 17 (35%) allografts at 1 month when the histologic features of renal biopsy suggested predominantly vascular rejection. Local graft <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> has helped maintain a limited number of allografts in patients whose rejection has failed to respond to systemic immunosuppression. <span class="hlt">Irradiation</span> may also benefit patients with ongoing rejection in whom further systemic immunosuppression is contra-indicated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Halperin, E.C.; Delmonico, F.L.; Nelson, P.W.; Shipley, W.U.; Cosimi, A.B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40728625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of mapping approaches of design annual maximum <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study 2-year and 100-year annual maximum <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation for rainfall–runoff studies and estimating flood hazard were mapped. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation measurements at 23 climate stations from 1961–2000 were used in the upper Hron basin in central Slovakia. The choice of data preprocessing and interpolation methods was guided by their practical applicability and acceptance in the engineering hydrologic community.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Szolgay; J. Parajka; S. Kohnová; K. Hlavcová</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39663609"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface Synoptic Circulation and <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Precipitation in Catalonia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary   Catalonian <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation patterns were obtained by means of S-mode Principal Component Analysis (PCA) applied to subsets\\u000a built up according to synoptic surface airflow. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> data from November to April 1990–1994 from 45 raingauge sites in Catalonia\\u000a without missing data were used. Eight circulation classes for days in this period were considered. A Precipitation Activity\\u000a Index (PAI) was calculated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Serra; G. Fernández Mills; M. C. Periago; X. Lana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/6735351137457423.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Children’s <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Routines During Kindergarten Transition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Routines are an important feature of family life and functioning in families with young children. Common <span class="hlt">daily</span> routines such\\u000a as dinnertime, bedtime, and waking activities are powerful organizers of family behavior and may be instrumental to children\\u000a and families during times of transition, such as elementary school entry. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> routines were examined in 132 families with\\u000a children entering kindergarten. Although</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leah K. Wildenger; Laura Lee McIntyre; Barbara H. Fiese; Tanya L. Eckert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1554850"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> Variability and Climate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The brightness of the Sun varies on all time scales on which it has been observed, and there is increasing evidence that it has an influence on climate. The amplitudes of such variations depend on the wavelength and possibly on the time scale. Although many aspects of this variability are well established, the exact magnitude of secular variations (going beyond a solar cycle) and the spectral dependence of variations are under discussion. The main drivers of solar variability are thought to be magnetic features at the solar surface. The climate reponse can be, on a <span class="hlt">global</span> scale, largely accounted for by simple energetic considerations, but understanding the regional climate effects is more difficult. Promising mechanisms for such a driving have been identified, including through the influence of UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> on the stratosphere and dynamical coupling to the surface. Here we provide an overview of the current state of our knowledge, as well as of the main open questions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Solanki, S K; Haigh, J D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26543881"> <span id="translatedtitle">The sun’s total and spectral <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> for solar energy applications and solar radiation models</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using the most recent composite time series of total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> spaceborne measurements, a solar constant value of 1366.1 Wm?2 is confirmed, and simple quadratic expressions are proposed to predict its <span class="hlt">daily</span> value from the Zurich sunspot number, the MgII index, or the 10.7 cm radio flux index. Whenever these three indices are available on a <span class="hlt">daily</span> basis (since 1978),</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christian A. Gueymard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/warming.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">QUESTIONS ABOUT <span class="hlt">GLOBAL</span> WARMING</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">QUESTIONS ABOUT <span class="hlt">GLOBAL</span> WARMING Â¥IS IT REAL? Â¥IS IT IMPORTANT? Â¥WHAT IS IT DUE TO? Â¥HOW MUCH MORE in the atmosphere, giving Earth its temperate climate. <span class="hlt">Global</span> Atmosphere, <span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming <span class="hlt">GLOBAL</span> TEMPERATURE TRENDÃ?t a cure for <span class="hlt">global</span> warming! Aerosols only last a short while in the atmosphere, they would have</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~kuang/LarissaBack.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow <span class="hlt">global</span> warming</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> hydrological cycle response to rapid and slow <span class="hlt">global</span> warming and Jiaxu Zhang #12;· Anthropogenic <span class="hlt">global</span> warming causes "robust" changes in the <span class="hlt">global</span> in the <span class="hlt">global</span> hydrological cycle due to anthropogenic <span class="hlt">global</span> warming Atmospheric radiative</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuang, Zhiming</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=personality+AND+social+AND+life&pg=5&id=EJ786986"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development of the Contentment with Life Assessment Scale (CLAS): Using <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life Experiences to Verify Levels of Self-Reported Life Satisfaction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On average, Anglo-Americans report that they are satisfied with their lives, but their <span class="hlt">global</span> evaluations tend to deviate from their <span class="hlt">daily</span> experiences (e.g., Oishi [2002, "Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin" 28(10), 1398-1406]). We explored the hypothesis that the average life satisfaction of Anglo-Americans is better characterized as…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lavallee, Loraine F.; Hatch, P. Maurine; Michalos, Alex C.; McKinley, Tara</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1241445"> <span id="translatedtitle">Particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, and <span class="hlt">daily</span> mortality in Chongqing, China.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1995, <span class="hlt">daily</span> mortality in a district of Chongqing, China, was analyzed from January through December for associations with <span class="hlt">daily</span> ambient sulfur dioxide and fine particles (airborne particles with diameters less than or equal to 2.5 microm; PM2.5. The mean concentration of PM2.5 was 147 microg/m3 (maximum, 666 microg/m3), and that of SO2 was 213 microg/m3 (maximum, 571 microg/m3). On average, 9.6 persons died each day. We used a generalized additive model using robust Poisson regression to estimate the associations of mean <span class="hlt">daily</span> SO2 and PM2.5 with <span class="hlt">daily</span> mortality (on the same day and at lags up to 5 days) adjusted for trend, season, temperature, humidity, and day of the week. The relative risk of mortality associated with a 100 microg/m3 increase in mean <span class="hlt">daily</span> SO2 was highest on the second lag day [1.04; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00-1.09] and the third lag day (1.04; 95% CI, 0.99-1.08). The associations between <span class="hlt">daily</span> mortality and mean <span class="hlt">daily</span> PM2.5 were negative and statistically insignificant on all days. The relative risk of respiratory mortality on the second day after a 100 microg/m3 increase in mean <span class="hlt">daily</span> SO2 was 1.11 (95% CI, 1.02-1.22), and that for cardiovascular mortality was 1.10 (95% CI, 1.02-1.20). The relative risk of cardiovascular mortality on the third day after a 100 microg/m3 increase in mean <span class="hlt">daily</span> SO2 was 1.20 (95% CI, 1.11-1.30). The relative risks of mortality due to cancer and other causes were insignificant on both days. The estimated effects of mean <span class="hlt">daily</span> SO2 on cardiovascular and respiratory mortality risk remained after controlling for PM2.5. PMID:12676616</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Venners, Scott A; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Zhonggui; Schlatter, Yu; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Xiping</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48063072"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adaptation to <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Stress Among Mothers of Children With an Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Positive Affect</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Raising a child with an autism spectrum disorder is a challenging experience that can impact maternal well-being. Using a\\u000a <span class="hlt">daily</span> diary methodology, this study investigates (1) the relationship between stress and negative affect, and (2) the role\\u000a of <span class="hlt">daily</span> positive affect as a protective factor in the stress and negative affect relationship. Results from hierarchical\\u000a linear models revealed that higher</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Naomi V. EkasThomas; Thomas L. Whitman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/865384"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comminuting <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> ferritic steel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Disclosed is a method of comminuting <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> components.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bauer, Roger E. (Kennewick, WA); Straalsund, Jerry L. (Kennewick, WA); Chin, Bryan A. (Auburn, AL)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5454031"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comminuting <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> ferritic steel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Disclosed is a method of comminuting <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> components.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bauer, R. E.; Chin, B. A.; Straalsund, J. