These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Environment Monitor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viking landers touched down on Mars equipped with a variety of systems to conduct automated research, each carrying a compact but highly sophisticated instrument for analyzing Martian soil and atmosphere. Instrument called a Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) had to be small, lightweight, shock resistant, highly automated and extremely sensitive, yet require minimal electrical power. Viking Instruments Corporation commercialized this technology and targeted their primary market as environmental monitoring, especially toxic and hazardous waste site monitoring. Waste sites often contain chemicals in complex mixtures, and the conventional method of site characterization, taking samples on-site and sending them to a laboratory for analysis is time consuming and expensive. Other terrestrial applications are explosive detection in airports, drug detection, industrial air monitoring, medical metabolic monitoring and for military, chemical warfare agents.

1988-01-01

2

Review of the Applications of Formosat-2 on Rapidly Responding to Global Disasters and Monitoring Earth Environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Formosat-2 is the first satellite with high-spatial-resolution sensor deployed in a daily-revisit orbit in the world. Together with its agility of pointing ±45 degree both across and along track, we are able to observe each accessible scene from the same angle under the similar illumination conditions. These characteristics make Formosat-2 an ideal satellite for site surveillance. We developed a Formosat-2 automatic image processing system (F-2 AIPS) that can accurately and rapidly process a large amount of Formosat-2 images to produce the higher levels of products, including rigorous band-to-band coregistration, automatic orthorectification, multi-temporal image coregistration and radiance normalization, and pan-sharpening. This system has been successfully employed to rapidly respond to many international disaster events in the past five years, including flood caused by Typhoon Mindulle (2004), landslide caused by Typhoon Aere (2004), South Asia earthquake and tsunami (2004), Hurricane Katrina (2005), California wildfire (2007), Sichuan Earthquake (2008), Typhoon Kalmaegi (2008), Typhoon Sinlaku (2008), Mountain Ali wildfire (2009), Victoria bushfire in Australia (2009), Honduras earthquake (2009), Typhoon Morakot (2009). This paper reviews the applications of Formosat-2 on rapidly responding to global disasters and monitoring earth environment.

Liu, C.

2009-12-01

3

Monitoring the Global Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this online, interactive module, students learn how enhanced Earth remote-sensing capabilities are used by dozens of satellites that are continuously collecting data from multiple vantage points. This allows scientists from different countries to transcend political and geographical boundaries by sharing data and ideas towards the common mission of caring for planet Earth. The module is part of an online course for grades 7-12 in satellite meteorology, which includes 10 interactive modules. The site also includes lesson plans developed by teachers and links to related resources. Each module is designed to serve as a stand-alone lesson, however, a sequential approach is recommended. Designed to challenge students through the end of 12th grade, middle school teachers and students may choose to skim or skip a few sections.

4

(Managing the global environment)  

SciTech Connect

The conference was stimulated by concern that policy makers increasingly have to make environmental management decisions in the absence of solidly established scientific consensus about ecological processes and the consequences of human actions. Often, as in the case of climate change, some decisions may have to be made in the absence of information that is desirable but may not be available for years to come, if ever. Six topics were identified as running throughout the Congress. These were: the epistemology and history of the sciences or disciplines concerned with the environment, including the scientific basis of rationality and modes of dealing with uncertainty and complexity; the social, economic, and institutional conditions for the production of knowledge bearing on the environment, including the politics of research and the improvement of scientific data; the structuring and institutionalization of expert assessments on national and international levels, including the global distribution of expertise; the means of establishing scientific information, the role of the media in transmitting and processing knowledge about the environment, and the organization of public environmental debate; and decision making and management under conditions of uncertainty; and, finally the relationship between science and ethics. 13 refs.

Rayner, S.F.

1989-10-03

5

GLobal Integrated Design Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE) is a collaborative engineering application built to resolve the design session issues of real-time passing of data between multiple discipline experts in a collaborative environment. Utilizing Web protocols and multiple programming languages, GLIDE allows engineers to use the applications to which they are accustomed in this case, Excel to send and receive datasets via the Internet to a database-driven Web server. Traditionally, a collaborative design session consists of one or more engineers representing each discipline meeting together in a single location. The discipline leads exchange parameters and iterate through their respective processes to converge on an acceptable dataset. In cases in which the engineers are unable to meet, their parameters are passed via e-mail, telephone, facsimile, or even postal mail. The result of this slow process of data exchange would elongate a design session to weeks or even months. While the iterative process remains in place, software can now exchange parameters securely and efficiently, while at the same time allowing for much more information about a design session to be made available. GLIDE is written in a compilation of several programming languages, including REALbasic, PHP, and Microsoft Visual Basic. GLIDE client installers are available to download for both Microsoft Windows and Macintosh systems. The GLIDE client software is compatible with Microsoft Excel 2000 or later on Windows systems, and with Microsoft Excel X or later on Macintosh systems. GLIDE follows the Client-Server paradigm, transferring encrypted and compressed data via standard Web protocols. Currently, the engineers use Excel as a front end to the GLIDE Client, as many of their custom tools run in Excel.

Kunkel, Matthew; McGuire, Melissa; Smith, David A.; Gefert, Leon P.

2011-01-01

6

Global nuclear material monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a one-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project provided a detailed systems design for advanced integrated facility monitoring and identified the components and enabling technologies required to facilitate the development of the monitoring system of the future.

Howell, J.A.; Monlove, H.O.; Goulding, C.A.; Martinez, B.J.; Coulter, C.A.

1997-08-01

7

Environment Monitoring -Robotic Sensor Agents  

E-print Network

contaminated), polluted natural environments, water treatment plants, nuclear stations, war zones, or remote, Ottawa, ON, Canada #12;Disaster prevention and management requires a clear understanding and monitoring

Petriu, Emil M.

8

Providing global WLCG transfer monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The WLCG[1] Transfers Dashboard is a monitoring system which aims to provide a global view of WLCG data transfers and to reduce redundancy in monitoring tasks performed by the LHC experiments. The system is designed to work transparently across LHC experiments and across the various technologies used for data transfer. Currently each LHC experiment monitors data transfers via experiment-specific systems but the overall cross-experiment picture is missing. Even for data transfers handled by FTS, which is used by 3 LHC experiments, monitoring tasks such as aggregation of FTS transfer statistics or estimation of transfer latencies are performed by every experiment separately. These tasks could be performed once, centrally, and then served to all experiments via a well-defined set of APIs. In the design and development of the new system, experience accumulated by the LHC experiments in the data management monitoring area is taken into account and a considerable part of the code of the ATLAS DDM Dashboard is being re-used. The paper describes the architecture of the Global Transfer monitoring system, the implementation of its components and the first prototype.

Andreeva, J.; Dieguez Arias, D.; Campana, S.; Flix, J.; Keeble, O.; Magini, N.; Molnar, Z.; Oleynik, D.; Petrosyan, A.; Ro, G.; Saiz, P.; Salichos, M.; Tuckett, D.; Uzhinsky, A.; Wildish, T.

2012-12-01

9

Monitoring the Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New ways of obtaining environmental data are being developed to meet the demand for comprehensive, accurate, and timely information on the environment. This article examines four developments that are transforming the entire field of environmental measurement: spectroscopy; satellite transmission of environmental data; remote sensing; and…

Heins, Conrad F.; And Others

1975-01-01

10

Towards the global monitoring of biodiversity change  

E-print Network

Towards the global monitoring of biodiversity change Henrique M. Pereira1,2,* and H. David Cooper3, Canada, H2Y1N9 Governments have set the ambitious target of reducing biodiversity loss by the year 2010. Here, we review current monitoring efforts and propose a global biodiversity monitoring network

Pereira, Henrique Miguel

11

Global ocean data for global weather and climate monitoring  

E-print Network

Jason-2 Global ocean data for global weather and climate monitoring #12;Global ocean data to meet of coupled ocean-atmosphere models used in climate research. Also, worldwide data sets are required importance for weather and climate. Currently, ocean altimetry satellites measure the height of the ocean

Stoffelen, Ad

12

MEMOS - Mars Environment Monitoring Satellite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF) in cooperation with the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) has conducted first studies on a Mars Environment Monitoring Satellite (MEMOS). The MEMOS microsatellite (mass < 20 kg) will accommodate four scientific instruments: solar EUV/UV monitor (SEM), solar wind monitor (SWIM), magnetometer (MAG) and radiation environment monitor (REM). The payload monitors the solar conditions at Mars and characterizes the Mars environment to support other missions and science investigations. Monitoring of the solar wind parameters (velocity, density, and field) is the key for any aeronomy and solar wind interaction mission at Mars. The solar EUV / UV (HeII 30.4 nm and HII 121.6 nm) flux monitoring is required for upper atmosphere / ionosphere studies. The radiation environment monitoring is needed to study space weather effects on the near-Mars environment as well as for the preparations for man-flights. MEMOS follows the design philosophy of a detached and autonomously flying instrument for achieving the mentioned objectives. It is intended to be carried "piggy-back" to Mars on a suitable mission. Potential missions are: ESA Mars orbiters within the NEXT or Cosmic Vision programs, NASA Mars orbiters, national / bilateral Mars missions. At Mars MEMOS is separated from its carrier (parent satellite) via the release mechanism implemented in the dual formation flight mission PRISMA. The separation will take place during the orbit insertion scenario of the parent satellite at Mars thus placing MEMOS in a highly elliptical orbit guarantying sufficient observation time in the solar wind. In orbit MEMOS will autonomously detumble and spin-up to ~1 rpm for reasons of stabilization and to fulfill instrument requirements. Such a low spin-rate is sufficient for a required inertial pointing accuracy of 2.5° because of the small external disturbance torques (< 10-7 Nm) predominant at Mars responsible for nutation and precession of the spin-axis. The advances in micropropulsion systems providing ?NmN adjustable thrust levels and reducing the dry mass to ~2 kg respectively are key factors in keeping the microsatellite stabilized and sun-pointed without stressing the mass budget. The low thrust level enables precise and active nutation damping. Moreover the system offers the possibility of implementing active orbit control or formation flight demonstrations at Mars. Attitude will be determined on-board with an accuracy < 1.0° using miniaturized Horizon Crossing Indicators, a two-axis sun sensor and in support accelerometers and gyroscopes based on MEMS-technology. TM/TC will be relayed via the parent satellite in the UHF frequency range. Therefore the Electra Lite (ELT) Proximity-1 transceiver will autonomously communicate with the parent satellite at inter-satellite ranges < 10 000 km featuring adaptive bit rates > 2 kbit/s. The transceiver also implements a coherent transponding mode for orbit determination through two-way Doppler ranging between the parent satellite and MEMOS. In addition ELT is compatible with a future Martian communication and navigation network pursued by NASA, which could be taken advantage of in the future for relaying data or performing ranging via other satellites part of the network. A system design driver for inter-satellite communication at Mars is the high demand of power. This leads to a disk-shape and thus easy to accommodate spacecraft configuration of MEMOS comprising a single sun-pointing solar array favourable in terms of power and spin stability. Multi-junction solar cells, which currently have an efficiency of ~29% under laboratory conditions are a key factor to keep MEMOS solar array area of ~1.15 m2 small compared to the worst case system power requirements of ~105 W. During eclipse periods high-efficient Li-ion batteries (6 x 20 Wh) will ensure power supply. The spacecraft and payload design will incorporate new technology developments such as autonomous navigation, MicroElectroMechanical Systems MEMS, Micro- Opto-ElectroMechanical Sys

Ott, T.; Barabash, S.; von Schéele, F.; Clacey, E.; Pokrupa, N.

2007-08-01

13

Materials engineering for a better global environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of materials engineering including ceramics technology for a better global environment is discussed. Present global\\u000a environmental issues will be solved by resourceful energy technology and waste management under a minimum pollution of environment.\\u000a The materials technology will play an important role to mitigate the global environmental issues. Research program on future\\u000a energy technology and waste management should be

Kiyotaka Wasa

1995-01-01

14

Global Estimation in Constrained Environments  

E-print Network

vehicle operating in a planar polygonal obstacle environment; a simulated helicopter searching are constrained due to their natural kinematics and dynamics and due to obstacles in the environment. The task

Del Moral , Pierre

15

Azores Global Atmosphere Monitoring Complex 1. INTRODUCTION  

E-print Network

Azores Global Atmosphere Monitoring Complex 1. INTRODUCTION The Azores Global Atmospheric by collaborating researchers to the maximum extent possible given space and power availability. 2. THE AZORES AS A BASE FOR ATMOSPHERIC STUDIES The Azores Islands (Fig. 1) have a long history as a base for atmospheric

Honrath, Richard E.

16

Global integrated drought monitoring and prediction system  

E-print Network

Global integrated drought monitoring and prediction system Zengchao Hao, Amir AghaKouchak, Navid Nakhjiri and Alireza Farahmand Drought is by far the most costly natural disaster that can lead Integrated Drought Monitoring and Prediction System (GIDMaPS), which provides drought information based

Kimball, Sarah

17

Global temperature monitoring from space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Global and regional temperature variations in the lower troposphere and lower stratosphere are examined for the period 1979-92 from Microwave Sounder Unit (MSU) data obtained by the Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS)-N series of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operational satellites. In the lower troposphere, globally-averaged temperature variations appear to be dominated by tropical El Nino (warm) and La Nina (cool) events and volcanic eruptions. The Pinatubo volcanic eruption in June 1991 appears to have initiated a cooling trend which persisted through the most recent data analyzed (July, 1992), and largely overwhelmed the warming from the 1991-92 El Nino. The cooling has been stronger in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere. The temperature trend over the 13.5 year satellite record is small (+0.03 C) compared to the year-to-year variability (0.2-0.4 C), making detection of any global warming signal fruitless to date. However, the future global warming trend, currently predicted to be around 0.3 C/decade, will be much easier to discern should it develop. The lower stratospheric temperature record is dominated by warm episodes from the Pinatubo eruption and the March 1982 eruption of El Chichon volcano.

Spencer, R. W.

1994-01-01

18

Autonomous Environment-Monitoring Networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Autonomous environment-monitoring networks (AEMNs) are artificial neural networks that are specialized for recognizing familiarity and, conversely, novelty. Like a biological neural network, an AEMN receives a constant stream of inputs. For purposes of computational implementation, the inputs are vector representations of the information of interest. As long as the most recent input vector is similar to the previous input vectors, no action is taken. Action is taken only when a novel vector is encountered. Whether a given input vector is regarded as novel depends on the previous vectors; hence, the same input vector could be regarded as familiar or novel, depending on the context of previous input vectors. AEMNs have been proposed as means to enable exploratory robots on remote planets to recognize novel features that could merit closer scientific attention. AEMNs could also be useful for processing data from medical instrumentation for automated monitoring or diagnosis. The primary substructure of an AEMN is called a spindle. In its simplest form, a spindle consists of a central vector (C), a scalar (r), and algorithms for changing C and r. The vector C is constructed from all the vectors in a given continuous stream of inputs, such that it is minimally distant from those vectors. The scalar r is the distance between C and the most remote vector in the same set. The construction of a spindle involves four vital parameters: setup size, spindle-population size, and the radii of two novelty boundaries. The setup size is the number of vectors that are taken into account before computing C. The spindle-population size is the total number of input vectors used in constructing the spindle counting both those that arrive before and those that arrive after the computation of C. The novelty-boundary radii are distances from C that partition the neighborhood around C into three concentric regions (see Figure 1). During construction of the spindle, the changing spindle radius is denoted by h. It is the final value of h, reached before beginning construction on the next spindle, that is denoted by r. During construction of a spindle, if a new vector falls between C and the inner boundary, the vector is regarded as completely familiar and no action is taken. If the new vector falls into the region between the inner and outer boundaries, it is considered unusual enough to warrant the adjustment of C and r by use of the aforementioned algorithms, but not unusual enough to be considered novel. If a vector falls outside the outer boundary, it is considered novel, in which case one of several appropriate responses could be initiation of construction of a new spindle.

Hand, Charles

2004-01-01

19

Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GEMS(Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) is a scanning UV-visible spectrometer to be onboard the GeoKOMPSAT-2B in geostationary orbit in 2018. The main objective of the mission is to measure concentration of ozone and aerosol with their precursors including NO2, SO2 and HCHO in high temporal and spatial resolution. Recently, GEMS passed the governmental mid-term technical review, thus is in main phase of the mission. System design review(SDR) of GEMS was completed successfully and preliminary design review(PDR) is planned in March, 2014. Spectral coverage of GEMS is 300 to 500 nm with resolution of 0.6 nm and 3 samples/band. The mission covers most of the interesting region in Asia, with occasional coverage out to Pacific for clear sector method. Algorithms are under the development. Error analysis was carried out using the optimal estimation method with TOMS climatology, GEOS-Chem and VLIDORT. For the analysis, randomly generated conditions were extracted for different time of day in 12 months with actual viewing geometry from a GEO satellite at 128.2 oE. Through the spatial and spectral coadding and flexible E-W scan to increase the SNR, the performance of GEMS is predicted to satisfy the science requirements in most of the cases. Measurements of SO2 in winter season is very challenging but can be resolved if 4 pixels are coadded and the E-W scan is reduced half to increase SNR. GEMS is a part of GEO air quality(AQ) constellation with the Sentinel-4 of ESA and the TEMPO of NASA. Harmonized efforts for the GEO AQ Constellation are underway in terms of common basic requirements, standards, data product quality and cross participation of meetings under the framework of CEOS ACC.

Kim, Jhoon

20

8 JMBA Global Marine Environment Mermaid's Glove  

E-print Network

8 JMBA Global Marine Environment Mermaid's Glove Nowadays Faroe islanders live a very post the nineteenth century. The njararvøttur was then used as a kind of tinder when lighting fires. Mermaid's glove by Börge Pettersson. Also Published in JMBA Svanberg, I. Human usage of mermaid's glove sponge (Isodictya

Watson, Andrew

21

Trade, Global Policy, and the Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To encourage the exchange of ideas among academics and government policy makers concerning the effects of trade liberalization on the environment, the World Bank Environment Department (discussed in the September 25, 1997 Scout Report for Business & Economics) has made fifteen working papers available from the "Trade, Global Policy, and the Environment" conference held April 21-22, 1998, in Washington, DC. Contributors from the World Bank, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the International Monetary Fund, Johns Hopkins University, and Columbia University, among others, address topics ranging from trade liberalization and pollution to policy options for global environmental problems. Papers are listed as they occurred in the original program, and thereby retain the interlocutory nature of this event. Now part of of the World Bank Discussion Papers series.

22

Volcano monitoring using the Global Positioning System: Filtering strategies  

E-print Network

Volcano monitoring using the Global Positioning System: Filtering strategies Kristine M. Larson,1 Global Positioning System (GPS) networks are routinely used for producing improved orbits and monitoring an effective tool for hazard mitigation. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is well-suited for monitoring

Larson, Kristine

23

Global meteorological drought - Part 1: Probabilistic monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Near-real-time drought monitoring can provide decision-makers with valuable information for use in several areas, such as water resources management, or international aid. One of the main constrains of assessing the current drought situation is associated with the lack of reliable sources of observed precipitation on a global scale available in near-real time. Furthermore, monitoring systems also need a long record of past observations to provide mean climatological conditions. To address these problems, a novel probabilistic drought monitoring methodology based on ECMWF probabilistic forecasts is presented, where probabilistic monthly means of precipitation were derived from short-range forecasts and merged with the long-term climatology of the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) data set. From the merged data set, the standardised precipitation index (SPI) was estimated. This methodology was compared with the GPCC first guess precipitation product as well as SPI calculations using the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation data sets. ECMWF probabilistic forecasts for near-real-time monitoring are similar to GPCC and TRMM in terms of correlation and root mean square errors, with the added value of including an estimate of the uncertainty given by the ensemble spread. The real-time availability of this product and its stability (i.e. that it does not directly depend on local rain gauges or single satellite products) are also beneficial in the light of an operational implementation.

Dutra, E.; Wetterhall, F.; Di Giuseppe, F.; Naumann, G.; Barbosa, P.; Vogt, J.; Pozzi, W.; Pappenberger, F.

2014-07-01

24

Monitoring tropical environments with space shuttle photography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Orbital photography from the Space Shuttle missions (1981–88) and earlier manned spaceflight programs (1962–1975) allows remote sensing time series to be constructed for observations of environmental change in selected portions of the global tropics. Particular topics and regions include deforestation, soil erosion, supersedimentation in streams, lacustrine, and estuarine environments, and desertification in the Greater Amazon, Tropical Africa and Madagascar, South

Michael R. Helfert; Kamlesh P. Lulla

1989-01-01

25

Monitoring Seasons Through Global Learning Communities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monitoring Seasons through Global Learning Communities (MSTGLC) is an inquiry- and project-based project that monitors seasons, specifically their interannual variability, in order to increase K-12 students' understanding of the Earth system by providing teacher professional development in Earth system science and inquiry, and engaging K-12 students in Earth system science research relevant to their local communities that connect globally. MSTGLC connects GLOBE students, teachers, and communities, with educators and scientists from three integrated Earth systems science programs: the International Arctic Research Center, and NASA Landsat Data Continuity and Terra Satellite Missions. The project organizes GLOBE schools by biomes into eight Global Learning Communities (GLCs) and students monitor their seasons through regional based field campaigns. The project expands the current GLOBE phenology network by adapting current protocols and making them biome-specific. In addition, ice and mosquito phenology protocols will be developed for Arctic and Tropical regions, respectively. Initially the project will focus on Tundra and Taiga biomes as phenological changes are so pronounced in these regions. However, our long-term goal is to determine similar changes in other biomes (Deciduous Forest, Desert, Grasslands, Rain Forest, Savannah and Shrubland) based upon what we learn from these two biomes. This project will also contribute to critically needed Earth system science data such as in situ ice, mosquito, and vegetation phenology measurements for ground validations of remotely sensed data, which are essential for regional climate change impact assessments. Additionally it will contribute environmental data critical to prevention and management of diseases such as malaria in Asian, African, and other countries. Furthermore, this project will enable students to participate in the International Polar Year (IPY) (2007-2009) through field campaigns conducted by students in polar regions, and web chats between IPY scientists and GLOBE students from all eight GLCs that include non-polar countries.

Sparrow, E. B.; Robin, J. H.; Jeffries, M. O.; Gordon, L. S.; Verbyla, D. L.; Levine, E. R.

2006-12-01

26

Monitoring periglacial processes: Towards construction of a global network  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines the strategy for constructing a global monitoring network for periglacial processes. The monitoring system should be designed with appropriate choices of parameters and techniques, which depend on the purpose of monitoring (e.g. modelling individual processes or assessing the sediment budget of a catchment). Acquisition of comparable data from globally distributed sites requires standardized techniques and instruments. In

Norikazu Matsuoka

2006-01-01

27

Monitoring Global Freshwater Resources with GRACE  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Freshwater resources include surface waters, groundwater, and seasonal snowpack. Given adequate ground based measurements, all of these can be monitored effectively, however, outside of the developed world such measurements often are not systematic and the data not centralized, and as a result reports of freshwater availability may be largely anecdotal. Even in the developed world it can be difficult to quantify changes in groundwater storage over large scales. Owing to its global coverage, satellite remote sensing has become a valuable tool for freshwater resources assessment. In particular, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has demonstrated an unequaled ability to monitor total terrestrial water storage including groundwater at regional to continental scales. In this presentation we will identify apparent trends in terrestrial water storage observed by GRACE over the past nine years and attempt to explain their origins and predict whether they are likely to continue. Trends in certain regions where groundwater extraction has significantly depleted aquifers, including northern India and California, will be discussed in detail.

Rodell, Matt; Famiglietti, Jay; Velicogna, Isabella; Swenson, Sean; Chambers, Don

2011-01-01

28

(1) FastOpt GmbH, Hamburg, Germany, (2) Dept of Earth Science, University of Bristol, UK, (3) European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Global Environment Monitoring Unit, Italy, (4) European Space  

E-print Network

. (2007)Scholze et al. (2007) #12;FastOpt Assimilation of MERIS FAPAR and atmospheric CO2 Very coarse 8 x 10 degree global grid Monthly CO2 from two sites: MLO and SPO over five years (120 data points) MERIS minimisations from different starting points find same minimum Zoom #12;FastOpt Atmospheric CO2 at MLO and SPO

Giering, Ralf

29

Microbial monitoring of spacecraft and associated environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Rapid microbial monitoring technologies are invaluable in assessing contamination of spacecraft and associated environments. Universal and widespread elements of microbial structure and chemistry are logical targets for assessing microbial burden. Several biomarkers such as ATP, LPS, and DNA (ribosomal or spore-specific), were targeted to quantify either total bioburden or specific types of microbial contamination. The findings of these assays were compared with conventional, culture-dependent methods. This review evaluates the applicability and efficacy of some of these methods in monitoring the microbial burden of spacecraft and associated environments. Samples were collected from the surfaces of spacecraft, from surfaces of assembly facilities, and from drinking water reservoirs aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Culture-dependent techniques found species of Bacillus to be dominant on these surfaces. In contrast, rapid, culture-independent techniques revealed the presence of many Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms, as well as actinomycetes and fungi. These included both cultivable and noncultivable microbes, findings further confirmed by DNA-based microbial detection techniques. Although the ISS drinking water was devoid of cultivable microbes, molecular-based techniques retrieved DNA sequences of numerous opportunistic pathogens. Each of the methods tested in this study has its advantages, and by coupling two or more of these techniques even more reliable information as to microbial burden is rapidly obtained. Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag.

La Duc, M. T.; Kern, R.; Venkateswaran, K.

2004-01-01

30

Sentinel-5 Precursor: Global Monitoring of Atmospheric Trace Gases & Aerosols  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ESA's Sentinel 5 Precursor (S5P) Mission will form part of the Space Component under the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) initiative. It represents a preparatory project for the GMES atmospheric missions that comprise both a geo-stationary (Sentinel-4 / part of MTG-S payload) and a polar orbiting (Sentinel-5 / MetOp Second Generation) component. In view of the planned launch date of around 2020 for the first S-4 MTG-S and MetOp-SG spacecrafts, respectively, S5P (launch: mid 2015) shall minimize gaps in the availability of global atmospheric data products as provided by its predecessor missions SCIAMACHY (Envisat) and OMI (AURA). The satellite's single payload instrument, TROPOMI (TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument), is jointly developed by The Netherlands and ESA. Covering spectral channels located in the UV, visible, near- and short-wave infrared it will measure various key species including stratospheric ozone, as well as NO2, SO2, CO, CH4, CH2O and aerosols, specifically in the lower Troposphere. The envisaged formation flying with NASA's Suomi NPP satellite will allow use of high spatial resolution imager data for enhanced cloud clearing of the observational data specifically in the short-wave infrared range. An outline of the Sentinel-5P mission objectives will be given. The status of development activities, covering Spacecraft and the Ground Segment will be presented.

Nett, Herbert; McMullan, Kevin; Ingmann, Paul

2013-04-01

31

Remote sensing monitoring of the global ozonosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of CFCs, which are the main responsible for the ozone depletion in the upper atmosphere and the formation of the so-called "ozone hole" over Antarctic Region, was phase out by Montreal Protocol (1989). CFCs' concentration is recently reported to decrease in the free atmosphere, but severe episodes of ozone depletion in both Arctic and Antarctic regions are still occurring. Nevertheless the complete recovery of the Ozone layer is expected by about 2050. Recent simulation of perturbations in stratospheric chemistry highlight that circulation, temperature and composition are strictly correlated and they influence the global climate changes. Chemical composition plays an important role in the thermodynamic of the atmosphere, as every gaseous species can absorb and emit in different wavelengths, so their different concentration is responsible for the heating or cooling of the atmosphere. Therefore long-term observations are required to monitor the evolution of the stratospheric ozone layer. Measurements from satellite remote sensing instruments, which provide wide coverage, are supplementary to selective ground-based observations which are usually better calibrated, more stable in time and cover a wider time span. The combination of the data derived from different space-borne instruments calibrated with ground-based sensors is needed to produce homogeneous and consistent long-term data records. These last are required for robust investigations and especially for trend analysis. Here, we perform a review of the major remote-sensing techniques and of the principal datasets available to study the evolution of ozone layer in the past decades and predict future behavio

Genco, S.; Bortoli, D.; Ravegnani, F.

2013-10-01

32

Coastal environment: historical and continuous monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The monitoring is a tool providing essential data to study the process dynamic. The formation and transformation of coastal environment involve physical, chemical, geological and biological processes. The knowledge of the littoral systems and marine seafloor therefore requires a multidisciplinary approach. Since the phenomena observation occurs in a short period of time it requires the use of high quality data acquired with high accuracy and suitable processing procedures. This knowledge considerable increased during the past 50 years closely following significant progress in the methods of investigation at sea and laboratory. In addition seafloor exploration is deeply rooted in History. A sector actually subject to control results the coastal zone for its position as transition component between continental and marine environments with closely connected natural and human actions. Certainly these activities are important in the time to develop the technologies suited for the knowledge and to increase different protection, prevention, intervention and management tools. In this context the Istituto Idrografico della Marina (Hydrographic Institute of Italian Navy - I.I.M.) is a precursor because since its foundation (in 1872) it contributed to the monitoring activities related to charting and navigation, including hydrologic surveying, seafloor measurements and in consequence the landward limit, the shoreline. The coastal area is certainly the most changeable sector either natural or socio-economic causes. This is the most dynamic environment, subject both to marine (waves and currents) and continental (river and ice) actions, and continuously changing the intended use for the increase of industrial, commercial, recreation and the need for new structures to support. The coast has more recently taken on a growing value determined by some processes, including erosion and retreat are evidence of a transformation of which, however, undermine the system and impoverishing the existing one. The constant monitoring activities of I.I.M. are the production of nautical paper charts and electronic navigational charts (ENC) together other specialised nautical charts and publications to aid safe navigation, the processing of the oldest data from analogical to digital and the care preservation in the archives of all hydrographic survey information. This process is occurred according to an international recognized standard, such as to allow a continuous improvement of all acquired data, even if with more advanced tools and technologies for the development of cartography in constant update both in content and in restitution. In this research the archives infrastructure is used to conduct hydrographic data collection and processing to follow the secular variation and its evolution of the shoreline and coastal seafloor. A key element in monitoring these changes, both of the sub-aerial and submarine beach, is the determination of the shoreline and restitution as the coastline, which already includes the definition of its complexity, in a time period that must be long enough. We present some examples of the Italian littoral evolution with evident changes of coastal morphology in support of present monitoring.

Ivaldi, Roberta; Surace, Luciano

2010-05-01

33

Monitoring and control of atmosphere in a closed environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Applications requiring new technologies for atmosphere monitoring and control in the closed environment and their principal functions aboard the Space Station Freedom are described. Oxygen loop closure, involving the conversion of carbon dioxide to oxygen; carbon dioxide reduction and removal; and monitoring of atmospheric contamination are discussed. The Trace Contaminant Monitor, the Major Constituent Analyzer, the Carbon Dioxide Monitor, and the Particulate Counter Monitor are discussed.

Humphries, R.; Perry, J.

1991-01-01

34

Potential global fire monitoring from EOS-MODIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) plans to launch the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MEDIS) on the polarorbiting Earth Observation System (EeS) providing morning and evening global observations in 1999 and afternoon and night observations in 2000. These four MEDIS daily fire observations will advance global fire monitoring with special 1 km resolution fire channels at 4 and 11

Yoram J. Kaufman; Christopher O. Justice; Luke P. Flynn; Jackie D. Kendall; Elaine M. Prins; Louis Giglio; Darold E. Ward; W. Paul Menzel; Alberto W. Setzer

1998-01-01

35

Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A workshop on Long-Term Monitoring of Global Climate Forcings and Feedbacks was held February 3-4, 1992, at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies to discuss the measurements required to interpret long-term global temperature changes, to critique the proposed contributions of a series of small satellites (Climsat), and to identify needed complementary monitoring. The workshop concluded that long-term (several decades) of continuous monitoring of the major climate forcings and feedbacks is essential for understanding long-term climate change.

Hansen, J. (editor); Rossow, W. (editor); Fung, I. (editor)

1993-01-01

36

Integration of Wireless Sensor Networks into Cyberinfrastructure for Monitoring Hawaiian “Mountain-to-Sea” Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monitoring the complex environmental relationships and feedbacks of ecosystems on catchment (or mountain)-to-sea scales is\\u000a essential for social systems to effectively deal with the escalating impacts of expanding human populations globally on watersheds.\\u000a However, synthesis of emerging technologies into a robust observing platform for the monitoring of coupled human-natural environments\\u000a on extended spatial scales has been slow to develop. For

Michael H. Kido; Carsten W. Mundt; Kevin N. Montgomery; Adam Asquith; David W. Goodale; Kenneth Y. Kaneshiro

2008-01-01

37

Monitoring global monthly mean surface temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The accuracy of the global surface air temperature (SST) estimates for a particular month over the past decade is assessed using all of the in situ observations available today. The sources of noise in the data, the numbers of observations, and the spatial coverage are appraised for the comparison with the climate signal, and different analyzed results are compared to determine their reproducibility. The data are further evaluated by comparing anomalies of near-global monthly mean surface temperatures with those of global satellite channel 2 microwave sounding unit temperatures for 144 months from 1979 to 1990. The results indicate that the inherent noise level in an SST observation is about 1.0 C, and this is compounded when the observation is made in regions of large temperature gradient.

Trenberth, Kevin E.; Christy, John R.; Hurrell, James W.

1992-01-01

38

Distributed computing environment monitoring and user expectations  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the growing needs for distributed system monitoring and compares it to current practices. It then goes on to identify the components of distributed system monitoring and shows how they are implemented and successfully used at one site today to address the Local Area Network (LAN), network services and applications, the Wide Area Network (WAN), and host monitoring. It shows how this monitoring can be used to develop realistic service level expectations and also identifies the costs. Finally, the paper briefly discusses the future challenges in network monitoring.

Cottrell, R.L.A.; Logg, C.A.

1995-11-01

39

Global Environmental Change: Modelling and Monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

The second half of the 20th century was a period of unprecedented and rapid change in the global population, the biosphere, the world economy and society. Recent inquiry related to the environmental effects has focused on the complexities of how the Earth behaves as a system, with connectivity linking its oceans, land, atmosphere, living, and non-living components. The search for

John J. Kelley

2003-01-01

40

Operational satellites and the global monitoring of snow and ice  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The altitudinal dependence of the global warming projected by global climate models is at least partially attributable to the albedo-temperature feedback involving snow and ice, which must be regarded as key variables in the monitoring for global change. Statistical analyses of data from IR and microwave sensors monitoring the areal coverage and extent of sea ice have led to mixed conclusions about recent trends of hemisphere sea ice coverage. Seasonal snow cover has been mapped for over 20 years by NOAA/NESDIS on the basis of imagery from a variety of satellite sensors. Multichannel passive microwave data show some promise for the routine monitoring of snow depth over unforested land areas.

Walsh, John E.

1991-01-01

41

Radiation monitoring with reference to the medical environment.  

PubMed

This paper discusses the general principles of monitoring with some examples taken from the medical environment. The discussion is divided into two sections. The first section deals with the principles of personnel monitoring as well as the most common types of dosimeters used. Specific techniques applicable to the various areas of radiology are delineated. The second section deals with the use of portable monitors in a medical environment. The types of instruments commonly encountered and their limitations are detailed. This section also discusses the use of portable monitors as applied to the various areas of radiology. In each section some brief historical background has been added where possible. PMID:7558864

St Germain, J

1995-11-01

42

The Global Geodetic Infrastructure for Accurate Monitoring of Earth Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS), two Program Offices within the National Ocean Service, NOAA, routinely collect, analyze and disseminate observations and products from several of the 17 critical systems identified by the U.S. Group on Earth Observations. Gravity, sea level monitoring, coastal zone and ecosystem management, geo-hazards and deformation monitoring and ocean surface vector winds are the primary Earth systems that have active research and operational programs in NGS and IOOS. These Earth systems collect terrestrial data but most rely heavily on satellite-based sensors for analyzing impacts and monitoring global change. One fundamental component necessary for monitoring via satellites is having a stable, global geodetic infrastructure where an accurate reference frame is essential for consistent data collection and geo-referencing. This contribution will focus primarily on system monitoring, coastal zone management and global reference frames and how the scientific contributions from NGS and IOOS continue to advance our understanding of the Earth and the Global Geodetic Observing System.

Weston, Neil; Blackwell, Juliana; Wang, Yan; Willis, Zdenka

2014-05-01

43

Volcano monitoring using the Global Positioning System: Filtering strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Permanent Global Positioning System (GPS) networks are routinely used for producing improved orbits and monitoring secular tectonic deformation. For these applications, data are transferred to an analysis center each day and routinely processed in 24-hour segments. To use GPS for monitoring volcanic events, which may last only a few hours, real-time or near real-time data processing and subdaily position estimates

Kristine M. Larson; Peter Cervelli; Michael Lisowski; Asta Miklius; Paul Segall; Susan Owen

2001-01-01

44

The global forum on environment and development  

SciTech Connect

The first Global Conference of Spiritual and Parliamentary Leaders on Human Survival was held in Oxford, England not to discuss world issues, but to test the ability of 100 spiritual leaders and 100 parliamentarians to work together in a world which has preferred to separate church and state. This conference, held in Moscow, attracted more than 1,000 people. The main purpose was to find common solutions to environmental quality, economic development, and human survival as citizens of planet Earth. Notable addresses were heard from Javier Perez de Cuellar, Senator Albert Gore, Carl Sagan, Lester Brown, Nafis Sadik, Evguenij Velikhov, and Mikhail Gorbachev who advocated an International Green Cross.

Not Available

1990-01-01

45

Monitoring data archives for grid environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developers and users of high-performance distributed systems often observe performance problems such as unexpectedly low throughput or high latency. To determine the source of these performance problems, detailed end-to-end monitoring data from applications, networks, operating systems, and hardware must be correlated across time and space. Researchers need to be able to view and compare this very detailed monitoring data from

Jason Lee; Dan Gunter; Martin Stoufer; Brian Tierney

2002-01-01

46

Monitoring Data Archives for Grid Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Developers and users of high-performance distributed systems often observe performance problems such as unexpectedly low throughput or high latency. To determine the source of these performance problems, detailed end-to-end monitoring data from applications, networks, operating systems, and hardware must be correlated across time and space. Researchers need to be able to view and compare this very detailed monitoring data from

Jason Lee; Dan Gunter; Martin Stoufer; Brian Tierney

2002-01-01

47

Monitoring of Sedimentary Fluxes in Cold Environments: The SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Programme  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Projected climate change in cold regions is expected to alter melt season duration and intensity, along with the number of extreme rainfall events, total annual precipitation and the balance between snowfall and rainfall. Similarly, changes to the thermal balance are expected to reduce the extent of permafrost and seasonal ground frost and increase active layer depths. These effects will undoubtedly change surface environments in cold regions and alter the fluxes of sediments, nutrients and solutes, but the absence of quantitative data and coordinated geomorphic process monitoring and analysis to understand the sensitivity of the Earth surface environment is acute in cold climate environments. The International Association of Geomorphologists` (I.A.G. / A.I.G.) SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments) Program (2005 - 2017) is addressing this existing key knowledge gap. The central research question of this global group of scientists is to: Assess and model the contemporary sedimentary fluxes in cold climates, with emphasis on both particulate and dissolved components. Research carried out at each of the ca. 50 defined SEDIBUD key test sites varies by program, logistics and available resources, but typically represent interdisciplinary collaborations of geomorphologists, hydrologists, ecologists, permafrost scientists and glaciologists. SEDIBUD has developed manuals and protocols (SEDIFLUX Manual) with a key set of primary surface process monitoring and research data requirements to incorporate results from these diverse projects and allow coordinated quantitative analysis across the program. Defined SEDIBUD key tasks for the coming years include (i) The continued generation and compilation of comparable longer-term datasets on contemporary sedimentary fluxes and sediment yields from SEDIBUD key test sites worldwide, (ii) The continued extension of the SEDIBUD metadata database with these datasets, (iii) The testing of defined SEDIBUD hypotheses (available online, see below) by using datasets continuously compiled in the SEDIBUD metadata database, (iv) The publication of a SEDIBUD book (synthesis book). The title of the currently prepared SEDIBUD book is Source-to-sink fluxes in undisturbed cold environments. The synthesis book will compile results from longer-term studies conducted at undisturbed Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine SEDIBUD key test sites. A synthesis chapter will integrate field data from the different study sites and shall provide a better understanding of (i) The key environmental drivers and rates of contemporary solute and sedimentary fluxes in largely undisturbed cold climate environments and (ii) Possible effects of projected climate change on solute and sedimentary fluxes in cold climate environments. Detailed information on the SEDIBUD Program, SEDIBUD meetings, publications and online documents and databases is available at the SEDIBUD website under http://www.geomorph.org/wg/wgsb.html.

Beylich, Achim A.

2014-05-01

48

Seagrass meadows in a globally changing environment.  

PubMed

Seagrass meadows are valuable ecosystem service providers that are now being lost globally at an unprecedented rate, with water quality and other localised stressors putting their future viability in doubt. It is therefore critical that we learn more about the interactions between seagrass meadows and future environmental change in the anthropocene. This needs to be with particular reference to the consequences of poor water quality on ecosystem resilience and the effects of change on trophic interactions within the food web. Understanding and predicting the response of seagrass meadows to future environmental change requires an understanding of the natural long-term drivers of change and how these are currently influenced by anthropogenic stress. Conservation management of coastal and marine ecosystems now and in the future requires increased knowledge of how seagrass meadows respond to environmental change, and how they can be managed to be resilient to these changes. Finding solutions to such issues also requires recognising people as part of the social-ecological system. This special issue aims to further enhance this knowledge by bringing together global expertise across this field. The special issues considers issues such as ecosystem service delivery of seagrass meadows, the drivers of long-term seagrass change and the socio-economic consequences of environmental change to seagrass. PMID:24874505

Unsworth, Richard K F; van Keulen, Mike; Coles, Rob G

2014-06-30

49

IMPROVE (INTERAGENCY MONITORING OF PROTECTED VISUAL ENVIRONMENTS) SITES DATA  

EPA Science Inventory

Since 1987, EPA has supported the IMPROVE (Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments) network in cooperation with the National Park Service, Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Fish and Wildlife Service, and State organizations. One of the principal purposes ...

50

SPECTRAL MONITORING OF FUGITIVE CONTAMINANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The accidental or intentional release of hazardous chemical substances into the environment is an inevitable consequence of anthropogenic activity. The detection, monitoring and remediation of fugitive contaminants is a major risk factor for human and ecological health and i...

51

Global Infrasonic Monitoring of Large Bolides.  

SciTech Connect

Using recent infrasonic data (1995-2001) and older infrasonic data recorded by AFTAC (1960-1974), we have refined our estimates of the global influx rate (cumulative influx) of large bolides with sufficient strength to deeply penetrate the atmosphere (below {approx} 50 km). The number of bolides arriving as a function of their initial source energy has been estimated from a least-squares curve-fit of our database of 19 bolides (for a source energy > 0.053 kt) with the resulting values and an estimate of the associated statistical counting errors: 30.3{+-} 6 bolides at {ge}0.1 kt, 5.8{+-} 2 at {ge}1 kt and 0.84{+-} 0.25 at {ge}15 kt. In this work we also used these estimates to infer the recurrence interval for energy levels slightly outside the original source energy range, The Tunguska bolide of 1908 ({approx}10 Mt) is a prime example of a previously observed body of great interest. Almost regardless of how we analyze the recent data, the conclusion is that bolides with Tunguska type energy levels should reoccur on the average every 120{+-}10 years.

ReVelle, D. O. (Douglas O.)

2001-01-01

52

Near-Earth space as an object of global monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Near-Earth space is analyzed as a specific object for global monitoring. The structure and specific features of near-Earth space are considered. It is shown that this zone includes almost all the terrestrial fields and the regions where space is actively explored by man.

Barmin, I. V.; Kulagin, V. P.; Savinykh, V. P.; Tsvetkov, V. Ya.

2014-12-01

53

Diagnostics for Dust Monitoring in Tokamak Environment  

SciTech Connect

During ITER lifetime, dusts and flakes will be produced due to the interaction of plasmas with the in-vessel materials or due to maintenance. They will be made of carbon, beryllium and tungsten and will be activated, tritiated and chemically reactive and toxic. Safety limits have been set in order to reduce dust hazards. Thus dust diagnostics and removal methods need to be developed for ITER within the constraints linked to magnetic field, radiation, vacuum and temperature. This paper reviews potential diagnostics to monitor the dust content using techniques already used for erosion or deposition monitoring or techniques specially developed for measuring dust in suspension.

Rosanvallon, S.; Grisolia, C.; Hong, S. H. [Association Euratom/CEA, DRFC/SIPP, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Onofri, F. [IUSTI-CNRS, University of Provence, Technopole de Chateau Gomberi, 13453 Marseille (France); Worms, J. [Association Euratom/CEA, DRFC/SIPP, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); IUSTI-CNRS, University of Provence, Technopole de Chateau Gomberi, 13453 Marseille (France)

2008-03-12

54

ESA's Radiation Environment Monitor and its technological role  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes the design and operational characteristics of the ESA Radiation Environment Monitor (REM) together with the objectives of the REM. Special attention is given to the radiation environment of the earth, the types of its effects, and the models for predicting radiation fluxes encountered at various altitudes. The first flight of REM is planned for late-1993 on the

E. J. Daly; L. Adams; A. Zehnder; S. Ljungfelt

1992-01-01

55

Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This impressive site from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Forecast Systems Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado serves as an educational gateway into the science of global climate patterns. Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) is "a worldwide network of students, teachers, and scientists working together to study and understand the global environment." Geared for K-12 students and their teachers, GLOBE students around the world "perform environmental observations and send their data via the Internet to the GLOBE Student Data Archive. GLOBE students work under the supervision of trained teachers and follow consistent protocols to produce scientifically useful data." Also at the site are excellent graphics of the El Nino monthly max air temperatures in South America, a detailed vegetation map of africa, and a special section on Earth Day 1998, with unique projects for April 22, 1998.

1969-12-31

56

Environment monitoring using LabVIEW  

SciTech Connect

A system has been developed for electronically recording and monitoring temperature, humidity, and other environmental variables at the Silicon Detector Facility located in Lab D. The data is collected by LabVIEW software, which runs in the background on an Apple Macintosh. The software is completely portable between Macintosh, MS Windows, and Sun platforms. The hardware includes a Macintosh with 8 MB of RAM; an external ADC-1 analog-to-digital converter that uses a serial port; LabVIEW software; temperature sensors; humidity sensors; and other voltage/current sensing devices. ADC values are converted to ASCII strings and entered into files which are read over Ethernet. Advantages include automatic logging, automatic recovery after power interruptions, and the availability of stand-alone applications for other locations with inexpensive software and hardware.

Hawtree, J.

1995-01-01

57

Monitoring the Earth's Atmosphere with the Global IMS Infrasound Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is tasked with monitoring compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) which bans nuclear weapon explosions underground, in the oceans, and in the atmosphere. The verification regime includes a globally distributed network of seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide stations which collect and transmit data to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria shortly

Nicolas Brachet; David Brown; Pierrick Mialle; Ronan Le Bras; John Coyne; Jeffrey Given

2010-01-01

58

Monitoring of ¹³?Cs fallout in Syrian environment.  

PubMed

This paper presents measurements of cesium 137 ((137)Cs) in the Syrian environment during the period between 2006 and 2010. More than 1,000 samples of soil, water, plants and aquatic life were collected from different locations. The measurements were realized using gamma spectroscopy, and the results showed that radioactivity concentrations were low overall. Concentrations ranged from below detection limits to several tens Bq kg(-1) (dry matter) or 9.8 mBq L(-1) (water), which were well below maximum allowable levels in food or drinking water as established according to Syrian national standards or the WHO/FAO Codex guidelines. However, high (137)Cs activity levels were observed in soil samples collected at a high elevation (Kadmous highs), where a mean concentration of 1,900 Bq kg(-1) was obtained. PMID:25063371

Alhajji, E; Al-Masri, M S; Al-Hamwi, A; Al-Haleem, M A; Hassan, M; Mamish, S; Al-Kharfan, K; Khalily, H; Alkhatib, Y; Sheaib, Z

2014-09-01

59

IEMS: An Intelligent Environment Monitoring System of Server Room  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to achieve low cost, low complexity, more reliable and more stable intelligent room environment monitoring system, in this paper, the designed system is composed of the surveillance mainframe and several sensors based on C\\/S (Client\\/Server) architecture through the reliable RS-485 network, which will construct an effective and feasible hardware platform to complete the real-time monitoring of the current

Changzhu Chen; Ling Sun; Yeqin Shao; Zuhui Hu; Quan Shi

2012-01-01

60

A Seamless Framework for Global Water Cycle Monitoring and Prediction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Water Strategy ('From Observations to Decisions') recognizes that 'water is essential for ensuring food and energy security, for facilitating poverty reduction and health security, and for the maintenance of ecosystems and biodiversity', and that water cycle data and observations are critical for improved water management and water security - especially in less developed regions. The GEOSS Water Strategy has articulated a number of goals for improved water management, including flood and drought preparedness, that include: (i) facilitating the use of Earth Observations for water cycle observations; (ii) facilitating the acquisition, processing, and distribution of data products needed for effective management; (iii) providing expertise, information systems, and datasets to the global, regional, and national water communities. There are several challenges that must be met to advance our capability to provide near real-time water cycle monitoring, early warning of hydrological hazards (floods and droughts) and risk assessment under climate change, regionally and globally. Current approaches to monitoring and predicting hydrological hazards are limited in many parts of the world, and especially in developing countries where national capacity is limited and monitoring networks are inadequate. This presentation describes the development of a seamless monitoring and prediction framework at all time scales that allows for consistent assessment of water variability from historic to current conditions, and from seasonal and decadal predictions to climate change projections. At the center of the framework is an experimental, global water cycle monitoring and seasonal forecast system that has evolved out of regional and continental systems for the US and Africa. The system is based on land surface hydrological modeling that is driven by satellite remote sensing precipitation to predict current hydrological conditions, flood potential and the state of drought. Seasonal climate model forecasts are downscaled and bias-corrected to drive the land surface model to provide hydrological forecasts and drought products out 6-9 months. The system relies on historic reconstructions of water variability over the 20th century, which forms the background climatology to which current conditions can be assessed. Future changes in water availability and drought risk are quantified based on bias-corrected and downscaled climate model projections that are used to drive the land surface models. For regions with lack of on-the-ground data we are field-testing low-cost environmental sensors and along with new satellite products for terrestrial hydrology and vegetation, integrating these into the system for improved monitoring and prediction. We provide an overview of the system and some examples of real-world applications to flood and drought events, with a focus on Africa.

Sheffield, J.; Wood, E. F.; Chaney, N.; Fisher, C. K.; Caylor, K. K.