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-03-26</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54917781"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forecasting sub-hourly solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> for prediction of photovoltaic output</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Short-term prediction of photovoltaic power output through forecast of <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> in the subhourly time frame is explored. The decomposition of the <span class="hlt">global</span> solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> into a deterministic clear sky component and a stochastic cloud cover component is achieved through a parameterization process. The cloud cover time series is modeled by a Box-Jenkins-type ARIMA model and forecasts issued hourly</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Badrul H. Chowdhury; Saifur Rahman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30467910"> <span id="translatedtitle">Postmastectomy electron-beam chest-wall <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> in women with breast cancer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: This retrospective study evaluates the results of postmastectomy electron-beam chest-wall <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> in patients with breast cancer. Methods and materials: From 1980 to 1994, 144 women with localized breast cancer received postmastectomy radiotherapy. The chest wall was <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> by electron beam, 6 to 12 MeV energy, depending on wall thickness, 2.0 Gy <span class="hlt">daily</span>, 5 times\\/week for total dose of 50</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eliahu. Gez; Nurit Ashaf; Rachel Bar-Deroma; Edward Rosenblatt; Abraham Kuten</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1018269.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">cMOOCs and <span class="hlt">Global</span> Learning: An Authentic Alternative</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Massive open online courses (MOOCs) continue to attract press coverage as they change almost <span class="hlt">daily</span> in their format, number of registrations, and potential for credentialing. An enticing aspect of the MOOC is its <span class="hlt">global</span> reach. In this paper, we will focus on a type of MOOC called a cMOOC because it is based on the theory of connectivism and fits…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yeager, Carol; Hurley-Dasgupta, Betty; Bliss, Catherine A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.biosci.ohio-state.edu/~patches/publication/Williams_2012_Climate%20change%20and%20cutaneous%20water%20loss%20of%20birds.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Introduction Climatologists have sounded the clarion call that <span class="hlt">global</span> warming</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">over will be impacted by <span class="hlt">global</span> warming, but because they are diurnal, and experience scarcity of food and drinking water and, more importantly, temperatures that are already extreme, desert birds may be among where vast deserts occur, simulations for climate change predict that <span class="hlt">daily</span> Ta will increase by 3­5°C</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Williams, Jos. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/2089702"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improved <span class="hlt">global</span> sea surface temperature analyses using optimum interpolation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The new NOAA operational <span class="hlt">global</span> sea surface temperature (SST) analysis is described. The analyses use 7 days of in situ (ship and buoy) and satellite SST. These analyses are produced weekly and <span class="hlt">daily</span> using optimum interpolation (OI) on a 1[degrees] grid. The OI technique requires the specification of data and analysis error statistics. These statistics are derived and show that</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richard W. Reynolds; Thomas M. Smith</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060034891&hterms=IPCC&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DIPCC"> <span id="translatedtitle">Models of Solar <span class="hlt">Irradiance</span> Variability and the Instrumental Temperature Record</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of decade-to-century (Dec-Cen) variations in total solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> (TSI) on <span class="hlt">global</span> mean surface temperature Ts during the pre-Pinatubo instrumental era (1854-1991) are studied by using two different proxies for TSI and a simplified version of the IPCC climate model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marcus, S. L.; Ghil, M.; Ide, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41997000"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uncertainty of measurements of spectral solar UV <span class="hlt">irradiance</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Most investigations on the nature and effects of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation at the Earth's surface require measurements of high accuracy combined with well-defined procedures to assess their quality. Here we present a general evaluation of all relevant errors and uncertainties associated with measurements of spectral <span class="hlt">global</span> <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> in the UV. The uncertainties are quantified in terms of dependence of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Bernhard; G. Seckmeyer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NHESD...2.2709B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spatial distribution of the <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation concentration index in Algeria</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, the spatial and temporal distribution of the <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation concentration index (CI) in Algeria (South Mediterranean Sea) has been assessed. Forty-two <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall series based on high quality and fairly regular rainfall records for the period from 1970 to 2008 were used. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation concentration index results allowed identifying three climatic zones: the northern country, characterized by coastal regions with CI values between 0.59 and 0.63, the highlands, with values between 0.57 and 0.62 (average of 0.61), except for the area of Biskra (CI = 0.70), and the southern region of the country, with high rainfall concentrations, with values between 0.62 and 0.69. CI is an index related to the rainfall intensity and erosive capacity; therefore, this index has great interest for studies on torrential rainfall and floods.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boucherf, D.; Benhamrouche, A.; Hamadache, R.; Bendahmane, L.; Martin-Vide, J.; Teixeira Nery, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16445360"> <span id="translatedtitle">Attentional demands and <span class="hlt">daily</span> functioning among community-dwelling elders.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Everyday life is full of numerous demands for attention that can affect the ability to function. For elders, examples of these attentional demands include negotiating public transportation and driving, sensory losses, and physical discomforts and worries that make it harder to concentrate and complete tasks. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between attentional demands and the ability to manage <span class="hlt">daily</span> activities requiring concentration for 54 community-dwelling elders (34 women, 20 men). As theorized, attentional demands correlated (r = -.58) significantly with <span class="hlt">daily</span> functioning: Elders with more attentional demands perceived themselves as having greater difficulty managing tasks requiring concentration. Attentional demands accounted for a significant proportion of variance in functioning (12%), even after partialling out the effects of depressive symptoms and health. Findings support the theorized relation between attentional demands and <span class="hlt">daily</span> functioning, as well as nursing interventions aimed at decreasing attentional demands to promote effective functioning for elders. PMID:16445360</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jansen, Debra A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3686135"> <span id="translatedtitle">Factors Associated with Growth in <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Smoking among Indigenous Adolescents</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">North American Indigenous adolescents smoke earlier, smoke more, and are more likely to become regular smokers as adults than youth from any other ethnic group yet we know very little about their early smoking trajectories. We use multilevel growth modeling across five waves of data from Indigenous adolescents (aged 10 to 13 years at Wave 1) to investigate factors associated with becoming a <span class="hlt">daily</span> smoker. Several factors, including number of peers who smoked at Wave 1 and meeting diagnostic criteria for major depressive episode and conduct disorder were associated with early <span class="hlt">daily</span> smoking. Only age and increases in the number of smoking peers were associated with increased odds of becoming a <span class="hlt">daily</span> smoker. PMID:23794792</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whitbeck, Les B.; Hartshorn, Kelley J. Sittner; McQuillan, Julia; Crawford, Devan M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUSM.H33B..02S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> water level by ENVISAT altimetry of the Amazon River</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radar Altimetry is a remote sensing technique applied in order to obtain the level of water of the hydrological processes, mostly in remote regions such as in the Amazon basin. However, the altimetry satellites have a limitation in their temporal resolution, which in the case of ENVISAT is 35 days, which prevents the study of short-term hydrological events alert of floods and droughts and etc. Thus, a method of obtaining altimetric <span class="hlt">daily</span> time series water level, based on a linear model of interpolation by optimization with multi-objective criteria was applied, using data from in situ on pluvial stations, along the Amazon River. The altimetry data validation show accurate results with a RMS of 11 cm, while the estimates carried out by the model obtained 63% of altimetric <span class="hlt">daily</span> time series water level data with RMS less than 40 cm, thus allowing the use of altimetry data <span class="hlt">daily</span> at various hydrological studies, hydrodynamic modeling and monitoring of extreme events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sousa, A. C.; Pereira, P.; Silva, J. S.; Calmant, S.; Seyler, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5269390"> <span id="translatedtitle">United States Historical Climatology Network <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature and precipitation data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document describes a data base containing <span class="hlt">daily</span> observations of maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation amounts from 138 US stations. These stations are a specially chosen subset of the 1219-station US Historical Climatology Network (HCN), compiled by the National Climatic Data Center (Asheville, North Carolina). The <span class="hlt">daily</span> data network (herein referred to as the HCN/D) consists of stations considered to be the best of those from the HCN, selected to provide reasonably homogeneous spatial coverage of the contiguous US after considering the temporal homogeneity of each station's observing times, instrument types/positions, and surroundings. The data for each station extend through 1987, and most station records are complete for at least 80 years. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> resolution of these data lends maximum flexibility for studies attempting to detect and monitor long-term climatic changes on a regional scale. Studies using <span class="hlt">daily</span> data may be able to detect changes in regional climate that would not be apparent from analysis of the more commonly used monthly temperature and precipitation data. Such studies may include analyses of trends in maximum/minimum temperatures, temperature extremes, <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature range, precipitation event size'' frequency, and the magnitude and duration of wet and dry periods. Other applications of the data include planning and risk assessment in areas such as agriculture, natural resource exploration, and construction. This document describes how the stations in the HCN/D were selected, defines limitations and restrictions of the data, describes the format and contents of the magnetic tape, and provides reprints of literature pertinent to the collection and application of <span class="hlt">daily</span> climate data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaiser, D.P. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center); Hughes, P.Y.; Mason, E.H.; Karl, T.R.; Brower, W.A. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Asheville, NC (United States). National Climatic Data Center)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10146509"> <span id="translatedtitle">United States Historical Climatology Network <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature and precipitation data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document describes a data base containing <span class="hlt">daily</span> observations of maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation amounts from 138 US stations. These stations are a specially chosen subset of the 1219-station US Historical Climatology Network (HCN), compiled by the National Climatic Data Center (Asheville, North Carolina). The <span class="hlt">daily</span> data network (herein referred to as the HCN/D) consists of stations considered to be the best of those from the HCN, selected to provide reasonably homogeneous spatial coverage of the contiguous US after considering the temporal homogeneity of each station`s observing times, instrument types/positions, and surroundings. The data for each station extend through 1987, and most station records are complete for at least 80 years. The <span class="hlt">daily</span> resolution of these data lends maximum flexibility for studies attempting to detect and monitor long-term climatic changes on a regional scale. Studies using <span class="hlt">daily</span> data may be able to detect changes in regional climate that would not be apparent from analysis of the more commonly used monthly temperature and precipitation data. Such studies may include analyses of trends in maximum/minimum temperatures, temperature extremes, <span class="hlt">daily</span> temperature range, precipitation ``event size`` frequency, and the magnitude and duration of wet and dry periods. Other applications of the data include planning and risk assessment in areas such as agriculture, natural resource exploration, and construction. This document describes how the stations in the HCN/D were selected, defines limitations and restrictions of the data, describes the format and contents of the magnetic tape, and provides reprints of literature pertinent to the collection and application of <span class="hlt">daily</span> climate data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaiser, D.P. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Hughes, P.Y.; Mason, E.H.; Karl, T.R.; Brower, W.A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Asheville, NC (United States). National Climatic Data Center</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23949604"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inorganic arsenic in the Japanese diet: <span class="hlt">daily</span> intake and source.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The concentrations of arsenic (As) species in 19 food composites prepared from 159 food items purchased in Shizuoka city, Japan, were determined (1) to estimate total <span class="hlt">daily</span> intake of inorganic As (InAs) and some organic As species and (2) to determine food contributing to total <span class="hlt">daily</span> InAs intake. As analysis included extraction of As species with a synthetic gastric juice (0.07 mol/L HCl + 0.01 % pepsin) from food composite and high-performance liquid chromatography-high efficiency photo-oxidation-hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. InAs was detected in 9 of 19 food composites at a concentration of 0.423-450 ng As/g fresh-weight. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> intake of InAs from cereals was greatest (13 ?g/person/day) followed by algae (5.7 ?g/person/day), and the intake from the two categories constituted 90 % of the total <span class="hlt">daily</span> InAs intake of adults (21 ?g/person/day on a bioaccessible-fraction basis and 24 ?g/person/day on a content basis). Analysis of individual food items showed that rice and hijiki contributed virtually 100 % of InAs from cereals and algae, respectively. The present survey indicated that InAs from rice and hijiki consumption contributed to total <span class="hlt">daily</span> InAs intake and consequently to significant cancer risk of the general Japanese population. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> intake of some organic forms of As and their contributing food categories was also estimated. PMID:23949604</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oguri, Tomoko; Yoshinaga, Jun; Tao, Hiroaki; Nakazato, Tetsuya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70027139"> <span id="translatedtitle">Statistical procedures for evaluating <span class="hlt">daily</span> and monthly hydrologic model predictions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The overall study objective was to evaluate the applicability of different qualitative and quantitative methods for comparing <span class="hlt">daily</span> and monthly SWAT computer model hydrologic streamflow predictions to observed data, and to recommend statistical methods for use in future model evaluations. Statistical methods were tested using <span class="hlt">daily</span> streamflows and monthly equivalent runoff depths. The statistical techniques included linear regression, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, nonparametric tests, t-test, objective functions, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation. None of the methods specifically applied to the non-normal distribution and dependence between data points for the <span class="hlt">daily</span> predicted and observed data. Of the tested methods, median objective functions, sign test, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation were most applicable for the <span class="hlt">daily</span> data. The robust coefficient of determination (CD*) and robust modeling efficiency (EF*) objective functions were the preferred methods for <span class="hlt">daily</span> model results due to the ease of comparing these values with a fixed ideal reference value of one. Predicted and observed monthly totals were more normally distributed, and there was less dependence between individual monthly totals than was observed for the corresponding predicted and observed <span class="hlt">daily</span> values. More statistical methods were available for comparing SWAT model-predicted and observed monthly totals. The 1995 monthly SWAT model predictions and observed data had a regression Rr2 of 0.70, a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.41, and the t-test failed to reject the equal data means hypothesis. The Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient and the R r2 coefficient were the preferred methods for monthly results due to the ability to compare these coefficients to a set ideal value of one.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Coffey, M. E.; Workman, S. R.; Taraba, J. L.; Fogle, A. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4013386"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fish Consumption, Sleep, <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Functioning, and Heart Rate Variability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Study Objectives: This study investigated the effects of fatty fish on sleep, <span class="hlt">daily</span> functioning and biomarkers such as heart rate variability (HRV), vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in red blood cells. Moreover the relationship among sleep, <span class="hlt">daily</span> functioning, HRV, vitamin D status, and levels of EPA+DHA was investigated. Methods: Ninety-five male forensic patients from a secure forensic inpatient facility in the USA were randomly assigned into a Fish or a Control group. The Fish group received Atlantic salmon three times per week from September to February, and the Control group was provided an alternative meal (e.g., chicken, pork, beef), but with the same nutritional value as their habitual diet, three times per week during the same period. Sleep (sleep latency, sleep efficiency, actual sleep time, and actual wake time), self-perceived sleep quality and <span class="hlt">daily</span> functioning, as well as vitamin D status, EPA+DHA, and HRV, were assessed pre- and post-intervention period. Results: There was a significant increase in sleep latency from pre- to post-test in the Control group. The Fish group reported better <span class="hlt">daily</span> functioning than the Control group during post-test. Fish consumption throughout the wintertime had also an effect on resting HRV and EPA+DHA, but not on vitamin D status. However, at post-test, the vitamin D status in the Fish group was still closer to the level regarded as optimal compared to the Control group. Vitamin D status correlated negatively with actual wake time and positively with sleep efficiency during pre-test, as well as positively with <span class="hlt">daily</span> functioning and sleep quality during post-test. Finally, HRV correlated negatively with sleep latency and positively with <span class="hlt">daily</span> functioning. Conclusions: Fish consumption seemed to have a positive impact on sleep in general and also on <span class="hlt">daily</span> functioning, which may be related to vitamin D status and HRV. Citation: Hansen AL, Dahl L, Olson G, Thornton D, Graff IE, Frøyland L, Thayer JF, Pallesen S. Fish consumption, sleep, <span class="hlt">daily</span> functioning, and heart rate variability. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(5):567-575. PMID:24812543</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hansen, Anita L.; Dahl, Lisbeth; Olson, Gina; Thornton, David; Graff, Ingvild E.; Frøyland, Livar; Thayer, Julian F.; Pallesen, Staale</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AtmEn..43.1364H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two <span class="hlt">daily</span> smoke maxima in eighteenth century London air</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Varied electrostatics experiments followed Benjamin Franklin's pioneering atmospheric investigations. In Knightsbridge, Central London, John Read (1726-1814) installed a sensing rod in the upper part of his house and, using a pith ball electrometer and Franklin chimes, monitored atmospheric electricity from 1789 to 1791. Atmospheric electricity is sensitive to weather and smoke pollution. In calm weather conditions, Read observed two <span class="hlt">daily</span> electrification maxima in moderate weather, around 9 am and 7 pm. This is likely to represent a double diurnal cycle in urban smoke. Before the motor car and steam railways, one source of the double maximum smoke pattern was the <span class="hlt">daily</span> routine of fire lighting for domestic heating.