2013-12-01

61

ESA's Radiation Environment Monitor and its technological role  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper describes the design and operational characteristics of the ESA Radiation Environment Monitor (REM) together with the objectives of the REM. Special attention is given to the radiation environment of the earth, the types of its effects, and the models for predicting radiation fluxes encountered at various altitudes. The first flight of REM is planned for late-1993 on the UK STRV-1(b) microsatellite, which will be launched into geostationary transfer orbit on Ariane.

Daly, E. J.; Adams, L.; Zehnder, A.; Ljungfelt, S.

1992-08-01

62

Experiences with global optimization techniques in massively parallel processing environments  

SciTech Connect

The modeling of many physically relevant processes involves the location of global extrema, which are often surrounded by numerous local extrema. The effort involved in locating these extrema grows rapidly with increasing dimensionality of the problems being investigated. A method of analysis for algorithms from the perspective of a parallel processing environment is developed and applied to the family of Monte Carlo global optimization schemes. A new highly parallel Monte Carlo algorithm is presented. Chaotic iteration schemes resulting in nondeterministic algorithms are discussed, and an analysis of the optimal conditions for their application to this class of problems is presented. 11 refs., 4 figs.

Hall, J.H.; Hiromoto, R.

1988-01-01

63

Global Agricultural Monitoring (GLAM) using MODAPS and LANCE Data Products  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies / Global Agricultural Monitoring (GIMMS GLAM) system is a web-based geographic application that offers Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery and user interface tools to data query and plot MODIS NDVI time series. The system processes near real-time and science quality Terra and Aqua MODIS 8-day composited datasets. These datasets are derived from the MOD09 and MYD09 surface reflectance products which are generated and provided by NASA/GSFC Land and Atmosphere Near Real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) and NASA/GSFC MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS). The GIMMS GLAM system is developed and provided by the NASA/GSFC GIMMS group for the U.S. Department of Agriculture / Foreign Agricultural Service / International Production Assessment Division (USDA/FAS/IPAD) Global Agricultural Monitoring project (GLAM). The USDA/FAS/IPAD mission is to provide objective, timely, and regular assessment of the global agricultural production outlook and conditions affecting global food security. This system was developed to improve USDA/FAS/IPAD capabilities for making operational quantitative estimates for crop production and yield estimates based on satellite-derived data. The GIMMS GLAM system offers 1) web map imagery including Terra & Aqua MODIS 8-day composited NDVI, NDVI percent anomaly, and SWIR-NIR-Red band combinations, 2) web map overlays including administrative and 0.25 degree Land Information System (LIS) shape boundaries, and crop land cover masks, and 3) user interface tools to select features, data query, plot, and download MODIS NDVI time series.

Anyamba, A.; Pak, E. E.; Majedi, A. H.; Small, J. L.; Tucker, C. J.; Reynolds, C. A.; Pinzon, J. E.; Smith, M. M.

2012-12-01

64

Rationale-Based Monitoring for Planning in Dynamic Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a framework for planning in dy- namic environments. A central question is how to focus the sensing performed by such a sys- tem, so that it responds appropriately to rel- evant changes, but does not attempt to moni- tor all the changes that could possibly occur in the world. To achieve the required balance, we introduce rationale.based monitors,

Manuela M. Veloso; Martha E. Pollack; Michael T. Cox

1998-01-01

65

WESTERN ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT MONITORING STUDY: PLANNING AND COORDINATION SUMMARY  

EPA Science Inventory

This report is a summary of the planning, coordination and implementation mechanisms which provide the framework for the Western Energy/Environment Monitoring Study. This Study involves participation by elements of EPA, NASA, NOAA, and USGS and is a segment of the Interagency Ene...

66

Preserving the global environment: The challenge of shared leadership  

SciTech Connect

This book brings together essays commissioned as background reading for an April 1990 conference on the global environment co-sponsored by the American Assembly and the World Resources Institute. Among the topic areas covered are the following: technical aspects of energy policy and climatic change; harnessing the power of the marketplace; international cooperation; international regulatory regimes; world economic climate; deforestation and species loss; human population growth.

Matthews, J.T. (ed.)

1993-01-01

67

ISS Microgravity Environment Monitoring System (MEMS). Part 1; System Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project at the NASA Glenn Research center supports Principal Investigators of the microgravity science community as they evaluate the effects of acceleration on their experiments. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services' primary responsibility is to support NASA sponsored investigators in the area of acceleration data analysis, interpretation and the monitoring of the microgravity environment on-board various carriers. The microgravity environment is a rich and very complex dynamic one. It is subject to quasi-steady accelerations, higher frequency acceleration, and transient disturbances. With the advent of the International Space Station operation, a significant amount of data is expected to be downlinked and processed for both the space station microgravity environment characterization (verification) and scientific experiments. Therefore, to help principal investigator teams monitor the microgravity environment on-board the International Space Station in order to avoid negative impact on their experiment, when possible, the NASA Glenn Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project is currently developing an artificial intelligence monitoring system, which will notify the principal investigator teams in near real time of any change in the microgravity environment susceptible to affect their experiments.

Jules, Kenol; Lin, Paul P.

2000-01-01

68

A Global Framework for Monitoring Phenological Responses to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Remote sensing of vegetation phenology is an important method with which to monitor terrestrial responses to climate change, but most approaches include signals from multiple forcings, such as mixed phenological signals from multiple biomes, urbanization, political changes, shifts in agricultural practices, and disturbances. Consequently, it is difficult to extract a clear signal from the usually assumed forcing: climate change. Here, using global 8 km 1982 to 1999 Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data and an eight-element monthly climatology, we identified pixels whose wavelet power spectrum was consistently dominated by annual cycles and then created phenologically and climatically self-similar clusters, which we term phenoregions. We then ranked and screened each phenoregion as a function of landcover homogeneity and consistency, evidence of human impacts, and political diversity. Remaining phenoregions represented areas with a minimized probability of non-climatic forcings and form elemental units for long-term phenological monitoring.

White, Michael A [Utah State University (USU); Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hargrove, William Walter [ORNL; Nemani, Ramakrishna R [NASA Ames Research Center

2005-01-01

69

A quasi-global precipitation time series for drought monitoring  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Estimating precipitation variations in space and time is an important aspect of drought early warning and environmental monitoring. An evolving drier-than-normal season must be placed in historical context so that the severity of rainfall deficits may quickly be evaluated. To this end, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center, working closely with collaborators at the University of California, Santa Barbara Climate Hazards Group, have developed a quasi-global (50°S–50°N, 180°E–180°W), 0.05° resolution, 1981 to near-present gridded precipitation time series: the Climate Hazards Group InfraRed Precipitation with Stations (CHIRPS) data archive.

Funk, Chris C.; Peterson, Pete J.; Landsfeld, Martin F.; Pedreros, Diego H.; Verdin, James P.; Rowland, James D.; Romero, Bo E.; Husak, Gregory J.; Michaelsen, Joel C.; Verdin, Andrew P.

2014-01-01

70

The Global Atmospheric Environment for the Next Generation  

SciTech Connect

Air quality, ecosystem exposure to nitrogen deposition, and climate change are intimately coupled problems: we assess changes in the global atmospheric environment between 2000 and 2030 using twenty-five state-of-the-art global atmospheric chemistry models and three different emissions scenarios. The first (CLE) scenario reflects implementation of current air quality legislation around the world, whilst the second (MFR) represents a more optimistic case in which all currently feasible technologies are applied to achieve maximum emission reductions. We contrast these scenarios with the more pessimistic IPCC SRES A2 scenario. Ensemble simulations for the year 2000 are consistent among models, and show a reasonable agreement with surface ozone, wet deposition and NO{sub 2} satellite observations. Large parts of the world are currently exposed to high ozone concentrations, and high depositions of nitrogen to ecosystems. By 2030, global surface ozone is calculated to increase globally by 1.5 {+-} 1.2 ppbv (CLE), and 4.3 {+-} 2.2 ppbv (A2). Only the progressive MFR scenario will reduce ozone by -2.3 {+-} 1.1 ppbv. The CLE and A2 scenarios project further increases in nitrogen critical loads, with particularly large impacts in Asia where nitrogen emissions and deposition are forecast to increase by a factor of 1.4 (CLE) to 2 (A2). Climate change may modify surface ozone by -0.8 {+-} 0.6 ppbv, with larger decreases over sea than over land. This study shows the importance of enforcing current worldwide air quality legislation, and the major benefits of going further. Non-attainment of these air quality policy objectives, such as expressed by the SRES-A2 scenario, would further degrade the global atmospheric environment.

Dentener, F; Stevenson, D; Ellingsen, K; van Joije, T; Schultz, M; Amann, M; Atherton, C; Bell, N; Bergmann, D; Bey, I; Bouwman, L; Butler, T; Cofala, J; Collins, B; Drevet, J; Doherty, R; Eickhout, B; Eskes, H; Fiore, A; Gauss, M; Hauglustaine, D; Horowitz, L; Isaksen, I A; Josse, B; Lawrence, M; Krol, M; Lamarque, J F; Montanaro, V; Muller, J F; Peuch, V H; Pitari, G; Pyle, J; Rast, S; Rodriguez, J; Sanderson, M; Savage, N H; Shindell, D; Strahan, S; Szopa, S; Sudo, K; Van Dingenen, R; Wild, O; Zeng, G

2005-12-07

71

Monitoring the Environment in a Lava Tube with a Wireless Sensor Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monitoring cave environments is important for several reasons. For instance, through the studies of cave environments, we can better protect cave ecology. Past experiments have monitored cave environments, although most of those were based on individual sensor nodes such as data loggers. In this paper we introduce and discuss a ZigBee wireless sensor network-based platform used for cave environment monitoring.

Y. Li; A. M. Jorgensen; J. L. Wilson; N. M. Rendon

2010-01-01

72

Developing Earth Observations Requirements for Global Agricultural Monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recognizing the dynamic nature of agricultural cultivation both within and between years and across the globe, the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is developing an agricultural monitoring (GEO-GLAM) system with the goal of enhancing the availability and use of satellite and in situ Earth observations (EO) for the generation of timely and accurate information on national, regional, and global food supply. One of the key components of the GEO-GLAM system is the coordination of satellite observations so as to ensure sufficient and appropriate data volume and quality for agricultural monitoring. Therefore, it is essential that we develop EO requirements which articulate in a spatially explicit way where, when, how frequently, and at what spatial resolution satellite imagery must be acquired to meet the needs of a variety of agricultural monitoring applications. Accordingly, best-available cropland location information ('where?') in conjunction with ten years of MODIS surface reflectance data have been used to characterize the timing and duration of the agricultural growing season ('when?') in the form of agricultural growing season calendars (GSCs) for all major agricultural areas of the Earth. With respect to temporal resolution, we must first identify the frequency with which we require imagery inputs for monitoring applications such as crop condition, crop type, crop yield estimation, and planted and harvested area estimation. Members of the GEO Agriculture Monitoring Community of Practice - a group of international scientists - have combined their knowledge and expertise to articulate these general requirements. Second, we must determine how cloud cover impacts the ability of optical sensing systems to meet these established temporal resolution requirements. To this end, MODIS Terra (morning; 2000-2011) and Aqua (afternoon; 2002-2011) observations have been analyzed to derive probabilities of a cloud free clear view at different times of day throughout the agricultural growing season. In conjunction with information on field size distribution - which helps inform where finer resolution imagery are required - this information is being synthesized to generate a set of spatially explicit Earth observation requirements that are scalable to different satellite mission-specific swath widths, and provide concrete evidence for a multi-sensor imaging constellation approach to global agricultural monitoring.

Whitcraft, A. K.; Becker-Reshef, I.; Vermote, E.; Justice, C. O.

2013-12-01

73

Global Communications Infrastructure: CTBT Treaty monitoring using space communications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Article 1 on Basic Obligations of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) states that: "Each State Party undertakes not to carry out any nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion, and to prohibit and prevent any such nuclear explosion at any place under its jurisdiction or control. Each State Party undertakes, furthermore, to refrain from causing, encouraging, or in any way participating in the carrying out of any nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion." To monitor States Parties compliance with these Treaty provisions, an International Monitoring System (IMS) consisting of 321 monitoring stations and 16 laboratories in some 91 countries is being implemented to cover the whole globe, including its oceans and polar regions. The IMS employs four technologies--seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide--to detect,locate and identify any seismic event of Richter magnitude 4 and above (equivalent to one kiloton of TNT) that may be associated with a nuclear test explosion. About one-half of this monitoring system is now operational in 67 countries. Monitoring stations send data in near real-time to an International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna over a Global Communications Infrastructure (GCI) incorporating 10 geostationary satellites plus three satellites in inclined orbits. The satellites relay the data to commercial earth stations, from where they are transferred by terrestrial circuits to the IDC. The IDC automatically processes and interactively analyzes the monitoring data, and distributes the raw data and reports relevant to Treaty verification to National Data Centers in Member States over the same communications network. The GCI will eventually support about 250 thin route VSAT links to the monitoring stations, many of them at remote or harsh locations on the earth, plus additional links to national data centres in various countries. Off-the-shelf VSAT and networking hardware are deployed. This is the first global integrated satellite communications network based on VSAT technology. Space segment has been leased to carry more than 9 gigabytes/day of data to the IDC with a designed annual availability of 99.5%. This paper explains the topology of this satellite-based network, and practical limitations encountered in organizing a single network with 250 links that span the majority of countries in the world, plus the Antarctic regions and the earth's oceans. Having now installed about half of the satellite links in 67 countries, CTBTO has had to hurdle regulatory challenges to install VSAT equipment, and operational challenges to keep the earth stations running in unmanned remote locations. Despite the challenges, the GCI has proven its worth in reliably collecting monitoring data and making such available to authorized users. It has also been useful to give scientists real-time access for controlling their remote monitoring stations.

Kebeasy, R.; Abaya, E.; Ricker, R.; Demeules, G.

74

Global land data sets for next-generation biospheric monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mauna Loa atmospheric CO2 record initiated in 1957 was the first data set to show that the entire Earth was being affected by human activity C. D. Keeling relived the history and current trends of that CO2 data set in a keynote address at a recent Earth observation meeting where next-generation capabilities in global biospheric monitoring were unveiled. The second MODIS Vegetation Workshop held last August, was attended by 170 scientists from 27 states and 19 countries.The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a visible/infrared optical sensor launched on both the Terra (December 1999) and the more recent Aqua (May 2002) platforms of the NASA Earth Observing System to provide daily global Earth observation at 250-1000-m spatial resolution. The MODIS Land Science Team since 1990 has developed algorithms analyzing the spectral data to produce biophysical variables over 110 million km2 of vegetated land surface for global science (http.7/modis-land.gsfc. nasa.gov/products/).

Running, Steven W.

2004-12-01

75

Female degus ( Octodon degus ) monitor their environment while foraging socially  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vigilance or scanning involves interruptions in foraging behavior when individuals lift their heads and conduct visual monitoring\\u000a of the environment. Theoretical considerations assume that foraging with the “head down”, and scanning (“head up”) are mutually\\u000a exclusive activities, such that foraging precludes vigilance. We tested this generalization in a socially foraging, small\\u000a mammal model, the diurnal Chilean degu (Octodon degus). We

Verónica Quirici; Rodrigo A. Castro; Javiera Oyarzún; Luis A. Ebensperger

2008-01-01

76

Metagenomic Frameworks for Monitoring Antibiotic Resistance in Aquatic Environments  

PubMed Central

Background: High-throughput genomic technologies offer new approaches for environmental health monitoring, including metagenomic surveillance of antibiotic resistance determinants (ARDs). Although natural environments serve as reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes that can be transferred to pathogenic and human commensal bacteria, monitoring of these determinants has been infrequent and incomplete. Furthermore, surveillance efforts have not been integrated into public health decision making. Objectives: We used a metagenomic epidemiology–based approach to develop an ARD index that quantifies antibiotic resistance potential, and we analyzed this index for common modal patterns across environmental samples. We also explored how metagenomic data such as this index could be conceptually framed within an early risk management context. Methods: We analyzed 25 published data sets from shotgun pyrosequencing projects. The samples consisted of microbial community DNA collected from marine and freshwater environments across a gradient of human impact. We used principal component analysis to identify index patterns across samples. Results: We observed significant differences in the overall index and index subcategory levels when comparing ecosystems more proximal versus distal to human impact. The selection of different sequence similarity thresholds strongly influenced the index measurements. Unique index subcategory modes distinguished the different metagenomes. Conclusions: Broad-scale screening of ARD potential using this index revealed utility for framing environmental health monitoring and surveillance. This approach holds promise as a screening tool for establishing baseline ARD levels that can be used to inform and prioritize decision making regarding management of ARD sources and human exposure routes. Citation: Port JA, Cullen AC, Wallace JC, Smith MN, Faustman EM. 2014. Metagenomic frameworks for monitoring antibiotic resistance in aquatic environments. Environ Health Perspect 122:222–228;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307009 PMID:24334622

Port, Jesse A.; Cullen, Alison C.; Wallace, James C.; Smith, Marissa N.

2013-01-01

77

Monitoring the impacts of trade agreements on food environments.  

PubMed

The liberalization of international trade and foreign direct investment through multilateral, regional and bilateral agreements has had profound implications for the structure and nature of food systems, and therefore, for the availability, nutritional quality, accessibility, price and promotion of foods in different locations. Public health attention has only relatively recently turned to the links between trade and investment agreements, diets and health, and there is currently no systematic monitoring of this area. This paper reviews the available evidence on the links between trade agreements, food environments and diets from an obesity and non-communicable disease (NCD) perspective. Based on the key issues identified through the review, the paper outlines an approach for monitoring the potential impact of trade agreements on food environments and obesity/NCD risks. The proposed monitoring approach encompasses a set of guiding principles, recommended procedures for data collection and analysis, and quantifiable 'minimal', 'expanded' and 'optimal' measurement indicators to be tailored to national priorities, capacity and resources. Formal risk assessment processes of existing and evolving trade and investment agreements, which focus on their impacts on food environments will help inform the development of healthy trade policy, strengthen domestic nutrition and health policy space and ultimately protect population nutrition. PMID:24074216

Friel, S; Hattersley, L; Snowdon, W; Thow, A-M; Lobstein, T; Sanders, D; Barquera, S; Mohan, S; Hawkes, C; Kelly, B; Kumanyika, S; L'Abbe, M; Lee, A; Ma, J; Macmullan, J; Monteiro, C; Neal, B; Rayner, M; Sacks, G; Swinburn, B; Vandevijvere, S; Walker, C

2013-10-01

78

An intelligent environment monitoring system based on wireless sensor networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nowadays, information technology is becoming more and more important to improve the productivity of agriculture, especially for real time environment monitoring. However, the traditional method of environmental data collection is unable to provide real-time and highly accurate data of the monitored region to meet the requirements of precision agriculture. As wireless sensor networks(WSNs) has profound impacts on many fields due to its promising capability, in this paper, a WSN-based environment monitoring system is proposed. A prototype of the system that utilizes GAINSJ nodes based on Zigbee communication protocol has been implemented, and its packet error rate in different conditions was evaluated. Based on the proposed system architecture and technologies, the real time data can be measured, transmitted and stored in high accuracy. Moreover, the system was applied in upland grassland in Yushu, Qinghai province, and compared the results with the data acquired by local weather station. The system evaluation and experimental results show the effectiveness and reliability of the system in measuring the variations of temperature and humidity data within monitored region.

Cao, Minghua; Wang, Huiqin; Peng, Duo; Jia, Kejun

2009-07-01

79

Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) is a hands-on international environmental science and education program. GLOBE links students, teachers, and the scientific research community in an effort to learn more about our environment through student data collection and observation. The website allows students to submit and peruse data in the fields of atmosphere, hydrology, soils, and land cover/phenology. It includes a mapping/graphing area, a teacher's guide, and an educator's forum. GLOBE is a cooperative effort of schools, led in the United States by a Federal interagency program sponsored by NOAA, NASA, NSF, and EPA, in partnership with over 140 colleges and universities, state and local school systems, and non-government organizations.

80

GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE): A Concurrent Engineering Application  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The GLobal Integrated Design Environment (GLIDE) is a client-server software application purpose-built to mitigate issues associated with real time data sharing in concurrent engineering environments and to facilitate discipline-to-discipline interaction between multiple engineers and researchers. GLIDE is implemented in multiple programming languages utilizing standardized web protocols to enable secure parameter data sharing between engineers and researchers across the Internet in closed and/or widely distributed working environments. A well defined, HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) based Application Programming Interface (API) to the GLIDE client/server environment enables users to interact with GLIDE, and each other, within common and familiar tools. One such common tool, Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation), paired with its add-in API for GLIDE, is discussed in this paper. The top-level examples given demonstrate how this interface improves the efficiency of the design process of a concurrent engineering study while reducing potential errors associated with manually sharing information between study participants.

McGuire, Melissa L.; Kunkel, Matthew R.; Smith, David A.

2010-01-01

81

Ecotones in a changing environment: Workshop on ecotones and global change  

SciTech Connect

The Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) has organized an international project to synthesize and advance current theory on the influence of ecotones, or transition zones between ecosystems, on biodiversity and flows of energy, nutrients, water, and project is other materials between ecosystems. In particular, the entire project is designed to evaluate the influence of global climate change and land-use practices on biodiversity and ecological flows associated with ecotones, and will assess the feasibility of monitoring ecotones as early indicators of global change. The later stages of the project will recommend landscape management strategies for ecotones that produce desirable patterns of biodiversity and ecological flows. The result of the project--a comprehensive body of information on the theory and management of biodiversity and ecological flows associated with ecotones--will be part of the planning for research to be carried out under the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program.

Risser, P.G.

1990-02-01

82

Landsat: The Backbone for Mapping and Monitoring Global Ecological Trends  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-term ecological monitoring requires consistent observation of key variables, long-term measurement continuity, and open and affordable access to measurements. The Landsat series of Earth observation missions uniquely meet those criteria, and Landsat's 30m-observation scale permits the detection and differentiation of natural versus human-caused land change. Landsat is the longest and most comprehensive record of the state of the global land surface in existence. No other high-resolution satellite program is either capable or committed to the systematic monitoring of global scale human and natural land change. Beginning with Landsat 1 in 1972, six Landsat missions have continuously recorded images of the Earth. As we near the fortieth anniversary of Landsat, we now have an archive of millions of repetitive images of the Earth with multispectral properties suited to assessing both biotic and abiotic conditions and at a scale appropriate for resource management. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Landsat archive contains nearly three million scenes and all are available to users at no cost. Furthermore, the entire Landsat record, Landsats 1-7, is now calibrated to a common radiometric standard and the majority of the data are orthorectified - enabling immediate assessment of long-term ecological conditions and land change. Landsats 5 and 7 continue to collect imagery and together they provide the potential to cover a significant portion of the Earth's land surfaces every eight days. Both of these missions now use a long-term acquisition plan designed to improve the collection of seasonal global coverage. Furthermore, recent agreements with international Landsat receiving stations are bringing previously inaccessible contemporary Landsat 5 data into the EROS archive. The amount of global coverage being acquired annually is the highest level in the history of the Landsat program. The EROS global historical archive is rapidly expanding because of the addition of 1972-present Landsat holdings from ground stations worldwide. More than three million Landsat scenes not currently found in the EROS archive exist in archives around the world and many of these data are at risk due to aging storage media and inadequate preservation practices. The repatriation of these data into the EROS archive will potentially double the number of no-cost Landsat scenes available to users. The uncertainty of future Landsat missions has challenged operational monitoring of ecological systems. However, that may be changing. The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) being developed by NASA and the USGS is slated for a December 2012 launch. LDCM (which will be renamed Landsat 8 following launch) will use new imaging technology to provide improved multispectral measurements, and offers additional spectral bands and increased daily imaging capacity. While missions beyond LDCM are uncertain, the President's Fiscal Year 2012 budget requests funds for the planning and development of Landsats 9 and 10, and includes language that will make Landsat an operational program - ending the decades of uncertainty.

Loveland, T. R.

2011-12-01

83

Global Monitoring of Air Pollution Using Spaceborne Sensors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The MODIS sensor onboard EOS-Terra satellite provides not only daily global coverage but also high spectral (36 channels from 0.41 to 14 microns wavelength) and spatial (250m, 500m and 1km) resolution measurements. A similar MODIS instrument will be also configured into EOS-Aqua satellite to be launched soon. Using the complementary EOS-Terra and EOS-Aqua sun-synchronous orbits (10:30 AM and 1:30 PM equator-crossing time respectively), it enables us also to study the diurnal changes of the Earth system. It is unprecedented for the derivation of aerosol properties with such high spatial resolution and daily global converge. Aerosol optical depth and other aerosol properties, e.g., Angstrom coefficient over land and particle size over ocean, are derived as standard products at a spatial resolution of 10 x 10 sq km. The high resolution results are found surprisingly useful in detecting aerosols in both urban and rural regions as a result of urban/industrial pollution and biomass burning. For long-lived aerosols, the ability to monitoring the evolution of these aerosol events could help us to establish an system of air quality especially for highly populated areas. Aerosol scenarios with city pollution and biomass burning will be presented. Also presented are the method used in the derivation of aerosol optical properties and preliminary results will be presented, and issue as well as obstacles in validating aerosol optical depth with AERONET ground-based observations.

Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Remer, L. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

84

Volcano monitoring using the Global Positioning System: Filtering strategies  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Permanent Global Positioning System (GPS) networks are routinely used for producing improved orbits and monitoring secular tectonic deformation. For these applications, data are transferred to an analysis center each day and routinely processed in 24-hour segments. To use GPS for monitoring volcanic events, which may last only a few hours, real-time or near real-time data processing and subdaily position estimates are valuable. Strategies have been researched for obtaining station coordinates every 15 min using a Kalman filter; these strategies have been tested on data collected by a GPS network on Kilauea Volcano. Data from this network are tracked continuously, recorded every 30 s, and telemetered hourly to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. A white noise model is heavily impacted by data outages and poor satellite geometry, but a properly constrained random walk model fits the data well. Using a borehole tiltmeter at Kilauea's summit as ground-truth, solutions using different random walk constraints were compared. This study indicates that signals on the order of 5 mm/h are resolvable using a random walk standard deviation of 0.45 cm/???h. Values lower than this suppress small signals, and values greater than this have significantly higher noise at periods of 1-6 hours. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

Larson, K.M.; Cervelli, P.; Lisowski, M.; Miklius, A.; Segall, P.; Owen, S.

2001-01-01

85

Monitoring of fatigue crack under complex environment using guided waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents an experimental study on monitoring of fatigue crack under complex environment using guided waves. An experimental set-up consisting of an electrical oven, a MTS testing machine and a monitoring system is established to perform the study. First, the combined effects of temperature, load and vibration on the propagation of guided waves in metallic structure is studied. Then, a statistical approach is proposed to detect fatigue crack under these combined effects. Damage feature is extracted after the guided wave signals are processed by Fourier transform. A Monte Carlo procedure is employed to estimate the probability density functions of the feature before and after cracking, respectively. By comparing the probability density functions, the probability of existence of fatigue crack is determined. Experimental study on a fatigue coupon under combined effects of temperature, load and vibration is conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

Tang, Jianfei; Yan, Gang; Xu, Xiwu

2011-11-01

86

Monitoring of fatigue crack under complex environment using guided waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents an experimental study on monitoring of fatigue crack under complex environment using guided waves. An experimental set-up consisting of an electrical oven, a MTS testing machine and a monitoring system is established to perform the study. First, the combined effects of temperature, load and vibration on the propagation of guided waves in metallic structure is studied. Then, a statistical approach is proposed to detect fatigue crack under these combined effects. Damage feature is extracted after the guided wave signals are processed by Fourier transform. A Monte Carlo procedure is employed to estimate the probability density functions of the feature before and after cracking, respectively. By comparing the probability density functions, the probability of existence of fatigue crack is determined. Experimental study on a fatigue coupon under combined effects of temperature, load and vibration is conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

Tang, Jianfei; Yan, Gang; Xu, Xiwu

2012-04-01

87

Virtual global positioning system for distributed interactive simulation environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major shortfall in the fidelity of current military distributed virtual environments (DVEs) is the lack of virtual global positioning system (GPS) timing and position signals for entities within the environment. The DVE's usefulness is reduced because positional errors and positional accuracy that would be available in the real world are not present in the DVE. This, in turn, affects the validity of the results of training, analysis, and evaluations involving systems that rely on GPS. The magnitude of the affect depends on the degree that the systems involved in the DVE rely on GPS in the real world. The project reported in this paper addresses this deficit in current military DVEs. The capability we developed to provide a virtual GPS-based navigation capability within a DVE is based upon three components. These components are a complete virtual GPS satellite constellation, a means for broadcasting GPS signals using the Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) simulation protocols, and a software system, the Virtual GPS Receiver (VGPSR), to calculate simulation entity position using the virtual GPS time and position signals. The virtual GPS satellites are propagated in their orbits using the solar system modeler (SM). The SM also performs the simulated GPS signal broadcast by transmitting a DIS protocol data unit (PDU) with the data that would appear within a real world GPS satellite broadcast. The VGPSR is a plug-in module available for simulation applications that require virtual GPS navigation. To demonstrate the capability of this system, we used the VGPSR in conjunction with the virtual cockpit to simulate virtual weapons deployment. We present the design of the VGPSR and the design of the modules added to the SM for GPS broadcast. We describe the calculations the system performs to calculate position in the virtual environment and we describe the accuracy and performance the system achieves when calculating virtual environment position using our system. We conclude with suggestions for further research in this area.

Williams, Gary; Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.

1997-07-01

88

An Induced Environment Contamination Monitor for the Space Shuttle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Induced Environment Contamination Monitor (IECM), a set of ten instruments integrated into a self-contained unit and scheduled to fly on shuttle Orbital Flight Tests 1 through 6 and on Spacelabs 1 and 2, is described. The IECM is designed to measure the actual environment to determine whether the strict controls placed on the shuttle system have solved the contamination problem. Measurements are taken during prelaunch, ascent, on-orbit, descent, and postlanding. The on-orbit measurements are molecular return flux, background spectral intensity, molecular deposition, and optical surface effects. During the other mission phases dew point, humidity, aerosol content, and trace gas are measured as well as optical surface effects and molecular deposition. The IECM systems and thermal design are discussed. Preflight and ground operations are presented together with associated ground support equipment. Flight operations and data reduction plans are given.

Miller, E. R. (editor); Decher, R. (editor)

1978-01-01

89

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT AND ENVIRONMENT INSTITUTE WORKING PAPER NO. 11-03  

E-print Network

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT AND ENVIRONMENT INSTITUTE WORKING PAPER NO. 11-03 Would Women Leaders Have Development and Environment Institute Working Paper 11-03 (pre-revision). Funding from the Institute for New Medford MA 02155, USA http://ase.tufts.edu/gdae ©Copyright 2012 Global Development and Environment

Tufts University

90

Validation of the ASAR Global Monitoring Mode Soil Moisture Product Using the NAFE'05 Data Set  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) Global Monitoring (GM) mode offers an opportunity for global soil moisture (SM) monitoring at much finer spatial resolution than that provided by the currently operational Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System and future planned missions such as Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity and Soil Moisture Active Passive. Considering the difficulties in

Iliana Mladenova; Venkat Lakshmi; Jeffrey P. Walker; Rocco Panciera; Wolfgang Wagner; Marcela Doubkova

2010-01-01

91

Ozone profile and tropospheric ozone retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment: Algorithm description and validation  

E-print Network

Ozone profile and tropospheric ozone retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment October 2005. [1] Ozone profiles are derived from back scattered radiance spectra in the ultraviolet (289­339 nm) measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) using the optimal estimation technique

Chance, Kelly

92

Global Environment Outlook-1: United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP): Global State of the Environment Report 1997: The Web Version  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United Nations Environment Programme has recently released this report, "a snap-shot of an ongoing worldwide environmental assessment process." It "describes the environmental status and trends in seven regions...summarizes developments over time in regional policy responses...[and] concludes with an exploration, based on model analysis, of what we might expect in the future for a selected number of environmental issues if no major policy reforms are initiated." An executive summary for each chapter is first presented, followed by the full report, which contains over seventy figures and thirty tables. The power of the report lies in its regional analysis. A second GEO report is due to be released in 1999.

1997-01-01

93

Surface Emissivity Retrieved with Satellite Ultraspectral IR Measurements for Monitoring Global Change  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Surface and atmospheric thermodynamic parameters retrieved with advanced ultraspectral remote sensors aboard Earth observing satellites are critical to general atmospheric and Earth science research, climate monitoring, and weather prediction. Ultraspectral resolution infrared radiance obtained from nadir observations provide atmospheric, surface, and cloud information. Presented here is the global surface IR emissivity retrieved from Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) measurements under "clear-sky" conditions. Fast radiative transfer models, applied to the cloud-free (or clouded) atmosphere, are used for atmospheric profile and surface parameter (or cloud parameter) retrieval. The inversion scheme, dealing with cloudy as well as cloud-free radiances observed with ultraspectral infrared sounders, has been developed to simultaneously retrieve atmospheric thermodynamic and surface (or cloud microphysical) parameters. Rapidly produced surface emissivity is initially evaluated through quality control checks on the retrievals of other impacted atmospheric and surface parameters. Surface emissivity and surface skin temperature from the current and future operational satellites can and will reveal critical information on the Earth s ecosystem and land surface type properties, which can be utilized as part of long-term monitoring for the Earth s environment and global climate change.

Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter

2009-01-01

94

The Global Communication Infrastructure of the International Monitoring System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Global Communications Infrastructure (GCI) employs 6 satellites in various frequency bands distributed around the globe. Communications with the PTS (Provisional Technical Secretariat) in Vienna, Austria are achieved through VSAT technologies, international leased data circuits and Virtual Private Network (VPN) connections over the Internet. To date, 210 independent VSAT circuits have been connected to Vienna as well as special circuits connecting to the Antarctic and to independent sub-networks. Data volumes from all technologies currently reach 8 Gigabytes per day. The first level of support and a 24/7 help desk remains with the GCI contractor, but performance is monitored actively by the PTS/GCI operations team. GCI operations are being progressively introduced into the PTS operations centre. An Operations centre fully integrated with the GCI segment of the IMS network will ensure a more focused response to incidents and will maximize the availability of the IMS network. Existing trouble tickets systems are being merged to ensure the commission manages GCI incidents in the context of the IMS as a whole. A focus on a single source of data for GCI network performance has enabled reporting systems to be developed which allow for improved and automated reports. The contracted availability for each individual virtual circuit is 99.5% and this performance is regularly reviewed on a monthly basis

Lastowka, L.; Gray, A.; Anichenko, A.

2007-05-01

95

Global monitoring of Sea Surface Salinity with Aquarius  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aquarius is a microwave remote sensing system designed to obtain global maps of the surface salinity field of the oceans from space. It will be flown on the Aquarius/SAC-D mission, a partnership between the USA (NASA) and Argentina (CONAE) with launch scheduled for late in 2008. The objective of Aquarius is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This will provide data to address scientific questions associated with ocean circulation and its impact on climate. For example, salinity is needed to understand the large scale thermohaline circulation, driven by buoyancy, which moves large masses of water and heat around the globe. Of the two variables that determine buoyancy (salinity and temperature), temperature is already being monitored. Salinity is the missing variable needed to understand this circulation. Salinity also has an important role in energy exchange between the ocean and atmosphere, for example in the development of fresh water lenses (buoyant water that forms stable layers and insulates water below from the atmosphere) which alter the air-sea coupling. Aquarius is a combination radiometer and scatterometer (radar) operating at L-band (1.413 GHz for the radiometer and 1.26 GHz for the scatterometer). The primary instrument,for measuring salinity is the radiometer which is able to detect salinity because of the modulation salinity produces on the thermal emission from sea water. This change is detectable at the long wavelength end of the microwave spectrum. The scatterometer will provide a correction for surface roughness (waves) which is one of the greatest unknowns in the retrieval. The sensor will be in a sun-synchronous orbit at about 650 km with equatorial crossings of 6am/6pm. The antenna for these two instruments is a 3 meter offset fed reflector with three feeds arranged in pushbroom fashion looking away from the sun toward the shadow side of the orbit to minimize sunglint. The mission goal is to produce maps of the salinity field globally once each month with an accuracy of 0.2 psu and a spatial resolution of 100 km. This will be adequate to address l&ge scale features of the salinity field of the open ocean. The temporal resolution is sufficient to address seasonal changes and a three year mission is planned to-collect sufficient data to look for interannual variation. Aquarius is being developed by NASA as part of the Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program. The SAC-D mission is being developed by CONAE and will include the space craft and several additional instruments, including visible and infrared cameras and a microwave radiometer to monitor rain and wind velocity over the oceans, and sea ice.

Lagerloef, G. S. E.; LeVine, D. M.; Chao, Yi; Colomb, R.; Nollmann, I.

2005-01-01

96

Monitoring the Earth's Atmosphere with the Global IMS Infrasound Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is tasked with monitoring compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) which bans nuclear weapon explosions underground, in the oceans, and in the atmosphere. The verification regime includes a globally distributed network of seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide stations which collect and transmit data to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria shortly after the data are recorded at each station. The infrasound network defined in the Protocol of the CTBT comprises 60 infrasound array stations. Each array is built according to the same technical specifications, it is typically composed of 4 to 9 sensors, with 1 to 3 km aperture geometry. At the end of 2000 only one infrasound station was transmitting data to the IDC. Since then, 41 additional stations have been installed and 70% of the infrasound network is currently certified and contributing data to the IDC. This constitutes the first global infrasound network ever built with such a large and uniform distribution of stations. Infrasound data at the IDC are processed at the station level using the Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation (PMCC) method for the detection and measurement of infrasound signals. The algorithm calculates the signal correlation between sensors at an infrasound array. If the signal is sufficiently correlated and consistent over an extended period of time and frequency range a detection is created. Groups of detections are then categorized according to their propagation and waveform features, and a phase name is assigned for infrasound, seismic or noise detections. The categorization complements the PMCC algorithm to avoid overwhelming the IDC automatic association algorithm with false alarm infrasound events. Currently, 80 to 90% of the detections are identified as noise by the system. Although the noise detections are not used to build events in the context of CTBT monitoring, they represent valuable data for other civil applications like monitoring of natural hazards (volcanic activity, storm tracking) and climate change. Non-noise detections are used in network processing at the IDC along with seismic and hydroacoustic technologies. The arrival phases detected on the three waveform technologies may be combined and used for locating events in an automatically generated bulletin of events. This automatic event bulletin is routinely reviewed by analysts during the interactive review process. However, the fusion of infrasound data with the other waveform technologies has only recently (in early 2010) become part of the IDC operational system, after a software development and testing period that began in 2004. The build-up of the IMS infrasound network, the recent developments of the IDC infrasound software, and the progress accomplished during the last decade in the domain of real-time atmospheric modelling have allowed better understanding of infrasound signals and identification of a growing data set of ground-truth sources. These infragenic sources originate from natural or man-made sources. Some of the detected signals are emitted by local or regional phenomena recorded by a single IMS infrasound station: man-made cultural activity, wind farms, aircraft, artillery exercises, ocean surf, thunderstorms, rumbling volcanoes, iceberg calving, aurora, avalanches. Other signals may be recorded by several IMS infrasound stations at larger distances: ocean swell, sonic booms, and mountain associated waves. Only a small fraction of events meet the event definition criteria considering the Treaty verification mission of the Organization. Candidate event types for the IDC Reviewed Event Bulletin include atmospheric or surface explosions, meteor explosions, rocket launches, signals from large earthquakes and explosive volcanic eruptions.

Brachet, Nicolas; Brown, David; Mialle, Pierrick; Le Bras, Ronan; Coyne, John; Given, Jeffrey

2010-05-01

97

Constraining Changes in the Global CH4 Budget Based on Global Ethane Changes: Insights From 30 Years of Global Trace Gas Monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

UC-Irvine has directly monitored global CH4 mixing ratios for 30 years, since 1978, and it is the longest- running of the continuous global monitoring networks. Every three months 80 ground-level whole air samples are collected in the remote Pacific Basin (71 °N-46 °S) and analyzed by gas chromatography for many dozens of trace gases including hydrocarbons, halocarbons, organic nitrates and

I. J. Simpson; D. R. Blake; S. Meinardi; N. J. Blake; M. S. Andersen; S. Rowland

2008-01-01

98

Ancestral populations perform better in a novel environment: domestication of medfly populations from five global regions  

PubMed Central

Geographically isolated populations of a species may differ in several aspects of life-history, morphology, behavior, and genetic structure as a result of adaptation in ecologically diverse habitats. We used a global invasive species, the Mediterranean fruit fly to investigate, whether adaptation to a novel environment differs among geographically isolated populations that vary in major life history components such as life span and reproduction. We used wild populations from five global regions (Kenya, Hawaii, Guatemala, Portugal, and Greece). Adult demographic traits were monitored in F2, F5, F7 and F9 generations in captivity. Although domestication in constant laboratory conditions had a different effect on the mortality and reproductive rates of the different populations, a general trend of decreasing life span and age of first reproduction was observed for most medfly populations tested. However, taking into account longevity of both sexes, age-specific reproductive schedules, and average reproductive rates we found that the ancestral Kenyan population kept the above life history traits stable during domestication compared to the other populations tested. These findings provide important insights in the life-history evolution of this model species, and suggest that ancestral medfly populations perform better than the derived – invasive ones in a novel environment. PMID:21278856

Diamantidis, Alexandros D.; Carey, James R.; Nakas, Christos T.; Papadopoulos, Nikos T.

2010-01-01

99

NOAA's Global Earth Observation - Integrated Data Environment (GEO-IDE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The international Group on Earth Observation (GEO) and the U.S. coordination group, USGEO, have identified nine societal benefit areas that require environmental data of a wide range of types and from many diverse sources. GEO has called on the nations of the world to ensure that the relevant data that they hold is made accessible and useful to these applications. In response, nations and their environmental agencies are addressing the challenges associated with data integration of these distributed and diverse data types. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) holds extremely large collections of data describing the physical and biological properties of the Earth's environment. To date, the data collections and the systems that support them have been acquired by individually funded and managed programs with differing requirements, standards, interfaces and conventions, mirroring the data integration issues faced at the national and international level. The Global Earth Observation - Integrated Data Environment (GEO-IDE) has been initiated by NOAA to address these issues for its own interdisciplinary applications as well as those of the the broader national and international iniatives. The concept and initial plans for GEO-IDE have been developed by the Data Management Integration Team (DMIT), a group of data management professionals representing all NOAA's Line Offices, Goal Teams and the office of the CIO. The goal of GEO-IDE is to define an architecture and the associated processes necessary to establish the required standards and guidelines that allow NOAA's data providers to make their products available as a set of interoperable services. GEO-IDE is addressing the integration of existing data services while at the same time providing guidance to future data system development activities. It is intended to meet an important NOAA need while also supporting NOAA's contribution to USGEO and GEO.

McDonald, K. R.

2007-12-01

100

Safety and Security of Remote Monitoring and Control of intelligent Home Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intelligent home environments are one of the major application areas of pervasive computing. Safety and security are two most important issues in the remote monitoring and control of intelligent home environments. This article takes safety and security into consideration together and proposes a phone-out-only policy for ensuring security and virtual home environments for safety. A remote monitoring and control system

Lili Yang; Shuang-Hua Yang; Fang Yao

2006-01-01

101

Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) for Monitoring Long Suspension Bridges  

E-print Network

, Nanjing, China 1 A Brief Introduction to the Global Positioning System 1 2 GPS for Structural Health 16 1 A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO THE GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM 1.1 GPS constellation The full term of the well-known acronym GPS is NAVSTAR global positioning system, where NAVSTAR stands for NAVigation System

Santerre, Rock

102

Monitoring and Forecasting Space Weather in Geospace Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

For improving the reliability of Space Weather prediction, we developed a new, Polar Magnetic (PM) index of geomagnetic activity, which shows high correlation with both upstream solar wind data and related events in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Similarly to the existing polar cap PC index, the new PM index was computed from data from two near-pole geomagnetic observatories; however, the method for computing the PM index is different. The high correlation of the PM index with both solar wind data and events in Geospace environment makes possible to improve significantly forecasting geomagnetic disturbances and such important parameters as the cross-polar-cap voltage and global Joule heating, which play an important role in the development of geomagnetic, ionospheric and thermospheric disturbances. We tested the PM index for 10-year period (1995-2004). The correlation between PM index and upstream solar wind data for these years is very high (the average correlation coefficient R approximately equal to 0.86). The PM index also shows the high correlation with the cross-polar-cap voltage and hemispheric Joule heating (the correlation coefficient between the actual and predicted values of these parameters approximately equal to 0.9), which results in significant increasing the prediction reliability of these parameters. Using the PM index of geomagnetic activity provides a significant increase in the forecasting reliability of geomagnetic disturbances and related events in Geospace environment. The PM index may be also used as an important input parameter in modeling ionospheric, magnetospheric, and thermospheric processes.

Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.

2008-01-01

103

From molecules to management: adopting DNA-based methods for monitoring biological invasions in aquatic environments  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent technological advances have driven rapid development of DNA-based methods designed to facilitate detection and monitoring of invasive species in aquatic environments. These tools promise to significantly alleviate difficulties associated with traditional monitoring approac...

104

Health and the environment: a global challenge. WHO Commission on Health and Environment.  

PubMed

A healthy environment is not only a need, it is also a right; the right to live and work in an environment conducive to physical and mental health is enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Everyone shares the responsibility for ensuring that this right is duly acknowledged. The responsibility for action lies with individuals and with business. Governments have the responsibility of setting up the strategic and institutional framework within which action is taken. There are three main global objectives: achieving a sustainable basis for health for all--by slowing down population growth as soon as possible, and promoting life-styles and patterns of consumption among affluent groups and countries that are consistent with ecological sustainability; providing an environment that promotes health--by reducing the risk of physical, chemical and biological hazards and ensuring that everyone has the means to acquire the resources on which health depends; making all individuals and organizations aware of their responsibilities for health and its environmental basis. PMID:1394773

1992-01-01

105

An artificial reality environment for remote factory control and monitoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Work has begun on the merger of two well known systems, VEOS (HITLab) and CLIPS (NASA). In the recent past, the University of Massachusetts Lowell developed a parallel version of NASA CLIPS, called P-CLIPS. This modification allows users to create smaller expert systems which are able to communicate with each other to jointly solve problems. With the merger of a VEOS message system, PCLIPS-V can now act as a group of entities working within VEOS. To display the 3D virtual world we have been using a graphics package called HOOPS, from Ithaca Software. The artificial reality environment we have set up contains actors and objects as found in our Lincoln Logs Factory of the Future project. The environment allows us to view and control the objects within the virtual world. All communication between the separate CLIPS expert systems is done through VEOS. A graphical renderer generates camera views on X-Windows devices; Head Mounted Devices are not required. This allows more people to make use of this technology. We are experimenting with different types of virtual vehicles to give the user a sense that he or she is actually moving around inside the factory looking ahead through windows and virtual monitors.

Kosta, Charles Paul; Krolak, Patrick D.

1993-01-01

106

Advanced monitoring systems for biological applications in marine environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increasing need to manage complex environmental problems demands a new approach and new technologies to provide the information required at a spatial and temporal resolution appropriate to the scales at which the biological processes occur. In particular sensor networks, now quite popular on land, still poses many difficult problems in underwater environments. In this context, it is necessary to develop an autonomous monitoring system that can be remotely interrogated and directed to address unforeseen or expected changes in such environmental conditions. This system, at the highest level, aims to provide a framework for combining observations from a wide range of different in-situ sensors and remote sensing instruments, with a long-term plan for how the network of sensing modalities will continue to evolve in terms of sensing modality, geographic location, and spatial and temporal density. The advances in sensor technology and digital electronics have made it possible to produce large amount of small tag-like sensors which integrate sensing, processing, and communication capabilities together and form an autonomous entity. To successfully use this kind of systems in under water environments, it becomes necessary to optimize the network lifetime and face the relative hindrances that such a field imposes, especially in terms of underwater information exchange.

Cella, U.; Chiffings, T.; Gandelli, A.; Grimaccia, F.; Johnstone, R. W.; Zich, R. E.

2007-12-01

107

Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment, Institute for Environmental Studies University of Wisconsin, Madison  

E-print Network

­ Diffusive & turbulent fluxes of heat and water vapor through canopy and soils (including soil ice) ­ Wind water flux #12;Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment, Institute for Environmental StudiesCenter for Sustainability and the Global Environment, Institute for Environmental Studies

108

A New GLORIA (Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments Site in Southwestern Montana  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global climate change is predicted to have a major impact on the alpine environments and plants of western North America. Alpine plant species and treelines may migrate upwards due to warmer temperatures. Species composition, vegetation cover, and the phenology of photosynthesis, flowering, pollination, and seed dispersal may change. The Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments (GLORIA) is a network of

M. E. Apple; J. E. Warden; C. J. Apple; T. Y. Pullman; J. H. Gallagher

2008-01-01

109

Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE) University of Wisconsin-Madison  

E-print Network

MEIYUN LIN Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE) University of Wisconsin-Madison, Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (3/08~present) Postdoctoral Scientist: Research "Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Green Hotels" #12;Curriculum Vitae Meiyun Lin - 2 - HONORS & AWARDS

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

110

The global obesity pandemic: shaped by global drivers and local environments.  

PubMed

The simultaneous increases in obesity in almost all countries seem to be driven mainly by changes in the global food system, which is producing more processed, affordable, and effectively marketed food than ever before. This passive overconsumption of energy leading to obesity is a predictable outcome of market economies predicated on consumption-based growth. The global food system drivers interact with local environmental factors to create a wide variation in obesity prevalence between populations. Within populations, the interactions between environmental and individual factors, including genetic makeup, explain variability in body size between individuals. However, even with this individual variation, the epidemic has predictable patterns in subpopulations. In low-income countries, obesity mostly affects middle-aged adults (especially women) from wealthy, urban environments; whereas in high-income countries it affects both sexes and all ages, but is disproportionately greater in disadvantaged groups. Unlike other major causes of preventable death and disability, such as tobacco use, injuries, and infectious diseases, there are no exemplar populations in which the obesity epidemic has been reversed by public health measures. This absence increases the urgency for evidence-creating policy action, with a priority on reduction of the supply-side drivers. PMID:21872749

Swinburn, Boyd A; Sacks, Gary; Hall, Kevin D; McPherson, Klim; Finegood, Diane T; Moodie, Marjory L; Gortmaker, Steven L

2011-08-27

111

Designing Training for Global Environments: Knowing What Questions To Ask.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a framework for identifying important issues for instructional design and delivery in global settings. Highlights include cultural factors in global training; an instructional design model; corporate globalization strategy; communication and training norms; language barriers; implicit value differences; and technical and legal…

Gayeski, Diane M.; Sanchirico, Christine; Anderson, Janet

2002-01-01

112

Global 2000: The Presidential Task Force on Resources and the Environment--A Series of Responses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A series of responses to "The Global 2000 Report to the President" is presented. The Global 2000 Report examines the issues and interdependencies of population, resources, and environment in the long term global perspective (ED 188 935). According to the above report, if present trends continue, serious stresses of overcrowding, pollution,…

Scrofani, E. Robert; And Others

113

Application of the Java Message Service in mobile monitoring environments Martin Kuehnhausen , Victor S. Frost  

E-print Network

Application of the Java Message Service in mobile monitoring environments Martin Kuehnhausen Ã? on trains. The Java Message Service (JMS) presents a flexible transport layer for asynchronous communication

Kansas, University of

114

A New GLORIA (Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments Site in Southwestern Montana  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global climate change is predicted to have a major impact on the alpine environments and plants of western North America. Alpine plant species and treelines may migrate upwards due to warmer temperatures. Species composition, vegetation cover, and the phenology of photosynthesis, flowering, pollination, and seed dispersal may change. The Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments (GLORIA) is a network of alpine sites established with the goal of understanding the interactions between climate change and alpine plants. The Continental Divide traverses Southwestern Montana, where the flora contains representative species from both sides of the divide. In the summer of 2008, we established a GLORIA site in southwestern Montana east of the Continental Divide with the objective of determining whether the temperature changes at the site, and if so, how temperature changes influence alpine plants. We are monitoring soil temperature along with species composition and percent cover of alpine plants at four sub-summits along an ascending altitudinal gradient. We placed the treeline, lower alpine, and upper alpine sites on Mt. Fleecer (45°49'36.06"N, 112°48'08.18"W, 2886.2 m (9469 ft)) and the highest sub-summit on Keokirk Mountain, (45°35'37.94"N, 112°57'03.89"W, 2987.3 m (9801 ft)) in the Pioneer Range. Interesting species on these mountains include Lewisia pygmaea, the Pygmy Bitterroot, Silene acaulis, the Moss Campion, Eritrichium nanum, the Alpine Forget-Me-Not, Lloydia serotina, the Alpine Lily, and Pinus albicaulis, the Whitebark Pine. This new site will remain in place indefinitely. Baseline and subsequent data from this site will be linked with the global network of GLORIA sites with which we will assess changes in alpine flora.

Apple, M. E.; Warden, J. E.; Apple, C. J.; Pullman, T. Y.; Gallagher, J. H.

2008-12-01

115

Lidar Remote Sensing for Industry and Environment Monitoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contents include the following: 1. Keynote paper: Overview of lidar technology for industrial and environmental monitoring in Japan. 2. lidar technology I: NASA's future active remote sensing mission for earth science. Geometrical detector consideration s in laser sensing application (invited paper). 3. Lidar technology II: High-power femtosecond light strings as novel atmospheric probes (invited paper). Design of a compact high-sensitivity aerosol profiling lidar. 4. Lasers for lidars: High-energy 2 microns laser for multiple lidar applications. New submount requirement of conductively cooled laser diodes for lidar applications. 5. Tropospheric aerosols and clouds I: Lidar monitoring of clouds and aerosols at the facility for atmospheric remote sensing (invited paper). Measurement of asian dust by using multiwavelength lidar. Global monitoring of clouds and aerosols using a network of micropulse lidar systems. 6. Troposphere aerosols and clouds II: Scanning lidar measurements of marine aerosol fields at a coastal site in Hawaii. 7. Tropospheric aerosols and clouds III: Formation of ice cloud from asian dust particles in the upper troposphere. Atmospheric boundary layer observation by ground-based lidar at KMITL, Thailand (13 deg N, 100 deg. E). 8. Boundary layer, urban pollution: Studies of the spatial correlation between urban aerosols and local traffic congestion using a slant angle scanning on the research vessel Mirai. 9. Middle atmosphere: Lidar-observed arctic PSC's over Svalbard (invited paper). Sodium temperature lidar measurements of the mesopause region over Syowa Station. 10. Differential absorption lidar (dIAL) and DOAS: Airborne UV DIAL measurements of ozone and aerosols (invited paper). Measurement of water vapor, surface ozone, and ethylene using differential absorption lidar. 12. Space lidar I: Lightweight lidar telescopes for space applications (invited paper). Coherent lidar development for Doppler wind measurement from the International Space Station. 13. Space lidar II: Using coherent Doppler lidar to estimate river discharge. 14. Poster session: Lidar technology, optics for lidar. Laser for lidar. Middle atmosphere observations. Tropospheric observations (aerosols, clouds). Boundary layer, urban pollution. Differential absorption lidar. Doppler lidar. and Space lidar.

Singh, Upendra N. (Editor); Itabe, Toshikazu (Editor); Sugimoto, Nobuo (Editor)

2000-01-01

116

The MERSEA Project : development of a European system for operational monitoring and forecasting of the ocean physics, biogeochemistry and ecosystems, on global and regional scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

MERSEA (Marine EnviRonment and Security for the European Area) is an Integrated Project funded by the EC under the FP6, Space thematic priority for GMES, Ocean and Marine Applications. Forty agencies and industrial partners participate in the project whose aim is to provide an integrated service of global and regional ocean monitoring and forecasting to intermediate users and policy makers

Y. Desaubies

2004-01-01

117

Global ocean monitoring for the World Climate Research Programme.  

PubMed

Oceanic research and modelling for the World Climate Research Program will utilize several recently-developed instruments and measuring techniques as well as well-tested, long-used instruments. Ocean-scanning satellites will map the component of the ocean-surface topography related to ocean currents and mesoscale eddies and to fluctuating water volumes caused by ocean warming and cooling. Other satellite instruments will measure the direction and magnitude of wind stress on the sea surface, surface water temperatures, the distribution of chlorophyll and other photosynthetic pigments, the characteristics of internal waves, and possible precipitation over the ocean. Networks of acoustic transponders will obtain a three-dimensional picture of the distribution of temperature from the surface down to mid-depth and of long-term changes in temperature at depth. Ocean research vessels will determine the distribution and fate of geochemical tracers and will also make high-precision, deep hydrographic casts. Ships of opportunity, using expendable instruments, will measure temperature, salinity and currents in the upper water layers. Drifting and anchored buoys will also measure these properties as well as those of the air above the sea surface. Tide gauges installed on islands and exposed coastal locations will measure variations in monthly and shorter-period mean sea level. These tide gauges will provide 'ground truth' for the satellite maps of sea-surface topography, and will also determine variations in ocean currents and temperature.All these instruments will be used in several major programs, the most ambitious of which is the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) designed to obtain global measurements of major currents throughout the world ocean, greater understanding of the transformation of water masses, and the role of advective, convective, and turbulent processes in exchange of properties between surface and deep-ocean layers.A five- to ten-year experiment-"Tropical Oceans and Global Atmosphere (TOGA)"-will be undertaken to sudy the sequence of events of air-sea interactions in the tropical oceans and their impact on climatic variations on land-for example, variations in the strength and location of the Indian Ocean monsoon, droughts in low latitudes, and climatic fluctuations in temperate latitudes.Experimental and continuing time series will be taken at fixed locations to obtain a better picture of the magnitude and causes of ocean climate variability. National and multinational systematic repeated measurements along selected ocean transects or in specific ocean areas will be taken to determine oceanic variability and teleconnections between oceanic and atmospheric processes. Examples are the long Japanese section along the meridian of 137° E and the 'Sections' program of the USSR and several other countries in Energy-Active zones.The results from this wide range of observations and experiments will be used to guide and define mathematical models of the ocean circulation and its interactions with the atmosphere.It can be shown that biogeochemical processes in the ocean play an important role in determining the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere and thus in causing long-term climatic changes. Variations in the biological productivity of sub-surface waters cause variations in the effectveness of the biological pump which carries organic carbon down into deeper waters where it is oxidized. Studies of ice cores from 20 000 to 30 000 yr before the present indicate that atmospheric carbon dioxide varied by a factor of 2 within times of the order of 100 yr, and these variations were accompanied by large excursions in atmospheric temperature. Thus, ocean climatic monitoring must take into account measurements of both biological and physical variations in the ocean. PMID:24254799

Revelle, R; Bretherton, F

1986-07-01

118

Infrasound monitoring, acoustic-gravity waves and global atmospheric dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the verification of the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty, the International Monitoring System has been developed. As part of this system, the infrasound network provides an unique opportunity to monitor continuously pressure waves in the atmosphere. Such infrasonic waves propagate in the channel formed by the temperature and wind gradients of the atmosphere. Long term observations provide information about

E. Blanc; A. Le Pichon; L. Ceranna; T. Farges

2008-01-01

119

Ocean Acidification: The Newest Threat to the Global Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ocean acidification is the newest global environmental threat confronting the earth. It is the consequence of the same anthropogenic excess that is responsible for global warming—release of much more CO2 at much faster rates, minute after minute, than the earth's capability to assimilate. Considering that oceans cover almost 70% of the earth's surface, any upset in the balance of forces

Tasneem Abbasi; S. A. Abbasi

2011-01-01

120

A global change data base using Thematic Mapper data - Earth Monitoring Educational System (EMES)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some of the main directions in creating an education program in earth system science aimed at combining top science and technology with high academic performance are presented. The creation of an Earth Monitoring Educational System (EMES) integrated with the research interests of the NASA Ames Research Center and one or more universities is proposed. Based on the integration of a global network of cooperators to build a global data base for assessments of global change, EMES would promote degrees at all levels in global ecology at associated universities and colleges, and extracurricular courses for multilevel audiences. EMES objectives are to: train specialists; establish a tradition of solving regional problems concerning global change in a systemic manner, using remote sensing technology as the monitoring tool; and transfer knowledge on global change to the national and world communities. South America is proposed as the pilot continent for the project.

D'Antoni, Hector L.; Peterson, David L.

1992-01-01

121

Monitoring the quality of ozone towards the prevention of further global warming  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the issue of Ozone depletion in global warming, factors causing Ozone depletion and the design of monitoring system. In developing countries like Malaysia, the rapid growth of industrial sectors does not only bring income to the nation, but also causes pollution in various forms. It is well known that air pollution has significant contribution towards global warming

M. Amir Abas; A. Khusairy Azim; M. Hilmi Fadzil; M. Dahlui

2011-01-01

122

Global characterization and monitoring of forest cover using Landsat data: opportunities and challanges  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The compilation of global Landsat data-sets and the ever-lowering costs of computing now make it feasible to monitor the Earth’s land cover at Landsat resolutions of 30 m. In this article, we describe the methods to create global products of forest cover and cover change at Landsat resolutions. Neve...

123

The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME): Mission Concept and First Scientific Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) is a new instrument aboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) Second European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-2), which was launched in April 1995. The main scientific objective of the GOME mission is to determine the global distribution of ozone and several other trace gases, which play an important role in the ozone chemistry of the

John P. Burrows; Mark Weber; Michael Buchwitz; Vladimir Rozanov; Annette Ladstätter-Weißenmayer; Andreas Richter; Rüdiger Debeek; Ricarda Hoogen; Klaus Bramstedt; Kai-Uwe Eichmann; Michael Eisinger; Dieter Perner

1999-01-01

124

Experimental Verification and Full-Scale Deployment of Global Positioning Systems to Monitor  

E-print Network

Experimental Verification and Full-Scale Deployment of Global Positioning Systems to Monitor Positioning Systems GPS provide one answer to this challenge, with rapid advancements in the available reliability; Global positioning; Buildings, high-rise; Dy- namic response. Introduction With the growing

Kareem, Ahsan

125

The use of differentially corrected global positioning system to monitor activities of cattle at pasture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global positioning system (GPS) technology is increasingly applied in livestock science to monitor pasture use and tracking routes, and is often combined with equipment for monitoring animal activity. As GPS data are referenced in time and space, it is hypothesised that parameters derived there from, such as distance travelled and aerial distance between the first and last point of a

Eva Schlecht; Christian Hülsebusch; Friedrich Mahler; Klaus Becker

2004-01-01

126

Joint faults detection in LV switchboard and its global diagnosis, through a Temperature Monitoring System.  

E-print Network

Joint faults detection in LV switchboard and its global diagnosis, through a Temperature Monitoring of monitoring and diagnosis of LV switchboards based on the measurements of currents, ambient temperatures and local temperatures of electrical joints. This system meets the needs to prevent the breakdowns of LV

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

127

SAGE: A Logical Agent-Based Environment Monitoring and Control System  

E-print Network

SAGE: A Logical Agent-Based Environment Monitoring and Control System Krysia Broda1 , Keith Clark1 London www.ucl.ac.uk/infostudies/rob-miller/ rsm@ucl.ac.uk Abstract. We propose SAGE, an agent-based environment monitor- ing and control system based on computation logic. SAGE uses forward chaining deductive

Clark, Keith L.

128

MONITORING ECOSYSTEMS FROM SPACE: THE GLOBAL FIDUCIALS PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

Images from satellites provide valuable insights to changes in land-cover and ecosystems. Long- term monitoring of ecosystem change using historical satellite imagery can provide quantitative measures of ecological processes and allows for estimation of future ecosystem condition...

129

In Remote sensing for monitoring the changing environment of Europe Edited by P. Winkler, A. A. Balkema Publishers, Rotterdam, pp. 53-57, 1993.  

E-print Network

In Remote sensing for monitoring the changing environment of Europe Edited by P. Winkler, A. A). The efficiency of the utilization of remote sensing data by the scientific community for the study of the global changes or by private bodies for land management and other purposes is directly related

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

130

Characterizing noise in the global nuclear weapon monitoring system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under the auspices of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization, a worldwide monitoring system designed to detect the illegal testing of nuclear weaponry has been under construction since 1999. The International Monitoring System is composed of a range of sensors, including detectors for hydroacoustic and seismic signals, and when completed, will include 60 infrasound measurement arrays set to detect low-frequency sound waves produced by an atmospheric nuclear detonation.

Schultz, Colin

2013-03-01

131

A major upgrade of the global Mercator Océan ocean monitoring and forecasting system and corresponding product quality improvements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercator Océan (the French ocean forecast service provider) was setup in France about 10 years ago by all the French organizations holding stakes in ocean forecasting. It has since then constantly developed and is currently operating operational ocean forecasting systems based on state-of-the-art Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCM, we use the NEMO code) assimilating the observations of the Global Ocean Observing System (remote sensing + in situ). The mandate of Mercator Océan is to cover the global ocean at a resolution sufficient to both simulate the physics including the eddies (eddy resolving) and take the maximum benefit from the GOOS via data assimilation. To do so, Mercator Océan is strongly connected to the ocean modeling and data assimilation research communities, at French, European and international levels. Mercator Océan is engaged in the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) European initiative and is currently coordinating a European consortium (~60 partners) gathering all the European skills in ocean monitoring and forecasting to build the Marine forecast component of the GMES service. This is currently done in the MyOcean II EU funded project (project started in 2012). Within the MyOcean consortium, among other commitments, Mercator Océan is the operator of the global ocean forecasting system, and one of the providers of global ocean reanalysis products. In this context (MyOcean V3 service), we have implemented a major upgrade of the systems operated at Mercator Océan ., including improvements in the model configurations, in data assimilation and product elaboration and serving. This concerns especially the global eddy resolving system (1/12° global) which is operational providing daily service. We focus our presentation on product quality, showing how these upgrades correspond to product improvements, and illustrating how the users are served with better quality products, thanks to this upgrade.

Dombrowsky, Eric; Drillet, Yann; Legalloudec, Olivier; Lellouche, Jean Michel; Regnier, Charly

2013-04-01

132

Global nuclear material monitoring with NDA and C/S data through integrated facility monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on a flexible, integrated demonstration of a monitoring approach for nuclear material monitoring. This includes aspects of item signature identification, perimeter portal monitoring, advanced data analysis, and communication as a part of an unattended continuous monitoring system in an operating nuclear facility. Advanced analysis is applied to the integrated nondestructive assay and containment and surveillance data that are synchronized in time. End result will be the foundation for a cost-effective monitoring system that could provide the necessary transparency even in areas that are denied to foreign nationals of both US and Russia should these processes and materials come under full-scope safeguards or bilateral agreements. Monitoring systems of this kind have the potential to provide additional benefits including improved nuclear facility security and safeguards and lower personnel radiation exposures. Demonstration facilities in this paper include VTRAP-prototype, Los Alamos Critical Assemblies Facility, Kazakhstan BM-350 Reactor monitor, DUPIC radiation monitoring, and JOYO and MONJU radiation monitoring.

Howell, J.A.; Menlove, H.O.; Argo, P.; Goulding, C.; Klosterbuer, S.; Halbig, J.

1996-09-01

133

A New GLORIA Target Region in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA; Alpine Plant Monitoring for Global Climate Change  

E-print Network

The earth experiences climate change whether from human-meditated atmospheric effects or as a response to natural drivers. High mountain ecosystems are both sensitive to climate variability and prone to be early indicators of effects that will ripple through distant ecosystems. To better anticipate effects of climate change, and to promote effective mitigation and adaptation, we must accurately measure and understand responses of mountain biota. The Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments (GLORIA), headquartered in Vienna, Austria, is an international monitoring program focused on responses of high-elevation

Ann Dennis; Constance Millar; Kathren E. Murrell

134

Using Global Positioning System techniques in landslide monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

The precise determination of point coordinates with conventional Global Positioning System (GPS) techniques often required observation times of one to several hours. In the last few years, new GPS methods have been developed (among them, the fast-static and real time kinematic), with higher productivity and good theoretical precision. The main objective of this paper is to ascertain the performance of

Josep A. Gili; Jordi Corominas; Joan Rius

2000-01-01

135

Precise monitoring of global temperature trends from satellites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passive microwave radiometry from satellites provides more precise atmospheric temperature information than that obtained from the relatively sparse distribution of thermometers over the earth's surface. Accurate global atmospheric temperature estimates are needed for detection of possible greenhouse warming, evaluation of computer models of climate change, and for understanding important factors in the climate system. Analysis of the first 10 years

R. W. Spencer; J. R. Christy

1990-01-01

136

Global warming threat on water resources and environment: a review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global warming, greenhouse effect, and the climate change problems are long-term anthropogenic consequences that are expected to threaten water related demand and supply patterns in the near future. These problems may be identified linguistically on a logical basis to take the necessary precautions, and implement mitigation strategies after vulnerability possibilities are assessed using fuzzy logic. Climate change effects are the focus of many scientific, engineering, economic, social, cultural, and global nuisances, and these effects awaits cost-effective remedial solutions. Extreme events such as floods and droughts and modified groundwater recharge may be influenced by climate change.

?en, Zekai

2009-03-01

137

Executive Perceptions on International Education in a Globalized Environment: The Travel Industry's Point of View  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on globalization has determined travel executives' perceptions of the psychological implications brought about by an interconnected global environment and the implications on international education. With the concepts of Clyne and Rizvi (1998) and Pittaway, Ferguson, and Breen (1998) on the value of cross-cultural interaction as a…

Munoz, J. Mark; Katsioloudes, Marios I.

2004-01-01

138

Introduction With alterations in local environments associated with global  

E-print Network

corals on a global scale: bleaching and disease. Coral bleaching is characterized by the loss of most of the coral's algal symbionts and/or their associated pigments (Brown, 1997). Bleaching can take place during may enhance their survival (Peck, 2008). Corals are extremely sensitive to environmental factors

Harvell, Catherine Drew

139

A Global Overview: Trends in Environment and Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The conditions and trends for four clusters of global issues--the air and the sky, the fishes and the sea, the creatures and the land, and people and poverty--are presented. The topics of climate change, the ozone hole, air pollution, biological diversity, deforestation, and desertification are discussed. (KR)

Paden, Mary E.

1991-01-01

140

Systems engineering in the global environment : a wicked future.  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses the following questions: (1) What are the Global Problems that require Systems Engineering; (2) Where is Systems Engineering going; (3) What are the boundaries of Systems Engineering; (4) What is the distinction between Systems Thinking and Systems Engineering; (5) Can we use Systems Engineering on Complex Systems; and (6) Can we use Systems Engineering on Wicked Problems?

Griego, Regina M.

2010-12-01

141

Educating Part-Time MBAs for the Global Business Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To be successful managers in the business world of the 21st century, MBA students must acquire global skills of business acumen, reflection, cultural sensitivity, and multi-cultural teamwork. Developing these skills requires international experience, but educating part-time MBAs creates a special challenge demanding both rigor and efficiency. This…

Randolph, W. Alan

2008-01-01

142

Design for Active Monitor System in Distance Learning Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The execution of course program and timetables in distance learning systems is more strict in military school, it imposes necessity for teachers to guarantee the progress of students according with a set of course program by monitoring the studentspsila behaviors and giving the alert when the predefined schedules are violated in such an e-learning situation. An active monitor system is

Bin Zeng; Jing Nie; Jun Wei

2009-01-01

143

Flood monitoring for ungauged rivers: the power of combining space-based monitoring and global forecasting models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Flood warning systems typically rely on forecasts from national meteorological services and in-situ observations from hydrological gauging stations. This capacity is not equally developed in flood-prone developing countries. Low-cost satellite monitoring systems and global flood forecasting systems can be an alternative source of information for national flood authorities. The Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS) has been develop jointly with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and the Joint Research Centre, and it is running quasi operational now since June 2011. The system couples state-of-the art weather forecasts with a hydrological model driven at a continental scale. The system provides downstream countries with information on upstream river conditions as well as continental and global overviews. In its test phase, this global forecast system provides probabilities for large transnational river flooding at the global scale up to 30 days in advance. It has shown its real-life potential for the first time during the flood in Southeast Asia in 2011, and more recently during the floods in Australia in March 2012, India (Assam, September-October 2012) and Chad Floods (August-October 2012).The Joint Research Centre is working on further research and development, rigorous testing and adaptations of the system to create an operational tool for decision makers, including national and regional water authorities, water resource managers, hydropower companies, civil protection and first line responders, and international humanitarian aid organizations. Currently efforts are being made to link GloFAS to the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS). GFDS is a Space-based river gauging and flood monitoring system using passive microwave remote sensing which was developed by a collaboration between the JRC and Dartmouth Flood Observatory. GFDS provides flood alerts based on daily water surface change measurements from space. Alerts are shown on a world map, with detailed reports for individual gauging sites. A comparison of discharge estimates from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) and the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS) with observations for representative climatic zones is presented. Both systems have demonstrated strong potential in forecasting and detecting recent catastrophic floods. The usefulness of their combined information on global scale for decision makers at different levels is discussed. Combining space-based monitoring and global forecasting models is an innovative approach and has significant benefits for international river commissions as well as international aid organisations. This is in line with the objectives of the Hyogo and the Post-2015 Framework that aim at the development of systems which involve trans-boundary collaboration, space-based earth observation, flood forecasting and early warning.

Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Netgeka, Victor; Raynaud, Damien; Thielen, Jutta

2013-04-01

144

Global lightning and severe storm monitoring from GPS orbit  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last few decades, there has been a growing interest to develop and deploy an automated and continuously operating satellite-based global lightning mapper [e.g. Christian et al., 1989; Weber et al., 1998; Suszcynsky et al., 2000]. Lightning is a direct consequence of the electrification and breakdown processes that take place during the convective stages of thunderstorm development. Satellite-based lightning

D. M. Suszcynsky; A. R. Jacobson; J. Linford; M. B. Pongratz; T. Light; X. Shao

2004-01-01

145

Taiga forest stands and SAR: Monitoring for subarctic global change  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for the first European Earth Remote Sensing (ERS-1) mission, a series of multitemporal, multifrequency, multipolarization aircraft synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data sets were acquired over the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest near Fairbanks, Alaska in March 1988. Significant change in radar backscatter was observed over the two-week experimental period due to changing environmental conditions. These preliminary results are presented to illustrate the opportunity afforded by the ERS-1 SAR to monitor temporal change in forest ecosystems.

Way, J.; Kwok, R.; Viereck, L.; Slaughter, C.; Dobson, C.

1992-03-01

146

A Review of Global Learning & Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program is a worldwide, hands-on, primary and secondary school-based science and education program. GLOBE supports students, teachers, and scientists in collaborations using inquiry-based investigations of the environment and the earth system. GLOBE currently works in close…

Executive Office of the President, 2010

2010-01-01

147

Thinking Globally, Acting Locally: Using the Local Environment to Explore Global Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asserts that water pollution is a global problem and presents statistics indicating how much of the world's water is threatened. Presents three elementary school classroom activities on water quality and local water resources. Includes a figure describing the work of the Global Rivers Environmental Education Network. (CFR)

Simmons, Deborah

1994-01-01

148

Global transcriptional response of Lactobacillus reuteri to the sourdough environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lactobacillus reuteri is a lactic acid bacterium that is highly adapted to the sourdough environment. It is a dominant member of industrial type II sourdoughs, and is also able to colonize the intestinal tract of mammals, including humans, and birds. In this study, the transcriptional response of L. reuteri ATCC 55730 was investigated during sourdough fermentation by using whole-genome microarrays.

Eric Hüfner; Robert A. Britton; Stefan Roos; Hans Jonsson; Christian Hertel

2008-01-01

149

Global Trends in Environment and Development. Presentation Set [Slides].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 50 slide set of presentation graphs and maps illustrates some of the major conditions and trends in population, agriculture, biodiversity, forests, water resources, energy, climate, and social and economic development that determine the state of the world's environment. Graphs and maps can be used by those in academic, professional, and…

World Resources Inst., Washington, DC.

150

MICROBIOLOGICAL METHODS FOR MONITORING THE ENVIRONMENT. WATER AND WASTES  

EPA Science Inventory

This first EPA manual contains uniform laboratory and field methods for microbiological analyses of waters and wastewaters, and is recommended in enforcement, monitoring and research activities. The procedures are prepared in detailed, stepwise form for the bench worker. The manu...

151

Large space-based systems for dealing with global environment change  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Increased concern over the effects of global climate change and depletion of the ozone layer has resulted in support for the Global Change Research Program and the Mission to Planet Earth. Research to understand Earth system processes is critical, but it falls short of providing ways of mitigating the effects of change. Geoengineering options and alternatives to interactively manage change need to be developed. Space-based concepts for dealing with changes to the environment should be considered in addition to Earth-based actions. 'Mission for Planet Earth' describes those space-based geoengineering solutions that may combine with an international global change program to stabilize the Global environment. Large space systems that may be needed for this response challenge guidance and control engineering and technology. Definition, analysis, demonstration, and preparation of geoengineering technology will provide a basis for policy response if global change consequences are severe.

Jenkins, Lyle M.

1992-01-01

152

Autonomous global sky monitoring with real-time robotic follow-up  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the development of prototypes for a global grid of advanced 'thinking' sky sentinels and robotic follow-up telescopes that observe the full night sky to provide real-time monitoring of the night sky by autonomously recognizing anomalous behavior, selecting targets for detailed investigation, and making real-time anomaly detection to enable rapid recognition and a swift response to transients as they emerge. This T3 global EO grid avoids the limitations imposed by geography and weather to provide persistent monitoring of the night sky.

Vestrand, W Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davis, H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wren, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wozniak, P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Norman, B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; White, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bloch, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fenimore, E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hodge, Barry [AFRL; Jah, Moriba [AFRL; Rast, Richard [AFRL

2008-01-01

153

A monitoring sensor management system for grid environments  

SciTech Connect

Large distributed systems, such as computational grids,require a large amount of monitoring data be collected for a variety oftasks, such as fault detection, performance analysis, performance tuning,performance prediction and scheduling. Ensuring that all necessarymonitoring is turned on and that the data is being collected can be avery tedious and error-prone task. We have developed an agent-basedsystem to automate the execution of monitoring sensors and the collectionof event data.

Tierney, Brian; Crowley, Brian; Gunter, Dan; Lee, Jason; Thompson, Mary

2001-06-01

154

School Projects for Monitoring the State of the Marine Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Australia's marine environment hosts a high level of diverse endemic species along with some of the highest biodiversity in the world. Two-thirds of the population of Australia are living in coastal areas and can be considered a threat to marine life which is very vulnerable to human impacts. Although marine environments conserve high economic…

Benkendorff, Kirsten

155

Induced environment contamination monitor: Preliminary results from the Spacelab 1 flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The STS-9/Induced Environment Contamination Monitor (IECM) mission is briefly described. Preliminary results and analyses are given for each of the 10 instruments comprising the IECM. The final section presents a summary of the major results.

Miller, E. R. (editor)

1984-01-01

156

Monitoring the abundance of plastic debris in the marine environment  

PubMed Central

Plastic debris has significant environmental and economic impacts in marine systems. Monitoring is crucial to assess the efficacy of measures implemented to reduce the abundance of plastic debris, but it is complicated by large spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the amounts of plastic debris and by our limited understanding of the pathways followed by plastic debris and its long-term fate. To date, most monitoring has focused on beach surveys of stranded plastics and other litter. Infrequent surveys of the standing stock of litter on beaches provide crude estimates of debris types and abundance, but are biased by differential removal of litter items by beachcombing, cleanups and beach dynamics. Monitoring the accumulation of stranded debris provides an index of debris trends in adjacent waters, but is costly to undertake. At-sea sampling requires large sample sizes for statistical power to detect changes in abundance, given the high spatial and temporal heterogeneity. Another approach is to monitor the impacts of plastics. Seabirds and other marine organisms that accumulate plastics in their stomachs offer a cost-effective way to monitor the abundance and composition of small plastic litter. Changes in entanglement rates are harder to interpret, as they are sensitive to changes in population sizes of affected species. Monitoring waste disposal on ships and plastic debris levels in rivers and storm-water runoff is useful because it identifies the main sources of plastic debris entering the sea and can direct mitigation efforts. Different monitoring approaches are required to answer different questions, but attempts should be made to standardize approaches internationally. PMID:19528052

Ryan, Peter G.; Moore, Charles J.; van Franeker, Jan A.; Moloney, Coleen L.

2009-01-01

157

Square of Life: Studies in Local and Global Environments  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this Internet-based collaborative project, students will investigate their local schoolyard environment and share information about the plants, animals and non-living objects found there with other students from around the country and the world. Participants will look for similarities and differences in the reported data and prepare a final report or presentation based on their findings. The site includes project instructions, a teacher guide, project data, links to reference materials, and an ask an expert section.

158

Precise monitoring of global temperature trends from satellites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Passive microwave radiometry from satellites provides more precise atmospheric temperature information than that obtained from the relatively sparse distribution of thermometers over the earth's surface. Accurate global atmospheric temperature estimates are needed for detection of possible greenhouse warming, evaluation of computer models of climate change, and for understanding important factors in the climate system. Analysis of the first 10 years (1979 to 1988) of satellite measurements of lower atmospheric temperature changes reveals a monthly precision of 0.01 C, large temperature variability on time scales from weeks to several years, but no obvious trend for the 10-year period. The warmest years, in descending order, were 1987, 1988, 1983, and 1980. The years 1984, 1985, and 1986 were the coolest.

Spencer, Roy W.; Christy, John R.

1990-01-01

159

Adolescents' compliance with self-monitoring and physiological assessment of smoking in natural environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brief daily telephone calls were evaluated as a method of enhancing adolescents' compliance with self-monitoring and physiological assessments of cigarette smoking in the natural environment. Seven direct and indirect measures of compliance were devised. Results indicated that subjects receiving telephone calls complied significantly more than control subjects in providing saliva samples and recording detailed self-monitoring data.

Scott McConnell; Anthony Biglan; Herbert H. Severson

1984-01-01

160

Embedded Wireless Network Control System: an Application of Remote Monitoring System for Greenhouse Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays with open computerized numerical controls the real time data can be shown in which Internet exists by means of integrated application. This paper proposes a remote monitoring system for the greenhouse environment. The system can be set in the monitoring spot. Real time data which gathered and simply disposed can be transmitted to the remote server by wireless module-GPRS

Xiuhong Li; Zhongfu Sun; Tianshu Huang; Keming Du; Qian Wang; Yingchun Wang

2006-01-01

161

Embedded Wireless Network Control System: an Application of Remote Monitoring System for Greenhouse Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays with open computerized numerical controls the real time data can be shown in which INTERNET exists by means of integrated application. This paper proposes a remote monitoring system for the greenhouse environment. The system can be set in the monitoring spot. Real time data which gathered and simply disposed can be transmitted to the remote server by wireless module-GPRS

Xiuhong Li; Zhongfu Sun; Tianshu Huang; Keming Du; Qian Wang; Yingchun Wang

2006-01-01

162

Non-Threshold based Event Detection for 3D Environment Monitoring in Sensor Networks  

E-print Network

are monitored in a three dimensional (3D) space of underground tunnels in the mine. Several event-detection- 1 - Non-Threshold based Event Detection for 3D Environment Monitoring in Sensor Networks Mo Li and Technology {limo, liu, leichen}@cs.ust.hk ABSTRACT Event detection is a crucial task for wireless sensor net

Liu, Yunhao

163

Design of a Water Environment Monitoring System Based on Wireless Sensor Networks  

PubMed Central

A water environmental monitoring system based on a wireless sensor network is proposed. It consists of three parts: data monitoring nodes, data base station and remote monitoring center. This system is suitable for the complex and large-scale water environment monitoring, such as for reservoirs, lakes, rivers, swamps, and shallow or deep groundwaters. This paper is devoted to the explanation and illustration for our new water environment monitoring system design. The system had successfully accomplished the online auto-monitoring of the water temperature and pH value environment of an artificial lake. The system's measurement capacity ranges from 0 to 80 °C for water temperature, with an accuracy of ±0.5 °C; from 0 to 14 on pH value, with an accuracy of ±0.05 pH units. Sensors applicable to different water quality scenarios should be installed at the nodes to meet the monitoring demands for a variety of water environments and to obtain different parameters. The monitoring system thus promises broad applicability prospects. PMID:22454592

Jiang, Peng; Xia, Hongbo; He, Zhiye; Wang, Zheming

2009-01-01

164

An Integrated Environment Monitoring System for Underground Coal Mines—Wireless Sensor Network Subsystem with Multi-Parameter Monitoring  

PubMed Central

Environment monitoring is important for the safety of underground coal mine production, and it is also an important application of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). We put forward an integrated environment monitoring system for underground coal mine, which uses the existing Cable Monitoring System (CMS) as the main body and the WSN with multi-parameter monitoring as the supplementary technique. As CMS techniques are mature, this paper mainly focuses on the WSN and the interconnection between the WSN and the CMS. In order to implement the WSN for underground coal mines, two work modes are designed: periodic inspection and interrupt service; the relevant supporting technologies, such as routing mechanism, collision avoidance, data aggregation, interconnection with the CMS, etc., are proposed and analyzed. As WSN nodes are limited in energy supply, calculation and processing power, an integrated network management scheme is designed in four aspects, i.e., topology management, location management, energy management and fault management. Experiments were carried out both in a laboratory and in a real underground coal mine. The test results indicate that the proposed integrated environment monitoring system for underground coal mines is feasible and all designs performed well as expected. PMID:25051037

Zhang, Yu; Yang, Wei; Han, Dongsheng; Kim, Young-Il

2014-01-01

165

An integrated environment monitoring system for underground coal mines--Wireless Sensor Network subsystem with multi-parameter monitoring.  

PubMed

Environment monitoring is important for the safety of underground coal mine production, and it is also an important application of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). We put forward an integrated environment monitoring system for underground coal mine, which uses the existing Cable Monitoring System (CMS) as the main body and the WSN with multi-parameter monitoring as the supplementary technique. As CMS techniques are mature, this paper mainly focuses on the WSN and the interconnection between the WSN and the CMS. In order to implement the WSN for underground coal mines, two work modes are designed: periodic inspection and interrupt service; the relevant supporting technologies, such as routing mechanism, collision avoidance, data aggregation, interconnection with the CMS, etc., are proposed and analyzed. As WSN nodes are limited in energy supply, calculation and processing power, an integrated network management scheme is designed in four aspects, i.e., topology management, location management, energy management and fault management. Experiments were carried out both in a laboratory and in a real underground coal mine. The test results indicate that the proposed integrated environment monitoring system for underground coal mines is feasible and all designs performed well as expected. PMID:25051037

Zhang, Yu; Yang, Wei; Han, Dongsheng; Kim, Young-Il

2014-01-01

166

TanDEM-X mission-new perspectives for the inventory and monitoring of global settlement patterns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

TerraSAR-X add-on for digital elevation measurement (TanDEM-X) is a German Earth observation mission collecting a total of two global coverages of very high resolution (VHR) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) X-band data with a spatial resolution of around three meters in the years 2011 and 2012. With these, the TanDEM-X mission (TDM) will provide a unique data set which is complementary to existing global coverages based on medium (MR) or high resolution (HR) optical imagery. The capabilities of the TDM in terms of supporting the analysis and monitoring of global human settlement patterns are explored and demonstrated. The basic methodology for a fully-operational detection and delineation of built-up areas from VHR SAR data is presented along with a description of the resulting geo-information product-the urban footprint (UF) mask-and the operational processing environment for the UF production. Moreover, potential follow-on analyses based on the intermediate products generated in the context of the UF analysis are introduced and discussed. The results of the study indicate the high potential of the TDM with respect to an analysis of urbanization patterns, peri-urbanization, spatio-temporal dynamics of settlement development as well as population estimation, vulnerability assessment and modeling of global change.

Esch, Thomas; Taubenböck, Hannes; Roth, Achim; Heldens, Wieke; Felbier, Andreas; Thiel, Michael; Schmidt, Martin; Müller, Andreas; Dech, Stefan

2012-01-01

167

Monitoring air quality: the role of OSSEs in determining the future global observing system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The need to monitor air quality is recognized world-wide. This involves, inter alia, measurements of key pollutants (e.g. ozone and carbon monoxide) in the lowermost troposphere at spatio-temporal scales relevant to monitor, forecast and manage air quality on a daily basis (temporal frequencies less than 1 hour; spatial scales less than 10 km). This presentation identifies the role of data assimilation observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) in determining the future observing system to monitor air quality, with focus on lower troposphere measurements of ozone and carbon monoxide. Caveats associated with setting up and interpreting OSSEs are discussed. OSSEs performed to assess the added value of the proposed geostationary satellite platform MAGEAQ (Monitoring the Atmosphere from Geostationary orbit for European Air Quality), as well as the added value of other observing platforms of the global observing system for monitoring air quality (low earth orbit satellites; ground-based data) are presented to illustrate the concept.

Lahoz, W.; Attié, J.-L.; El Amraoui, L.; Hache, E.

2012-04-01

168

Global monitoring of large reservoir storage from satellite remote sensing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We studied 34 global reservoirs for which good quality surface elevation data could be obtained from a combination of five satellite altimeters for the period from 1992 to 2010. For each of these reservoirs, we used an unsupervised classification approach using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 16-day 250 m vegetation product to estimate the surface water areas over the MODIS period of record (2000 to 2010). We then derived elevation-area relationships for each of the reservoirs by combining the MODIS-based estimates with satellite altimeter-based estimates of reservoir water elevations. Through a combination of direct observations of elevation and surface area along with documented reservoir configurations at capacity, we estimated storage time histories for each reservoir from 1992 to 2010. We evaluated these satellite-based data products in comparison with gauge observations for the five largest reservoirs in the United States (Lakes Mead, Powell, Sakakawea, Oahe, and Fort Peck Reservoir). The storage estimates were highly correlated with observations (R = 0.92 to 0.99), with values for the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) ranging from 3% to 15%. The storage mean absolute error (expressed as a percentage of reservoir capacity) for the reservoirs in this study was 4%. The multidecadal reconstructed reservoir storage variations are in accordance with known droughts and high flow periods on each of the five continents represented in the data set.

Gao, Huilin; Birkett, Charon; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

2012-09-01

169

Mobile monitoring and embedded control system for factory environment.  

PubMed

This paper proposes a real-time method to carry out the monitoring of factory zone temperatures, humidity and air quality using smart phones. At the same time, the system detects possible flames, and analyzes and monitors electrical load. The monitoring also includes detecting the vibrations of operating machinery in the factory area. The research proposes using ZigBee and Wi-Fi protocol intelligent monitoring system integration within the entire plant framework. The sensors on the factory site deliver messages and real-time sensing data to an integrated embedded systems via the ZigBee protocol. The integrated embedded system is built by the open-source 32-bit ARM (Advanced RISC Machine) core Arduino Due module, where the network control codes are built in for the ARM chipset integrated controller. The intelligent integrated controller is able to instantly provide numerical analysis results according to the received data from the ZigBee sensors. The Android APP and web-based platform are used to show measurement results. The built-up system will transfer these results to a specified cloud device using the TCP/IP protocol. Finally, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach is used to analyze the power loads in the factory zones. Moreover, Near Field Communication (NFC) technology is used to carry out the actual electricity load experiments using smart phones. PMID:24351642

Lian, Kuang-Yow; Hsiao, Sung-Jung; Sung, Wen-Tsai

2013-01-01

170

Science Series Aquatic Environment Monitoring Report no. 61  

E-print Network

-mail: licensing@cabinet-office.x.gsi.gov.uk #12;Contents CONTENTS 3 Executive summary 5 Background to the incident Sublethal biological effects monitoring 30 Assessment of impact 31 Lessons learnt 32 Acknowledgements 33 airlifted to safety, and two emergency towing vessels maintained on station in the Western Approaches

171

Institute of Environment & Resources Online monitoring and control  

E-print Network

, 52, 473-478. Paper II Boe, K., Batstone, D.J. and Angelidaki, I. (2006) An innovative online VFA on efficiency of full-scale biogas plants. Water Science and Technology, 52, 189-194. Paper VI Boe, K Boe #12;#12;Online monitoring and control of the biogas process Kanokwan Boe Ph.D. Thesis May 2006

172

Mobile Monitoring and Embedded Control System for Factory Environment  

PubMed Central

This paper proposes a real-time method to carry out the monitoring of factory zone temperatures, humidity and air quality using smart phones. At the same time, the system detects possible flames, and analyzes and monitors electrical load. The monitoring also includes detecting the vibrations of operating machinery in the factory area. The research proposes using ZigBee and Wi-Fi protocol intelligent monitoring system integration within the entire plant framework. The sensors on the factory site deliver messages and real-time sensing data to an integrated embedded systems via the ZigBee protocol. The integrated embedded system is built by the open-source 32-bit ARM (Advanced RISC Machine) core Arduino Due module, where the network control codes are built in for the ARM chipset integrated controller. The intelligent integrated controller is able to instantly provide numerical analysis results according to the received data from the ZigBee sensors. The Android APP and web-based platform are used to show measurement results. The built-up system will transfer these results to a specified cloud device using the TCP/IP protocol. Finally, the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach is used to analyze the power loads in the factory zones. Moreover, Near Field Communication (NFC) technology is used to carry out the actual electricity load experiments using smart phones. PMID:24351642

Lian, Kuang-Yow; Hsiao, Sung-Jung; Sung, Wen-Tsai

2013-01-01

173

Gene-environment interaction and biological monitoring of occupational exposures  

SciTech Connect

Biological monitoring methods and biological limit values applied in occupational and environmental medicine have been traditionally developed on the assumption that individuals do not differ significantly in their biotransformation capacities. It has become clear, however, that this is not the case, but wide inter-individual differences exist in the metabolism of chemicals. Integration of the data on individual metabolic capacity in biological monitoring studies is therefore anticipated to represent a significant refinement of the currently used methods. We have recently conducted several biological monitoring studies on occupationally exposed subjects, which have included the determination of the workers' genotypes for the metabolic genes of potential importance for a given chemical exposure. The exposure levels have been measured by urine metabolites, adducts in blood macromolecules, and cytogenetic alterations in lymphocytes. Our studies indicate that genetic polymorphisms in metabolic genes may indeed be important modifiers of individual biological monitoring results of, e.g., carbon disulphide and styrene. The information is anticipated to be useful in insuring that the workplace is safe for everyone, including the most sensitive individuals. This knowledge could also be useful to occupational physicians, industrial hygienists, and regulatory bodies in charge of defining acceptable exposure limits for environmental and/or occupational pollutants.

Hirvonen, Ari [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, 00250 Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: Ari.Hirvonen@ttl.fi

2005-09-01

174

Regional Monitoring of Ocean Acidification in Coral Reef Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The surface oceans serve as an important natural sink for increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. As this CO2 reacts with seawater it reduces pH (acidification) and redistributes inorganic carbon species. A growing number of experimental studies now document adverse effects on a range of coral and related species as a consequence of ocean acidification. Mapping and monitoring the distribution

D. K. Gledhill; C. Eakin; R. Wanninkhof; G. Liu; T. Christensen; S. Heron; J. Morgan; W. Skirving; A. Strong

2009-01-01

175

Global Entrepreneurship Monitor: Data Collection Design and Implementation 1998–2003  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor research program was designed as a comprehensive assessment of the role of entrepreneurship in national economic growth. The conceptual model reflected in a wide range of factors associated with national variations in entrepreneurial activity and the major contextual features. Empirical tests of the many relationships in the model required four major data collection activities: adult population

Paul Reynolds; Niels Bosma; Erkko Autio; Steve Hunt; Natalie De Bono; Isabel Servais; Paloma Lopez-Garcia; Nancy Chin

2005-01-01

176

Satellite passive microwave remote sensing for monitoring global land surface phenology  

E-print Network

Satellite passive microwave remote sensing for monitoring global land surface phenology Matthew O (Schwartz & Hanes, 2009; Wang et al., 2005). The remote sensing of land surface phenology (LSP) has also­2008) using satellite passive microwave remote sensing based Vegetation Optical Depth (VOD) retrievals derived

Montana, University of

177

Pluto and Charon with HST I: Monitoring Global Change and Improved Surface Properties from Lightcurves  

E-print Network

Pluto and Charon with HST I: Monitoring Global Change and Improved Surface Properties from to Astronomical Journal #12;­ 2 ­ ABSTRACT We present new lightcurve measurements of Pluto and Charon taken of Pluto show that the lightcurve amplitude has decreased since the mutual event season in the late 1980's

Young, Leslie A.

178

Inferential monitoring of global change impact on biodiversity through remote sensing and species distribution modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The world is suffering from rapid changes in both climate and land cover which are the main factors affecting global biodiversity. These changes may affect ecosystems by altering species distributions, population sizes, and community compositions, which emphasizes the need for a rapid assessment of biodiversity status for conservation and management purposes. Current approaches on monitoring biodiversity rely mainly on long

Florencia Sangermano

2009-01-01

179

75 FR 62837 - Cooperative Agreement To Support Building Global Capacity for the Surveillance and Monitoring of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing its intention to accept and consider a single source application for award of a cooperative agreement to the World Health Organization (WHO) in support of building a global surveillance and monitoring system for combating counterfeit/falsified medicines and risks and breaches in the...

2010-10-13

180

Large meteoroid detection using the global International Monitoring System infrasound system  

Microsoft Academic Search

We will review the subject of infrasound from large bolides (large meteor-fireballs) entering the atmosphere at hypersonic speeds and their expected rate of detection by the 60 infrasonic arrays of the global IMS network (International Monitoring System). This will include the details of the generation of a quasiline source blast wave and its subsequent decay for near-continuum flow conditions. We

Douglas O. ReVelle

2002-01-01

181

Developing countries and monitoring WTO commitments in response to the global economic crisis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the role of the public sector in providing additional information to exporters in developing countries as they seek to monitor and keep open their access to foreign markets by using the rules of the WTO system. It highlights new information generation and dissemination initiatives undertaken by the WTO Secretariat, Global Trade Alert, and the World Bank in

Chad P. Bown

2010-01-01

182

Full time and full coverage global observation system for ecological monitoring base on MEO satellite grid constellation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Human life more and more rely on earth environment and atmosphere, environmental information required by space based monitor is a crucial importance, although GEO and polar weather satellite in orbit by several countries, but it can’t monitor all zone of earth with real time. This paper present a conception proposal which can realize stable, continue and real time observation for any zone(include arctic and ant-arctic zone) of earth and its atmosphere, it base on walker constellation in 20000Km high medium orbit with 24 satellites, payloads configuration with infrared spectrometer, visible camera, ultraviolet ray camera, millimeter wave radiometer, leaser radar, spatial resolution are 1km@ infrared,0.5km@ visible optical. This satellite of grid constellation can monitor any zone of global with 1-3hours retrial observation cycles. Air pollution, ozone of atmosphere, earth surface pollution, desert storm, water pollution, vegetation change, natural disasters, man-made emergency situations, agriculture and climate change can monitor by this MEO satellite grid constellation. This system is a international space infrastructure, use of mature technologies and products, can build by co-operation with multi countries.

You, Rui; Liu, Shuhao

183

Oversight role of the Independent Monitoring Board of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.  

PubMed

The Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) established its Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) in 2010 to monitor and guide its progress toward stopping polio transmission globally. The concept of an IMB is innovative, with no clear analogue in the history of the GPEI or in any other global health program. The IMB meets with senior program officials every 3-6 months. Its reports provide analysis and recommendations about individual polio-affected countries. The IMB also examines issues affecting the global program as a whole. Its areas of focus have included escalating the level of priority afforded to polio eradication (particularly by recommending a World Health Assembly resolution to declare polio eradication a programmatic emergency, which was enacted in May 2012), placing greater emphasis on people factors in the delivery of the program, encouraging innovation, strengthening focus on the small number of so-called sanctuaries where polio persists, and continuous quality improvement to reach every missed child with vaccination. The IMB's true independence from the agencies and countries delivering the program has enabled it to raise difficult issues that others cannot. Other global health programs might benefit from establishing similar independent monitoring mechanisms. PMID:25316831

Rutter, Paul D; Donaldson, Liam J

2014-11-01

184

Monitoring the resin infusion manufacturing process under industrial environment using distributed sensors  

E-print Network

1 Monitoring the resin infusion manufacturing process under industrial environment using the Liquid Resin Infusion process under industrial environment is proposed. To detect the resin front; Liquid Resin Infusion. #12;2 1. Introduction Recently, Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes have been

Boyer, Edmond

185

Laboratory and software applications for clinical trials: the global laboratory environment.  

PubMed

The Applied Pharmaceutical Software Meeting is held annually. It is sponsored by The Boston Society, a not-for-profit organization that coordinates a series of meetings within the global pharmaceutical industry. The meeting generally focuses on laboratory applications, but in recent years has expanded to include some software applications for clinical trials. The 2011 meeting emphasized the global laboratory environment. Global clinical trials generate massive amounts of data in many locations that must be centralized and processed for efficient analysis. Thus, the meeting had a strong focus on establishing networks and systems for dealing with the computer infrastructure to support such environments. In addition to the globally installed laboratory information management system, electronic laboratory notebook and other traditional laboratory applications, cloud computing is quickly becoming the answer to provide efficient, inexpensive options for managing the large volumes of data and computing power, and thus it served as a central theme for the meeting. PMID:22074278

Briscoe, Chad

2011-11-01

186

Monitoring of global geodynamic processes using satellite observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To study mechanisms of destructive geodynamic phenomena including determination of places of possible severe earthquakes, volcano eruptions and some other natural hazards, it is important to have means to evolve areas where maximum changes of the displacement velocities and the terrestrial crust vertical movements are possible. The previous experience has shown that the satellite geodesy techniques including global navigation systems and satellite laser ranging are the most effective for research activities in this field. Permanent control of secular movement of GPS-stations of the international geodynamic network, located in Russia, has allowed improving the reference coordinate frame for North Eurasia since Russian network stations provide representative covering of the largest stable areas (the Siberian and the East European) of the Eurasian plate. Along its southern border, there is a zone consisting of a great number of microplates surrounding the South-Eurasian stable plate. Interaction of these small plates and blocks influences distribution of seismic stresses in internal parts of the continent that is confirmed by the highest seismic activity of the triangle bordered by thrusts of the Himalayas and faults of the Pamirs, the Tien-Shan, the Baikal and the North-Eastern China. One of the active tectonic zones of Egypt located in Aswan, is characterized by regional basement rock uplift and regional faulting. In 1997, the African Regional Geodynamic Network was developed around the northern part of Lake Nasser, consists of 11 points, on both sides of the Lake. Its main goal is to study the geodynamical behavior around the northern part of the lake. The collected data were processed using the Bernese software version 5.0. From the velocity results, including also the African plate motion, it can be noticed that all stations of this network are moved to the northeast direction and it is typically the direction of the African plate motion.