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harrison, R. Giles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMSA51D1968S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-term variation in the upper atmosphere as seen in the amplitude of the geomagnetic solar quiet <span class="hlt">daily</span> variation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been well-known that geomagnetic solar quiet (Sq) <span class="hlt">daily</span> variation is produced by <span class="hlt">global</span> ionospheric currents flowing in the E-region from middle latitudes to the magnetic equator. These currents are generated by a dynamo process via interaction between the neutral wind and ionospheric plasma in a region of the thermosphere and ionosphere. From the Ohm's equation, the ionospheric currents strongly depend on the ionospheric conductivity, polarization electric field and neutral wind. Then, to investigate the Sq amplitude is essential for understanding the long-term variations in the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind of the thermosphere and ionosphere. Elias et al. [2010] found that the Sq amplitude tends to increase by 5.4-9.9 % in the middle latitudes from 1961 to 2001. They mentioned that the long-term variation of ionospheric conductivity associated with geomagnetic secular variation mainly determines the Sq trend, but that the rest component is ionospheric conductivity enhancement associated with cooling effects in the thermosphere due to increasing the greenhouse gases. In this talk, we clarify the characteristics of the long-term variation in the Sq amplitude using the long-term observation data of geomagnetic field and neutral wind. These observation data have been provided by the IUGONET (Inter-university Upper atmosphere <span class="hlt">Global</span> Observation NETwork) project. In the present analysis, we used the F10.7 flux as an indicator of the variation in the solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> in the EUV and UV range, geomagnetic field data with time resolution of 1 hour. The definition of the Sq amplitude is the difference of the H-component between the maximum and minimum per day when the Kp index is less than 4. As a result, the Sq amplitude at all the stations strongly depends on 11-year solar activity, and tends to enhance more during the high activities (19- and 22- solar cycles) than during the low activity (20-solar cycle). The Fourier spectra of the F10.7 flux and Sq amplitude at Guam (13.59N, 144.87E) showed that the common peaks appear at the periods of 5.5, 7,5 and 10.5 years with the coherence of more than 0.9 while the spectrum peaks around 0.5 and 1.0 year appear only in the Sq amplitude. The former peak of the Sq amplitude is due to the solar activity while the latter is a cause of the upper atmosphere variation. In order to minimize the solar activity dependence of the Sq amplitude, we calculated the residual Sq amplitude using a second degree polynomial curve between the F10.7 and Sq amplitude during 1957-2010, and examined the residual Sq field defined as the deviation from the fitting curve. The residual Sq amplitude showed a clear tendency to increase and decrease during the periods of 1957-1992 and 1993-2010, respectively. It should be noted that the residual Sq amplitude around 2010 is almost the same level as that around 1970. In order to verify qualitatively the above signatures, we need to investigate the long-term variation in the ionospheric conductivities calculated with the IRI-2007 and MSIS-00 models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shinbori, A.; Koyama, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Nose, M.; Hori, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Tsuda, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997SPIE.3139..225L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance validation of an <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> redistribution guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Science Applications International Corporation has used a unique nonimaging-optical <span class="hlt">global</span> optimization computer code, NICOS, to design an innovative secondary concentrator for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). NICOS allows for the optimal design of such devices to achieve a variety of <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> distributions on a desired target. The case of interest to NREL called for a uniform <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> of concentrated sunlight over a relatively large area and at a reasonable working distance from the exit of the device. Because the <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> at the nominal focal point of NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) was reshaped from a near- Gaussian distribution to a nearly uniform one, the designs generated have been called <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> redistribution guides (IRG). A design featuring reentrant optics was selected for fabrication and testing. This IRG has been fabricated and tested at the HFSF to compare predicted and measured performance. The IRG's performance is close to the theoretical predictions. Much of the performance difference can be explained by discrepancies between the actual HFSF performance relative to that assumed in the NICOS predictions. This IRG will be useful for applications in which uniform solar concentration at moderate flux is required. In general, the design methodology and resulting devices can provide a new way to satisfy diverse flux tailoring needs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lewandowski, Allan; Bingham, Carl; Shatz, Narkis E.; Bortz, John C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title48-vol5/pdf/CFR-2011-title48-vol5-sec836-573.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">48 CFR 836.573 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> report of workers and materials.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...<span class="hlt">Daily</span> report of workers and materials. 836.573 Section 836...CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses...<span class="hlt">Daily</span> report of workers and materials. The contracting officer...<span class="hlt">Daily</span> report of workers and materials, in solicitations and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title48-vol5/pdf/CFR-2010-title48-vol5-sec836-573.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">48 CFR 836.573 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> report of workers and materials.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...<span class="hlt">Daily</span> report of workers and materials. 836.573 Section 836...CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses...<span class="hlt">Daily</span> report of workers and materials. The contracting officer...<span class="hlt">Daily</span> report of workers and materials, in solicitations and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ebd06.ebd.csic.es/pdfs/Herrera.1990.Oikos.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">OIKOS 58: 277-288. Copenhagen 1990 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> patterns of pollinator activity, differential pollinating</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">OIKOS 58: 277-288. Copenhagen 1990 <span class="hlt">Daily</span> patterns of pollinator activity, differential pollinating Herrera, C . M. 1990. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> patterns of pollinator activity, differential pollinating effectiveness examined the <span class="hlt">daily</span> activity patterns of the pollinators of Lavandula latifolia (Labiatae), a summer</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Herrera, Carlos M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/sites/default/files/content/ghs/bay-area-series-jan-27a.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Health Seminar Series</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bay Area <span class="hlt">Global</span> Health Seminar Series <span class="hlt">Global</span> HIV/AIDS at the crossroads: Where do we go from here? Join us for the inaugural Bay Area <span class="hlt">Global</span> Health Seminar, a quarterly series of moderated salon seminar will feature a different <span class="hlt">global</span> health topic and be hosted by one of the four participating</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klein, Ophir</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/sites/default/files/content/ghs/bay-area-series-mar-31.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Health Seminar Series</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bay Area <span class="hlt">Global</span> Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in <span class="hlt">global</span> health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus <span class="hlt">global</span> health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in <span class="hlt">global</span> health</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Klein, Ophir</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a 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bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://environment.yale.edu/climate-communication/files/Six-Americas-September-2012.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">global</span> warming's six americas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">global</span> warming's six americas in september 2012 #12;<span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming's Six Americas, September 2012, G. & Howe, P. (2013) <span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming's Six Americas, September 2012. Yale University and George Mason and Costs of Reducing Fossil Fuel Use and <span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming 8 The Alarmed 9 The Concerned 10 The Cautious 11</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haller, Gary L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.chem.utoronto.ca/~jmschofi/ENV235/warming.ps"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming Observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming Observations: 1. <span class="hlt">Global</span> temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for <span class="hlt">global</span> warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines <span class="hlt">global</span> temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schofield, Jeremy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.geos.ed.ac.uk/research/globalchange/Global_Change_2007.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Change at Edinburgh</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> Change at Edinburgh 2007 #12;1 | <span class="hlt">Global</span> Change at Edinburgh © 2007 The University Illustration, Learning Technology Section, The University of Edinburgh School of GeoSciences #12;<span class="hlt">Global</span> Change at Edinburgh | 2 The <span class="hlt">Global</span> Change Group Human impacts on our planet are changing the atmosphere, climate, ice</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greenaway, Alan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51110164"> <span id="translatedtitle">Model-based <span class="hlt">global</span> assessment of OTEC resources with data validation off Southeast Florida</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">As part of an ongoing effort to create a publicly accessible GIS database that characterizes the <span class="hlt">global</span> OTEC resource, more than two years of <span class="hlt">daily</span> HYCOM (Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model) temperature data were processed. This <span class="hlt">global</span> dataset was used to estimate annual and seasonal averages of the temperature gradient between the sea surface and water at 1000 m depth, a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. T. Rauchenstein; J. H. VanZwieten; H. P. Hanson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.7366W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impacts of ENSO on <span class="hlt">global</span> hydrology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The economic consequences of flooding are huge, as exemplified by recent major floods in Thailand, Pakistan, and Australia. Moreover, research shows that economic losses due to flooding have increased dramatically in recent decades. Whilst much research is being carried out to assess how this may be related to socioeconomic development (increased exposure to floods) or climate change (increased hazard), the role of interannual climate variability is poorly understood at the <span class="hlt">global</span> scale. We provide the first <span class="hlt">global</span> assessment of the sensitivity of extreme <span class="hlt">global</span> river discharge to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Past studies have either: (a) assessed this at the local scale; or (b) assessed only <span class="hlt">global</span> correlations between ENSO and mean river discharge. Firstly, we used a <span class="hlt">daily</span> observed discharge dataset for 622 gauging stations (from the GRDC database), and assessed and mapped correlations and sensitivities between these time-series and several indices of ENSO. We found that, on average, for the stations studied ENSO has a greater impact on annual high-flow events than on mean annual discharge, especially in the extra-tropics. However, the geographical coverage of the dataset is poor in some regions, and is highly skewed towards certain areas (e.g. North America, Europe, and eastern Australia). This renders a truly <span class="hlt">global</span> assessment of ENSO impacts impossible based on these observed time-series. Hence, we are also using a modelling approach to estimate correlations and sensitivities in all basins, gauged and ungauged. For this, we are using a gridded time-series of modelled <span class="hlt">daily</span> discharge from the EU-WATCH project, and analysing relationships between these time-series (per grid-cell) and indices of ENSO. This allows for the first truly <span class="hlt">global</span> assessment of the impact of ENSO variability on river discharge; these analyses are ongoing. Of course, this approach entails its own problems; the use of <span class="hlt">global</span> hydrological models to derive <span class="hlt">daily</span> discharge time-series introduces its own uncertainties. Hence, the results derived from the modelling exercise will be validated against the results derived from the observed data. The quantification of ENSO impacts provides relevant information for water management, allowing the identification of problem areas and providing a basis for risk assessments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ward, P. J.; Eisner, S.; Flörke, M.; Kummu, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6496547"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reproduction of Japanese quail after microwave <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> (2. 