Tatevian, S. K.; Attia, G. F.; Abou-Aly, N.; Ghoneim, R.; Hegazy, M.

2014-06-01

187

Monitoring ocean heat content from the current generation of global ocean observing systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variations in the world's ocean heat storage and its associated volume changes are a key factor to gauge global warming and to assess the Earth's energy budget. It is also directly link to sea level change, which has a direct impact on coastal populations. Understanding and monitoring heat and sea level change is therefore one of the major legacies of current global ocean observing systems. In this study, we present an inter-comparison of the three of these global ocean observing systems: the ocean temperature/salinity network Argo, the gravimeter GRACE and the satellite altimeters. Their consistency is investigated at global and regional scale during the period 2005-2010 of overlapping time window of re-qualified data. These three datasets allow closing the recent global ocean sea level budget within uncertainties. However, sampling inconsistencies need to be corrected for an accurate budget at global scale. The Argo network allows estimating global ocean heat content and global sea level and reveals a positive change of 0.5 ± 0.1W m-2 and 0.5 ± 0.1 mm yr-1 over the last 8 yr (2005-2012). Regional inter-comparison of the global observing systems highlights the importance of specific ocean basins for the global estimates. Specifically, the Indonesian Archipelago appears as a key region for the global ocean variability. Both the large regional variability and the uncertainties in the current observing systems, prevent us to shed light, from the global sea level perspective, on the climatically important deep ocean changes. This emphasises, once more, the importance of continuing sustained effort in measuring the deep ocean from ship platforms and by setting up a much needed automated deep-Argo network.

von Schuckmann, K.; Sallée, J.-B.; Chambers, D.; Le Traon, P.-Y.; Cabanes, C.; Gaillard, F.; Speich, S.; Hamon, M.

2013-06-01

188

STS-2, -3, -4 Induced Environment Contamination Monitor (ICEM)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The second, third, and fourth space transportation system missions are described including the location of the IECM in the payload bay and the shuttle coordinate systems used. Measurement results from the three flights are given for each instrument with comparisons to original goals for preflight environment and induced environment contamination. These results include very low levels of molecular mass accumulation rates, absence of molecular films on optical samples, outgassing species above 50 amu undetectable generally low levels of on-orbit particulates, and decay rates for early mission water dump particulates. Results of exposure of several optical materials and coatings to atomic oxygen are also presented. From these results, it is concluded that the space shuttle met the established induced environment contamination goals.

Miller, E. R. (editor)

1983-01-01

189

The role of 'Big Society' in monitoring the state of the natural environment.  

PubMed

Environmental monitoring is essential for assessing the current state of the environment, measuring impacts of environmental pressures and providing evidence to government. Recent UK government announcements have indicated an increased role for 'Big Society' in monitoring. In this paper, we review available literature concerning the use of citizen science for monitoring, present examples of successful volunteer monitoring work and highlight important issues surrounding the use of volunteers. We argue that in order to ensure that environmental monitoring continues to be effective it is important to learn from examples where volunteers are currently used, acknowledging constraints and identifying potential approaches which will help to maximise both their engagement and data quality. Effective partnerships between environmental monitoring organisations and volunteers may thus aid the UK in developing robust coordinated monitoring systems that will be less vulnerable to funding variances. PMID:21879098

Mackechnie, Colin; Maskell, Lindsay; Norton, Lisa; Roy, David

2011-10-01

190

Patient and social environment factors associated with self blood pressure monitoring by male veterans with hypertension.  

PubMed

Self blood pressure monitoring (SBPM) can facilitate hypertension management, but determinants of SBPM are understudied. The authors examined the relationship of patient and social environment characteristics to monitor possession and frequency of SBPM in 578 male hypertensive veterans. Measures included possession of a monitor; SBPM frequency; concurrent blood pressure control; and patient demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors. In logistic regression analyses, older age, diabetes, unemployment, and better mental health status were related to greater likelihood of monitor possession. Ordinal logistic regression showed that among patients with a monitor, having diabetes, being unemployed, and having a shorter duration of hypertension were independently related to greater frequency of SBPM. Monitor possession, but not frequency of SBPM, was related to a decreased likelihood of blood pressure control in adjusted analyses. Our results suggest that patient characteristics may influence SBPM and may represent points of leverage for intervening to increase self-monitoring. PMID:18844764

Thorpe, Carolyn T; Oddone, Eugene Z; Bosworth, Hayden B

2008-09-01

191

Monitoring the Environment in a Lava Tube with a Wireless Sensor Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monitoring cave environments is important for several reasons. For instance, through the studies of cave environments, we can better protect cave ecology. Past experiments have monitored cave environments, although most of those were based on individual sensor nodes such as data loggers. In this paper we introduce and discuss a ZigBee wireless sensor network-based platform used for cave environment monitoring. The platform is based on a Freescale ZigBee evaluation kit. We carried out a proof-of-concept experiment in Junction Cave, a lava tube, at El Malpais National Monument in New Mexico. That experiment monitored temperature, humidity, and air turbulence inside the cave. The instrumentation consisted of a turbulence tower with five thermocouple-based sensors, reaching from the floor to the ceiling of the cave, temperature/humidity sensors distributed throughout the cave, and a low-power embedded Linux computer for data collection and storage. The experiment measured interesting air turbulence variations at different heights, which we related to to weather changes outside the cave and human activities inside the cave. The experiment also observed variations of air temperature at different locations inside the cave. In this presentation we will discuss the instrumentation as well as interpretations of the observations. The experiment demonstrated that a ZigBee wireless sensor network-based monitoring system is a potentially feasible platform for a cave environment monitoring system. We also found that network reliability, node cost, and power consumption need to be improved for future systems.

Li, Y.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Wilson, J. L.; Rendon, N. M.

2010-12-01

192

Global Future: Time to Act. Report to the President on Global Resources, Environment and Population.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents recommendations and ideas for actions the United States could take, in concert with other nations, for a vigorous response to urgent global problems. The goal of the report is to further public discussion of these important issues and to offer ideas to government leaders who will be developing U.S. policy in the years ahead. A…

Gillman, Katherine, Ed.; And Others

193

Hyperresolution Global Land Surface Modeling: Meeting a Grand Challenge for Monitoring Earth's Terrestrial Water  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Monitoring Earth's terrestrial water conditions is critically important to many hydrological applications such as global food production; assessing water resources sustainability; and flood, drought, and climate change prediction. These needs have motivated the development of pilot monitoring and prediction systems for terrestrial hydrologic and vegetative states, but to date only at the rather coarse spatial resolutions (approx.10-100 km) over continental to global domains. Adequately addressing critical water cycle science questions and applications requires systems that are implemented globally at much higher resolutions, on the order of 1 km, resolutions referred to as hyperresolution in the context of global land surface models. This opinion paper sets forth the needs and benefits for a system that would monitor and predict the Earth's terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. We discuss six major challenges in developing a system: improved representation of surface-subsurface interactions due to fine-scale topography and vegetation; improved representation of land-atmospheric interactions and resulting spatial information on soil moisture and evapotranspiration; inclusion of water quality as part of the biogeochemical cycle; representation of human impacts from water management; utilizing massively parallel computer systems and recent computational advances in solving hyperresolution models that will have up to 10(exp 9) unknowns; and developing the required in situ and remote sensing global data sets. We deem the development of a global hyperresolution model for monitoring the terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles a grand challenge to the community, and we call upon the international hydrologic community and the hydrological science support infrastructure to endorse the effort.

Wood, Eric F.; Roundy, Joshua K.; Troy, Tara J.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; 4 Blyth, Eleanor; de Roo, Ad; Doell. Petra; Ek, Mike; Famiglietti, James; Gochis, David; van de Giesen, Nick; Houser, Paul; Jaffe, Peter R.; Kollet, Stefan; Lehner, Bernhard; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Sivpalan, Murugesu; Sheffield, Justin; Wade, Andrew; Whitehead, Paul

2011-01-01

194

Hyperresolution global land surface modeling: Meeting a grand challenge for monitoring Earth's terrestrial water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monitoring Earth's terrestrial water conditions is critically important to many hydrological applications such as global food production; assessing water resources sustainability; and flood, drought, and climate change prediction. These needs have motivated the development of pilot monitoring and prediction systems for terrestrial hydrologic and vegetative states, but to date only at the rather coarse spatial resolutions (˜10-100 km) over continental to global domains. Adequately addressing critical water cycle science questions and applications requires systems that are implemented globally at much higher resolutions, on the order of 1 km, resolutions referred to as hyperresolution in the context of global land surface models. This opinion paper sets forth the needs and benefits for a system that would monitor and predict the Earth's terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. We discuss six major challenges in developing a system: improved representation of surface-subsurface interactions due to fine-scale topography and vegetation; improved representation of land-atmospheric interactions and resulting spatial information on soil moisture and evapotranspiration; inclusion of water quality as part of the biogeochemical cycle; representation of human impacts from water management; utilizing massively parallel computer systems and recent computational advances in solving hyperresolution models that will have up to 109 unknowns; and developing the required in situ and remote sensing global data sets. We deem the development of a global hyperresolution model for monitoring the terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles a "grand challenge" to the community, and we call upon the international hydrologic community and the hydrological science support infrastructure to endorse the effort.

Wood, Eric F.; Roundy, Joshua K.; Troy, Tara J.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; Blyth, Eleanor; de Roo, Ad; DöLl, Petra; Ek, Mike; Famiglietti, James; Gochis, David; van de Giesen, Nick; Houser, Paul; Jaffé, Peter R.; Kollet, Stefan; Lehner, Bernhard; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Sheffield, Justin; Wade, Andrew; Whitehead, Paul

2011-05-01

195

Iron Resources and Oceanic Nutrients: Advancement of Global Environment Simulations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept of a single factor limiting plankton blooms, is presently giving way to co-limitation by light, and the nutrients N, P, Si and Fe. Primary production, export into the deep sea, and CO2 uptake from the atmosphere together form the 'biological pump' in Ocean Biogeochemical Climate Models (OBCM's). Thus far OBCM's assume just one limiting nutrient (P) and one universal phytoplankton species, for C budgets and CO2 exchange. New realistic OBCM's are being developed for budgeting and exchanges of both CO2 and DMS, implementing (i) co-limitation by 4 nutrients of 5 major taxonomic classes of phytoplankton, (ii) DMS(P) pathways, (iii) global iron cycling, (iv) chemical forms of iron and (v) iron supply into surface waters. The new OBCM's will predict realistic climate scenario's, notably climatic feedbacks on oceanic biogeochemistry. IRONAGES is a European consortium of twelve institutes and is coordinated by Royal NIOZ. Input from below of iron from anoxic sediments of coastal margins has been assessed (March 2002) along a 2-D vertical section from Europe into the centre of the north Atlantic. Input from above of Fe(II) dissolved in rainwater from Sahara dust blown over the central Atlantic will be quantified at sea (October 2002), and related to observed plankton production. Different chemical forms of iron are being assessed and a certification excercise for Fe in seawater also under aegis of SCOR Working Group 109 is being completed (December 2002). For two major DMS-producing algal groups Phaeocystis sp. and Emiliania huxleyi the life cycle, Fe limitation, export production, CO2 uptake and DMS emissions have been synthesized from existing literature and laboratory experiments. This is being fed into ecosystem modeling, as well as into DMS(P) pathway modeling. Also know-how has been synthesized for three other major classes (diatoms, N2-fixing Trichodesmium and nano-pico-plankton) and fed into the ecosystem modeling. Pathways of DMS(P) in blooms are being simulated. An existing plankton ecosystem model already well predicts limitation by four nutrients (N, P, Si, Fe) of two algal groups (diatoms and nanoplankton) including export and CO2 air/sea exchange. This is being expanded with 3 other groups of algae and DMS(P)pathways. Next this extended ecosystem model is being simplified while maintaining reliable output for export and CO2/DMS gas exchange. This unit will then be put into two existing OBCM's. Inputs of Fe from above and below into the oceans have been modeled. Moreover a simple global Fe cycling model has been verified versus field data and insights. Two different OBCM's with same upper ocean ecosystem/DMS unit and Fe cycling will be verified versus pre-industrial and present conditions. Next climate change scenario's, notably changes in Fe inputs, will be run, with special attention to climatic feedbacks (warming) on the oceanic cycles and fluxes.

Debaar, H. J.

2002-12-01

196

Developing and implementing a data acquisition strategy for global agricultural monitoring: an inter-agency initiative  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 2011, in response to global food crises, the G20 Agricultural Ministers launched a satellite-based global agricultural monitoring initiative to develop the Group on Earth Observations Global Agriculture Monitoring (GEOGLAM) system. The GEO is aimed at enhancing the availability and use of both satellite and in situ data for societal benefit. This initiative builds on the observation requirements developed by the GEO Agricultural Community of Practice, the understanding that no one satellite system can currently provide all the data needed for agricultural monitoring and the resulting recommendation for improved acquisition and availability of data by the World's space agencies. Implicit in this recommendation is the fact that certain regions of the Earth are imagery rich while others are imagery poor, leaving knowledge gaps about agricultural processes and food supply for certain areas of the World. In order to respond to these knowledge gaps and to strengthen national, regional, and global agricultural monitoring networks, GEOGLAM is working with the Committee on Earth Observations (CEOS), the space arm of GEO, to develop a coordinated global acquisition strategy. A key component of GEOGLAM is an effort to articulate the temporal and spatial Earth Observation (EO) requirements for monitoring; second, the identification of current and planned missions which are capable of fulfilling these EO requirements; and third, the development of a multi-agency, multi-mission image acquisition strategy for agricultural monitoring. CEOS engineers and GEOGLAM scientists have been collaborating on the EO requirements since 2012, and are now beginning the first implementation phase of the acquisition strategy. The goal is to put in place an operational system of systems using a virtual constellation of satellite-based sensors acquiring data to meet the needs for monitoring and early warning of shortfalls in agricultural production, a goal that was articulated in the 1970's, which has yet to be met. Although technically feasible, the challenges are largely institutional and speak to issues of coordination, data policy, data continuity and political will. The GEOGLAM initiative provides an opportunity to address and overcome these challenges to implement a global image acquisition strategy designed to meet critical societal needs.

Justice, C. O.; Whitcraft, A. K.; Becker-Reshef, I.; Killough, B.

2013-12-01

197

Do persistent organic pollutants reach a thermodynamic equilibrium in the global environment?  

PubMed

Equilibrium partitioning between different environmental media is one of the main driving forces that govern the environmental fate of organic chemicals. In the global environment, equilibrium partitioning is in competition with long-range transport, advective phase transfer processes such as wet deposition, and degradation. Here we investigate under what conditions equilibrium partitioning is strong enough to control the global distribution of organic chemicals. We use a global multimedia mass-balance model to calculate the Globally Balanced State (GBS) of organic chemicals. The GBS is the state where equilibrium partitioning is in balance with long-range transport; it represents the maximum influence of thermodynamic driving forces on the global distribution of a chemical. Next, we compare the GBS with the Temporal Remote State, which represents the long-term distribution of a chemical in the global environment when the chemical's distribution is influenced by all transport and degradation processes in combination. This comparison allows us to identify the chemical properties required for a substance to reach the GBS as a stable global distribution. We find that thermodynamically controlled distributions are rare and do not occur for most Persistent Organic Pollutants. They are only found for highly volatile and persistent substances, such as chlorofluorocarbons. Furthermore, we find that the thermodynamic cold-trap effect (i.e., accumulation of pollutants at the poles because of reduced vapor pressure at low temperatures) is often strongly attenuated by atmospheric and oceanic long-range transport. PMID:24654605

Schenker, Sebastian; Scheringer, Martin; Hungerbühler, Konrad

2014-05-01

198

Evaluation of change detection techniques for monitoring coastal zone environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Procedures for detecting changes in Landsat multispectral scanning imagery of coastal zone environments are discussed. Four detection procedures are examined: a comparison of independently produced spectral classifications; a classification of a multispectral difference data set; a single analysis of a multidate data set; and a maximum likelihood classification using multistage decision logic. The relatively complex maximum likelihood classification technique was found to yield results closest to those obtained with the comparison of independently produced spectral classifications, the chosen standard.

Weismiller, R. A.; Kristof, S. J.; Scholz, D. K.; Anuta, P. E.; Momin, S. M.

1977-01-01

199

Global monitoring of water supply and sanitation: history, methods and future challenges.  

PubMed

International monitoring of drinking water and sanitation shapes awareness of countries' needs and informs policy, implementation and research efforts to extend and improve services. The Millennium Development Goals established global targets for drinking water and sanitation access; progress towards these targets, facilitated by international monitoring, has contributed to reducing the global disease burden and increasing quality of life. The experiences of the MDG period generated important lessons about the strengths and limitations of current approaches to defining and monitoring access to drinking water and sanitation. The methods by which the Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) of WHO and UNICEF tracks access and progress are based on analysis of data from household surveys and linear regression modelling of these results over time. These methods provide nationally representative and internationally comparable insights into the drinking water and sanitation facilities used by populations worldwide, but also have substantial limitations: current methods do not address water quality, equity of access, or extra-household services. Improved statistical methods are needed to better model temporal trends. This article describes and critically reviews JMP methods in detail for the first time. It also explores the impact of, and future directions for, international monitoring of drinking water and sanitation. PMID:25116635

Bartram, Jamie; Brocklehurst, Clarissa; Fisher, Michael B; Luyendijk, Rolf; Hossain, Rifat; Wardlaw, Tessa; Gordon, Bruce

2014-08-01

200

Global Monitoring of Water Supply and Sanitation: History, Methods and Future Challenges  

PubMed Central

International monitoring of drinking water and sanitation shapes awareness of countries’ needs and informs policy, implementation and research efforts to extend and improve services. The Millennium Development Goals established global targets for drinking water and sanitation access; progress towards these targets, facilitated by international monitoring, has contributed to reducing the global disease burden and increasing quality of life. The experiences of the MDG period generated important lessons about the strengths and limitations of current approaches to defining and monitoring access to drinking water and sanitation. The methods by which the Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) of WHO and UNICEF tracks access and progress are based on analysis of data from household surveys and linear regression modelling of these results over time. These methods provide nationally-representative and internationally-comparable insights into the drinking water and sanitation facilities used by populations worldwide, but also have substantial limitations: current methods do not address water quality, equity of access, or extra-household services. Improved statistical methods are needed to better model temporal trends. This article describes and critically reviews JMP methods in detail for the first time. It also explores the impact of, and future directions for, international monitoring of drinking water and sanitation. PMID:25116635

Bartram, Jamie; Brocklehurst, Clarissa; Fisher, Michael B.; Luyendijk, Rolf; Hossain, Rifat; Wardlaw, Tessa; Gordon, Bruce

2014-01-01

201

Man in the Living Environment. A Report on Global Ecological Problems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The findings of four groups of ecologists are synthesized in chapter I of this report on global ecological problems prepared as a data base for the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment. The other chapters contain the reports of each group. In "Cycles of Elements" the biologically important elements, phosphorus, sulfur, and nitrogen,…

Inger, Robert F.; And Others

202

Automated video screening for unattended background monitoring in dynamic environments.  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the development of automated video-screening technology to assist security forces in protecting our homeland against terrorist threats. A threat of specific interest to this project is the covert placement and subsequent remote detonation of bombs (e.g., briefcase bombs) inside crowded public facilities. Different from existing video motion detection systems, the video-screening technology described in this report is capable of detecting changes in the static background of an otherwise, dynamic environment - environments where motion and human activities are persistent. Our goal was to quickly detect changes in the background - even under conditions when the background is visible to the camera less than 5% of the time. Instead of subtracting the background to detect movement or changes in a scene, we subtracted the dynamic scene variations to produce an estimate of the static background. Subsequent comparisons of static background estimates are used to detect changes in the background. Detected changes can be used to alert security forces of the presence and location of potential threats. The results of this research are summarized in two MS Power-point presentations included with this report.

Carlson, Jeffrey J.

2004-03-01

203

Aerosols and past environments: A global investigation into cave aerosol identification, distribution, and contribution to speleothem geochemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new sector of interest is developing within cave science regarding the influence of aerosols on the cave environment and the potential speleothem palaeoenvironmental aerosol record which may be preserved. This paper presents the results from a global collaboration project which explored all aspects of aerosols in the cave environment. Cave aerosol identification, introduction and distribution Cave aerosol multivariable environmental monitoring projects were carried out in the UK, Spain, Austria and Australia. Results demonstrate that cave ventilation is the predominant control on the introduction and distribution of aerosols throughout the cave environment (Dredge et al., 2013). Consequently, aerosol transportation processes vary as a result of seasonal ventilation changes and cave morphological features. Cave aerosol contribution to speleothem geochemistry Aerosol contributions to speleothem geochemistry were determined by comparing monitored aerosol deposition to speleothem trace element data. Significant aerosol contribution scenarios were identified as: hiatus events, high aerosol flux situations and secondary microbial concentration processes. Modelling indicates that a >99.9% reduction in drip water flow rates is required to reduce trace element supply quantities to equal that of aerosol supply (Dredge et al., 2013). Aerosol palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironmental records Aerosol contributions and the ability to utilise aerosol records in speleothem are investigated in samples from Gibraltar and Australia. Long range dust sources and past atmospheric circulation over several glacial cycles is studied through Sr isotope analysis of a Flowstone core from Gibraltar. Results of organic fire proxy analysis from Australian speleothem samples indicate an aerosol deposition forest fire record. In addition to primary fire deposition, secondary biological feedbacks and subsequent bioaccumulation processes in the cave environment are explored by microbial analysis. References Dredge, J., Fairchild, I.J., Harrison, R.M., Fernandez-Cortes, A., Sanchez-Moral, S. Jurado, V., Gunn, J., Smith, A., Spötl, C., Mattey, D., Wynn, P.M., Grassineau, N. 2013. Cave aerosols: distribution and contribution to speleothem geochemistry. Quaternary Science Reviews, 63, 23-41

Dredge, J. A.; Fairchild, I. J.; Harrison, R. M.; Woodhead, J. D.; Hellstrom, J.; Mattey, D.

2013-12-01

204

MONITORING WASTE HEAT REJECTION TO THE ENVIRONMENT VIA REMOTE SENSING  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power plants typically use waste heat rejection systems such as cooling lakes and natural draft cooling towers. These systems are designed to reduce cooling water temperatures sufficiently to allow full power operation even during adverse meteorological conditions. After the power plant is operational, the performance of the cooling system is assessed. These assessments usually rely on measured temperatures of the cooling water after it has lost heat to the environment and is being pumped back into the power plant (cooling water inlet temperature). If the cooling system performance is not perceived to be optimal, the utility will collect additional data to determine why. This paper discusses the use of thermal imagery collected from aircraft and satellites combined with numerical simulation to better understand the dynamics and thermodynamics of nuclear power plant waste heat dissipation systems. The ANS meeting presentation will discuss analyses of several power plant cooling systems based on a combination of remote sensing data and hydrodynamic modeling.

Garrett, A

2009-01-13

205

A New ERA in Global Temperature Monitoring with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The launch of the first Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on the NOAA-15 spacecraft on 13 May 1998 marked a significant advance in our ability to monitor global temperatures. Compared to the Microwave Sounding Units (MSU) flying since 1978 on the TIROS-N series of NOAA polar orbiters, the AMSU offers better horizontal, vertical, and radiometric resolutions. It will allow routine monitoring of 1 1 (mostly) separate layers, compared to 2 or 3 with the MSU, including layers in the middle and upper stratosphere (2.5 hPa) where increasing carbon dioxide concentrations should be causing a cooling rate of about 1 deg. C per decade. More precise limb corrections combined with low noise will allow identification of subtle spatial temperature patterns associated with global cyclone activity.

Spencer, Roy W.; Braswell, William D.; Christy, John R.

1999-01-01

206

Global calibration of terrestrial reference cells and errors involved in using different irradiance monitoring techniques  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of global calibration of terrestrial reference cells is discussed. A simple, accurate 'secondary' calibration technique based on ratios of test to reference cell currents measured in natural sunlight is described. Different techniques for monitoring incident irradiance during solar cell performance measurements are also examined and assessed, including the techniques of black-body detectors, calibrated reference cells, and the convolution of spectral response with solar irradiance.

Curtis, H. B.

1980-01-01

207

GLOBAL MONITORING OF URANIUM HEXIFLORIDE CYLINDERS NEXT STEPS IN DEVELOPMENT OF AN ACTION PLAN  

SciTech Connect

Over 40 industrial facilities world-wide use standardized uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders for transport, storage and in-process receiving in support of uranium conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication processes. UF{sub 6} is processed and stored in the cylinders, with over 50,000 tU of UF{sub 6} transported each year in these International Organization for Standardization (ISO) qualified containers. Although each cylinder is manufactured to an ISO standard that calls for a nameplate with the manufacturer's identification number (ID) and the owner's serial number engraved on it, these can be quite small and difficult to read. Recognizing that each facility seems to use a different ID, a cylinder can have several different numbers recorded on it by means of metal plates, sticky labels, paint or even marker pen as it travels among facilities around the world. The idea of monitoring movements of UF{sub 6} cylinders throughout the global uranium fuel cycle has become a significant issue among industrial and safeguarding stakeholders. Global monitoring would provide the locations, movements, and uses of cylinders in commercial nuclear transport around the world, improving the efficiency of industrial operations while increasing the assurance that growing nuclear commerce does not result in the loss or misuse of cylinders. It should be noted that a unique ID (UID) attached to a cylinder in a verifiable manner is necessary for safeguarding needs and ensuring positive ID, but not sufficient for an effective global monitoring system. Modern technologies for tracking and inventory control can pair the UID with sensors and secure data storage for content information and complete continuity of knowledge over the cylinder. This paper will describe how the next steps in development of an action plan for employing a global UF{sub 6} cylinder monitoring network could be cultivated using four primary UID functions - identification, tracking, controlling, and accounting.

Hanks, D.

2010-06-09

208

New indicators for global crop monitoring in CropWatch -case study in North China Plain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CropWatch is a monitoring system developed and operated by the Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (Chinese Academy of Sciences) to provide global-scale crop information. Now in its 15th year of operation, CropWatch was modified several times to be a timely, comprehensive and independent global agricultural monitoring system using advanced remote sensing technology. Currently CropWatch is being upgraded with new indicators based on new sensors, especially those on board of China Environmental Satellite (HJ-1 CCD), the Medium Resolution Spectral Imager (MERSI) on Chinese meteorological satellite (FY-3A) and cloud classification products of FY-2. With new satellite data, CropWatch will generate new indicators such as fallow land ratio (FLR), crop condition for irrigated (CCI) and non-irrigated (CCNI) areas separately, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), radiation use efficiency for the photosynthetically active radiation (RUEPAR) and cropping index (CI) with crop rotation information (CRI). In this paper, the methods for monitoring the new indicators are applied to the North China Plain which is one of the major grain producing areas in China. This paper shows the preliminary results of the new indicators and methods; they still need to be thoroughly validated before being incorporated into the operational CropWatch system. In the future, the new and improved indicators will help us to better understand the global situation of food security.

Bingfang, Wu; Miao, Zhang; Hongwei, Zeng; Guoshui, Liu; Sheng, Chang; Gommes, René

2014-03-01

209

Design and package of a 14CO2 field analyzer: the Global Monitor Platform (GMP)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is widely accepted as a means to reduce and eliminate the fossil fuel CO2 (ff- CO2) emissions from coal fired power plants. Success of CCS depends on near zero leakage rates over decadal time scales. Currently no commercial methods to determine leakage of ff-CO2 are available. The Global Monitor Platform (GMP) field analyzer provides high precision analysis of CO2 isotopes [12C (99%), 13C (<1%), 14C (1.2x10-10 %)] that can differentiate between fossil and biogenic CO2 emissions. Fossil fuels contain no 14C; their combustion should lower atmospheric amounts on local to global scales. There is a clear mandate for monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) of CCS systems nationally and globally to verify CCS integrity, treaty verification (Kyoto Protocol) and to characterize the nuclear fuel cycle. Planetary Emissions Management (PEM), working with the National Secure Manufacturing Center (NSMC), has the goal of designing, ruggedizing and packaging the GMP for field deployment. The system will conduct atmosphere monitoring then adapt to water and soil evaluations. Measuring 14CO2 in real time will provide quantitative concentration data for ff-CO2 in the atmosphere and CCS leakage detection. Initial results will be discussed along with design changes for improved detection sensitivity and manufacturability.

Marino, Bruno D. V.; Bright, Michelle; Gronniger, Glen

2011-09-01

210

Towards global benchmarking of food environments and policies to reduce obesity and diet-related non-communicable diseases: design and methods for nation-wide surveys  

PubMed Central

Introduction Unhealthy diets are heavily driven by unhealthy food environments. The International Network for Food and Obesity/non-communicable diseases (NCDs) Research, Monitoring and Action Support (INFORMAS) has been established to reduce obesity, NCDs and their related inequalities globally. This paper describes the design and methods of the first-ever, comprehensive national survey on the healthiness of food environments and the public and private sector policies influencing them, as a first step towards global monitoring of food environments and policies. Methods and analysis A package of 11 substudies has been identified: (1) food composition, labelling and promotion on food packages; (2) food prices, shelf space and placement of foods in different outlets (mainly supermarkets); (3) food provision in schools/early childhood education (ECE) services and outdoor food promotion around schools/ECE services; (4) density of and proximity to food outlets in communities; food promotion to children via (5) television, (6) magazines, (7) sport club sponsorships, and (8) internet and social media; (9) analysis of the impact of trade and investment agreements on food environments; (10) government policies and actions; and (11) private sector actions and practices. For the substudies on food prices, provision, promotion and retail, ‘environmental equity’ indicators have been developed to check progress towards reducing diet-related health inequalities. Indicators for these modules will be assessed by tertiles of area deprivation index or school deciles. International ‘best practice benchmarks’ will be identified, against which to compare progress of countries on improving the healthiness of their food environments and policies. Dissemination This research is highly original due to the very ‘upstream’ approach being taken and its direct policy relevance. The detailed protocols will be offered to and adapted for countries of varying size and income in order to establish INFORMAS globally as a new monitoring initiative to reduce obesity and diet-related NCDs. PMID:24833697

Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Swinburn, Boyd

2014-01-01

211

Volcanic Environments Monitoring by Drones Mud Volcano Case Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volcanic activity has often affected human life both at large and at small scale. For example, the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption caused severe economic damage at continental scale due to its strong effect on air traffic. At a local scale, ash fall and lava flow emission can cause harm and disruption. Understanding precursory signals to volcanic eruptions is still an open and tricky challenge: seismic tremor and gas emissions, for example, are related to upcoming eruptive activity but the mechanisms are not yet completely understood. Furthermore, information related to gases emission mostly comes from the summit crater area of a volcano, which is usually hard to investigate with required accuracy. Although many regulation problems are still on the discussion table, an increasing interest in the application of cutting-edge technology like unmanned flying systems is growing up. In this sense, INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) started to investigate the possibility to use unmanned air vehicles for volcanic environment application already in 2004. A flight both in visual- and radio-controlled mode was carried out on Stromboli volcano as feasibility test. In this work we present the preliminary results of a test performed by INGV in collaboration with the University of Bologna (aerospace division) by using a multi-rotor aircraft in a hexacopter configuration. Thermal camera observations and flying tests have been realised over a mud volcano located on its SW flank of Mt. Etna and whose activity proved to be related to early stages of magma accumulation within the volcano.

Amici, S.; Turci, M.; Giulietti, F.; Giammanco, S.; Buongiorno, M. F.; La Spina, A.; Spampinato, L.

2013-08-01

212

Monitoring Progress towards Universal Health Coverage at Country and Global Levels  

PubMed Central

Universal health coverage (UHC) has been defined as the desired outcome of health system performance whereby all people who need health services (promotion, prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and palliation) receive them, without undue financial hardship. UHC has two interrelated components: the full spectrum of good-quality, essential health services according to need, and protection from financial hardship, including possible impoverishment, due to out-of-pocket payments for health services. Both components should benefit the entire population. This paper summarizes the findings from 13 country case studies and five technical reviews, which were conducted as part of the development of a global framework for monitoring progress towards UHC. The case studies show the relevance and feasibility of focusing UHC monitoring on two discrete components of health system performance: levels of coverage with health services and financial protection, with a focus on equity. These components link directly to the definition of UHC and measure the direct results of strategies and policies for UHC. The studies also show how UHC monitoring can be fully embedded in often existing, regular overall monitoring of health sector progress and performance. Several methodological and practical issues related to the monitoring of coverage of essential health services, financial protection, and equity, are highlighted. Addressing the gaps in the availability and quality of data required for monitoring progress towards UHC is critical in most countries. PMID:25243899

Boerma, Ties; Eozenou, Patrick; Evans, David; Evans, Tim; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Wagstaff, Adam

2014-01-01

213

Global environment  

SciTech Connect

We all recognize that the greater part of what constitutes environmental degradation is chemically related. Public and private bodies in many parts of the world have, for 20 years or more, set about identifying the problems in detail, and extensive lists of their concerns have been published. For me to address such detailed issues here would seem pointless, for that work is largely done, broadly disseminated, and widely accepted. Rather, my task, as I see it, is to consider a more general question: What currently constitutes the main chemical challenge. The answer, I have concluded, lies in the challenge to chemists themselves - not in any challenge to our professional abilities to diagnose and treat environmental degradation, because that cannot be disputed, but in the challenge that calls to account our role and posture regarding environmental protection, now and in the future.

Purnell, J.H.

1988-01-01

214

Silver-based electrochemical sensors for sulfide monitoring in deep-sea environments: New approaches based on autonomous measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A large variety of sulfidic environments have been described in the deep-sea since the late seventies, such as hydrothermal vents, cold seeps, organic falls or sub-seafloor microbial habitats. The reactivity of sulfide toward living organisms is a key concern in the exploration and study of these ecosystems, especially at hydrothermal vents where sulfide is a predominant energy source for chemosynthesis. However, the dynamics of sulfide gradients in these marine environments are still poorly documented, constraining the knowledge of their biogeochemical and ecological consequences. In this context, the development of sulfide autonomous sensors became a primary challenge. Measurement tools capable to capture the temporal variability of sulfide concentrations and related parameters are particularly needed, owing to the variability of environments at hydrothermal vents. Silver sulfide potentiometry, which was already applied in situ for punctual measurements, and a new voltammetric method based on bare silver, an electrode material which avoids the need for complex and repeated conditioning of the electrodes, are particularly suitable for unattended use. The advantages and limits of the potentiometric and voltammetric sensing techniques using solid-state electrodes were compared, with respect to the major requirements: concentration ranges; sensitivity to change of pH and temperature; minimum measurement rate; spatial resolution; autonomy; stability and reliability over time. Laboratory tests, combined with unprecedented series of in situ deployments in deep sea and other shallow water sulfidic environments, depict the potential of these tools for monitoring sulfide fluctuations in deep-sea habitats over weeks to months, and their use for investigation of the biogeochemical transformation of sulfur over time. Such sensors, improves the knowledge from these hardly accessible environments and could also reveal usefull to study shallow coastal waters, where sulfidic environments have been known for long. Mangroves, salt-marshes and submarine groundwater discharge zones had proven their importance in local, regional and even global scale processes. The need to monitor sulfide in this context is increasing, due to the probable increase of sulfide exposure episodes as a result of global changes, particularly with the increase of coastal anoxia.

Contreira Pereira, Leonardo; Peru, Erwan; Le Bris, Nadine

2014-05-01

215

An Experimental Global Monitoring System for Rainfall-triggered Landslides using Satellite Remote Sensing Information  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Landslides triggered by rainfall can possibly be foreseen in real time by jointly using rainfall intensity-duration thresholds and information related to land surface susceptibility. However, no system exists at either a national or a global scale to monitor or detect rainfall conditions that may trigger landslides due to the lack of extensive ground-based observing network in many parts of the world. Recent advances in satellite remote sensing technology and increasing availability of high-resolution geospatial products around the globe have provided an unprecedented opportunity for such a study. In this paper, a framework for developing an experimental real-time monitoring system to detect rainfall-triggered landslides is proposed by combining two necessary components: surface landslide susceptibility and a real-time space-based rainfall analysis system (http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.aov). First, a global landslide susceptibility map is derived from a combination of semi-static global surface characteristics (digital elevation topography, slope, soil types, soil texture, and land cover classification etc.) using a GIs weighted linear combination approach. Second, an adjusted empirical relationship between rainfall intensity-duration and landslide occurrence is used to assess landslide risks at areas with high susceptibility. A major outcome of this work is the availability of a first-time global assessment of landslide risk, which is only possible because of the utilization of global satellite remote sensing products. This experimental system can be updated continuously due to the availability of new satellite remote sensing products. This proposed system, if pursued through wide interdisciplinary efforts as recommended herein, bears the promise to grow many local landslide hazard analyses into a global decision-making support system for landslide disaster preparedness and risk mitigation activities across the world.

Hong, Yang; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.

2006-01-01

216

World Resources 1996-97: A Guide to the Global Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Full text of _World Resources 1996-97: A Guide to the Global Environment_, produced by the World Resources Institute, United Nations Environment Programme, United Nations Development Programme, and World Bank, is available via the Web. It is the official source book for the United Nations Habitat II Conference being held in Istanbul, Turkey June 3-14, 1996. The tenth edition of _World Resources_ contains two major sections, Global Conditions and Trends and Data Tables, and The Urban Environment, a special section concentrating on how urban population growth is affecting the global environment. Major findings include: "more than half of humankind will live in urban areas by the end of the century, and 60 percent by 2020; by 2010 the number of motor vehicles could grow to more than 800 million; and, by 2050, as many as 2.4 billion people could live in countries facing water scarcity." The report is available in HTML, and the data tables and Executive Summary are available as Adobe Acrobat .pdf files. Acrobat may be downloaded from the site. Print version availability and pricing can be found on the home page at the bottom of the News Release and under "Ordering Information." http://www.wri.org/wri/wr-96-97/index.html Habitat II Conference: http://pan.cedar.univie.ac.at/habitat/habitat.html http://www.un.org/Conferences/habitat/

Programme., United N.; Programme., United N.; Bank., World

1996-01-01

217

Heisenberg versus standard scaling in quantum metrology with Markov generated states and monitored environment  

E-print Network

Finding optimal and noise robust probe states is a key problem in quantum metrology. In this paper we propose Markov dynamics as a possible mechanism for generating such states, and show how the Heisenberg scaling emerges for systems with multiple `dynamical phases' (stationary states), and noiseless channels. We model noisy channels by coupling the Markov output to `environment' ancillas, and consider the scenario where the environment is monitored to increase the quantum Fisher information of the output. In this setup we find that the survival of the Heisenberg limit depends on whether the environment receives `which phase' information about the memory system.

Catalin Catana; Madalin Guta

2014-07-04

218

Project Title: Air Quality Monitoring in the Coastal Environment of Miami Professor's name: Xinrong Ren________________________________________ ______ _  

E-print Network

on the campus of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. Atmospheric pollutants include ozone in this project will learn basic knowledge of atmospheric science and air pollution, operate some environmentalProject Title: Air Quality Monitoring in the Coastal Environment of Miami Professor's name: Xinrong

Miami, University of

219

Harsh Environment Silicon Carbide Sensors for Health and Performance Monitoring of Aerospace Systems: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent increase in transportation costs and the push for cleaner emissions demands advancements in aerospace technology. The current instrumentation used in aerospace applications is costly, and indirect measurement approaches are often employed due to the inability to locate sensors in harsh environments. Health monitoring technologies for the development of a distributed sensor network can be utilized to improve engine

Debbie G. Senesky; Babak Jamshidi; Kan Bun Cheng; A. P. Pisano

2009-01-01

220

P&P: a Combined Push-Pull Model for Resource Monitoring in Cloud Computing Environment  

E-print Network

P&P: a Combined Push-Pull Model for Resource Monitoring in Cloud Computing Environment He Huang Cloud computing paradigm contains many shared re- sources, such as infrastructures, data storage Cloud computing operations. In this paper, we extend the prevailing moni- toring methods in Grid

Wang, Liqiang

221

Monitoring the tobacco use epidemic V The environment: Factors that influence tobacco use  

Microsoft Academic Search

article i nfo Available online 26 October 2008 Objective. This environment paper (V of V) summarizes important surveillance and evaluation systems that monitor influences on tobacco use such as smoke-free laws and other legislation, excise taxes, mass media, and a broad range of tobacco control activities, discusses their strengths and weaknesses, and makes recommendations for enhancement. Methods. We summarize and

Matthew C. Farrelly

2009-01-01

222

Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission: Monitoring the Global Tropics for 3 Years and Beyond. 1.1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) was launched in November 1997 as a joint U.S.-Japanese mission to advance understanding of the global energy and water cycle by providing distributions of rainfall and latent heating over the global tropics. As a part of NASA's Earth System Enterprise, TRMM seeks to understand the mechanisms through which changes in tropical rainfall influence global circulation. Additionally, a goal is to improve the ability to model these processes in order to predict global circulations and rainfall variability at monthly and longer time scales. Such understanding has implications for assessing climate processes related to El Nino/La Nina and Global Warming. TRMM has also provided unexpected and exciting new knowledge and applications in areas related to hurricane monitoring, lightning, pollution, hydrology, and other areas. This CD-ROM includes a self-contained PowerPoint presentation that provides an overview of TRMM and significant science results; a set of data movies or animation; and listings of current TRMM-related publications in the literature.

Shepherd, Marshall; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

223

Nonthreshold-based event detection for 3d environment monitoring in sensor networks  

SciTech Connect

Event detection is a crucial task for wireless sensor network applications, especially environment monitoring. Existing approaches for event detection are mainly based on some predefined threshold values and, thus, are often inaccurate and incapable of capturing complex events. For example, in coal mine monitoring scenarios, gas leakage or water osmosis can hardly be described by the overrun of specified attribute thresholds but some complex pattern in the full-scale view of the environmental data. To address this issue, we propose a nonthreshold-based approach for the real 3D sensor monitoring environment. We employ energy-efficient methods to collect a time series of data maps from the sensor network and detect complex events through matching the gathered data to spatiotemporal data patterns. Finally, we conduct trace-driven simulations to prove the efficacy and efficiency of this approach on detecting events of complex phenomena from real-life records.

Li, M.; Liu, Y.H.; Chen, L. [Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, Kowloon (China)

2008-12-15

224

CTFS-ForestGEO: a worldwide network monitoring forests in an era of global change.  

PubMed

Global change is impacting forests worldwide, threatening biodiversity and ecosystem services including climate regulation. Understanding how forests respond is critical to forest conservation and climate protection. This review describes an international network of 59 long-term forest dynamics research sites (CTFS-ForestGEO) useful for characterizing forest responses to global change. Within very large plots (median size 25 ha), all stems ?1 cm diameter are identified to species, mapped, and regularly recensused according to standardized protocols. CTFS-ForestGEO spans 25°S-61°N latitude, is generally representative of the range of bioclimatic, edaphic, and topographic conditions experienced by forests worldwide, and is the only forest monitoring network that applies a standardized protocol to each of the world's major forest biomes. Supplementary standardized measurements at subsets of the sites provide additional information on plants, animals, and ecosystem and environmental variables. CTFS-ForestGEO sites are experiencing multifaceted anthropogenic global change pressures including warming (average 0.61 °C), changes in precipitation (up to ±30% change), atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds (up to 3.8 g N m(-2)  yr(-1) and 3.1 g S m(-2)  yr(-1) ), and forest fragmentation in the surrounding landscape (up to 88% reduced tree cover within 5 km). The broad suite of measurements made at CTFS-ForestGEO sites makes it possible to investigate the complex ways in which global change is impacting forest dynamics. Ongoing research across the CTFS-ForestGEO network is yielding insights into how and why the forests are changing, and continued monitoring will provide vital contributions to understanding worldwide forest diversity and dynamics in an era of global change. PMID:25258024

Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J; Davies, Stuart J; Bennett, Amy C; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika B; Muller-Landau, Helene C; Joseph Wright, S; Abu Salim, Kamariah; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M; Alonso, Alfonso; Baltzer, Jennifer L; Basset, Yves; Bourg, Norman A; Broadbent, Eben N; Brockelman, Warren Y; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Burslem, David F R P; Butt, Nathalie; Cao, Min; Cardenas, Dairon; Chuyong, George B; Clay, Keith; Cordell, Susan; Dattaraja, Handanakere S; Deng, Xiaobao; Detto, Matteo; Du, Xiaojun; Duque, Alvaro; Erikson, David L; Ewango, Corneille E N; Fischer, Gunter A; Fletcher, Christine; Foster, Robin B; Giardina, Christian P; Gilbert, Gregory S; Gunatilleke, Nimal; Gunatilleke, Savitri; Hao, Zhanqing; Hargrove, William W; Hart, Terese B; Hau, Billy C H; He, Fangliang; Hoffman, Forrest M; Howe, Robert W; Hubbell, Stephen P; Inman-Narahari, Faith M; Jansen, Patrick A; Jiang, Mingxi; Johnson, Daniel J; Kanzaki, Mamoru; Kassim, Abdul Rahman; Kenfack, David; Kibet, Staline; Kinnaird, Margaret F; Korte, Lisa; Kral, Kamil; Kumar, Jitendra; Larson, Andrew J; Li, Yide; Li, Xiankun; Liu, Shirong; Lum, Shawn K Y; Lutz, James A; Ma, Keping; Maddalena, Damian M; Makana, Jean-Remy; Malhi, Yadvinder; Marthews, Toby; Mat Serudin, Rafizah; McMahon, Sean M; McShea, William J; Memiaghe, Hervé R; Mi, Xiangcheng; Mizuno, Takashi; Morecroft, Michael; Myers, Jonathan A; Novotny, Vojtech; de Oliveira, Alexandre A; Ong, Perry S; Orwig, David A; Ostertag, Rebecca; den Ouden, Jan; Parker, Geoffrey G; Phillips, Richard P; Sack, Lawren; Sainge, Moses N; Sang, Weiguo; Sri-Ngernyuang, Kriangsak; Sukumar, Raman; Sun, I-Fang; Sungpalee, Witchaphart; Suresh, Hebbalalu Sathyanarayana; Tan, Sylvester; Thomas, Sean C; Thomas, Duncan W; Thompson, Jill; Turner, Benjamin L; Uriarte, Maria; Valencia, Renato; Vallejo, Marta I; Vicentini, Alberto; Vrška, Tomáš; Wang, Xihua; Wang, Xugao; Weiblen, George; Wolf, Amy; Xu, Han; Yap, Sandra; Zimmerman, Jess

2015-02-01

225

The Global Integrated Drought Monitoring and Prediction System (GIDMaPS): Overview and Capabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of reliable monitoring and prediction indices and tools are fundamental to drought preparedness and management. Motivated by the Global Drought Information Systems (GDIS) activities, this paper presents the Global Integrated Drought Monitoring and Prediction System (GIDMaPS) which provides near real-time drought information using both remote sensing observations and model simulations. The monthly data from the NASA Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-Land), North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS), and remotely sensed precipitation data are used as input to GIDMaPS. Numerous indices have been developed for drought monitoring based on various indicator variables (e.g., precipitation, soil moisture, water storage). Defining droughts based on a single variable (e.g., precipitation, soil moisture or runoff) may not be sufficient for reliable risk assessment and decision making. GIDMaPS provides drought information based on multiple indices including Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), Standardized Soil Moisture Index (SSI) and the Multivariate Standardized Drought Index (MSDI) which combines SPI and SSI probabilistically. In other words, MSDI incorporates the meteorological and agricultural drought conditions for overall characterization of droughts. The seasonal prediction component of GIDMaPS is based on a persistence model which requires historical data and near-past observations. The seasonal drought prediction component is based on two input data sets (MERRA and NLDAS) and three drought indicators (SPI, SSI and MSDI). The drought prediction model provides the empirical probability of drought for different severity levels. In this presentation, both monitoring and prediction components of GIDMaPS will be discussed, and the results from several major droughts including the 2013 Namibia, 2012-2013 United States, 2011-2012 Horn of Africa, and 2010 Amazon Droughts will be presented. The results indicate that GIDMaPS advances our drought monitoring and prediction capabilities through integration of multiple data and indicators.

AghaKouchak, A.; Hao, Z.; Farahmand, A.; Nakhjiri, N.

2013-12-01

226

Monitoring temporal and spatial trends of legacy and emerging contaminants in marine environment: results from the environmental specimen bank (es-BANK) of Ehime University, Japan.  

PubMed

The Environmental Specimen Bank (es-BANK) for Global Monitoring at the Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, Japan has more than four decades of practical experience in specimen banking. Over the years, es-BANK has archived specimens representing a wide range of environmental matrices, i.e. fishes, reptiles, birds, aquatic mammals, terrestrial mammals, human, soils, and sediments. The samples have been collected as part of the various monitoring programs conducted worldwide. The current review is a summary of selected studies conducted at the Center for Marine Environmental Studies, on temporal and spatial trends of legacy and emerging contaminants in the marine environment. One of the major conclusions drawn from the studies is that environmental problems are no more regional issues and, thus, environmental specimen banking should not be limited to national boundaries, but should have a global outlook. PMID:22704146

Tanabe, Shinsuke; Ramu, Karri

2012-07-01

227

Uncovering Global Icebergs in Distributed Monitors Guanyao Huang, Ashwin Lall, Chen-Nee Chuah, and Jun Xu  

E-print Network

Uncovering Global Icebergs in Distributed Monitors Guanyao Huang, Ashwin Lall, Chen-Nee Chuah and worm detection, called distributed global icebergs. While previous work has concentrated on mea- suring local heavy-hitters using "sketches" in the non-distributed streaming case or icebergs in the non

Chuah, Chen-Nee

228

Effective sensing approach for assessment and monitoring of in-situ biodegradation in a subsurface environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rapid assessment and monitoring of biological conditions in a subsurface environment is becoming more and more important as bioremediation approaches become widely used in environmental cleanup. Remediation monitoring is also more challenging for in-situ remedial approaches, such as bioventing, biosparging, or passive bioremediation, where conventional 'inlet' and 'outlet' monitoring can no longer be applied. A sensing approach using subsurface chemical sensors offers a cost- effective alternative for remediation monitoring. Additional benefits of deploying subsurface sensors include continuous and unattended measurement with minimum disturbance to the subsurface condition. In a series of field studies, an electrochemical oxygen sensor, a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) carbon dioxide sensor, and two hydrocarbons sensors were employed for monitoring in-situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. Biodegradation rates were effectively measured through an in-situ respiration measurement using subsurface oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors. The high sensitivity of the carbon dioxide sensor to small change in the concentration enables rapid respiration measurements. Subsurface hydrocarbon sensors offer a means to monitor the progress of remediation and the migration of contaminant vapors during the remediation. The chemical sensors tested are clearly cost effective for remediation monitoring. The strengths of oxygen and carbon dioxide sensors are complimentary to each other. Strengths and limitations of different hydrocarbon sensors were also noted. Balancing cost and performance of sensors is crucial for environmental remediation application.

Li, Dong X.

1999-02-01

229

Youth, Skills Development, and Work in the Education for All Global Monitoring Report 2012: Learning from Asia or for Asia?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article underlines the historic importance of the treatment of skills development, finally, by the Education for All Global Monitoring Report (GMR) team. Among the many challenges in its analysis are the multiple and overlapping meanings of the word skill, and the consequent difficulties of quantifying and monitoring efforts at skills…

King, Kenneth

2014-01-01

230

A Low-Cost Sensor Buoy System for Monitoring Shallow Marine Environments  

PubMed Central

Monitoring of marine ecosystems is essential to identify the parameters that determine their condition. The data derived from the sensors used to monitor them are a fundamental source for the development of mathematical models with which to predict the behaviour of conditions of the water, the sea bed and the living creatures inhabiting it. This paper is intended to explain and illustrate a design and implementation for a new multisensor monitoring buoy system. The system design is based on a number of fundamental requirements that set it apart from other recent proposals: low cost of implementation, the possibility of application in coastal shallow-water marine environments, suitable dimensions for deployment and stability of the sensor system in a shifting environment like the sea bed, and total autonomy of power supply and data recording. The buoy system has successfully performed remote monitoring of temperature and marine pressure (SBE 39 sensor), temperature (MCP9700 sensor) and atmospheric pressure (YOUNG 61302L sensor). The above requirements have been satisfactorily validated by operational trials in a marine environment. The proposed buoy sensor system thus seems to offer a broad range of applications. PMID:23012562

Albaladejo, Cristina; Soto, Fulgencio; Torres, Roque; Sánchez, Pedro; López, Juan A.

2012-01-01

231

United Nations Environment Programme; Resources for Scientists  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site provides information on the state of the planet's natural resources and sustainable development. The site highlights scientific assessment and global monitoring efforts that are currently underway such as the Global International Waters Assessment, the Global Environment Monitoring System Freshwater Quality Programme and the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. A section on maps and graphics is also included.

The United Nations

232

Beyond indicators: advances in global HIV monitoring and evaluation during the PEPFAR era.  

PubMed

Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) is fundamental to global HIV program implementation and has been a cornerstone of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Rapid results were crucial to demonstrating feasibility and scalability of HIV care and treatment services early in PEPFAR. When national HIV M&E systems were nascent, the rapid influx of funds and the emergency expansion of HIV services contributed to the development of uncoordinated "parallel" information systems to serve donor demands for information. Close collaboration of PEPFAR with multilateral and national partners improved harmonization of indicators, standards, methods, tools, and reports. Concurrent PEPFAR investments in surveillance, surveys, program monitoring, health information systems, and human capacity development began to show signs of progress toward sustainable country-owned systems. Awareness of the need for and usefulness of data increased, far beyond discussions of indicators and reporting. Emphasis has turned toward ensuring the quality of data and using available data to improve the quality of care. Assessing progress toward an AIDS-free generation requires that the global community can measure the reduction of new HIV infections in children and adults and monitor the coverage, quality, and outcomes of highly efficacious interventions in combination. Building national M&E systems requires sustained efforts over long periods of time with effective leadership and coordination. PEPFAR, in close collaboration with its global and national partners, is well positioned to transform the successes and challenges associated with early rapid scale-up into future opportunities for sustainable, cost-effective, country-owned programs and systems. PMID:22797733

Porter, Laura E; Bouey, Paul D; Curtis, Sian; Hochgesang, Mindy; Idele, Priscilla; Jefferson, Bobby; Lemma, Wuleta; Myrick, Roger; Nuwagaba-Biribonwoha, Harriet; Prybylski, Dimitri; Souteyrand, Yves; Tulli, Tuhuma

2012-08-15

233

Global atmospheric temperature monitoring with satellite microwave measurements - Method and results 1979-84  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes a method for determining global atmospheric-temperature anomalies by means of satellite microwave radiometry. It is shown that microwave measurements of molecular oxygen thermal emission by the Microwave Sounding Units (MSUs) flying aboard the NOAA-6 and NOAA-7 can be used to monitor tropospheric temperature anomalies on global basis to a high level of precision. Comparisons between monthly MSU-derived hemispheric temperature anomalies with those computed from surface thermometer data show a very good agreement over the United States, although not for the hemispheres, especially the Southern Hemisphere. In this latter case, the poor agreement is ascribed to weaker thermal coupling between the ocean and the deep troposphere than that over the U.S. Annual anomalies for the hemispheres exhibit better correlations than do monthly anomalies.

Spencer, Roy W.; Christy, John R.; Grody, Norman C.

1990-01-01

234

Global Monitoring of Clouds and Aerosols Using a Network of Micro-Pulse Lidar Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Long-term global radiation programs, such as AERONET and BSRN, have shown success in monitoring column averaged cloud and aerosol optical properties. Little attention has been focused on global measurements of vertically resolved optical properties. Lidar systems are the preferred instrument for such measurements. However, global usage of lidar systems has not been achieved because of limits imposed by older systems that were large, expensive, and logistically difficult to use in the field. Small, eye-safe, and autonomous lidar systems are now currently available and overcome problems associated with older systems. The first such lidar to be developed is the Micro-pulse lidar System (MPL). The MPL has proven to be useful in the field because it can be automated, runs continuously (day and night), is eye-safe, can easily be transported and set up, and has a small field-of-view which removes multiple scattering concerns. We have developed successful protocols to operate and calibrate MPL systems. We have also developed a data analysis algorithm that produces data products such as cloud and aerosol layer heights, optical depths, extinction profiles, and the extinction-backscatter ratio. The algorithm minimizes the use of a priori assumptions and also produces error bars for all data products. Here we present an overview of our MPL protocols and data analysis techniques. We also discuss the ongoing construction of a global MPL network in conjunction with the AERONET program. Finally, we present some early results from the MPL network.

Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Spinhirne, James D.; Scott, V. Stanley

2000-01-01

235

An evaluation of monthly mean MSU and ECMWF global atmospheric temperatures for monitoring climate  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The usefulness of global satellite sounding data for monitoring climate was assessed by comparing monthly mean brightness temperature anomalies derived from channel 2 of the microwave sounding units (MSUs) on board NOAA satellites over the past decade with both weighted and pressure-level ECMWF monthly mean temperatures for 96 months from 1982 to 1989. Results show that very good agreement exists between the MSU and the weighted ECMWF temperatures over the period considered, with grid-point correlations exceeding 0.85. Comparisons with individual pressure-level temperatures from ECMWF showed high correlations at 300 mb over most of the globe.

Hurrell, James W.; Trenberth, Kevin E.

1992-01-01

236

Use of Sentinels to aid the global monitoring of snow cover  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earth observation instruments onboard Sentinel satellites provide a unique opportunity for the monitoring and investigation of global snow processes. The issue of the possible decay of seasonal snow cover is highly relevant for climate research. In addition to water cycle, the extent and amount of snow affects to surface albedo, and indirectly to carbon cycling. The latter issue includes snow-induced changes in permafrost regions (active layer characteristics), as well as the effect of snow (melt) to vegetation growth and soil respiration. Recent advances in ESA DUE GlobSnow project have shown that by combining data from optical satellite sensors and passive microwave instruments advanced Climate Data Records (CDR) on seasonal snow cover can be produced, extending to time periods of over 30 years. The combined snow cover products provide information both on Snow Extent (SE) and Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) on a daily basis. The applicable instruments providing historical data for CDR generation include such microwave radiometers as SMMR, AMSR and SSMI/I, and such optical sensors as AVHRR, AATSR and VIIRS. Sentinel 3, especially its SLSTR instrument, is a prominent tool for expanding the snow CDR for forthcoming years. The developed global snow cover monitoring methodology, demonstrated and discussed here, derives the SWE information from passive microwave data (accompanied with in situ observations of snow depth at synoptic weather stations). The snow extent and fractional snow cover (FSC) on ground is derived from optical satellite data, in order to accurately map the continental line of seasonal snow cover, and to map regions of ephemeral snow cover. An advanced feature in the developed methodology is the provision of uncertainty information on snow cover characteristics associated with each individual satellite data footprint on ground and moment of time. In addition to assisting the generation and extension of the global snow cover CDR, Sentinel missions provide data that enable the improvement of snow monitoring algorithms for hydrological and NWP applications. On the other hand, Sentinel observations can be applied to enhance snow processes considerations in hydrological, climate and weather prediction models. In general, synergistic techniques that apply data from different sensors (active-passive, optical-microwave, moderate-coarse resolution) are feasible to numerous cryospheric research and end-use applications. For example, MSI of Sentinel 2 and Sentinel 1 SAR can be synergistically used to provide information on snow melt at the scale of sub-drainage basins for hydrological river discharge forecasting independently on cloud conditions. The snow melt monitoring information has also been shown to be relevant for the mapping of the start of the growing season at the conifer forests of the boreal forest zone, which is highly relevant for the global mapping of annual carbon balance.

Pulliainen, Jouni; Salminen, Miia; Luojus, Kari; Metsämäki, Sari; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Takala, Matias; Cohen, Juval; Böttcher, Kristine

2014-05-01

237

Design principles for an unmanned-spacecraft global heliogeophysical monitoring system.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper briefly sets forth basic principles for development of an earth-space Global Heliogeophysical Monitoring System (GHMS) that provides for operational monitoring and prediction of solar activity, the state of the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and upper atmosphere, and processes that take place on the surface and in the interior of the earth with consequences in near-earth space, in the interests of many branches of the economy, ecology, science, natural-disaster prediction, and monitoring observance of international agreements, for example in the area of arms limitation. The GHMS design concept is based on the idea of multilevel structuring of its components, which are based on convertible space and military hardware and the use of existing equipment, data-processing methods, etc., thus ensuring relatively low cost, early availability, low risk, and high reliability of the System. The makeup and functions of the main GHMS components are stated, along with the characteristics of the proposed space vehicles and an options list of monitored parameters and measuring instruments for all System levels. It is noted that the System must be developed step by step and with maximum reliance on international cooperation.

Kovtunenko, V. M.; Avdyushin, S. I.; Zajtsev, A. V.

1993-09-01

238

Mutations in Global Regulators Lead to Metabolic Selection during Adaptation to Complex Environments  

PubMed Central

Adaptation to ecologically complex environments can provide insights into the evolutionary dynamics and functional constraints encountered by organisms during natural selection. Adaptation to a new environment with abundant and varied resources can be difficult to achieve by small incremental changes if many mutations are required to achieve even modest gains in fitness. Since changing complex environments are quite common in nature, we investigated how such an epistatic bottleneck can be avoided to allow rapid adaptation. We show that adaptive mutations arise repeatedly in independently evolved populations in the context of greatly increased genetic and phenotypic diversity. We go on to show that weak selection requiring substantial metabolic reprogramming can be readily achieved by mutations in the global response regulator arcA and the stress response regulator rpoS. We identified 46 unique single-nucleotide variants of arcA and 18 mutations in rpoS, nine of which resulted in stop codons or large deletions, suggesting that subtle modulations of ArcA function and knockouts of rpoS are largely responsible for the metabolic shifts leading to adaptation. These mutations allow a higher order metabolic selection that eliminates epistatic bottlenecks, which could occur when many changes would be required. Proteomic and carbohydrate analysis of adapting E. coli populations revealed an up-regulation of enzymes associated with the TCA cycle and amino acid metabolism, and an increase in the secretion of putrescine. The overall effect of adaptation across populations is to redirect and efficiently utilize uptake and catabolism of abundant amino acids. Concomitantly, there is a pronounced spread of more ecologically limited strains that results from specialization through metabolic erosion. Remarkably, the global regulators arcA and rpoS can provide a “one-step” mechanism of adaptation to a novel environment, which highlights the importance of global resource management as a powerful strategy to adaptation. PMID:25501822

Saxer, Gerda; Krepps, Michael D.; Merkley, Eric D.; Ansong, Charles; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L.; Valovska, Marie-Thérèse; Ristic, Nikola; Yeh, Ping T.; Prakash, Vittal P.; Leiser, Owen P.; Nakhleh, Luay; Gibbons, Henry S.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Shamoo, Yousif

2014-01-01

239

Mutations in Global Regulators Lead to Metabolic Selection during Adaptation to Complex Environments  

SciTech Connect

Adaptation to ecologically complex environments can provide insights into the evolutionary dynamics and functional constraints encountered by organisms during natural selection. Unlike adaptation to a single limiting resource, adaptation to a new environment with abundant and varied resources can be difficult to achieve by small incremental changes since many mutations are required to achieve even modest gains in fitness. Since changing complex environments are quite common in nature, we investigated how such an epistatic bottleneck can be avoided to allow rapid adaptation. We show that adaptive mutations arise repeatedly in independently evolved populations in the context of greatly increased genetic and phenotypic diversity. We go on to show that weak selection requiring substantial metabolic reprogramming can be readily achieved by mutations in the global response regulator arcA and the stress response regulator rpoS. We identified 46 unique single-nucleotide variants of arcA and 18 mutations in rpoS, nine of which resulted in stop codons or large deletions, suggesting that a subtle modulation of ArcA function and knockouts of rpoS are largely responsible for the metabolic shifts leading to adaptation. These mutations allow a higher order “metabolic selection” that eliminates epistatic bottlenecks, which could occur when many changes would be required. Proteomic and carbohydrate analysis of adapting E. coli populations revealed an up-regulation of enzymes associated with the TCA cycle and amino acid metabolism and an increase in the secretion of putrescine. The overall effect of adaptation across populations is to redirect and efficiently utilize uptake and catabolism of abundant amino acids. Concomitantly, there is a pronounced spread of more ecologically limited strains that results from specialization through metabolic erosion. Remarkably, the global regulators arcA and rpoS can provide a “one-step” mechanism of adaptation to a novel environment, which highlights the importance of global resource management as a powerful strategy to adaptation.

Saxer, Gerda; Krepps, Michael D.; Merkley, Eric D.; Ansong, Charles; Kaiser, Brooke LD; Valovska, Marie-Thrse; Ristic, Nikola; Yeh, Ping T.; Prakash, Vittal; Leiser, Owen P.; Nakhleh, Luay; Gibbons, Henry S.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Shamoo, Yousif

2014-12-11

240

Mutations in global regulators lead to metabolic selection during adaptation to complex environments.  

PubMed

Adaptation to ecologically complex environments can provide insights into the evolutionary dynamics and functional constraints encountered by organisms during natural selection. Adaptation to a new environment with abundant and varied resources can be difficult to achieve by small incremental changes if many mutations are required to achieve even modest gains in fitness. Since changing complex environments are quite common in nature, we investigated how such an epistatic bottleneck can be avoided to allow rapid adaptation. We show that adaptive mutations arise repeatedly in independently evolved populations in the context of greatly increased genetic and phenotypic diversity. We go on to show that weak selection requiring substantial metabolic reprogramming can be readily achieved by mutations in the global response regulator arcA and the stress response regulator rpoS. We identified 46 unique single-nucleotide variants of arcA and 18 mutations in rpoS, nine of which resulted in stop codons or large deletions, suggesting that subtle modulations of ArcA function and knockouts of rpoS are largely responsible for the metabolic shifts leading to adaptation. These mutations allow a higher order metabolic selection that eliminates epistatic bottlenecks, which could occur when many changes would be required. Proteomic and carbohydrate analysis of adapting E. coli populations revealed an up-regulation of enzymes associated with the TCA cycle and amino acid metabolism, and an increase in the secretion of putrescine. The overall effect of adaptation across populations is to redirect and efficiently utilize uptake and catabolism of abundant amino acids. Concomitantly, there is a pronounced spread of more ecologically limited strains that results from specialization through metabolic erosion. Remarkably, the global regulators arcA and rpoS can provide a "one-step" mechanism of adaptation to a novel environment, which highlights the importance of global resource management as a powerful strategy to adaptation. PMID:25501822

Saxer, Gerda; Krepps, Michael D; Merkley, Eric D; Ansong, Charles; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L; Valovska, Marie-Thérèse; Ristic, Nikola; Yeh, Ping T; Prakash, Vittal P; Leiser, Owen P; Nakhleh, Luay; Gibbons, Henry S; Kreuzer, Helen W; Shamoo, Yousif

2014-12-01

241

On the Relevance of Using Open Wireless Sensor Networks in Environment Monitoring  

PubMed Central

This paper revisits the problem of the readiness for field deployments of wireless sensor networks by assessing the relevance of using Open Hardware and Software motes for environment monitoring. We propose a new prototype wireless sensor network that fine-tunes SquidBee motes to improve the life-time and sensing performance of an environment monitoring system that measures temperature, humidity and luminosity. Building upon two outdoor sensing scenarios, we evaluate the performance of the newly proposed energy-aware prototype solution in terms of link quality when expressed by the Received Signal Strength, Packet Loss and the battery lifetime. The experimental results reveal the relevance of using the Open Hardware and Software motes when setting up outdoor wireless sensor networks. PMID:22408557

Bagula, Antoine B.; Inggs, Gordon; Scott, Simon; Zennaro, Marco

2009-01-01

242

Real-time molecular monitoring of chemical environment in obligate anaerobes during oxygen adaptive response  

PubMed Central

Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment can elucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms that enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bond structures in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of well orchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses. PMID:19541631

Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

2009-01-01

243

A novel technique for acoustic emission monitoring in civil structures with global fiber optic sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of acoustic emission (AE)-based damage detection is gaining interest in the field of civil structural health monitoring. Damage progress can be detected and located in real time and the recorded AEs hold information on the fracture process which produced them. One of the drawbacks for on-site application in large-scale concrete and masonry structures is the relatively high attenuation of the ultrasonic signal, which limits the detection range of the AE sensors. Consequently, a large number of point sensors are required to cover a certain area. To tackle this issue, a global damage detection system, based on AE detection with a polarization-modulated, single mode fiber optic sensor (FOS), has been developed. The sensing principle, data acquisition and analysis in time and frequency domain are presented. During experimental investigations, this AE-FOS is applied for the first time as a global sensor for the detection of crack-induced AEs in a full-scale concrete beam. Damage progress is monitored during a cyclic four-point bending test and the AE activity, detected with the FOS, is related to the subsequent stages of damage progress in the concrete element. The results obtained with the AE-FOS are successfully linked to the mechanical behavior of the concrete beam and a qualitative correspondence is found with AE data obtained by a commercial system.

Verstrynge, E.; Pfeiffer, H.; Wevers, M.

2014-06-01

244

In the global market environment, agile manufacturing companies are forced to cooperate with each other and form  

E-print Network

14 Abstract In the global market environment, agile manufacturing companies are forced to cooperate of work. This paper presents a distributed information system architecture for agile manufacturing purposes. Keywords: Agile Manufacturing, Information Systems, Workflow Management, Common Object Request

Nagi, Rakesh

245

Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Space Environments Engineering and Crew Auroral Observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Today s presentation describes how real time space weather data is used by the International Space Station (ISS) space environments team to obtain data on auroral charging of the ISS vehicle and support ISS crew efforts to obtain auroral images from orbit. Topics covered include: Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU), . Auroral charging of ISS, . Real ]time space weather monitoring resources, . Examples of ISS auroral charging captured from space weather events, . ISS crew observations of aurora.

Minow, Joseph; Pettit, Donald R.; Hartman, William A.

2012-01-01

246

A novel integrative technique for locating and monitoring polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon discharges to the aquatic environment  

SciTech Connect

A simple integrative technique for locating and monitoring polynuclear aromatic hydrogen discharges to aquatic environments is described. The technique involves anchoring artificial substrates cut from a commercial oil-adsorbant cloth (3M Co.) near suspected sources of contamination. Analytical methodology involves mild ethanolic extraction and liquid-liquid partitioning to isolate a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon containing fraction that is amenable to analysis by high-pressure liquid chromatography.

Black, J.J.; Hart, T.F. Jr.; Black, P.J.

1982-05-01

247

CORA – a dedicated device for carbon dioxide monitoring in cave environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

High resolution time-series of cave CO2 fluctuations are increasingly demanded to quantify calcite precipitation processes. CORA, an energy-efficient NDIR-device, has been specifically developed for the long-term monitoring of carbon dioxide in remote cave environments. To allow comparison between different cave sites, changes in air pressure and temperature are compensated for using dedicated probes. Laboratory experiments demonstrate that CORA’s precision is

Marc Luetscher; Felix Ziegler

2012-01-01

248

Integrity mechanism for eHealth tele-monitoring system in smart home environment.  

PubMed

During the past few years, a lot of effort has been invested in research and development of eHealth tele-monitoring systems that will provide many benefits for healthcare delivery from the healthcare provider to the patient's home. However, there is a plethora of security requirements in eHealth tele-monitoring systems. Data integrity of the transferred medical data is one of the most important security requirements that should be satisfied in these systems, since medical information is extremely sensitive information, and even sometimes life threatening information. In this paper, we present a data integrity mechanism for eHealth tele-monitoring system that operates in a smart home environment. Agent technology is applied to achieve data integrity with the use of cryptographic smart cards. Furthermore, the overall security infrastructure and its various components are described. PMID:19964802

Mantas, Georgios; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios; Komninos, Nikos

2009-01-01

249

Constraining Changes in the Global CH4 Budget Based on Global Ethane Changes: Insights From 30 Years of Global Trace Gas Monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

UC-Irvine has directly monitored global CH4 mixing ratios for 30 years, since 1978, and it is the longest- running of the continuous global monitoring networks. Every three months 80 ground-level whole air samples are collected in the remote Pacific Basin (71 °N-46 °S) and analyzed by gas chromatography for many dozens of trace gases including hydrocarbons, halocarbons, organic nitrates and sulfur species. For example our network is unique in that, in addition to CH4, ethane has been retrieved from each air sample since 1984. Tetrachloroethene (C2Cl4) has been retrieved since 1988. Methane, ethane, and C2Cl4 are all OH-controlled species, but only CH4 and ethane share common anthropogenic sources (fossil fuel and biomass burning). Therefore CH4, ethane and C2Cl4 are a powerful combination to help us determine which source and sink variations are consistent with the observed CH4 trends. In the long-term, methane's annual growth rate has slowed from 15.2 to 18.9 ppbv yr-1 in the early-to- mid 1980s, to -3.8 to 6.6 ppbv yr-1 since 2000. For the first time, our network has simultaneously shown a long-term decline in the global ethane mixing ratio, by 150 pptv (20%) in the past two decades. In the short-term, CH4 has shown positive growth rate anomalies every 3½--4½ years since 1991, the fifth and most recent of which peaked at 6.6 ± 0.9 ppbv yr-1 in 2007. Interestingly, each short-term CH4 growth rate peak has been matched by a peak in ethane's mixing ratio. Coincident CH4 and ethane fluctuations that are not matched by C2Cl4---for example the 1998, 2002-2003, and 2007 CH4 and ethane fluctuations---point to anomalous biomass burning emissions at those times as an influencing source. Methane and ethane are emitted from biomass burning in quantitative ratios relative to each other and to CO, and our results suggest that roughly one-third of the 1998 and 2007 CH4 growth rate anomalies were attributed to biomass burning, with the remainder from anomalous wetlands emissions. By comparison, we found that, to within the uncertainties, almost all of the 2002-2003 CH4 growth rate anomaly was explained by biomass burning. We also show an apparent link between strong El Niño events and strong biomass burning emissions in the northern hemisphere during the following growing season.

Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, N. J.; Andersen, M. S.; Rowland, S.

2008-12-01

250

The impact of global environment on galaxy mass functions at low redshift  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the galaxy stellar mass function in different environments in the local Universe, considering both the total mass function and that of individual galaxy morphological types. We compare the mass functions of galaxies with log10M*/M? ? 10.25 in the general field and in galaxy groups, binary and single galaxy systems from the Padova-Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue at z = 0.04-0.1 with the mass function of galaxy clusters of the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-Cluster Survey at z = 0.04-0.07. Strikingly, the variations of the mass function with global environment, overall, are small and subtle. The shapes of the mass functions of the general field and clusters are indistinguishable, and only small, statistically insignificant variations are allowed in groups. Only the mass function of our single galaxies, representing the least massive haloes and comprising less than a third of the general field population, is proportionally richer in low-mass galaxies than other environments. The most notable environmental effect is a progressive change in the upper galaxy mass, with very massive galaxies found only in the most massive environments. This environment-dependent mass cut-off is unable to affect the Schechter parameters and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and can only be revealed by an ad hoc analysis. Finally, we show how, in each given environment, the mass function changes with morphological type, and that galaxies of the same morphological type can have different mass functions in different environments.

Calvi, Rosa; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Vulcani, Benedetta; Fasano, Giovanni

2013-07-01

251

Global ozone monitoring by occultation of stars: an overview of GOMOS measurements on ENVISAT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GOMOS on ENVISAT (launched in February, 2002) is the first space instrument dedicated to the study of the atmosphere of the Earth by the technique of stellar occultations (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars). From a polar orbit, it allows to have a good latitude coverage. Because it is self-calibrated, it is particularly well adapted to the long time trend monitoring of stratospheric species. With 4 spectrometers the wavelength coverage of 248 nm to 942 nm allows to monitor ozone, H2O, NO2, NO3, air, aerosols, and O2. Two additional fast photometers (1 kHz sampling rate) allow for the correction of scintillations, as well as the study of the structure of air density irregularities, resulting from gravity waves and turbulence. A high vertical resolution profile of the temperature may also be obtained from the time delay between the red and the blue photometer. Noctilucent clouds (Polar Mesospheric Clouds, PMC), are routinely observed in both polar summers, and global observations of OCLO and sodium are achieved. The instrument configuration, dictated by the scientific objectives rationale and technical constraints, are described, together with the typical operations along one orbit, and statistics over 5 years of operation. Typical atmospheric transmission spectra are presented, and some retrieval difficulties are discussed, in particular for O2 and H2O. An overview of a number of scientific results is presented, already published or found in more details as companion papers in the same ACP GOMOS special issue. This paper is particularly intended to provide the incentive for GOMOS data exploitation, available to the whole scientific community in the ESA data archive, and to help the GOMOS data users to better understand the instrument, its capabilities and the quality of its measurements, for an optimized scientific return.

Bertaux, J. L.; Kyrölä, E.; Fussen, D.; Hauchecorne, A.; Dalaudier, F.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.; Vanhellemont, F.; Fanton D'Andon, O.; Barrot, G.; Mangin, A.; Blanot, L.; Lebrun, J. C.; Pérot, K.; Fehr, T.; Saavedra, L.; Fraisse, R.

2010-04-01

252

Global ozone monitoring by occultation of stars: an overview of GOMOS measurements on ENVISAT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GOMOS on ENVISAT (launched in February, 2002) is the first space instrument dedicated to the study of the atmosphere of the Earth by the technique of stellar occultations (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars). Its polar orbit makes good latitude coverage possible. Because it is self-calibrating, it is particularly well adapted to long time trend monitoring of stratospheric species. With 4 spectrometers, the wavelength coverage of 248 nm to 942 nm enables monitoring ozone, H2O, NO2, NO3, air density, aerosol extinction, and O2. Two additional fast photometers (with 1 kHz sampling rate) enable the correction of the effects of scintillations, as well as the study of the structure of air density irregularities resulting from gravity waves and turbulence. A high vertical resolution profile of the temperature may also be obtained from the time delay between the red and the blue photometer. Noctilucent clouds (Polar Mesospheric Clouds, PMC) are routinely observed in both polar summers and global observations of OClO and sodium are achieved. The instrument configuration, dictated by the scientific objectives' rationale and technical constraints, is described, together with the typical operations along one orbit, along with the statistics from over 6 years of operation. Typical atmospheric transmission spectra are presented and some retrieval difficulties are discussed, in particular for O2 and H2O. An overview is presented of a number of scientific results already published or found in more detail as companion papers in the same ACP GOMOS special issue. This paper is particularly intended to provide an incentive for the exploitation of GOMOS data available to the whole scientific community in the ESA data archive, and to help GOMOS data users to better understand the instrument, its capabilities and the quality of its measurements, thus leading to an increase in the scientific return.

Bertaux, J. L.; Kyrölä, E.; Fussen, D.; Hauchecorne, A.; Dalaudier, F.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.; Vanhellemont, F.; Fanton D'Andon, O.; Barrot, G.; Mangin, A.; Blanot, L.; Lebrun, J. C.; Pérot, K.; Fehr, T.; Saavedra, L.; Leppelmeier, G. W.; Fraisse, R.

2010-12-01

253

Cycling of DDT in the global environment 1950-2002: World ocean returns the pollutant  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The global distribution and fate of the insecticide DDT was modeled for the first time using a spatially resolved global multicompartment chemistry-transport model comprising a 3D coupled atmosphere and ocean GCM, coupled to 2D vegetation surfaces and top soils. DDT enters the model environment as a pesticide in agriculture only. Final sinks of DDT in the total environment are degradation in air (hydroxyl radical reaction), on vegetation surfaces, in ocean sediments and soils. The process resolution of the ocean compartment, i.e., either a fixed or variable size and sinking velocity of suspended particles, has almost no effect on the large-scale cycling and fate of DDT. The residence times in various ocean basins were declining but varied regionally. The global ocean absorbed until 1977 and since then has been losing DDT, while large sea areas are still accumulating the pollutant. The main sink is volatilization to the atmosphere. In 1990, the year when emissions ceased, 292 kt of DDT were deposited to the global ocean, 301 kt were volatilized, and 41 kt were exported from the surface layer to the deeper levels. The sea region that has been representing the most significant (secondary) DDT source is the western N Atlantic (Gulf stream and N Atlantic Drift regions). It has been a source since approximately 1970. Also large parts of the tropical ocean and the southern mid-latitude ocean have turned net volatilizational (i.e., volatilization flux > deposition flux) during the 1980s. Despite the emissions migrating southward as a consequence of substance ban in mid latitudes, the geographic distribution of the contaminant (and, hence, environmental exposure) has been migrating steadily northward since the 1960s.

Stemmler, Irene; Lammel, Gerhard

2009-12-01

254

Global Characterization and Monitoring of Forest Cover Using Landsat Data: Opportunities and Challenges  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The compilation of global Landsat data-sets and the ever-lowering costs of computing now make it feasible to monitor the Earth's land cover at Landsat resolutions of 30 m. In this article, we describe the methods to create global products of forest cover and cover change at Landsat resolutions. Nevertheless, there are many challenges in ensuring the creation of high-quality products. And we propose various ways in which the challenges can be overcome. Among the challenges are the need for atmospheric correction, incorrect calibration coefficients in some of the data-sets, the different phenologies between compilations, the need for terrain correction, the lack of consistent reference data for training and accuracy assessment, and the need for highly automated characterization and change detection. We propose and evaluate the creation and use of surface reflectance products, improved selection of scenes to reduce phenological differences, terrain illumination correction, automated training selection, and the use of information extraction procedures robust to errors in training data along with several other issues. At several stages we use Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer data and products to assist our analysis. A global working prototype product of forest cover and forest cover change is included.

Townshend, John R.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Huang, ChengQuan; Vermote, Eric F.; Gao, Feng; Channan, Saurabh; Sexton, Joseph O.; Feng, Min; Narasimhan, Ramghuram; Kim, Dohyung; Song, Kuan; Song, Danxia; Song, Xiao-Peng; Noojipady, Praveen; Tan, Bin; Hansen, Matthew C.; Li, Mengxue; Wolfe, Robert E.

2012-01-01

255

Photonic-crystal fiber-based pressure sensor for dual environment monitoring.  

PubMed

In this paper the development of a side-hole photonic-crystal fiber (SH-PCF) pressure sensor for dual environment monitoring is reported. SH-PCF properties (phase and group birefringence, sensitivity to pressure variations) are measured and compared to simulated data. In order to probe two environments, two sections of the SH-PCF with different lengths are spliced and set in a Solc filter-like configuration. This setup allows obtaining the individual responses of the first and second fiber independently, which is useful for a space-multiplexed measurement. As the employed fiber is sensitive to pressure variations, we report the use of this configuration for dual environment pressure sensing. PMID:24921131

Osório, Jonas H; Hayashi, Juliano G; Espinel, Yovanny A V; Franco, Marcos A R; Andrés, Miguel V; Cordeiro, Cristiano M B

2014-06-10

256

Automatic Event Detection in Noisy Environment for Material Process Monitoring by Laser AE Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser acoustic emission (AE) method is a unique in-situ and non-contact nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method. It has a capability to detect signals generated from crack generation and propagation, friction and other physical phenomena in materials even in high temperature environment. However, laser AE system has lower signal-to-noise ratio compared to the conventional AE system using PZT sensors, so it is difficult to apply this method in noisy environment. A novel AE measurement system to detect events in such difficult environments was developed. This system could continuously record all AE waveforms and enable unrestricted post-analyses. Noise reduction filters in frequency domain coupling with a new AE event extraction using multiple threshold values showed a good potential for AE signal processing. This system was successfully applied for crack monitoring of plasma spray deposition process of ceramic coating.

Ito, K.; Kuriki, H.; Araki, H.; Kuroda, S.; Enoki, M.

2014-06-01

257

From molecules to management: adopting DNA-based methods for monitoring biological invasions in aquatic environments.  

PubMed

Recent technological advances have driven rapid development of DNA-based methods designed to facilitate detection and monitoring of invasive species in aquatic environments. These tools promise to improve on traditional monitoring approaches by enhancing detection sensitivity, reducing analytical turnaround times and monitoring costs, and increasing specificity of target identifications. However, despite the promise of DNA-based monitoring methods, the adoption of these tools in decision-making frameworks remains challenging. Here, rather than explore technical aspects of method development, we examine impediments to effective translation of those methods into management contexts. In addition to surveying current use of DNA-based tools for aquatic invasive species monitoring, we explore potential sources of uncertainty associated with molecular technologies and possibilities for limiting that uncertainty and effectively communicating its implications for decision-making. We pay particular attention to the recent adoption of DNA-based methods for detection of invasive Asian carp species in the United States Great Lakes region, as this example illustrates many of the challenges associated with applying molecular tools to achieve desired management outcomes. Our goal is to provide a useful assessment of the obstacles associated with integrating DNA-based methods into aquatic invasive species management, and to offer recommendations for future efforts aimed at overcoming those obstacles. PMID:21353670

Darling, John A; Mahon, Andrew R

2011-10-01

258

Observations of urban and suburban environments with global satellite scatterometer data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A global and consistent characterization of land use and land change in urban and suburban environments is crucial for many fundamental social and natural science studies and applications. Presented here is a dense sampling method (DSM) that uses satellite scatterometer data to delineate urban and intraurban areas at a posting scale of about 1 km. DSM results are analyzed together with information on population and housing censuses, with Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) imagery, and with Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) night-light data. The analyses include Dallas-Fort Worth and Phoenix in the United States, Bogotá in Colombia, Dhaka in Bangladesh, Guangzhou in China, and Quito in Ecuador. Results show that scatterometer signatures correspond to buildings and infrastructures in urban and suburban environments. City extents detected by scatterometer data are significantly smaller than city light extents, but not all urban areas are detectable by the current SeaWinds scatterometer on the QuikSCAT satellite. Core commercial and industrial areas with high buildings and large factories are identified as high-backscatter centers. Data from DSM backscatter and DMSP nighttime lights have a good correlation with population density. However, the correlation relations from the two satellite datasets are different for different cities indicating that they contain complementary information. Together with night-light and census data, DSM and satellite scatterometer data provide new observations to study global urban and suburban environments and their changes. Furthermore, the capability of DSM to identify hydrological channels on the Greenland ice sheet and ecological biomes in central Africa demonstrates that DSM can be used to observe persistent structures in natural environments at a km scale, providing contemporaneous data to study human impacts beyond urban and suburban areas.

Nghiem, S. V.; Balk, D.; Rodriguez, E.; Neumann, G.; Sorichetta, A.; Small, C.; Elvidge, C. D.

259

A New GLORIA Target Region in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA; Alpine Plant Monitoring For Global Climate Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments (GLORIA) is an international research project with the goal to assess climate change impacts on vegetation in alpine environments worldwide. Standardized protocols direct selection of each node in the network, called a target region, which consists of a set of four geographically proximal mountain summits at elevations extending from treeline to the

A. Dennis; C. I. Millar; K. E. Murrell

2004-01-01

260

Can the ASAR Global Monitoring Mode Product Adequately Capture Spatial Soil Moisture Variability?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global soil moisture (SM) monitoring in the past several decades has been undertaken mainly at coarse spatial resolution, which is not adequate for addressing small-scale phenomena and processes. The currently operational Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (NASA) and future planned missions such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (ESA) and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (NASA) will remain resolution limited. Finer scale soil moisture estimates can be achieved either by down-scaling the available coarse resolution radiometer and scatterometer (i.e. ERS1/2, ASCAT) observations or by using high resolution active microwave SAR type systems (typical resolution is in the order of meters). Considering the complex land surface - backscatter signal interaction, soil moisture inversion utilizing active microwave observations is difficult and generally needs supplementary data. Algorithms based on temporal change detection offer an alternative less complex approach for deriving (and disaggregating coarse) soil moisture estimates. Frequent monitoring and low frequency range along with a high pixel resolution are essential preconditions when characterizing spatial and temporal soil moisture variability. An alternative active system that meets these requirements is the Advance Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) on ENVISAT [C-band, global, 1 km in Global Monitoring (GM) Mode]. The Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) has developed a 1 km soil moisture product using the temporal change detection approach and the ASAR GM. The TU Wien SM product sensitivity was evaluated at two scales: point (using in situ data from permanent soil moisture stations) and regional [using ground measured data and aircraft estimates derived from the Polarimetric L-band Microwave Radiometer (PLMR)] over the National Airborne Field Experiment (NAFE'05) area located in the Goulburn catchment, SE Australia. The month long (November 2005) campaign was undertaken in a region predominantly covered by grasslands and partly by forests and croplands. Point scale analysis revealed high ASAR sensitivity and adequate response to changes in moisture conditions (R = 0.69 and RMSE = 0.08 v/v). Regional analysis was performed at several different spatial resolutions (1 km to 25 km). ASAR exhibited high noise level and significant wet bias. Increase in pixel size resulted in improving R and RMSE from R = 0.59 and RMSE = 0.14 to R = 0.91 and RMSE = 0.05 at 1 km and 25 km respectively; however, despite the reasonable statistical agreement at 1 km, the soil moisture spatial patterns clearly visible in the PLMR images, the later were verified with ground data, were lacking in the ASAR product.

Mladenova, I.; Lakshmi, V.; Walker, J.; Panciera, R.; Wagner, W.; Doubkova, M.

2008-12-01

261

Neurocognitive monitors: toward the prevention of cognitive performance decrements and catastrophic failures in the operational environment.  

PubMed

Network-centric doctrine and the proposed C41SR (command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) distributions to the individual warfighter require that the cognitive performance, judgment, and decision making of warfighters must be sustained and effectively managed in the forward operating environment, where various physiological and psychological stressors abound, in order to reduce human errors and catastrophic failures. The U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) established the Cognitive Performance, Judgment, and Decision-Making Research Program (CPJDRP) in 2004 to direct research to this issue. A Neurophysiological Measures and Cognition Focus Team (NMFCT) was formed to work with augmented cognition investigators and to specifically address the development of neurophysiological measures as potential monitors of alertness-cognitive state in warfighters. The USAM-RMC approach complemented the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Augmented Cognition approach, which focused on the detection of workload-related impaired cognitive state, and subsequent modification of information flow through automation. In this preface, the premise for neurophysiological measures as neurocognitive monitors is explained using an example of a neurophysiological index: the oculomotor measure, saccadic velocity. The progress of the NMFCT on the development of a neurocognitive monitor is described, as well as the recommendations of a 2005 USAMRMC/Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC)-sponsored workshop. Awareness of neurocognitive monitoring is discussed, as are future endeavors related to operational testing and fieldability. Four papers are summarized in this Neurophysiological Monitoring and Augmented Cognition section involving technologies to enhance cognitive performance in the operational environment: one on dynamic cortical electroencephalography, two on oculometrics, and one on a spatial orientation enhancement system. PMID:17547315

Thomas, Maria L; Russo, Michael B

2007-05-01

262

Using the international monitoring system of seismic, infrasound, and hydroacoustic sensors for global airburst detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impact of meter-sized objects with the Earth occurs every few weeks [1,2]. Most of these collisions result in airbursts, here defined as impacts where the meteoroid's initial kinetic energy is of order a small nuclear weapon (> 0.1 kilotons of TNT equivalent = 4.185×10^{11} J) and where this energy is fully deposited at high altitude in the atmosphere. Historically, the majority of these airbursts go undetected over oceans or remote land areas as dedicated fireball camera networks (eg.[ 3]) cover less than 1 % of the globe. Airbursts often produce meteorite falls and hence airburst data may yield pre-atmospheric orbits and physical properties for the impacting NEO providing context for recovered meteorite samples [4]. With the advent of more capable telescopic survey systems, pre-atmospheric detection of NEO-producing airbursts has become possible as evidenced by the impacts of 2014 AA and 2008 TC_3 [5]. Detection of ''terminal plungers'' is expected to become more common as projects such as ATLAS [6] become operational. This increases the need for instrumental data of the corresponding airburst, particularly its location and energy. Beginning in the late 1990s, a global network of seismic, infrasound, and hydroacoustic sensors has been deployed globally to provide treaty verification for a nuclear test ban. This network is the International Monitoring System (IMS) overseen by Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) [7]. The IMS is a unique global resource for detection of explosions worldwide and in recent years shock waves from many airbursts [8] have been detected by the system. Data from the IMS permits airburst location, origin time and energy to be measured. In rare cases, source heights, trajectories, and details of fragmentation may be obtained. Here the current capabilities of the IMS will be presented in the context of airburst detection and characterization. Empirical characteristics of the long-range sound produced by airbursts through comparison with other technologies will be summarized [9] and some recent examples of IMS detected airbursts presented. Finally, the inferred flux of impactors based on global airburst monitoring will also be described.

Brown, P.

2014-07-01

263

Sub-daily periodicities in the results of local monitoring using global navigation satellite systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nowadays the more attention is focused on the continuous monitoring by using of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) in the study and control of stability of engineering structures and natural objects. The diurnal and semi-diurnal oscillations take place in high frequency GNSS observation. These waves are caused by the presence of the high frequency periodicities in changes of all geospheres, but also in systematic errors of GNSS techniques. Thus the diurnal variations are already found in the coordinates of global and regional networks of CORS stations. They are often related with the influence of Earth's diurnal tides. The purpose of this study is to examine the periodic variations in coordinate increments of local monitoring networks of engineering structures and the earth's surface. But in this case the tidal changes have a small influence because of the relative proximity of the network control points. Results of static GNSS observations in the local network with the control vectors baselines from 170 m to 4.3 km of length were used for the analysis of periodicities. The hourly time series of baseline components of the length of two months were analyzed. Three qualitatively different methods were applied: wavelet transformation (Morlet wavelet function), fast Fourier transformation (FFT), and sequential analysis of the dominant harmonics (dominant analysis) for the more sure detection of hidden periodicities. The results of determination of oscillation spectrum were obtained by the three methods mentioned above. For all baselines their good mutual agreement were obtained. Diurnal and semi-diurnal waves are mainly and the most vividly appeared in the horizontal components, in the height’s component there are also other periodicity of the high and low frequencies. The oscillation’s amplitude reaches 4 mm. It is necessary to clarify the nature of the observed oscillations, which will be the main subject of the following more detailed studies. It is important, since the cause of the detected periodic oscillations can be the real changes, such as temperature deformation of engineering structures as well as the changes connected with the influence of systematic errors of GNSS measurements for example. The obtained results lead to the following conclusions. - In the results of GNSS geodynamic monitoring of engineering structures and objects on the earth surface the stable oscillatory components with periods of 1 and 0.5 days, and amplitudes up to 4 mm are found. - Further analysis of the reasons of identified oscillations that may be caused by the real change of monitored objects and as well as systematic errors of measurement GNSS is required.

Kaftan, Vladimir; Ustinov, Alexander

264

EDITORIAL: Siberia Integrated Regional Study: multidisciplinary investigations of the dynamic relationship between the Siberian environment and global climate change  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is an editorial overview of the Siberia Integrated Regional Study (SIRS), which is a large-scale investigation of ongoing and future environmental change in Siberia and its relationship to global processes, approaches, existing challenges and future direction. Introduction The SIRS is a mega-project within the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI), which coordinates interdisciplinary, national and international activities in Northern Eurasia that follow the Earth System Science Program (ESSP) approach. Under the direction of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP), SIRS is one of the Integrated Regional Studies (IRS) that aims to investigate environmental change in Siberia under the current environment of global change, and the potential impact on Earth system dynamics [1]. The regions of interest are those that may function as 'choke or switch points' for the global Earth system, where changes in regional biophysical, biogeochemical and anthropogenic components may have significant consequences for the Earth system at the global scale. Siberia is a large and significant region that may compel change [2]. Regional consequences of global warming (e.g. anomalous increases in cold season temperatures) have already been documented for Siberia [3]. This result is also supported by climate modeling results for the 20th-22nd centuries [4]. Future climatic change threatens Siberia with the shift of permafrost boundaries northward, dramatic changes in land cover (redistribution among boreal forest, wetlands, tundra, and steppe zones often precipitated by fire regime change) and the entire hydrological regime of the territory [5-8]. These processes feed back to and influence climate dynamics through the exchange of energy, water, greenhouse gases and aerosols [9]. Even though there have been a handful of national and international projects focused on the Siberian environment, scientists have minimal knowledge about the processes that control change in this understudied region, particularly those concerning the primary components that influence regional climate (i.e. cloud cover, precipitation) and responses and feedbacks to and from terrestrial and aquatic systems. This provides a strong impetus for the SIRS project. SIRS was initiated at a boreal forest conference in Krasnoyarsk in 2002 under the auspices of the IGBP and ESSP regional strategy by Will Steffen (IGBP) and the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (SB RAS). Russian and foreign scientific activities continued under the Siberian Center for Environmental Research and Training (SCERT) in 2003. In 2005, the Siberian Branch of the Russian National Committee (SB RNC) for IGBP endorsed these activities and recommended investigations focus on four major themes: quantification of the terrestrial biota full greenhouse gas budget, with a focus on the exchange between biota and atmosphere; monitoring and modeling of regional climate change impacts; development of SIRS informational-computational infrastructure; and development of a regional strategy of adaptation to and mitigation of the negative consequences of global change. SIRS development [10, 11] supports Siberian Earth science investigations funded by the RAS Foundation for Basic Research, the European Commission (EC), the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). SB RNC is responsible for SIRS advances, and SCERT hosts the Committee office and houses major SIRS informational-computational infrastructure development. NEESPI (www.neespi.org/) serves as an IGBP and World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) external project, and as a NEESPI mega-project, SIRS has organized distribution centers in Krasnoyarsk and Tomsk to support NEESPI activity, and has coordinated training and educational activity aimed at young scientists. SIRS approaches and outcomes Organizational activity The 'Siberian Geosphere-Biosphere Program: integrated regional study of contemporary natural and climatic changes' is one of se

Gordov, E. P.; Vaganov, E. A.

2010-03-01

265

A review of the global emissions, transport and effects of heavy metals in the environment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the sources and quantities of heavy metal emissions, their transport and fate, their potential health and environmental effects, and strategies to control them. The approach is to review the literature on this topic and to consult with experts in the field. Ongoing research activities and research needs are discussed. Estimates of global anthropogenic and natural emissions indicate that anthropogenic emissions are responsible for most of the heavy metals released into the atmosphere and that industrial activities have had a significant impact on the global cycling of trace metals. The largest anthropogenic sources of trace metals are coal combustion and the nonferrous metal industry. Atmospheric deposition is an important pathway by which trace metals enter the environment. Atmospheric deposition varies according to the solubility of the element and the length of time it resides in the atmosphere. Evidence suggests that deposition is influenced by other chemicals in the atmosphere, such as ozone and sulfur dioxide. Trace metals also enter the environment through leaching. Existing emissions-control technologies such as electrostatic precipitators, baghouses, and scrubbers are designed to remove other particulates from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants and are only partially effective at removing heavy metals. Emerging technologies such as flue gas desulfurization, lignite coke, and fluidized bed combustion could further reduce emissions. 108 refs.

Friedman, J.R.; Ashton, W.B.; Rapoport, R.D.

1993-06-01

266

A global standard for monitoring coastal wetland vulnerability to accelerated sea-level rise  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sea-level rise threatens coastal salt-marshes and mangrove forests around the world, and a key determinant of coastal wetland vulnerability is whether its surface elevation can keep pace with rising sea level. Globally, a large data gap exists because wetland surface and shallow subsurface processes remain unaccounted for by traditional vulnerability assessments using tide gauges. Moreover, those processes vary substantially across wetlands, so modelling platforms require relevant local data. The low-cost, simple, high-precision rod surface-elevation table–marker horizon (RSET-MH) method fills this critical data gap, can be paired with spatial data sets and modelling and is financially and technically accessible to every country with coastal wetlands. Yet, RSET deployment has been limited to a few regions and purposes. A coordinated expansion of monitoring efforts, including development of regional networks that could support data sharing and collaboration, is crucial to adequately inform coastal climate change adaptation policy at several scales.

Webb, Edward L.; Friess, Daniel A.; Krauss, Ken W.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Phelps, Jacob

2013-01-01

267

Use of global navigation satellite systems for monitoring deformations of water-development works  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using global radio-navigation satellite systems (GNSS) to improve functional safety of high-liability water-development works - dams at hydroelectric power plants, and, consequently, the safety of the population in the surrounding areas is examined on the basis of analysis of modern publications. Characteristics for determination of displacements and deformations with use of GNSS, and also in a complex with other types of measurements, are compared. It is demonstrated that combined monitoring of deformations of the ground surface of the region, and engineering and technical structures is required to ensure the functional safety of HPP, and reliable metrologic assurance of measurements is also required to obtain actual characteristics of the accuracy and effectiveness of GNSS observations.