45 GHz CW) during embryogeny</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) embryos were <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> continuously in ovo with 2.45-GHz continuous wave radiation during the first 12 days of embryogenesis at an incident power of 5 mW/cm2 and a specific absorption rate of 4.03 mW/g. The internal temperature of <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> and nonirradiated (sham) eggs was 37.5 +/- 0.3 degrees C, which is the optimum temperature for incubating quail eggs. At 35 days after hatching <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> and sham-<span class="hlt">irradiated</span> males were paired with <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> or sham-<span class="hlt">irradiated</span> females and <span class="hlt">daily</span> records of reproductive performance were collected through 224 days of age. Progeny were hatched from each of the male-female pairs, and progeny reproductive performance was measured from 35 through 168 days of age. Hatchability was not affected by <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> during embryogeny. Mortality after hatching, egg production, egg weight, fertility, hatchability of eggs produced, and reproductive performance of the progeny were not affected by <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> during embryogeny. These observations indicate that <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> of quail embryos with low-level microwave radiation does not affect the reproductive capacity of the hatchlings or of progeny produced from quail <span class="hlt">irradiated</span> during incubation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gildersleeve, R.P.; Galvin, M.J.; McRee, D.I.; Thaxton, J.P.; Parkhurst, C.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002JNuM..307.1655P"> <span id="translatedtitle">The ARBOR <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> project</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> project 'ARBOR', for 'Associated Reactor <span class="hlt">Irradiation</span> in BOR 60', includes 150 mini-tensile/low cycle fatigue specimens and 150 mini-Charpy (KLST) specimens of nine different RAFM steels. Specimens began <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> on 22 November 2000 in an specially designed <span class="hlt">irradiation</span> rig in BOR 60, in a fast neutron flux (>0.1 MeV) of 1.8×10 15 n/cm 2 s and with direct sodium cooling at a temperature less than 340 °C. Tensile, low cycle fatigue and Charpy specimens of the following materials are included: EUROFER 97, F82H mod., OPTIFER IVc, EUROFER 97 with different boron contents, ODS-EUROFER 97, as well as EUROFER 97 electron-beam welded and reference bulk material, from NRG, Petten.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Petersen, C.; Shamardin, V.; Fedoseev, A.; Shimansky, G.; Efimov, V.; Rensman, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMGC41A0677R"> <span id="translatedtitle">New Version of the Data Set "<span class="hlt">Daily</span> Temperature and Precipitation Data for 223 USSR Stations"</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The first version of the data set "<span class="hlt">Daily</span> Temperature and Precipitation Data for 223 USSR Stations" contains mean <span class="hlt">daily</span>, minimum and maximum air temperatures and <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation totals for 223 stations of the former USSR for the period 1881 - 1989. The data set was created by RIHMI-WDC and was jointly prepared for publication by RIHMI-WDC and Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC; ORNL, Oak Ridge, USA). The data set was described by V.N. Razuvaev, E.G. Apasova, R.A. Martuganov (RIHMI-WDC) and Russel Vose (CDIAC) and was published by CDIAC in 1993 as ORNL/CDIAC 56 (NDP-40) (Razuvaev et al. 1993). The data set is distributed free of charge by request. The data set has recently been widely used by the international scientific community to study climate changes over the Russian territory and their relation to <span class="hlt">global</span> climate changes. The authors have received a lot of responses and comments concerning data quality, errors and uncertainties, and proposals to improve the data set. Particular attention was given to the need for complementing the data set with current data. Currently, a new version of the data set has been prepared, including the data up to 2006. Wherever possible, errors in data are corrected and gaps are filled. The new version has a data retrieval system and is complemented with a metadata set. Unfortunately, some stations over the Russian territory were closed and a number of stations in the former USSR republics (beyond Russia) do not make their information available for the international data exchange. The new version has already been used in analyzing the climate changes and the frequency of extreme events over the Russian territory (Bulygina et al. 2007). The new version of the data set is available from the RIHMI-WDC Web site http://www.meteo.ru and is disseminated free of charge. The English copy of the data set will also be available from the CDIAC Web site.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Razuvaev, V. N.; Bulygina, O. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25207653"> <span id="translatedtitle">Coping with <span class="hlt">daily</span> thermal variability: behavioural performance of an ectotherm model in a warming world.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Global</span> climate change poses one of the greatest threats to species persistence. Most analyses of the potential biological impacts have focused on changes in mean temperature, but changes in thermal variance will also impact organisms and populations. We assessed the effects of acclimation to <span class="hlt">daily</span> variance of temperature on dispersal and exploratory behavior in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio laevis in an open field. Acclimation treatments were 24 ± 0, 24 ± 4 and 24 ± 8 °C. Because the performance of ectotherms relates nonlinearly to temperature, we predicted that animals acclimated to a higher <span class="hlt">daily</span> thermal variation should minimize the time exposed in the centre of open field, --i.e. increase the linearity of displacements. Consistent with our prediction, isopods acclimated to a thermally variable environment reduce their exploratory behaviour, hypothetically to minimize their exposure to adverse environmental conditions. This scenario as well as the long latency of animals after releases acclimated to variable environments is consistent with this idea. We suggested that to develop more realistic predictions about the biological impacts of climate change, one must consider the interactions between the mean and variance of environmental temperature on animals' performance. PMID:25207653</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rojas, José M; Castillo, Simón B; Folguera, Guillermo; Abades, Sebastián; Bozinovic, Francisco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeoRL..40..589C"> <span id="translatedtitle">The role of land use change in the recent warming of <span class="hlt">daily</span> extreme temperatures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><title type="main">Abstract Understanding how temperature extremes respond in a climate forced by human activity is of great importance, as extreme temperatures are detrimental to health and often responsible for mortality increases. While previous detection and attribution studies demonstrated a significant human influence on the recent warming of <span class="hlt">daily</span> extremes, contributions of individual anthropogenic forcings like changes in land use have not yet been investigated in such studies. Here we apply an optimal fingerprinting technique to data from observations and experiments with a new earth system model to examine whether changing land use has led to detectable changes in <span class="hlt">daily</span> extreme temperatures on a quasi-<span class="hlt">global</span> scale. We find that loss of trees and increase of grassland since preindustrial times has caused an overall cooling trend in both mean and extreme temperatures which is detectable in the observed changes of warm but not cold extremes. The warming in both mean and extreme temperatures due to anthropogenic forcings other than land use is detected in all cases, whereas the weaker effect of natural climatic forcings is not detected in any. This is the first formal attribution of observed climatic changes to changing land use, suggesting further investigations are justified, particularly in studies of warm extremes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Christidis, Nikolaos; Stott, Peter A.; Hegerl, Gabriele C.; Betts, Richard A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JHyd..414..284R"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> streamflow forecasting by machine learning methods with weather and climate inputs</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SummaryWeather forecast data generated by the NOAA <span class="hlt">Global</span> Forecasting System (GFS) model, climate indices, and local meteo-hydrologic observations were used to forecast <span class="hlt">daily</span> streamflows for a small watershed in British Columbia, Canada, at lead times of 1-7 days. Three machine learning methods - Bayesian neural network (BNN), support vector regression (SVR) and Gaussian process (GP) - were used and compared with multiple linear regression (MLR). The nonlinear models generally outperformed MLR, and BNN tended to slightly outperform the other nonlinear models. Among various combinations of predictors, local observations plus the GFS output were generally best at shorter lead times, while local observations plus climate indices were best at longer lead times. The climate indices selected include the sea surface temperature in the Niño 3.4 region, the Pacific-North American teleconnection (PNA), the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). In the binary forecasts for extreme (high) streamflow events, the best predictors to use were the local observations plus GFS output. Interestingly, climate indices contribute to <span class="hlt">daily</span> streamflow forecast scores during longer lead times of 5-7 days, but not to forecast scores for extreme streamflow events for all lead times studied (1-7 days).