Kaftan, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Geophysical Center (Russian Federation); Ustinov, A. V. [JSC Institut Gidropreoekt (Russian Federation)

2013-05-15

268

Global monitoring of air pollution over land from the Earth Observing System-Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements (7 channels: 0.47-2.1 mum, 250-500 m resolutions) provide us with new insights into the characteristics of global aerosols. MODIS retrieves not only aerosol loading but also the fraction of fine mode particle. In this paper we demonstrate MODIS capability for use in monitoring global, regional, and local air pollution. Three case studies in northern

D. A. Chu; Y. J. Kaufman; G. Zibordi; J. D. Chern; Jietai Mao; Chengcai Li; B. N. Holben

2003-01-01

269

Inferential monitoring of global change impact on biodiversity through remote sensing and species distribution modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The world is suffering from rapid changes in both climate and land cover which are the main factors affecting global biodiversity. These changes may affect ecosystems by altering species distributions, population sizes, and community compositions, which emphasizes the need for a rapid assessment of biodiversity status for conservation and management purposes. Current approaches on monitoring biodiversity rely mainly on long term observations of predetermined sites, which require large amounts of time, money and personnel to be executed. In order to overcome problems associated with current field monitoring methods, the main objective of this dissertation is the development of framework for inferential monitoring of the impact of global change on biodiversity based on remotely sensed data coupled with species distribution modeling techniques. Several research pieces were performed independently in order to fulfill this goal. First, species distribution modeling was used to identify the ranges of 6362 birds, mammals and amphibians in South America. Chapter 1 compares the power of different presence-only species distribution methods for modeling distributions of species with different response curves to environmental gradients and sample sizes. It was found that there is large variability in the power of the methods for modeling habitat suitability and species ranges, showing the importance of performing, when possible, a preliminary gradient analysis of the species distribution before selecting the method to be used. Chapter 2 presents a new methodology for the redefinition of species range polygons. Using a method capable of establishing the uncertainty in the definition of existing range polygons, the automated procedure identifies the relative importance of bioclimatic variables for the species, predicts their ranges and generates a quality assessment report to explore prediction errors. Analysis using independent validation data shows the power of this methodology to redefine species ranges in a more biophysically reasonable way. If a specific variable is important for a species, a change in that variable is likely to impact the species. Chapter 3 presents a methodology to identify the impact of environmental changes on 6362 species of mammals, amphibians and birds of South America, based on per-species measures of sensitivity, marginality, range restriction and trends in remotely sensed bioclimatic variables. Maps of the impact of environmental changes on vertebrates of South America were generated, with the Andes, Patagonia and the Atlantic Forest experiencing the strongest impact of environmental change in this over the past quarter century. Contributions of this dissertation include the development of new range polygons for all mammals, amphibians and birds of South America, as well as a methodology to re-draw the polygons in any other region of the world. This dataset is essential for both biodiversity analysis and conservation prioritization. Other contributions are the generation of maps of impact of global change on biodiversity, together with a framework for the development and updating of those maps. Conservation and monitoring agencies will find this research useful not only for the selection of new conservation areas but also for prioritizing areas for field monitoring.

Sangermano, Florencia

2009-12-01

270

Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Monitoring and Control of Harsh Combustion Environments  

SciTech Connect

This work represents the collaborative effort between American Air Liquide and Physical Sciences, Inc. for developing a sensor based on near-IR tunable diode lasers (TDL). The multi-species capability of the sensor for simultaneous monitoring of CO, O2, and H2O concentration as well as gas temperature is ideal for in-situ monitoring on industrial furnaces. The chemical species targeted are fundamental for controlling the combustion space for improved energy efficiency, reduced pollutants, and improved product quality, when coupling the measurement to a combustion control system. Several add-on modules developed provide flexibility in the system configuration for handling different process monitoring applications. For example, the on-Demand Power Control system for the 1.5 ?m laser is used for high particle density exhaust streams where laser transmission is problematic. For long-distance signal collection a fiber optic communication system is used to reduce noise pick-up. Finally, hardened modules to withstand high ambient temperatures, immune to EMF interference, protection from flying debris, and interfaced with pathlength control laser beam shielding probes were developed specifically for EAF process monitoring. Demonstration of these different system configurations was conducted on Charter Steel's reheat furnace, Imco Recycling, Inc. (now Aleris International, Inc.) aluminum reverberatory furnace, and Gerdau Ameristeel's EAF. Measurements on the reheat furnace demonstrated zone monitoring with the measurement performed close to the steel billet. Results from the aluminum furnace showed the benefit of measuring in-situ near the bath. In this case, low-level furnace optimization was performed and demonstrated 5% fuel savings. Monitoring tests on the EAF off-gas demonstrated the level of industrialization of the sensor to survive the harsh EAF environment. Long-term testing on the EAF has been on-going for over 6 months with essentially zero maintenance. Validation of the TDL measurement on the EAF was confirmed by comparison with extractive sampling CO measurements.

VonDrasek, William; Melsio-Pubill, Anna

2006-05-30

271

Global warming in the palliative care research environment: adapting to change.  

PubMed

Advocates of palliative care research have often described the cold and difficult environment that has constrained the development of research internationally. The development of palliative care research has been slow over the last few decades and has met with resistance and sometimes hostility to the idea of conducting research in 'vulnerable populations'. The seeds of advocacy for research can be found in palliative care literature from the 1980s and early 1990s. Although we have much to do, we need to recognize that palliative care research development has come a long way. Of particular note is the development of well-funded collaboratives that now exist in Europe, Canada, Australia and the USA. The European Association for Palliative Care and the International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care has recognized the need to develop and promote global research initiatives, with a special focus on developing countries. Time is needed to develop good research evidence and in a more complex healthcare environment takes increasingly more resources to be productive. The increased support (global warming) evident in the increased funding opportunities available to palliative care researchers in a number of countries brings both benefits and challenges. There is evidence that the advocacy of individuals such as Kathleen Foley, Neil MacDonald, Balfour Mount, Vittorio Ventafridda, Robert Twycross and Geoff Hanks is now providing fertile ground and a much friendlier environment for a new generation of interdisciplinary palliative care research. We have achieved many of the goals necessary to avoid failure of the 'palliative care experiment', and need to accept the challenge of our present climate and adapt and take advantage of the change. PMID:18541636

Fainsinger, R L

2008-06-01

272

What is a habitable environment? -answers from observations of a global transect  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extremophiles are specialists which colonise special niches in these extreme environments due to there adaptation capacities attained during the evolution of life. Some examples of ex-tremophiles and their potential to deal with harsh conditions as well as the characterisation of their niches will be presented. Based on observations and results obtained in the 10th German Antarctic North Victoria Land Expedition (GANOVEX X) in the area of the Transantarctic Mountains led by the German Geosciences and Resource Research Society (BGR) and during an environment characterisation campaign of the European Alps and the Spanish Mountains "Sierra de Gredos" supported by the German Ministry of Economy and Technology (BMWi) a global transect from temperate Alpine regions to Mediterranean mountains and Polar Mountain regions can be analysed. Due to a summary of these results we are able to compare different strategies of colonisation in different habitats of the global mountain transect by cosmopolitan and endemic species as there are, the colonisation of rocks, fissures, cracks, polygon forming substrates, permafrost and glaciers. Data of UV B-, PAR-and IR-radiation measurements, humidity and temperature as well as the activity of microorganisms are accomplishing with more details the habitat characterisation and may give relevant information on probably niches for life on other planets as e.g. the planet Mars and may give answers on the question what is a habitable environment. These results will also form the basis of a series of new space experiments on satellites or on the International Space Station (ISS) and furthermore may lead to progress in probes-and rover-development for particular "hardly" accessible terrains.

de Vera, Jean-Pierre; de La Torre Noetzel, Rosa; Onofri, Silvano; Ott, Sieglinde

273

The sperm whale sonar: Monitoring and use in mitigation of anthropogenic noise effects in the marine environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Noise pollution in the marine environment is an emerging but serious concern. Its implications are less well understood than other global threats and largely undetectable to everyone but the specialist. In addition, the assessment of the acoustic impact of artificial sounds in the sea is not a trivial task, certainly because there is a lack of information on how the marine organisms process and analyse sounds and how relevant these sounds are for the balance and development of the populations. Further, this possible acoustic impact not only concerns the hearing systems but may also affect other sensory or systemic levels and result equally lethal for the animal concerned. If we add that the negative consequences of a short or long term exposure to artificial sounds may not be immediately observed one can understood how challenging it is to obtain objective data allowing an efficient control of the introduction of anthropogenic sound in the sea. To answer some of these questions, the choice to investigate cetaceans and their adaptation to an aquatic environment is not fortuitous. Cetaceans, because of their optimum use of sound as an ad-hoc source of energy and their almost exclusive dependence on acoustic information, represent not only the best bio-indicator of the effects of noise pollution in the marine environment, but also a source of data to improve and develop human underwater acoustic technology. Here, we present how the characteristics and performance of the sperm whale mid-range biosonar can be used to develop a mitigation solution based on passive acoustics and ambient noise imaging to prevent negative interactions with human activities by monitoring cetacean movements in areas of interest, e.g. deep-sea observatories.

André, Michel

2009-04-01

274

Global and time-resolved monitoring of crop photosynthesis with chlorophyll fluorescence  

PubMed Central

Photosynthesis is the process by which plants harvest sunlight to produce sugars from carbon dioxide and water. It is the primary source of energy for all life on Earth; hence it is important to understand how this process responds to climate change and human impact. However, model-based estimates of gross primary production (GPP, output from photosynthesis) are highly uncertain, in particular over heavily managed agricultural areas. Recent advances in spectroscopy enable the space-based monitoring of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) from terrestrial plants. Here we demonstrate that spaceborne SIF retrievals provide a direct measure of the GPP of cropland and grassland ecosystems. Such a strong link with crop photosynthesis is not evident for traditional remotely sensed vegetation indices, nor for more complex carbon cycle models. We use SIF observations to provide a global perspective on agricultural productivity. Our SIF-based crop GPP estimates are 50–75% higher than results from state-of-the-art carbon cycle models over, for example, the US Corn Belt and the Indo-Gangetic Plain, implying that current models severely underestimate the role of management. Our results indicate that SIF data can help us improve our global models for more accurate projections of agricultural productivity and climate impact on crop yields. Extension of our approach to other ecosystems, along with increased observational capabilities for SIF in the near future, holds the prospect of reducing uncertainties in the modeling of the current and future carbon cycle. PMID:24706867

Guanter, Luis; Zhang, Yongguang; Jung, Martin; Joiner, Joanna; Voigt, Maximilian; Berry, Joseph A.; Frankenberg, Christian; Huete, Alfredo R.; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo; Lee, Jung-Eun; Moran, M. Susan; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo; Beer, Christian; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Buchmann, Nina; Gianelle, Damiano; Klumpp, Katja; Cescatti, Alessandro; Baker, John M.; Griffis, Timothy J.

2014-01-01

275

Sensor Selection to Support Practical Use of Health-Monitoring Smart Environments  

PubMed Central

The data mining and pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. In order to monitor the functional health of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track activities that people normally perform as part of their daily routines. One question that frequently arises, however, is how many smart home sensors are needed and where should they be placed in order to accurately recognize activities? We employ data mining techniques to look at the problem of sensor selection for activity recognition in smart homes. We analyze the results based on six data sets collected in five distinct smart home environments. PMID:21760755

HOLDER, Lawrence B.

2011-01-01

276

Development of Biomarkers for Screening Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Global Data Mining and Multiple Reaction Monitoring  

PubMed Central

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and aggressive cancers and is associated with a poor survival rate. Clinically, the level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has been used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of HCC. The discovery of useful biomarkers for HCC, focused solely on the proteome, has been difficult; thus, wide-ranging global data mining of genomic and proteomic databases from previous reports would be valuable in screening biomarker candidates. Further, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), based on triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, has been effective with regard to high-throughput verification, complementing antibody-based verification pipelines. In this study, global data mining was performed using 5 types of HCC data to screen for candidate biomarker proteins: cDNA microarray, copy number variation, somatic mutation, epigenetic, and quantitative proteomics data. Next, we applied MRM to verify HCC candidate biomarkers in individual serum samples from 3 groups: a healthy control group, patients who have been diagnosed with HCC (Before HCC treatment group), and HCC patients who underwent locoregional therapy (After HCC treatment group). After determining the relative quantities of the candidate proteins by MRM, we compared their expression levels between the 3 groups, identifying 4 potential biomarkers: the actin-binding protein anillin (ANLN), filamin-B (FLNB), complementary C4-A (C4A), and AFP. The combination of 2 markers (ANLN, FLNB) improved the discrimination of the before HCC treatment group from the healthy control group compared with AFP. We conclude that the combination of global data mining and MRM verification enhances the screening and verification of potential HCC biomarkers. This efficacious integrative strategy is applicable to the development of markers for cancer and other diseases. PMID:23717429

Yu, Su Jong; Jang, Eun Sun; Yu, Jiyoung; Cho, Geunhee; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Youngsoo

2013-01-01

277

Development of biomarkers for screening hepatocellular carcinoma using global data mining and multiple reaction monitoring.  

PubMed

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and aggressive cancers and is associated with a poor survival rate. Clinically, the level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) has been used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of HCC. The discovery of useful biomarkers for HCC, focused solely on the proteome, has been difficult; thus, wide-ranging global data mining of genomic and proteomic databases from previous reports would be valuable in screening biomarker candidates. Further, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), based on triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, has been effective with regard to high-throughput verification, complementing antibody-based verification pipelines. In this study, global data mining was performed using 5 types of HCC data to screen for candidate biomarker proteins: cDNA microarray, copy number variation, somatic mutation, epigenetic, and quantitative proteomics data. Next, we applied MRM to verify HCC candidate biomarkers in individual serum samples from 3 groups: a healthy control group, patients who have been diagnosed with HCC (Before HCC treatment group), and HCC patients who underwent locoregional therapy (After HCC treatment group). After determining the relative quantities of the candidate proteins by MRM, we compared their expression levels between the 3 groups, identifying 4 potential biomarkers: the actin-binding protein anillin (ANLN), filamin-B (FLNB), complementary C4-A (C4A), and AFP. The combination of 2 markers (ANLN, FLNB) improved the discrimination of the before HCC treatment group from the healthy control group compared with AFP. We conclude that the combination of global data mining and MRM verification enhances the screening and verification of potential HCC biomarkers. This efficacious integrative strategy is applicable to the development of markers for cancer and other diseases. PMID:23717429

Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Kyunggon; Yu, Su Jong; Jang, Eun Sun; Yu, Jiyoung; Cho, Geunhee; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Youngsoo

2013-01-01

278

Intelligent Monitoring of the Elderly in Home Environment Bostjan Kaluza and Erik Dovgan and Mitja Lustrek and Matjaz Gams  

E-print Network

Intelligent Monitoring of the Elderly in Home Environment Bostjan Kaluza and Erik Dovgan and Mitja project Confidence, whose main objec- tive is to build a care system for the elderly. An im- portant a profile of the user based on gait, turning, activity and spatial-activity characteristics. It monitors

LuÂ?trek, Mitja

279

[Morphophysiological monitoring of winter wheat at spring in connection with problem of global climate change].  

PubMed

Data on morphophysiological monitoring of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar Mironovskaya 808 grown in Hoagland and Arnon solution in a greenhouse and transferred to natural conditions in March-April 2004 with the mean daily temperature of 0.6 +/- 0.7 degrees C within the exposure period of 42 days are presented. Water content, dry weight of plants and their organs, frost hardiness of plants, degree of tissue damage by frost, CO2 metabolism (photosynthesis and respiration), concentrations of sugars in tissues and proportions between different sugar forms, and activities of soluble and insoluble acid and alkaline phosphatases were monitored. Monitoring was carried out for three experimental variants simulating different microclimatic conditions in spring: after snow melting (experiment I), under ice crust (experiment II), and under snow cover (experiment III). Plants in experiments III and II demonstrated a higher water content in tissues, lower frost hardiness, higher rates of biomass loss, lower concentration of sugars and lower di- to monosaccharide ratio in tissues, and higher total invertase activity, particularly, cell wall-associated acid invertase activity. The dark respiration rates at 0 degrees C did not significantly differ between experimental variants. The photosynthetic capacity at this measurement temperature was maintained in all experimental variants being most pronounced in experiment II with the most intense photoinhibition under natural conditions. Comparison of experiments III and II with experiment I is used to discuss the negative effect of changes in certain microclimatic variables associated with global warming and leading to plant extortion and death from frost in spring. PMID:17022477

Klimov, S V; Burakhanova, E A; Dubinina, I M; Alieva, G P; Sal'nikova, E B; Trunova, T I

2006-01-01

280

Biomedical real-time monitoring in restricted and safety-critical environments  

PubMed Central

Biomedical signal monitoring can counteract the risk of human operator error due to inattention or fatigue in safetycritical and restrictive environments, such as in aviation, space, automobile and heavy industrial machinery operation. Real-time biomedical data acquisition is changing through advances in microelectronics fabrication, bio-MEMS and power micro-generators. Such data acquisition and processing systems are becoming increasingly miniaturised, flexible and pervasive, while data is being collected from inside the human body as well as around it. In this paper we review two related research projects exploiting this technological convergence, discuss its implications and suggest future innovation prospects through further similar cross-disciplinary synergies. PMID:19048087

Astaras, A; Bamidis, P D; Kourtidou-Papadeli, C; Maglaveras, N

2008-01-01

281

The zCOSMOS redshift survey: how group environment alters global downsizing trends  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context. Groups of galaxies are a common environment, bridging the gap between starforming field galaxies and quiescent cluster galaxies. Within groups secular processes could be at play, contributing to the observed strong decrease of star formation with cosmic time in the global galaxy population. Aims: We took advantage of the wealth of information provided by the first 10 000 galaxies of the zCOSMOS-bright survey and its group catalogue to study in detail the complex interplay between group environment and galaxy properties. Methods: The classical indicator Fblue, i.e., the fraction of blue galaxies, proved to be a simple but powerful diagnostic tool. We studied its variation for different luminosity and mass selected galaxy samples, divided as to define groups/field/isolated galaxy subsamples. Results: Using rest-frame evolving B-band volume-limited samples, the groups galaxy population exhibits significant blueing as redshift increases, but maintains a systematic difference (a lower Fblue) with respect to the global galaxy population, and an even larger difference with respect to the isolated galaxy population. However moving to mass selected samples it becomes apparent that such differences are largely due to the biased view imposed by the B-band luminosity selection, being driven by the population of lower mass, bright blue galaxies for which we miss the redder, equally low mass, counterparts. By carefully focusing the analysis on narrow mass bins such that mass segregation becomes negligible we find that only for the lowest mass bin explored, i.e., log ({\\cal M}*/{\\cal M}?) ? 10.6 , does a significant residual difference in color remain as a function of environment, while this difference becomes negligible toward higher masses. Conclusions: Our results indicate that red galaxies of mass log ({\\cal M}*/{\\cal M}?) ? 10.8 are already in place at z 1 and do not exhibit any strong environmental dependence, possibly originating from so-called nature or internal mechanisms. In contrast, for lower galaxy masses and redshifts lower than z 1, we observe the emergence in groups of a population of nurture red galaxies: slightly deviating from the trend of the downsizing scenario followed by the global galaxy population, and more so with cosmic time. These galaxies exhibit signatures of group-related secular physical mechanisms directly influencing galaxy evolution. Our analysis implies that these mechanisms begin to significantly influence galaxy evolution after z 1, a redshift corresponding to the emergence of structures in which these mechanisms take place. based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, program 175.A-0839, PI: S. Lilly.

Iovino, A.; Cucciati, O.; Scodeggio, M.; Knobel, C.; Kova?, K.; Lilly, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Caputi, K.; Pozzetti, L.; Oesch, P.; Lamareille, F.; Halliday, C.; Bardelli, S.; Finoguenov, A.; Guzzo, L.; Kampczyk, P.; Maier, C.; Tanaka, M.; Vergani, D.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Bongiorno, A.; Coppa, G.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Le Brun, V.; Mignoli, M.; Pellò, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Ricciardelli, E.; Silverman, J. D.; Tresse, L.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cassata, P.; Cimatti, A.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Leauthaud, A.; Maccagni, D.; Marinoni, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Memeo, P.; Meneux, B.; Porciani, C.; Scaramella, R.; Schiminovich, D.; Scoville, N.

2010-01-01

282

The thermal environment of the human being on the global scale  

PubMed Central

Background The close relationship between human health, performance, well-being and the thermal environment is obvious. Nevertheless, most studies of climate and climate change impacts show amazing shortcomings in the assessment of the environment. Populations living in different climates have different susceptibilities, due to socio-economic reasons, and different customary behavioural adaptations. The global distribution of risks of hazardous thermal exposure has not been analysed before. Objective To produce maps of the baseline and future bioclimate that allows a direct comparison of the differences in the vulnerability of populations to thermal stress across the world. Design The required climatological data fields are obtained from climate simulations with the global General Circulation Model ECHAM4 in T106-resolution. For the thermo-physiologically relevant assessment of these climate data a complete heat budget model of the human being, the ‘Perceived Temperature’ procedure has been applied which already comprises adaptation by clothing to a certain degree. Short-term physiological acclimatisation is considered via Health Related Assessment of the Thermal Environment. Results The global maps 1971–1980 (control run, assumed as baseline climate) show a pattern of thermal stress intensities as frequencies of heat. The heat load for people living in warm–humid climates is the highest. Climate change will lead to clear differences in health-related thermal stress between baseline climate and the future bioclimate 2041–2050 based on the ‘business-as-usual’ greenhouse gas scenario IS92a. The majority of the world's population will be faced with more frequent and more intense heat strain in spite of an assumed level of acclimatisation. Further adaptation measures are crucial in order to reduce the vulnerability of the populations. Conclusions This bioclimatology analysis provides a tool for various questions in climate and climate change impact research. Considerations of regional or local scale require climate simulations with higher resolution. As adaptation is the key term in understanding the role of climate/climate change for human health, performance and well-being, further research in this field is crucial. PMID:20052427

Jendritzky, Gerd; Tinz, Birger

2009-01-01

283

Development of an Instrument To Monitor the Success of Outcomes-Based Learning Environments in Science Classrooms in South Africa.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of an effort to monitor the transformation of classrooms within Limpopo Province, South Africa, an instrument was developed to assess students perceptions of their learning environments. The developed questionnaire, the Outcomes-Based Learning Environment Questionnaire (OBLEQ), was designed to measure the impact of the Curriculum 2005…

Seopa, Mampone A.; Laugksch, Rudiger C.; Aldridge, Jill M.; Fraser, Barry J.

284

Reflecting on the EFA Global Monitoring Report's Framework for Understanding Quality Education: A Teacher's Perspective in Eritrea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper considers issues concerning the quality of education in Eritrea using the Education for All (EFA) Global Monitoring Report's (GMR) framework for quality education. Drawing on 2 years school-based professional experience in the country, the multiple factors affecting quality in schooling are discussed. The applicability of the GMR…

Gordon, Charlie

2010-01-01

285

Site-level evaluation of satellite-based global terrestrial gross primary production and net primary production monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Operational monitoring of global terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) and net primary production (NPP) is now underway using imagery from the satellite-borne Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Evaluation of MODIS GPP and NPP products will require site-level studies across a range of biomes, with close attention to numerous scaling issues that must be addressed to link ground measurements to

P. T URNER; THOMAS K. M AEIRSPERGER; S TITH T. G OWER; A. K I R S C H B A U Mz; STEVE W. R UNNING; M AOSHENG; Z HAO; S TEVEN C. W OFSY; J OHN; L. C AMPBELL; H Y O J U N G K W O Nk; TILDEN P. M EYERS; A. K URC; J O H N A. G A M O N zz

2005-01-01

286

Enhancing Global Competitiveness: Benchmarking Airline Operational Performance in Highly Regulated Environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Enhancing competitiveness in the global airline industry is at the forefront of attention with airlines, government, and the flying public. The seemingly unchecked growth of major airline alliances is heralded as an enhancement to global competition. However, like many mega-conglomerates, mega-airlines will face complications driven by size regardless of the many recitations of enhanced efficiency. Outlined herein is a conceptual model to serve as a decision tool for policy-makers, managers, and consumers of airline services. This model is developed using public data for the United States (U.S.) major airline industry available from the U/S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Transportation Safety Board, and other public and private sector sources. Data points include number of accidents, pilot deviations, operational performance indicators, flight problems, and other factors. Data from these sources provide opportunity to develop a model based on a complex dot product equation of two vectors. A row vector is weighted for importance by a key informant panel of government, industry, and consumer experts, while a column vector is established with the factor value. The resulting equation, known as the national Airline Quality Rating (AQR), where Q is quality, C is weight, and V is the value of the variables, is stated Q=C[i1-19] x V[i1-19]. Looking at historical patterns of AQR results provides the basis for establishment of an industry benchmark for the purpose of enhancing airline operational performance. A 7 year average of overall operational performance provides the resulting benchmark indicator. Applications from this example can be applied to the many competitive environments of the global industry and assist policy-makers faced with rapidly changing regulatory challenges.

Bowen, Brent D.; Headley, Dean E.; Kane, Karisa D.

1998-01-01

287

Sample project: establishing a global forest monitoring capability using multi-resolution and multi-temporal remotely sensed data sets  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Quantifying rates of forest-cover change is important for improved carbon accounting and climate change modeling, management of forestry and agricultural resources, and biodiversity monitoring. A practical solution to examining trends in forest cover change at global scale is to employ remotely sensed data. Satellite-based monitoring of forest cover can be implemented consistently across large regions at annual and inter-annual intervals. This research extends previous research on global forest-cover dynamics and land-cover change estimation to establish a robust, operational forest monitoring and assessment system. The approach integrates both MODIS and Landsat data to provide timely biome-scale forest change estimation. This is achieved by using annual MODIS change indicator maps to stratify biomes into low, medium and high change categories. Landsat image pairs can then be sampled within these strata and analyzed for estimating area of forest cleared.

Hansen, Matt; Stehman, Steve; Loveland, Tom; Vogelmann, Jim; Cochrane, Mark

2009-01-01

288

Monitoring performance of the cameras under the high dose-rate gamma ray environments.  

PubMed

CCD/CMOS cameras, loaded on a robot system, are generally used as the eye of the robot and monitoring unit. A major problem that arises when dealing with images provided by CCD/CMOS cameras under severe accident situations of a nuclear power plant is the presence of speckles owing to the high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. To use a CCD/CMOS camera as a monitoring unit in a high radiation area, the legibility of the camera image in such intense gamma-radiation fields should therefore be defined. In this paper, the authors describe the monitoring index as a figure of merit of the camera's legibleness under a high dose-rate gamma ray irradiation environment. From a low dose-rate (10 Gy h) to a high dose-rate (200 Gy h) level, the legible performances of the cameras owing to the speckles are evaluated. The numbers of speckles generated by gamma ray irradiation in the camera image are calculated by an image processing technique. The legibility of the sensor indicator (thermo/hygrometer) owing to the number of speckles is also presented. PMID:24667385

Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min

2014-05-01

289

Effects of Kinetic Processes in Shaping Io's Global Plasma Environment: A 3D Hybrid Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral components in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io. The stationary simulation of this problem was done in the MHD and the electrodynamics approaches. One of the main significant results from the simplified two-fluid model simulations was a production of the structure of the double-peak in the magnetic field signature of the I0 flyby that could not be explained by standard MHD models. In this paper, we develop a method of kinetic ion simulation. This method employs the fluid description for electrons and neutrals whereas for ions multilevel, drift-kinetic and particle, approaches are used. We also take into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. Our model provides much more accurate description for ion dynamics and allows us to take into account the realistic anisotropic ion distribution that cannot be done in fluid simulations. The first results of such simulation of the dynamics of ions in the Io's environment are discussed in this paper.

Lipatov, Alexander S.; Combi, Michael R.

2004-01-01

290

Effects of Kinetic Processes in Shaping Io's Global Plasma Environment: A 3D Hybrid Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral gases in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter s corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io. Stationary simulations of this problem have already been done using the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and the electrodynamics approaches. One of the major results of recent simplified two-fluid model simulations [Saur, J., Neubauer, F.M., Strobel, D.F., Summers, M.E., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. 107 (SMP5), 1-18] was the production of the structure of the double-peak in the magnetic field signature of the Io flyby. These could not be explained before by standard MHD models. In this paper, we present a hybrid simulation for Io with kinetic ions and fluid electrons. This method employs a fluid description for electrons and neutrals, whereas for ions a particle approach is used. We also take into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes and solve self-consistently for electric and magnetic fields. Our model may provide a much more accurate description for the ion dynamics than previous approaches and allows us to account for the realistic anisotropic ion velocity distribution that cannot be done in fluid simulations with isotropic temperatures. The first results of such a simulation of the dynamics of ions in Io s environment are discussed in this paper. Comparison with the Galileo IO flyby results shows that this approach provides an accurate physical basis for the interaction and can therefore naturally reproduce all the observed salient features.

Lipatov, Alexander S.; Combi, Michael R.

2006-01-01

291

The growing pains of global cities : struggles in the urban environment of Dubai and Singapore  

E-print Network

This Master's thesis explores the validity of current theories of globalization through the analysis of two prominent second level global cities, Dubai and Singapore. The hypotheses of global homogenization and hybridization ...

Haider, Deeba, 1971-

1999-01-01

292

The monitoring system for vibratory disturbance detection in microgravity environment aboard the international space station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Scientists in the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications within the Microgravity Research Division oversee studies in important physical, chemical, and biological processes in microgravity environment. Research is conducted in microgravity environment because of the beneficial results that come about for experiments. When research is done in normal gravity, scientists are limited to results that are affected by the gravity of Earth. Microgravity provides an environment where solid, liquid, and gas can be observed in a natural state of free fall and where many different variables are eliminated. One challenge that NASA faces is that space flight opportunities need to be used effectively and efficiently in order to ensure that some of the most scientifically promising research is conducted. Different vibratory sources are continually active aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Some of the vibratory sources include crew exercise, experiment setup, machinery startup (life support fans, pumps, freezer/compressor, centrifuge), thruster firings, and some unknown events. The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMs), which acts as the hardware and carefully positioned aboard the ISS, along with the Microgravity Environment Monitoring System MEMS), which acts as the software and is located here at NASA Glenn, are used to detect these vibratory sources aboard the ISS and recognize them as disturbances. The various vibratory disturbances can sometimes be harmful to the scientists different research projects. Some vibratory disturbances are recognized by the MEMS's database and some are not. Mainly, the unknown events that occur aboard the International Space Station are the ones of major concern. To better aid in the research experiments, the unknown events are identified and verified as unknown events. Features, such as frequency, acceleration level, time and date of recognition of the new patterns are stored in an Excel database. My task is to carefully synthesize frequency and acceleration patterns of unknown events within the Excel database into a new file to determine whether or not certain information that is received i s considered a real vibratory source. Once considered as a vibratory source, further analysis is carried out. The resulting information is used to retrain the MEMS to recognize them as known patterns. These different vibratory disturbances are being constantly monitored to observe if, in any way, the disturbances have an effect on the microgravity environment that research experiments are exposed to. If the disturbance has little or no effect on the experiments, then research is continued. However, if the disturbance is harmful to the experiment, scientists act accordingly by either minimizing the source or terminating the research and neither NASA's time nor money is wasted.

Laster, Rachel M.

2004-01-01

293

Mercator-Ocean monitoring and forecasting : a 4D vision of the global ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercator Ocean is a public interest grouping formed in Toulouse in early 2002 by six major players in the French oceanography community: the space agency CNES, the scientific research centre CNRS, IFREMER (the institute of marine research and exploration), the development research institute IRD, the Météo France weather service, and SHOM (the French Navy's hydrography & oceanography department). In 1995, these same organizations gave themselves seven years to achieve a challenging objective: to conceive, develop and implement France's first operational oceanography system. The unique system would be capable of describing, analysing and predicting conditions at the ocean surface and subsurface in real time, anytime, anywhere in the world, even in the most inhospitable seas. That objective was met on 17 January 2001 with the release of the first Mercator ocean bulletin, providing a two-week forecast for the entire North Atlantic. Two thousands new forecast charts are now added to the MERCATOR bulletin every week. Building on these successes, a dedicated operational oceanography team, Mercator Ocean, was set up in 2002. Mercator Ocean's mission is to deliver incremental improvements in the service provided by this new operational oceanography capability by increasing the resolution and the geographic coverage of the models used. The new high-resolution model that is now on line offers 6 km grid resolution, and the first models offering global ocean coverage will be implemented in 2004. Over the next four years, Mercator Ocean also plans to establish a European Operational Oceanography Centre in Toulouse. Objective 1. Develop an operational oceanography system using three-dimensional simulation and a high-resolution primitive-equation model capable of assimilating satellite data (from the Jason altimetry satellite in particular) and in-situ ocean observation data (particularly those gathered by the CORIOLIS centre). 2. Support applications for commercial shipping and naval forces, promote sustainable stewardship of the world's oceans, oceanographic research, safety at sea, environmental monitoring and conservation, and further knowledge of the ocean's role in climatic change. 3. Contribute to the international GODAE initiative (Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment) through routine real-time analysis and forecasting of global ocean conditions.

Bahurel, P.; Toumazou, V.

294

Global Security Rule Sets An Analysis of the Current Global Security Environment and Rule Sets Governing Nuclear Weapons Release  

SciTech Connect

America is in a unique position in its history. In maintaining its position as the world's only superpower, the US consistently finds itself taking on the role of a global cop, chief exporter of hard and soft power, and primary impetus for globalization. A view of the current global situation shows an America that can benefit greatly from the effects of globalization and soft power. Similarly, America's power can be reduced significantly if globalization and its soft power are not handled properly. At the same time, America has slowly come to realize that its next major adversary is not a near peer competitor but terrorism and disconnected nations that seek nuclear capabilities. In dealing with this new threat, America needs to come to terms with its own nuclear arsenal and build a security rule set that will establish for the world explicitly what actions will cause the US to consider nuclear weapons release. This rule set; however, needs to be established with sensitivity to the US's international interests in globalization and soft power. The US must find a way to establish its doctrine governing nuclear weapons release without threatening other peaceful nations in the process.

Mollahan, K; Nattrass, L

2004-09-30

295

Installation of a variable-angle spectrometer system for monitoring diffuse and global solar radiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the design and installation of a spectrometer system for monitoring solar radiation in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Both the light intensity and the spectral distribution affect the power produced by a photovoltaic device. Local variations in the solar spectrum (especially compared to the AM1.5 standard) may have important implications for device optimization and energy yield estimation. The spectrometer system, based on an Ocean Optics USB4000 (300-900nm) spectrometer, was designed to increase functionality. Typically systems only record the global horizontal radiation. Our system moves a fiber-optic cable 0-90 degrees and takes measurements in 9 degree increments. Additionally, a shadow band allows measurement of the diffuse component of the radiation at each position. The electronic controls utilize an Arduino UNO microcontroller to synchronizes the movement of two PAP bipolar (stepper) motors with the activation of the spectrometer via an external trigger. The spectrometer was factory calibrated for wavelength and calibrated for absolute irradiance using a Sellarnet SL1-Cal light source. We present preliminary results from data taken March-June, 2013, and comment on implications for PV devices in Cochabamba.

Ormachea, O.; Abrahamse, A.; Tolavi, N.; Romero, F.; Urquidi, O.; Pearce, J. M.; Andrews, R.

2013-11-01

296

Preliminary Concept of Operations for a Global Cylinder Identification and Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a preliminary concept of operations for a Global Cylinder Identification and Monitoring System that could improve the efficiency of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in conducting its current inspection activities and could provide a capability to substantially increase its ability to detect credible diversion scenarios and undeclared production pathways involving UF6 cylinders. There exist concerns that a proliferant State with access to enrichment technology could obtain a cylinder containing natural or low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and produce a significant quantity (SQ)1 of highly enriched uranium in as little as 30 days. The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative sponsored a multi-laboratory team to develop an integrated system that provides for detecting scenarios involving 1) diverting an entire declared cylinder for enrichment at a clandestine facility, 2) misusing a declared cylinder at a safeguarded facility, and 3) using an undeclared cylinder at a safeguarded facility. An important objective in developing this integrated system was to improve the timeliness for detecting the cylinder diversion and undeclared production scenarios. Developing this preliminary concept required in-depth analyses of current operational and safeguards practices at conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication facilities. The analyses evaluated the processing, movement, and storage of cylinders at the facilities; the movement of cylinders between facilities (including cylinder fabrication); and the misuse of safeguarded facilities.

Whitaker, J. M. [ORNL; White-Horton, J. L. [ORNL; Morgan, J. B. [InSolves Associates

2013-08-01

297

Design and package of a {sup 14}CO{sub 2} field analyzer The Global Monitor Platform (GMP)  

SciTech Connect

Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is widely accepted as a means to reduce and eliminate the fossil fuel CO{sub 2} (ff- CO{sub 2}) emissions from coal fired power plants. Success of CCS depends on near zero leakage rates over decadal time scales. Currently no commercial methods to determine leakage of ff-CO{sub 2} are available. The Global Monitor Platform (GMP) field analyzer provides high precision analysis of CO{sub 2} isotopes [12C (99%), 13C (<1%), 14C (1.2x10-10 %)] that can differentiate between fossil and biogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. Fossil fuels contain no {sup 14}C; their combustion should lower atmospheric amounts on local to global scales. There is a clear mandate for monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) of CCS systems nationally and globally to verify CCS integrity, treaty verification (Kyoto Protocol) and to characterize the nuclear fuel cycle. Planetary Emissions Management (PEM), working with the National Secure Manufacturing Center (NSMC), has the goal of designing, ruggedizing and packaging the GMP for field deployment. The system will conduct atmosphere monitoring then adapt the system to monitor water and soil evaluations. Measuring {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in real time will provide quantitative concentration data for ff-CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere and CCS leakage detection. Initial results will be discussed along with design changes for improved detection sensitivity and manufacturability.

Bright, Michelle; Marino, Bruno D.V.; Gronniger, Glen

2011-08-01

298

Leakage and Seepage in the Near-Surface Environment: An Integrated Approach to Monitoring and Detection  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring and detection of leakage and seepage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the near-surface environment is needed to ensure the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration. Large leakage fluxes, e.g., through leaking wells, will be easier to detect and monitor than slow and diffuse leakage and seepage. The challenge of detecting slow leakage and seepage is discerning a leakage or seepage signal from within the natural background variations in CO{sub 2} concentration and flux that are controlled by a variety of coupled processes in soil. Although there are no direct examples of leaking geologic carbon sequestration sites on which to base a proposed verification approach, we have been guided by our prior simulation studies of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage, which showed that large CO{sub 2} concentrations can develop in the shallow subsurface even for relatively small CO{sub 2} leakage fluxes. A variety of monitoring technologies exists for measuring CO{sub 2} concentration and flux, but there is a gap between instrument performance and the detection of a leakage or seepage signal from within large natural background variability. We propose an integrated approach to monitoring and verification. The first part of our proposed approach is to characterize and understand the natural ecosystem before CO{sub 2} injection occurs so that future anomalies can be recognized. Measurements of natural CO{sub 2} fluxes using accumulation chamber (AC) and eddy correlation (EC) approaches, soil CO{sub 2} concentration profiles with depth, and carbon isotope compositions of CO{sub 2} are needed to characterize the natural state of the system prior to CO{sub 2} injection. From this information, modeling needs to be carried out to enhance understanding of carbon sources and sinks so that anomalies can be recognized and subject to closer scrutiny as potential leakage or seepage signals. Long-term monitoring using AC, EC, and soil-gas analyses along with ecosystem and flow and transport modeling should continue after CO{sub 2} injection. The integrated use of multiple measurements and modeling offers a promising approach to discerning and quantifying a small CO{sub 2} leakage or seepage signal from within the expected background variability.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2003-12-18

299

Snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) as monitors for mercury contamination of aquatic environments.  

PubMed

We assessed the distribution of mercury in snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) by analyzing front shoulder muscle, back leg muscle, tail muscle, blood, liver, and marginal carapacial scute (shell) of 26 adult turtles from five small lakes. Total mercury concentration in muscle ranged from 50 to 500 ng g(-1) wet weight and was highly correlated among the three tissue locations. There was no relationship between muscle mercury concentration and body size. Mercury concentration in blood was similar to muscle; the correlation with muscle mercury concentration was significant but there was some variability. Mercury concentration in shell was much higher than in muscle or blood, ranging from 500 to 3300 ng g(-1), and was highly correlated with muscle mercury concentration. Liver mercury concentration was similar to shell, but was highly variable and uncorrelated with any other tissue. We conclude that snapping turtles accumulate mercury from their environment and may be useful monitors of mercury contamination. PMID:11683228

Golet, W J; Haines, T A

2001-10-01

300

The role of environmental biotechnology in exploring, exploiting, monitoring, preserving, protecting and decontaminating the marine environment.  

PubMed

In light of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) and the EU Thematic Strategy on the Sustainable Use of Natural Resources, environmental biotechnology could make significant contributions in the exploitation of marine resources and addressing key marine environmental problems. In this paper 14 propositions are presented focusing on (i) the contamination of the marine environment, and more particularly how to optimize the use of biotechnology-related tools and strategies for predicting and monitoring contamination and developing mitigation measures; (ii) the exploitation of the marine biological and genetic resources to progress with the sustainable, eco-compatible use of the maritime space (issues are very diversified and include, for example, waste treatment and recycling, anti-biofouling agents; bio-plastics); (iii) environmental/marine biotechnology as a driver for a sustainable economic growth. PMID:24747820

Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Arff, Johanne; Banat, Ibrahim M; Broch, Ole Jacob; Daffonchio, Daniele; Edvardsen, Torgeir; Eguiraun, Harkaitz; Giuliano, Laura; Handå, Aleksander; López-de-Ipiña, Karmele; Marigomez, Ionan; Martinez, Iciar; Oie, Gunvor; Rojo, Fernando; Skjermo, Jorunn; Zanaroli, Giulio; Fava, Fabio

2015-01-25

301

Estimates of riparian evapotranspiration using diurnal monitoring of groundwater regime in desert environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shallow groundwater is mainly discharged by phreatophytes in many riparian ecosystems of arid and semiarid environment, while estimation of groundwater evapotranspiration in these regions still remains a challenge for regional water resources assessment. In this study, a simple relationship between the average standard deviation of diurnal groundwater level fluctuations and the daily evapotranspiration over relatively short periods (days or weeks) was developed for estimating groundwater consumption by phreatophytes in arid/semi-arid areas. Our approach allows estimating groundwater evapotranspiration using stable statistical characteristics of diurnal groundwater fluctuation, and it is useful for analyzing large amounts of data obtained from digital groundwater level monitoring sensors. The developed methodology was applied to two phreatophyte-dominated riparian areas (Populus euphratica and Tamarix ramosissima) in a typical Gobi desert region of northwest China to demonstrate the usefulness of the technique.

Wang, P.; Pozdniakov, S. P.; Grinevsky, S.; Yu, J.

2013-12-01

302

Impact of Globalization on Sugarcane Pests, Biodiversity and the Environment: A Review of the 2009 Entomology Workshop  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The 7th International Society of Sugar Cane Technologists (ISSCT) Entomology Workshop was held from 20 to 24 April 2009 in San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina under the theme: “Impact of Globalization on Sugar Cane Pests, Biodiversity and the Environment”. Technical sessions held over three days were g...

303

Cross-Cultural Collisions in Cyberspace: Case Studies of International Legal Issues for Educators Working in Globally Networked Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores some of the legal and law-related challenges educators face in designing, implementing, and sustaining globally networked learning environments (GNLEs) in the context of conflicting international laws on intellectual property and censorship/free speech. By discussing cases and areas involving such legal issues, the article…

Rife, Martine Courant

2010-01-01

304

Monitoring technologies for the evaluation of a Soil-Aquifer-Treatment system in coastal aquifer environments.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Artificial recharge of groundwater has an important role to play in water reuse. Treated sewage effluent can be infiltrated into the ground for recharge of aquifers. As the effluent water moves through the soil and the aquifer, it undergoes significant quality improvements through physical, chemical, and biological processes in the underground environment. Collectively, these processes and the water quality improvement obtained are called soil-aquifer-treatment (SAT) or geopurification. Recharge systems for SAT can be designed as infiltration-recovery systems, where all effluent water is recovered as such from the aquifer, or after blending with native groundwater. SAT typically removes essentially all suspended solids, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and pathogens (viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and helminthic eggs). Concentrations of synthetic organic carbon, phosphorous, and heavy metals are greatly reduced. The pilot site of LTCP will involve the employment of infiltration basins, which will be using waters of impaired quality as a recharge source, and hence acting as a Soil-Aquifer-Treatment, SAT, system. T he LTCP site will be employed as a pilot SAT system complemented by new technological developments, which will be providing continuous monitoring of the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of infiltrating groundwater through all hydrologic zones (i.e. surface, unsaturated and saturated zone). This will be achieved through the development and installation of an integrated system of prototype sensors, installed on-site, and offering a continuous evaluation of the performance of the SAT system. An integrated approach of the performance evaluation of any operating SAT system should aim at parallel monitoring of all hydrologic zones, proving the sustainability of all involved water quality treatment processes within unsaturated and saturated zone. Hence a prototype system of Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) sensors will be developed, in order to achieve continuous quantitative monitoring of the unsaturated zone through the entire soil column down to significant depths below the SAT basin. The above technique will offer continuous monitoring of infiltration rates and possible mechanical clogging effects. The qualitative monitoring of the unsaturated zone will be achieved through the installation of appropriate pore-water samplers within a multi-level basis, ensuring repeatability of sampling of infiltrating water of impaired quality. This study also involves the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the Lavrion multi-aquifer system through continuous monitoring of the performance of (i) the alluvial aquifer and its potential for additional water treatment as well as (ii) the effects of the SAT system for countermeasuring seawater intrusion in the area of Lavrion. Additionally, setup and calibration of numerical flow and transport models for evaluating and optimizing different operational modes of the SAT system within both saturated and unsaturated zones will be conducted. The monitoring system will be connected to an ad-hoc wireless network for continuous data transfer within the SAT facilities. It is envisaged that the development and combined application of all the above technologies will provide an integrated monitoring platform for the evaluation of SAT system performance.

Kallioras, Andreas; Tsertou, Athanasia; Foglia, Laura; Bumberger, Jan; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Schüth, Christoph

2014-05-01

305

RTEMIS: Real-time Tumoroid and Environment Monitoring Using Impedance Spectroscopy and pH Sensing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research utilizes Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy, a technique classically used for electrochemical analysis and material characterization, as the basis for a non-destructive, label-free assay platform for three dimensional (3D) cellular spheroids. In this work, a linear array of microelectrodes is optimized to rapidly respond to changes located within a 3D multicellular model. In addition, this technique is coupled with an on chip micro-pH sensor for monitoring the environment around the cells. Finally, the responses of both impedance and pH are correlated with physical changes within the cellular model. The impedance analysis system realized through this work provides a foundation for the development of high-throughput drug screening systems that utilize multiple parallel sensing modalities including pH and impedance sensing in order to quickly assess the efficacy of specific drug candidates. The slow development of new drugs is mainly attributed to poor predictability of current chemosensitivity and resistivity assays, as well as genetic differences between the animal models used for tests and humans. In addition, monolayer cultures used in early experimentation are fundamentally different from the complex structure of organs in vivo. This requires the study of smaller 3D models (spheroids) that more efficiently replicate the conditions within the body. The main objective of this research was to develop a microfluidic system on a chip that is capable of deducing viability and morphology of 3D tumor spheroids by monitoring both the impedance of the cellular model and the pH of their local environment. This would provide a fast and reliable method for screening pharmaceutical compounds in a high-throughput system.

Alexander, Frank A., Jr.

306

Searching for Global Descriptors of Engineered Nanomaterial Fate and Transport in the Environment  

PubMed Central

CONSPECTUS Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are a new class of environmental pollutants. Researchers are beginning to debate whether new modeling paradigms and experimental tests to obtain model parameters are required for ENMs or if approaches for existing pollutants are robust enough to predict ENM distribution between environmental compartments. This Account outlines how experimental research can yield quantitative data for use in ENM fate and exposure models. We first review experimental testing approaches that are employed with ENMs. Then we compare and contrast ENMs against other pollutants. Finally, we summarize the findings and identify research needs that may yield global descriptors for ENMs that are suitable for use in fate and transport modeling. Over the past decade, researchers have made significant progress in understanding factors that influence the fate and transport of ENMs. In some cases researchers have developed approaches toward global descriptor models (experimental, conceptual, and quantitative). We suggest the following global descriptors for ENMs: octanol-water partition coefficients, solid-water partition coefficients, attachment coefficients, and rate constants describing reactions such as dissolution, sedimentation, and degradation. ENMs appear to accumulate at the octanol-water interface and readily interact with other interfaces, such as lipid-water interfaces. Batch experiments to investigate factors that influence retention of ENMs on solid phases are very promising. However ENMs probably do not behave in the same way as dissolved chemicals, and therefore researchers need to use measurement techniques and concepts more commonly associated with colloids. Despite several years of research with ENMs in column studies, available summaries tend to discuss the effects of ionic strength, pH, organic matter, ENM type, packing media, or other parameters qualitatively rather than reporting quantitative values, such as attachment efficiencies, that would facilitate comparison across studies. Only a few structure-activity relationships have been developed for ENMs so far, but such evaluations will facilitate the understanding of the reactivities of different forms of a single ENM. The establishment of predictive capabilities for ENMs in the environment would enable accurate exposure assessments that would assist in ENM risk management. Such information is also critical for understanding the ultimate disposition of ENMs and may provide a framework for improved engineering of nanomaterials that are more environmentally benign. PMID:22950943

Nowack, Bernd

2012-01-01

307

Global isoprene emissions estimated using MEGAN, ECMWF analyses and a detailed canopy environment model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The global emissions of isoprene are calculated at 0.5° resolution for each year between 1995 and 2006, based on the MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature) version 2 model (Guenther et al., 2006) and a detailed multi-layer canopy environment model for the calculation of leaf temperature and visible radiation fluxes. The calculation is driven by meteorological fields - air temperature, cloud cover, downward solar irradiance, windspeed, volumetric soil moisture in 4 soil layers - provided by analyses of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The estimated annual global isoprene emission ranges between 374 Tg (in 1996) and 449 Tg (in 1998 and 2005), for an average of ca. 410 Tg/year over the whole period, i.e. about 30% less than the standard MEGAN estimate (Guenther et al., 2006). This difference is due, to a large extent, to the impact of the soil moisture stress factor, which is found here to decrease the global emissions by more than 20%. In qualitative agreement with past studies, high annual emissions are found to be generally associated with El Niño events. The emission inventory is evaluated against flux measurement campaigns at Harvard forest (Massachussets) and Tapajós in Amazonia, showing that the model can capture quite well the short-term variability of emissions, but that it fails to reproduce the observed seasonal variation at the tropical rainforest site, with largely overestimated wet season fluxes. The comparison of the HCHO vertical columns calculated by a chemistry and transport model (CTM) with HCHO distributions retrieved from space provides useful insights on tropical isoprene emissions. For example, the relatively low emissions calculated over Western Amazonia (compared to the corresponding estimates in the inventory of Guenther et al., 1995) are validated by the excellent agreement found between the CTM and HCHO data over this region. The parameterized impact of the soil moisture stress on isoprene emissions is found to reduce the model/data bias over Australia, but it leads to underestimated emissions near the end of the dry season over subtropical Africa.

Müller, J.-F.; Stavrakou, T.; Wallens, S.; de Smedt, I.; van Roozendael, M.; Potosnak, M. J.; Rinne, J.; Munger, B.; Goldstein, A.; Guenther, A. B.

2007-11-01

308

Global isoprene emissions estimated using MEGAN, ECMWF analyses and a detailed canopy environment model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The global emissions of isoprene are calculated at 0.5° resolution for each year between 1995 and 2006, based on the MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature) version 2 model (Guenther et al., 2006) and a detailed multi-layer canopy environment model for the calculation of leaf temperature and visible radiation fluxes. The calculation is driven by meteorological fields - air temperature, cloud cover, downward solar irradiance, windspeed, volumetric soil moisture in 4 soil layers - provided by analyses of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The estimated annual global isoprene emission ranges between 374 Tg (in 1996) and 449 Tg (in 1998 and 2005), for an average of ca. 410 Tg/year over the whole period, i.e. about 30% less than the standard MEGAN estimate (Guenther et al., 2006). This difference is due, to a large extent, to the impact of the soil moisture stress factor, which is found here to decrease the global emissions by more than 20%. In qualitative agreement with past studies, high annual emissions are found to be generally associated with El Niño events. The emission inventory is evaluated against flux measurement campaigns at Harvard forest (Massachussets) and Tapajós in Amazonia, showing that the model can capture quite well the short-term variability of emissions, but that it fails to reproduce the observed seasonal variation at the tropical rainforest site, with largely overestimated wet season fluxes. The comparison of the HCHO vertical columns calculated by a chemistry and transport model (CTM) with HCHO distributions retrieved from space provides useful insights on tropical isoprene emissions. For example, the relatively low emissions calculated over Western Amazonia (compared to the corresponding estimates in the inventory of Guenther et al., 1995) are validated by the excellent agreement found between the CTM and HCHO data over this region. The parameterized impact of the soil moisture stress on isoprene emissions is found to reduce the model/data bias over Australia, but it leads to underestimated emissions near the end of the dry season over subtropical Africa.

Müller, J.-F.; Stavrakou, T.; Wallens, S.; de Smedt, I.; van Roozendael, M.; Potosnak, M. J.; Rinne, J.; Munger, B.; Goldstein, A.; Guenther, A. B.

2008-03-01

309

Fast fiber Bragg grating interrogation system with scalability to support monitoring of large structures in harsh environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fiber optic sensor systems can alleviate certain challenges faced by electronics sensors faced when monitoring structures subject to marine and other harsh environments. Challenges in implementation of such systems include scalability, interconnection and cabling. We describe a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor system architecture based that is scalable to support over 1000 electromagnetic interference immune sensors at high sampling rates for harsh environment applications. A key enabler is a high performance FBG interrogator supporting subsection sampling rates ranging from kHz to MHz. Results are presented for fast dynamic switching between multiple structural sections and the use of this sensing system for dynamic load monitoring as well as the potential for acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring on materials ranging from aluminum and composites to concrete subject to severe environments.

Moslehi, Behzad; Black, Richard J.; Costa, Joannes M.; Edwards, Elizabeth H.; Faridian, Fereydoun; Sotoudeh, Vahid

2014-04-01

310

Trends in monitoring pharmaceuticals and personal-care products in the aquatic environment by use of passive sampling devices  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The use of passive sampling in monitoring pharmaceuticals and personal-care products (PPCPs) in the aquatic environment is discussed. The utility of passive sampling methods for monitoring the fraction of heavy metals and the biologically available fraction of non-polar organic priority pollutants is recognized and these technologies are being used in surveys of water quality. These devices are used to measure the dissolved fraction and they can yield information that can be used in the development of risk assessments models. These devices can also be used to locate illegal damping and to monitor specific sources of input of PPCPs into the environment, or to monitor the effectiveness of water treatment processes in the removal of these compounds from wastewater. These devices can provide representative information at low cost which necessitate a combination of laboratory calibration and field studies for emerging pollutants.

Mills, G.A.; Vrana, B.; Allan, I.; Alvarez, D.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Greenwood, R.

2007-01-01

311

Ceramic MEMS designed for wireless pressure monitoring in the industrial environment.  

PubMed

This paper presents the design of a wireless pressure-monitoring system for harsh-environment applications. Two types of ceramic pressure sensors made with a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) were considered. The first type is a piezoresistive strain gauge pressure sensor. The second type is a capacitive pressure sensor, which is based on changes of the capacitance values between two electrodes: one electrode is fixed and the other is movable under an applied pressure. The design was primarily focused on low power consumption. Reliable operation in the presence of disturbances, like electromagnetic interference, parasitic capacitances, etc., proved to be contradictory constraints. A piezoresistive ceramic pressure sensor with a high bridge impedance was chosen for use in a wireless pressure-monitoring system and an acceptable solution using energy-harvesting techniques has been achieved. The described solution allows for the integration of a sensor element with an energy harvester that has a printed thick-film battery and complete electronics in a single substrate packaged inside a compact housing. PMID:22368471

Pavlin, Marko; Belavic, Darko; Novak, Franc

2012-01-01

312

A global organism detection and monitoring system for non-native species  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Harmful invasive non-native species are a significant threat to native species and ecosystems, and the costs associated with non-native species in the United States is estimated at over $120 Billion/year. While some local or regional databases exist for some taxonomic groups, there are no effective geographic databases designed to detect and monitor all species of non-native plants, animals, and pathogens. We developed a web-based solution called the Global Organism Detection and Monitoring (GODM) system to provide real-time data from a broad spectrum of users on the distribution and abundance of non-native species, including attributes of their habitats for predictive spatial modeling of current and potential distributions. The four major subsystems of GODM provide dynamic links between the organism data, web pages, spatial data, and modeling capabilities. The core survey database tables for recording invasive species survey data are organized into three categories: "Where, Who & When, and What." Organisms are identified with Taxonomic Serial Numbers from the Integrated Taxonomic Information System. To allow users to immediately see a map of their data combined with other user's data, a custom geographic information system (GIS) Internet solution was required. The GIS solution provides an unprecedented level of flexibility in database access, allowing users to display maps of invasive species distributions or abundances based on various criteria including taxonomic classification (i.e., phylum or division, order, class, family, genus, species, subspecies, and variety), a specific project, a range of dates, and a range of attributes (percent cover, age, height, sex, weight). This is a significant paradigm shift from "map servers" to true Internet-based GIS solutions. The remainder of the system was created with a mix of commercial products, open source software, and custom software. Custom GIS libraries were created where required for processing large datasets, accessing the operating system, and to use existing libraries in C++, R, and other languages to develop the tools to track harmful species in space and time. The GODM database and system are crucial for early detection and rapid containment of invasive species. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Graham, J.; Newman, G.; Jarnevich, C.; Shory, R.; Stohlgren, T.J.

2007-01-01

313

Understanding The GLAST Burst Monitor Detector Calibration: A Detailed Simulation Of The Calibration Including The Environment  

SciTech Connect

The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) is the secondary instrument on NASA's next Gamma-ray mission GLAST. It will enhance the capabilities of GLAST by locating and detecting cosmic gamma-ray bursts at lower energies by the use of 12 NaI detectors (energy range 10 keV to 1 MeV) and 2 BGO-detectors (energy range 150 keV to 30 MeV). GBM was built in a close collaboration between the MPE and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The angular and energy response of each GBM detector has been calibrated using various radioactive sources at different incidence angles relative to the detector in a laboratory environment at the MPE in 2005. To facilitate the understanding of the reconstruction of the detector response, a detailed simulation of the whole laboratory environment and the setup of the calibration source were performed. A modified version of the CERN GEANT 4 simulation software (provided by collaborators at the Los Alamos National Laboratory) was used.

Steinle, Helmut; Kienlin, Andreas von; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Lichti, Giselher; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A. [NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States); Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Bhat, P. Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie [University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States); Kippen, R. Marc; Hoover, Andrew S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

2007-07-12

314

Protection of quantum information and optimal singlet conversion through higher-dimensional quantum systems and environment monitoring  

SciTech Connect

We study how to protect quantum information in quantum systems subjected to local dissipation. We show that combining the use of three-level systems, environment monitoring, and local feedback can fully and deterministically protect any available quantum information, including entanglement initially shared by different parties. These results can represent a gain in resources and/or distances in quantum communication protocols such as quantum repeaters and teleportation as well as time for quantum memories. Finally, we show that monitoring local environments physically implements the optimum singlet conversion protocol, which is essential for classical entanglement percolation.

Mascarenhas, E.; Marques, B.; Santos, M. Franca [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postal 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Cavalcanti, D. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Cunha, M. Terra [Departamento de Matematica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postal 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

2010-03-15

315

Effects of protons reflected by lunar crustal magnetic fields on the global lunar plasma environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solar wind plasma interaction with lunar crustal magnetic fields is different than that of magnetized bodies like the Earth. Lunar crustal fields are, for typical solar wind conditions, not strong enough to form a (bow)shock upstream but rather deflect and perturb plasma and fields. Here we study the global effects of protons reflected from lunar crustal magnetic fields on the lunar plasma environment when the Moon is in the unperturbed solar wind. We employ a three-dimensional hybrid model of plasma and an observed map of reflected protons from lunar magnetic anomalies over the lunar farside. We observe that magnetic fields and plasma upstream over the lunar crustal fields compress to nearly 120% and 160% of the solar wind, respectively. We find that these disturbances convect downstream in the vicinity of the lunar wake, while their relative magnitudes decrease. In addition, solar wind protons are disturbed and heated at compression regions and their velocity distribution changes from Maxwellian to a non-Maxwellian. Finally, we show that these features persists, independent of the details of the ion reflection by the magnetic fields.

Fatemi, Shahab; Holmström, Mats; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Lue, Charles; Collier, Michael R.; Barabash, Stas; Stenberg, Gabriella

2014-08-01

316

Sensor Web for Spatio-Temporal Monitoring of a Hydrological Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Sensor Web is a macroinstrument concept that allows for the spatio-temporal understanding of an environment through coordinated efforts between multiple numbers and types of sensing platforms, including, in its most general form, both orbital and terrestrial and both fixed and mobile. Each of these platforms, or pods, communicates within its local neighborhood and thus distributes information to the instrument as a whole. The result of sharing and continual processing of this information among all the Sensor Web elements will result in an information flow and a global perception of and reactive capability to the environment. As illustrated, the Sensor Web concept also allows for the recursive notion of a web of webs with individual distributed instruments possibly playing the role of a single node point on a larger Sensor Web instrument. In particular, the fusion of inexpensive, yet sophisticated, commercial technology from both the computation and telecommunication revolutions has enabled the development of practical, fielded, and embedded in situ systems that have been the focus of the NASA/JPL Sensor Webs Project (http://sensorwebs.jpl.nasa.gov/). These Sensor Webs are complete systems consisting of not only the pod elements that wirelessly communicate among themselves, but also interfacing and archiving software that allows for easy use by the end-user. Previous successful deployments have included environments as diverse as coastal regions, Antarctica, and desert areas. The Sensor Web has broad implications for Earth and planetary science and will revolutionize the way experiments and missions are conceived and performed. As part of our current efforts to develop a macrointelligence within the system, we have deployed a Sensor Web at the Central Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project (CAVSARP) facility located west of Tucson, AZ. This particular site was selected because it is ideal for studying spatio-temporal phenomena and for providing a test site for more sophisticated hydrological studies in the future.

Delin, K. A.; Jackson, S. P.; Johnson, D. W.; Burleigh, S. C.; Woodrow, R. R.; McAuley, M.; Britton, J. T.; Dohm, J. M.; Ferre, T. P. A.; Ip, Felipe

2004-01-01

317

Natural hazards education in global environment leaders education programme for designing a low-carbon society  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global environmental leader (GEL) education programme at graduate school for international development and cooperation (IDEC) in Hiroshima University is an education and training programme for graduate students especially from developing countries in Asian region to build and enhance their ability to become international environmental leaders. Through this programme, they will participate in regular course works and other activities to learn how to cope with the various environment and resource management issues from global to regional scales toward a low-carbon society via multi-disciplinary approaches considering sustainable development and climate change. Under this GEL programme, there are five different research sub-groups as follows assuming a cause-effect relationship among interacting components of social, economic, and environmental systems; 1) urban system design to prevent global warming, 2) wise use of biomass resources, 3) environmental impact assessment, 4) policy and institutional design, and 5) development of environmental education programs. Candidate students of GEL programme belong to one of the five research sub-groups, perform their researches and participate in many activities under the cross-supervisions from faculty members of different sub-groups. Under the third research group for environmental impact assessment, we use numerical models named as regional environment simulator (RES) as a tool for research and education for assessing the environmental impacts due to natural hazards. Developed at IDEC, Hiroshima University, RES is a meso-scale numerical model system that can be used for regional simulation of natural disasters and environmental problems caused by water and heat circulation in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. RES has three components: i) atmosphere-surface waves-ocean part, ii) atmosphere-land surface process-hydrologic part, and iii) coastal and estuarine part. Each part is constructed with state-of-the-art public domain numerical models that are combined synchronously by an own-developed model coupler. Therefore, RES can provide detailed insights from various aspects of interaction processes between each component in the earth system. For instance, RES has been used for the study of storm surges and the abnormally high ocean waves caused by typhoons, cyclones, hurricanes, and winter monsoon winds in Asian region; dam lake circulation; air-sea interaction of momentum, heat, and tracer material exchange; heavy rainfall and runoff simulation; estuarine circulation with cohesive sediment transport; and wave overtopping in coastal regions. Most recently, a project on the impact of reduced discharge of freshwater and sediment from the Yangtze River basin on the adjacent East China Sea has been initiated by using the RES. Under the GEL programme, we found the RES can be an important and useful tool for graduate students not only from science and engineering background but also from social science so as to evaluate their policy and institutional design.

Lee, Han Soo; Yamashita, Takao; Fujiwara, Akimasa

2010-05-01

318

Noninvasive in vivo monitoring of tissue-specific global gene expression in humans.  

PubMed

Circulating cell-free RNA in the blood provides a potential window into the health, phenotype, and developmental programs of a variety of human organs. We used high-throughput methods of RNA analysis such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing to characterize the global landscape circulating RNA in a cohort of human subjects. By focusing on genes whose expression is highly specific to certain tissues, we were able to identify the relative contributions of these tissues to circulating RNA and to monitor changes in tissue development and health. As one application of this approach, we performed a longitudinal study on pregnant women and analyzed their combined cell-free RNA transcriptomes across all three trimesters of pregnancy and after delivery. In addition to the analysis of mRNA, we observed and characterized noncoding species such as long noncoding RNA and circular RNA transcripts whose presence had not been previously observed in human plasma. We demonstrate that it is possible to track specific longitudinal phenotypic changes in both the mother and the fetus and that it is possible to directly measure transcripts from a variety of fetal tissues in the maternal blood sample. We also studied the role of neuron-specific transcripts in the blood of healthy adults and those suffering from the neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease and showed that disease specific neural transcripts are present at increased levels in the blood of affected individuals. Characterization of the cell-free transcriptome in its entirety may thus provide broad insights into human health and development without the need for invasive tissue sampling. PMID:24799715

Koh, Winston; Pan, Wenying; Gawad, Charles; Fan, H Christina; Kerchner, Geoffrey A; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Blumenfeld, Yair J; El-Sayed, Yasser Y; Quake, Stephen R

2014-05-20

319

Global Radiological Source Sorting, Tracking, and Monitoring Project: Phase I Final Report  

SciTech Connect

As a proof of concept tested in an operational context, the Global Radiological Source Sorting, Tracking, and Monitoring (GRadSSTraM) Project successfully demonstrated that radio frequency identification (RFID) and Web 2.0* technologies can be deployed to track controlled shipments between the United States and the European Union. Between November 2009 and May 2010, a total of 19 shipments were successfully shipped from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and tracked to their delivery at England's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) by the United Kingdom Royal Mail. However, the project can only be viewed as a qualified success as notable shortcomings were observed. Although the origin and terminus of all RFID-enabled shipments were recorded and no shipments were lost, not all the waypoints between ORNL and NPL were incorporated into the pilot. Given limited resources, the project team was able to install RFID listeners/actuators at three waypoints between the two endpoints. Although it is likely that all shipments followed the same route between ORNL and NPL, it cannot be determined beyond question that all 19 shipments were routed on identical itineraries past the same three waypoints. The pilot also raises the distinct possibility that unattended RFID tracking alone, without positive confirmation that a tagged item has been properly recorded by an RFID reader, does not meet a rigorous standard for shipping controlled items. Indeed, the proof of concept test strongly suggests that a multifaceted approach to tracking may be called for, including tracking methods that are capable of reading and accepting multiple inputs for individual items [e.g., carrier-provided tracking numbers, Universal Product Codes (UPCs), and RFID tags]. For controlled items, another apparent requirement is a confirmation feature, human or otherwise, which can certify that an item's RFID tag, UPC, or tracking number has been recorded.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL

2010-09-01

320

Net ecosystem fluxes of isoprene over tropical South America inferred from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) observations of HCHO columns  

Microsoft Academic Search

We estimate isoprene emissions over tropical South America during 1997–2001 using column measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO) from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument, the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model, and the MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature) bottom-up isoprene inventory. GEOS-Chem is qualitatively consistent with in situ ground-based and aircraft concentration profiles of isoprene and

Michael P. Barkley; Paul I. Palmer; Uwe Kuhn; Juergen Kesselmeier; Kelly Chance; Thomas P. Kurosu; Randall V. Martin; Detlev Helmig; Alex Guenther

2008-01-01

321

Net ecosystem fluxes of isoprene over tropical South America inferred from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) observations of HCHO columns  

Microsoft Academic Search

We estimate isoprene emissions over tropical South America during 1997-2001 using column measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO) from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument, the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model, and the MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature) bottom-up isoprene inventory. GEOS-Chem is qualitatively consistent with in situ ground-based and aircraft concentration profiles of isoprene and

Michael P. Barkley; Paul I. Palmer; Uwe Kuhn; Juergen Kesselmeier; Kelly Chance; Thomas P. Kurosu; Randall V. Martin; Detlev Helmig; Alex Guenther

2008-01-01

322

Global radionuclide monitoring in near-real time for verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  

Microsoft Academic Search

A global radionuclide monitoring system is being engineered as part of a multi-technology verification system for the Comprehensive\\u000a Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. The system detects airborne radioactive aerosols and gases that can indicate nuclear weapons test\\u000a debris. The backbone of the system is a network of 80 remote detection stations that utilize high-volume air sampling and\\u000a high-resolution gamma spectrometry to

L. R. Mason; J. D. Bohner; D. L. Williams

1998-01-01

323

Off-the-shelf real-time monitoring of satellite constellations in a visual 3-D environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The multimission spacecraft analysis system (MSAS) data monitor is a generic software product for future real-time data monitoring and analysis. The system represents the status of a satellite constellation through the shape, color, motion and position of graphical objects floating in a three dimensional virtual reality environment. It may be used for the monitoring of large volumes of data, for viewing results in configurable displays, and for providing high level and detailed views of a constellation of monitored satellites. It is considered that the data monitor is an improvement on conventional graphic and text-based displays as it increases the amount of data that the operator can absorb in a given period, and can be installed and configured without the requirement for software development by the end user. The functionality of the system is described, including: the navigation abilities; the representation of alarms in the cybergrid; limit violation; real-time trend analysis, and alarm status indication.

Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Hervias, Felipe; Cheng, Cecilia Han; Mactutis, Anthony; Angelino, Robert

1996-01-01

324

SiC Sensors in Extreme Environments: Real-time Hydrogen Monitoring for Energy Plant Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clean, efficient energy production, such as the gasification of coal (syngas), requires physical and chemical sensors for exhaust gas monitoring as well as real-time control of the combustion process. Wide-bandgap semiconducting materials systems can meet the sensing demands in these extreme environments consisting of chemically corrosive gases at high temperature and pressure. We have developed a SiC based micro-sensor for detection of hydrogen containing species with millisecond response at 600 C. The sensor is a Pt-SiO2-SiC device with a dense Pt catalytic sensing film, capable of withstanding months of continuous high temperature operation. The device was characterized in robust sensing module that is compatible with an industrial reactor. We report on the performance of the SiC sensor in a simulated syngas ambient at 370 C containing the common interferants CO2, CH4 and CO [1]. In addition we demonstrate that hours of exposure to >=1000 ppm H2S and 15% water vapor does not degrade the sensor performance. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the hydrogen response of the sensor we have modeled the hydrogen adsorptions kinetics at the internal Pt-SiO2 interface, using both the Tempkin and Langmuir isotherms. Under the conditions appropriate for energy plant applications, the response of our sensor is significantly larger than that obtained from ultra-high vacuum electrochemical sensor measurements at high temperatures. We will discuss the role of morphology, at the nano to micro scale, on the enhanced catalytic activity observed for our Pt sensing films in response to a heated hydrogen gas stream at atmospheric pressure. [1] R. Loloee, B. Chorpening, S. Beers & R. Ghosh, Hydrogen monitoring for power plant applications using SiC sensors, Sens. Actuators B:Chem. (2007), doi:10.1016/j.snb.2007.07.118

Ghosh, Ruby

2008-03-01

325

Monitoring system in the emergency planning area, integrated in the environment pollution management system from chemical platforms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes to present a system for environment monitoring and chemical accident prevention. The technological accident will be minimised in the pollution units, so it can be at a tolerant acceptance level, risk will be avoid and emergencies that may occur will be promptly solved. The system achievement is that it informs the decision factors in territory about what

A. Craciun; G. Vladut; C. Popa

2008-01-01

326

Evolution of the concentration PDF in random environments modeled by global random walk  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The evolution of the probability density function (PDF) of concentrations of chemical species transported in random environments is often modeled by ensembles of notional particles. The particles move in physical space along stochastic-Lagrangian trajectories governed by Ito equations, with drift coefficients given by the local values of the resolved velocity field and diffusion coefficients obtained by stochastic or space-filtering upscaling procedures. A general model for the sub-grid mixing also can be formulated as a system of Ito equations solving for trajectories in the composition space. The PDF is finally estimated by the number of particles in space-concentration control volumes. In spite of their efficiency, Lagrangian approaches suffer from two severe limitations. Since the particle trajectories are constructed sequentially, the demanded computing resources increase linearly with the number of particles. Moreover, the need to gather particles at the center of computational cells to perform the mixing step and to estimate statistical parameters, as well as the interpolation of various terms to particle positions, inevitably produce numerical diffusion in either particle-mesh or grid-free particle methods. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a global random walk method to solve the system of Ito equations in physical and composition spaces, which models the evolution of the random concentration's PDF. The algorithm consists of a superposition on a regular lattice of many weak Euler schemes for the set of Ito equations. Since all particles starting from a site of the space-concentration lattice are spread in a single numerical procedure, one obtains PDF estimates at the lattice sites at computational costs comparable with those for solving the system of Ito equations associated to a single particle. The new method avoids the limitations concerning the number of particles in Lagrangian approaches, completely removes the numerical diffusion, and speeds up the computation by orders of magnitude. The approach is illustrated for the transport of passive scalars in heterogeneous aquifers, with hydraulic conductivity modeled as a random field.

Suciu, Nicolae; Vamos, Calin; Attinger, Sabine; Knabner, Peter

2013-04-01

327

The AMSAT-OSCAR-40 High Elliptical Orbit Radiation Environment Monitoring Payload - First Flight Results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last decade, Surrey's micro-satellites have provided continuous monitoring of the proton and heavy-ion environment encountered in low-Earth orbit (LEO), through the use of a series of silicon PIN-diode-based particle detectors, starting with the UK Defence Evaluation Research Agency's (DERA's) Cosmic-Radiation Environment and Dosimetry (CREDO) payload, flown on-board UoSAT-3 in 1990, followed in 1992 by the Cosmic-Ray Experiment (CRE), developed at the Surrey Space Centre under a micro-satellite Technology Transfer (TT) programme operated between Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), and flown on the resulting KITSAT-1 micro-satellite. The CRE was flown again in 1993 on-board the PoSAT- 1 micro-satellite, developed under a similar TT programme operated between SSTL and Portugal. The results from all of these instruments have given a great deal of information on the nature of the low-Earth orbit (LEO) ionising radiation environment, and in the case of the PoSAT-1 CRE, continue to do so. However, to obtain a more complete "picture" of the magnetosphere, it is necessary to orbit instruments much further out in space An opportunity to do this arose in 1994 when amateur radio satellite groups (AMSAT) proposed launching a small (600 kg) communications satellite into highly elliptical orbit. This satellite, called AMSAT-OSCAR-40 (AO-40), was launched by Ariane 5 rocket on 16th November 2000, initially into a geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). The satellite has subsequently been manoeuvred into a highly elliptical, 1070 km x 58,700 km, 6.8o inclination orbit, and thus it affords the opportunity to observe the proton and heavy-ion environment through a large cross-section of Earth's magnetosphere. AO-40 carries a version of the CRE, which has been slightly modified in terms of interfaces and packaging to fit that particular satellite bus. However the particle detecting element is essentially identical to that of the previous CREs, and is able to monitor protons and heavy ions by means of the pulse-height analysis of charge-deposition spectra in a single, shielded 300mm thick, 30mm x 30mm silicon PIN diode. This is connected to a charge amplifier and a "CR-RC" (constant peaking-time) pulse-shaping circuit, which in turn is connected to an event-driven, hardware-logic controlled 512-channel multi-channel analyser, where each channel can log up to 16 million events. The overall experiment is controlled by an 87C51 micro-controller. The pulse-processing section has a "dead-time" of 5 ms, and so the instrument is able to cope with high flux conditions. The useful energy-deposition range of the instrument is approximate 4.5 MeV to 584 MeV - approximately 1.1 MeV per channel. The instruments were calibrated prior to flight by particle sources and by direct charge injection into the analogue front-end. This paper describes the instrument, and reports on the first flight-results, which were obtained in December 2001. The instrument is working well, and as expected, we see a peak in trapped proton flux at L= 1.7 Earth Radius (RE), with a profile largely as predicted by standard models. However, we also detect a significant second peak at approximately L= 3 RE. The cause and nature of this second peak is under investigation, and may well be related to recent major solar flare activity. The flat particle profile beyond L=4 RE indicates that, as expected, the instrument is not contaminated by the detection of outer-belt electrons.

Sweeting, Martin, , Sir

328

Ground Monitoring Neotropical Dry Forests: A Sensor Network for Forest and Microclimate Dynamics in Semi-Arid Environments (Enviro-Net°)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the face of unprecedented global change driven by anthropogenic pressure on natural systems it has become imperative to monitor and better understand potential shifts in ecosystem functioning and services from local to global scales. The utilization of automated sensors technologies offers numerous advantages over traditional on-site ecosystem surveying techniques and, as a result, sensor networks are becoming a powerful tool in environmental monitoring programs. Tropical forests, renowned for their biodiversity, are important regulators of land-atmosphere fluxes yet the seasonally dry tropical forests, which account for 40% of forested ecosystems in the American tropics, have been severely degraded over the past several decades and not much is known of their capacity to recover. With less than 1% of these forests protected, our ability to monitor the dynamics and quantify changes in the remaining primary and recovering secondary tropical dry forests is vital to understanding mechanisms of ecosystem stress responses and climate feedback with respect to annual productivity and desertification processes in the tropics. The remote sensing component of the Tropi-Dry: Human and Biophysical Dimensions of Tropical Dry Forests in the Americas research network supports a network of long-term tropical ecosystem monitoring platforms which focus on the dynamics of seasonally dry tropical forests in the Americas. With over 25 sensor station deployments operating across a latitudinal gradient in Mexico, Costa Rica, Brazil, and Argentina continuously collecting hyper-temporal sensory input based on standardized deployment parameters, this monitoring system is unique among tropical environments. Technologies used in the network include optical canopy phenology towers, understory wireless sensing networks, above and below ground microclimate stations, and digital cameras. Sensory data streams are uploaded to a cyber-infrastructure initiative, denominated Enviro-Net°, for data storage, management, visualization, and retrieval for further analysis. The use of tower and ground-based optical sensor networks and meteorological monitoring instrumentation has proven effective in capturing seasonal growth patterns in primary and secondary forest stands. Furthermore, the observed trends in above and below ground microclimate variables are shown to closely correlate with in-situ vegetative indices (NDVI and EVI) across study sites. These long-term environmental sensory data streams provide valuable insights as to how these threatened semi-arid ecosystems regenerate after disturbances and how they respond to environmental stress such as climate change in the tropical and sub-tropical latitudes.

Rankine, C. J.; Sánchez-Azofeifa, G.

2011-12-01

329

Global Gradients in Vertebrate Diversity Predicted by Historical Area-Productivity Dynamics and Contemporary Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel hierarchical framework integrates the effects of time, area, productivity, and temperature at their respective relevant scales and successfully predicts the latitudinal gradient in global vertebrate diversity.

Walter Jetz; Paul V. A. Fine

2012-01-01

330

Monitoring psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria contamination in a ready-to-eat vegetable salad production environment.  

PubMed

A study monitoring lactic acid bacteria contamination was conducted in a company producing fresh, minimally processed, packaged and ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetable salads (stored at 4°C) in order to investigate the reason for high psychrotrophic LAB levels in the products at the end of shelf-life. Initially, high microbial counts exceeding the established psychrotrophic thresholds (>10(7)-10(8)CFU/g) and spoilage manifestations before the end of the shelf-life (7days) occurred in products containing an assortment of sliced and diced vegetables, but within a one year period these spoilage defects became prevalent in the entire processing plant. Environmental sampling and microbiological analyses of the raw materials and final products throughout the manufacturing process highlighted the presence of high numbers of Leuconostoc spp. in halved and unseeded, fresh sweet bell peppers provided by the supplier. A combination of two DNA fingerprinting techniques facilitated the assessment of the species diversity of LAB present in the processing environment along with the critical point of their introduction in the production facility. Probably through air mediation and surface adhesion, mainly members of the strictly psychrotrophic species Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum and L. gelidum subsp. gelidum were responsible for the cross-contamination of every vegetable handled within the plant. PMID:24927398

Pothakos, Vasileios; Snauwaert, Cindy; De Vos, Paul; Huys, Geert; Devlieghere, Frank

2014-08-18

331

THE LOCAL ENVIRONMENT OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES VIEWED BY XMM-NEWTON's OPTICAL MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

We have used XMM-Newton's Optical Monitor (OM) images to study the local environment of a sample of 27 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in nearby galaxies. UVW1 fluxes were extracted from 100 pc regions centered on the ULX positions. We find that at least 4 ULXs (out of 10 published) have spectral types that are consistent with previous literature values. In addition, the colors are similar to those of young stars. For the highest-luminosity ULXs, the UVW1 fluxes may have an important contribution from the accretion disk. We find that the majority of ULXs are associated with recent star formation. Many of the ULXs in our sample are located inside young OB associations or star-forming regions (SFRs). Based on their colors, we estimated ages and masses for SFRs located within 1 kpc from the ULXs in our sample. The resolution of the OM was insufficient to detect young dense superclusters, but some of these SFRs are massive enough to contain such clusters. Only three ULXs have no associated SFRs younger than ?50 Myr. The age and mass estimates for clusters were used to test runaway scenarios. The data are, in general, compatible with stellar-mass binaries accreting at super-Eddington rates and ejected by natal kicks. We also tested the hypothesis that ULXs are sub-Eddington accreting intermediate mass black holes ejected by three-body interactions; however, this is not supported well by the data.

Berghea, C. T.; Dudik, R. P. [United States Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392 (United States); Tincher, J. [St. John's College, Annapolis, MD 21401 (United States); Winter, L. M., E-mail: ciprian.berghea@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: rachel.dudik@usno.navy.mil [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States)

2013-10-20

332

Flood monitoring in a semi-arid environment using spatially high resolution radar and optical data.  

PubMed

The geographic term "Niger Inland Delta" stands for a vast plain of approximately 40,000 km(2), which is situated in the western Sahel (Republic of Mali). The Inland Delta is affected by yearly inundation through the variable water levels of the Niger-Bani river system. Due to a good availability of (surface) water, the ecosystem at the Niger Inland Delta serves as resting place stop-over for many migrating birds and other wildlife species as well as economic base for farmers and pastoral people. To foster the sustainable usage of its natural resources and to protect this natural heritage, the entire Niger Inland Delta became RAMSAR site in 2004. This paper aims to test to which extent texture analysis can improve the quality of flood monitoring in a semi-arid environment using spatially high resolution ASAR imaging mode data. We found the Gray Level Dependence Method (GLDM) was most suitable proceeding for our data. Several statistical parameters were calculated via co-occurrence matrices and were used to classify the images in different gradation of soil moisture classes. In a second step we used additional information from spatially high resolution optical data (ASTER) to improve the separability of open water areas from moisture/vegetated areas. PMID:18554774

Seiler, Ralf; Schmidt, Jana; Diallo, Ousmane; Csaplovics, Elmar

2009-05-01

333

Insights on How NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Monitors Our World Environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During this year, four EOS science missions were launched, representing observations of (1) total solar irradiance, (2) Earth radiation budget, (3) land cover and land use change, (4) ocean processes (vector wind, sea surface temperature, and ocean color), (5) atmospheric processes (aerosol and cloud properties, water vapor, and temperature and moisture profiles), and (6) tropospheric chemistry. In succeeding years many more satellites will be launched that will contribute immeasurably to our understanding of the Earth's environment. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using EOS data to examine land use and natural hazards, environmental air quality, including dust storms over the world's deserts, cloud and radiation properties, sea surface temperature, and winds over the ocean.

King, Michael D.

2000-01-01

334

On the modeling of planetary plasma environments by a fully kinetic electromagnetic global model HYB-em  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have developed a fully kinetic electromagnetic model to study instabilities and waves in planetary plasma environments. In the particle-in-a-cell (PIC) model both ions and electrons are modeled as particles. An important feature of the developed global kinetic model, called HYB-em, compared to other electromagnetic codes is that it is built up on an earlier quasi-neutral hybrid simulation platform called

V. Pohjola; E. Kallio

2010-01-01

335

A Multimodel Global Drought Information System (GDIS) for Near Real-Time Monitoring of Surface Water Conditions (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While the absolute magnitude of economic losses associated with weather and climate disasters such as droughts is greatest in the developed world, the relative impact is much larger in the developing world, where agriculture typically constitutes a much larger percentage of the labor force and food insecurity is a major concern. Nonetheless, our ability to monitor and predict the development and occurrence of droughts at a global scale in near real-time is limited and long-term records of soil moisture are essentially non-existent globally The problem is particularly critical given that many of the most damaging droughts occur in parts of the world that are most deficient in terms of in situ precipitation observations. In recent years, a number of near real-time drought monitoring systems have been developed with regional or global extent. While direct observations of key variables such as moisture storage are missing, the evolution of land surface models that are globally applicable provides a means of reconstructing them. The implementation of a multi-model drought monitoring system is described, which provides near real-time estimates of surface moisture storage for the global land areas between 50S and 50N with a time lag of about one day. Near real-time forcings are derived from satellite-based precipitation estimates and modeled air temperatures. The system is distinguished from other operational systems in that it uses multiple land surface models to simulate surface moisture storage, which are then combined to derive a multi-model estimate of drought. Previous work has shown that while land surface models agree in broad context, particularly in terms of soil moisture percentiles, important differences remain, which motivates a multi-model ensemble approach. The system is an extension of similar systems developed by at the University of Washington for the Pacific Northwest and for the United States, but global application of the protocols used in the U.S. systems poses new challenges, particularly with respect to the generation of meteorological forcings that drive the land surface models. Agricultural and hydrological droughts are inherently defined in the context of a long-term climatology. Changes in observing platforms can be misinterpreted as droughts (or as excessively wet periods). This problem cannot simply be addressed through the addition of more observations or through the development of new observing platforms. Instead, it will require careful (re)construction of long-term records that are updated in near real-time in a consistent manner so that changes in surface meteorological forcings reflect actual conditions rather than changes in methods or sources.

Nijssen, B.

2013-12-01

336

Dust storm monitoring: effects on the environment, human health, and potential security conflicts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monitoring dust storms with recently available medium and moderate resolution satellites (Meris, Modis and SeaWiFS) is providing new global information regarding the sources, transportation tracks and affected areas. Saharan dust plumes reach the SE region of the United States and the Caribbean region in summer and the Amazon basin in winter. Generally these Saharan plumes branch off in dust tracks along the North Atlantic reaching Western Europe as far north as the Scandinavian countries. Furthermore, dust storms originating in the Eastern Sahara and Northern African deserts form dust plumes propagated by the Sirocco winds that, after crossing the Mediterranean Sea, affect Southern and Central Europe particularly during spring and summer. Dust storms originating in the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts blow in an easterly direction propagating dust plumes affecting Korea, Japan and reach the United States after crossing the Pacific Ocean. The large amount of cyclic deposition generated by dust storms produces an environmental impact that causes the decay of coral reefs in the Caribbean, the origin and distribution of red tides and the disappearance of sea grasses. The relationship of dust plumes with the increasing number of asthma and allergy cases in the Caribbean correlates well with the appearance of similar cases in Europe and elsewhere during the mid 1980s. The recurrence presence of insecticides in regions where these products were banned long ago, or where they were never used, may be partly due to Saharan dust plumes. The loss of agricultural soil, literally blown away by dust storms in the source areas, creates hardship, hunger and forced-migration. Dust storms should be considered as an important security issue.

Davara, Fernando; de la Cruz, Antonio

2004-10-01

337

U.S. Interests and the Global Environment. Occasional Paper 35.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay presents an argument for policies responsive to global environmental needs by examining the causes and consequences of six critical environmental issues, and then offering specific U.S. policy recommendations. Following an explanation of the global nature of environmental problems, a summary of the salient facts regarding the following…

Caldwell, Lynton K.

338

Reflecting changes in global business environment, nimble curriculum provides executives relevant, practical, and timely MBA education  

E-print Network

Times. This builds on The Wall Street Journal ranking which placed the Rutgers EMBA program 8th Street Journal Ranked #20 globally by The Wall Street Journal Ranked #5 globally in Strategy and #6 to the Powerhouse: Ranked #13 in the US by Financial Times Ranked #8 in Return on Investment in the US by The Wall

Lin, Xiaodong

339

Vision-based global localization in indoor environment with an object entity-based hybrid map  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new object entity based global localization approach with stereo camera. A local invariant feature and stereo depth information are used as visual features. The map we use here is a hybrid of global topological map and local object location map. The topological map includes some semantic information about the representing space and the object entities in

Howon Cheong; Mignon Park; Sung-Kee Park

2007-01-01

340

Unattended wireless proximity sensor networks for counterterrorism, force protection, littoral environments, PHM, and tamper monitoring ground applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a digital-ultrasonic ground network, which forms an unique "unattended mote sensor system" for monitoring the environment, personnel, facilities, vehicles, power generation systems or aircraft in Counter-Terrorism, Force Protection, Prognostic Health Monitoring (PHM) and other ground applications. Unattended wireless smart sensor/tags continuously monitor the environment and provide alerts upon changes or disruptions to the environment. These wireless smart sensor/tags are networked utilizing ultrasonic wireless motes, hybrid RF/Ultrasonic Network Nodes and Base Stations. The network is monitored continuously with a 24/7 remote and secure monitoring system. This system utilizes physical objects such as a vehicle"s structure or a building to provide the media for two way secure communication of key metrics and sensor data and eliminates the "blind spots" that are common in RF solutions because of structural elements of buildings, etc. The digital-ultrasonic sensors have networking capability and a 32-bit identifier, which provide a platform for a robust data acquisition (DAQ) for a large amount of sensors. In addition, the network applies a unique "signature" of the environment by comparing sensor-to-sensor data to pick up on minute changes, which would signal an invasion of unknown elements or signal a potential tampering in equipment or facilities. The system accommodates satellite and other secure network uplinks in either RF or UWB protocols. The wireless sensors can be dispersed by ground or air maneuvers. In addition, the sensors can be incorporated into the structure or surfaces of vehicles, buildings, or clothing of field personnel.

Forcier, Bob

2003-09-01

341

Monitoring of the Environment at the Transplant Unit—Hemato-Oncology Clinic  

PubMed Central

Aims: Aim of this study was to monitor the environment at the Transplant Unit—Hemato-Oncology Clinic, University Hospital Olomouc (Olomouc, Czech Republic) and identify risks for the patients. Methods and Results: Microorganisms were cultivated under standard aerobic conditions. Strains were biochemically identified using the BD Phoenix™ PID Panel (USA). Legionella pneumophila was identified by DNA sequencing. From the air, the most frequently isolated strains were coagulase-negative staphylococci (94.3%), Micrococcus spp. and Bacillus spp. No Gram-negative strains were isolated from the air. From the surfaces, the most frequently isolated Gram-positive strains were coagulase-negative staphylococci (67.4%), Bacillus spp., enterococci (5.5%), Staphylococcus aureus (2.3%) and Micrococcus spp. (1.7%). From the surfaces, the most frequently isolated Gram-negative strains were from genera Pseudomonas (28%), Enterobacter (28%), E. coli (6%), and Klebsiella spp. (5%). From the personnel, the most frequently isolated Gram-positive strains were coagulase-negative staphylococci (59.6%), Bacillus spp. (24.1%) and Staphylococcus aureus (9.8%). From the personnel, the most frequently isolated Gram-negative strains were Enterobacter spp. (61%), Klebsiella oxytoca (18%), and E. coli (11%). Microscopic filamentous fungi were isolated in 13 cases (2.71%). Isolated strains were Aspergillus spp. (4), Trichoderma spp. (2), Penicillium spp. (2), one case of the strains Paecilomyces spp., Eurotium spp., Monilia spp. Conclusions: The study found no significant deviations in the microbial contamination of the cleanroom air. The personnel entrance of the Transplant Unit represent a high risk area, an extreme value (7270 CFU/m3) was recorded. Regime measures are fully effective, no other deficiencies were found. Significance and Impact of the Study: This epidemiological study, which was held for the duration of one year at the Transplant Unit—Hemato-Oncology Clinic, University Hospital Olomouc. The study monitored microbial contamination of the cleanroom air, surfaces, water, colonization of the personnel by bacterial strains of epidemiological consequence. PMID:25222472

Matoušková, Ivanka; Holy, Ond?ej

2014-01-01

342

Chemical fate, latitudinal distribution and long-range transport of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in the global environment: a modeling assessment.  

PubMed

Cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) such as octamethycyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethycyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) are widely used as intermediates in the synthesis of high-molecular weight silicone polymers or as ingredients in the formulation of personal care products. The global environmental fate, latitudinal distribution, and long range transport of those cVMS were analyzed by two multimedia chemical fate models using the best available physicochemical properties as inputs and known persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and highly persistent volatile organic chemicals ("fliers") as reference. The global transport and accumulation characteristics of cVMS differ from those of typical POPs in three significant ways. First, a large fraction of the released cVMS tends to become airborne and is removed from the global environment by degradation in air, whereas known POPs have a tendency to be distributed and persistent in all media. Secondly, although cVMS can travel a substantial distance in the atmosphere, they have little potential for deposition to surface media in remote regions. This contrasts with a deposition potential of known POPs that exceeds that of cVMS by 4-5 orders of magnitude. Thirdly, cVMS have short global residence times with the majority of the global mass removed within 3months of the end of release. Global residence times of POPs on the other hand are in years. The persistent fliers resemble the cVMS with respect to the first two attributes, but their global residence times are more like those of the POPs. PMID:23177006

Xu, Shihe; Wania, Frank

2013-10-01

343

Monitoring the Impact of Anthropogenic and Natural Influences on the Environment of Mesoamerica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mesoamerica - composed of the seven Central American countries and the five southernmost states of Mexico - is one of the richest biological regions in the world. The region is home to approximately eight percent of the planet's biodiversity. There are 14 biosphere reserves, eight world heritage sites and 589 protected areas. The human population, of over 45 million people consists of more than 50 ethnic groups. This rich biological and cultural diversity is threatened by human influence and natural disasters. Illegal logging and slash and burn agriculture are major contributors to extensive deforestation. Earthquakes, volcanoes, drought, and severe storms threaten the region. Of particular note is the massive destruction and loss of life resulting from hurricane Mitch in 1998. An international effort is underway to preserve the remaining forested regions, with its biodiversity, and to promote sustained development throughout the region. In 2002 the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) joined with the World Bank and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) to work with the Central American Commission for Environment and Development (CCAD), to develop an advanced decision support system for Mesoamerica known as SERVIR. (SERVIR is a Spanish acronym meaning to serve.) The partners are contributing expertise in space-based observation with information management technologies and intimate knowledge of local ecosystems to create a system for use by scientists, educators, and policy makers to monitor and forecast ecological changes, respond to natural disasters, and better understand both natural and human induced effects. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are concentrating on the preparation of data products and Information Technology applications that will integrate information from the entire region into a coherent information system that is easy to access and utilize. Already, numerous products derived from data from NASA's Earth-Sun Connection missions (formerly known as the Earth Science Enterprise) have been developed. Data from the MODIS instrument is being used to create imagery products that can be used to monitor the extent of fires, and the location of harmful algae blooms. Data from the NOAA GOES satellites are made available at 15 minute intervals for weather forecasting. Other data products are planned that will address issues such as local flooding and hot spots. Many other institutions, both in the United States and in Central America, are generating data products for the region. In an effort to make all of the information readily available, UAH is developing web services and related GIS applications. These technologies are designed to present the information in both two and three dimensions, giving the decision makers clear representations of the physical environment. By providing data products that accurately capture specific geophysical phenomena and, an information delivery system that combines inputs from each country, we are making inroads toward preserving the wealth to society that Mesoamerica provides.

Hardin, D.; Graves, S.; Sever, T.; Irwin, D.

2005-12-01

344

Global verification of atmospheric gamma radiation as a monitor of precipitation and its dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in atmospheric gamma radiation rates (GRR) due to radon progeny adsorbed by rain measured at 6-20 m above ground may be used as a reliable monitor of rain and snow precipitation rates (RPR and SPR, respectively). Monitoring GRR in Mitaka, Japan with four 12.9 cm3 NaI detectors enabled consistent determinations of RPR and SPR to within 0.3 mm\\/hr limited

M. Greenfield; G. Austin; B. A. Demeijer; A. Domondon; J. Donoghue; S. Garimella; W. Henson; Y. Ikeda; R. L. Koomans; M. K. Kubo; J. Limburg; A. McArthur; A. Peace; D. Stow; M. Tomiyama; S. Tsuchiya

2003-01-01

345

Cytokinesis block micronucleus assay in field plants for monitoring radiation-induced genotoxicity of the environment.  

PubMed

Effective biomonitoring for detection of radiation-induced genotoxicity of contaminants in natural environments involves testing of field plants for cytogenetic changes. To increase the efficiency and precision of cytogenetic analyses of field plants that have naturally high individual variability, an improved micronucleus assay is proposed that employs a cytokinesis block technique similar to the lymphocyte test system used in mammals. In seed embryonic meristems of the Japanese cedar, application of a methylxanthine derivative, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), was found to be effective in inhibiting cytokinesis to make once-divided cells easily recognizable by their binucleate appearance. In the meristem of IBMX-treated seminal roots from X-ray-irradiated seeds, variation in micronucleus frequency in the binucleate cell population was reduced compared to that in the total cell population. The highest efficiency of measurement of micronucleus frequencies was obtained in the root meristems where 0.2- to 1.5-mm-long seminal roots were incubated with IBMX for 24 h. This result indicated that this root elongation stage corresponded to the first divisions of the root meristematic cells, and was therefore suitable for obtaining reliable estimations of accumulated genetic damage in the seeds. This cytokinesis block assay applied specifically at the root elongation stage was then used to examine dose-response relationships in Japanese cedar seeds irradiated either acutely with X-rays or chronically with ?-rays. The resulting dose-response curve for the acute X-ray irradiation was fitted onto a linear-quadratic regression curve, whereas the dose-response curve for the chronic ?-irradiation matched a linear regression line better. Both dose-response curves were consistent with the target theory of classical radiation biology. The good agreement of the micronucleus data to a simple dose-response model indicates the proposed accuracy of the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay for plant monitoring. PMID:25440909

Watanabe, Yoshito; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Fuma, Shoichi; Kouichi, Maruyama; Ichikawa, San'ei; Kubota, Masahide; Yoshida, Satoshi

2014-11-01

346

Organophosphorus pollutants (OPP) in aquatic environment at Damietta Governorate, Egypt: implications for monitoring and biomarker responses.  

PubMed

The study was carried out from spring 1999 to spring 2001 to monitor the residue levels of organophosphorus pollutants (OPP) in aquatic environment of the drainage canal surrounding a pesticide factory at Damietta Governorate. Water, sediment, and fish samples were collected at six different seasonal periods. OPPs were analyzed by GLC and confirmed using GC-MS. Chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-methyl, malathion, diazinon, pirimiphos-methyl and profenofos were detected in most samples. Chlorpyrifos was dominant in all water and sediment samples. It was ranged from 24.5 to 303.8 and 0.9 to 303.8 ppb in water and sediment samples, respectively. Diazinon level was slightly similar to chlorpyrifos in fish samples. Data based on the grand total concentration of OPP showed that the most polluted samples were collected either at spring 1999 or autumn 2000. They were 675.5 and 303.8 ppb in water samples and 43.0 and 52.2 ppb in fish collected at spring 1999 and autumn 2000, respectively. The obtained results are in parallel to that found in case of cholinesterase activity where the activity of both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) was declined at these seasonal period. The activity levels of AChE and BuChE were found to be 77.18% and 59.67% of control at spring 1999 and 78.62% and 85.80% of control, at autumn 2000, respectively. Thus, AChE and BuChE could be used as biomarkers for tracing and biomonitoring OPP pollution. PMID:16289700

Abdel-Halim, K Y; Salama, A K; El-Khateeb, E N; Bakry, N M

2006-06-01

347

Spectroscopic study of firefly oxyluciferin in an enzymatic environment on the basis of stability monitoring.  

PubMed

To understand the influence of the enzyme microenvironment on the properties of the emitter oxyluciferin (OL) in firefly bioluminescence, we investigated the spectroscopic characteristics of OL in a complex with the enzyme luciferase formed in a consumed reaction mixture. By monitoring the in situ absorption spectra, we analyzed the enzymatic synthesis and the stability of OL in luciferase environment. The absorption spectra of OL in Photinus pyralis luciferase showed that the dominant form was neutral OL, probably the enol form, which emitted blue fluorescence (?450 nm). A monoanionic OL emitting green fluorescence (?560 nm) exhibited a weak pH-dependent equilibrium with the neutral enol-OL. The red-emitting form of OL was almost completely absent from the consumed reaction mixture. The peak wavelengths of the green and red emissions of the fluorescence and bioluminescence were similar, but the peak intensities, and hence the spectral shapes, differed greatly. The above characteristics were also found in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of OL in a complex with the H433Y mutant of Luciola cruciata luciferase, which catalyzes pH-independent red bioluminescence. Optical excitation could not reproduce the excited states of bioluminescence that was generated from the chemical reaction. The probable reason is that the chemical excited states formed from a keto-like transition state after decomposition of a dioxetanone intermediate, whereas the optical excited states were generated by exciting the neutral enol-OL. Different luciferases only influenced the chemical transition state during the bioluminescence reaction; they did not influence the ground states or optical excited states after the reaction. PMID:24491124

Wang, Yu; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Akiyama, Hidefumi

2014-02-27

348

On the modeling of planetary plasma environments by a fully kinetic electromagnetic global model HYB-em  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a fully kinetic electromagnetic model to study instabilities and waves in planetary plasma environments. In the particle-in-a-cell (PIC) model both ions and electrons are modeled as particles. An important feature of the developed global kinetic model, called HYB-em, compared to other electromagnetic codes is that it is built up on an earlier quasi-neutral hybrid simulation platform called HYB and that it can be used in conjunction with earlier hybrid models. The HYB models have been used during the past ten years to study globally the flowing plasma interaction with various Solar System objects: Mercury, Venus, the Moon, Mars, Saturnian moon Titan and asteroids. The new stand-alone fully kinetic model enables us to (1) study the stability of various planetary plasma regions in three-dimensional space, (2) analyze the propagation of waves in a plasma environment derived from the other global HYB models. All particle processes in a multi-ion plasma which are implemented on the HYB platform (e.g. ion-neutral-collisions, chemical processes, particle loss and production processes) are also automatically included in HYB-em model. In this brief report we study the developed approach by analyzing the propagation of high frequency electromagnetic waves in non-magnetized plasma in two cases: We study (1) expansion of a spherical wave generated from a point source and (2) propagation of a plane wave in plasma. The analysis shows that the HYB-em model is capable of describing these space plasma situations successfully. The analysis also suggests the potential of the developed model to study both high density-high magnetic field plasma environments, such as Mercury, and low density-low magnetic field plasma environments, such as Venus and Mars.

Pohjola, V.; Kallio, E.

2010-03-01

349

Global warming, energy efficiency and the role of the built environment  

E-print Network

This thesis attempts to explore the relationships between the Buildings Sector, energy efficiency and global warming. Through a qualitative analysis the author illustrates the connection between these three areas and shows ...

DiBona, Donna K

2008-01-01

350

Mapping Global Urban Extent and Intensity for Environmental Monitoring and Modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The human dimensions of global environmental change have received increased attention in policy, decision- making, research, and even the media. However, the influence of urban areas in global change processes is still often assumed to be negligible. Although local environmental conditions such as the urban heat island effect are well-documented, little or no work has focused on cross-scale interactions, or the ways in which local urban processes cumulatively impact global changes. Given the rapid rates of rural-urban migration, economic development and urban spatial expansion, it is becoming increasingly clear that the `ecological footprint' of cities may play a critical role in environmental changes at regional and global scales. Our understanding of the cumulative impacts of urban areas on natural systems has been limited foremost by a lack of reliable, accurate data on current urban form and extent at the global scale. The data sets that have emerged to fill this gap (LandScan, GRUMP, nighttime lights) suffer from a number of limitations that prevent widespread use. Building on our early efforts with MODIS data, our current work focuses on: (1) completing a new, validated map of global urban extent; and (2) developing methods to estimate the subpixel fraction of impervious surface, vegetation, and other land cover types within urbanized areas using coarse resolution satellite imagery. For the first task, a technique called boosting is used to improve classification accuracy and provides a means to integrate 500 m resolution MODIS data with ancillary data sources. For the second task, we present an approach for estimating percent cover that relies on continuous training data for a full range of city types. These exemplars are used as inputs to fuzzy neural network and regression tree algorithms to predict fractional amounts of land cover types with increased accuracy. Preliminary results for a global sample of 100 cities (which vary in population size, level of economic development, and spatial extent) show good agreement with the expected morphology in each region.

Schneider, A.; Friedl, M. A.

2007-05-01

351

Global Fluency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Defines global fluency as a facility with cultural behaviors that help an organization thrive in an ever-changing global business environment; and discusses business culture, global culture, an example of a change effort at a global company, leadership values, company values, and defining global values and practices. (Author/LRW)

Tosti, Donald T.

1999-01-01

352

Environment, Complexity and Professional Training in Agriculture. "Turning Local Learning into Global Knowledge."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Training farmers to care for the environment must address the complex relationship between farming and the environment. The example of maize weeding in France demonstrates the process of decision making on a farm and the need for teaching about complexity and adopting a pragmatic approach to training. (SK)

Prevost, P.

1994-01-01

353

Long-term mobility monitoring of older adults using accelerometers in a clinical environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the accuracy of accelerometer-based mobility monitoring during extended measurements on older adults in a clinical setting and to evaluate two different approaches to thresholding.Design: The monitoring device consisted of two Analog Devices ADXL202 accelerometers, an ambulatory data-logger and associated cabling. The monitoring system used custom-designed analysis software to detect activities of daily living, namely duration of sitting,

K M Culhane; G M Lyons; D Hilton; P A Grace; D Lyons

2004-01-01

354

Remote sensing of gene expression in Planta: transgenic plants as monitors of exogenous stress perception in extraterrestrial environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Transgenic arabidopsis plants containing the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene were developed as biological sensors for monitoring physiological responses to unique environments. Plants were monitored in vivo during exposure to hypoxia, high salt, cold, and abcissic acid in experiments designed to characterize the utility and responses of the Adh/GFP biosensors. Plants in the presence of environmental stimuli that induced the Adh promoter responded by expressing GFP, which in turn generated a detectable fluorescent signal. The GFP signal degraded when the inducing stimulus was removed. Digital imaging of the Adh/GFP plants exposed to each of the exogenous stresses demonstrated that the stress-induced gene expression could be followed in real time. The experimental results established the feasibility of using a digital monitoring system for collecting gene expression data in real time from Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) biosensor plants during space exploration experiments.

Manak, Michael S.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Sehnke, Paul C.; Ferl, Robert J.

2002-01-01

355

TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect

Eric Karsenti of EMBL delivers the closing keynote on "TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Karsenti, Eric [EMBL Heidelberg

2013-03-01

356

The Challenges of Developing a Framework for Global Water Cycle Monitoring and Prediction (Alfred Wegener Medal Lecture)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) Water Strategy ("From Observations to Decisions") recognizes that "water is essential for ensuring food and energy security, for facilitating poverty reduction and health security, and for the maintenance of ecosystems and biodiversity", and that water cycle data and observations are critical for improved water management and water security - especially in less developed regions. The GEOSS Water Strategy has articulated a number of goals for improved water management, including flood and drought preparedness, that include: (i) facilitating the use of Earth Observations for water cycle observations; (ii) facilitating the acquisition, processing, and distribution of data products needed for effective management; (iii) providing expertise, information systems, and datasets to the global, regional, and national water communities. There are several challenges that must be met to advance our capability to provide near real-time water cycle monitoring, early warning of hydrological hazards (floods and droughts) and risk assessment under climate change, regionally and globally. Current approaches to monitoring and predicting hydrological hazards are limited in many parts of the world, and especially in developing countries where national capacity is limited and monitoring networks are inadequate. This presentation describes the developments at Princeton University towards a seamless monitoring and prediction framework at all time scales that allows for consistent assessment of water variability from historic to current conditions, and from seasonal and decadal predictions to climate change projections. At the center of the framework is an experimental, global water cycle monitoring and seasonal forecast system that has evolved out of regional and continental systems for the US and Africa. The system is based on land surface hydrological modeling that is driven by satellite remote sensing precipitation to predict current hydrological conditions, flood potential and the state of drought. Seasonal climate model forecasts are downscaled and bias-corrected to drive the land surface model to provide hydrological forecasts and drought products out 6-9 months. The system relies on historic reconstructions of water variability over the 20th century, which forms the background climatology to which current conditions can be assessed. Future changes in water availability and drought risk are quantified based on bias-corrected and downscaled climate model projections that are used to drive the land surface models. For regions with lack of on-the-ground data we are field-testing low-cost environmental sensors and along with new satellite products for terrestrial hydrology and vegetation, integrating these into the system for improved monitoring and prediction. At every step there are scientific challenges whose solutions are only partially being solved. In addition there are challenges in delivering such systems as "climate services", especially to societies with low technical capacity such as rural agriculturalists in sub-Saharan Africa, but whose needs for such information are great. We provide an overview of the system and some examples of real-world applications to flood and drought events, with a focus on Africa.

Wood, Eric F.

2014-05-01

357

Monitoring minimization of grade B environments based on risk assessment using three-dimensional airflow measurements and computer simulation.  

PubMed

A practical, risk-based monitoring approach using the combined data collected from actual experiments and computer simulations was developed for the qualification of an EU GMP Annex 1 Grade B, ISO Class 7 area. This approach can locate and minimize the representative number of sampling points used for microbial contamination risk assessment. We conducted a case study on an aseptic clean room, newly constructed and specifically designed for the use of a restricted access barrier system (RABS). Hotspots were located using three-dimensional airflow analysis based on a previously published empirical measurement method, the three-dimensional airflow analysis. Local mean age of air (LMAA) values were calculated based on computer simulations. Comparable results were found using actual measurements and simulations, demonstrating the potential usefulness of such tools in estimating contamination risks based on the airflow characteristics of a clean room. Intensive microbial monitoring and particle monitoring at the Grade B environmental qualification stage, as well as three-dimensional airflow analysis, were also conducted to reveal contamination hotspots. We found representative hotspots were located at perforated panels covering the air exhausts where the major piston airflows collect in the Grade B room, as well as at any locations within the room that were identified as having stagnant air. However, we also found that the floor surface air around the exit airway of the RABS EU GMP Annex 1 Grade A, ISO Class 5 area was always remarkably clean, possibly due to the immediate sweep of the piston airflow, which prevents dispersed human microbes from falling in a Stokes-type manner on settling plates placed on the floor around the Grade A exit airway. In addition, this airflow is expected to be clean with a significantly low LMAA. Based on these observed results, we propose a simplified daily monitoring program to monitor microbial contamination in Grade B environments. To locate hotspots we propose using a combination of computer simulation, actual airflow measurements, and intensive environmental monitoring at the qualification stage. Thereafter, instead of particle or microbial air monitoring, we recommend the use of microbial surface monitoring at the main air exhaust. These measures would be sufficient to assure the efficiency of the monitoring program, as well as to minimize the number of surface sampling points used in environments surrounding a RABS. PMID:19174953

Katayama, Hirohito; Higo, Takashi; Tokunaga, Yuji; Katoh, Shigeo; Hiyama, Yukio; Morikawa, Kaoru

2008-01-01

358

Monitoring and assessing global impacts of roads and off-road vehicle traffic  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Rapid increases in the number of vehicles, urban sprawl, exurban development and infrastructure development for energy and water have led to dramatic increases in both the size and extent of the global road network. Anecdotal evidence suggests that off-road vehicle traffic has also increased in many...

359

Global Hawk monitors hurricane eye wall development - Duration: 0:41.  

NASA Video Gallery

The Global Hawk UAV flies over Hurricane Karl to reveal a hot tower. Red shows reflectivity that is 12 km from the surface, orange is 10 km, yellow is 7.5 km, green is 6 km, and blue is under 6 km....

360

Using global information technology to detect, monitor, and control mosquito pest and disease vector populations.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Geographic Information Systems (GIS), image analysis, and remote sensing comprise global information technologies that are used to characterize pest and vector populations of mosquitoes. At this national meeting, scientists from ARS and McNeese State University organized and convened a half-day sym...

361

Intelligent environment for monitoring Alzheimer patients, agent technology for health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an autonomous intelligent agent developed for monitoring Alzheimer patients' health care in execution time in geriatric residences. The AGALZ (Autonomous aGent for monitoring ALZheimer patients) is an autonomous deliberative case-based planner agent designed to plan the nurses' working time dynamically, to maintain the standard working reports about the nurses' activities, and to guarantee that the patients assigned

Juan M. Corchado; Javier Bajo; Yanira De Paz; Dante I. Tapia

2008-01-01

362

Global long-term monitoring of the ozone layer - a prerequisite for predictions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the Montreal Protocol now controls the production and emission of ozone depleting substances, the timing of ozone recovery is unclear. There are many other factors affecting the ozone layer, in particular climate change is expected to modify the speed of re-creation of the ozone layer. Therefore, long- term observations are needed to monitor the further evolution of the stratospheric

D. G. Loyola; R. M. Coldewey-Egbers; M. Dameris; H. Garny; A. Stenke; M. van Roozendael; C. Lerot; D. Balis; M. Koukouli

2009-01-01

363

CARTOGRAPHIC AND GEOMETRIC COMPONENTS OF A GLOBAL SAMPLING DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

EPA Science Inventory

A comprehensive environmental monitoring program based on a sound statistical design is necessary to provide estimates of the status of, and trends in, the condition of ecological resources. ampling design based upon a systematic grid can adequately assess the condition of many t...

364

Ability of the Geo-environment and Oceans to Support the Global Population  

E-print Network

to meet the demand (Marsdon, 2009). It has been suggested that it would be wise to save oil relied heavily on coal and oil for heating and energy have found themselves becoming responsible for global climate change at the same time as they are facing the prospect that oil supply may soon be unable

Coles, Cynthia

365

2. INTRODUCTION With the increasing public concern on the global environment,  

E-print Network

technology. Due to the low power density of the current battery technology, the electric cars also tend fuel consumption. The appearance of electric cars is the consequence of this global trend to push clean is one of the major sources of greenhouse gas emission. Small and light cars become popular for their low

Zha, Gecheng

366

NEW DIRECTIONS IN A CHANGING GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT: FOREIGN POLICY IN POST-APARTHEID SOUTH AFRICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foreign policy issues pose questions of inherent interest to political geographers. The ‘new’ South Africa entered a dramatically changed global milieu. The international community was eager to receive it, and expected much from it. South Africa's stance on foreign policy issues at regional, continental, South-South and South-North scales poses many questions, and its initial policies were widely criticised as lacking

ANTHONY LEMON

2000-01-01

367

Once upon a Future Time: Thoughts on the Global Environment and LRE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that law-related education should prepare students to be able to debate global environmental issues. Discusses overpopulation, water quality, and species extinction. Concludes that law-related education's critical contribution may be to prepare citizens to balance competing interests and make decisions that promote the common good. (CFR)

Williams, Mary Louise

1993-01-01

368

The Global Environment Facility and biodiversity conservation: lessons to date and suggestions for future action  

Microsoft Academic Search

The last five years in particular have seen increasing attention paid to biodiversity. This culminated at the Earth Summit last June with the completion of Agenda 21 and a major international Convention on Biological Diversity, a document signed by some 165 nations. Concurrent with the Convention negotiations was the development of a global fund for biodiversity conservation and other environmental

R. A. Mittermeier; I. A. Bowles

1993-01-01

369

Fluorocarbons in the global environment: a review of the important interactions with atmospheric chemistry and physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluorocarbon impact on ozone depletion is reviewed together with the efficacy of the Montreal Protocol in acting to correct the imbalance between stratospheric ozone production and destruction. The Protocol is also helping to reduce global warming: CFCs are shown to be currently the largest fluorocarbon contributors to climate change. Relative contributions to climate change from CFCs and their HFC substitutes

Archie McCulloch

2003-01-01

370

Evaluating The Global Inventory of Planetary Analog Environments on Earth: An Ontological Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction: Field sites on Earth are routinely used to simulate planetary environments so that we can try to understand the evidence of processes such as sedimentary deposition, weathering, evolution of habitable environments, and behavior of spacecraft and instrumentation prior to selection of mission architectures, payload investigations and landing sites for in situ exploration of other planets. The rapid evolution of astrobiology science drivers for space exploration as well as increasing capability to explore planetary surfaces in situ has led to a proliferation of declarations that various Earth environments are analogs for less accessible planetary environments. We have not yet progressed to standardized measures of analog fidelity, and the analog value of field sites can be variable de-pending upon a variety of factors. Here we present a method of evaluating the fidelity and hence utility of analog environments by using an ontological approach to evaluating how well the analogs work. The use of ontologies as specification constructs is now quite common in artificial intelligence, systems engineering, business development and various informatics systems. We borrow from these developments just as they derive from the original use of ontology in philosophy, where it was meant as a systematic approach to describing the fundamental elements that define “being,” or existence [1]. An ontology is a framework for the specification of a concept or domain of interest. The knowledge regarding that domain, eg., inventory of objects, hierarchical classes, relationships and functions is what describes and defines the domain as a declarative formalism [2]. In the case of planetary environments, one can define a list of fundamen-tal attributes without which the domain (environment) in question must be defined (classified) otherwise. In particu-lar this is problematic when looking at ancient environments because of their alteration over time. In other words, their fundamental attributes may no longer exist and have to be reconstructed. In the case of Earth analogs for Mars, there are important distinctions that cannot be duplicated in contemporary Earth environments—we cannot produce the same surface conditions with respect to thermal fluctuation, ionizing radiation and extremely oxidizing chemistry. Mars analogs on Earth: We have studied the habitability of several desert environments on Earth by measuring their chemical, physical and biological features. These locations, which include Battleship Promontory in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica; several sites in Svalbard, the arctic; the Imperial Dunes in southern California and Amboy Crater in the Mojave Desert, CA, form the basis for a trial ontology of analog environments which have varying degrees of analogy to potential environments of interest on Mars for exploration of its habitability potential. We present a trial taxonomy for Mars analog environments to which we can add the attributes of other environments advocated as Earth analogs for Mars. References: [1] Bunge,M.,Treatise on Basic Philosophy: Ontology I, The Furniture of the World, Reidel, 1977. [2] Gruber, T. R., (1993). Knowledge Acquisition, 5(2):199-220.

Conrad, P. G.

2010-12-01

371

AQUARIUS: A Passive/Active Microwave Sensor to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity Globally from Space  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Salinity is important for understanding ocean dynamics, energy exchange with the atmosphere and the global water cycle. Existing data is limited and much of the ocean has never even been sampled. Sea surface salinity can be measured remotely by satellite and a three year mission for this purpose called AquariudSAC-D has recently been selected by NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program. The objective is to map the salinity field globally with a spatial resolution of 100 km and a monthly average accuracy of 0.2 psu. The mission, scheduled for launch in 2008, is a partnership of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) and the Argentine Comision National de Actividades Epaciales (CONAE).

LeVine, David; Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Colomb, F. Raul; Chao, Yi

2004-01-01

372

Global positioning system reobservations over the Eastern United States Strain Monitoring Network  

SciTech Connect

In the period March--May, 1990, a 45 station geodetic network, originally established in November--December, 1987, was reobserved using global positioning system (GPS) technology. This network, known as the Eastern US Strain network, was established for the purpose of determining strain and deformation in the central and eastern US. This 1990 reobservation was the first of a series of reobservations scheduled to take place over a decade in order to place meaningful constraints on the small differential movements involved.

Strange, W.E. [National Geodetic Survey, Silver Spring, MD (United States)] [National Geodetic Survey, Silver Spring, MD (United States)

1996-06-01

373

Monitoring Multitemporal Soil Moisture, Rainfall, and ET in Lake Manatee Watershed, South Florida under Global Changes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ni-Bin Chang1, Ammarin Daranpob 1, and Y. Jeffrey Yang2 1Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering Department, University of Central Florida, Orlando FL, USA 2Water Supply and Water Resources Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA ASBTRACT: Global climate change and its related impacts on water supply are universally recognized. The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), which is based

N. Chang

2009-01-01

374

33 Years of Near-Global Daily Precipitation from Multisatellite Observations and its Application to Drought Monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

PERSIANN Climate Data Record (PERSIANN-CDR) is a new retrospective satellite-based precipitation data set that is constructed for long-term hydrological and climate studies. The PERSIANN-CDR is a near-global (60°S-60°N) long-term (1980-2012), multi-satellite, high-resolution precipitation product that provides rain rate estimates at 0.25° and daily spatiotemporal resolution. PERSIANN-CDR is aimed at addressing the need for a consistent, long-term, high resolution precipitation data set for studying the spatial and temporal variations and changes of precipitation patterns, particularly in a scale relevant to climate extremes at the global scale. PERSIANN-CDR is generated from the PERSIANN algorithm using GridSat-B1 infrared data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). PERSIANN-CDR is adjusted using the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) monthly precipitation to maintain consistency of two data sets at 2.5° monthly scale throughout the entire reconstruction period. PERSIANN-CDR daily precipitation data demonstrates considerable consistency with both GPCP monthly and GPCP 1DD precipitation products. Verification studies over Hurricane Katrina show that PERSIANN-CDR has a good agreement with NCEP Stage IV radar data, noting that PERSIANN-CDR has better spatial coverage. In addition, the Probability Density Function (PDF) of PERSIANN-CDR over the contiguous United States was compared with the PDFs extracted from CPC gauge data and the TMPA precipitation product. The experiment also shows good agreement of the PDF of PERSIANN-CDR with the PDFs of TMPA and CPC gauge data. The application of PERSIANN-CDR in regional and global drought monitoring is investigated. Consisting of more than three decades of high-resolution precipitation data, PERSIANN-CDR makes us capable of long-term assessment of droughts at a higher resolution (0.25°) than previously possible. The results will be presented at the meeting.

Ashouri, H.; Hsu, K.; Sorooshian, S.; Braithwaite, D.; Knapp, K. R.; Cecil, L. D.

2013-12-01

375

Bioindicators for Monitoring Radioactive Pollution of the  

E-print Network

* IK s Dfc2looX|o Risø-R-443 Bioindicators for Monitoring Radioactive Pollution of the Marine-R-443 BIOINDICATORS FOR MONITORING RADIOACTIVE POLLUTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT Experiments Dahlgaard Abstract. Mussels (Mytilus edulis) are globally used as bio- indicators for pollution of coastal

376

Monitoring Needs to Transform Amazonian Forest Maintenance Into a Global Warming-Mitigation Option  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two approaches are frequently mentioned in proposals to use tropical forest maintenance as a carbon offset. One is to set\\u000a up specific reserves, funding the establishment, demarcation, and guarding of these units. Monitoring, in this case, consists\\u000a of the relatively straightforward process of confirming that the forest stands in question continue to exist. In Amazonia,\\u000a where large expanses of tropical

Philip M. Fearnside

1997-01-01

377

Selecting the spatial resolution of satellite sensors required for global monitoring of land transformations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper provides preliminary evidence for the spatial resolutions required to monitor land transformations at broad scales. This is obtained from simulations of imagery at various spatial resolutions between 125 and 4000 m derived from Landsat MSS imagery. Consideration is given to the various types of spatial images detectable by remotely-sensed systems, as well as to the difficulties associated in disentangling permanent land transformations from shorter term changes such as phenological and interannual changes.

Townshend, J. R. G.; Justice, C. O.

1988-01-01

378

Conformance Monitoring Approaches in Current and Future Air Traffic Control Environments  

E-print Network

Conformance monitoring is a core task in Air Traffic Control (ATC) operations to determine whether aircraft are adhering to assigned trajectories. This is important for many reasons, including to ensure that tactical ...

Reynolds, Tom G.

379

Monitoring in situ stress changes in a mining environment with coda wave interferometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coda waves are highly sensitive to changes in the subsurface; we use this sensitivity to monitor small stress changes in an underground mine. We apply coda wave interferometry to seismic data excited by a hammer source, collected at an experimental hard rock mine in Idaho Springs, CO. We carried out a controlled stress-change experiment in a mine pillar and we show how coda wave interferometry can be used to monitor the in situ stress change with modest hardware requirements.

Grêt, Alexandre; Snieder, Roel; Özbay, U?ur

2006-11-01

380

Nuclear Power Plant environment`s surveillance by satellite remote sensing and in-situ monitoring data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main environmental issues affecting the broad acceptability of nuclear power plant are the emission of radioactive materials, the generation of radioactive waste, and the potential for nuclear accidents. All nuclear fission reactors, regardless of design, location, operator or regulator, have the potential to undergo catastrophic accidents involving loss of control of the reactor core, failure of safety systems and subsequent widespread fallout of hazardous fission products. Risk is the mathematical product of probability and consequences, so lowprobability and high-consequence accidents, by definition, have a high risk. NPP environment surveillance is a very important task in frame of risk assessment. Satellite remote sensing data had been applied for dosimeter levels first time for Chernobyl NPP accident in 1986. Just for a normal functioning of a nuclear power plant, multitemporal and multispectral satellite data in complementarily with field data are very useful tools for NPP environment surveillance and risk assessment. Satellite remote sensing is used as an important technology to help environmental research to support research analysis of spatio-temporal dynamics of environmental features nearby nuclear facilities. Digital processing techniques applied to several LANDSAT, MODIS and QuickBird data in synergy with in-situ data are used to assess the extent and magnitude of radiation and non-radiation effects on the water, near field soil, vegetation and air. As a test case the methodology was applied for for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Cernavoda, Romania. Thermal discharge from nuclear reactors cooling is dissipated as waste heat in Danube-Black -Sea Canal and Danube River. Water temperatures captured in thermal IR imagery are correlated with meteorological parameters. If during the winter thermal plume is localized to an area of a few km of NPP, the temperature difference between the plume and non-plume areas being about 1.5 oC, during summer and fall , is a larger thermal plume up to 5-6 km far along Danube Black Sea Canal ,the temperature change is about 1.0 oC.

Zoran, Maria

381

A monitor for the laboratory evaluation of control integrity in digital control systems operating in harsh electromagnetic environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a strategy for dynamically monitoring digital controllers in the laboratory for susceptibility to electromagnetic disturbances that compromise control integrity. The integrity of digital control systems operating in harsh electromagnetic environments can be compromised by upsets caused by induced transient electrical signals. Digital system upset is a functional error mode that involves no component damage, can occur simultaneously in all channels of a redundant control computer, and is software dependent. The motivation for this work is the need to develop tools and techniques that can be used in the laboratory to validate and/or certify critical aircraft controllers operating in electromagnetically adverse environments that result from lightning, high-intensity radiated fields (HIRF), and nuclear electromagnetic pulses (NEMP). The detection strategy presented in this paper provides dynamic monitoring of a given control computer for degraded functional integrity resulting from redundancy management errors, control calculation errors, and control correctness/effectiveness errors. In particular, this paper discusses the use of Kalman filtering, data fusion, and statistical decision theory in monitoring a given digital controller for control calculation errors.

Belcastro, Celeste M.; Fischl, Robert; Kam, Moshe

1992-01-01

382

Effects of Global Warming on Ancient Mammalian Communities and Their Environments  

PubMed Central

Background Current global warming affects the composition and dynamics of mammalian communities and can increase extinction risk; however, long-term effects of warming on mammals are less understood. Dietary reconstructions inferred from stable isotopes of fossil herbivorous mammalian tooth enamel document environmental and climatic changes in ancient ecosystems, including C3/C4 transitions and relative seasonality. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we use stable carbon and oxygen isotopes preserved in fossil teeth to document the magnitude of mammalian dietary shifts and ancient floral change during geologically documented glacial and interglacial periods during the Pliocene (?1.9 million years ago) and Pleistocene (?1.3 million years ago) in Florida. Stable isotope data demonstrate increased aridity, increased C4 grass consumption, inter-faunal dietary partitioning, increased isotopic niche breadth of mixed feeders, niche partitioning of phylogenetically similar taxa, and differences in relative seasonality with warming. Conclusion/Significance Our data show that global warming resulted in dramatic vegetation and dietary changes even at lower latitudes (?28°N). Our results also question the use of models that predict the long term decline and extinction of species based on the assumption that niches are conserved over time. These findings have immediate relevance to clarifying possible biotic responses to current global warming in modern ecosystems. PMID:19492043

DeSantis, Larisa R. G.; Feranec, Robert S.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

2009-01-01

383

Biodiversity Monitoring Using NGS Approaches on Unusual Substrates (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect

Tom Gilbert of the Natural History Museum of Denmark on "Biodiversity monitoring using NGS approaches on unusual substrates" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Gilbert, Tom [National History Museum of Denmark

2013-03-01

384

Global Channels of Evidence for Learning and Assessment in Complex Game Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we take a designer's look at how the activities and data of learning and assessment can be structured in immersive virtual game environments called Massively Multi-Player Online Games (MMOG). In doing so, we examine the channels of evidence through which learning and assessment activities are derived in MMOGs, offering examples of…

Nelson, Brian C.; Erlandson, Benjamin; Denham, Andre

2011-01-01

385

Home Musical Environment of Children in Singapore: On Globalization, Technology, and Media  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The home musical environments of a class of 28 first-grade children in Singapore were examined in this ethnographic study. Technology was an integral part of the soundscape in the home. The musical repertoire gathered was closely associated with electronic and pop-influenced music, approaching the styles favored by teens and adults. Particular…

Lum, Chee-Hoo

2008-01-01

386

Retrieval and molecule sensitivity studies for the global ozone monitoring experiment and the scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric chartography  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) are diode based spectrometers that will make atmospheric constituent and aerosol measurements from European satellite platforms beginning in the mid 1990's. GOME measures the atmosphere in the UV and visible in nadir scanning, while SCIAMACHY performs a combination of nadir, limb, and occultation measurements in the UV, visible, and infrared. A summary is presented of the sensitivity studies that were performed for SCIAMACHY measurements. As the GOME measurement capability is a subset of the SCIAMACHY measurement capability, the nadir, UV, and visible portion of the studies is shown to apply to GOME as well.

Chance, Kelly V.; Burrows, John P.; Schneider, Wolfgang

1991-01-01

387

A new method for monitoring global volcanic activity. [Alaska, Hawaii, Washington, California, Iceland, Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ERTS Data Collection System makes it feasible for the first time to monitor the level of activity at widely separated volcanoes and to relay these data rapidly to one central office for analysis. While prediction of specific eruptions is still an evasive goal, early warning of a reawakening of quiescent volcanoes is now a distinct possibility. A prototypical global volcano surveillance system was established under the ERTS program. Instruments were installed in cooperation with local scientists on 15 volcanoes in Alaska, Hawaii, Washington, California, Iceland, Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua. The sensors include 19 seismic event counters that count four different sizes of earthquakes and six biaxial borehole tiltmeters that measure ground tilt with a resolution of 1 microradian. Only seismic and tilt data are collected because these have been shown in the past to indicate most reliably the level of volcano activity at many different volcanoes. Furthermore, these parameters can be measured relatively easily with new instrumentation.

Ward, P. L.; Endo, E.; Harlow, D. H.; Allen, R.; Eaton, J. P.

1974-01-01

388

SoundProof: A Smartphone Platform for Wireless Monitoring of Wildlife and Environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are developing an open-source, low-cost wildlife and environmental monitoring solution based on Android smartphones. Using a smartphone instead of a traditional microcontroller or single board computer has several advantages: smartphones are single integrated devices with multiple radios and a battery; they have a robust software interface which enables customization; and are field-tested by millions of users daily. Consequently, smartphones can improve the cost, configurability, and real-time access to data for environmental monitoring, ultimately replacing existing monitoring solutions which are proprietary, difficult to customize, expensive, and require labor-intensive maintenance. While smartphones can radically change environmental and wildlife monitoring, there are a number of technical challenges to address. We present our smartphone-based platform, SoundProof, discuss the challenges of building an autonomous system based on Android phones, and our ongoing efforts to enable environmental monitoring. Our system is built using robust off-the-shelf hardware and mature open-source software where available, to increase scalability and ease of installation. Key features include: * High-quality acoustic signal collection from external microphones to monitor wildlife populations. * Real-time data access, remote programming, and configuration of the field sensor via wireless cellular or WiFi channels, accessible from a website. * Waterproof packaging and solar charger setup for long-term field deployments. * Rich instrumentation of the end-to-end system to quickly identify and debug problems. * Supplementary mesh networking system with long-range wireless antennae to provide coverage when no cell network is available. We have deployed this system to monitor Rufous Crowned Sparrows on Anacapa Island, Chinese Crested Turns on the Matsu Islands in Taiwan, and Ashy Storm Petrels on South East Farallon Island. We have testbeds at two UC Natural Reserves to field-test new or exploratory features before deployment. Side-by-side validation data collected in the field using SoundProof and state-of-the-art wildlife monitoring solutions, including the Cornell ARU and Wildlife Acoustic's Songmeter, demonstrate that acoustic signals collected with cellphones provide sufficient data integrity for measuring the success of bird conservation efforts, measuring bird relative abundance and detecting elusive species. We are extending this platform to numerous other areas of environmental monitoring. Recent developments such as the Android Open Accessory, the IOIO Board, MicroBridge, Amarino, and Cellbots enable microcontrollers to talk with Android applications, making it affordable and feasible to extend our platform to operate with the most common sensors.

Lukac, M.; Monibi, M.; Lane, M. L.; Howell, L.; Ramanathan, N.; Borker, A.; McKown, M.; Croll, D.; Terschy, B.

2011-12-01

389

National nutrition surveys in Asian countries: surveillance and monitoring efforts to improve global health.  

PubMed

Asian regions have been suffering from growing double burden of nutritional health problems, such as undernutrition and chronic diseases. National nutrition survey plays an essential role in helping to improve both national and global health and reduce health disparities. The aim of this review was to compile and present the information on current national nutrition surveys conducted in Asian countries and suggest relevant issues in implementation of national nutrition surveys. Fifteen countries in Asia have conducted national nutrition surveys to collect data on nutrition and health status of the population. The information on national nutrition survey of each country was obtained from government documents, international organizations, survey website of governmental agencies, and publications, including journal articles, books, reports, and brochures. The national nutrition survey of each country has different variables and procedures. Variables of the surveys include sociodemographic and lifestyle variables; foods and beverages intake, dietary habits, and food security of individual or household; and health indicators, such as anthropometric and biochemical variables. The surveys have focused on collecting data about nutritional health status in children aged under five years and women of reproductive ages, nutrition intake adequacy and prevalence of obesity and chronic diseases for all individuals. To measure nutrition and health status of Asian populations accurately, improvement of current dietary assessment methods with various diet evaluation tools is necessary. The information organized in this review is important for researchers, policy makers, public health program developers, educators, and consumers in improving national and global health. PMID:25516308

Song, SuJin; Song, Won O

2014-01-01

390

A demonstration of centimeter-level monitoring of polar motion with the Global Positioning System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Daily estimates of the Earth's pole position were obtained with the Global Positioning System (GPS) by using measurements obtained during the GPS IERS (International Earth Rotation Service) and Geodynamics (GIG'91) experiment from 22 Jan. to 13 Feb. 1991. Data from a globally distributed network consisting of 21 Rogue GPS receivers were chosen for the analysis. A comparison of the GPS polar motion series with nine 24-hour very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) estimates yielded agreement in the day-to-day pole position of about 1.5 cm for both X and Y polar motion. A similar comparison of GPS and satellite laser ranging (SLR) data showed agreement to about 1.0 cm. These preliminary results indicate that polar motion can be determined by GPS independent of, and at a level comparable to, that which is obtained from either VLBI or SLR. Furthermore, GPS can provide these data with a daily frequency that neither alternative technique can readily achieve. Thus, GPS promises to be a powerful tool for determining high-frequency platform parameter variation, essential for the ultraprecise spacecraft-tracking requirements of the coming years.

Lindqwister, U. J.; Freedman, A. P.; Blewitt, G.

1992-01-01

391

Cyber-physical security of Wide-Area Monitoring, Protection and Control in a smart grid environment  

PubMed Central

Smart grid initiatives will produce a grid that is increasingly dependent on its cyber infrastructure in order to support the numerous power applications necessary to provide improved grid monitoring and control capabilities. However, recent findings documented in government reports and other literature, indicate the growing threat of cyber-based attacks in numbers and sophistication targeting the nation’s electric grid and other critical infrastructures. Specifically, this paper discusses cyber-physical security of Wide-Area Monitoring, Protection and Control (WAMPAC) from a coordinated cyber attack perspective and introduces a game-theoretic approach to address the issue. Finally, the paper briefly describes how cyber-physical testbeds can be used to evaluate the security research and perform realistic attack-defense studies for smart grid type environments.

Ashok, Aditya; Hahn, Adam; Govindarasu, Manimaran

2013-01-01

392

Impacts Of Global/Regional Climate Changes On Environment And Health: Need For Integrated Research And Education Collaboration (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The realization of long term changes in climate in research community has to go beyond the comfort zone through climate literacy in academics. Higher education on climate change is the platform to bring together the otherwise disconnected factors such as effective discovery, decision making, innovation, interdisciplinary collaboration, Climate change is a complex process that may be due to natural internal processes within the climate system, or to variations in natural or anthropogenic (human-driven) external forcing. Global climate change indicates a change in either the mean state of the climate or in its variability, persisting for several decades or longer. This includes changes in average weather conditions on Earth, such as a change in average global temperature, as well as changes in how frequently regions experience heat waves, droughts, floods, storms, and other extreme weather. It is important to examine the effects of climate variations on human health and disorders in order to take preventive measures. Similarly, the influence of climate changes on animal management practices, pests and pest management systems, and high value crops such as citrus and vegetables is also equally important for investigation. New genetic agricultural varieties must be explored, and pilot studies should examine biotechnology transfer. Recent climate model improvements have resulted in an enhanced ability to simulate many aspects of climate variability and extremes. However, they are still characterized by systematic errors and limitations in accurately simulating more precisely regional climate conditions. The present situations warrant developing climate literacy on the synergistic impacts of environmental change, and improve development, testing and validation of integrated stress impacts through computer modeling. In the present study we present a detailed study of the current status on the impacts of global/regional climate changes on environment and health with a view to highlighting the need for integrated research and education collaboration at national and global level.

Tuluri, F.

2013-12-01

393

Monitoring the implementation of the WHO Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To present the findings of the first round of monitoring of the global implementation of the WHO Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel (“the Code”), a voluntary code adopted in 2010 by all 193 Member States of the World Health Organization (WHO). Methods WHO requested that its Member States designate a national authority for facilitating information exchange on health personnel migration and the implementation of the Code. Each designated authority was then sent a cross-sectional survey with 15 questions on a range of topics pertaining to the 10 articles included in the Code. Findings A national authority was designated by 85 countries. Only 56 countries reported on the status of Code implementation. Of these, 37 had taken steps towards implementing the Code, primarily by engaging relevant stakeholders. In 90% of countries, migrant health professionals reportedly enjoy the same legal rights and responsibilities as domestically trained health personnel. In the context of the Code, cooperation in the area of health workforce development goes beyond migration-related issues. An international comparative information base on health workforce mobility is needed but can only be developed through a collaborative, multi-partnered approach. Conclusion Reporting on the implementation of the Code has been suboptimal in all but one WHO region. Greater collaboration among state and non-state actors is needed to raise awareness of the Code and reinforce its relevance as a potent framework for policy dialogue on ways to address the health workforce crisis. PMID:24347705

Zurn, Pascal; Rø, Otto Christian; Gedik, Gulin; Ronquillo, Kenneth; Joan Co, Christine; Vaillancourt-Laflamme, Catherine; dela Rosa, Jennifer; Perfilieva, Galina; Dal Poz, Mario Roberto

2013-01-01

394

DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED IN SITU TECHNIQUES FOR CHEMISTRY MONITORING AND CORROSION MITIGATION IN SCWO ENVIRONMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

We propose to develop chemical and corrosion sensors for use in high subcritical and supercritical aqueous environments, to improve their precision and reliability, and to use them to characterize the fundamental properties of supercritical aqueous solutions. A better understandi...

395

Global Use of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index  

PubMed Central

Background Although the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index has been endorsed as a gauge of the quality of the nursing practice environment by several organizations in the United States promoting healthcare quality, there is no literature describing its use in different practice settings and countries. Objective To inform research by describing the modifications and use of the scale in a variety of practice settings and countries. Method The Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature and PubMed databases were searched for the years 2002-2010 to identify 37 research reports published since 2002 describing use, modification, and scoring variations in different practice settings and countries. Results The scale was modified for 10 practice settings in five countries and translated into three languages. Composite scores ranged from 2.48 to 3.17 (on a 1-4 scale). The Staffing and Resource Adequacy subscale most often scored lowest. A new nursing information technology subscale has been developed. New scoring methods to identify the favorability of practice environments are described. Over time, the nature of the research conducted using the measure has changed. Overall, most publications report significant associations between scale scores and multiple nurse, patient, and organizational outcomes. Discussion Scale use is growing across different clinical settings and countries. Recommendations for future research use include reducing scale length, employing consistent scoring methods, considering the impact of various modifications based on cultural and clinical setting nuances, and using the measure in longitudinal and intervention research designs. PMID:21127450

Warshawsky, Nora E.; Havens, Donna Sullivan

2011-01-01

396

A Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer for a Global Ground-Based Column Carbon Monitoring Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present progress in the development of a passive, miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (mini-LHR) that will measure key greenhouse gases (C02, CH4, CO) in the atmospheric column as well as their respective altitude profiles, and O2 for a measure of atmospheric pressure. Laser heterodyne radiometry is a spectroscopic method that borrows from radio receiver technology. In this technique, a weak incoming signal containing information of interest is mixed with a stronger signal (local oscillator) at a nearby frequency. In this case, the weak signal is sunlight that has undergone absorption by a trace gas of interest and the local oscillator is a distributive feedback (DFB) laser that is tuned to a wavelength near the absorption feature of the trace gas. Mixing the sunlight with the laser light, in a fast photoreceiver, results in a beat signal in the RF. The amplitude of the beat signal tracks the concentration of the trace gas in the atmospheric column. The mini-LHR operates in tandem with AERONET, a global network of more than 450 aerosol sensing instruments. This partnership simplifies the instrument design and provides an established global network into which the mini-LHR can rapidly expand. This network offers coverage in key arctic regions (not covered by OCO-2) where accelerated warming due to the release of CO2 and CH4 from thawing tundra and permafrost is a concern as well as an uninterrupted data record that will both bridge gaps in data sets and offer validation for key flight missions such as OCO-2, OCO-3, and ASCENDS. Currently, the only ground global network that routinely measures multiple greenhouse gases in the atmospheric column is TCCON (Total Column Carbon Observing Network) with 18 operational sites worldwide and two in the US. Cost and size of TCCON installations will limit the potential for expansion, We offer a low-cost $30Klunit) solution to supplement these measurements with the added benefit of an established aerosol optical depth measurement. Aerosols induce a radiative effect that is an important modulator of regional carbon cycles. Changes in the diffuse radiative flux fraction (DRF) due to aerosol loading have the potential to alter the terrestrial carbon exchange.

Wilson, Emily L.; Melroy, Hilary R.; Miller, J. Houston; McLinden, Matthew L.; Ott, Lesley E.; Holben, Brent

2012-01-01

397

A Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer for a Global Ground-Based Column Carbon Monitoring Network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present progress in the development of a passive, miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (mini-LHR) that will measure key greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, CO) in the atmospheric column as well as their respective altitude profiles, and O2 for a measure of atmospheric pressure. Laser heterodyne radiometry is a spectroscopic method that borrows from radio receiver technology. In this technique, a weak incoming signal containing information of interest is mixed with a stronger signal (local oscillator) at a nearby frequency. In this case, the weak signal is sunlight that has undergone absorption by a trace gas of interest and the local oscillator is a distributive feedback (DFB) laser that is tuned to a wavelength near the absorption feature of the trace gas. Mixing the sunlight with the laser light, in a fast photo-receiver, results in a beat signal in the RF. The amplitude of the beat signal tracks the concentration of the trace gas in the atmospheric column. The mini-LHR operates in tandem with AERONET, a global network of more than 450 aerosol sensing instruments. This partnership simplifies the instrument design and provides an established global network into which the mini-LHR can rapidly expand. This network offers coverage in key arctic regions (not covered by OCO-2) where accelerated warming due to the release of CO2 and CH4 from thawing tundra and permafrost is a concern as well as an uninterrupted data record that will both bridge gaps in data sets and offer validation for key flight missions such as OCO-2, OCO-3, and ASCENDS. Currently, the only ground global network that routinely measures multiple greenhouse gases in the atmospheric column is TCCON (Total Column Carbon Observing Network) with 18 operational sites worldwide and two in the US. Cost and size of TCCON installations will limit the potential for expansion. We offer a low-cost (<$30K/unit) solution to supplement these measurements with the added benefit of an established aerosol optical depth measurement. Aerosols induce a radiative effect that is an important modulator of regional carbon cycles. Changes in the diffuse radiative flux fraction (DRF) due to aerosol loading have the potential to alter the terrestrial carbon exchange.omponents of the mini-LHR. Clockwise from upper right: (1) collimation optics clamped to an AERONET sun tracker, (2) RF receiver box containing a bias-T, low pass filter, 4 RF amplifiers, an RF detector, and a printed circuit board (PCB) video amplifier, (3) mini-LHR housed in a waterproof case, (4) screen capture of the raw beat signal, (5) real-time scan of CO2 line.

Wilson, E. L.; Melroy, H.; Miller, J. H.; McLinden, M. L.; Ott, L.; Holben, B. N.

2012-12-01

398

A rapidly deployable chemical sensing network for the real-time monitoring of toxic airborne contaminant releases in urban environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present findings of the DYCE project, which addresses the needs of military and blue light responders in providing a rapid, reliable on-scene analysis of the dispersion of toxic airborne contaminants following their malicious or accidental release into a rural, urban or industrial environment. We describe the development of a small network of ad-hoc deployable chemical and meteorological sensors capable of identifying and locating the source of the contaminant release, as well as monitoring and estimating the dispersion characteristics of the plume. We further present deployment planning methodologies to optimize the data gathering mission given a constrained asset base.

Lepley, Jason J.; Lloyd, David R.

2010-04-01

399

Air Mass Factor Formulation for Spectroscopic Measurements from Satellites: Application to Formaldehyde Retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present a new formulation for the air mass factor (AMF) to convert slant column measurements of optically thin atmospheric species from space into total vertical columns. Because of atmospheric scattering, the AMF depends on the vertical distribution of the species. We formulate the AMF as the integral of the relative vertical distribution (shape factor) of the species over the depth of the atmosphere, weighted by altitude-dependent coefficients (scattering weights) computed independently from a radiative transfer model. The scattering weights are readily tabulated, and one can then obtain the AMF for any observation scene by using shape factors from a three dimensional (3-D) atmospheric chemistry model for the period of observation. This approach subsequently allows objective evaluation of the 3-D model with the observed vertical columns, since the shape factor and the vertical column in the model represent two independent pieces of information. We demonstrate the AMF method by using slant column measurements of formaldehyde at 346 nm from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment satellite instrument over North America during July 1996. Shape factors are cumputed with the Global Earth Observing System CHEMistry (GEOS-CHEM) global 3-D model and are checked for consistency with the few available aircraft measurements. Scattering weights increase by an order of magnitude from the surface to the upper troposphere. The AMFs are typically 20-40% less over continents than over the oceans and are approximately half the values calculated in the absence of scattering. Model-induced errors in the AMF are estimated to be approximately 10%. The GEOS-CHEM model captures 50% and 60% of the variances in the observed slant and vertical columns, respectively. Comparison of the simulated and observed vertical columns allows assessment of model bias.

Palmer, Paul I.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Chance, Kelly; Martin, Randall V.; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Bey, Isabelle; Yantosca, Robert; Fiore, Arlene; Li, Qinbin

2004-01-01

400

Black Carbon : Impacts on Local, Regional and Global Environment and Climate (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Black Carbon is one of the unique pollutants that has a large direct negative impact on human health, indoor and outdoor air quality, temperature, cloudiness, precipitation, mountain glaciers, sea ice, and snow packs. We are just beginning to unravel its impact on all these scales and phenomena. The lack of access to fossil fuels forces more than 3 billion from rural populations to burn biomass fuels such as dung, firewood, and crops. The resulting pollution indoors and outdoors kills over 2 million people annually in developing nations. It also contributes to the so-called atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs), which eventually become transcontinental plumes, with large impacts on clouds and rainfall patterns and which also contribute to glacier melting. In the industrial world, fossil fuel combustion is a major source of black carbon and ABCs, which contribute to global warming and retreat of arctic sea ice. There is now a compelling, if not convincing, case to regulate or eliminate black carbon emissions. Such measures can reduce global warming, improve health, improve air quality, and slow down glacier retreat.

Ramanathan, V.

2010-12-01

401

Measurements of global current density and electric field in urban environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results of continuous and simultaneous measurements of global current density (flowing between ionosphere and the earth) and electric field intensity (in the vicinity of the earth surface) are presented. The results were obtained in a measuring system placed 20 m above ground level. Using the continuity equation, the conductive and displacement components of current density (as well as conductivity of the atmosphere) were determined. It was found that the displacement part of the total current is much smaller in comparison to the conduction one. Analysis of measurement showed a high coincidence of the electric field derivative with the time course of the global current. Temporal courses of conductivity indicate the presence of space charge and suggests the continuity equation is supplemented with a space charge component. The calculated average value of the short-period (10 min long) current density was found to be on the level of 2-3 pA m-2 (average conductivity of the order of 15-20 fS m-1). At the same time period the average value of field intensity was on the level of 150-300 V m-1.

Kacprzyk, R.; Pelesz, A.

2013-03-01

402

Sunsynchronous low Earth orbit spacecraft concepts and technology requirements for global change monitoring  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Global Change Technology Initiative listing of instruments for operation in low Earth, sunsynchronous orbits contain 21 entries, of which 20 are carried aboard multi-instrument spacecraft. This list identifies the temporal requirements for repetition of measurements and also includes groups of instruments that make complementing measurements. Definitions for individual spacecraft follows the temporal and grouping requirements to establish constellations which will provide the measurement data. The definitions of constellations for multi-instrument spacecraft show two alternatives: a constellation of 10 spacecraft, each compatible with launch by a Delta booster; a constellation of 4 spacecraft, each requiring a Titan booster. Operating subsystems for the individual spacecraft can use modular concepts that are adaptations based upon current plans for improving the performance of the NASA-Goddard Multimission Modular units. The descriptions of the spacecraft and constellations begins with a compilation of instrument related requirements that define the principal system performance parameters and operating capabilities.

Garrett, L. Bernard; Butterfield, Ansel J.; Taback, Israel; Garn, Paul A.; Burrowbridge, Donald R., Jr.

1991-01-01

403

Global positioning system surveying to monitor land subsidence in Sacramento Valley, California, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A subsidence research program began in 1985 to document the extent and magnitude of land subsidence in Sacramento Valley, California, an area of about 15 600 km2m, using Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying. In addition to periodic conventional spirit levelling, an examination was made of the changes in GPS-derived ellipsoidal height differences (summary differences) between pairs of adjacent bench marks in central Sacramento Valley from 1986 to 1989. The average rates of land subsidence in the southern Sacramento Valley for the past several decades were determined by comparing GPS-derived orthometric heights with historic published elevations. A maximum average rate of 0.053 m year-1 (0.90 m in 17 years) of subsidence has been measured. -Author

Ikehara, M.E.

1994-01-01