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rasouli, Kabir; Hsieh, William W.; Cannon, Alex J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2657440"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Globalization</span> and human cooperation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Globalization</span> magnifies the problems that affect all people and that require large-scale human cooperation, for example, the overharvesting of natural resources and human-induced <span class="hlt">global</span> warming. However, what does <span class="hlt">globalization</span> imply for the cooperation needed to address such <span class="hlt">global</span> social dilemmas? Two competing hypotheses are offered. One hypothesis is that <span class="hlt">globalization</span> prompts reactionary movements that reinforce parochial distinctions among people. Large-scale cooperation then focuses on favoring one's own ethnic, racial, or language group. The alternative hypothesis suggests that <span class="hlt">globalization</span> strengthens cosmopolitan attitudes by weakening the relevance of ethnicity, locality, or nationhood as sources of identification. In essence, <span class="hlt">globalization</span>, the increasing interconnectedness of people worldwide, broadens the group boundaries within which individuals perceive they belong. We test these hypotheses by measuring <span class="hlt">globalization</span> at both the country and individual levels and analyzing the relationship between <span class="hlt">globalization</span> and individual cooperation with distal others in multilevel sequential cooperation experiments in which players can contribute to individual, local, and/or <span class="hlt">global</span> accounts. Our samples were drawn from the general populations of the United States, Italy, Russia, Argentina, South Africa, and Iran. We find that as country and individual levels of <span class="hlt">globalization</span> increase, so too does individual cooperation at the <span class="hlt">global</span> level vis-à-vis the local level. In essence, “<span class="hlt">globalized</span>” individuals draw broader group boundaries than others, eschewing parochial motivations in favor of cosmopolitan ones. <span class="hlt">Globalization</span> may thus be fundamental in shaping contemporary large-scale cooperation and may be a positive force toward the provision of <span class="hlt">global</span> public goods. PMID:19255433</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Buchan, Nancy R.; Grimalda, Gianluca; Wilson, Rick; Brewer, Marilynn; Fatas, Enrique; Foddy, Margaret</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3781502"> <span id="translatedtitle">Efficacy and Safety of Lixisenatide Once <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Versus Exenatide Twice <span class="hlt">Daily</span> in Type 2 Diabetes Inadequately Controlled on Metformin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">OBJECTIVE To compare efficacy and safety of lixisenatide once <span class="hlt">daily</span> versus exenatide twice <span class="hlt">daily</span> in type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adults with diabetes inadequately controlled (HbA1c 7–10%) with metformin were randomized to lixisenatide 20 ?g once <span class="hlt">daily</span> (n = 318) or exenatide 10 ?g twice <span class="hlt">daily</span> (n = 316) in a 24-week (main period), open-label, parallel-group, multicenter study. The primary objective was a noninferiority assessment of lixisenatide versus exenatide in HbA1c change from baseline to week 24. RESULTS Lixisenatide once <span class="hlt">daily</span> demonstrated noninferiority in HbA1c reduction versus exenatide twice <span class="hlt">daily</span>. The least squares mean change was ?0.79% (mean decrease 7.97 to 7.17%) for lixisenatide versus ?0.96% (mean decrease 7.96 to 7.01%) for exenatide, and treatment difference was 0.17% (95% CI, 0.033–0.297), meeting a predefined noninferiority upper CI margin of 0.4%. Responder rate (HbA1c <7.0%) and improvements in fasting plasma glucose were comparable. Both agents induced weight loss (from 94.5 to 91.7 kg and from 96.7 to 92.9 kg with lixisenatide and exenatide, respectively). Incidence of adverse events (AEs) was similar for lixisenatide and exenatide, as was incidence of serious AEs (2.8 and 2.2%, respectively). Discontinuations attributable to AEs occurred in 33 lixisenatide (10.4%) and 41 exenatide (13.0%) patients. In the lixisenatide group, fewer participants experienced symptomatic hypoglycemia (2.5 vs. 7.9%; P < 0.05), with fewer gastrointestinal events (especially nausea; 24.5 vs. 35.1%; P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Add-on lixisenatide once <span class="hlt">daily</span> in type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin demonstrated noninferior improvements in HbA1c, with slightly lower mean weight loss, lower incidence of hypoglycemia, and better gastrointestinal tolerability compared with exenatide twice <span class="hlt">daily</span>. PMID:23698396</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosenstock, Julio; Raccah, Denis; Koranyi, Laszlo; Maffei, Laura; Boka, Gabor; Miossec, Patrick; Gerich, John E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/820g05j7607647x4.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis with unfractionated heparin in the hospitalized medical patient: the case for thrice <span class="hlt">daily</span> over twice <span class="hlt">daily</span> dosing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention in the hospitalized medical patient, no head-to-head trials have been performed\\u000a of unfractionated heparin (UFH) 5,000 U subcutaneously thrice (i.e. q8 h or TID) <span class="hlt">daily</span> versus twice <span class="hlt">daily</span> (q12 h or BID).\\u000a Several meta-analyses have been undertaken in attempts to determine whether one regimen may be more beneficial for safety\\u000a and efficacy. Currently, not all international guidelines include</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Charles E. Mahan; Mario Pini; Alex C. Spyropoulos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0706.4294v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cosmic Rays and <span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been claimed by others that observed temporal correlations of terrestrial cloud cover with `the cosmic ray intensity' are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and <span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim to look for evidence to corroborate it. So far we have not found any and so our tentative conclusions are to doubt it. Such correlations as appear are more likely to be due to the small variations in solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span>, which, of course, correlate with cosmic rays. We estimate that less than 15% of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 35 years is due to this cause.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Sloan; A W Wolfendale</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-06-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21052870"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cosmic Rays and <span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Some workers have claimed that the observed temporal correlations of (low level) terrestrial cloud cover with the cosmic ray intensity changes, due to solar modulation, are causal. The possibility arises, therefore, of a connection between cosmic rays and <span class="hlt">Global</span> Warming. If true, the implications would be very great. We have examined this claim in some detail. So far, we have not found any evidence in support and so our conclusions are to doubt it. From the absence of corroborative evidence we estimate that less than 15% at the 95% confidence level, of the 11-year cycle warming variations are due to cosmic rays and less than 2% of the warming over the last 43 years is due to this cause. The origin of the correlation itself is probably the cycle of solar <span class="hlt">irradiance</span> although there is, as yet, no certainty.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sloan, T. [Physics Department, University of Lancaster, Lancaster, UK (United Kingdom); Wolfendale, A. W. [Physics Department, Durham University, Durham (United Kingdom)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IJBm..tmp...34M"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable <span class="hlt">daily</span> meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether <span class="hlt">daily</span> meteorological variables—namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature—influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, <span class="hlt">daily</span> meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between <span class="hlt">daily</span> meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://preuss.ucsd.edu/_files/daily-bulletin/april-24-2012.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Preuss School UCSD <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Bulletin B Day</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Preuss School UCSD <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Bulletin ­ B Day April 24, 2012 After School Tutoring - Science, C101, C202 - Math, A101, D101 - Spanish, A203 - Preuss Student Scientists, B103 High School Lunch Time've raised it by touch, doesn't mean it even when we'd memorized each other's Follows. All day it pecks</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Russell, Lynn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED142598.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Activities of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Living of Spanish-Speaking Immigrants.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This anthropological study reports on some of the activities of <span class="hlt">daily</span> living (ADL's) of 19 Spanish-speaking families living in a low income suburb of Washington, D.C. ADL's are defined as those functions which are performed on a usual day. Generically they include eating, sleeping, communicating, working, and recreating. In this paper, they…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ailinger, Rita L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Stress+AND+graduate+AND+psychology+AND+student&pg=5&id=ED264797"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Comparison of Graduate and Professional Students: Their <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Stressors.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The stressful effects of advanced academic training were examined in a comparison of six graduate and professional programs at Vanderbilt University. The focus was on the nonacademic, <span class="hlt">daily</span> stressors and negative mood states of 152 students in medicine, business, divinity, graduate department of religion, and two graduate psychology departments.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smith, M. Shelton; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JHyd..228..188M"> <span id="translatedtitle">On stochastic properties of <span class="hlt">daily</span> river flow processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A study of the structure of <span class="hlt">daily</span> river flows is made by means of the correlation theory of stochastic processes, i.e. on the basis of time functions of the first two moments: mean, variance, and autocorrelation function. The experimental basis of the study are long (over 50 years) time series of <span class="hlt">daily</span> flows, without any gaps from five stations, with an average length of 71.2 years and areas of drainage basins ranging from 25,083 to 131,959 km 2. As a result of the analysis, it can be stated that (i) days with high mean have also high variance; (ii) the coefficients of variations cannot be considered to be constant even approximately (iii) the lag 1 autocorrelation functions ? i(1), i=1,2,…,365, estimated "over realizations" have at least half of their coefficients significantly different from other coefficients; (iv) autocorrelation functions estimated "over time" are greater in the absolute value for data which have not been standardized but were initially treated with the logarithmic transformation only; (v) autocorrelation functions estimated "over realizations" are preferred to autocorrelation functions estimated "over time" because the <span class="hlt">daily</span> river process is not ergodic. It is suggested that the description of <span class="hlt">daily</span> flows as ergodic stochastic processes should be abandoned and the autocorrelation functions should be estimated "over realizations". The "over time" estimated autocorrelation functions may only be treated as a very rough approximation of the "over realizations" autocorrelation functions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mitosek, H. T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.zoology.ubc.ca/files/203._Validation_of_the_use_of_doubly_labeled_water.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">INTRODUCTION <span class="hlt">Daily</span> energetic expenditure and timeenergy budgets are useful for</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">of DLW to determine background enrichment of the isotopes naturally occurring in the animal Canada, 2 Conservation and Fisheries Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and Labour, Government insight into an animal's <span class="hlt">daily</span> food requirements and allocation of energy to various activities (i</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schluter, Dolph</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=banerjee&pg=2&id=EJ1014350"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supporting Classroom Transitions between <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Routines: Strategies and Tips</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of this article is to provide tools for preschool professionals to plan for transitions between <span class="hlt">daily</span> routines, to identify challenging transitions during the day, and to offer strategies to support transitions in classrooms to prevent challenging behaviors from occurring due to frequent changes. Specifically, the authors answer three…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Banerjee, Rashida; Horn, Eva</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED027993.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> Modular Scheduling Practice at Pahranagat Valley High School. Report.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The main topic discussed is a <span class="hlt">daily</span> modular scheduling system initiated for the small enrollment at Pahranagat Valley High School in Alamo, Nevada, with specific reference to types of instruction, schedule procedures, and conflict problems. An evaluation of the scheduling system is also included. The report is written in dissertation format, which…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anderson, David Neil</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.lanl.gov/safety/electrical/docs/lithium_battery.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Description: Lithium batteries are used <span class="hlt">daily</span> in our work</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Description: Lithium batteries are used <span class="hlt">daily</span> in our work activities from flashlights, cell phones containing one SureFire 3-volt non-rechargeable 123 lithium battery and one Interstate 3-volt non-rechargeable 123 lithium battery. A Garage Mechanic had the SureFire flashlight in his shirt pocket with the lens</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23885246"> <span id="translatedtitle">Physical activity and affect in elementary school children's <span class="hlt">daily</span> lives.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A positive influence of physical activity (PA) on affect has been shown in numerous studies. However, this relationship has not yet been studied in the <span class="hlt">daily</span> life of children. We present a part of the FLUX study that attempts to contribute to filling that gap. To this end, a proper way to measure PA and affect in the <span class="hlt">daily</span> life of children is needed. In pre-studies of the FLUX study, we were able to show that affect can be measured in children with self-report items that are answered using smartphones. In the current article, we show that it is feasible to objectively measure children's PA with accelerometers for a period of several weeks and report descriptive information on the amount of activity of 51 children from 3rd and 4th grade. Additionally, we investigate the influence of <span class="hlt">daily</span> PA on <span class="hlt">daily</span> affect in children. Mixed effects models show no effect of PA on any of the four measured dimensions of affect. We discuss that this might be due to effects taking place at shorter time intervals, which can be investigated in future analyses. PMID:23885246</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kühnhausen, Jan; Leonhardt, Anja; Dirk, Judith; Schmiedek, Florian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=motivation+AND+for+AND+nontraditional+AND+students&pg=7&id=EJ680832"> <span id="translatedtitle">Australian and International Mature Students: The <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Challenges</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we explore the learning climate and possible obstacles faced by mature students enrolled in Australian universities. More specifically, using the Experience Sampling Method devised by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, we chart the <span class="hlt">daily</span> activities of Australian and international students and examine these for factors which may facilitate or…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leder, Gilah; Forgasz, Helen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=81983"> <span id="translatedtitle">THREE MILE CREEK TOTAL MAXIMUM <span class="hlt">DAILY</span> LOAD STUDY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The pupose of this project is to establish the allowable loading of pollutants, or other quantifiable parameters for Threemile Creek. These funds will assist ADEM in the preparation of Total Maximum <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Loads (TMDL) for the reduction and elimination of pollution in Threemile C...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/3049264"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating the Open Market Desk's <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Reaction Function</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper presents the results of an empirical investigation into the proximate determinants of the Federal Reserve's <span class="hlt">daily</span> open market operations. Using information available each morning at the Fed conference call, the author models the Open Market Desk's choice of both the quantity and the type of operation, using a friction model for the former and a multinomial logit framework</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Joshua N Feinman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/31152720"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improving communication in the ICU using <span class="hlt">daily</span> goals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background: Clear communication is imperative if teams in any industry expect to make improvements. An estimated 85% of errors across industries result from communication failures. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of communication during patient care rounds in the intensive care unit (ICU) using a <span class="hlt">daily</span> goals form. Design: We conducted a prospective</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter Pronovost; Sean Berenholtz; Todd Dorman; Pam A. Lipsett; Terri Simmonds; Carol Haraden</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%2215+M%22&pg=6&id=EJ876060"> <span id="translatedtitle">Keeping Secrets from Parents: <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Variations among Poor, Urban Adolescents</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> variations in secrecy with mothers and fathers were examined in 108 poor, urban, diverse middle adolescents (M = 15.16 years, SD = 0.89). Adolescents completed online diaries over 14 days assessing secrecy from parents about school, personal, and multifaceted activities (e.g., staying out late), and bad behavior. Three-level hierarchical…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smetana, Judith G.; Villalobos, Myriam; Rogge, Ronald D.; Tasopoulos-Chan, Marina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/34987894"> <span id="translatedtitle">Psychosocial influences on blood pressure during <span class="hlt">daily</span> life</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring allows frequent non-invasive blood pressure (BP) recordings in a variety of settings. Emerging evidence suggests that ABP is a better predictor of cardiovascular morbidity than clinic BP. Ambulatory blood pressure is influenced by a variety of physical, psychological and behavioral factors that comprise an individual's <span class="hlt">daily</span> life. The present article reviews psychosocial research relating ABP</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert A Carels; Andrew Sherwood; James A Blumenthal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36009929"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> consumption of individual snack foods decreases their reinforcing value</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The reinforcing value of food is one factor that influences energy intake. The purpose of this study was to determine if the reinforcing value of highly liked snack foods could be modified by restriction or <span class="hlt">daily</span> intake of individual preferred foods in the absence of changes in total energy intake. Food reinforcement was tested at baseline and after each of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jennifer L. Temple; Ashley Chappel; Jennifer Shalik; Suzanne Volcy; Leonard H. Epstein</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24851413"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Daily</span> and seasonal activity patterns in blackheaded munia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To test the circadian clock characteristics, activity behaviour of male blackheaded munia was recorded. Two experiments were performed. In experiment 1A, activity of munia was recorded under long days, LD (14L: 10D); and short days, SD (10L: 14D). Locomotor activity of two groups of munia exposed to equinox (12L: 12D) daylength followed by transfer of one group each to continuous dimlight (DD) and continuous bright light (LL) was recorded in experiment 1B. Experiment 2 aimed to describe seasonal trend in <span class="hlt">daily</span> pattern of activity/rest cycle under natural illumination conditions (NDL). Hourly activity during daytime was more under SD than under LD. Munia did not exhibit bimodality in <span class="hlt">daily</span> activity pattern; activity during morning, M (2h) was more than evening, E. A free-running activity rhythm was recorded in munia under DD; the same was arrhythmic under LL. The seasonal pattern in <span class="hlt">daily</span> activity profiles under NDL corresponds to the seasonal changes in daylength. Daylength regulates <span class="hlt">daily</span> and seasonal activity patterns in blackheaded munia. PMID:24851413</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">GuptA, Neelu Jain</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=applied+AND+analysis&pg=4&id=EJ771599"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fostering Activities of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Living by Intact Nursing Home Residents</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We assessed effectiveness of four education programs in providing nursing assistants with ability to produce a therapeutic milieu supportive of intact residents' activities of <span class="hlt">daily</span> living, positive self-esteem and mood: (1) a combination of Orem's Systems of Nursing Care and Skinner's Applied Behavioral Analysis, (2) Applied Behavioral Analysis,…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blair, Charles E.; Glaister, Judy; Brown, Alston; Phillips, Carolyn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://preuss.ucsd.edu/_files/daily-bulletin/january-10-2012.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Preuss School UCSD <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Bulletin B Day</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Preuss School UCSD <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Bulletin ­ B Day January 10, 2012 After School Tutoring - Science, C102/C202 - Math, A101/D101 - Spanish, A203 - Preuss Student Scientists, B103 High School Lunch Time vs. Gompers at Preuss, 3:15pm - Boy's Varsity BB vs. Escondido Charter at Escondido Charter, 7:30pm</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Russell, Lynn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23876991"> <span id="translatedtitle">Needs, concerns, strategies, and advice of <span class="hlt">daily</span> home hemodialysis caregivers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Improved patient outcomes have led to increased international interest in <span class="hlt">daily</span> home hemodialysis as a kidney replacement therapy. <span class="hlt">Daily</span> home hemodialysis often requires the assistance of a caregiver during and between treatments. Understanding the needs and concerns of caregivers of persons on <span class="hlt">daily</span> home hemodialysis will inform the design of supportive interventions to improve caregiver retention and maintain their health and well-being. Using a descriptive qualitative design, the purpose of this study was to identify and describe the needs, concerns, strategies, and advice of family caregivers. Twenty-one caregivers were interviewed; five of these individuals were former caregivers of patients who had returned to outpatient hemodialysis. Data were collected via audio-recorded telephone interviews following a semistructured interview guide with five open-ended questions. A content analysis approach was used to code and analyze the data. Caregivers described needs, concerns, and strategies and offered advice in five predetermined major categories. Major findings included a need for respite services and a need for interventions to manage the emotional responses to caregiving. This study provides valuable information about relevant areas to consider when developing an intervention program for <span class="hlt">daily</span> home hemodialysis caregivers. PMID:23876991</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Welch, Janet L; Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Bakas, Tamilyn; McLennon, Susan M; Byers, Doris M; Monetti, Catherine J; Decker, Brian S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.huli.group.shef.ac.uk/dailytelegraph2009.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Telegraph Higher hormones equal robust offspring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Telegraph Higher hormones equal robust offspring By Kate Sikora and Amy Dale From. Scientists have found that women taking the birth control pill have stable hormone levels and are attracted to the less masculine men, while women who don't take the Pill are at the mercy of their fluctuating hormones</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lummaa, Virpi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.med.upenn.edu/uep/user_documents/VanDongen_etal_Sleep_26_2_2003.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">INTRODUCTION THE DEBATE OVER <span class="hlt">DAILY</span> SLEEP NEED IN MODERN HUMANS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">is known about the effects of the relatively common practice of chronically reducing time for sleep during <span class="hlt">daily</span> sleep is reduced across many days. Experimental reports on the effects of long-term chronic sleep, confounded and/or insensitive measures of sleep and waking; and lacked sophisticated time series analyses</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pennsylvania, University of</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26189739"> <span id="translatedtitle">A continous point process model for <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A probabilistic model for the temporal description of <span class="hlt">daily</span> rainfall at a fixed point is presented. The model is a member of the family of point process models. Model development is based on statistics estimated from rainfall data in Lebanon. Scale considerations for Markovian models and a theory of projection are used to determine the continuous process of alternation between</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. Najem; Ecole Superieure</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">441</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED098585.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using Your <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Newspaper to Turn On the Resistant Reader.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">One of a series prepared by the Hawaii Newspaper Agency, this teaching guide offers suggestions on using the <span class="hlt">daily</span> newspaper to "turn on" the resistant reader. Sample materials describe how to use the 5 w's (who, what, where, when, why) and a H (how) to answer questions, read without words, play beginner's bridge, use comics for learning, watch…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hawaii Newspaper Agency, Inc., Honolulu.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">442</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/eimsapi.dispdetail?deid=57302"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">DAILY</span> MORTALITY AND FINE AND ULTRAFINE PARTICLES IN ERFURT, GERMANY</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dr H-Erich Wichmann and colleagues at the National Research Center for Environment and Health (GSF) in Neuherberg, Germany, prospec-tively studied the association of <span class="hlt">daily</span> mortality data with the number and mass concentrations of ultra-fine and fine particles in Erfurt, Ger...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">443</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=personality+AND+family+AND+friends&pg=5&id=EJ296514"> <span id="translatedtitle">Frequency of Social Evaluation in Self-Observed <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Interactions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Evaluated the assumption that social evaluations are infrequent in <span class="hlt">daily</span> interactions. Undergraduates (N=39) self-observed five different hours of social interaction and reported an average of 2.6 evaluations per rated hour of interaction. An average of 61 percent were rated positive. Family members gave positive evaluations less frequently than…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schoeneman, Thomas J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">444</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6037750"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recognizing <span class="hlt">daily</span> activities with RFID-based sensors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We explore a dense sensing approach that uses RFID sensor network technology to recognize human activities. In our setting, everyday objects are instrumented with UHF RFID tags called WISPs that are equipped with accelerometers. RFID readersdetect when the objects are used by examining this sensor data, and <span class="hlt">daily</span> activities are then inferred from the traces of object use via a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael Buettner; Richa Prasad; Matthai Philipose; David Wetherall</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">445</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.d2.mpi-inf.mpg.de/sites/default/files/StikicTPAMI2011.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Weakly Supervised Recognition of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life Activities with Wearable Sensors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">and nontrivial in particular for long-term recordings. There exists a wide range of annotation techniques number of activities and long periods of time. Experience sampling is based on periodic prompts of a userWeakly Supervised Recognition of <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Life Activities with Wearable Sensors Maja Stikic, Diane</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">446</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020069150&hterms=tibia&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dtibia"> <span id="translatedtitle">Skeletal Adaptation to <span class="hlt">Daily</span> Activity: A Biochemical Perspective</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Musculoskeletal forces generated by normal <span class="hlt">daily</span> activity on Earth maintain the functional and structural properties of muscle and bone throughout most of one's adult life. A reduction in the level of cumulative <span class="hlt">daily</span> loading caused by space flight, bed rest or spinal cord injury induces rapid muscle atrophy, functional changes in muscle, and bone resorption in regions subjected to the reduced loading. Bone cells in culture and bone tissue reportedly respond to a wide variety of non-mechanical and mechanical stimuli ranging, from electromagnetic fields, and hormones to small amplitude, high frequency vibrations, fluid flow, strain rate, and stress/strain magnitude. However, neither the transduction mechanism that transforms the mechanical input into a muscle or bone metabolic response nor the characteristics, of the loading history that directly or indirectly stimulates the cell is known. Identifying the factors contributing to the input stimulus will have a major impact on the design of effective countermeasures for long duration space flight. This talk will present a brief overview of current theories of bone remodeling and functional adaptation to mechanical loading. Work from our lab will be presented from the perspective of <span class="hlt">daily</span> cumulative loading on Earth and its relationship to bone density and structure. Our objective is to use the tibia and calcaneus as model bone sites of cortical and cancellous bone adaptation, loaded <span class="hlt">daily</span> by musculoskeletal forces in equilibrium with the ground reaction force. All materials that will be discussed are in the open scientific literature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whalen, Robert T.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">447</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48890551"> <span id="translatedtitle">A resampling procedure for generating conditioned <span class="hlt">daily</span> weather sequences</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method is introduced to generate conditioned <span class="hlt">daily</span> precipitation and temperature time series at multiple stations. The method resamples data from the historical record “nens” times for the period of interest (nens = number of ensemble members) and reorders the ensemble members to reconstruct the observed spatial (intersite) and temporal correlation statistics. The weather generator model is applied to 2307</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Martyn P. Clark; Subhrendu Gangopadhyay; David Brandon; Kevin Werner; Lauren Hay; Balaji Rajagopalan; David Yates</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">448</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title27-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title27-vol1-sec25-292.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">27 CFR 25.292 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> records of operations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Records and Reports § 25.292 <span class="hlt">Daily</span>...material received and used in the production of beer and cereal beverage (including the balling...of wort or concentrated wort). (2) Beer and cereal beverage produced...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">449</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title27-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title27-vol1-sec25-292.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">27 CFR 25.292 - <span class="hlt">Daily</span> records of operations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Records and Reports § 25.292 <span class="hlt">Daily</span>...material received and used in the production of beer and cereal beverage (including the balling...of wort or concentrated wort). (2) Beer and cereal beverage produced...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">450</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo