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1

Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Informatics and information technology do not appear to be valued by the health industry to the degree that they are in other industries. The agenda for health informatics should be presented so that value to the health system is linked directly to required investment. The agenda should acknowledge the foundation provided by the current health system and the role of financial issues, system impediments, policy, and knowledge in effecting change. The desired outcomes should be compelling, such as improved public health, improved quality as perceived by consumers, and lower costs. Strategies to achieve these outcomes should derive from the differentia of health, opportunities to leverage other efforts, and lessons from successes inside and outside the health industry. Examples might include using logistics to improve quality, mass customization to adapt to individual values, and system thinking to change the game to one that can be won. The justification for the informatics infrastructure of a virtual health care data bank, a national health care knowledge base, and a personal clinical health record flows naturally from these strategies. PMID:10495093

Stead, William W.; Lorenzi, Nancy M.

1999-01-01

2

[Strengthening global health informatics research within the andean region through international collaboration].  

PubMed

To improve global health and the welfare of a population, skilled human resources are required, not only in medicine and health, but also in the field of informatics. Unfortunately, training and research programs specific to biomedical informatics in developing countries are both scarce and poorly documented. The aim of this paper is to report the results from the first Informatics Expert Meeting for the Andean Region, including, nine Latin American based institutional case studies. This two-day event occurred in March 2010 and brought together twenty-three leaders in biomedical informatics from around the world. The blend of practical and experiential advice from these experts contributed to rich discussions addressing both challenges and applications of informatics within Latin American. In addition, to address the needs emphasized at the meeting, the QUIPU Network was established to expand the research consortium in the Andean Region, Latin America, and internationally. The use of these new technologies in existing public health training and research programs will be key to improving the health of populations in the Andean Region and around the globe. PMID:21152740

Curioso, Walter H; García, Patricia J; Castillo, Greta M; Blas, Magaly M; Perez-Brumer, Amaya; Zimic, Mirko

2010-09-01

3

Individualization, globalization and health--about sustainable information technologies and the aim of medical informatics.  

PubMed

This paper discusses aspects of information technologies for health care, in particular on transinstitutional health information systems (HIS) and on health-enabling technologies, with some consequences for the aim of medical informatics. It is argued that with the extended range of health information systems and the perspective of having adequate transinstitutional HIS architectures, a substantial contribution can be made to better patient-centered care, with possibilities ranging from regional, national to even global care. It is also argued that in applying health-enabling technologies, using ubiquitous, pervasive computing environments and ambient intelligence approaches, we can expect that in addition care will become more specific and tailored for the individual, and that we can achieve better personalized care. In developing health care systems towards transinstitutional HIS and health-enabling technologies, the aim of medical informatics, to contribute to the progress of the sciences and to high-quality, efficient, and affordable health care that does justice to the individual and to society, may be extended to also contributing to self-determined and self-sufficient (autonomous) life. Reference is made and examples are given from the Yearbook of Medical Informatics of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) and from the work of Professor Jochen Moehr. PMID:16846748

Haux, Reinhold

2006-12-01

4

The need for global certification in the field of health informatics: some ethical issues.  

PubMed

In the past, the training of health information professionals (HIPs) has focussed almost exclusively on technical matters, the concerns of software developers and purveyors have essentially centred on security and functionality, and health care providers have mainly worried about costs and efficiency. This paper outlines some ethical threats that are ignored by such a purely technical focus and argues that because of the increasing globalization of health care delivery through e-Health, and because of the international threats to confidentiality posed by legislation such as the US Patriot Act, the health informatics community should pursue a project of global certification for HIPs that includes information ethics as an integral component. It also argues that a corresponding certification process for health care institutions and software developers should be initiated. PMID:17911713

Kluge, Eike-Henner W

2007-01-01

5

Health Informatics: An Overview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews literature related to health informatics and health information management. Provides examples covering types of information, library and information services outcomes, training of informatics professionals, areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine, professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the…

MacDougall, Jennifer; And Others

1996-01-01

6

Re-Visiting Health Informatics What is Health Informatics?  

E-print Network

Re-Visiting Health Informatics HINF1100 Fall 2008 #12;What is Health Informatics? · Health the effective organization, analysis, management and use of health information to improve the delivery and practice of healthcare · Health Informatics is the study of applying information and technology to improve

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

7

Individualization, globalization and health - about sustainable information technologies and the aim of medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses aspects of information technologies for health care, in particular on transinstitutional health information systems (HIS) and on health-enabling technologies, with some consequences for the aim of medical informatics. It is argued that with the extended range of health information systems and the perspective of having adequate transinstitutional HIS architectures, a substantial contribution can be made to better

Reinhold Haux

2006-01-01

8

Standardization in health informatics in Canada.  

PubMed

Around the world, informatics has been cited as a key enabler of health sector reform. Recent reform programs in Canada, reflecting this global consensus, have emphasized the importance of quality information and information technology in meeting their goals. Standards are an important building block for achieving the required comprehensive and integrated health information infrastructure. This paper describes the current status of, and future plans for, health informatics and related standards in Canada. PMID:9600397

Alvarez, R C; Zelmer, J

1998-02-01

9

Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Open Rank Tenure Track Faculty Position in Health Informatics  

E-print Network

(Health Informatics, Bioinformatics, Human-Computer Interaction, and Media Arts & Science), and three Baccalaureate programs (Informatics, Health Information Administration, and Media Arts & Science). Nearly 1Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Open Rank Tenure Track Faculty Position in Health

Zhou, Yaoqi

10

The scope and direction of health informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based on the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art," and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information used in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA-Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

McGinnis, Patrick J.

2002-01-01

11

The Scope and Direction of Health Informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based upon the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain is can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art" , and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information utilized in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

McGinnis, Patrick J.

2001-01-01

12

The history of pathology informatics: A global perspective  

PubMed Central

Pathology informatics has evolved to varying levels around the world. The history of pathology informatics in different countries is a tale with many dimensions. At first glance, it is the familiar story of individuals solving problems that arise in their clinical practice to enhance efficiency, better manage (e.g., digitize) laboratory information, as well as exploit emerging information technologies. Under the surface, however, lie powerful resource, regulatory, and societal forces that helped shape our discipline into what it is today. In this monograph, for the first time in the history of our discipline, we collectively perform a global review of the field of pathology informatics. In doing so, we illustrate how general far-reaching trends such as the advent of computers, the Internet and digital imaging have affected pathology informatics in the world at large. Major drivers in the field included the need for pathologists to comply with national standards for health information technology and telepathology applications to meet the scarcity of pathology services and trained people in certain countries. Following trials by a multitude of investigators, not all of them successful, it is apparent that innovation alone did not assure the success of many informatics tools and solutions. Common, ongoing barriers to the widespread adoption of informatics devices include poor information technology infrastructure in undeveloped areas, the cost of technology, and regulatory issues. This review offers a deeper understanding of how pathology informatics historically developed and provides insights into what the promising future might hold. PMID:23869286

Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil V.; Aller, Raymond D.; Banach, Lech; Becich, Michael J.; Borkenfeld, Stephan; Carter, Alexis B.; Friedman, Bruce A.; Rojo, Marcial Garcia; Georgiou, Andrew; Kayser, Gian; Kayser, Klaus; Legg, Michael; Naugler, Christopher; Sawai, Takashi; Weiner, Hal; Winsten, Dennis; Pantanowitz, Liron

2013-01-01

13

Public Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1973, program managers at the National Institutes of Health began working with scientists at the Centers for Disease Control\\u000a and Prevention to assemble a network of data registries for monitoring the nation’s progress in its newly announced “war on\\u000a cancer.” Data from the registries, the agencies reasoned, could be compiled into a commonly accessible database to track the\\u000a incidence,

Bradford W. Hesse

14

Career development initiatives in biomedical health informatics.  

PubMed

The disciplines of biomedical engineering and health informatics complement each other. These two scientific fields sometimes strive independently to deliver better health care services. The rapid evolution in data-intensive methods has made practitioners to think about reviewing the educational needs of the biomedical health informatics workforces. This paper discusses the changing skills requirements in biomedical health informatics discipline. The author reports on the challenges faced by IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBS) in the context of continuous career development of the EMBS members. This paper discusses Queensland chapter's initiative towards an integrated career development to address challenges faced by IEEE EMBS. PMID:23367308

Wagholikar, Amol

2012-01-01

15

ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Laboratory (AMIIL) Data Mining and Health Informatics in  

E-print Network

-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Lab http://amiil.engineering.asu.edu/ 3 Oncologists Medical physicistsASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Laboratory (AMIIL) 1 Data Mining and Health Informatics in Cancer Medicine #12;ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Lab http://amiil.engineering.asu.edu/ 2 #12;ASU

Li, Jing

16

Identifying a Prudent Informatics Praxis for Public Health Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tools afforded by biomedical informatics enable not only the critique of modern global intervention strategies but to offer strategies for improving sustainable health care. Often, short-term medical care trips break raise ethical concerns. The concept of 'duffle bag medicine' is introduced as ineffectual health care trips with cultural, social, and environmental flaws. Communication is identified as the mechanism through

Victor T. Nwankwo

17

Nursing Informatics: Decades of Contribution to Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Objectives In this paper we present a contemporary understanding of "nursing informatics" and relate it to applications in three specific contexts, hospitals, community health, and home dwelling, to illustrate achievements that contribute to the overall schema of health informatics. Methods We identified literature through database searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. Database searching was complemented by one author search and hand searches in six relevant journals. The literature review helped in conceptual clarification and elaborate on use that are supported by applications in different settings. Results Conceptual clarification of nursing data, information and knowledge has been expanded to include wisdom. Information systems and support for nursing practice benefits from conceptual clarification of nursing data, information, knowledge, and wisdom. We introduce three examples of information systems and point out core issues for information integration and practice development. Conclusions Exploring interplays of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom, nursing informatics takes a practice turn, accommodating to processes of application design and deployment for purposeful use by nurses in different settings. Collaborative efforts will be key to further achievements that support task shifting, mobility, and ubiquitous health care. PMID:23882413

Maeland Knudsen, Lina Merete

2013-01-01

18

Michigan Informatics: Informatics for the Public Health Workforce  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As health care job opportunities continue to expand, a number of institutions have been developing online training materials to help support academic public health programs. One such program is the Michigan Informatics (MI-INFO) website, which contains a variety of tutorials that deal with health information and computer skills. All told, the site contains nine tutorials which include titles like "Evidence Based Public Health", "Finding Health Statistics Online", and "Searching the Public Health Literature". Each of the tutorials features key concept overviews, exercises, and case studies. Near the bottom of the site, visitors can find a user manual for the tutorials, and a place where they can offer their own feedback. The site is rounded out by the "Other Resources" area, which contains links to other relevant sites, such as the Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Greater Midwest Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

2007-01-01

19

Introduction to Health InformaticsIntroduction to Health Informatics HINF1100HINF1100  

E-print Network

Health Informatics: Definitions "Medical informatics is the rapidly developing scientific field that deals, communications and information technology and systems to all fields of medicine - medical care, medical education in healthcare? Information about the patient's health Medical record, lab results, medical images, disease

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

20

Consumer Health Informatics: Health Information Technology for Consumers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains consumer health informatics and describes the technology advances, the computer programs that are currently available, and the basic research that addresses both the effectiveness of computer health informatics and its impact on the future direction of health care. Highlights include commercial computer products for consumers and…

Jimison, Holly Brugge; Sher, Paul Phillip

1995-01-01

21

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

1 electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net 2010; Vol 6, No 1 (2011): e4 The electronic Journal of Health Informatics is an international journal committed to scholarly excellence and dedicated to the advancement of Health Informatics and information technology in healthcare. ISSN: 1446

Yu, Ping

22

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair Medical Health Informatics  

E-print Network

, and the potential to achieve international recognition in the field of medical health informatics within the nextTier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics Schulich School of Medicine intensive universities, seeks applicants for a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

23

MEDINFO 2007 Studies in Health Technology and Informatics  

E-print Network

. Engelbrecht, A. Geissbuhler, C. Lovis and G. Mihalas (Eds.), Connecting Medical Informatics and Bio of the 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics Building Sustainable Health Systems Part 2 EditedMEDINFO 2007 #12;Studies in Health Technology and Informatics This book series was started in 1990

Hansen, René Rydhof

24

Entry Level Masters of Health Informatics and Information  

E-print Network

Entry ­ Level Masters of Health Informatics and Information Management Post-Graduate Masters of Health Informatics and Information Management Certificate in Health Informatics and Information 6 Statistics 3 Medical Terminology 3 Management Information Systems 3 System Analysis and Design 3

Cui, Yan

25

Unravelling the tangled taxonomies of health informatics.  

PubMed

Even though informatics is a term used commonly in healthcare, it can be a confusing and disengaging one. Many definitions exist in the literature, and attempts have been made to develop a clear taxonomy. Despite this, informatics is still a term that lacks clarity in both its scope and the classification of sub-terms that it encompasses. This paper reviews the importance of an agreed taxonomy and explores the challenges of establishing exactly what is meant by health informatics (HI). It reviews what a taxonomy should do, summarises previous attempts at categorising and organising HI and suggests the elements to consider when seeking to develop a system of classification. The paper does not provide all the answers, but it does clarify the questions. By plotting a path towards a taxonomy of HI, it will be possible to enhance understanding and optimise the benefits of embracing technology in clinical practice. PMID:25207619

Barrett, David; Liaw, S T; de Lusignan, Simon

2014-01-01

26

IMIA Accreditation of Health Informatics Programs  

PubMed Central

Objectives Health informatics programs usually are evaluated by national accreditation committees. Not always are the members of these committees well informed about the international level of (education in) health informatics. Therefore, when a program is accredited by a national accreditation committee, this does not always mean that the program is of an international level. The International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) has expertise in the field of education. The IMIA Recommendations on Education in Biomedical and Health Informatics guide curricula development. The goal of this article is to show that IMIA can also play the role of accreditation agency and to present the IMIA accreditation protocol and experiences obtained with it. Methods The accreditation procedure used in the Netherlands and Belgium was taken as a template for the design of the IMIA accreditation protocol. In a trial period of one and a half year the protocol is tested out on six health informatics programs. Results An accreditation protocol was designed. For judging the curriculum of a program the IMIA Recommendations are used. The institution has to write a self-assessment report and a site visit committee visits the program and judges its quality, supported by the self-assessment report and discussions with all stakeholders of the program. Conclusions After having visited three programs it appears that the IMIA accreditation procedure works well. Only a few changes had to be introduced. Writing the self-assessment report already appears to be beneficial for the management of the program to obtain a better insight in the quality of their program. PMID:24175114

Mantas, John

2013-01-01

27

Medical informatics and health care organizations.  

PubMed

A dialogue between upper management and operational elements over an organization's informatics policies and procedures could take place in an environment in which both parties could succeed. Excellent patient care practices can exist in organizational settings where upper management is not concerned with the specifics of the medical care process. But as the medical care process itself becomes costly, complex, and part of the purview of upper management, solutions to ambiguous informatics policies and practices need to be found. As the discussion of cost determination suggests, a comprehensive "top-down" solution may not be feasible. Allowing patient care expertise to drive the design and implementation of clinical computing modules without unduly restrictive specifications from above is probably the best way to proceed. But if the organization needs to know the specifics of a treatment episode, then the informatics definitions specific to treatment episodes need to be unambiguous and consistently applied. As the discussion of Social Security numbers suggests, communication of information across various parts of the organization not only requires unambiguous data structure definitions, but also suggests that the communication process not be dependent on the content of the messages. Both ideas--consistent data structure definitions for essential data and open system communication architectures--are current in the medical informatician's vocabulary. The same ideas are relevant to the management and operation of large and diffuse health care enterprises. The lessons we are learning about informatics policy and practice controls in clinical computing need to be applied to the enterprise as a whole. PMID:1921663

Holden, F M

1991-01-01

28

Introduction to Health Informatics FALL 2008/09  

E-print Network

1 HINF 1100 Introduction to Health Informatics FALL 2008/09 Course Outline Instructor: Raza Abidi, theory, applications and organizational perspectives of health informatics. HINF 1100 is designed Technology in the field of Health Care. The main focus of this course is to enable students to understand

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

29

Informatics  

Cancer.gov

The Cancer Imaging Program (CIP) is a driver of imaging informatics research at NCI. The CIP Informatics Team provides critical services and infrastructure to both the intramural and extramural imaging research communities. Major ongoing initiatives include:

30

Exploring the biomedical and health informatics educational programs in europe.  

PubMed

The Health Information Technology can improve public health, quality of health care etc. Thus, it is important for professionals to be well educated by training programs. The aim of this paper is to record all the educational programs with specializations in Health Informatics, Medical Informatics, Bioinformatics, Biomedical Informatics and Biomedical Engineering in European Universities and Institutions. An on-line research was conducted on Scopus, PubMed, Scholar Google, and Google. More than 150 universities and colleges in Europe conduct educational programs for these domains. The majority them, expertise in Biomedical Engineering (31%), 22% of the educational programs correspond to Bioinformatics, while Health Informatics studies have 18%. On the last few years, a growth of Health informatics professionals has been observed in Europe. PMID:25000017

Manifava, Eirini; Kolokathi, Aikaterini; Mantas, John

2014-01-01

31

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

There is obvious potential for bene- fit from the provision of electronic support for chronic disease manage- ment1 electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net 2009; Vol 4(1): e The electronic of articles is retained by authors; originally published in the electronic Journal of Health Informatics (http

Grundy, John

32

Food Safety Informatics: A Public Health Imperative  

PubMed Central

To date, little has been written about the implementation of utilizing food safety informatics as a technological tool to protect consumers, in real-time, against foodborne illnesses. Food safety outbreaks have become a major public health problem, causing an estimated 48 million illnesses, 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. Yet, government inspectors/regulators that monitor foodservice operations struggle with how to collect, organize, and analyze data; implement, monitor, and enforce safe food systems. Currently, standardized technologies have not been implemented to efficiently establish “near-in-time” or “just-in-time” electronic awareness to enhance early detection of public health threats regarding food safety. To address the potential impact of collection, organization and analyses of data in a foodservice operation, a wireless food safety informatics (FSI) tool was pilot tested at a university student foodservice center. The technological platform in this test collected data every six minutes over a 24 hour period, across two primary domains: time and temperatures within freezers, walk-in refrigerators and dry storage areas. The results of this pilot study briefly illustrated how technology can assist in food safety surveillance and monitoring by efficiently detecting food safety abnormalities related to time and temperatures so that efficient and proper response in “real time” can be addressed to prevent potential foodborne illnesses. PMID:23569605

Tucker, Cynthia A.; Larkin, Stephanie N.; Akers, Timothy A.

2011-01-01

33

Informatics critical to public health surveillance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Public health surveillance is the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of data regarding a health-related event for use in public health action to reduce morbidity and mortality and to improve health by effective response management and coordination. As new pressures for early detection of disease outbreaks have arisen, particularly for outbreaks of possible bioterrorism (BT) origin, and as electronic health data have become increasingly available, so has the demand for public health situation awareness systems. Although these systems are valuable for early warning of public health emergencies, there remains the cost of developing and managing such large and complex systems and of investigating inevitable false alarms. Whether these systems are dependable and cost effective enough and can demonstrate a significant and indispensable role in detection or prevention of mass casualty events of BT origin remains to be proven. This article will focus on the complexities of design, analysis, implementation and evaluation of public health surveillance and situation awareness systems and, in some cases, will discuss the key technologies being studied in Center for Biosecurity Informatics Research at University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston.

Mirhaji, Parsa; Zhang, Jiajie; Smith, Jack W.; Madjid, Mohammad; Casscells, Samuel W.; Lillibridge, Scott R.

2003-09-01

34

Biomedical and health informatics education at UMIT - approaches and strategies at a newly founded university  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA, http:\\/\\/www.IMIA.org) on education in health and medical informatics and on experiences in founding a new school, the University for Health Informatics and Technology Tyrol (UMIT, http:\\/\\/www.UMIT.at), at Innsbruck, Austria, questions on education in health informatics, medical informatics, and biomedical informatics are discussed.Suggestions are made on (1) appropriate approaches for

Reinhold Haux

2004-01-01

35

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

in Australian Aged Care Homes Ning Wang1 , Ping Yu1 , David Hailey1 , Deborah Oxlade2 1 Health Informatics Research Laboratory, Faculty of Informatics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia 2 RSL Care, Australia documentation in residential aged care homes. Methods: Three information sources were reviewed to explore

Yu, Ping

36

Perspectives on Information Science and Health Informatics Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theoretical discussion of what information science can contribute to the health professions addresses questions of definition and describes application and knowledge models for the emerging profession of informatics. A review of existing programs includes curriculum models and provides details on informatics programs emphasizing information…

Lunin, Lois F., Ed.; Ball, Marion J., Ed.

1989-01-01

37

Towards a Definition of Health Informatics Ethics Hamman W. Samuel  

E-print Network

Society (BCS), Inter- national Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), Associa- tion for ComputingTowards a Definition of Health Informatics Ethics Hamman W. Samuel Department of Computing Science in medicine leads to new ethical issues that are not covered by medical or computing ethics. We define

Zaiane, Osmar R.

38

GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY INFORMATICS: SETTING THE SCENE FOR A \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in information and communication technology are allowing new experiences in the integration, analysis and visualization of biodiversity information, and are leading to development of a new field of research, biodiversity informatics. Although this field has great potential in diverse realms, including basic biology, human economics, and public health, much of this potential remains to be explored. The success

V. P. CANHOS; S. SOUZA; R. GIOVANNI; D. A. L. CANHOS

2004-01-01

39

Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

Frisse, Mark E.

1992-01-01

40

Consumer Health Informatics--integrating patients, providers, and professionals online.  

PubMed

Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) means different things to patients, health professionals, and health care systems. A broader perspective on this new and rapidly developing field will enable us to understand and better apply its advances. This article provides an overview of CHI discussing its evolution and driving forces, along with advanced applications such as Personal Health Records, Internet transmission of personal health data, clinical e-mail, online pharmacies, and shared decision-making tools. Consumer Health Informatics will become integrated with medical care, electronic medical records, and patient education to impact the whole process and business of health care. PMID:12238015

Klein-Fedyshin, Michele S

2002-01-01

41

The Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform  

PubMed Central

Improving healthcare quality while simultaneously reducing cost has become a high priority of healthcare reform. Informatics is crucial in tackling this challenge. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 mandates adaptation and “meaningful use (MU)” of health information technology. In this review, we will highlight several areas in which informatics can make significant contributions, with a focus on radiology. We also discuss informatics related to the increasing imperatives of state and local regulations (such as radiation dose tracking) and quality initiatives. PMID:22771052

Liu, Yueyi I.

2012-01-01

42

Health Informatics for Pediatric Disaster Preparedness Planning  

PubMed Central

Objective 1. To conduct a review of the role of informatics in pediatric disaster preparedness using all medical databases. 2. To provide recommendations to improve pediatric disaster preparedness by the application of informatics. Methods A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, CINHL and the Cochrane Library using the key words “children” AND “disaster preparedness and disaster” AND “informatics”. Results A total of 314 papers were initially produced by the search and eight that met the selection criteria were included in the review. Four themes emerged: tools for disaster preparedness, education, reunification and planning and response. Conclusion The literature pertaining to informatics and pediatric disaster preparedness is sparse and many gaps still persist. Current disaster preparedness tools focus on the general population and do not specifically address children. The most progress has been achieved in family reunification; however, the recommendations delineated are yet to be completed. PMID:23616840

Burke, R.V.; Ryutov, T.; Neches, R.; Upperman, J.S.

2010-01-01

43

Reducing Health Cost: Health Informatics and Knowledge Management as a Business and Communication Tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Health informatics has the potential to improve the quality and provision of care while reducing the cost of health care delivery.\\u000a However, health informatics is often falsely regarded as synonymous with information management (IM). This chapter (i) provides\\u000a a clear definition and characteristic benefits of health informatics and information management in the context of health care\\u000a delivery, (ii) identifies and

Regina Gyampoh-Vidogah; Robert Moreton; David Sallah

2010-01-01

44

The Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform  

E-print Network

reducing cost has become a high priority. There has been a push for Accountable Care Organizations, whichThe Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform Yueyi I. Liu, MD, PhD, Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS Improving health care quality while simultaneously reducing cost has become a high priority of health care

Rubin, Daniel L.

45

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes  

E-print Network

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes: different-cameras). · Context ­ pervasive watching systems for Health Smart Homes ­ detection of neuro-degenerative diseases (e ­ model of elderly persons activity in Health Smart Homes ­ evaluation of actimetric perseveration

Fouquet, Yannick

46

Evaluation in health informatics: computer simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evaluation of complex medical informatics applications involves not only the information system, but also its impact on the organizational environment in which it is implemented. In instances where these applications cannot be evaluated with traditional experimental methods, computer simulation provides a flexible approach to evaluation. The construction of a computer simulation model involves the development of a model that

James G. Anderson

2002-01-01

47

Evaluation in health informatics: social network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis comprises a set of research methods that can be used to analyze the relationships among entities such as people, departments, and organizations. The purpose of the analysis is to discover patterns of relationships that affect both individual and organizational attitudes and behavior such as the adoption, diffusion, and use of new medical informatics applications. This paper presents

James G. Anderson

2002-01-01

48

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes  

E-print Network

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes Yannick Fouquet (arrows) for localizing dependent people in a health smart home (left) & pressure sensors (right: FSA Seat integrated smart home (HsH). In general, the underlying principle of the HsH consists in continuously

Fouquet, Yannick

49

A stimulus to define informatics and health information technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Despite the growing interest by leaders, policy makers, and others, the terminology of health information technology as well as biomedical and health informatics is poorly understood and not even agreed upon by academics and professionals in the field. DISCUSSION: The paper, presented as a Debate to encourage further discussion and disagreement, provides definitions of the major terminology used in

William R Hersh

2009-01-01

50

Education for Health Information Professionals: Perspectives from Health Informatics in the U.S.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While interest and activity in health informatics continues to increase worldwide, concerns about the most appropriate educational preparation for practice also arise. Health informatics is an interdisciplinary field that pursues effective use of data, information and knowledge to support effective decision making; in the health field, those…

Dalrymple, Prudence W.; Roderer, Nancy K.

2011-01-01

51

IHI 2012 CALL FOR PAPERS ACM SIGHIT International Health Informatics Symposium  

E-print Network

information technology, studies on health informatics in the context of community impact and implicationsIHI 2012 ­ CALL FOR PAPERS 2nd ACM SIGHIT International Health Informatics Symposium January 28 Special Interest Group on Health Informatics (SIGHIT). It is ACM's premier community forum concerned

Xu, Jianliang

52

Markov Logic Networks in Health Informatics Shalini Ghosh, Natarajan Shankar, Sam Owre, Sean David  

E-print Network

Markov Logic Networks in Health Informatics Shalini Ghosh, Natarajan Shankar, Sam Owre, Sean David , Gary Swan, Patrick Lincoln SRI International, Menlo Park, CA Abstract Health informatics is a fertile in health informatics and present high-level ideas about possible approaches using the framework

Ghosh, Shalini

53

electronic Journal of Health Informatics www.eJHI.net  

E-print Network

electronic Journal of Health Informatics www.eJHI.net 2012; Vol 7(2):e12 Aged Care IT in Australia of Wollongong Abstract This paper reviews the development of aged care IT innovations in Australia in the past decade. It starts with a brief description of the establishment of the Aged Care eConnect project

Yu, Ping

54

Evolving Health Informatics Semantic Frameworks and Metadata-Driven Architectures  

E-print Network

Evolving Health Informatics Semantic Frameworks and Metadata-Driven Architectures Jim Davies, will revolutionise both medical and clinical research, and the impact on healthcare delivery will be dramatic advances in methods and tools for automatic, metadata- driven data sharing and integration. And of course

Melham, Tom

55

The Challenges of Publishing on Health Informatics in Developing Countries  

PubMed Central

Summary The Journal of Health Informatics in Developing Countries was established to meet a perceived need for Health Informaticians in developing countries to be able to share the results of their research in an affordable and easy-to-access online publication. The journal was developed using the open source platform “Open Journal System,” and has now published 67 articles across 13 issues. A collaborative editorial approach has been established to address the problems of limited research budgets, difficulties with translating to English and other problems specific to authors from developing countries. The journal faces many challenges including ensuring future financial sustainability and inclusion in journal indexing systems. However, the continuing support of an international body of Associate Editors and Editorial Board Members has enabled a wide range of useful and informative health informatics research to be disseminated across the developing world. PMID:24155794

Paton, C.; Househ, M.; Malik, M.

2013-01-01

56

Where does informatics fit in health care organizations?  

PubMed

Why is medical informatics important to health care leaders? As an emerging science, informatics focuses on applying computing and communication technology to decision making for clinicians and managers. It enhances the understanding of how information and communication systems can impact the work health care managers must accomplish. As the cost of technology for digital information management continues to decline, organizations and individuals will look for ways to offset the human costs of managing and conveying information. The way of the paper medical record is being replaced by the less expensive and more efficient digital information systems. Leaders of health care organizations need to look for every opportunity to deploy networks and computers to reduce the labor costs of data collection, storage, retrieval, and analysis. PMID:10167481

Ruffin, M

1997-01-01

57

A Viewpoint on Evidence-based Health Informatics, Based on a Pilot Survey on Evaluation Studies in Health Care Informatics  

PubMed Central

Concerned about evidence-based health informatics, the authors conducted a limited pilot survey attempting to determine how many IT evaluation studies in health care are never published, and why. A survey distributed to 722 academics had a low response rate, with 136 respondents giving instructive comments on 217 evaluation studies. Of those studies, half were published in international journals, and more than one-third were never published. Reasons for not publishing (with multiple reasons per study possible) included: “results not of interest for others” (1/3 of all studies), “publication in preparation” (1/3), “no time for publication” (1/5), “limited scientific quality of study” (1/6), “political or legal reasons” (1/7), and “study only conducted for internal use” (1/8). Those reasons for non-publication in health informatics resembled those reported in other fields. Publication bias (preference for positive studies) did not appear to be a major issue. The authors believe that widespread application of guidelines in conducting health informatics evaluation studies and utilization of a registry for evaluation study results could improve the evidence base of the field. PMID:17329724

Ammenwerth, Elske; de Keizer, Nicolette

2007-01-01

58

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research  

E-print Network

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated water. Mark Jones #12;5 | Global Health Research We support researchers in low- and middle- income

Rambaut, Andrew

59

Unobtrusive sensing and wearable devices for health informatics.  

PubMed

The aging population, prevalence of chronic diseases, and outbreaks of infectious diseases are some of the major challenges of our present-day society. To address these unmet healthcare needs, especially for the early prediction and treatment of major diseases, health informatics, which deals with the acquisition, transmission, processing, storage, retrieval, and use of health information, has emerged as an active area of interdisciplinary research. In particular, acquisition of health-related information by unobtrusive sensing and wearable technologies is considered as a cornerstone in health informatics. Sensors can be weaved or integrated into clothing, accessories, and the living environment, such that health information can be acquired seamlessly and pervasively in daily living. Sensors can even be designed as stick-on electronic tattoos or directly printed onto human skin to enable long-term health monitoring. This paper aims to provide an overview of four emerging unobtrusive and wearable technologies, which are essential to the realization of pervasive health information acquisition, including: (1) unobtrusive sensing methods, (2) smart textile technology, (3) flexible-stretchable-printable electronics, and (4) sensor fusion, and then to identify some future directions of research. PMID:24759283

Zheng, Ya-Li; Ding, Xiao-Rong; Poon, Carmen Chung Yan; Lo, Benny Ping Lai; Zhang, Heye; Zhou, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Zhao, Ni; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

2014-05-01

60

Developing Informatics Tools and Strategies for Consumer-centered Health Communication  

PubMed Central

As the emphasis on individuals' active partnership in health care grows, so does the public's need for effective, comprehensible consumer health resources. Consumer health informatics has the potential to provide frameworks and strategies for designing effective health communication tools that empower users and improve their health decisions. This article presents an overview of the consumer health informatics field, discusses promising approaches to supporting health communication, and identifies challenges plus direction for future research and development. The authors' recommendations emphasize the need for drawing upon communication and social science theories of information behavior, reaching out to consumers via a range of traditional and novel formats, gaining better understanding of the public's health information needs, and developing informatics solutions for tailoring resources to users' needs and competencies. This article was written as a scholarly outreach and leadership project by members of the American Medical Informatics Association's Consumer Health Informatics Working Group. PMID:18436895

Keselman, Alla; Logan, Robert; Smith, Catherine Arnott; Leroy, Gondy; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

2008-01-01

61

Informatics, evidence-based care, and research; implications for national policy: a report of an American Medical Informatics Association health policy conference  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increased level of activity in the biomedical and health informatics world (e-prescribing, electronic health records, personal health records) that, in the near future, will yield a wealth of available data that we can exploit meaningfully to strengthen knowledge building and evidence creation, and ultimately improve clinical and preventive care. The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) 2008 Health

Meryl Bloomrosen; Don E. Detmer

2010-01-01

62

Public Health Informatics: A CDC Course for Public Health Program Managers  

E-print Network

to the modern practice of public health. Yet today’s public health professionals generally have no formal training in public health informatics—the application of information science and technology to public health practice and research. Responding to this need, the U.S.

unknown authors

63

Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2014-2015  

E-print Network

Foundations 3 UF 200 Civic and Ethical Foundations 3 DLM MATH 254 Applied Statistics with Computers 3 DLN BIOL Introduction to Health Informatics HLTHST 300 Pathophysiology HLTHST 314 Health Law and Ethics CID HLTHST 382 Accounting ACCT 206 Introduction to Managerial Accounting HLTHST 330 Health Information Management I with lab

Barrash, Warren

64

Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2013-2014  

E-print Network

Foundations 3 UF 200 Civic and Ethical Foundations 3 DLM MATH 254 Applied Statistics with Computers 3 DLN BIOL Introduction to Health Informatics HLTHST 300 Pathophysiology HLTHST 314 Health Law and Ethics CID HLTHST 382 Accounting ACCT 206 Introduction to Managerial Accounting HLTHST 330 Health Information Management I with lab

Barrash, Warren

65

Management and Evaluation of a Pan-Canadian Graduate Training Program in Health Informatics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eight Canadian universities partnered to establish a Collaborative Health Informatics PhD/Postdoc Strategic Training Program (CHPSTP). The 6-year goal was to increase research capacity in health informatics in Canada. Three cohorts of 20 trainees participated in the training, which included online Research Learning Experiences, annual face-to-face…

Hebert, Marilynne; Lau, Francis

2010-01-01

66

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes : From Language Model to Location Model  

E-print Network

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes : From Language. Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes : From Language Model, this approach seems to be a good way of location modelling. Index Terms--smart flats for elderly people

Fouquet, Yannick

67

Evidence-based Patient Choice and Consumer health informatics in the Internet age  

PubMed Central

In this paper we explore current access to and barriers to health information for consumers. We discuss how computers and other developments in information technology are ushering in the era of consumer health informatics , and the potential that lies ahead. It is clear that we witness a period in which the public will have unprecedented ability to access information and to participate actively in evidence-based health care. We propose that consumer health informatics be regarded as a whole new academic discipline, one that should be devoted to the exploration of the new possibilities that informatics is creating for consumers in relation to health and health care issues. PMID:11720961

2001-01-01

68

Context sensitive health informatics: concepts, methods and tools.  

PubMed

Context is a key consideration when designing and evaluating health information technology (HIT) and cannot be overstated. Unintended consequences are common post HIT implementation and even well designed technology may not achieve desired outcomes because of contextual issues. While context should be considered in the design and evaluation of health information systems (HISs) there is a shortcoming of empirical research on contextual aspects of HIT. This conference integrates the sociotechnical and Human-Centered-Design (HCD) approaches and showcases current research on context sensitive health informatics. The papers and presentations outlines theories and models for studying contextual issues and insights on how we can better design HIT to accommodate different healthcare contexts. PMID:23941921

Kuziemsky, Craig; Nøhr, Christian; Aarts, Jos; Jaspers, Monique; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine

2013-01-01

69

Developing health informatics as a recognised professional domain supporting clinical and health management activity.  

PubMed

This paper puts forward a case for use of the term "health informatics" to be deployed as a catalyst to collective recognition of the contribution that technology, information handling and decision support can provide to effective health care internationally. It cautions against disregarding the impact that the collective 'health informatics' may have on cohesion and recognition across the specialist clinical areas, management sectors and diverse professions involved in specialist areas. It also recognises that commonality of standards and consistency of protocols can be identified in many of the technical and clinical specialist areas, confirming the basis for a collective term. Having looked at potentially generic factors in the development of both a learned society and professional regulation body in the UK, the paper concludes that without recognition of the collective term "health informatics" there will be an grossy extended time frame before any of those working in this area gain the recognition and respect of a formal discipline. PMID:17396757

Roberts, Jean

2006-01-01

70

National Institutes of Health Data and Informatics Working Group  

E-print Network

, Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin- Madison; co-chair Lawrence Professor, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, University of Washington Jill P, University of Michigan Medical School Paul Harris, Ph.D., Director, Office of Research Informatics

Bezrukov, Sergey M.

71

Program management and health care informatics: defining relationships.  

PubMed

The program management (PM) structure is a relatively well-known organizational model for hospitals. A variation of the matrix structure, it allows for an interdisciplinary team of health care providers to facilitate patient care delivery. However, providing such focused care results in a complex, highly information-dependent operational environment. To meet the information needs of such an environment, careful planning in selecting and implementing technology is required. Along with supporting patient care, the technology will also help in managing costs, human resources, quality and utilization, as well as in monitoring performance and outcomes measurement. Focusing specifically on the information technology environment, this article addresses health care informatics (the diverse categories of information and systems) needed to support clinical program managers, executives and others in a PM organization. Examples from both a university-affiliated and a community-based program managed hospital illustrate their approach to PM and information technology. PMID:10140165

Harber, B W; Miller, S A

1994-01-01

72

The State of Information and Communication Technology and Health Informatics in Ghana  

PubMed Central

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has become a major tool in delivery of health services and has had an innovative impact on quality of life. ICT is affecting the way healthcare is delivered to clients. In this paper, we discuss the state of ICT and health informatics in Ghana. We also discuss the state of various relevant infrastructures for the successful implementation of ehealth projects. We analyse the past and present state of health informatics in Ghana, in comparison to other African countries. We also review the challenges facing successful implementation of health informatics projects in Ghana and suggest possible solutions. PMID:23569633

Achampong, Emmanuel Kusi

2012-01-01

73

Introduction to the Special Issue on Data Mining for Health Informatics  

E-print Network

informatics: · Diagnostics: to determine whether a patient is suffer- ing from a certain medical conditionIntroduction to the Special Issue on Data Mining for Health Informatics Raymond T. Ng Department of medical research in the next decade is what is often called "personalized" medicine. The goal

Ng, Raymond T.

74

Global Health Seminar Series  

E-print Network

Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health: The challenges of investing in health and universal health coverage Although targets can help to focus global health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health

Klein, Ophir

75

STAT-HI: A Socio-Technical Assessment Tool for Health Informatics Implementations  

PubMed Central

This paper proposes a socio-technical assessment tool (STAT-HI) for health informatics implementations. We explore why even projects allegedly using sound methodologies repeatedly fail to give adequate attention to socio-technical issues, and we present an initial draft of a structured assessment tool for health informatics implementation that encapsulates socio-technical good practice. Further work is proposed to enrich and validate the proposed instrument. This proposal was presented for discussion at a meeting of the UK Faculty of Health Informatics in December 2009. PMID:21603280

Scott, Philip J; Briggs, James S

2010-01-01

76

A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

We present a searchable repository of codes of ethics and standards in health informatics. It is built using state-of-the-art search algorithms and technologies. The repository will be potentially beneficial for public health practitioners, researchers, and software developers in finding and comparing ethics topics of interest. Public health clinics, clinicians, and researchers can use the repository platform as a one-stop reference for various ethics codes and standards. In addition, the repository interface is built for easy navigation, fast search, and side-by-side comparative reading of documents. Our selection criteria for codes and standards are two-fold; firstly, to maintain intellectual property rights, we index only codes and standards freely available on the internet. Secondly, major international, regional, and national health informatics bodies across the globe are surveyed with the aim of understanding the landscape in this domain. We also look at prevalent technical standards in health informatics from major bodies such as the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our repository contains codes of ethics from the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), the iHealth Coalition (iHC), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Australasian College of Health Informatics (ACHI), the British Computer Society (BCS), and the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP), with room for adding more in the future. Our major contribution is enhancing the findability of codes and standards related to health informatics ethics by compilation and unified access through the health informatics ethics repository.

Zaïane, Osmar R.

2014-01-01

77

Establishing health informatics as a recognised and respected profession in the UK National Health Service.  

PubMed

The delivery of healthcare is an information dependent process. National government modernisation targets, and drives to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of care delivery systems and processes have the better use of information and IT at their heart. If we are to realise the benefits information and IT developments can bring, we have to ensure we have a suitable cadre of well educated, proactive professional specialists who understand the business of healthcare. The English NHS has an attrition rate of something like 43% amongst its ICT specialists, and there are recruitment and retention problems in a range of other informatics disciplines like medical records, project management and strategic management. A 1999-2000 survey indicated the reasons for recruitment and retention problems. One agreed solution has been to work towards establishing health informatics as a recognised and respected national profession. This is in addition to other national work to establish career pathways, make health informatics as a profession "mainstream", and to provide development opportunities at all levels. This paper sets out the background to the establishment of a profession in UK health services, outlines progress to date, and summarises other national development activity to support health informatics professionals. PMID:14664092

Millen, Di

2003-01-01

78

Population Health Sciences/Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 650 Introduction to SAS Programming for Population Health  

E-print Network

1 Population Health Sciences/Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 650 Introduction to SAS and to perform basic statistical analyses. Text (required): Delwiche, Lora D. and Slaughter, Susan J. The Little and user-defined formats. 5. Recognize common SAS program errors and identify strategies for debugging SAS

Sheridan, Jennifer

79

Clinical microbiology informatics.  

PubMed

The clinical microbiology laboratory has responsibilities ranging from characterizing the causative agent in a patient's infection to helping detect global disease outbreaks. All of these processes are increasingly becoming partnered more intimately with informatics. Effective application of informatics tools can increase the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of microbiology testing while decreasing the laboratory workload, which can lead to optimized laboratory workflow and decreased costs. Informatics is poised to be increasingly relevant in clinical microbiology, with the advent of total laboratory automation, complex instrument interfaces, electronic health records, clinical decision support tools, and the clinical implementation of microbial genome sequencing. This review discusses the diverse informatics aspects that are relevant to the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the following: the microbiology laboratory information system, decision support tools, expert systems, instrument interfaces, total laboratory automation, telemicrobiology, automated image analysis, nucleic acid sequence databases, electronic reporting of infectious agents to public health agencies, and disease outbreak surveillance. The breadth and utility of informatics tools used in clinical microbiology have made them indispensable to contemporary clinical and laboratory practice. Continued advances in technology and development of these informatics tools will further improve patient and public health care in the future. PMID:25278581

Rhoads, Daniel D; Sintchenko, Vitali; Rauch, Carol A; Pantanowitz, Liron

2014-10-01

80

The next generation Internet and health care: a civics lesson for the informatics community.  

PubMed Central

The Internet provides one of the most compelling examples of the way in which government research investments can, in time, lead to innovations of broad social and economic impact. This paper reviews the history of the Internet's evolution, emphasizing in particular its relationship to medical informatics and to the nation's health-care system. Current national research programs are summarized and the need for more involvement by the informatics community and by federal health-care agencies is emphasized. PMID:9929176

Shortliffe, E. H.

1998-01-01

81

Requirements for Realizing the Full Potential of Informatics in the Field of Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper proposes a zero concept, health-oriented approach to applying informatics to two health care problems: first, the lack of easily understood and used terminology linking health problems and interventions to the concept of "health"; and second, the lack of a unifying principle on which to base all aspects of health care. (DB)

Wittenstrom, John C.

1991-01-01

82

Informatic nephrology.  

PubMed

Biomedical informatics in Health (BIH) is the discipline in charge of capturing, handling and using information in health and biomedicine in order to improve the processes involved with assistance and management. Informatic nephrology has appeared as a product of the combination between conventional nephrology with BIH and its development has been considerable in the assistance as well as in the academic field. Regarding the former, there is increasing evidence that informatics technology can make nephrological assistance be better in quality (effective, accessible, safe and satisfying), improve patient's adherence, optimize patient's and practitioner's time, improve physical space and achieve health cost reduction. Among its main elements, we find electronic medical and personal health records, clinical decision support system, tele-nephrology, and recording and monitoring devices. Additionally, regarding the academic field, informatics and Internet contribute to education and research in the nephrological field. In conclusion, informatics nephrology represents a new field which will influence the future of nephrology. PMID:23065430

Musso, Carlos; Aguilera, Jerónimo; Otero, Carlos; Vilas, Manuel; Luna, Daniel; de Quirós, Fernán González Bernaldo

2013-08-01

83

An informatics agenda for public health: summarized recommendations from the 2011 AMIA PHI Conference  

PubMed Central

The AMIA Public Health Informatics 2011 Conference brought together members of the public health and health informatics communities to revisit the national agenda developed at the AMIA Spring Congress in 2001, assess the progress that has been made in the past decade, and develop recommendations to further guide the field. Participants met in five discussion tracks: technical framework; research and evaluation; ethics; education, professional training, and workforce development; and sustainability. Participants identified 62 recommendations, which clustered into three key themes related to the need to (1) enhance communication and information sharing within the public health informatics community, (2) improve the consistency of public health informatics through common public health terminologies, rigorous evaluation methodologies, and competency-based training, and (3) promote effective coordination and leadership that will champion and drive the field forward. The agenda and recommendations from the meeting will be disseminated and discussed throughout the public health and informatics communities. Both communities stand to gain much by working together to use these recommendations to further advance the application of information technology to improve health. PMID:22395299

Goodman, Kenneth W; Gotham, Ivan J; Holmes, John H; Lang, Lisa; Miner, Kathleen; Potenziani, David D; Richards, Janise; Turner, Anne M; Fu, Paul C

2012-01-01

84

Global Health Seminar Series  

E-print Network

Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Global HIV/AIDS at the crossroads: Where do we go from here? Join us for the inaugural Bay Area Global Health Seminar, a quarterly series of moderated salon seminar will feature a different global health topic and be hosted by one of the four participating

Klein, Ophir

85

Integrating Experiential Learning into a Double Degree Masters Program in Nursing and Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

In Canada there are few nurses who have advanced practice competencies in nursing informatics. This is a significant issue for regional health authorities, governments and electronic health record vendors in Canada who are implementing electronic health records. Few Schools of Nursing provide formalized opportunities for nurses to develop informatics competencies. Many of these opportunities take the form of post-baccalaureate certificate programs or individual undergraduate or graduate level courses in nursing. The purpose of this paper will be to: (1) describe the health and human resource issues in this area in Canada, (2) provide a brief overview of the design and development of a new, innovative double degree program at the intersection of nursing and health informatics that interleaves cooperative learning, (3) describe the integration of cooperative learning into this new program, and (4) outline the lessons learned in integrating cooperative education into such a graduate program. PMID:24199044

Borycki, Elizabeth M.; Frisch, Noreen; Kushniruk, Andre W.; McIntyre, Marjorie; Hutchinson, David

2012-01-01

86

Healthcare Informatics for Mental Health Recent Advances and the Outlook for the Future  

E-print Network

Healthcare Informatics for Mental Health Recent Advances and the Outlook for the Future Hamed and their surrounding environment (e.g., by monitoring their CO2 level [13]). Mental health care has seen less. Electronic records are relatively recent in mental health care and tend to be poorly integrated in clinical

Purver, Matthew

87

The new global health.  

PubMed

Global health reflects the realities of globalization, including worldwide dissemination of infectious and noninfectious public health risks. Global health architecture is complex and better coordination is needed between multiple organizations. Three overlapping themes determine global health action and prioritization: development, security, and public health. These themes play out against a background of demographic change, socioeconomic development, and urbanization. Infectious diseases remain critical factors, but are no longer the major cause of global illness and death. Traditional indicators of public health, such as maternal and infant mortality rates no longer describe the health status of whole societies; this change highlights the need for investment in vital registration and disease-specific reporting. Noncommunicable diseases, injuries, and mental health will require greater attention from the world in the future. The new global health requires broader engagement by health organizations and all countries for the objectives of health equity, access, and coverage as priorities beyond the Millennium Development Goals are set. PMID:23876365

De Cock, Kevin M; Simone, Patricia M; Davison, Veronica; Slutsker, Laurence

2013-08-01

88

The New Global Health  

PubMed Central

Global health reflects the realities of globalization, including worldwide dissemination of infectious and noninfectious public health risks. Global health architecture is complex and better coordination is needed between multiple organizations. Three overlapping themes determine global health action and prioritization: development, security, and public health. These themes play out against a background of demographic change, socioeconomic development, and urbanization. Infectious diseases remain critical factors, but are no longer the major cause of global illness and death. Traditional indicators of public health, such as maternal and infant mortality rates no longer describe the health status of whole societies; this change highlights the need for investment in vital registration and disease-specific reporting. Noncommunicable diseases, injuries, and mental health will require greater attention from the world in the future. The new global health requires broader engagement by health organizations and all countries for the objectives of health equity, access, and coverage as priorities beyond the Millennium Development Goals are set. PMID:23876365

Simone, Patricia M.; Davison, Veronica; Slutsker, Laurence

2013-01-01

89

STARE-HI - Statement on Reporting of Evaluation Studies in Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Improving the quality of reporting of evaluation studies in health informatics is an important requirement towards the vision of evidence-based health informatics. The STARE-HI – Statement on Reporting of Evaluation Studies in health informatics, published in 2009, provides guidelines on the elements to be contained in an evaluation study report. Objectives To elaborate on and provide a rationale for the principles of STARE-HI and to guide authors and readers of evaluation studies in health informatics by providing explanatory examples of reporting. Methods A group of methodologists, researchers and editors prepared the present elaboration of the STARE-HI statement and selected examples from the literature. Results The 35 STARE-HI items to be addressed in evaluation papers describing health informatics interventions are discussed one by one and each is extended with examples and elaborations. Conclusion The STARE-HI statement and this elaboration document should be helpful resources to improve reporting of both quantitative and qualitative evaluation studies. Evaluation manuscripts adhering to the principles will enable readers of such papers to better place the studies in a proper context and judge their validity and generalizability, and thus in turn optimize the exploitation of the evidence contained therein. Limitations This paper is based on experiences of a group of editors, reviewers, authors of systematic reviews and readers of the scientific literature. The applicability of the details of these principles has to evolve as a function of their use in practice. PMID:24155788

Brender, J.; Talmon, J.; de Keizer, N.; Nykanen, P.; Rigby, M.; Ammenwerth, E.

2013-01-01

90

GLOBAL HEALTH STUDENTTRAVELPOLICY FORPRESENTINGATPROFESSIONALCONFERENCES  

E-print Network

1 GLOBAL HEALTH STUDENTTRAVELPOLICY FORPRESENTINGATPROFESSIONALCONFERENCES If you are invited to present global health research at a national conference, you may be eligible to have some of the costs, subject to the limitations described below, funded by the Global Health Center. If you wish to apply

Bukauskas, Feliksas

91

Informatics and Telematics in Health. Present and Potential Uses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report focuses on technical issues associated with informatics--a term covering all aspects of the development and operations of information systems, the supporting computer methodology and technology, and the supporting telecommunications links. The first of six chapters discusses the purpose of the report together with basic assumptions…

World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

92

Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Health Informatics Masters Program at KSAU-HS University, Saudi Arabia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Saudi health sector has witnessed a significant progress in recent decades with some Saudi hospitals receiving international recognition. However, this progress has not been accompanied by the same advancement in the health informatics field whose applications have become a necessity for hospitals in order to achieve important objectives such…

Majid, Altuwaijri

2007-01-01

93

Adapting social media as a scaffolding tool for teaching health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health informatics is an applied hybrid discipline of health and life sciences, computer science and business. Teaching this subject to undergraduate students, presents the challenge of learning without the assistance of internship or work experience that enable placing the learning in context. We used the university's learning management software as a form of social medium to stimulate discussions in preparation

Karen Day; Stewart Wells

2009-01-01

94

Beyond information access: Support for complex cognitive activities in public health informatics tools  

PubMed Central

Public health professionals work with a variety of information sources to carry out their everyday activities. In recent years, interactive computational tools have become deeply embedded in such activities. Unlike the early days of computational tool use, the potential of tools nowadays is not limited to simply providing access to information; rather, they can act as powerful mediators of human-information discourse, enabling rich interaction with public health information. If public health informatics tools are designed and used properly, they can facilitate, enhance, and support the performance of complex cognitive activities that are essential to public health informatics, such as problem solving, forecasting, sense-making, and planning. However, the effective design and evaluation of public health informatics tools requires an understanding of the cognitive and perceptual issues pertaining to how humans work and think with information to perform such activities. This paper draws on research that has examined some of the relevant issues, including interaction design, complex cognition, and visual representations, to offer some human-centered design and evaluation considerations for public health informatics tools. PMID:23569645

Sedig, Kamran; Parsons, Paul; Dittmer, Mark; Ola, Oluwakemi

2012-01-01

95

Global Health Field Experience  

E-print Network

Experience, Yale University Kaveh Khoshnood School of Public Health, Yale University Director, Yale Global on economic development, public health, and other related topics will be valuable as you begin to makeGlobal Health Field Experience Guide Yale College Center for International and Professional

96

INFORMATICS 4TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE  

E-print Network

and Informatics Office of Continuing Medical Education and the UC Davis Health Informatics Program wwwHEALTH INFORMATICS PROGRAM 4TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE The Integration of Care: Innovations, MD Professor of Psychiatry Director, Health Informatics Graduate Program GUEST FACULTY Faculty Yan

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

97

Global Health/International Global Health/International Experiences Experiences  

E-print Network

Global Health/International Global Health/International Experiences Experiences Year Out Opportunities Year Out Opportunities Nancy Biller Nancy Biller Global Health Programs Office Global Health Programs Office nbiller@exchange.upenn.edu nbiller@exchange.upenn.edu Global Health/International Global

Bushman, Frederic

98

Sustainable Development of Medical Informatics in Africa: Need for a Health Informatics Curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information and communication technologies (ICT) have been recognized in the past decades as an essential tool for the scientific, economic, and social development of a country. In the health sector these technologies have proven to be a significant factor for an effective and comprehensive planning, management, and estimation of health care. The increased development and use of these technologies in

Ghislain Kouematchoua; Otto Rienhoff

99

Globalization and Health  

PubMed Central

This debut editorial of Globalization and Health introduces the journal, briefly delineating its goals and objectives and outlines its scope of subject matter. 'Open Access' publishing is expected to become an increasingly important format for peer reviewed academic journals and that Globalization and Health is 'Open Access' is appropriate. The rationale behind starting a journal dedicated to globalization and health is three fold: Firstly: Globalization is reshaping the social geography within which we might strive to create health or prevent disease. The determinants of health – be they a SARS virus or a predilection for fatty foods – have joined us in our global mobility. Driven by economic liberalization and changing technologies, the phenomenon of 'access' is likely to dominate to an increasing extent the unfolding experience of human disease and wellbeing. Secondly: Understanding globalization as a subject matter itself needs certain benchmarks and barometers of its successes and failings. Health is one such barometer. It is a marker of social infrastructure and social welfare and as such can be used to either sound an alarm or give a victory cheer as our interconnectedness hurts and heals the populations we serve. And lastly: In as much as globalization can have an effect on health, it is also true that health and disease has an effect on globalization as exemplified by the existence of quarantine laws and the devastating economic effects of the AIDS pandemic. A balanced view would propose that the effects of globalization on health (and health systems) are neither universally good nor bad, but rather context specific. If the dialogue pertaining to globalization is to be directed or biased in any direction, then it must be this: that we consider the poor first. PMID:15847699

Martin, Greg

2005-01-01

100

A model curriculum of health care informatics for Dutch higher professional education.  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the results of a two year project to design a model curriculum of health care informatics for Dutch higher professional education. The core of the curriculum are sixteen modules which cover the broad range of medical informatics and which are closely related to the profiles of the professions involved (nursing, physiotherapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy and dietetics). The curriculum emphasizes the need of using structured data and information to perform tasks in health care delivery and management, for which modern information technology is indispensable. The model curriculum will enable faculty to redesign existing undergraduate programs and to select the contents they see appropriate. In this way we hope that the model curriculum will contribute to an innovative attitude of future graduating health care professionals. A new three year project just has started to develop learning materials using professional health care software based on the sixteen modules of the curriculum. PMID:8563329

Aarts, J.

1995-01-01

101

Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education  

PubMed Central

Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search) and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. PMID:25057246

Hersh, William R; Gorman, Paul N; Biagioli, Frances E; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Mejicano, George C

2014-01-01

102

A Clinical Informatics Network (CLINT) to support the practice of evidence-based health care.  

PubMed

CLINT, which stands for Clinical Informatics NeTwork, is one of the clinical informatics initiatives in development at McMaster University's Health Information Research Unit. CLINT is a microcomputer-based system of over 60 workstations providing 24 hour availability of a set of clinical information resources to clinicians throughout our teaching hospital. CLINT encompasses three domains: (1) a user adaptable clinician-computer interface, (2) unique evidence-based health care content, and (3) automated data collection and viewing tools. An objective of the CLINT project is to determine CLINT's impact on the practice of health care. Early analysis of our data has revealed that over the past year, there has been widespread use of CLINT by clinicians from all clinical domains. Our next task is to evaluate CLINT's usefulness. PMID:8947702

Langton, K B; Horsman, J; Hayward, R S; Ross, S A

1996-01-01

103

Global Health Center MICROGRANT PROGRAM  

E-print Network

Raufman, MS, MPH Program Manager, Global Health Center Albert Einstein College of Medicine of YeshivaGlobal Health Center MICROGRANT PROGRAM Request for Applications The Einstein Global Health Center-3518 jill.raufman@einstein.yu.edu #12;

Yates, Andrew

104

Global Health Council  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created in 1972, the Global Health Council (then known as the National Council of International Health) was created to identify priority world health problems and report on them to a wide range of parties, including government agencies and the global health community. In order to disseminate its findings and keep the public informed, the Council has created this well-organized website. The homepage offers visitors the basic layout of the site's contents, as it includes a selection of news briefs dealing with world health concerns and information on the most recent accomplishments of the Council. The top of the homepage offers subject links to the main programmatic areas of interest to the Council: women's health, child health, HIV/AIDS, and infectious disease. Of course, there is a strong publication section, which includes such timely documents as "Faith in Action: Examining the Role of Faith-Based Organizations in Addressing HIV/AIDS" and "Preventing Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Persons".

105

Imaging informatics for consumer health: towards a radiology patient portal  

PubMed Central

Objective With the increased routine use of advanced imaging in clinical diagnosis and treatment, it has become imperative to provide patients with a means to view and understand their imaging studies. We illustrate the feasibility of a patient portal that automatically structures and integrates radiology reports with corresponding imaging studies according to several information orientations tailored for the layperson. Methods The imaging patient portal is composed of an image processing module for the creation of a timeline that illustrates the progression of disease, a natural language processing module to extract salient concepts from radiology reports (73% accuracy, F1 score of 0.67), and an interactive user interface navigable by an imaging findings list. The portal was developed as a Java-based web application and is demonstrated for patients with brain cancer. Results and discussion The system was exhibited at an international radiology conference to solicit feedback from a diverse group of healthcare professionals. There was wide support for educating patients about their imaging studies, and an appreciation for the informatics tools used to simplify images and reports for consumer interpretation. Primary concerns included the possibility of patients misunderstanding their results, as well as worries regarding accidental improper disclosure of medical information. Conclusions Radiologic imaging composes a significant amount of the evidence used to make diagnostic and treatment decisions, yet there are few tools for explaining this information to patients. The proposed radiology patient portal provides a framework for organizing radiologic results into several information orientations to support patient education. PMID:23739614

Arnold, Corey W; McNamara, Mary; El-Saden, Suzie; Chen, Shawn; Taira, Ricky K; Bui, Alex A T

2013-01-01

106

Uncovering patterns of technology use in consumer health informatics  

PubMed Central

Internet usage and accessibility has grown at a staggering rate, influencing technology use for healthcare purposes. The amount of health information technology (Health IT) available through the Internet is immeasurable and growing daily. Health IT is now seen as a fundamental aspect of patient care as it stimulates patient engagement and encourages personal health management. It is increasingly important to understand consumer health IT patterns including who is using specific technologies, how technologies are accessed, factors associated with use, and perceived benefits. To fully uncover consumer patterns it is imperative to recognize common barriers and which groups they disproportionately affect. Finally, exploring future demand and predictions will expose significant opportunities for health IT. The most frequently used health information technologies by consumers are gathering information online, mobile health (mHealth) technologies, and personal health records (PHRs). Gathering health information online is the favored pathway for healthcare consumers as it is used by more consumers and more frequently than any other technology. In regard to mHealth technologies, minority Americans, compared with White Americans utilize social media, mobile Internet, and mobile applications more frequently. Consumers believe PHRs are the most beneficial health IT. PHR usage is increasing rapidly due to PHR integration with provider health systems and health insurance plans. Key issues that have to be explicitly addressed in health IT are privacy and security concerns, health literacy, unawareness, and usability. Privacy and security concerns are rated the number one reason for the slow rate of health IT adoption. PMID:24904713

Hung, Man; Conrad, Jillian; Hon, Shirley D.; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D.; Tang, Philip

2014-01-01

107

Nursing informatics issues and progress in New Zealand.  

PubMed

This paper presents an updated view of progress made in health informatics in New Zealand since 2003 and also highlights current issues facing nursing informatics. The progress made in health informatics in New Zealand since the national health information development "Working to Add Value through E-information" Project was introduced is outlined. A new Health Information Strategy for New Zealand 2005 has been released to guide the use of innovative information to improve the health outcomes of New Zealanders. This strategy reflects the global trends in healthcare related to epidemiological, demographic, system structure, workforce, service delivery changes and the increase in consumer expectations. PMID:17102319

Honey, Michelle; Westbrooke, Lucy

2006-01-01

108

Globalisation of health and medical informatics education - what are the issues?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: We are witnessing a paradigm shift in higher education as a result of technological advances, adoption of on-line learning and a greater participation in e-commerce by higher education providers. Given the dearth of academics with high-level expertise in health informatics in many countries, we need to explore how best to use our scarce resources to have the greatest possible

Evelyn J. S. Hovenga

2004-01-01

109

Globalism and Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the advent of twenty-four-hour news media, local, state, and national agencies' warnings and with the explosive role of the Internet, people are more aware of global health concerns that may have significant consequences for the world's population. As international travel continues to increase, health care professionals around the world are…

Rowland, Michael L.

2011-01-01

110

Integrating Governance of Research Informatics and Health Care IT Across an Enterprise: Experiences from the Trenches  

PubMed Central

Advances in health information technology and biomedical informatics have laid the groundwork for significant improvements in healthcare and biomedical research. For instance, Electronic Health Records can help improve the delivery of evidence-based care, enhance quality, and contribute to discoveries and evidence generation. Despite this promise, there are many challenges to achieving the vision and missions of our healthcare and research enterprises. Given the challenges inherent in doing so, institutions are increasingly moving to establish dedicated leadership and governance models charged with designing, deploying and leveraging various information resources to advance research and advanced care activities at AHCs. Some institutions have even created a new leadership position to oversee such activities, such as the Chief Research Information Officer. This panel will include research informatics leaders discussing their experiences from the proverbial trenches as they work to operationalize such cross-mission governance models. Panelists will start by providing an overview their respective positions and environments, discuss their experiences, and share lessons learned through their work at the intersection of clinical and translational research informatics and Health IT. PMID:24303236

Embi, Peter J.; Tachinardi, Umberto; Lussier, Yves; Starren, Justin; Silverstein, Jonathan

111

The Abzooba Smart Health Informatics Platform (SHIP) TM - From Patient Experiences to Big Data to Insights  

E-print Network

This paper describes a technology to connect patients to information in the experiences of other patients by using the power of structured big data. The approach, implemented in the Abzooba Smart Health Informatics Platform (SHIP),is to distill concepts of facts and expressions from conversations and discussions in health social media forums, and use those distilled concepts in connecting patients to experiences and insights that are highly relevant to them in particular. We envision our work, in progress, to provide new and effective tools to exploit the richness of content in social media in health for outcomes research.

Ashish, Naveen; Das, Sumit; Nag, Saurav; Pratap, Rajiv

2012-01-01

112

Global health and justice.  

PubMed

In Australia, Japan, Sweden, and Switzerland, the average life expectancy is now greater than 80 years. But in Angola, Malawi, Sierra Leone, and Zimbabwe, the average life expectancy is less than 40 years. The situation is even worse than these statistics suggest because average figures tend to mask inequalities within countries. What are we to make of a world with such inequal health prospects? What does justice demand in terms of global health? To address these problems, I characterize justice at the local level, at the domestic or social level, and at the international or global level. Because social conditions, structures, and institutions have such a profound influence on the health of populations, I begin by focusing attention on the relationship between social justice and health prospects. Then I go on to discuss health prospects and the problem of global justice. Here I distinguish two views: a cosmopolitan view and a political view of global justice. In my account of global justice, I modify and use the political view that John Rawls developed in The Law of Peoples. I try to show why an adequate political account must include three duties: a duty not to harm, a duty to reconstruct international arrangements, and a duty to assist. PMID:16425484

Dwyer, James

2005-10-01

113

About the Global Health Minor Global Health Minor Goals  

E-print Network

therapy), public health, and so on. Completion of the GLBHL minor will strengthen students' capacityAbout the Global Health Minor Global Health Minor Goals The Global Health (GLBHL) minor is designed and practical issues affecting the health of people in various countries and regions of the world. Emphasis

Guiltinan, Mark

114

Global Health/International Experiences  

E-print Network

Global Health/International Experiences Year Out Opportunities Nancy Biller Global Health Programs Office nbiller@exchange.upenn.edu http://www.med.upenn.edu/globalhealth/index.shtml #12;Global Health-Fellowships-for-Medical-Students/ Fogarty Global Health Program for Fellows & Scholars (mainly for individuals from low-resource areas

Bushman, Frederic

115

Globalization and Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Open-access peer-reviewed journals continue to grow in number and in scope, and those dealing with the future of public health are no exception. One of the latest is Globalization and Health, which provides âÂÂa platform for research, knowledge sharing and debate on the topic of globalization and its effects on health, both positive and negative.â With such a broad range, it is no surprise that the journal has included articles on the tobacco industry, intellectual property rights, the effect of trade agreements on health, and the dissemination of Western diets across the globe. The journal currently publishes everything from book reviews to debate articles, so interested parties should definitely take a look at their work and requirements for publication consideration.

116

Accepted Special Issue of Methods of Information in Medicine Journal: Health and Medical Informatics Applications Educational Aspects,  

E-print Network

Accepted Special Issue of Methods of Information in Medicine Journal: Health and Medical Informatics Applications ­ Educational Aspects, August 2005 Revised May 2006 Selected eHealth Applications, Cyprus (2) Department of Computer Science, University of Cyprus, Cyprus (3) Ministry of Health, Cyprus

Pitsillides, Andreas

117

Understanding public health informatics competencies for mid-tier public health practitioners: a web-based survey.  

PubMed

The literature suggests that there is a need for measuring public health informatics (PHI) competency to further understand whether current educational modules and modalities meet the needs of PHI practitioners and researchers to perform their jobs more effectively, particularly for mid-tier practitioners that constitute the majority of public health workers in the USA. The present study seeks to update current knowledge of the perceptions and experiences of PHI competencies proposed by the U.S. Council on Linkage in Public Health specifically for mid-tier PH practitioners and researchers. The results were collected and analyzed by using a Web-based survey (WBS) method administered among both practitioners and researchers. Researchers first compiled a draft list of candidate competency set by incorporating existing competency areas provided by: 1) the Council on Linkage; and by 2) those proposed by the USA's Centers for Disease Control CDC Public Health Informatics Work Group. Nine sets of competency statements with 120 competency items and demographic information of respondents were included in the WBS. The online survey instruments were pilot-tested accordingly to incorporate feedback from respondents of the pilot. Fifty-six subjects were recruited from PH experts who were: 1) members of the Health Informatics Information Technology (HIIT) group of American Public Health Association; and, 2) members from the Community of Science (COS) Website who were the first authors published in the PHI field from PubMed. The sample included diverse backgrounds of PHI workers. They expressed an increased need for training to improve their PHI competencies. Respondents agreed that four competency sets should be adequately represented, including Leadership and System Thinking Skills (82%), followed by Financial Planning and Management Skills (79%), Community Dimensions of Practice Skills (77%), and Policy Development/Program Planning Skills (63%). The findings parallel current literature indicating that there exists an expressed need for clarification of the public health practitioner's job-specific informatics competency. Findings of expressed needs for basic computer literacy training and community-based practice were consistent with those of the literature. Additional training and resources should be allocated to address the competency of leadership, management, community-based practice and policy advocacy skills for mid-tier public health practitioners to perform their jobs more effectively. Only when healthcare organizations properly identify PHI competency needs will public health practitioners likely improve their overall informatics skills while improving diversification for contribution across multiple settings. PMID:22447878

Hsu, Chiehwen Ed; Dunn, Kim; Juo, Hsin-Hsuan; Danko, Rick; Johnson, Drew; Mas, Francisco Soto; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye

2012-03-01

118

Bridging Informatics and Implementation Science: Evaluating a Framework to Assess Electronic Health Record Implementations in Community Settings  

PubMed Central

Effective electronic health record (EHR) implementations in community settings are critical to promoting safe and reliable EHR use as well as mitigating provider dissatisfaction that often results. The implementation challenge is compounded given the scale and scope of EHR installations that are occurring and will continue to occur over the next five years. However, when compared to EHR evaluations relatively few biomedical informatics researchers have published on evaluating EHR implementations. Fewer still have evaluated EHR implementations in community settings. We report on the methods we used to achieve a novel application of an implementation science framework in informatics to qualitatively evaluate community-based EHR implementations. We briefly provide an overview of the implementation science framework, our methods for adapting it to informatics, the effects the framework had on our qualitative methods of inquiry and analysis, and discuss its potential value for informatics research. PMID:23304351

Richardson, Joshua E.; Abramson, Erika L.; Pfoh, Elizabeth R.; Kaushal, Rainu

2012-01-01

119

Bridging informatics and implementation science: evaluating a framework to assess electronic health record implementations in community settings.  

PubMed

Effective electronic health record (EHR) implementations in community settings are critical to promoting safe and reliable EHR use as well as mitigating provider dissatisfaction that often results. The implementation challenge is compounded given the scale and scope of EHR installations that are occurring and will continue to occur over the next five years. However, when compared to EHR evaluations relatively few biomedical informatics researchers have published on evaluating EHR implementations. Fewer still have evaluated EHR implementations in community settings. We report on the methods we used to achieve a novel application of an implementation science framework in informatics to qualitatively evaluate community-based EHR implementations. We briefly provide an overview of the implementation science framework, our methods for adapting it to informatics, the effects the framework had on our qualitative methods of inquiry and analysis, and discuss its potential value for informatics research. PMID:23304351

Richardson, Joshua E; Abramson, Erika L; Pfoh, Elizabeth R; Kaushal, Rainu

2012-01-01

120

A case for using grid architecture for state public health informatics: the Utah perspective  

PubMed Central

This paper presents the rationale for designing and implementing the next-generation of public health information systems using grid computing concepts and tools. Our attempt is to evaluate all grid types including data grids for sharing information and computational grids for accessing computational resources on demand. Public health is a broad domain that requires coordinated uses of disparate and heterogeneous information systems. System interoperability in public health is limited. The next-generation public health information systems must overcome barriers to integration and interoperability, leverage advances in information technology, address emerging requirements, and meet the needs of all stakeholders. Grid-based architecture provides one potential technical solution that deserves serious consideration. Within this context, we describe three discrete public health information system problems and the process by which the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) and the Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Utah in the United States has approached the exploration for eventual deployment of a Utah Public Health Informatics Grid. These three problems are: i) integration of internal and external data sources with analytic tools and computational resources; ii) provide external stakeholders with access to public health data and services; and, iii) access, integrate, and analyze internal data for the timely monitoring of population health status and health services. After one year of experience, we have successfully implemented federated queries across disparate administrative domains, and have identified challenges and potential solutions concerning the selection of candidate analytic grid services, data sharing concerns, security models, and strategies for reducing expertise required at a public health agency to implement a public health grid. PMID:19545428

2009-01-01

121

A case for using grid architecture for state public health informatics: the Utah perspective.  

PubMed

This paper presents the rationale for designing and implementing the next-generation of public health information systems using grid computing concepts and tools. Our attempt is to evaluate all grid types including data grids for sharing information and computational grids for accessing computational resources on demand. Public health is a broad domain that requires coordinated uses of disparate and heterogeneous information systems. System interoperability in public health is limited. The next-generation public health information systems must overcome barriers to integration and interoperability, leverage advances in information technology, address emerging requirements, and meet the needs of all stakeholders. Grid-based architecture provides one potential technical solution that deserves serious consideration. Within this context, we describe three discrete public health information system problems and the process by which the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) and the Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Utah in the United States has approached the exploration for eventual deployment of a Utah Public Health Informatics Grid. These three problems are: i) integration of internal and external data sources with analytic tools and computational resources; ii) provide external stakeholders with access to public health data and services; and, iii) access, integrate, and analyze internal data for the timely monitoring of population health status and health services. After one year of experience, we have successfully implemented federated queries across disparate administrative domains, and have identified challenges and potential solutions concerning the selection of candidate analytic grid services, data sharing concerns, security models, and strategies for reducing expertise required at a public health agency to implement a public health grid. PMID:19545428

Staes, Catherine J; Xu, Wu; LeFevre, Samuel D; Price, Ronald C; Narus, Scott P; Gundlapalli, Adi; Rolfs, Robert; Nangle, Barry; Samore, Matthew; Facelli, Julio C

2009-01-01

122

A Vision of Health Care and Informatics in 2008  

PubMed Central

By the year 2008, a major reorganization of health care services in the United States will have evolved from the solo- and group-practice models of the 1940s, with fee-for-service and insurer-indemnification financing and paper-based information systems, to nationwide managed care plans employing enhanced computer-based information systems. PMID:9925224

Collen, Morris F.

1999-01-01

123

Global Health and the Global Economic Crisis  

PubMed Central

Although the resources and knowledge for achieving improved global health exist, a new, critical paradigm on health as an aspect of human development, human security, and human rights is needed. Such a shift is required to sufficiently modify and credibly reduce the present dominance of perverse market forces on global health. New scientific discoveries can make wide-ranging contributions to improved health; however, improved global health depends on achieving greater social justice, economic redistribution, and enhanced democratization of production, caring social institutions for essential health care, education, and other public goods. As with the quest for an HIV vaccine, the challenge of improved global health requires an ambitious multidisciplinary research program. PMID:21330597

Gill, Stephen; Bakker, Isabella

2011-01-01

124

An agenda for action on global e-health.  

PubMed

Use of e-health, or electronic information technologies, has spread to cities and remote villages worldwide. Countries such as Rwanda are activating nationwide e-health networks. The Rockefeller Foundation's month-long 2008 conference Making the eHealth Connection: Global Partners, Local Solutions accelerated this process. Conference participants proposed global partnerships, health technology solutions based on local needs, cross-border interoperability, leveraging current open-source networks, and shared informatics systems; they achieved progress on a shared, cross-border understanding of e-health solutions and policy. Early steps toward furthering these goals include creation of a new organization, the mHealth Alliance, to coordinate efforts, but collaborative investments are needed to usher in the promise of e-health. PMID:20348066

Gerber, Ticia; Olazabal, Veronica; Brown, Karl; Pablos-Mendez, Ariel

2010-02-01

125

[Fitzpatrick, G., (2004) "Integrated care and the working record", in Health Informatics Journal, Vol 10, No 4, 291-302  

E-print Network

[Fitzpatrick, G., (2004) "Integrated care and the working record", in Health Informatics Journal, Vol 10, No 4, 291-302] Integrated Care and the Working Record Geraldine Fitzpatrick B.Inf.Tech (Hons: By default, many discussions and specifications of electronic health records or integrated care records often

Fitzpatrick, Geraldine

126

Why mental health matters to global health.  

PubMed

Global health has been defined as an area of study, research, and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. This article provides an overview of some central issues in global mental health in three parts. The first part demonstrates why mental health is relevant to global health by examining three key principles of global health: priority setting based on the burden of health problems, health inequalities and its global scope in particular in relation to the determinants and solutions for health problems. The second part considers and addresses the key critiques of global mental health: (a) that the "diagnoses" of mental disorders are not valid because there are no biological markers for these conditions; (b) that the strong association of social determinants undermines the use of biomedical interventions; (c) that the field is a proxy for the expansion of the pharmaceutical industry; and (d) that the actions of global mental health are equivalent to "medical imperialism" and it is a "psychiatric export." The final part discusses the opportunities for the field, piggybacking on the surge of interest in global health more broadly and on the growing acknowledgment of mental disorders as a key target for global health action. PMID:24595266

Patel, Vikram

2014-12-01

127

Comprehensive Environmental Informatics System (CEIS) Integrating Crew and Vehicle Environmental Health  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) systems have been pursued as highly integrated systems that include smart sensors, diagnostic and prognostics software for assessments of real-time and life-cycle vehicle health information. Inclusive to such a system is the requirement to monitor the environmental health within the vehicle and the occupants of the vehicle. In this regard an enterprise approach to informatics is used to develop a methodology entitled, Comprehensive Environmental Informatics System (CEIS). The hardware and software technologies integrated into this system will be embedded in the vehicle subsystems, and maintenance operations, to provide both real-time and life-cycle health information of the environment within the vehicle cabin and of its occupants. This comprehensive information database will enable informed decision making and logistics management. One key element of the CEIS is interoperability for data acquisition and archive between environment and human system monitoring. With comprehensive components the data acquired in this system will use model based reasoning systems for subsystem and system level managers, advanced on-board and ground-based mission and maintenance planners to assess system functionality. Knowledge databases of the vehicle health state will be continuously updated and reported for critical failure modes, and routinely updated and reported for life cycle condition trending. Sufficient intelligence, including evidence-based engineering practices which are analogous to evidencebased medicine practices, will be included in the CEIS to result in more rapid recognition of off-nominal operation to enable quicker corrective actions. This will result from better information (rather than just data) for improved crew/operator situational awareness, which will produce significant vehicle and crew safety improvements, as well as increasing the chance for mission success, future mission planning as well as training. Other benefits include improved reliability, increase safety in operations and cost of operations. The cost benefits stem from significantly reduced processing and operations manpower, predictive maintenance for systems and subjects. The improvements in vehicle functionality and cost will result from increased prognostic and diagnostic capability due to the detailed total human exploration system health knowledge from CEIS. A collateral benefit is that there will be closer observations of the vehicle occupants as wrist watch sized devices are worn for continuous health monitoring. Additional database acquisition will stem from activities in countermeasure practices to ensure peak performance capability by occupants of the vehicle. The CEIS will provide data from advanced sensing technologies and informatics modeling which will be useful in problem troubleshooting, and improving NASA s awareness of systems during operation.

Nall, Mark E.

2006-01-01

128

Globalization, global health, and access to healthcare.  

PubMed

It is now commonly realized that the globalization of the world economy is shaping the patterns of global health, and that associated morbidity and mortality is affecting countries' ability to achieve economic growth. The globalization of public health has important implications for access to essential healthcare. The rise of inequalities among and within countries negatively affects access to healthcare. Poor people use healthcare services less frequently when sick than do the rich. The negative impact of globalization on access to healthcare is particularly well demonstrated in countries of transitional economies. No longer protected by a centralized health sector that provided free universal access to services for everyone, large segments of the populations in the transition period found themselves denied even the most basic medical services. Only countries where regulatory institutions are strong, domestic markets are competitive and social safety nets are in place, have a good chance to enjoy the health benefits of globalization. PMID:12841150

Collins, Téa

2003-01-01

129

From a time standard for medical informatics to a controlled language for health.  

PubMed

CEN ENV 12381 is a European Prestandard focusing on formal representation and explicit reference of temporal information in healthcare informatics and telematics. One of its merits is not just the possibility to represent natural language expressions containing time-related information in a structured way, but also to give some mechanisms on how clinical language itself can be used to convey meaning unambiguously. As such, CEN ENV 12381 introduces the notion of 'controlled language use' in the domain of healthcare. In this paper the principles behind controlled language design and use are explained. Through a detailed study of the inconsistencies and ambiguities that arise when interpreting Snomed procedure terms in the framework of the Galen-In-Use project, it is shown that most of them can be explained as a violation of sound term-formation principles. A proposal is made to develop a controlled language for health and to use it in subsequent versions of coding and classification systems. It is expected that such an endeavour will lead to a more effective application of linguistic engineering in areas such as automatic knowledge acquisition, automatic translation, and terminology validation in the domain of healthcare informatics. PMID:9600408

Ceusters, W; Steurs, F; Zanstra, P; Van Der Haring, E; Rogers, J

1998-02-01

130

Consumer Health Informatics: The Application of ICT in Improving Patient-Provider Partnership for a Better Health Care  

PubMed Central

Background There is a growing interest concerning the potential of ICT solutions that are customized to consumers. This emerging discipline referred to as consumer health informatics (CHI) plays a major role in providing information to patients and the public, and facilitates the promotion of self-management. The concept of CHI has emerged out of the desire of most patients to shoulder responsibilities regarding their health and a growing desire of health practitioners to fully appreciate the potential of the patient. Aim To describe the role of ICT in improving the patient-provider partnership in consumer health informatics. Methods Systematic reviewing of literature, identification of reference sources and formulation of search strategies and manual search regarding the significance of developed CHI applications in healthcare delivery. Results New consumer health IT applications have been developed to be used on a variety of different platforms, including the Web, messaging systems, PDAs, and cell phones. These applications assists patients with self-management through reminders and prompts, delivery of real-time data on a patient’s health condition to patients and providers, web-based communication and personal electronic health information. Conclusion New tools are being developed for the purposes of providing information to patients and the public which has enhanced decision making in health matters and an avenue for clinicians and consumers to exchange health information for personal and public use. This calls for corroboration among healthcare organizations, governments and the ICT industry to develop new research and IT innovations which are tailored to the health needs of the consumer.

Larweh, Benjamin Teye

2014-01-01

131

430 IEEE JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH INFORMATICS, VOL. 18, NO. 2, MARCH 2014 Exploiting Geo-Distributed Clouds for a E-Health  

E-print Network

the user health data traffic to the nonhealth data traffic such that the capability of traffic analysis430 IEEE JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL AND HEALTH INFORMATICS, VOL. 18, NO. 2, MARCH 2014 Exploiting Geo-Distributed Clouds for a E-Health Monitoring System With Minimum Service Delay and Privacy Preservation Qinghua Shen

Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

132

Advancing the Framework: Use of Health Data--A Report of a Working Conference of the American Medical Informatics Association  

PubMed Central

The fields of health informatics and biomedical research increasingly depend on the availability of aggregated health data. Yet, despite over fifteen years of policy work on health data issues, the United States (U.S.) lacks coherent policy to guide users striving to navigate the ethical, political, technical, and economic challenges associated with health data use. In 2007, building on more than a decade of previous work, the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) convened a panel of experts to stimulate discussion about and action on a national framework for health data use. This initiative is being carried out in the context of rapidly accelerating advances in the fields of health informatics and biomedical research, many of which are dependent on the availability of aggregated health data. Use of these data poses complex challenges that must be addressed by public policy. This paper highlights the results of the meeting, presents data stewardship as a key building block in the national framework, and outlines stewardship principles for the management of health information. The authors also introduce a taxonomy developed to focus definitions and terminology in the evolving field of health data applications. Finally, they identify areas for further policy analysis and recommend that public and private sector organizations elevate consideration of a national framework on the uses of health data to a top priority. PMID:18755988

Bloomrosen, Meryl; Detmer, Don

2008-01-01

133

Factors in the Development of Clinical Informatics Competence in Early Career Health Sciences Professionals in Australia: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their…

Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

2011-01-01

134

Health Informatics in Developing Countries: Going beyond Pilot Practices to Sustainable Implementations: A Review of the Current Challenges  

PubMed Central

Objectives Information technology is an essential tool to improve patient safety and the quality of care, and to reduce healthcare costs. There is a scarcity of large sustainable implementations in developing countries. The objective of this paper is to review the challenges faced by developing countries to achieve sustainable implementations in health informatics and possible ways to address them. Methods In this non-systematic review of the literature, articles were searched using the keywords medical informatics, developing countries, implementation, and challenges in PubMed, LILACS, CINAHL, Scopus, and EMBASE. The authors, after reading the literature, reached a consensus to classify the challenges into six broad categories. Results The authors describe the problems faced by developing countries arising from the lack of adequate infrastructure and the ways these can be bypassed; the fundamental need to develop nationwide e-Health agendas to achieve sustainable implementations; ways to overcome public uncertainty with respect to privacy and security; the difficulties shared with developed countries in achieving interoperability; the need for a trained workforce in health informatics and existing initiatives for its development; and strategies to achieve regional integration. Conclusions Central to the success of any implementation in health informatics is knowledge of the challenges to be faced. This is even more important in developing countries, where uncertainty and instability are common. The authors hope this article will assist policy makers, healthcare managers, and project leaders to successfully plan their implementations and make them sustainable, avoiding unexpected barriers and making better use of their resources. PMID:24627813

Almerares, Alfredo; Mayan, John Charles; Gonzalez Bernaldo de Quiros, Fernan; Otero, Carlos

2014-01-01

135

Contemporary Issues in Medicine--Medical Informatics and Population Health: Report II of the Medical School Objectives Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report of the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical School Objectives Program presents the work of two expert panels. One, on medical informatics, identified five important physician roles: lifelong learner, clinician, educator, researcher, and manager. Another panel established a definition for "population health perspective"…

Academic Medicine, 1999

1999-01-01

136

Global Health and Foreign Policy  

PubMed Central

Health has long been intertwined with the foreign policies of states. In recent years, however, global health issues have risen to the highest levels of international politics and have become accepted as legitimate issues in foreign policy. This elevated political priority is in many ways a welcome development for proponents of global health, and it has resulted in increased funding for and attention to select global health issues. However, there has been less examination of the tensions that characterize the relationship between global health and foreign policy and of the potential effects of linking global health efforts with the foreign-policy interests of states. In this paper, the authors review the relationship between global health and foreign policy by examining the roles of health across 4 major components of foreign policy: aid, trade, diplomacy, and national security. For each of these aspects of foreign policy, the authors review current and historical issues and discuss how foreign-policy interests have aided or impeded global health efforts. The increasing relevance of global health to foreign policy holds both opportunities and dangers for global efforts to improve health. PMID:20423936

Feldbaum, Harley; Lee, Kelley; Michaud, Joshua

2010-01-01

137

The future of health IT innovation and informatics: a report from AMIA's 2010 policy meeting  

PubMed Central

While much attention has been paid to the short-term impact that widespread adoption of health information technology (health IT) will have on the healthcare system, there is a corresponding need to look at the long-term effects that extant policies may have on health IT system resilience, innovation, and related ethical, social/legal issues. The American Medical Informatics Association's 2010 Health Policy Conference was convened to further the national discourse on the issues surrounding these longer-term considerations. Conference participants self-selected into three broad categories: resilience in healthcare and health IT; ethical, legal, and social challenges; and innovation, adoption, and sustainability. The discussions about problem areas lead to findings focusing on the lack of encouragement for long-term IT innovation that may result from current health IT policies; the potential impact of uneven adoption of health IT based on the exclusions of the current financial incentives; the weaknesses of contingency and risk mitigation planning that threaten system resilience; and evolving standards developed in response to challenges relating to the security, integrity, and availability of electronic health information. This paper discusses these findings and also offers recommendations that address the interwoven topics of innovation, resilience, and adoption. The goal of this paper is to encourage public and private sector organizations that have a role in shaping health information policy to increase attention to developing a national strategy that assures that health IT innovation and resilience are not impeded by shorter-term efforts to implement current approaches emphasizing adoption and meaningful use of electronic health records. PMID:22037887

McGowan, Julie J; Cusack, Caitlin M

2012-01-01

138

Integrating Genome-based Informatics to Modernize Global Disease Monitoring, Information Sharing, and Response  

PubMed Central

The rapid advancement of genome technologies holds great promise for improving the quality and speed of clinical and public health laboratory investigations and for decreasing their cost. The latest generation of genome DNA sequencers can provide highly detailed and robust information on disease-causing microbes, and in the near future these technologies will be suitable for routine use in national, regional, and global public health laboratories. With additional improvements in instrumentation, these next- or third-generation sequencers are likely to replace conventional culture-based and molecular typing methods to provide point-of-care clinical diagnosis and other essential information for quicker and better treatment of patients. Provided there is free-sharing of information by all clinical and public health laboratories, these genomic tools could spawn a global system of linked databases of pathogen genomes that would ensure more efficient detection, prevention, and control of endemic, emerging, and other infectious disease outbreaks worldwide. PMID:23092707

Brown, Eric W.; Detter, Chris; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Gilmour, Matthew W.; Harmsen, Dag; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Hewson, Roger; Heymann, David L.; Johansson, Karin; Ijaz, Kashef; Keim, Paul S.; Koopmans, Marion; Kroneman, Annelies; Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Lund, Ole; Palm, Daniel; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Sobel, Jeremy; Schlundt, J?rgen

2012-01-01

139

International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-print Network

countries ·Health and human rights ·Conflicts and health ·School health ·Infectious diseases (HIV/AIDS, TB genetics of bone and joint diseases · Host susceptibility factors to infectious diseases · Molecular studies of infectious diseases, nutritional disorders and congenital anomalies. At present, the main

Miyashita, Yasushi

140

Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health  

E-print Network

5th Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health Hosted by The Stanford WSDM* Center May 21;3 Welcome to the 5th Annual Women's Health Forum - hosted by the Stanford WSDM Center, also known acknowledges the wisdom of conducting research and expanding knowledge about women's health and sex differences

Kay, Mark A.

141

A prototype informatics system integrating weather and health data to manage meningitis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation will describe progress in developing the informatics system that will support a newly funded project designed to integrate health and environmental data for health-related decision-making in Africa. This infromatics system supports a project in which the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), the International Research Institute for Climate and Society, and North Carolina State University in the United States, and the Navrongo Health Research Centre in Ghana will build and implement a prototype decision-support system that integrates two- to 14-day weather forecasts and epidemiological data to provide actionable information that can be used to contain the spread of meningitis epidemics in Ghana. By applying a preliminary economic evaluation of this decision support system, we will also assess the potential benefit of using environmental data to improve public health outcomes, help prioritize continuing investment in meningitis management in Ghana and throughout the Meningitis Belt, and determine the appropriateness of extending the prototype to other diseases, nations, and continents. This effort is a small piece of an overall Google.org effort to develop an Earth-gauging System that will integrate environmental, health and development data into products that stakeholders and researchers can use to monitor variables, analyze trends and identify relationships among different variables. The Earth-gauging System will support the prediction of emerging threats, and provide the basis for an robust early-warning system that will improve health, food security, and development and conservation outcomes. For the informatics session, our presentation will focus on the projects' leveraging of current UCAR Unidata data management software to create and populate an archive of meteorological and epidemiological data. We will also describe strategies to extend the Unidata network for data distribution - which currently provides real-time access to over 2.6 GB/hr of meteorological data to 160 Universities in North and South America - to support the development and dissemination of weather and health information in Ghana. Finally, we will describe how Unidata tools will provide a vehicle for delivering meningitis decision support to stakeholders and decision makers in Ghana, via GoogleEarth and other mechanisms.

Pandya, R.; Yoksas, T.; Hayden, M.; Hopson, T.; Laing, A.; Lazo, J.; Warner, T.; Rice, J.; Adams-Forgor, A.; Hodgson, A.; Semazzi, F.; Mera, R.; Thomson, M.; Trzaska, S.; Lamptey, B.

2009-04-01

142

Biomedical informatics and translational medicine  

PubMed Central

Biomedical informatics involves a core set of methodologies that can provide a foundation for crossing the "translational barriers" associated with translational medicine. To this end, the fundamental aspects of biomedical informatics (e.g., bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics, and public health informatics) may be essential in helping improve the ability to bring basic research findings to the bedside, evaluate the efficacy of interventions across communities, and enable the assessment of the eventual impact of translational medicine innovations on health policies. Here, a brief description is provided for a selection of key biomedical informatics topics (Decision Support, Natural Language Processing, Standards, Information Retrieval, and Electronic Health Records) and their relevance to translational medicine. Based on contributions and advancements in each of these topic areas, the article proposes that biomedical informatics practitioners ("biomedical informaticians") can be essential members of translational medicine teams. PMID:20187952

2010-01-01

143

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic health record and medical informatics training for undergraduate health professionals.  

PubMed

The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is planning interprofessional training in electronic health records (EHRs) and medical informatics. Training will be integrated throughout the curricula and will include seminars on broad concepts supplemented with online modules, didactic lectures, and hands-on experiences. Training will prepare future health professionals to use EHRs, evidence-based medicine, medical decision support, and point-of-care tools to reduce errors, improve standards of care, address Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements and accreditation standards, and promote appropriate documentation to enable data retrieval for clinical research. UAMS will ensure that graduates are ready for the rapidly evolving practice environment created by the HITECH Act. PMID:20648253

Hart, Jan K; Newton, Bruce W; Boone, Steven E

2010-07-01

144

Women's Health, Poverty and Globalization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wendy Harcourt maps out some concerns about the impact of globalization on poor women's health. She argues that in a pro-poor health strategy it is crucial to understand the different realities of poor women and men's lives and the complex economic and social factors determining their health and well-being. She focuses on how women's reproductive rights and health groups have

Wendy Harcourt

2001-01-01

145

Synergy between medical informatics and bioinformatics: facilitating genomic medicine for future health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we review the results of BIOINFOMED, a study funded by the European Commission (EC) with the purpose to analyse the different issues and challenges in the area where Medical Informatics and Bioinformatics meet. Traditionally, Medical Informatics has been focused on the intersection between computer science and clinical medicine, whereas Bioinformatics have been predominantly centered on the intersection

Fernando Martín-sánchez; Ilias Iakovidis; S. Nørager; Victor Maojo; Piet C. De Groen; Johan Van Der Lei; T. Jones; Klaus Abraham-fuchs; R. Apweiler; Ankica Babic; R Baud; V Breton; P Cinquin; P Doupi; M Dugas; R Eils; R Engelbrecht; P Ghazal; P Jehenson; C Kulikowski; K Lampe; G De Moor; S Orphanoudakis; N Rossing; B Sarachan; A Sousa; G Spekowius; G Thireos; G Zahlmann; J Zvárová; I Hermosilla; F. J Vicente

2004-01-01

146

Preprint: Final version published as: FLEET, L. & BLANDFORD, A. (2005) Requirements of Time Management Tools for Outpatient Physiotherapy Practice. Health Informatics  

E-print Network

Management Tools for Outpatient Physiotherapy Practice. Health Informatics Journal. 11: 179 - 199. Requirements of Time Management Tools for Outpatient Physiotherapy Practice Leanne Fleet MSc & Ann E. Blandford Management Tools for Outpatient Physiotherapy Practice Abstract The effects of electronic appointment booking

Blandford, Ann

147

[A continuous 4-year evaluation of medical informatics education in a graduate school of health sciences using a questionnaire survey].  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to identify the level of awareness among undergraduate students regarding medical informatics and to ascertain whether educational training has progressed with time in the Department of Health Sciences at Hirosaki University, Japan, which is a co-medical staff training institution that conducts a 4-year university course in medical informatics. The university accepts students who have completed the 3rd grade of medical licensing tests and who have attended the medical informatics lectures for 4 years (2007-2010). The ratio of first sight terminology percentage in any given fiscal year in all the 30 terminology categories varied widely from 0% to 80%, but the trend in various categories did not vary between fiscal years. The terminology of informatics under medical technology students obtained high scores of 52.5-77.3% after attending courses, which was higher compared with students from other classes. On the other hand, student nurses and occupational therapy students obtained 0-44.2%. Each class scored a high percentage of correct answers in the medical information-related terminology. Among the radiology students who attended the classes, the percentage of correct answers in categories of "digital imaging and communication in medicine" and "picture archiving and communication system" were lower than other medical terminology categories. These results reflect the gaps in educational curriculum of 1st and 2nd grades of medical licensing tests. PMID:23358336

Monzen, Satoru; Matsutani, Hideya; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

2013-01-01

148

Global solidarity, migration and global health inequity.  

PubMed

The grounds for global solidarity have been theorized and conceptualized in recent years, and many have argued that we need a global concept of solidarity. But the question remains: what can motivate efforts of the international community and nation-states? Our focus is the grounding of solidarity with respect to global inequities in health. We explore what considerations could motivate acts of global solidarity in the specific context of health migration, and sketch briefly what form this kind of solidarity could take. First, we argue that the only plausible conceptualization of persons highlights their interdependence. We draw upon a conception of persons as 'ecological subjects' and from there illustrate what such a conception implies with the example of nurses migrating from low and middle-income countries to more affluent ones. Next, we address potential critics who might counter any such understanding of current international politics with a reference to real-politik and the insights of realist international political theory. We argue that national governments--while not always or even often motivated by moral reasons alone--may nevertheless be motivated to acts of global solidarity by prudential arguments. Solidarity then need not be, as many argue, a function of charitable inclination, or emergent from an acknowledgment of injustice suffered, but may in fact serve national and transnational interests. We conclude on a positive note: global solidarity may be conceptualized to helpfully address global health inequity, to the extent that personal and transnational interdependence are enough to motivate national governments into action. PMID:22827320

Eckenwiler, Lisa; Straehle, Christine; Chung, Ryoa

2012-09-01

149

GLOBAL HEALTH PROGRAMS ANNUAL REPORT CY 13  

E-print Network

GLOBAL HEALTH PROGRAMS ANNUAL REPORT CY 13 Contents · Global health options · International: Issues in Global Health (PUBH 519), Fall · Course: Frontiers Challenges in Global Health (FRO 503), Spring · Students from international medical schools · Afya Bora Fellowship GLOBAL HEALTH OPTIONS

Bushman, Frederic

150

Global Health Curriculum Guide Spring 2012  

E-print Network

Global Health Curriculum Guide Spring 2012 #12;Global Health Curriculum Guide | Spring 2012 | page 2 Introduction The Global Health Curriculum Guide provides a listing of the current global health in the field of global health. Students should work with their faculty advisors to select the appropriate

Subramanian, Venkat

151

A systematic view on medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical informatics is defined as the scientific discipline concerned with the systematic processing of data, information and knowledge in medicine and health care. The domain of medical informatics (including health informatics), its aim, methods and tools, and its relevance to other disciplines in medicine and health sciences are outlined. It is recognized that one of the major tasks of medical

A. Hasman; R. Haux; A. Albert

1996-01-01

152

Foundations for Global Health Practice  

E-print Network

course designed to prepare health professional students and graduate students in the health sciences for specific global health field experiences. The course presumes some background and understanding of global health and addresses key topics at a graduate level. Individualized readings and assignments walk the students through the critical steps needed to prepare for a global health field experience. Course Objectives: 1. To examine general precepts of global health with an emphasis on public health and inter-disciplinary approaches. 2. To prepare students to use information from inter-disciplinary sources, including quantitative and qualitative data, to gain a place-based understanding of the health status and health care system, as well as the overall socio-cultural context in which the project takes place. 3. To enable students to plan, implement and evaluate their global health field experience. Topics to include identifying a counterpart organization that is a good match with the students goals and values, developing a scope of work that is of mutual benefit to the

unknown authors

153

Ideas in ACTION, Solving Global Health Problems Solutions for Global Health  

E-print Network

Ideas in ACTION, Solving Global Health Problems Solutions for Global Health Global South contributions to human development in the global South and that has provided solutions to global health problems

154

Factors in the development of clinical informatics competence in early career health sciences professionals in Australia: a qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying\\u000a essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences\\u000a of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their university education and during\\u000a workplace learning and training. This study is based on

Kathleen Gray; Jenny Sim

2011-01-01

155

WHO: Global Health Observatory: Mental Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While more than 800,000 people die from suicide globally each year, the median amount of the health budget allocated to mental health in 2011 was 2.8%. In Afghanistan, six out of every 100,000 men committed suicide. In the United States, that number was 19. These and other data can be gleaned from the age-standardized suicide rates interactive graph on the World Health OrganizationâÂÂs Global Health Observatory website dedicated to issues of Mental Health. Additionally, the page provides links to reports on Policy and financing of mental health, Human resources (in terms of the number of psychiatrists available per 100,000 people in a given country), and Mental health care delivery.

156

Origins of Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Medical informatics is a new knowledge domain of computer and information science, engineering and technology in all fields of health and medicine, including research, education and practice. Medical informatics has evolved over the past 30 years as medicine learned to exploit the extraordinary capabilities of the electronic digital computer to better meet its complex information needs. The first articles on this subject appeared in the 1950s, the number of publications rapidly increased in the 1960s and medical informatics was identified as a new specialty in the 1970s. PMID:3544507

Collen, Morris F.

1986-01-01

157

Rethinking the 'global' in global health: a dialectic approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Current definitions of 'global health' lack specificity about the term 'global'. This debate presents and discusses existing definitions of 'global health' and a common problem inherent therein. It aims to provide a way forward towards an understanding of 'global health' while avoiding redundancy. The attention is concentrated on the dialectics of different concepts of 'global' in their application to

Kayvan Bozorgmehr

2010-01-01

158

Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH  

E-print Network

Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet · College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION health applies public health principles to solutions of health problems that transcend national boundaries. Our Mission The Center for Global Health, located within the College of Public Health

Arnold, Jonathan

159

Computing Health Quality Measures Using Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside  

PubMed Central

Background The Health Quality Measures Format (HQMF) is a Health Level 7 (HL7) standard for expressing computable Clinical Quality Measures (CQMs). Creating tools to process HQMF queries in clinical databases will become increasingly important as the United States moves forward with its Health Information Technology Strategic Plan to Stages 2 and 3 of the Meaningful Use incentive program (MU2 and MU3). Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) is one of the analytical databases used as part of the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC)’s Query Health platform to move toward this goal. Objective Our goal is to integrate i2b2 with the Query Health HQMF architecture, to prepare for other HQMF use-cases (such as MU2 and MU3), and to articulate the functional overlap between i2b2 and HQMF. Therefore, we analyze the structure of HQMF, and then we apply this understanding to HQMF computation on the i2b2 clinical analytical database platform. Specifically, we develop a translator between two query languages, HQMF and i2b2, so that the i2b2 platform can compute HQMF queries. Methods We use the HQMF structure of queries for aggregate reporting, which define clinical data elements and the temporal and logical relationships between them. We use the i2b2 XML format, which allows flexible querying of a complex clinical data repository in an easy-to-understand domain-specific language. Results The translator can represent nearly any i2b2-XML query as HQMF and execute in i2b2 nearly any HQMF query expressible in i2b2-XML. This translator is part of the freely available reference implementation of the QueryHealth initiative. We analyze limitations of the conversion and find it covers many, but not all, of the complex temporal and logical operators required by quality measures. Conclusions HQMF is an expressive language for defining quality measures, and it will be important to understand and implement for CQM computation, in both meaningful use and population health. However, its current form might allow complexity that is intractable for current database systems (both in terms of implementation and computation). Our translator, which supports the subset of HQMF currently expressible in i2b2-XML, may represent the beginnings of a practical compromise. It is being pilot-tested in two Query Health demonstration projects, and it can be further expanded to balance computational tractability with the advanced features needed by measure developers. PMID:23603227

Murphy, Shawn N

2013-01-01

160

Medical informatics academia and industry: a symbiotic relationship that may assure survival of both through health care reform.  

PubMed Central

There are often clear lines drawn identifying the demilitarized zone between medical informatics academics and industry. Academics were "pure" intellectuals sequestered in ivory towers that effectively shielded them from the realities of the world. Industry has historically focused on creating effective products that produce financial return to the corporation. Both the paradigms of academia and industry are quickly becoming dinosaurs in the era of health care reform where both medical informatics academia and industry are under increasing pressure to develop and prove that medical informatics has a positive impact on health care both in terms of the quality of care as well as cost. Unfortunately, neither academia or industry alone are going to be able to successfully complete this task. The purpose of this paper is to describe such a collaborative effort that has produced a computerized decision support system for the management of mechanical ventilation in patients with the Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) that is now installed and supported on three different commercial CIS platforms. This collaborative effort has allowed us to successfully mount a large multi-center clinical trial designed to determine efficacy. PMID:8563277

East, T. D.; Wallace, C. J.; Franklin, M. A.; Kinder, T.; Sailors, R. M.; Carlson, D.; Bradshaw, R.; Morris, A. H.

1995-01-01

161

UCSF Global Health Sciences 2011 Annual Report  

E-print Network

UCSF Global Health Sciences 2011 Annual Report #12;UCSF Global Health Sciences 2011 Annual Report Fieldwork Project Sites | 10 The Global Health Group | 12 Prevention & Public Health Group | 17 Cross-Campus Initiatives | 21 Global Health Leadership | 23 GHS Financials | 25 GHS Governance | 26 GHS Partners & Funders

Klein, Ophir

162

ICS 614 Spring 2013 Biomedical Informatics I  

E-print Network

topics and issues in biomedical informatics including electronic medical records, Obama care] E. Shortliffe and J. Cimino, Eds. Biomedical Informatics, Computer Applications in Health Care and Biomedical Informatics (Ch. 4), System Design and Engineering in Health Care (Ch. 6), Imaging and Structural

Reed, Nancy E.

163

MSc Nutrition for Global Health  

E-print Network

MSc Nutrition for Global Health The Mission of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, postgraduate teaching and advanced training in national and international public health and tropical medicine: Registry London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Keppel Street London WC1E 7HT UNITED KINGDOM

Maizels, Rick

164

Excellence in Public & Global Health  

E-print Network

Excellence in Public & Global Health The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in a Globalising World Strategy 2012-17 www.lshtm.ac.uk 1 School's core expertise in public health and tropical medicine, a focus found in only a few institutions

Maizels, Rick

165

Global Trade and Public Health  

PubMed Central

Global trade and international trade agreements have transformed the capacity of governments to monitor and to protect public health, to regulate occupational and environmental health conditions and food products, and to ensure affordable access to medications. Proposals under negotiation for the World Trade Organization’s General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) and the regional Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) agreement cover a wide range of health services, health facilities, clinician licensing, water and sanitation services, and tobacco and alcohol distribution services. Public health professionals and organizations rarely participate in trade negotiations or in resolution of trade disputes. The linkages among global trade, international trade agreements, and public health deserve more attention than they have received to date. PMID:15623854

Shaffer, Ellen R.; Waitzkin, Howard; Brenner, Joseph; Jasso-Aguilar, Rebeca

2005-01-01

166

A comparative analysis of moral principles and behavioral norms in eight ethical codes relevant to health sciences librarianship, medical informatics, and the health professions  

PubMed Central

Objective: Based on the authors' shared interest in the interprofessional challenges surrounding health information management, this study explores the degree to which librarians, informatics professionals, and core health professionals in medicine, nursing, and public health share common ethical behavior norms grounded in moral principles. Methods: Using the “Principlism” framework from a widely cited textbook of biomedical ethics, the authors analyze the statements in the ethical codes for associations of librarians (Medical Library Association [MLA], American Library Association, and Special Libraries Association), informatics professionals (American Medical Informatics Association [AMIA] and American Health Information Management Association), and core health professionals (American Medical Association, American Nurses Association, and American Public Health Association). This analysis focuses on whether and how the statements in these eight codes specify core moral norms (Autonomy, Beneficence, Non-Maleficence, and Justice), core behavioral norms (Veracity, Privacy, Confidentiality, and Fidelity), and other norms that are empirically derived from the code statements. Results: These eight ethical codes share a large number of common behavioral norms based most frequently on the principle of Beneficence, then on Autonomy and Justice, but rarely on Non-Maleficence. The MLA and AMIA codes share the largest number of common behavioral norms, and these two associations also share many norms with the other six associations. Implications: The shared core of behavioral norms among these professions, all grounded in core moral principles, point to many opportunities for building effective interprofessional communication and collaboration regarding the development, management, and use of health information resources and technologies. PMID:25349543

Byrd, Gary D.; Winkelstein, Peter

2014-01-01

167

1 | the GLOBAL heALth GROUP The Global Health Group  

E-print Network

1 | the GLOBAL heALth GROUP The Global Health Group UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO GLOBAL in this brochure courtesy of the Global Health Group and Global Health Sciences faculty, staff, students an impact on human lives. Yet, since our founding in 2007, the Global health Group at the University

Klein, Ophir

168

GLOBAL HEALTH CENTER Request For Applications  

E-print Network

GLOBAL HEALTH CENTER Request For Applications Funding for Global Health-related Pilot projects To: Einstein Faculty From: Global Health Center Date: July 15, 2013 Re: Request for Applications for funding of Global Health Pilot Projects Details: Up to $30,000/project per year to be awarded Deadline: EXTENDED

Emmons, Scott

169

GLOBAL HEALTH CENTER Request For Applications  

E-print Network

GLOBAL HEALTH CENTER Request For Applications Funding for Global Health-related Pilot projects To: Einstein Faculty From: Global Health Center Date: July 20, 2012 Re: Request for Applications for funding of Global Health Pilot Projects Details: Up to $30,000/project per year to be awarded Deadline: September 24

Emmons, Scott

170

Clinical research informatics: a conceptual perspective  

PubMed Central

Clinical research informatics is the rapidly evolving sub-discipline within biomedical informatics that focuses on developing new informatics theories, tools, and solutions to accelerate the full translational continuum: basic research to clinical trials (T1), clinical trials to academic health center practice (T2), diffusion and implementation to community practice (T3), and ‘real world’ outcomes (T4). We present a conceptual model based on an informatics-enabled clinical research workflow, integration across heterogeneous data sources, and core informatics tools and platforms. We use this conceptual model to highlight 18 new articles in the JAMIA special issue on clinical research informatics. PMID:22523344

Weng, Chunhua

2012-01-01

171

Academic freedom and global health.  

PubMed

There is a tension between the preservation of academic freedom and the economic context in which the university currently finds itself. This tension embodies serious threats to global health as a result of three overlapping phenomena which impede the production and diffusion of valuable knowledge about health. These phenomena, the privatisation, commercialisation and instrumentalisation of knowledge are identified and examined in this paper in relation to human rights and international morality. PMID:21737839

Evans, Donald

2012-02-01

172

Sequential incoherence in a multi-party synchronous computer mediated communication for an introductory Health Informatics course  

PubMed Central

Online courses will play a key role in the high-volume Informatics education required to train the personnel that will be necessary to fulfill the health IT needs of the country. Online courses can cause feelings of isolation in students. A common way to address these feelings is to hold synchronous online “chats” for students. Conventional chats, however, can be confusing and impose a high extrinsic cognitive load on their participants that hinders the learning process. In this paper we present a qualitative analysis that shows the causes of this high cognitive load and our solution through the use of a moderated chat system. PMID:21346988

Herskovic, Jorge R.; Goodwin, J. Caleb; Bozzo Silva, Pamela A.; Willcockson, Irmgard; Franklin, Amy

2010-01-01

173

INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING Graduate Programs  

E-print Network

.indiana.edu/graduate/programs. #12;Real-world experience Whether you're destined for an industry, research, or academic career. Curiosity about the world and a commitment to solving problems motivate our faculty. Students work side sciences informatics (bio, chemical, and health) � Machine learning � Music informatics � Natural lang

Menczer, Filippo

174

INFORMATICS www.cs.pdx.edu  

E-print Network

and medical discovery at unprecedented rates and levels. Biomedical informatics played a leading roleBIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS www.cs.pdx.edu Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Informatics from Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) After completion of the five

175

Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report  

E-print Network

Submitted to: Dr. Joyce Mitchell Chair, Department of Medical Informatics Associate Vice President, HealthClinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report March 29, 2010 Rev. 8.30.2010 Report Orientation Checklist (Draft)................................XII #12;Clinical Research Informatics Systems

Provancher, William

176

Teaching Health Informatics to the Net Generation: A New Baseline for Building Capability?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The current generation of medical students are the Net Generation. However there is a dearth of data on their Internet use to inform universities' approaches to using the Internet, especially Web 2.0, most effectively in medical education .In particular, we have little information on students' skills base to use in planning to build greater informatics capacity in the Australian

Kathleen Gray; Gregor Kennedy; Terry Judd

177

Cancer Control and Global Health:  

Cancer.gov

In conjunction with a high-level United Nations meeting on non-communicable diseases in the developing world, NCI Director Harold Varmus, M.D., and Edward L. Trimble, M.D., NCI, have published a commentary in Science Translational Medicine on “Integrating Cancer Control into Global Health.”

178

Global Health and Cancer Epidemiology  

Cancer.gov

In 2012, there were 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million new cancer deaths. The World Health Organization (WHO) projected that by 2035, these figures could increase to 24 million new cases and 14.6 million cancer deaths worldwide. The majority of the global cancer burden is shifting from the more developed world to economically disadvantaged countries.

179

GLOBAL HEALTH Paying the poor  

E-print Network

healthcare services, puts indigenous children in rural areas at high risk of early death, particularly from, USA The Economist calls it "the world's favourite new anti-poverty device."1 Global health donors in over 40 developing countries, from Mexico to Burkina Faso, Cambodia to Yemen. Although each country

Klein, Ophir

180

Health, globalization and developing countries.  

PubMed

In health care today, scientific and technological frontiers are expanding at unprecedented rates, even as economic and financial pressures shrink profit margins, intensify competition, and constrain the funds available for investment. Therefore, the world today has more economic, and social opportunities for people than 10 or 100 years since globalization has created a new ground somewhat characterized by rapid economic transformation, deregulation of national markets by new trade regimes, amazing transport, electronic communication possibilities and high turnover of foreign investment and capital flow as well as skilled labor. These trends can easily mask great inequalities in developing countries such as importation and spreading of infectious and non-communicable diseases; miniaturization of movement of medical technology; health sector trades management driven by economics without consideration to the social and health aspects and its effects, increasing health inequalities and their economic and social burden creation; multinational companies' cheap labor employment promotion in widening income differentials; and others. As a matter of fact, all these factors are major determinants of ill health. Health authorities of developing countries have to strengthen their regulatory framework in order to ensure that national health systems derive maximum benefit in terms of equity, quality and efficiency, while reducing potential social cost to a minimum generated risky side of globalization. PMID:15770290

Cilingiroglu, Nesrin

2005-02-01

181

Computing and Global Health: Bridging Health System Needs and  

E-print Network

10/13/2010 1 Computing and Global Health: Bridging Health System Needs and Computing Solutions of computing in PATH's portfolio? 10/12/2010 14CSEColloquium Bridging between Global Health and ComputingCSEColloquium Computing and Global Health · Broad interest in introducing computing based solutions to health

Anderson, Richard

182

Global health: governance and policy development.  

PubMed

Global health policy is now being influenced by an ever-increasing number of nonstate and non-intergovernmental actors to include influential foundations, multinational corporations, multi-sectoral partnerships, and civil society organizations. This article reviews how globalization is a key driver for the ongoing evolution of global health governance. It describes the massive increases in bilateral and multilateral investments in global health and it highlights the current global and US architecture for performing global health programs. The article closes describing some of the challenges and prospects that characterize global health governance today. PMID:21628057

Kelley, Patrick W

2011-06-01

183

UCSF GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES BURKE FAMILY GLOBAL HEALTH FACULTY SCHOLARS AWARD  

E-print Network

UCSF GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES BURKE FAMILY GLOBAL HEALTH FACULTY SCHOLARS AWARD 2013 ­ 2014 | Description & Application Guidelines GENERAL SUMMARY The Global Health Sciences (GHS) Burke Family Global for junior faculty members whose research focuses on basic science and its applications in global health

Mullins, Dyche

184

EGY: Progress Toward a Global Earth and Space Science Informatics Commons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The series of International Polar Years leading up to the International Geophysical Year (IGY) in 1957-1958 taught scientists that the free and open exchange of data be-tween nations was cost effective and scientifically beneficial. The IGY also led to the de-velopment of a world-wide network of data centers that have facilitated and fostered re-search begun in the IGY. We now have achieved an unparalleled ability to acquire data and have attained a good understanding of traditional regions - the troposphere, the mag-netosphere, and other such "spheres". Much of the new and important science is presently coming from the study of the boundaries between these regions and of coupling between geophysical domains. The past 15 years have seen the development of many cost effec-tive ways to acquire, store, and exchange data. We have the potential to expand the ex-change of data by allowing working scientists to access and manipulate data from large interdisciplinary data centers as well as from small, previously isolated, research groups. The key to this technology requires adoption of a few communitydeveloped standards for data storage and description to form an "Informatics Commons." It has been agreed that for the 50th anniversary of IGY, scientific societies should promote the establishment of a system of Virtual Observatories. This can provide a forward impetus to geophysics in this century similar to that provided by the IGY fifty years ago. The Electronic Geo-physical Year (eGY) concept embraces all available and upcoming geophysical data (e.g., oceanographic, seismic, atmospheric, geomagnetic, gravity, ionospheric, magnetospheric, etc.) and is helping organize them into a series of virtual geophysical observatories "de-ployed" in cyberspace. This concept implies access to all available data through the Internet and World Wide Web, taking advantage of existing networking hardware and software technologies (e.g., Internet, XML, Service- Oriented Architectures, Web 2.0, Semantic Web, etc.). The eGY can be smoothly incorporated into the several ongo-ing International Year initiatives and will provide an international focus for a resolve to address the issues of data release, data discovery, and data preservation.

Baker, Daniel N.

185

Museum Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses museum informatics that studies how information science and technology affect the museum environment. Examines digital technology; information organization and access; digitization, personal computers, and the Internet; data sharing; standards; social impacts of new technologies; collaboration; consortia; multimedia exhibits; virtual…

Marty, Paul F.; Rayward, W. Boyd; Twidale, Michael B.

2003-01-01

186

Bubble CPAP System Global Health Challenge  

E-print Network

Bubble CPAP System Global Health Challenge Respiratory failure is a leading cause of infant for the advancement of appropriate, high-value innovations in global health biotechnology August 2011 Rice University

187

Computing and Global Health: Bridging Health System Needs and  

E-print Network

Computing and Global Health: Bridging Health System Needs and Computing Solutions Richard Anderson is the role of computing in PATH's portfolio? 10/12/2010 14CSE Colloquium #12;Bridging between Global HealthCSE Colloquium #12;Computing and Global Health · Broad interest in introducing computing based

Anderson, Richard

188

New Realities for Global Health 2013  

E-print Network

#12;New Realities for Global Health 2013 Rapporteur's Report Graham Lister Canada-UK Colloquium, 21-UK Council #12;II /NEW REALITIES FOR GLOBAL HEALTH 2013 � The Canada-UK Council, 2014 #12;GRAHAM LISTER / III /NEW REALITIES FOR GLOBAL HEALTH 2013 #12;GRAHAM LISTER / V About the Author Graham Lister MSc Ph

Abolmaesumi, Purang

189

Attachment A Certificate in Global Health  

E-print Network

Attachment A Certificate in Global Health Core Competencies Candidates who successfully complete the Certificate in Global Health will have achieved the following educational benchmarks: Expansion and discussion of their knowledge of major themes and trends in global health; Enhancement of their communication skills for trans

Sheridan, Jennifer

190

2012 update on meaningful use of electronic health records: recommendations from the AAO-HNS Medical Informatics Committee.  

PubMed

In 2011, the US federal government implemented an oversight program to encourage the adoption and meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs). Otolaryngologists may receive as much as $44,000 under Medicare or $63,750 under Medicaid as part of this law. To receive this full benefit, otolaryngologists must acquire a certified EHR and demonstrate stage 1 meaningful use requirements by the end of 2012. Furthermore, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT intends to advance meaningful use requirements to stage 2 (estimated to go in effect in 2014) and stage 3 requirements. This commentary discusses updated recommendations from the Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Medical Informatics Committee for implementing meaningful use of EHRs, receiving incentive payments, and preparing for potential stage 2 and stage 3 requirements. PMID:22241788

Sun, Gordon H; Eisenberg, Lee D; Ermini, Edward B; Lee, K J; Nielsen, David R; Rubin, Koryn Y; Das, Subinoy

2012-04-01

191

Informatics: A Brief Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a brief survey of informatics, defined as the application of information technology to various fields, with respect to its historical background, disciplinary identity, fundamental aspects, applications, and challenges. Highlights include biological, clinical, dental, environmental, geomatics, health, legal, management, medical, museum,…

He, Shaoyi

2003-01-01

192

Promoting usability in organizations with a new health usability model: implications for nursing informatics.  

PubMed

Usability issues with products such as Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are of global interest to nursing informaticists. Although improvements in patient safety, clinical productivity and effectiveness are possible when usability principles and practices are in place, most organizations do not embrace usability. This paper presents a new Health Usability Maturity Model consisting of 5 phases: unrecognized, preliminary, implemented, integrated and strategic. Within each level various aspects are discussed including focus on users, management, education, resources, processes and infrastructure. Nurse informaticists may use this new model as a guide for assessing their organization's level of usability and transitioning to the next level. Using tactics outlined here, nurse informaticists may also serve as catalysts for change and lead efforts to improve the user experience in organizations across industry, academe and healthcare settings. PMID:24199128

Staggers, Nancy; Rodney, Melanie

2012-01-01

193

Proceedings of the 3rd INFORMS Workshop on Data Mining and Health Informatics (DM-HI 2008) J. Li, D. Aleman, R. Sikora, eds.  

E-print Network

Proceedings of the 3rd INFORMS Workshop on Data Mining and Health Informatics (DM-HI 2008) J. Li, D is fatal, a person's body infected with anthrax bacilli becomes a potential source of infection to others services, 911 calls and ambulance dispatch records, laboratory and mortality records, veterinary reports

Powell, Warren B.

194

This is the real me: a community informatics researcher joins the barrio arts, culture, and communication academy in a health information campaign  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we describe the ongoing collaboration in community informatics (CI) between the University of Illinois and Paseo Boricua, a neighborhood in Chicago. We illustrate the nature of the partnership by presenting an early set of findings from one specific study that grew from the partnership: a qualitative CI study that investigated the community-based health campaign led by youth

Chaebong Nam; Ann Peterson Bishop

2011-01-01

195

Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship Application Guidelines Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship Application Guidelines  

E-print Network

4/23/2012 1 Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship Application Guidelines Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship Application Guidelines Introduction The Global Health Equity Scholars (GHES) fellowship and professional school (MD, DVM, DrPH, DDS, PharmD) students. It is part of the Global Health Program for Fellows

Healy, Kevin Edward

196

Enacting global health in the nursing classroom.  

PubMed

Globalization presents nurses with the challenges and an ethical responsibility of being competent caregivers within a global society. The link between globalization and global health, and the contributions nursing can make to the global health environment are described in the delivery of a new required course for undergraduate nursing students in a four year degree program. Innovative approaches for the delivery of this course are described, which even though living locally, can encourage nursing students to think globally. The need for nursing programs to acknowledge the shared responsibilities for examining global health challenges is now part of our reality in many countries. PMID:23433848

MacNeil, Joan; Ryan, Maureen

2013-11-01

197

Informatic system for a global tissue-fluid biorepository with a graph theory-oriented graphical user interface.  

PubMed

The Richard Floor Biorepository supports collaborative studies of extracellular vesicles (EVs) found in human fluids and tissue specimens. The current emphasis is on biomarkers for central nervous system neoplasms but its structure may serve as a template for collaborative EV translational studies in other fields. The informatic system provides specimen inventory tracking with bar codes assigned to specimens and containers and projects, is hosted on globalized cloud computing resources, and embeds a suite of shared documents, calendars, and video-conferencing features. Clinical data are recorded in relation to molecular EV attributes and may be tagged with terms drawn from a network of externally maintained ontologies thus offering expansion of the system as the field matures. We fashioned the graphical user interface (GUI) around a web-based data visualization package. This system is now in an early stage of deployment, mainly focused on specimen tracking and clinical, laboratory, and imaging data capture in support of studies to optimize detection and analysis of brain tumour-specific mutations. It currently includes 4,392 specimens drawn from 611 subjects, the majority with brain tumours. As EV science evolves, we plan biorepository changes which may reflect multi-institutional collaborations, proteomic interfaces, additional biofluids, changes in operating procedures and kits for specimen handling, novel procedures for detection of tumour-specific EVs, and for RNA extraction and changes in the taxonomy of EVs. We have used an ontology-driven data model and web-based architecture with a graph theory-driven GUI to accommodate and stimulate the semantic web of EV science. PMID:25317275

Butler, William E; Atai, Nadia; Carter, Bob; Hochberg, Fred

2014-01-01

198

Informatic system for a global tissue-fluid biorepository with a graph theory-oriented graphical user interface  

PubMed Central

The Richard Floor Biorepository supports collaborative studies of extracellular vesicles (EVs) found in human fluids and tissue specimens. The current emphasis is on biomarkers for central nervous system neoplasms but its structure may serve as a template for collaborative EV translational studies in other fields. The informatic system provides specimen inventory tracking with bar codes assigned to specimens and containers and projects, is hosted on globalized cloud computing resources, and embeds a suite of shared documents, calendars, and video-conferencing features. Clinical data are recorded in relation to molecular EV attributes and may be tagged with terms drawn from a network of externally maintained ontologies thus offering expansion of the system as the field matures. We fashioned the graphical user interface (GUI) around a web-based data visualization package. This system is now in an early stage of deployment, mainly focused on specimen tracking and clinical, laboratory, and imaging data capture in support of studies to optimize detection and analysis of brain tumour–specific mutations. It currently includes 4,392 specimens drawn from 611 subjects, the majority with brain tumours. As EV science evolves, we plan biorepository changes which may reflect multi-institutional collaborations, proteomic interfaces, additional biofluids, changes in operating procedures and kits for specimen handling, novel procedures for detection of tumour-specific EVs, and for RNA extraction and changes in the taxonomy of EVs. We have used an ontology-driven data model and web-based architecture with a graph theory–driven GUI to accommodate and stimulate the semantic web of EV science. PMID:25317275

Butler, William E.; Atai, Nadia; Carter, Bob; Hochberg, Fred

2014-01-01

199

The Extending Access Index: Promoting Global Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many people around the world cannot access essential medicines for diseases like malaria, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV\\/AIDS. One way of addressing this problem is a Global Health Impact certification system where pharmaceutical companies are rated on the basis of their drugs’ impact on global health. The best companies, in a given year, will then be allowed to use a Global

NICOLE HASSOUN

2012-01-01

200

From Concept Representations to Ontologies: A Paradigm Shift in Health Informatics?  

PubMed Central

Objectives This work aims at uncovering challenges in biomedical knowledge representation research by providing an understanding of what was historically called "medical concept representation" and used as the name for a working group of the International Medical Informatics Association. Methods Bibliometrics, text mining, and a social media survey compare the research done in this area between two periods, before and after 2000. Results Both the opinion of socially active groups of researchers and the interpretation of bibliometric data since 1988 suggest that the focus of research has moved from "medical concept representation" to "medical ontologies". Conclusions It remains debatable whether the observed change amounts to a paradigm shift or whether it simply reflects changes in naming, following the natural evolution of ontology research and engineering activities in the 1990s. The availability of powerful tools to handle ontologies devoted to certain areas of biomedicine has not resulted in a large-scale breakthrough beyond advances in basic research. PMID:24523987

Balkanyi, Laszlo; Cornet, Ronald; Bodenreider, Olivier

2013-01-01

201

Global women's health--a global perspective.  

PubMed

The burden of disease and public health issues affecting girls and women throughout their lives is significantly greater in resource-poor settings. These women and girls suffer from high rates of maternal mortality, obstetric fistulas, female genital cutting, HIV/AIDS, malaria in pregnancy, and cervical cancer. Although the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are being met in some nations, the majority of the goals will not be reached by 2015. In addition, insufficient attention is given to non-communicable and chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular diseases, stroke, obesity, and chronic respiratory diseases. A life-course approach that includes improvements in earlier-life factors such as diet and exercise is necessary to improve women's long-term health outcomes. Innovative diagnostic tools and treatment strategies along with cost-effective health service delivery systems are needed to make a significant impact on women's and girls' health worldwide. PMID:25083886

Nour, Nawal M

2014-01-01

202

Dr. Raza Abidi, Dalhousie University2 Health Informatics (The logic of healthcare)  

E-print Network

in support of health and health- related fields, including health-care services, health surveillance, health, healthcare providers, as well as policy makers" [European Commission] E-health is an emerging field Benefits · Consultations without geographic limitations · Improved economics for local health care facility

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

203

Biotechnology, biofortification, and global health.  

PubMed

Deficiencies of micronutrients such as iron, zinc, and vitamin A afflict over three billion people (more than 50% of the world's population), most of them women, infants, and children in resource-poor families in the developing world. This global crisis in nutritional health is the result of dysfunctional food systems that do not consistently supply enough of these essential nutrients to meet the nutritional requirements of high-risk groups. Deficiencies of micronutrients result in increased morbidity and mortality rates, lost worker productivity, stagnated national development, permanent impairment of cognitive development in infants and children, and large economic costs and suffering to those societies affected. Because agricultural systems are the primary source of all micronutrients for all people, changes in agricultural policies and systems must be made that will ensure consistent and adequate supplies of all essential nutrients to all people. Additionally, the nutrition and health sectors must turn to agricultural interventions as a primary tool in their efforts to eliminate malnutrition from the world if they want to ensure sustainability. Biotechnological advances show great promise for improving the output of bioavailable micronutrients from agricultural systems that feed the poor. This paper reviews some of these opportunities and discusses the questions and concerns that should be raised when these technologies are used to improve the micronutrient status of vast numbers of people who are dependent on staple food crops for their sustenance. Further, important issues surrounding micronutrient bioavailability and plant food factors that affect it are discussed. PMID:16465989

Welch, Ross M

2005-12-01

204

Global warming and reproductive health.  

PubMed

The largest absolute numbers of maternal deaths occur among the 40-50 million women who deliver annually without a skilled birth attendant. Most of these deaths occur in countries with a total fertility rate of greater than 4. The combination of global warming and rapid population growth in the Sahel and parts of the Middle East poses a serious threat to reproductive health and to food security. Poverty, lack of resources, and rapid population growth make it unlikely that most women in these countries will have access to skilled birth attendants or emergency obstetric care in the foreseeable future. Three strategies can be implemented to improve women's health and reproductive rights in high-fertility, low-resource settings: (1) make family planning accessible and remove non-evidenced-based barriers to contraception; (2) scale up community distribution of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage and, where it is legal, for medical abortion; and (3) eliminate child marriage and invest in girls and young women, thereby reducing early childbearing. PMID:22883918

Potts, Malcolm; Henderson, Courtney E

2012-10-01

205

INFORMATICS Knowledge Management  

E-print Network

MEDICAL INFORMATICS Knowledge Management and Data Mining in Biomedicine #12;INTEGRATED SERIES, Friedrich, Kaluza, Abdelkafi & Kreutler #12;MEDICAL INFORMATICS Knowledge Management and Data Mining ............................................................................................xxxix UNITI: Foundational Topics in Medical Informatics Chapter 1: Knowledge Management. Data Mining

Athens, University of

206

Handbook of Research on Urban Informatics  

E-print Network

Handbook of Research on Urban Informatics: The Practice and Promise of the Real-Time City Marcus Kingdom by Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global) 3 Henrietta Street Covent Garden on urban informatics : the practice and promise of the real-time city / Marcus Foth, editor. p. cm

Paulos, Eric

207

DoseRight Syringe Clip The Global Health Challenge  

E-print Network

in the particularities and complexities of global public health. Courses explore global health and national and international health systems and policies, global health conditions and their relationship to gender, ethnicity

208

Office of Global Public Health www.globalhealth.utah.edu  

E-print Network

Office of Global Public Health www.globalhealth.utah.edu Global Public Health Grand Rounds Featuring: Global Health Scholars.m. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine Division of Public Health, 375 Chipeta

Tipple, Brett

209

Announcing Global Health Equity Scholars Program The NIH/Fogarty International Center Global Health Fellows and Scholars program, which is called Global  

E-print Network

Announcing Global Health Equity Scholars Program The NIH/Fogarty International Center Global Health Fellows and Scholars program, which is called Global Health by the Global Health Program for Fellows and Scholars funded by the Fogarty International

Healy, Kevin Edward

210

Ethics and governance of global health inequalities  

PubMed Central

Background A world divided by health inequalities poses ethical challenges for global health. International and national responses to health disparities must be rooted in ethical values about health and its distribution; this is because ethical claims have the power to motivate, delineate principles, duties and responsibilities, and hold global and national actors morally responsible for achieving common goals. Theories of justice are necessary to define duties and obligations of institutions and actors in reducing inequalities. The problem is the lack of a moral framework for solving problems of global health justice. Aim To study why global health inequalities are morally troubling, why efforts to reduce them are morally justified, how they should be measured and evaluated; how much priority disadvantaged groups should receive; and to delineate roles and responsibilities of national and international actors and institutions. Discussion and conclusions Duties and obligations of international and state actors in reducing global health inequalities are outlined. The ethical principles endorsed include the intrinsic value of health to well?being and equal respect for all human life, the importance of health for individual and collective agency, the concept of a shortfall from the health status of a reference group, and the need for a disproportionate effort to help disadvantaged groups. This approach does not seek to find ways in which global and national actors address global health inequalities by virtue of their self?interest, national interest, collective security or humanitarian assistance. It endorses the more robust concept of “human flourishing” and the desire to live in a world where all people have the capability to be healthy. Unlike cosmopolitan theory, this approach places the role of the nation?state in the forefront with primary, though not sole, moral responsibility. Rather shared health governance is essential for delivering health equity on a global scale. PMID:17053290

Ruger, J P

2006-01-01

211

UC Irvine Global Health Framework Request for Proposals Global Health Research and Travel Fellowships for UCI Students and Junior Scientists  

E-print Network

UC Irvine Global Health Framework Request for Proposals Global Health Research and Travel of the National Institutes of Health, the UC Irvine Global Health Framework was established in 2008-2009. The overarching objective of the Global Health Framework program is to coordinate and enhance the global health

Loudon, Catherine

212

BioInformatics BioInformatics  

E-print Network

BigRoc The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open Club The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open Bioinformatics group, Utrecht University, the Netherlands Patterns in genome and regulome evolution: insights

Shamir, Ron

213

The state of global health in 2014.  

PubMed

The global health landscape looks more promising than ever, although progress has been uneven. Here, we describe the current global burden of disease throughout the life cycle, highlighting regional differences in the unfinished agenda of communicable diseases and reproductive, maternal, and child health and the additive burden of emerging noncommunicable diseases and injuries. Understanding this changing landscape is an essential starting point for effective allocation of both domestic and international resources for health. PMID:25214611

Sepúlveda, Jaime; Murray, Christopher

2014-09-12

214

International environmental law and global public health.  

PubMed Central

The environment continues to be a source of ill-health for many people, particularly in developing countries. International environmental law offers a viable strategy for enhancing public health through the promotion of increased awareness of the linkages between health and environment, mobilization of technical and financial resources, strengthening of research and monitoring, enforcement of health-related standards, and promotion of global cooperation. An enhanced capacity to utilize international environmental law could lead to significant worldwide gains in public health. PMID:12571726

Schirnding, Yasmin von; Onzivu, William; Adede, Andronico O.

2002-01-01

215

Global health politics: neither solidarity nor policy  

PubMed Central

The global health agenda has been dominating the current global health policy debate. Furthermore, it has compelled countries to embrace strategies for tackling health inequalities in a wide range of public health areas. The article by Robert and colleagues highlights that although globalization has increased opportunities to share and spread ideas, there is still great asymmetry of power according to the countries’ economic and political development. It also emphasizes how policy diffusion from High Income Countries (HICs) to Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs) have had flaws at understanding their political, economic, and cultural backgrounds while they are pursuing knowledge translation. Achieving a fair global health policy diffusion of ideas would imply a call for a renewal on political elites worldwide at coping global health politics. Accordingly, moving towards fairness in disseminating global health ideas should be driven by politics not only as one of the social determinants of health, but the main determinant of health and well-being among—and within—societies. PMID:25114949

Mendez, Claudio A.

2014-01-01

216

An “App Store” for Health Care — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

217

Health Informatics Systemic changes enabled by electronic record keeping, networked databases, and  

E-print Network

develops e-health education systems.S Bo Xie examines how aging affects the ways people access and use in health education instruction and multimedia product development. Her research interests range from and e-Health Literacy Bo Xie, a researcher with the university's College of Information Studies

Hill, Wendell T.

218

OHSU Global Health Center Frequent Flyer Donation Form  

E-print Network

OHSU Global Health Center Frequent Flyer Donation Form The OHSU Global Health Center Frequent Flyer to volunteer in global health. Activities include research, field activities, service projects, and life affirming experiences that have positive impact on education and global health. The OHSU Global Health

Chapman, Michael S.

219

Accessibility: global gateway to health literacy.  

PubMed

Health literacy, cited as essential to achieving Healthy People 2010's goals to "increase quality and years of healthy life" and to "eliminate health disparities," is defined by Healthy People as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions." Accessibility, by definition, the aforementioned "capacity to obtain," thus is health literacy's primary prerequisite. Accessibility's designation as the global gateway to health literacy is predicated also on life's realities: global aging and climate change, war and terrorism, and life-extending medical and technological advances. People with diverse access needs are health professionals' raison d'être. However, accessibility, consummately cross-cultural and universal, is virtually absent as a topic of health promotion and practice research and scholarly discussion of health literacy and equity. A call to action to place accessibility in its rightful premier position on the profession's agenda is issued. PMID:18955546

Perlow, Ellen

2010-01-01

220

www.abdn.ac.uk/study Global Health  

E-print Network

on Health Systems and Policy, Managing for Health and Global Health. Global Health topics include: · Poverty · Disability and mental health · Health financing and donor funding · Health care for humanitarian crisis for global, regional, national and sub-national health policy and planning, governance and administration

Levi, Ran

221

Aims and tasks of medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ten major long-term aims and tasks, so to speak ‘grand challenges’, for research in the field of medical informatics, including health informatics, are proposed and described. These are the further development of methods and tools of information processing for: (1) diagnostics (‘the visible body’); (2) therapy (‘medical intervention with as little strain on the patient as possible’); (3) therapy simulation;

Reinhold Haux

1997-01-01

222

Health professionals for global health: include dental personnel upfront!  

PubMed

The Global Health Beyond 2015 was organized in Stockholm in April 2013, which was announced as public engagement and where the dialogue focused on three main themes: social determinants of health, climate change and the non-communicable diseases. This event provided opportunity for both students and health professionals to interact and brainstorm ideas to be formalized into Stockholm Declaration on Global Health. Amongst the active participation of various health professionals, one that was found significantly missing was that of oral health. Keeping this as background in this debate, a case for inclusion of oral health professions is presented by organizing the argument in four areas: education, evidence base, political will and context and what each one offers at a time when Scandinavia is repositioning itself in global health. PMID:23863132

Preet, Raman

2013-01-01

223

Framing health and foreign policy: lessons for global health diplomacy  

PubMed Central

Global health financing has increased dramatically in recent years, indicative of a rise in health as a foreign policy issue. Several governments have issued specific foreign policy statements on global health and a new term, global health diplomacy, has been coined to describe the processes by which state and non-state actors engage to position health issues more prominently in foreign policy decision-making. Their ability to do so is important to advancing international cooperation in health. In this paper we review the arguments for health in foreign policy that inform global health diplomacy. These are organized into six policy frames: security, development, global public goods, trade, human rights and ethical/moral reasoning. Each of these frames has implications for how global health as a foreign policy issue is conceptualized. Differing arguments within and between these policy frames, while overlapping, can also be contradictory. This raises an important question about which arguments prevail in actual state decision-making. This question is addressed through an analysis of policy or policy-related documents and academic literature pertinent to each policy framing with some assessment of policy practice. The reference point for this analysis is the explicit goal of improving global health equity. This goal has increasing national traction within national public health discourse and decision-making and, through the Millennium Development Goals and other multilateral reports and declarations, is entering global health policy discussion. Initial findings support conventional international relations theory that most states, even when committed to health as a foreign policy goal, still make decisions primarily on the basis of the 'high politics' of national security and economic material interests. Development, human rights and ethical/moral arguments for global health assistance, the traditional 'low politics' of foreign policy, are present in discourse but do not appear to dominate practice. While political momentum for health as a foreign policy goal persists, the framing of this goal remains a contested issue. The analysis offered in this article may prove helpful to those engaged in global health diplomacy or in efforts to have global governance across a range of sectoral interests pay more attention to health equity impacts. PMID:20727211

2010-01-01

224

THE FACULTY OF BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND LAW Surrey Informatics Summer School -SISS  

E-print Network

THE FACULTY OF BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND LAW Surrey Informatics Summer School - SISS Building of health data - Medical records staff looking to extend their skills - Public health trainees to introducing multilevel models Clinical INFORMATICS & HEALTH OUTCOMES RESEARCH GROUP ­ www

Doran, Simon J.

225

A case for using grid architecture for state public health informatics: the Utah perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the rationale for designing and implementing the next-generation of public health information systems using grid computing concepts and tools. Our attempt is to evaluate all grid types including data grids for sharing information and computational grids for accessing computational resources on demand. Public health is a broad domain that requires coordinated uses of disparate and heterogeneous information

Catherine J Staes; Wu Xu; Samuel D LeFevre; Ronald C Price; Scott P Narus; Adi Gundlapalli; Robert Rolfs; Barry Nangle; Matthew Samore; Julio C Facelli

2009-01-01

226

CERTIFICATE IN GLOBAL HEALTH FOR ANTHROPOLOGY MAJORS AND ANTHROPOLOGY  

E-print Network

CERTIFICATE IN GLOBAL HEALTH FOR ANTHROPOLOGY MAJORS AND ANTHROPOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS a career in global health. The Anthropology Department strongly encourages students to seriously consider: Anthropology Majors: 1) INTH 301: Fundamental Concepts in Global Health (see: http

Rollins, Andrew M.

227

For general information about the Certificate in Global Health, please  

E-print Network

For general information about the Certificate in Global Health, please contact: Robin Eric Mittenthal Global Health Administrative Program Manager 272 Nutritional Sciences 1415 Linden Dr. TEL: 608 appointments. OR Sweta Shrestha Education Programs Associate Global Health Institute 1026 Medical Sciences

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

228

Doctoral Bursaries Available Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS)  

E-print Network

1 Doctoral Bursaries Available Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS) What is GHRCAPS? The Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS to the national and international development of global health research by recruiting and training

Barthelat, Francois

229

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES  

E-print Network

1 UCSF-GHS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES MASTERS OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES Student Handbook 2014-2015 #12;2 WELCOME FROM THE GHS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR...................................... 4 UCSF GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES .................................................................5

Mullins, Dyche

230

Data Management for Meeting Global Health Challenges Tapan S. Parikh  

E-print Network

Data Management for Meeting Global Health Challenges Tapan S. Parikh UC Berkeley School global health challenges are becoming increasingly data driven. Governments and donors are demanding activities, and responding to remote outbreaks of disease. Data challenges in global health intersect

Parikh, Tapan S.

231

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES  

E-print Network

1 UCSF-GHS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES MASTERS OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES Student Handbook 2012-2013 #12;2 WELCOME FROM THE GHS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR......................................4 UCSF GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES .................................................................5

Mullins, Dyche

232

Software and Global Health: Assessing Vaccine Cold Chains from  

E-print Network

Software and Global Health: Assessing Vaccine Cold Chains from National Equipment Inventories of inventory based cold chain planning to global health 2. Stakeholders for global health software 3. Software

Anderson, Richard

233

Global Health Technologies The George R. Brown School of Engineering,  

E-print Network

Global Health Technologies The George R. Brown School of Engineering, The Weiss School of Natural°: Institute for Global Health Technologies collaborates with a number of departments to offer Rice undergraduate students a minor in global health technologies

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

234

Postdoctoral Bursaries Available Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS)  

E-print Network

1 Postdoctoral Bursaries Available Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS) What is GHRCAPS? The Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS to the national and international development of global health research by recruiting and training

Barthelat, Francois

235

Global Health Technologies The George R. Brown School of Engineering,  

E-print Network

1 Global Health Technologies The George R. Brown School of Engineering, The Weiss School of Natural°: Institute for Global Health Technologies collaborates with a number of departments to offer Rice undergraduate students a minor in global health technologies

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

236

Globalization and Health BioMed Central Review Global health priorities – priorities of the wealthy?  

E-print Network

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Health has gained importance on the global agenda. It has become recognized in forums where it was once not addressed. In this article three issues are considered: global health policy actors, global health priorities and the means of addressing the identified health priorities. I argue that the arenas for global health policy-making have shifted from the public spheres towards arenas that include the transnational for-profit sector. Global health policy has become increasingly fragmented and verticalized. Infectious diseases have gained ground as global health priorities, while noncommunicable diseases and the broader issues of health systems development have been neglected. Approaches to tackling the health problems are increasingly influenced by trade and industrial interests with the emphasis on technological solutions. Global health policy actors The major actors in global health policy are changing. New actors are entering and old ones are losing power; the overall change has seen a shift from global nation-based

Eeva Ollila; Eeva Ollila

2005-01-01

237

Ethics in collaborative global health researchhealth research  

E-print Network

samples · The views of IRBs about the international movement of samples · Ownership or `governance' #12Ethics in collaborative global health researchhealth research Michael Parker Ethox Centre, University of Oxford #12;Ethical reasons for doing global research ·Ethics is, at least in part, about what

Oxford, University of

238

What informatics is and isn't.  

PubMed

The term informatics is currently enveloped in chaos. One way to clarify the meaning of informatics is to identify the competencies associated with training in the field, but this approach can conceal the whole that the competencies atomistically describe. This work takes a different approach by offering three higher-level visions of what characterizes the field, viewing informatics as: (1) cross-training between basic informational sciences and an application domain, (2) the relentless pursuit of making people better at what they do, and (3) a field encompassing four related types of activities. Applying these perspectives to describe what informatics is, one can also conclude that informatics is not: tinkering with computers, analysis of large datasets per se, employment in circumscribed health IT workforce roles, the practice of health information management, or anything done using a computer. PMID:23059730

Friedman, Charles P

2013-01-01

239

Towards a Framework Convention on Global Health: a transformative agenda for global health justice.  

PubMed

Global health inequities cause nearly 20 million deaths annually, mostly among the world's poor. Yet international law currently does little to reduce the massive inequalities that underlie these deaths. This Article offers the first systematic account of the goals and justifications, normative foundations, and potential construction of a proposed new global health treaty, a Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH), grounded in the human right to health. Already endorsed by the United Nations Secretary-General, the FCGH would reimagine global governance for health, offering a new, post-Millennium Development Goals vision. A global coalition of civil society and academics has formed the Joint Action and Learning Initiative on National and Global Responsibilities for Health (JALI) to advance the FCGH. PMID:23815040

Gostin, Lawrence O; Friedman, Eric A

2013-01-01

240

The Rise of Global Health: Consensus, Expansion and Specialization.  

E-print Network

??Political Science This dissertation examines the rise of global health assistance among states, multilateral institutions and NGOs. Resources devoted to global public health expanded rapidly… (more)

Leon, Joshua K.

2010-01-01

241

China's distinctive engagement in global health.  

PubMed

China has made rapid progress in four key domains of global health. China's health aid deploys medical teams, constructs facilities, donates drugs and equipment, trains personnel, and supports malaria control mainly in Africa and Asia. Prompted by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003, China has prioritised the control of cross-border transmission of infectious diseases and other health-related risks. In governance, China has joined UN and related international bodies and has begun to contribute to pooled multilateral funds. China is both a knowledge producer and sharer, offering lessons based on its health accomplishments, traditional Chinese medicine, and research and development investment in drug discovery. Global health capacity is being developed in medical universities in China, which also train foreign medical students. China's approach to global health is distinctive; different from other countries; and based on its unique history, comparative strength, and policies driven by several governmental ministries. The scope and depth of China's global engagement are likely to grow and reshape the contours of global health. PMID:25176550

Liu, Peilong; Guo, Yan; Qian, Xu; Tang, Shenglan; Li, Zhihui; Chen, Lincoln

2014-08-30

242

http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca  

E-print Network

http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca www.medicine.dal.ca www at the level of Assistant Professor. Medical Informatics in the Faculty of Medicine was established in 1996 in the Medical Informatics Program, program development in the Faculty of Medicine and in the Health Informatics

Adl, Sina

243

Updated Topics in Healthcare Informatics Hiroshi Takeda, MD, PhD1,2,3  

E-print Network

, International Medical Informatics Association h-takeda@jrhm.jikei.com Abstract. This key note lecture introduces of medical informatics, including health informatics. These were the further development of methods and toolsUpdated Topics in Healthcare Informatics Hiroshi Takeda, MD, PhD1,2,3 1 Professsor Emeritus, Osaka

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

244

Global Public Health Surveillance under New International Health Regulations  

PubMed Central

The new International Health Regulations adopted by the World Health Assembly in May 2005 (IHR 2005) represents a major development in the use of international law for public health purposes. One of the most important aspects of IHR 2005 is the establishment of a global surveillance system for public health emergencies of international concern. This article assesses the surveillance system in IHR 2005 by applying well-established frameworks for evaluating public health surveillance. The assessment shows that IHR 2005 constitutes a major advance in global surveillance from what has prevailed in the past. Effectively implementing the IHR 2005 surveillance objectives requires surmounting technical, resource, governance, legal, and political obstacles. Although IHR 2005 contains some provisions that directly address these obstacles, active support by the World Health Organization and its member states is required to strengthen national and global surveillance capabilities. PMID:16836821

Fidler, David P.

2006-01-01

245

Visual Approaches to Global Health Course Syllabus  

E-print Network

, and health psychology journals relevant to their topic, as well as those pertaining to film concepts scholarship and make it more accessible to the general public Analyze the research, theory, method of global. Screenings will be of films (of relevant public health value) in a broader context. (Project specific journal

246

Improving the Health of the Global Poor  

E-print Network

of child, maternal, and adult deaths annually in poor countries. Improvements in global health million child deaths occur annually, and other enormous health burdens remain. In 1998, almost a third of deaths in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) (1) were due to communicable diseases, maternal

247

Environmental Health and Safety Global Harmonization System  

E-print Network

Environmental Health and Safety Global Harmonization System for the Classification and Labeling of Chemicals Department of Environmental Health and Safety (412) 624-9505 www.ehs.pitt.edu #12;Environmental (GHS) as a revision to the Hazard Communication Standard (HazCom) · GHS was developed and adopted

Jiang, Huiqiang

248

Globalization and health: results and options.  

PubMed Central

The last two decades have witnessed the emergence and consolidation of an economic paradigm which emphasizes domestic deregulation and the removal of barriers to international trade and finance. If properly managed, such an approach can lead to perceptible gains in health status. Where markets are non-exclusionary, regulatory institutions strong and safety nets in place, globalization enhances the performance of countries with a good human and physical infrastructure but narrow domestic markets. Health gains in China, Costa Rica, the East Asian "tiger economies" and Viet Nam can be attributed in part to their growing access to global markets, savings and technology. However, for most of the remaining countries, many of them in Africa, Latin America and Eastern Europe, globalization has not lived up to its promises due to a combination of poor domestic conditions, an unequal distribution of foreign investments and the imposition of new conditions further limiting the access of their exports to the OECD markets. In these developing countries, the last twenty years have brought about a slow, unstable and unequal pattern of growth and stagnation in health indicators. Autarky is not the answer to this situation, but neither is premature, unconditional and unselective globalization. Further unilateral liberalization is unlikely to help them to improve their economic performance and health conditions. For them, a gradual and selective integration into the world economy linked to the removal of asymmetries in global markets and to the creation of democratic institutions of global governance is preferable to instant globalization. PMID:11584731

Cornia, G. A.

2001-01-01

249

Rating the Raters: Legal Exposure of Trustmark Authorities in the Context of Consumer Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

There are three areas of potential legal exposure for an organization such as a trustmark authority involved in e-health quality rating. First, an e-health provider may make a complaint about negative or impliedly negative ratings rendered by the ratings body (false negative). Typically, a negative ratings complaint would rely on defamation or product disparagement causes of action. In some cases such complaints could be defended on the basis of absence of malice (US). Second, the rating body might render a positive rating on e-health data that a third party allegedly relied upon and suffered injury (false positive). While the primary cause of action would be against the e-health data provider, questions may arise as to the possible liability of the trustmark authority. For example, some US liability exposure is possible based on cases involving the potential liability of product warrantors, trade associations, and certifiers or endorsers. Third, a ratings body may face public law liability for its own web misfeasance. Several risk management approaches are possible and would not necessarily be mutually exclusive. These approaches will require careful investigation to assess their risk reduction potential and, in some cases, the introduction of legislation. PMID:11720941

2000-01-01

250

Juris Doctor/Master of science in HealtH inforMatics (JD/MHi)  

E-print Network

of law and technology. The JD/MHI combines practice-focused expertise in healthcare information systems of healthcare law, whether in law firms, business, or government settings. Using Technology to Improve Health and technology, and law, providing you the knowledge and skills to be prepared for the modern practice

Acosta, Charles A.

251

Online social networks for personal informatics to promote positive health behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network services are becoming increasingly popular, and people are using these networks to obtain and share information. The application of social network and social media to the collection, storage and review of personal information presents opportunities for improved personal health management. This paper presents a survey of the literature on the models for the use of online social networks

Noreen Kamal; Sidney Fels; Kendall Ho

2010-01-01

252

Training the biomedical informatics workforce in Latin America: results of a needs assessment.  

PubMed

Objective To report the results of a needs assessment of research and training in Medical Informatics (MI) and Bioinformatics (BI) in Latin America. Methods and results This assessment was conducted by QUIPU: The Andean Global Health Informatics Research and Training Center. After sending email invitations to MI-BI related professionals from Latin America, 142 surveys were received from 11 Latin American countries. The following were the top four ranked MI-related courses that a training programme should include: introduction to biomedical informatics; data representation and databases; mobile health; and courses that address issues of security, confidentiality and privacy. Several new courses and topics for research were suggested by survey participants. The information collected is guiding the development of curricula and a research agenda for the MI and BI QUIPU multidisciplinary programme for the Andean Region and Latin America. PMID:22080537

Blas, Magaly M; Curioso, Walter H; Garcia, Patricia J; Zimic, Mirko; Carcamo, Cesar P; Castagnetto, Jesus M; Lescano, Andres G; Lopez, Diego M

2011-01-01

253

Potential effects on health of global warming  

SciTech Connect

Prediction of the impacts of global climate change on health is complicated by a number of factors. These include: the difficulty in predicting regional changes in climate, the capacity for adaptation to climate change, the interactions between the effects of global climate change and a number of other key determinants of health, including population growth and poverty, and the availability of adequate preventive and curative facilities for diseases that may be effected by climate change. Nevertheless, it is of importance to consider the potential health impacts of global climate change for a number of reasons. It is also important to monitor diseases which could be effected by climate change in order to detect changes in incidence as early as possible and study possible interactions with other factors. It seems likely that the possible impacts on health of climate change will be a major determinant of the degree to which policies aimed at reducing global warming are followed, as perceptions of the effect of climate change to human health and well-being are particularly likely to influence public opinion. The potential health impacts of climate change can be divided into direct (primary) and indirect (secondary and tertiary) effects. Primary effects are those related to the effect of temperature on human well-being and disease. Secondary effects include the impacts on health of changes in food production, availability of water and of sea level rise. A tertiary level of impacts can also be hypothesized.

Haines, A. (Univ. College London Medical School, London (United Kingdom). Whittington Hospital); Parry, M. (Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Environmental Change Unit)

1993-12-01

254

Health Promotion: An Effective Tool for Global Health  

PubMed Central

Health promotion is very relevant today. There is a global acceptance that health and social wellbeing are determined by many factors outside the health system which include socioeconomic conditions, patterns of consumption associated with food and communication, demographic patterns, learning environments, family patterns, the cultural and social fabric of societies; sociopolitical and economic changes, including commercialization and trade and global environmental change. In such a situation, health issues can be effectively addressed by adopting a holistic approach by empowering individuals and communities to take action for their health, fostering leadership for public health, promoting intersectoral action to build healthy public policies in all sectors and creating sustainable health systems. Although, not a new concept, health promotion received an impetus following Alma Ata declaration. Recently it has evolved through a series of international conferences, with the first conference in Canada producing the famous Ottawa charter. Efforts at promoting health encompassing actions at individual and community levels, health system strengthening and multi sectoral partnership can be directed at specific health conditions. It should also include settings-based approach to promote health in specific settings such as schools, hospitals, workplaces, residential areas etc. Health promotion needs to be built into all the policies and if utilized efficiently will lead to positive health outcomes. PMID:22529532

Kumar, Sanjiv; Preetha, GS

2012-01-01

255

A future without health? Health dimension in global scenario studies.  

PubMed Central

This paper reviews the health dimension and sociocultural, economic, and ecological determinants of health in existing global scenario studies. Not even half of the 31 scenarios reviewed gave a good description of future health developments and the different scenario studies did not handle health in a consistent way. Most of the global driving forces of health are addressed adequately in the selected scenarios, however, and it therefore would have been possible to describe the future developments in health as an outcome of these multiple driving forces. To provide examples on how future health can be incorporated in existing scenarios, we linked the sociocultural, economic, and environmental developments described in three sets of scenarios (special report on emission scenarios (SRES), global environmental outlook-3 (GEO3), and world water scenarios (WWS)) to three potential, but imaginary, health futures ("age of emerging infectious diseases", "age of medical technology", and "age of sustained health"). This paper provides useful insights into how to deal with future health in scenarios and shows that a comprehensive picture of future health evolves when all important driving forces and pressures are taken into account. PMID:14997242

Martens, Pim; Huynen, Maud

2003-01-01

256

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200  

E-print Network

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200 San Francisco, CA 94105, USA tel: 415.597.4660 fax: 415.597.8299 UCSF Global Health Group Research Assistant (limited hire) The UCSF Global Health Group (http://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/global-health-group) seeks a candidate with experience

Derisi, Joseph

257

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200  

E-print Network

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200 San Francisco, CA 94105, USA tel: 415.597.4660 fax: 415.597.8299 UCSF Global Health Group Research Assistant (limited hire) The UCSF Global Health Group (http://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/global-health-group) seeks

Klein, Ophir

258

Global ovarian cancer health disparities  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of this article is to broadly review the scientific literature and summarize the most up-to-date findings on ovarian cancer health disparities worldwide and in the United States (U.S.). Methods The present literature on disparities in ovarian cancer was reviewed. Original research and relevant review articles were included. Results Ovarian cancer health disparities exist worldwide and in the U.S. Ovarian cancer disproportionately affect African American women at all stages of the disease, from presentation through treatment, and ultimately increased mortality and decreased survival, compared to non-Hispanic White women. Increased mortality is likely to be explained by unequal access to care and non-standard treatment regimens frequently administered to African American women, but may also be attributed to genetic susceptibility, acquired co-morbid conditions and increased frequency of modifiable risk factors, albeit to substantially lesser extent. Unequal access to care is, in turn, largely a consequence of lower socioeconomic status and lack of private health insurance coverage among the African American population. Conclusions Our findings suggest the need for policy changes aimed at facilitating equal access to quality medical care. At the same time, further research is necessary to fully resolve racial disparities in ovarian cancer. PMID:23266352

Chornokur, Ganna; Amankwah, Ernest K.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Phelan, Catherine M.

2013-01-01

259

Global Advances in Health and Medicine  

PubMed Central

Science, technology, and medicine (STM) are not immune to the widespread and persistent crises that have defined the 21st century. We, the editors of Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHMJ), a new scholarly medical journal, believe that solutions in healthcare will be ones that accelerate the application of global advances in health and medicine, resulting in improved population-health management, healthcare delivery, and patient outcomes. The journal is focused on solutions in 3 main areas: (1) systems theory and medicine, (2) the global convergence of healthcare practices, and (3) evidence from the point of care (eg, medical case reports). And GAHMJ is more than a scholarly medical journal; it is a communication platform. The journal itself is cross-disciplinary and peer reviewed and offers innovative STM content for the worldwide community of healthcare professionals who actively participate in the healthcare debate. PMID:24278792

2012-01-01

260

Engineering Polymer Informatics  

E-print Network

Engineering Polymer Informatics Nico Adams, Jen Ryder, Nicholas England, David Jessop, Peter Corbett, Peter Murray-Rust Our mission is to develop an informatics toolbox, which will take into account the special computational needs of polymers...

Adams, Nico; Ryder, Jennifer; Jessop, David M; Corbett, Peter; Murray-Rust, Peter

2007-12-17

261

Global mental health: from science to action.  

PubMed

This article charts the historical development of the discipline of global mental health, whose goal is to improve access to mental health care and reduce inequalities in mental health outcomes between and within nations. The article begins with an overview of the contribution of four scientific foundations toward the discipline's core agenda: to scale up services for people with mental disorders and to promote their human rights. Next, the article highlights four recent, key events that are indicative of the actions shaping the discipline: the Mental Health Gap Action Programme to synthesize evidence on what treatments are effective for a range of mental disorders; the evidence on task shifting to nonspecialist health workers to deliver these treatments; the Movement for Global Mental Health's efforts to build a common platform for professionals and civil society to advocate for their shared goal; and the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health, which has identified the research priorities that, within the next decade, can lead to substantial improvements in the lives of people living with mental disorders. The article ends by examining the major challenges for the field, and the opportunities for addressing them in the future. PMID:22335178

Patel, Vikram

2012-01-01

262

www.globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu UCSF Global Health Sciences  

E-print Network

www.globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu UCSF Global Health Sciences 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200 San that train students to become future leaders in global health--not only as clinicians, but also as policy health challenges. Global Health Sciences leverages UCSF's unparalleled expertise in the health

Klein, Ophir

263

Office of Global Public Health www.globalhealth.utah.edu  

E-print Network

Office of Global Public Health www.globalhealth.utah.edu Global Public Health Grand Rounds, PhD Chief and Associate Professor Division of Public Health "Integrating Global Public Health Medicine Division of Public Health, 375 Chipeta Way Classroom 203 Or Join Us via GoToWebinar Please

Tipple, Brett

264

National health expenditures: a global analysis.  

PubMed Central

As part of the background research to the World development report 1993: investing in health, an effort was made to estimate public, private and total expenditures on health for all countries of the world. Estimates could be found for public spending for most countries, but for private expenditure in many fewer countries. Regressions were used to predict the missing values of regional and global estimates. These econometric exercises were also used to relate expenditure to measures of health status. In 1990 the world spent an estimated US$ 1.7 trillion (1.7 x 10(12) on health, or $1.9 trillion (1.9 x 10(12)) in dollars adjusted for higher purchasing power in poorer countries. This amount was about 60% public and 40% private in origin. However, as incomes rise, public health expenditure tends to displace private spending and to account for the increasing share of incomes devoted to health. PMID:7923542

Murray, C. J.; Govindaraj, R.; Musgrove, P.

1994-01-01

265

Global health security and the International Health Regulations  

PubMed Central

Global nuclear proliferation, bioterrorism, and emerging infections have challenged national capacities to achieve and maintain global security. Over the last century, emerging infectious disease threats resulted in the development of the preliminary versions of the International Health Regulations (IHR) of the World Health Organization (WHO). The current HR(2005) contain major differences compared to earlier versions, including: substantial shifts from containment at the border to containment at the source of the event; shifts from a rather small disease list (smallpox, plague, cholera, and yellow fever) required to be reported, to all public health threats; and shifts from preset measures to tailored responses with more flexibility to deal with the local situations on the ground. The new IHR(2005) call for accountability. They also call for strengthened national capacity for surveillance and control; prevention, alert, and response to international public health emergencies beyond the traditional short list of required reporting; global partnership and collaboration; and human rights, obligations, accountability, and procedures of monitoring. Under these evolved regulations, as well as other measures, such as the Revolving Fund for vaccine procurement of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), global health security could be maintained in the response to urban yellow fever in Paraguay in 2008 and the influenza (H1N1) pandemic of 2009-2010. PMID:21143824

2010-01-01

266

The World Health Organization and Global Health Governance: post-1990.  

PubMed

This article takes a historical perspective on the changing position of WHO in the global health architecture over the past two decades. From the early 1990s a number of weaknesses within the structure and governance of the World Health Organization were becoming apparent, as a rapidly changing post Cold War world placed more complex demands on the international organizations generally, but significantly so in the field of global health. Towards the end of that decade and during the first half of the next, WHO revitalized and played a crucial role in setting global health priorities. However, over the past decade, the organization has to some extent been bypassed for funding, and it lost some of its authority and its ability to set a global health agenda. The reasons for this decline are complex and multifaceted. Some of the main factors include WHO's inability to reform its core structure, the growing influence of non-governmental actors, a lack of coherence in the positions, priorities and funding decisions between the health ministries and the ministries overseeing development assistance in several donor member states, and the lack of strong leadership of the organization. PMID:24388640

Lidén, J

2014-02-01

267

UCSF Global Health Sciences 2012 Annual Report  

E-print Network

and productive year for us here at Global Health Sciences. We welcomed several new members to our leadership team to learn firsthand about the city's early response to the AIDS epidemic and to hear perspectives on what teacher, she has twice received the Kaiser Family Foundation Teaching Award as well as a UCSF Academic

Klein, Ophir

268

Breast cancer as a global health concern  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public health data indicate that the global burden of breast cancer in women, measured by incidence, mortality, and economic costs, is substantial and on the increase. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than one million women are diagnosed with breast cancer every year, and more than 410,000 will die from the disease. In low- and middle-income countries (LMCs), the infrastructure

Steven S. Coughlin; Donatus U. Ekwueme

2009-01-01

269

Informatics: the key to efficiency.  

PubMed

In India a computer-based national health management information system is being implemented by linking more than 450 districts on a network. This and other actions in the field of informatics technology could significantly raise the efficiency of the country's health sector by making decisions more logical, speeding them up and monitoring their impact, and could help to improve the utilization of scarce resources. PMID:7546180

Indrayan, A

1995-01-01

270

Is globalization good for your health?  

PubMed Central

Four points are made about globalization and health. First, economic integration is a powerful force for raising the incomes of poor countries. In the past 20 years several large developing countries have opened up to trade and investment, and they are growing well--faster than the rich countries. Second, there is no tendency for income inequality to increase in countries that open up. The higher growth that accompanies globalization in developing countries generally benefits poor people. Since there is a large literature linking income of the poor to health status, we can be reasonably confident that globalization has indirect positive effects on nutrition, infant mortality and other health issues related to income. Third, economic integration can obviously have adverse health effects as well: the transmission of AIDS through migration and travel is a dramatic recent example. However, both relatively closed and relatively open developing countries have severe AIDS problems. The practical solution lies in health policies, not in policies on economic integration. Likewise, free trade in tobacco will lead to increased smoking unless health-motivated disincentives are put in place. Global integration requires supporting institutions and policies. Fourth, the international architecture can be improved so that it is more beneficial to poor countries. For example, with regard to intellectual property rights, it may be practical for pharmaceutical innovators to choose to have intellectual property rights in either rich country markets or poor country ones, but not both. In this way incentives could be strong for research on diseases in both rich and poor countries. PMID:11584730

Dollar, D.

2001-01-01

271

OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY Certificate in Global Health (Online Program)  

E-print Network

OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY Certificate in Global Health (Online Program) Global Health aims to show us the big picture. Mistakenly, people assume that the target of "Global Health" involves mainly tackling problems in the developing world. Diseases and health problems do not recognize

272

PATHWAYS TO GLOBAL HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGIC PLAN 2008-2012  

E-print Network

PATHWAYS TO GLOBAL HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGIC PLAN 2008-2012 THE JOHN E. FOGARTY INTERNATIONAL CENTER ADVANCING SCIENCE FOR GLOBAL HEALTH U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National the Disease Control Priorities Project. GOAL III: Develop human capital to meet global health challenges

Bandettini, Peter A.

273

Basch, Paul F. General References: Global Health and Development  

E-print Network

Basch, Paul F. General References: Global Health and Development Textbook of International Health. America's Vital Interest in Global Health. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1997. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1119101/ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1119101/pdf/1361.pdf Chen, et al., eds. Global Health

Sheridan, Jennifer

274

The World at Your Fingertips Global Health Information Resources  

E-print Network

The World at Your Fingertips Global Health Information Resources: An Introductory Tour Gurpreet K. Rana, MLIS Global Health Coordinator Taubman Health Sciences Library preet@umich.edu #12;· establishing long-term goals and effective strategies to meet global health objectives · developing partnerships

Eustice, Ryan

275

OPENING PLENARY SECOND PLENARY THIRD PLENARYWater Crisis Global Health Governance  

E-print Network

OPENING PLENARY SECOND PLENARY THIRD PLENARYWater Crisis Global Health Governance Marjorie GriffinOpOliS experience Associate Dean, Research, Director of Global Health and Professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences SiMon FraSer UniverSity Professor of Global Health Policy London SChooL oF hyGiene and tropi

Haykin, Simon

276

Building Global Health Through a Center-Without-Walls: The Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health  

PubMed Central

The Institute for Global Health at Vanderbilt enables the expansion and coordination of global health research, service, and training, reflecting the university's commitment to improve health services and outcomes in resource-limited settings. Global health encompasses both prevention via public health and treatment via medical care, all nested within a broader community-development context. This has fostered university-wide collaborations to address education, business/economics, engineering, nursing, and language training, among others. The institute is a natural facilitator for team building and has been especially helpful in organizing institutional responses to global health solicitations from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and other funding agencies. This center-without-walls philosophy nurtures noncompetitive partnerships among and within departments and schools. With extramural support from the NIH and from endowment and developmental investments from the school of medicine, the institute funds new pilot projects to nurture global educational and research exchanges related to health and development. Vanderbilt's newest programs are a CDC-supported HIV/AIDS service initiative in Africa and an overseas research training program for health science graduate students and clinical fellows. New opportunities are available for Vanderbilt students, staff, and faculty to work abroad in partnership with international health projects through a number of Tennessee institutions now networked with the institute. A center-without-walls may be a model for institutions contemplating strategic investments to better organize service and teaching opportunities abroad, and to achieve greater successes in leveraging extramural support for overseas and domestic work focused on tropical medicine and global health. PMID:18303361

Vermund, Sten H.; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Khedkar, Sheetal; Jia, Yujiang; Etherington, Carol; Vergara, Alfredo

2008-01-01

277

Global Health Sciences and CTSI-GHP Global Research Enterprise Support  

E-print Network

Global Health Sciences and CTSI-GHP Global Research Enterprise Support (G-RES) Coordinating and point of overall coordination of international research on behalf of Global Health Sciences and the OSR. The Coordinating Committee will report to the Director of Research, Global Health, Nina Agabian, who will report

Mullins, Dyche

278

Globalization and social determinants of health: Promoting health equity in global governance (part 3 of 3)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is the third in a three-part review of research on globalization and the social determinants of health (SDH). In the first article of the series, we identified and defended an economically oriented definition of globalization and addressed a number of important conceptual and metholodogical issues. In the second article, we identified and described seven key clusters of pathways

Ronald Labonté; Ted Schrecker

2007-01-01

279

Globalization of public health law and ethics.  

PubMed

The Constitution of the World Health Organization (1946) states that the "enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social position." The international legal framework for this right was laid by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and reaffirmed in the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (1966) and the Declaration of Alma-Ata (1978). In recent years, the framework has been developed on 10 key elements: national and international human rights, laws, norms, and standards; resource constraints and progressive realization; obligations of immediate effect; freedoms and entitlements; available, accessible, acceptable, and good quality; respect, protect, and fulfill; non-discrimination, equality, and vulnerability; active and informed participation; international assistance and cooperation; and monitoring and accountability. Whereas public health law plays an essential role in the protection and promotion of the right to health, the emergence of SARS (2003) highlighted the urgent need to reform national public health laws and international obligations relating to public health in order to meet the new realities of a globalized world, leading to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (2003) and the revision of the WHO International Health Regulations (2005). The Asian Institute for Bioethics and Health Law, in conjunction with the Republic of Korea's Ministry of Health and Welfare and the WHO International Digest of Health Legislation, conducted a comparative legal analysis of national public health laws in various countries through a project entitled Domestic Profiles of Public/Population Health Legislation (2006), which underscored the importance of recognizing the political and social contexts of distinct legal cultures, including Western, Asian, Islamic, and African. PMID:23093515

Sohn, Myongsei

2012-09-01

280

Global health funding and economic development.  

PubMed

The impact of increased national wealth, as measured by Gross Domestic Product (GDP), on public health is widely understood, however an equally important but less well-acclaimed relationship exists between improvements in health and the growth of an economy. Communicable diseases such as HIV, TB, Malaria and the Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) are impacting many of the world's poorest and most vulnerable populations, and depressing economic development. Sickness and disease has decreased the size and capabilities of the workforce through impeding access to education and suppressing foreign direct investment (FDI). There is clear evidence that by investing in health improvements a significant increase in GDP per capita can be attained in four ways: Firstly, healthier populations are more economically productive; secondly, proactive healthcare leads to decrease in many of the additive healthcare costs associated with lack of care (treating opportunistic infections in the case of HIV for example); thirdly, improved health represents a real economic and developmental outcome in-and-of itself and finally, healthcare spending capitalises on the Keynesian 'economic multiplier' effect. Continued under-investment in health and health systems represent an important threat to our future global prosperity. This editorial calls for a recognition of health as a major engine of economic growth and for commensurate investment in public health, particularly in poor countries. PMID:22490207

Martin, Greg; Grant, Alexandra; D'Agostino, Mark

2012-01-01

281

Global health funding and economic development  

PubMed Central

The impact of increased national wealth, as measured by Gross Domestic Product (GDP), on public health is widely understood, however an equally important but less well-acclaimed relationship exists between improvements in health and the growth of an economy. Communicable diseases such as HIV, TB, Malaria and the Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) are impacting many of the world's poorest and most vulnerable populations, and depressing economic development. Sickness and disease has decreased the size and capabilities of the workforce through impeding access to education and suppressing foreign direct investment (FDI). There is clear evidence that by investing in health improvements a significant increase in GDP per capita can be attained in four ways: Firstly, healthier populations are more economically productive; secondly, proactive healthcare leads to decrease in many of the additive healthcare costs associated with lack of care (treating opportunistic infections in the case of HIV for example); thirdly, improved health represents a real economic and developmental outcome in-and-of itself and finally, healthcare spending capitalises on the Keynesian 'economic multiplier' effect. Continued under-investment in health and health systems represent an important threat to our future global prosperity. This editorial calls for a recognition of health as a major engine of economic growth and for commensurate investment in public health, particularly in poor countries. PMID:22490207

2012-01-01

282

Health in global context; beyond the social determinants of health?  

PubMed Central

The rise of the social determinants of health (SDH) discourse on the basis of statistical evidence that correlates ill health to SDH and pictures causal pathways in comprehensive theoretical frameworks led to widespread awareness that health and health disparities are the outcome of complex pathways of interconnecting SDH. In this paper we explore whether and how SDH frameworks can be translated to effectively inform particular national health policies. To this end we identified major challenges for this translation followed by reflections on ways to overcome them. Most important challenges affecting adequate translation of these frameworks into concrete policy and intervention are 1) overcoming the inclination to conceptualize SDH as mere barriers to health behavior to be modified by lifestyle interventions by addressing them as structural factors instead; 2) obtaining sufficient in-depth insight in and evidence for the exact nature of the relationship between SDs and health; 3) to adequately translate the general determinants and pathways into explanations for ill health and limited access to health care in local settings; 4) to develop and implement policies and other interventions that are adjusted to those local circumstances. We conclude that to transform generic SDH models into useful policy tools and to prevent them to transform in SDH themselves, in depth understanding of the unique interplay between local, national and global SDH in a local setting, gathered by ethnographic research, is needed to be able to address structural SD in the local setting and decrease health inequity.

Krumeich, Anja; Meershoek, Agnes

2014-01-01

283

Roadmap: Public Health Global Health Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Global Health­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-GLHL] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 10-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap One: [13 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

Sheridan, Scott

284

Roadmap: Public Health Global Health Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Global Health­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-GLHL] College of Public Health Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 24-Apr-2013/LNHD This roadmap One: [14 Credit Hours] PH 10001 Introduction to Public Health 3 US 10097 Destination Kent State

Sheridan, Scott

285

Medicine Global Health Diplomacy series. Launch of the Foreign Policy and Global Health Initiative  

E-print Network

dialogue on the inter-linkages between health and foreign policy, with a focus on how health matters to foreign policy and whether foreign policy can make a difference to health. What brought the ministers together was the realization that the state of global health has a profound impact on all nations and is deeply interconnected with trade and environment, economic growth, social development, national security, human rights, and dignity. These are challenges that go beyond the scope of ministries of health, and represent areas for which WHO (as the UN specialized agency for health) must have broader political support from member countries. Based on the ministers ’ analysis, the Oslo Ministerial Declaration in 2007 stated a commitment to ‘‘make impact on health a defining lens that each of the countries would use to examine key elements of foreign policy and development strategies’’ [1]. The ministers also decided to engage in a dialogue on how to deal with policy options from this perspective. The need for countries to protect themselves from cross-border exposure to health risks was not a new insight in 2006. The world had already had the experience of pandemics, bioterrorism, and other threats to global health security. (The reference to security should not be understood in terms of threats to the maintenance of peace and security enshrined in the UN Charter. So far, there is no consensus on the definition of ‘‘global health security,’ ’ see Oslo Ministerial

Sigrun Møgedal; Benedikte Louise Alveberg

286

Globalization and Health: Exploring the opportunities and constraints for health arising from globalization.  

PubMed

The tremendous benefits which have been conferred to almost 5 billion people through improved technologies and knowledge highlights the concomitant challenge of bringing these changes to the 1 billion people living mostly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia who are yet to benefit. There is a growing awareness of the need to reduce human suffering and of the necessary participation of governments, non-government organizations and industry within this process. This awareness has recently translated into new funding mechanisms to address HIV/Aids and vaccines, a global push for debt relief and better trade opportunities for the poorest countries, and recognition of how global norms that address food safety, infectious diseases and tobacco benefit all. 'Globalization and Health' will encourage an exchange of views on how the global architecture for health governance needs to changes in the light of global threats and opportunities. PMID:15847700

Yach, Derek

2005-04-22

287

Who should pay for global health, and how much?  

PubMed

Roman Carrasco and colleagues propose a "cap and trade" system for global health involving a cost-effectiveness criterion and a DALY global credit market, mirroring global carbon emission permits trading markets to mitigate climate change. PMID:23431273

Carrasco, Luis R; Coker, Richard; Cook, Alex R

2013-01-01

288

The Growing Impact of Globalization for Health and Public Health Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent decades, public health policy and practice have been increasingly challenged by globalization, even as global financing for health has increased dramatically. This article discusses globalization and its health challenges from a vantage of political science, emphasizing increased global flows (of pathogens, information, trade, finance, and people) as driving, and driven by, global market integration. This integration requires a

Ronald Labonté; Katia Mohindra; Ted Schrecker

289

Globalization and social determinants of health: Promoting health equity in global governance (part 3 of 3)  

PubMed Central

This article is the third in a three-part review of research on globalization and the social determinants of health (SDH). In the first article of the series, we identified and defended an economically oriented definition of globalization and addressed a number of important conceptual and metholodogical issues. In the second article, we identified and described seven key clusters of pathways relevant to globalization's influence on SDH. This discussion provided the basis for the premise from which we begin this article: interventions to reduce health inequities by way of SDH are inextricably linked with social protection, economic management and development strategy. Reflecting this insight, and against the background of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), we focus on the asymmetrical distribution of gains, losses and power that is characteristic of globalization in its current form and identify a number of areas for innovation on the part of the international community: making more resources available for health systems, as part of the more general task of expanding and improving development assistance; expanding debt relief and taking poverty reduction more seriously; reforming the international trade regime; considering the implications of health as a human right; and protecting the policy space available to national governments to address social determinants of health, notably with respect to the hypermobility of financial capital. We conclude by suggesting that responses to globalization's effects on social determinants of health can be classified with reference to two contrasting visions of the future, reflecting quite distinct values. PMID:17578570

Labonte, Ronald; Schrecker, Ted

2007-01-01

290

Global health: chronic diseases and other emergent issues in global health.  

PubMed

Infectious diseases have had a decisive and rapid impact on shaping and changing health policy. Noncommunicable diseases, while not garnering as much interest or importance over the past 20 years, have been affecting public health around the world in a steady and critical way, becoming the leading cause of death in developed and developing countries. This article discusses emergent issues in global health related to noncommunicable diseases and conditions, with focus on defining the unique epidemiologic features and relevant programmatic, health systems, and policy responses concerning noncommunicable chronic diseases, mental health, accidents and injuries, urbanization, climate change, and disaster preparedness. PMID:21896363

Koehlmoos, Tracey Pérez; Anwar, Shahela; Cravioto, Alejandro

2011-09-01

291

Combating healthcare corruption and fraud with improved global health governance  

PubMed Central

Corruption is a serious threat to global health outcomes, leading to financial waste and adverse health consequences. Yet, forms of corruption impacting global health are endemic worldwide in public and private sectors, and in developed and resource-poor settings alike. Allegations of misuse of funds and fraud in global health initiatives also threaten future investment. Current domestic and sectorial-level responses are fragmented and have been criticized as ineffective. In order to address this issue, we propose a global health governance framework calling for international recognition of “global health corruption” and development of a treaty protocol to combat this crucial issue. PMID:23088820

2012-01-01

292

Combating healthcare corruption and fraud with improved global health governance.  

PubMed

Corruption is a serious threat to global health outcomes, leading to financial waste and adverse health consequences. Yet, forms of corruption impacting global health are endemic worldwide in public and private sectors, and in developed and resource-poor settings alike. Allegations of misuse of funds and fraud in global health initiatives also threaten future investment. Current domestic and sectorial-level responses are fragmented and have been criticized as ineffective. In order to address this issue, we propose a global health governance framework calling for international recognition of "global health corruption" and development of a treaty protocol to combat this crucial issue. PMID:23088820

Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A

2012-01-01

293

Doctoral specialization in nursing informatics.  

PubMed Central

A prototype program of doctoral study has been developed at the University of Maryland School of Nursing to prepare students with nursing expertise in the conceptualization and research of computer based information systems in hospitals, industry and other health care organizations. The graduate will be prepared to design effective nursing information systems; create innovative information technology; conduct research regarding integration of technology with nursing practice, administration, and education; and develop theoretical, practice, and evaluation models for nursing informatics. PMID:1807601

Gassert, C. A.; Mills, M. E.; Heller, B. R.

1991-01-01

294

China engages global health governance: Processes and dilemmas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using HIV\\/AIDS, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), and avian influenza as case studies, this paper discusses the processes and dilemmas of China's participation in health governance, both at the domestic level and the global level. Globalization has eroded the boundary between public and private health and between domestic and global health governance. In addition, the SARS outbreak of 2002–2003 focused

L. H. Chan; P. K. Lee; G. Chan

2009-01-01

295

Science & Engineering for Global Health 2014 CEND Research Fellowship  

E-print Network

Science & Engineering for Global Health 2014 CEND Research Fellowship The "Science & Engineering for Global Health" Fellowship provides $10, 000 for PhD candidates and postdocs interested background, aims, methods, global health significance · Curriculum Vitae (2 pages) · Budget (1 page): include

296

SAVING LIVESUniversities transforming global health Stories by John Donnelly  

E-print Network

SAVING LIVESUniversities transforming global health #12;Stories by John Donnelly Cover photographs for Global Health (CUGH) Email: info@cugh.org Web: www.cugh.org Printed in USA, 2009 Printed on recycled paper. © 2009 Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) All rights reserved. Front cover

Goldberg, Bennett

297

Global Health Services Duke University School of Nursing  

E-print Network

Summer 2006 BIKE RIDE FOR GLOBAL HEALTH ANATOMY RECONFIGURED ALUMNI NEWS AND FEATURES Goldfor Teaching to raise money for and awareness of global health issues. I trust you'll find this a "moving" issue Bike Ride for Global Health 14 NJMS Student Pursues Research at NIH 14 Accolades 15 A Large Step

Zhou, Pei

298

Harvard Medical School AbundanceFound Global Health  

E-print Network

Harvard Medical School AbundanceFound Global Health Loan Forgiveness Program for Graduating who have an intention of pursuing careers in global health delivery. This program is designed and who have demonstrated intention to pursue a career in global health delivery following residency

Lahav, Galit

299

GLOBAL HEALTH FACULTY RESEARCH SEMINAR MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013  

E-print Network

GLOBAL HEALTH FACULTY RESEARCH SEMINAR MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013 4:00-5:00 p.m. Location: Foege D-209 Grace John-Stewart, MD, MPH, PhD Departments of Global Health, Medicine, Epidemiology, and Pediatrics University of Washington Please join us for the monthly Global Health Faculty Research Seminar

Kaminsky, Werner

300

PhotobyStePhanietache Bay Area Global Health Summit  

E-print Network

PhotobyStePhanietache Bay Area Global Health Summit: Innovation and action for the next decade OCTOBER 13, 2010, University of California, San Francisco PhotobyZachiSdahl #12;Bay Area Global Health Summit Program | 3 | Welcome Welcome to the first annual Bay Area Global Health Summit: Innovation

Klein, Ophir

301

Global climate change and children's health.  

PubMed

There is broad scientific consensus that Earth's climate is warming rapidly and at an accelerating rate. Human activities, primarily the burning of fossil fuels, are very likely (>90% probability) to be the main cause of this warming. Climate-sensitive changes in ecosystems are already being observed, and fundamental, potentially irreversible, ecological changes may occur in the coming decades. Conservative environmental estimates of the impact of climate changes that are already in process indicate that they will result in numerous health effects to children. The nature and extent of these changes will be greatly affected by actions taken or not taken now at the global level. Physicians have written on the projected effects of climate change on public health, but little has been written specifically on anticipated effects of climate change on children's health. Children represent a particularly vulnerable group that is likely to suffer disproportionately from both direct and indirect adverse health effects of climate change. Pediatric health care professionals should understand these threats, anticipate their effects on children's health, and participate as children's advocates for strong mitigation and adaptation strategies now. Any solutions that address climate change must be developed within the context of overall sustainability (the use of resources by the current generation to meet current needs while ensuring that future generations will be able to meet their needs). Pediatric health care professionals can be leaders in a move away from a traditional focus on disease prevention to a broad, integrated focus on sustainability as synonymous with health. This policy statement is supported by a technical report that examines in some depth the nature of the problem of climate change, likely effects on children's health as a result of climate change, and the critical importance of responding promptly and aggressively to reduce activities that are contributing to this change. PMID:17967923

Shea, Katherine M

2007-11-01

302

The Global Health Network and globalization of higher education  

PubMed Central

The year 2001 and the next millennium will soon be upon us. The major gains in health in the 20th century were primarily the result of improvements in public health including sanitation and immunization. Global health improvements will occur in the 21st century through improvements in information (in particular health training). We will describe a new paradigm for transnational training, the supercourse. In the next century global lecture-shareware training will take place, with Deming based quality control systems on the Internet. Faculty will thus share their best, most passionate lectures on the internet. During the past 100 years there has been a 25-year increase in life expectancy. It has been estimated that 24 of the 25 years were the result of prevention. Most prevention activity is sharing of information. We are working with leaders from WHO, the World Bank, IBM, NASA, PAHO to create a discipline called telepreventive medicine. This is the application of low band with information systems (the Internet) to large numbers of well people to prevent disease. One of the most important aspect of this work is the establishment globalisation of prevention education; the Supercourse. Question: What is the best way to improve health training/research? Answer: Improve the lectures. Question: How do we improve health training/research lectures: Answer: Have academic faculty worldwide share their lectures: Question: Will faculty share lectures? Answer: Yes, The Supercourse has 1107 faculty from 101 countries who created a Library of Lectures with 110 lectures on the Internet with quality control, and cutting edge cognitive design. This is being shared worldwide. We are developing a "Library of Lectures" with passionate lectures in public health from across the world such as seen here from South Africa. We propose to expand this to all areas of research in health. Our program consists of: Shareware: A Global faculty is developing and sharing their best, most passionate lectures. This benefits all. The experienced faculty member can beef up their lectures that are not cutting edge. New instructors reduce preparation time and improve their lectures, as they can employ state of the art lectures from others. Faculty in developing countries have access to current public health information for the first time. The concept is that of a library of lectures for all to use is in many ways similar to that of "shareware" on the computer. Statistical Quality Assurance: We have established a Deming Model of statistical quality control to monitor lectures over time Supporting the teachers: The Library of Lectures consists of exciting lectures by public health experts in the field. The classroom teacher "takes" them out for free like a library book. There is no direct teaching of students from a distance, rather the concept of the system is to provide cutting edge material for all faculty to present. Hypertext comic book: The lectures are icon driven, and the students can go deep into the Internet for more information through hyperlinks. It is based upon PowerPoint for ease of usage Presentation Speed: We have discovered technologies to speed access to lectures world wide Text books: The British Medical Association has put 2 current text books on line for us Multilingual: For global use, this must be multilingual, the first lecture is in 8 languages Voice-Sound Video: We are using state of the art Internet voice-video systems. We soon will be using "clickable" voice video We have published over 68 papers in leading medical journals including the Lancet, British Medical Journal, Nature Medicine among others. We are working with PAHO to put mirrored servers into every medical school in the Americas this year, with 5 years we should reach globally all medical schools. WHO has developed a Supercourse. Initial pilot studies reveal that 2500 individuals will see each lecture each year, which is 50 times that of our classroom teaching. We have beta tested lectures in 2 centers in Japan and one in South Africa with very positive results. We are now dev

LaPorte, Ron

1999-01-01

303

November 1315 | Montreal, Canada Advancing health equity in the 21st Century2011Global Health Conference  

E-print Network

November 13­15 | Montreal, Canada Advancing health equity in the 21st Century2011Global Health Conference Hosted by the Global Health Education Consortium, the Canadian Society for International Health, and the Consortium of Universities for Global Health Meeting Venue: Hilton Montreal Bonaventure, Montreal Information

Barthelat, Francois

304

CDC Global Health E-Brief Building USG Interagency Collaboration Through Global Health Engagement First Quarter 2008 WELCOME to 2008’s first quarter Global Health  

E-print Network

E-Brief, designed to inform readers about key global health activities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Our first issue of the year focuses on efforts to harmonize national global public health priorities across the U.S. Government and other public-private partnerships through Global Health Engagement—a strategic approach to leverage U.S. public health capabilities in support of equity, security, diplomacy, trade, development and the environment. Co-authored with our interagency partners, this issue highlights Project Horizon, an ongoing interagency strategic planning process bringing greater cohesion to federal agencies with international mandates. This issue also features activities that exemplify Global Health Engagement, and a plan to chart its success.? The Spirit of Engagement Already a recognized global public health leader through its work in smallpox eradication and global malaria and measles control, CDC continues to invest in cross-sector global health strategies and partnerships. Increasingly, CDC is partnering with federal agencies with growing interests, mandates, and unique capabilities in global health. The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), administered through the Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC), set the standard for a USG-wide approach when it formalized the response to the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. The remarkable progress to date would not have been possible without hard won unity between federal

unknown authors

305

Epidemiology and global policy in child health.  

PubMed

Global interest in child health has waxed and waned over the last 30 years. In the 1980s, the United Nations Children's Fund led the child survival revolution, focusing on growth monitoring, oral rehydration, breastfeeding promotion and immunizations. By the 1990s, however, global interest in the health of mothers and children had waned. Key indicators such as immunization rates, which had increased sharply in the 1980s, either stagnated or declined in the 1990s. Attempting to reverse this situation, concerned scientists and policy makers joined forces, building upon the Millennium Development Goals which included a specific target of a reduction in under-five mortality by two-thirds by 2015. Sound epidemiological research laid the foundation for selecting a handful of cost-effective interventions and advocating for their incorporation into national and international policies. Epidemiology then contributed to measuring coverage with these interventions, assessing which population groups are lagging behind, feeding this information back to policy makers on a continuous basis, and evaluating the impact of large-scale programmes. Focusing on childhood pneumonia, this paper shows how child health has improved considerably as a result of this renewed vigor and international collaboration. PMID:22310501

Victora, C G

2012-03-01

306

Making stem cells count for global health.  

PubMed

Developing countries such as China, India and Brazil are making large investments in the stem cell field. Here we argue that hands-on involvement in the field by these countries is essential if the products developed are going to be locally relevant, affordable and appropriate. However, stem cells are a high-risk investment and any global health impacts are still likely to be far off. Even if they are eventually successful, better clinical oversight and measures to ensure access are required for stem cells to have a substantial and equitable impact. PMID:21999282

McMahon, Dominique S; Thorsteinsdóttir, Halla

2011-11-01

307

Office of Global Public Health www.globalhealth.utah.edu  

E-print Network

and Preventive Medicine Division of Public Health, 375 Chipeta Way Classroom 203 #12.m. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine Division of Public Health 375 Chipeta Office of Global Public Health www

308

Office of Global Public Health www.globalhealth.utah.edu  

E-print Network

and Preventive Medicine Division of Public Health, 375 Chipeta Way Classroom 203.m. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine Division of Public Health 375 Chipeta Office of Global Public Health www

309

The Biodiversity Informatics Potential Index  

PubMed Central

Background Biodiversity informatics is a relatively new discipline extending computer science in the context of biodiversity data, and its development to date has not been uniform throughout the world. Digitizing effort and capacity building are costly, and ways should be found to prioritize them rationally. The proposed 'Biodiversity Informatics Potential (BIP) Index' seeks to fulfill such a prioritization role. We propose that the potential for biodiversity informatics be assessed through three concepts: (a) the intrinsic biodiversity potential (the biological richness or ecological diversity) of a country; (b) the capacity of the country to generate biodiversity data records; and (c) the availability of technical infrastructure in a country for managing and publishing such records. Methods Broadly, the techniques used to construct the BIP Index were rank correlation, multiple regression analysis, principal components analysis and optimization by linear programming. We built the BIP Index by finding a parsimonious set of country-level human, economic and environmental variables that best predicted the availability of primary biodiversity data accessible through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) network, and constructing an optimized model with these variables. The model was then applied to all countries for which sufficient data existed, to obtain a score for each country. Countries were ranked according to that score. Results Many of the current GBIF participants ranked highly in the BIP Index, although some of them seemed not to have realized their biodiversity informatics potential. The BIP Index attributed low ranking to most non-participant countries; however, a few of them scored highly, suggesting that these would be high-return new participants if encouraged to contribute towards the GBIF mission of free and open access to biodiversity data. Conclusions The BIP Index could potentially help in (a) identifying countries most likely to contribute to filling gaps in digitized biodiversity data; (b) assisting countries potentially in need (for example mega-diverse) to mobilize resources and collect data that could be used in decision-making; and (c) allowing identification of which biodiversity informatics-resourced countries could afford to assist countries lacking in biodiversity informatics capacity, and which data-rich countries should benefit most from such help. PMID:22373233

2011-01-01

310

Transforming Global Health with Mobile Technologies and Social Enterprises  

PubMed Central

More than 2,000 people convened for the ninth annual Global Health and Innovation Conference at Yale University on April 21-22, 2012. Participants discussed the latest innovations, ideas in development, lessons learned, opportunities and challenges in global health activities. Several themes emerged, including the important role of frontline workers, strengthening health systems, leveraging social media, and sustainable and impact-driven philanthropy. Overall, the major outcome of the conference was the increased awareness of the potential of mobile technologies and social enterprises in transforming global health. Experts warned that donations and technological advances alone will not transform global health unless there are strong functioning health infrastructures and improved workforce. It was noted that there is a critical need for an integrated systems approach to global health problems and a need for scaling up promising pilot projects. Lack of funding, accountability, and sustainability were identified as major challenges in global health. PMID:23012591

Kayingo, Gerald

2012-01-01

311

Evolution of medical informatics in bibliographic databases.  

PubMed

Medical informatics became a medical specialty during the last years and this is evidenced by a great amount of journal articles regarding the subject published worldwide. We compared the presentation of Medical Informatics in two different bibliographic databases: MEDLINE and LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on the Health Sciences). Previous studies described how Medical Informatics was represented in MEDLINE, but we wanted to compare it to a regional database as LILACS. We search both databases completely (MEDLINE 1966 -2002 and LILACS 1982-2002) using the keyword "Medical Informatics" as MeSH term in MEDLINE and as DeCS term in LILACS, and we added "medical informatics" as text word and analyzed the references obtained as results. We found that MEDLINE properly represents the impact of Medical Informatics in non-Latin-American international journals, but lacks of a considerable amount of articles from this region, while LILACS, although in comparison it is smaller in size, has more articles regarding the subject. So we think that LILACS properly represents the specialty in Latin America and the Caribbean Region. PMID:15360823

Otero, Paula; Pedernera, Federico; Montenegro, Sergio; Borbolla, Damian; Garcia Marti, Sebastián; Luna, Daniel; de Quiros, Fernan Gonzalez Bernaldo

2004-01-01

312

Global health: the importance of evidence-based medicine  

PubMed Central

Global health is a varied field that comprises research, evaluation and policy that, by its definition, also occurs in disparate locations across the world. This forum article is introduced by our guest editor of the Medicine for Global Health article collection, Gretchen Birbeck. Here, experts based across different settings describe their personal experiences of global health, discussing how evidence-based medicine in resource-limited settings can be translated into improved health outcomes. PMID:24228722

2013-01-01

313

Addressing cancer health disparities using a global "biopsychosocial" approach Addressing global cancer health disparities  

PubMed Central

The Center for Research on Minority Health (CRMH) has translated the biopsychosocial framework to address global cancer health disparities through the integration of biological (e.g., endogenous steroids, genetic susceptibility and pesticide levels) and behavioral (e.g., dietary interventions) determinants, along with community-based research (e.g., comprehensive involvement of community advisory boards) and educational approaches (e.g., kindergarten through postgraduate training). Evidence of successful implementation of this framework includes: health disparities training for over two thousand individuals ranging from elementary to postgraduate level, and conducting transdisciplinary projects that incorporate traditional and non-traditional health professionals to examine associations between biological and non-biological determinants of health. Examples and recommendations for implementation of the biopsychosocial approach as it applies to cancer health disparities research are described. PMID:19924792

King, Denae; Miranda, Patricia; Gor, Beverly; Fuchs-Young, Robin; Chilton, Janice; Hajek, Richard; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Hernandez-Valero, Maria; Snipes, S. Amy; Jones, Lovell

2013-01-01

314

Foundations for Global Health Practice Population Health Sciences 640, Spring 2012  

E-print Network

and qualitative data, to gain a place-based understanding of the health status and health care system, as well. 4. To consider field experience plans in light of global health policy, the right to healthFoundations for Global Health Practice Population Health Sciences 640, Spring 2012 Wednesdays, 3

Sheridan, Jennifer

315

Synthetic biology, patenting, health and global justice.  

PubMed

The legal and moral issues that synthetic biology (SB) and its medical applications are likely to raise with regard to intellectual property (IP) and patenting are best approached through the lens of a theoretical framework highlighting the "co-construction" or "co-evolution" of patent law and technology. The current situation is characterized by a major contest between the so-called IP frame and the access-to-knowledge frame. In SB this contest is found in the contrasting approaches of Craig Venter's chassis school and the BioBricks school. The stakes in this contest are high as issues of global health and global justice are implied. Patents are not simply to be seen as neutral incentives, but must also be judged on their effects for access to essential medicines, a more balanced pattern of innovation and the widest possible social participation in innovative activity. We need moral imagination to design new institutional systems and new ways of practising SB that meet the new demands of global justice. PMID:24432146

van den Belt, Henk

2013-09-01

316

New Approaches in Teaching Medical Informatics to Medical Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

As technologies of information and communication are integrated incrementally with all facets of everyday life, it is reasonable to expect a penetration into educational procedures as well. This is also true for the case of medical\\/health informatics. In this paper, we describe our approach to facilitate the provision of online medical informatics modules with all those tools (Moodle) and standards

Panagiotis D. Bamidis; Stathis Th. Konstantinidis; Eleni Kaldoudi; Charalampos Bratsas; Maria M. Nikolaidou; Dimitris Koufogiannis; Nicos Maglaveras; Costas Pappas

2008-01-01

317

Combat Medical Informatics: Present and Future Reed W. Hoyt, PhD1,2  

E-print Network

Combat Medical Informatics: Present and Future Reed W. Hoyt, PhD1,2 , Jaques Reifman, PhD1,3 Trinka. INTRODUCTION Historic advances in medicine and dramatic progress in medical informatics over the last decade of automated monitoring and medical informatics tools. The health care of the soldier of the future, however

318

White Paper: Toward a National Framework for the Secondary Use of Health Data: An American Medical Informatics Association White Paper  

Microsoft Academic Search

Secondary use of health data applies personal health information (PHI) for uses outside of direct health care delivery. It includes such activities as analysis, research, quality and safety measurement, public health, payment, provider certification or accreditation, marketing, and other business applications, including strictly commercial activities. Secondary use of health data can enhance health care experiences for individuals, expand knowledge about

Charles Safran; Meryl Bloomrosen; W. Edward Hammond; Steven Labkoff; Suzanne Markel-Fox; Paul C. Tang; Don E. Detmer

2007-01-01

319

Clinical informatics sub-specialty board certification.  

PubMed

Increased funding for health information technology and the advance of electronic health records in hospitals and practices have created the need for a new specialist: the clinical informatician. Clinical informatics was recognized in 2011 as the latest subspecialty in medicine by the American Board of Medical Specialties. This article reviews the need for this new specialty as well as the steps necessary for its creation. The content and training requirements for clinical informatics are discussed as well as eligibility criteria for taking the board examination. Training programs as well as board preparation are addressed along with the expected impact that this new field will have on the practice of medicine. PMID:24187144

Lehmann, Christoph U; Shorte, Vanessa; Gundlapalli, Adi V

2013-11-01

320

Understanding global health governance as a complex adaptive system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The transition from international to global health reflects the rapid growth in the numbers and nature of stakeholders in health, as well as the constant change embodied in the process of globalisation itself. This paper argues that global health governance shares the characteristics of complex adaptive systems, with its multiple and diverse players, and their polyvalent and constantly evolving relationships,

Peter S. Hill

2010-01-01

321

Viewpoint Paper: The Informatics Opportunities at the Intersection of Patient Safety and Clinical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care providers have a basic responsibility to protect patients from accidental harm. At the institutional level, creating safe health care organizations necessitates a systematic approach. Effective use of informatics to enhance safety requires the establishment and use of standards for concept definitions and for data exchange, development of acceptable models for knowledge representation, incentives for adoption of electronic health

Peter M. Kilbridge; David C. Classen

2008-01-01

322

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE GLOBAL HEALTH FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION  

E-print Network

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE GLOBAL HEALTH FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION CLASS of____________ Return completed application to Jill Raufman at global@einstein.yu.edu by April 15th. (Medical Spanish:___________________________________________________ Name/title of mentor at Einstein: _____________________________________________________ Name

Yates, Andrew

323

Informatics changes the world. What's Informatics?  

E-print Network

to each student's motivation, interests, and academic research plan. In addition to the student's main leaders of the informatics domain. Each student is extended personal care and support from top to become one of the dominant areas of academic inquiry in the 21st century. Rising from the traditional

Banbara, Mutsunori

324

The globalization of public health, I: Threats and opportunities.  

PubMed Central

The globalization of public health poses new threats to health but also holds important opportunities in the coming century. This commentary identifies the major threats and opportunities presented by the process of globalization and emphasizes the need for transnational public health approaches to take advantage of the positive aspects of global change and to minimize the negative ones. Transnational public health issues are areas of mutual concern for the foreign policies of all countries. These trends indicate a need for cross-national comparisons (e.g., in the areas of health financing and policy development) and for the development of a transnational research agenda in public health. PMID:9585736

Yach, D; Bettcher, D

1998-01-01

325

In the Name of Global Health: Trends in Academic Institutions  

E-print Network

In the Name of Global Health: Trends in Academic Institutions S A R A H B . M A C F A R L A N E 1 , M A R I A N J A C O B S , 2 a n d E P H ATA E . K A AYA 3 1 Global Health Sciences, University Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Correspondence: Sarah B. Macfarlane, Global Health Sciences, University

Klein, Ophir

326

Education for public health in Europe and its global outreach  

PubMed Central

Introduction At the present time, higher education institutions dealing with education for public health in Europe and beyond are faced with a complex and comprehensive task of responding to global health challenges. Review Literature reviews in public health and global health and exploration of internet presentations of regional and global organisations dealing with education for public health were the main methods employed in the work presented in this paper. Higher academic institutions are searching for appropriate strategies in competences-based education, which will increase the global attractiveness of their academic programmes and courses for continuous professional development. Academic professionals are taking advantage of blended learning and new web technologies. In Europe and beyond they are opening up debates about the scope of public health and global health. Nevertheless, global health is bringing revitalisation of public health education, which is recognised as one of the core components by many other academic institutions involved in global health work. More than ever, higher academic institutions for public health are recognising the importance of institutional partnerships with various organisations and efficient modes of cooperation in regional and global networks. Networking in a global setting is bringing new opportunities, but also opening debates about global harmonisation of competence-based education to achieve functional knowledge, increase mobility of public health professionals, better employability and affordable performance. Conclusions As public health opportunities and threats are increasingly global, higher education institutions in Europe and in other regions have to look beyond national boundaries and participate in networks for education, research and practice. PMID:24560263

Bjegovic-Mikanovic, Vesna; Jovic-Vranes, Aleksandra; Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Otok, Robert

2014-01-01

327

ARCS FOUNDATION GLOBAL IMPACT AWARD Global Health, Public Good and Graduate Education  

E-print Network

ARCS FOUNDATION GLOBAL IMPACT AWARD Global Health, Public Good and Graduate Education Case multiple disciplines that cross the biomedical and social sciences, humanities and public health. Advancing accomplishment in biomedical and public health related research directed towards preventing, treating or curing

Arnold, Jonathan

328

ARCS FOUNDATION GLOBAL IMPACT AWARD Global Health, Public Good and Graduate Education  

E-print Network

1 ARCS FOUNDATION GLOBAL IMPACT AWARD Global Health, Public Good and Graduate Education Case multiple disciplines that cross the biomedical and social sciences, humanities and public health. Advancing accomplishment in biomedical and public health related research directed towards preventing, treating or curing

Arnold, Jonathan

329

Information empowerment: predeparture resource training for students in global health*  

PubMed Central

The Taubman Health Sciences Library (THL) collaborates with health sciences schools to provide information skills instruction for students preparing for international experiences. THL enhances students' global health learning through predeparture instruction for students who are involved in global health research, clinical internships, and international collaborations. This includes teaching international literature searching skills, providing country-specific data sources, building awareness of relevant mobile resources, and encouraging investigation of international news. Information skills empower creation of stronger global partnerships. Use of information resources has enhanced international research and training experiences, built lifelong learning foundations, and contributed to the university's global engagement. THL continues to assess predeparture instruction. PMID:24860266

Rana, Gurpreet K.

2014-01-01

330

Global mental health: perspectives from Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Global mental health (GMH) advocates for access to and the equitable provision of mental health care. Although the treatment gap is a useful construct to measure access and equitability of care, it fails to communicate the real-life consequences of the treatment gap and the urgent need to address care disparities. Objective The aim of this article is to present a perspective on the practical application of the principles of GMH to understand the real-life impact of the treatment gap and the approaches taken to improve treatment coverage in Ethiopia. Design A case study method is used. Results Multiple international collaborations undertaken in Ethiopia and facilitated by GMH to improve care, capacity, and the evidence base for increased treatment coverage are described briefly. A series of steps taken at the local and national levels to address the treatment gap are highlighted. The stories of two patients are also presented to illustrate the real-life consequences of the treatment gap and the potential transformational impact of addressing the treatment gap on patients, families, and communities. Conclusions GMH has a key role to play in addressing the treatment gap, which improves the life of people with mental disorders, their families, and their communities. However, national-level policy support and coordination are essential for any realistic improvement in treatment coverage. The reflections offered through the case examples may have utility in similar low-income settings. PMID:25280740

Fekadu, Abebaw; Thornicroft, Graham

2014-01-01

331

INFORMATICS ISSN 03333590  

E-print Network

REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333­3590 Structure Comparison and Structure Patterns Ingvar Eidhammer Bergen, Norway #12; #12; Structure Comparison and Structure Patterns Ingvar Eidhammer, Inge Jonassen, 1999 Abstract This article investigate different aspects regarding pairwise and multiple structure com

Jonassen, Inge

332

Human Health and Global Security. Relevance to Medical Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Programs in human health and global security should be incorporated into medical school curricula. Information about nuclear arms proliferation and unmet human health needs will help physicians exert a critical leadership role. (SK)

Kornfeld, Howard

1984-01-01

333

Toward a National Framework for the Secondary Use of Health Data: An American Medical Informatics Association White Paper  

PubMed Central

Secondary use of health data applies personal health information (PHI) for uses outside of direct health care delivery. It includes such activities as analysis, research, quality and safety measurement, public health, payment, provider certification or accreditation, marketing, and other business applications, including strictly commercial activities. Secondary use of health data can enhance health care experiences for individuals, expand knowledge about disease and appropriate treatments, strengthen understanding about effectiveness and efficiency of health care systems, support public health and security goals, and aid businesses in meeting customers’ needs. Yet, complex ethical, political, technical, and social issues surround the secondary use of health data. While not new, these issues play increasingly critical and complex roles given current public and private sector activities not only expanding health data volume, but also improving access to data. Lack of coherent policies and standard “good practices” for secondary use of health data impedes efforts to strengthen the U.S. health care system. The nation requires a framework for the secondary use of health data with a robust infrastructure of policies, standards, and best practices. Such a framework can guide and facilitate widespread collection, storage, aggregation, linkage, and transmission of health data. The framework will provide appropriate protections for legitimate secondary use. PMID:17077452

Safran, Charles; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Hammond, W. Edward; Labkoff, Steven; Markel-Fox, Suzanne; Tang, Paul C.; Detmer, Don E.

2007-01-01

334

Global Health Global Health in Medical Education: A Call for More Training and Opportunities  

E-print Network

Worldwide increases in global migration and trade have been making communicable diseases a concern throughout the world and have highlighted the connections in health and medicine among and between continents. Physicians in developed countries are now expected to have a broader knowledge of tropical disease and newly emerging infections, while being culturally sensitive to the increasing number of international travelers and ethnic minority populations. Exposing medical students to these

Pierce Gardner

335

Global and planetary health: teaching as if the future matters.  

PubMed

If nursing, along with other health professions, is to be able to critique national and international health policy and be equipped to address the global and planetary dimensions of health, the conceptual horizons of our educational and research enterprises will need to be expanded. Not only are nursing curricula needed that address such concepts as "health for all" and "environmental sustainability," but new pedagogies are required that engage students deeply and call them to socially and globally responsible ways-of-being. This article describes teaching and learning in a course that situates health in a global and environmental context and calls forth new personal and professional meanings. PMID:16021936

Johnston, Nancy; Rogers, Martha; Cross, Nadine; Sochan, Anne

2005-01-01

336

Meeting global health challenges through operational research and management science  

PubMed Central

Abstract This paper considers how operational research and management science can improve the design of health systems and the delivery of health care, particularly in low-resource settings. It identifies some gaps in the way operational research is typically used in global health and proposes steps to bridge them. It then outlines some analytical tools of operational research and management science and illustrates how their use can inform some typical design and delivery challenges in global health. The paper concludes by considering factors that will increase and improve the contribution of operational research and management science to global health. PMID:21897489

2011-01-01

337

What is biomedical informatics?  

PubMed Central

Biomedical informatics lacks a clear and theoretically grounded definition. Many proposed definitions focus on data, information, and knowledge, but do not provide an adequate definition of these terms. Leveraging insights from the philosophy of information, we define informatics as the science of information, where information is data plus meaning. Biomedical informatics is the science of information as applied to or studied in the context of biomedicine. Defining the object of study of informatics as data plus meaning clearly distinguishes the field from related fields, such as computer science, statistics and biomedicine, which have different objects of study. The emphasis on data plus meaning also suggests that biomedical informatics problems tend to be difficult when they deal with concepts that are hard to capture using formal, computational definitions. In other words, problems where meaning must be considered are more difficult than problems where manipulating data without regard for meaning is sufficient. Furthermore, the definition implies that informatics research, teaching, and service should focus on biomedical information as data plus meaning rather than only computer applications in biomedicine. PMID:19683067

Bernstam, Elmer V.; Smith, Jack W.; Johnson, Todd R.

2009-01-01

338

Medical Informatics and the Science of Cognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in medical informatics research have afforded possibilities for great advances in health care delivery. These exciting opportunities also present formidable challenges to the implementation and integration of technologies in the workplace. As in most domains, there is a gulf between technologic artifacts and end users. Since medical practice is a human endeavor, there is a need for bridging

Vimla L Patel; David R Kaufman

1998-01-01

339

The role of medical informatics in telemedicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of medical informatics in telemedicine is dependent on using the power of the computerized database to not only feed patient specific information to the health care providers, but to use the epidemiological and statistical information in the data base to improve decision making and ultimately care. The computer is also a powerful tool to facilitate standardizing and monitoring

Terry P. Clemmer

1995-01-01

340

Ecosystem Informatics Strategic Initiative Final Report 2009 Julia Jones, Geosciences; Tom Dietterich, Computer Science; Enrique Thomann, Mathematics; Ed  

E-print Network

Ecosystem Informatics Strategic Initiative Final Report 2009 Julia Jones, Geosciences; Tom over the last five years. The Ecosystem Informatics program at Oregon State University has established a presence here at the University and on a global scale. The OSU Ecosystem Informatics IGERT Program (with

Escher, Christine

341

NASA Biomedical Informatics Capabilities and Needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To improve on-orbit clinical capabilities by developing and providing operational support for intelligent, robust, reliable, and secure, enterprise-wide and comprehensive health care and biomedical informatics systems with increasing levels of autonomy, for use on Earth, low Earth orbit & exploration class missions. Biomedical Informatics is an emerging discipline that has been defined as the study, invention, and implementation of structures and algorithms to improve communication, understanding and management of medical information. The end objective of biomedical informatics is the coalescing of data, knowledge, and the tools necessary to apply that data and knowledge in the decision-making process, at the time and place that a decision needs to be made.

Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

2009-01-01

342

Australian Medical Students' Association Global Health Essay Competition - Global climate change, geo-engineering and human health.  

PubMed

Rio+20's proposed Sustainable Development Goals have the potential to redefine the course of international action on climate change. They recognise that environmental health is inextricably linked with human health, and that environmental sustainability is of paramount importance in safeguarding global health. Competition entrants were asked to discuss ways of making global health a central component of international sustainable development initiatives and environmental policy, using one or two concrete examples PMID:24099214

Boyages, Costa S

2013-10-01

343

Globalization and health: a framework for analysis and action.  

PubMed Central

Globalization is a key challenge to public health, especially in developing countries, but the linkages between globalization and health are complex. Although a growing amount of literature has appeared on the subject, it is piecemeal, and suffers from a lack of an agreed framework for assessing the direct and indirect health effects of different aspects of globalization. This paper presents a conceptual framework for the linkages between economic globalization and health, with the intention that it will serve as a basis for synthesizing existing relevant literature, identifying gaps in knowledge, and ultimately developing national and international policies more favourable to health. The framework encompasses both the indirect effects on health, operating through the national economy, household economies and health-related sectors such as water, sanitation and education, as well as more direct effects on population-level and individual risk factors for health and on the health care system. Proposed also is a set of broad objectives for a programme of action to optimize the health effects of economic globalization. The paper concludes by identifying priorities for research corresponding with the five linkages identified as critical to the effects of globalization on health. PMID:11584737

Woodward, D.; Drager, N.; Beaglehole, R.; Lipson, D.

2001-01-01

344

Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health.  

PubMed

Diets link environmental and human health. Rising incomes and urbanization are driving a global dietary transition in which traditional diets are replaced by diets higher in refined sugars, refined fats, oils and meats. By 2050 these dietary trends, if unchecked, would be a major contributor to an estimated 80 per cent increase in global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions from food production and to global land clearing. Moreover, these dietary shifts are greatly increasing the incidence of type II diabetes, coronary heart disease and other chronic non-communicable diseases that lower global life expectancies. Alternative diets that offer substantial health benefits could, if widely adopted, reduce global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, reduce land clearing and resultant species extinctions, and help prevent such diet-related chronic non-communicable diseases. The implementation of dietary solutions to the tightly linked diet-environment-health trilemma is a global challenge, and opportunity, of great environmental and public health importance. PMID:25383533

Tilman, David; Clark, Michael

2014-11-27

345

Globally oriented community and regional health  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the global context of modern medicine, even a paediatrician in a remote area has to practice with a global view. Since I have a little experience in international circumstances, I have been trying to keep abreast of the global update. In Pakistan I was involved in a high-level care centre, especially in NICU. There, however, I learned the tendency

Harumichi Ito

2004-01-01

346

Proceedings of the 5td INFORMS Workshop on Data Mining and Health Informatics (DM-HI 2010)  

E-print Network

of mashing up expert models of real-world systems related to health to create an interoperating complex picture. This paper describes our progress toward designing the Smarter Planet Platform for Analysis-up, modeling, health policy, obesity. Introduction Treatment of chronic diseases presents multi-faceted issues

Tan, Wang-Chiew

347

Creating Global Health Curricula for Canadian Medical Students Report of the AFMC Resource Group on Global Health  

E-print Network

Global Health in Medical Education”, we described a rational and suggested steps for implementing global health curricula in Canadian undergraduate medical education. Given the growing recognition by medical educators, accreditation bodies and others of the importance of global health training and the increasing demand for this training from medical students, we believe that this need will best be met through a coordinated, cooperative national approach rather than piecemeal efforts by individual schools. As documented in our last report, there is wide variation among Canadian medical schools in their offerings and approach to global health training. The Resource Group established as one of its goals for this year the identification of core competency areas in global health that every medical student would benefit from receiving during the course of their medical education. Other organizations including the Global Health Education Consortium (GHEC) have independently undertaken similar efforts, and a recent publication by Houpt and colleagues outlines their recommendations. 1 This year report’s builds on this work and suggests ways in which global health educational opportunities may be implemented. The Resource Group recognizes that individual medical schools will need to develop their own approach and timeline for implementing global health topics in their curricula,

unknown authors

2007-01-01

348

GLOBAL HEALTH CONNECT PROBLEM: Global health data have grown exponentially and, in the next five years, Big Data  

E-print Network

years, Big Data (e.g. genomics, proteomics) is expected to grow by 800%. While data and informationGLOBAL HEALTH CONNECT PROBLEM: Global health data have grown exponentially and, in the next five of consolidation and coordination in sharing information and data. There is no single web-based site where a user

Bezrukov, Sergey M.

349

The Role of Psychosomatic Medicine in Global Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the principles and skills involved with psychosomatic medicine and their potential ability to improve\\u000a global health care. New awareness of the escalating global public health impact of noncommunicable diseases, including chronic\\u000a medical conditions and mental disorders, has stimulated interest in determining how best to organize health services. Home\\u000a to the biopsychosocial model, the field of psychosomatic medicine

Amy M. Bauer; Pedro Bonilla; Matthew W. Grover; Fremonta Meyer; Carleen Riselli; Laura White

2011-01-01

350

Guideposts to the future--an agenda for nursing informatics.  

PubMed

As new directions and priorities emerge in health care, nursing informatics leaders must prepare to guide the profession appropriately. To use an analogy, where a road bends or changes directions, guideposts indicate how drivers can stay on course. The AMIA Nursing Informatics Working Group (NIWG) produced this white paper as the product of a meeting convened: 1) to describe anticipated nationwide changes in demographics, health care quality, and health care informatics; 2) to assess the potential impact of genomic medicine and of new threats to society; 3) to align AMIA NIWG resources with emerging priorities; and 4) to identify guideposts in the form of an agenda to keep the NIWG on course in light of new opportunities. The anticipated societal changes provide opportunities for nursing informatics. Resources described below within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the National Committee for Health and Vital Statistics (NCVHS) can help to align AMIA NIWG with emerging priorities. The guideposts consist of priority areas for action in informatics, nursing education, and research. Nursing informatics professionals will collaborate as full participants in local, national, and international efforts related to the guideposts in order to make significant contributions that empower patients and providers for safer health care. PMID:17068358

McCormick, Kathleen A; Delaney, Connie J; Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Effken, Judith A; Kendrick, Kathie; Murphy, Judy; Skiba, Diane J; Warren, Judith J; Weaver, Charlotte A; Weiner, Betsy; Westra, Bonnie L

2007-01-01

351

A framework convention on global health: health for all, justice for all.  

PubMed

Health inequalities represent perhaps the most consequential global health challenge and yet they persist despite increased funding and innovative programs. The United Nations is revising the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that will shape the world for many years to come. What would a transformative post-MDG framework for global health justice look like? A global coalition of civil society and academics--the Joint Action and Learning Initiative on National and Global Responsibilities for Health (JALI)--has formed an international campaign to advocate for a Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH). Recently endorsed by the UN Secretary-General, the FCGH would reimagine global governance for health, offering a new post-MDG vision. This Special Communication describes the key modalities of an FCGH to illustrate how it would improve health and reduce inequalities. The modalities would include defining national responsibilities for the population's health; defining international responsibilities for reliable, sustainable funding; setting global health priorities; coordinating fragmented activities; reshaping global governance for health; and providing strong global health leadership through the World Health Organization. PMID:22665108

Gostin, Lawrence O

2012-05-16

352

Global health for undergraduates: "we are not alone".  

PubMed

This paper presents a review of an undergraduate global health curriculum implemented at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. It is in concert with the framework and principles of the Association of American Colleges and Universities and their vision of Shared Futures of Global Learning and Social Responsibility. The rationale for a deep and broad undergraduate public health curriculum, which includes a global health component, is clear. Global health is a necessary and timely pathway for undergraduate liberal arts education. The world has dramatically changed in the past 50 years, and undergraduate education must continue to keep pace with these changes. Pathogens will adapt to changing ecologies, demographics, disease burdens, and population distributions. They are able to cross the world in hours or days. No country is invulnerable to disease importation and consequent indigenous transmission. Broad epidemic preparedness is required across all academic disciplines from epidemiology to sociology, from medicine to economics. Global health is anchored in the complementary application of various disciplines effectively joined to address a particular problem and mitigate potential adverse consequences. Our students recognize the reality of this interconnected world and are eager to take their place as global citizens. Knowledge, understanding, technical acumen, and humility represent the foundation of the global citizenry required to address the changing global pattern of disease worldwide. Undergraduate public health, and particularly undergraduate global health, will enable our undergraduates to embark on a myriad of professional trajectories that include public health, medicine, biomedical research, law, policy, environmental studies, anthropology, economics, sociology and other disciplines. The "Y" Generation in the U.S. (individuals born between 1980 and 2000) is poised for action; we must give them the tools to succeed. PMID:18692741

Barbiero, Victor K

2008-09-01

353

Global health disparities: crisis in the diaspora.  

PubMed Central

The United States spends more than the rest of the world on healthcare. In 2000, the U.S. health bill was 1.3 trillion dollars, 14.5% of its gross domestic product. Yet, according to the WHO World Health Report 2000, the United States ranked 37th of 191 member nations in overall health system performance. Racial/ethnic disparities in health outcomes are the most obvious examples of an unbalanced healthcare system. This presentation will examine health disparities in the United States and reveal how health disparities among and within countries affect the health and well-being of the African Diaspora. PMID:15101675

Cox, Raymond L.

2004-01-01

354

Clinical Social Franchising Case Study Series: DKT's Andalan Indonesia 1 The Global Health Group  

E-print Network

Clinical Social Franchising Case Study Series: DKT's Andalan Indonesia 1 The Global Health GroupKt's andalan indonesia #12;Copyright © 2012 The Global Health Group The Global Health Group Global Health Email: ghg@globalhealth.ucsf.edu Website: globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/global-health-group Ordering

Klein, Ophir

355

Commentary: global action on social determinants of health.  

PubMed

This commentary argues that there are three major crises confronting global health: ongoing financial crises; deepening ecological crises; and rapidly escalating income and wealth inequalities within and between nations. Global rhetorical responses to these crises frequently invoke policy sentiments similar to those advised by the 2008 WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH). However, actual policy decisions run counter to the evidence reviewed by the Commission, and its final report recommendations. Failure to re-regulate financial capitalism, introduce regulatory standards for transnational companies, or subordinate trade and investment liberalization treaties to development goals and human rights treaties will exacerbate global health inequities into the future. More positively, there is increasing support for systems of global taxation. The challenge for global health, however, will remain the willingness of states to make domestic and foreign policy choices that strengthen income redistribution, economic regulation, and citizen rights. PMID:22277972

Labonté, Ronald

2012-05-01

356

National Institute of Informatics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Informatics is a field that is gaining importance around the globe, and the National Institute of Informatics (NII) in Japan seeks "to advance integrated research and development activities in information-related fields, including networking, software, and content." First-time visitors should note that most of the materials in the site can be located in sections such as "Research & Project" and "Services". Before delving into these areas, visitors may wish to take a look at the most recent issue of "NII Today" via the homepage. Afterwards, visitors should look over the "Research" area. Here they will find summaries of research projects, working papers, and information about their international partnerships. The "Services" area is well worth a look as it contains links to additional informatics databases that will be of use to scholars and students within the field.

357

The evolution of global health teaching in undergraduate medical curricula  

PubMed Central

Background Since the early 1990s there has been a burgeoning interest in global health teaching in undergraduate medical curricula. In this article we trace the evolution of this teaching and present recommendations for how the discipline might develop in future years. Discussion Undergraduate global health teaching has seen a marked growth over the past ten years, partly as a response to student demand and partly due to increasing globalization, cross-border movement of pathogens and international migration of health care workers. This teaching has many different strands and types in terms of topic focus, disciplinary background, the point in medical studies in which it is taught and whether it is compulsory or optional. We carried out a survey of medical schools across the world in an effort to analyse their teaching of global health. Results indicate that this teaching is rising in prominence, particularly through global health elective/exchange programmes and increasing teaching of subjects such as globalization and health and international comparison of health systems. Our findings indicate that global health teaching is moving away from its previous focus on tropical medicine towards issues of more global relevance. We suggest that there are three types of doctor who may wish to work in global health – the ‘globalised doctor’, ‘humanitarian doctor’ and ‘policy doctor’ – and that each of these three types will require different teaching in order to meet the required competencies. This teaching needs to be inserted into medical curricula in different ways, notably into core curricula, a special overseas doctor track, optional student selected components, elective programmes, optional intercalated degrees and postgraduate study. Summary We argue that teaching of global health in undergraduate medical curricula must respond to changing understandings of the term global health. In particular it must be taught from the perspective of more disciplines than just biomedicine, in order to reflect the social, political and economic causes of ill health. In this way global health can provide valuable training for all doctors, whether they choose to remain in their countries of origin or work abroad. PMID:23148763

2012-01-01

358

Michele Barry, MD, FACP Senior Associate Dean of Global Health  

E-print Network

in Internal Medicine #12;A. Definition ­ What Is It? B.Why Now? C.Why Here at Stanford? D.The Many Faces of Global Health at Stanford #12;"Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most Health Mutuality Combines medicine, social sciences, anthropology, law, engineering, "transdisciplinary

Kay, Mark A.

359

The Indian and Chinese health biotechnology industries: potential champions of global health?  

PubMed

India and China have made major progress toward establishing research- and innovation-based health biotechnology sectors. Local health needs, including diseases that predominantly affect the poor, have driven much of this success. We argue that emerging domestic firms can play an important role as reliable and high-quality suppliers of existing products and as innovators for global health needs. Indeed, these firms' participation may make existing global health approaches more sustainable. However, global health stakeholders, including international donors and the Indian and Chinese governments, will need to fashion incentives for these companies to retain a strategic focus on the global poor. PMID:18607038

Frew, Sarah E; Kettler, Hannah E; Singer, Peter A

2008-01-01

360

The Center for Global Health integrates global health education programming and faculty re-search initiatives within the Feinberg School of Medicine (FSM), and encourages medical stu-  

E-print Network

The Center for Global Health integrates global health education programming and faculty re- search Center residents to engage in global health in a meaningful way via research projects, supervised professionals with global health interests to collaborate on research opportunities and new proposals

Chisholm, Rex L.

361

The Center for Global Health integrates global health education programming and faculty research initiatives within the Feinberg School of Medicine. The Center works closely with Feinberg students and  

E-print Network

The Center for Global Health integrates global health education programming and faculty researchGaw residents and fellows to facilitate meaningful engagement in global health via research projects, supervised clinics, and International Non-Governmental Organizations around the world. The global health programs

Chisholm, Rex L.

362

Understanding change in global health policy: ideas, discourse and networks.  

PubMed

How is radical change in global health policy possible? Material factors such as economics or human resources are important, but ideational factors such as ideas and discourse play an important role as well. In this paper, I apply a theoretical framework to show how discourse made it possible for public and private actors to fundamentally change their way of working together--to shift from international public and private interactions to global health partnerships (GHPs)--and in the process create a new institutional mechanism for governing global health. Drawing on insights from constructivist analysis, I demonstrate how discourse justified, legitimised, communicated and coordinated ideas about the practice of GHPs through a concentrated network of partnership pioneers. As attention from health policy analysts turns increasingly to ideational explanations for answers to global health problems, this paper contributes to the debate by showing how, precisely, discourse makes change possible. PMID:20924870

Harmer, Andrew

2011-01-01

363

Global health diplomacy, 'smart power', and the new world order.  

PubMed

Both the theory and practice of foreign policy and diplomacy, including systems of hard and soft power, are undergoing paradigm shifts, with an increasing number of innovative actors and strategies contributing to international relations outcomes in the 'New World Order'. Concurrently, global health programmes continue to ascend the political spectrum in scale, scope and influence. This concatenation of circumstances has demanded a re-examination of the existing and potential effectiveness of global health programmes in the 'smart power' context, based on adherence to a range of design, implementation and assessment criteria, which may simultaneously optimise their humanitarian, foreign policy and diplomatic effectiveness. A synthesis of contemporary characteristics of 'global health diplomacy' and 'global health as foreign policy', grouped by common themes and generated in the context of related field experiences, are presented in the form of 'Top Ten' criteria lists for optimising both diplomatic and foreign policy effectiveness of global health programmes, and criteria are presented in concert with an examination of implications for programme design and delivery. Key criteria for global health programmes that are sensitised to both diplomatic and foreign policy goals include visibility, sustainability, geostrategic considerations, accountability, effectiveness and alignment with broader policy objectives. Though diplomacy is a component of foreign policy, criteria for 'diplomatically-sensitised' versus 'foreign policy-sensitised' global health programmes were not always consistent, and were occasionally in conflict, with each other. The desirability of making diplomatic and foreign policy criteria explicit, rather than implicit, in the context of global health programme design, delivery and evaluation are reflected in the identified implications for (1) international security, (2) programme evaluation, (3) funding and resource allocation decisions, (4) approval systems and (5) training. On this basis, global health programmes are shown to provide a valuable, yet underutilised, tool for diplomacy and foreign policy purposes, including their role in the pursuit of benign international influence. A corresponding alignment of resources between 'hard' and 'smart' power options is encouraged. PMID:24953683

Kevany, Sebastian

2014-01-01

364

Understanding the development and perception of global health for more effective student education.  

PubMed

The concept of "global health" that led to the establishment of the World Health Organization in the 1940s is still promoting a global health movement 70 years later. Today's global health acts first as a guiding principle for our effort to improve people's health across the globe. Furthermore, global health has become a branch of science, "global health science," supporting institutionalized education. Lastly, as a discipline, global health should focus on medical and health issues that: 1) are determined primarily by factors with a cross-cultural, cross-national, cross-regional, or global scope; 2) are local but have global significance if not appropriately managed; and 3) can only be efficiently managed through international or global efforts. Therefore, effective global health education must train students 1) to understand global health status; 2) to investigate both global and local health issues with a global perspective; and 3) to devise interventions to deal with these issues. PMID:25191139

Chen, Xinguang

2014-09-01

365

Understanding the Development and Perception of Global Health for More Effective Student Education  

PubMed Central

The concept of “global health” that led to the establishment of the World Health Organization in the 1940s is still promoting a global health movement 70 years later. Today’s global health acts first as a guiding principle for our effort to improve people’s health across the globe. Furthermore, global health has become a branch of science, “global health science,” supporting institutionalized education. Lastly, as a discipline, global health should focus on medical and health issues that: 1) are determined primarily by factors with a cross-cultural, cross-national, cross-regional, or global scope; 2) are local but have global significance if not appropriately managed; and 3) can only be efficiently managed through international or global efforts. Therefore, effective global health education must train students 1) to understand global health status; 2) to investigate both global and local health issues with a global perspective; and 3) to devise interventions to deal with these issues.

Chen, Xinguang

2014-01-01

366

A survey of informatics approaches to whole-exome and whole-genome clinical reporting in the electronic health record  

PubMed Central

Purpose Genome-scale clinical sequencing is being adopted more broadly in medical practice. The National Institutes of Health developed the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) program to guide implementation and dissemination of best practices for the integration of sequencing into clinical care. This study describes and compares the state of the art of incorporating whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing results into the electronic health record, including approaches to decision support across the six current CSER sites. Methods The CSER Medical Record Working Group collaboratively developed and completed an in-depth survey to assess the communication of genome-scale data into the electronic health record. We summarized commonalities and divergent approaches. Results Despite common sequencing platform (Illumina) adoptions, there is a great diversity of approaches to annotation tools and workflow, as well as to report generation. At all sites, reports are human-readable structured documents available as passive decision support in the electronic health record. Active decision support is in early implementation at two sites. Conclusion The parallel efforts across CSER sites in the creation of systems for report generation and integration of reports into the electronic health record, as well as the lack of standardized approaches to interfacing with variant databases to create active clinical decision support, create opportunities for cross-site and vendor collaborations. PMID:24071794

Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Amendola, Laura; Aronson, Samuel J.; Garraway, Levi; Gray, Stacy; Grundmeier, Robert W.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Jarvik, Gail; Karavite, Dean; Lebo, Matthew; Plon, Sharon E.; Van Allen, Eliezer; Weck, Karen E.; White, Peter S.; Yang, Yaping

2014-01-01

367

Sponsored by: UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM  

E-print Network

and e-Health Journal William Hersh, MD Professor and Chair Department of Medical Informatics & ClinicalSponsored by: UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM Office of Continuing Medical Education and UC Davis Health Informatics Graduate Program HEALTH INFORMATICS 7TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2013 Educating the Informatics Workforce

California at Davis, University of

368

Sponsored by: UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM  

E-print Network

Hersh, MD Professor and Chair Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology Oregon HealthSponsored by: UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM Office of Continuing Medical Education and UC Davis Health Informatics Graduate Program HEALTH INFORMATICS 7TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2013 Educating the Informatics Workforce

Nguyen, Danh

369

Public health at a crossroads: assessing teaching on economic globalization as a social determinant of health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines how public health faculty prepare students to respond to economic globalization, and more broadly considers the response of public health academics to structural challenges that fall within the realm of global economics, politics, and policy. At this moment, public health is at a crossroads of formalizing its education through graduate competencies and certifications. This research undertook in-depth

Shelley K. White

2012-01-01

370

Evaluation: salvation or nemesis of medical informatics?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The currently prevailing paradigms of evaluation in medical\\/health informatics are reviewed. Some problems with application of the objectivist approach to the evaluation of real—rather than simulated—(health) information systems are identified. The rigorous application of the objectivist approach, which was developed for laboratory experiments, is difficult to adapt to the evaluation of information systems in a practical real-world environment because such

Jochen R. Moehr

2002-01-01

371

Promoting global population health while constraining the environmental footprint.  

PubMed

Populations today face increasing health risks from human-induced regional and global environmental changes and resultant ecological nonsustainability. Localized environmental degradation that has long accompanied population growth, industrialization, and rising consumerism has now acquired a global and often systemic dimension (e.g., climate change, disrupted nitrogen cycling, biodiversity loss). Thus, the economic intensification and technological advances that previously contributed to health gains have now expanded such that humanity's environmental (and ecological) footprint jeopardizes global population health. International data show, in general, a positive correlation of a population's health with level of affluence and size of per-person footprint. Yet, beyond a modest threshold, larger footprints afford negligible health gain and may impair health (e.g., via the rise of obesity). Furthermore, some lower-income countries have attained high levels of health. Many changes now needed to promote ecological (and social) sustainability will benefit local health. Continued improvement of global health could thus coexist with an equitably shared global environmental footprint. PMID:21219161

McMichael, A J; Butler, C D

2011-01-01

372

Global Health in the Social Studies Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It may surprise students to realize that health problems in other countries affect them, too. Where people live and the conditions under which they live directly affect their health. The health of a population can also offer insight into a region's social, political, and economic realities. As a powerful lens into how human societies function,…

Smith, David J.

2005-01-01

373

Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There is a growing body of evidence linking health and well-being to key business issues. Despite this, corporate uptake of workplace health promotion programmes has been slow outside the USA. One possible reason for this is the lack of a generally available health risk measure that is quick and easy to administer and produces data that is rich enough

Peter R Mills

374

GLOBAL PRESCRIPTIONS Gendering Health and Human Rights  

E-print Network

the agendas for women's health in international and national settings. The book reviews a decade of women of profit over people' - Barbara Klugman, Women's Health Project, South Africa Contents Preface and Acknowledgements 1. Transnationalizing Women's Health Movements 2. UN Conferences as Sites of Discursive Struggle

Qiu, Weigang

375

Globalization and Health at the United States-Mexico Border  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We studied the impact of globalization on the making of health policy. Globalization is understood as economic interdependence among nations. The North American Free Trade Agreement is used as a marker to assess the effects of economic interdependence on binational health cooperation along the United States–Mexico border. Methods. We observed participants and conducted in-depth interviews with policymakers, public health specialists, representatives of professional organizations, and unions. Results. Globalization has not promoted binational health policy cooperation. Barriers that keep US and Mexican policymakers apart prevail while health problems that do not recognize international borders go unresolved. Conclusions. If international health problems are to be solved, political, cultural, and social interdependence need to be built with the same impetus by which policymakers promote international trade. PMID:14652325

Homedes, Nuria; Ugalde, Antonio

2003-01-01

376

Gap Analysis of Biomedical Informatics Graduate Education Competencies  

PubMed Central

Graduate training in biomedical informatics (BMI) is evolving rapidly. BMI graduate programs differ in informatics domain, delivery method, degrees granted, as well as breadth and depth of curricular competencies. Using the current American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) definition of BMI core competencies as a framework, we identified and labeled course offerings within graduate programs. From our qualitative analysis, gaps between defined competencies and curricula emerged. Topics missing from existing graduate curricula include community health, translational and clinical research, knowledge representation, data mining, communication and evidence-based practice. PMID:24551403

Ritko, Anna L.; Odlum, Michelle

2013-01-01

377

Global health inequalities: an international comparison  

PubMed Central

Objective To study cross?national inequalities in mortality of adults and of children aged <5?years using a novel approach, with clustering techniques to stratify countries into mortality groups (better?off, worse?off, mid?level) and to examine risk factors associated with inequality. Design, setting and participants Analysis of data from the World Development Indicators 2003 database, compiled by the World Bank. Main outcome measures Adult and child mortality among countries placed into distinct mortality categories by cluster analysis. Results 29 countries had a high adult mortality (mean 584/1000; range 460/1000 to 725/1000) and 23 had a high child mortality (mean 207/1000, range 160/1000 to 316/1000). All these countries were in western and sub?Saharan Africa and Afghanistan. Bivariate analyses showed that relative to countries with low child mortality, those with high child mortality had significantly higher rates of extreme poverty (p<0.001), populations living in rural areas (p<0.001) and female illiteracy (p<0.001), significantly lower per capita expenditure on healthcare (p<0.001), outpatient visits, hospital beds and doctors, and lower rates of access to improved water (p<0.001), sanitation (p<0.001) and immunisations. In multivariate analyses, countries with high adult mortality had a higher prevalence of HIV infection (odds ratio per 1% increase 18.6; 95% CI 0.3 to 1135.5). Between 1960 and 2000, adult male mortality in countries with high mortality increased at >4 times the rate in countries with low mortality. For child mortality, the worse?off group made slower progress in reducing <5 mortality than the better?off group. Conclusions Inequalities in child and adult mortality are large, are growing, and are related to several economic, social and health sector variables. Global efforts to deal with this problem require attention to the worse?off countries, geographic concentrations, and adopt a multidimensional approaches to development. PMID:17053281

Ruger, J P; Kim, H-J

2006-01-01

378

An ethics curriculum for short-term global health trainees  

PubMed Central

Background Interest in short-term global health training and service programs continues to grow, yet they can be associated with a variety of ethical issues for which trainees or others with limited global health experience may not be prepared to address. Therefore, there is a clear need for educational interventions concerning these ethical issues. Methods We developed and evaluated an introductory curriculum, “Ethical Challenges in Short-term Global Health Training.” The curriculum was developed through solicitation of actual ethical issues experienced by trainees and program leaders; content drafting; and external content review. It was then evaluated from November 1, 2011, through July 1, 2012, by analyzing web usage data and by conducting user surveys. The survey included basic demographic data; prior experience in global health and global health ethics; and assessment of cases within the curriculum. Results The ten case curriculum is freely available at http://ethicsandglobalhealth.org. An average of 238 unique visitors accessed the site each month (standard deviation, 19). Of users who had been abroad before for global health training or service, only 31% reported prior ethics training related to short-term work. Most users (62%) reported accessing the site via personal referral or their training program; however, a significant number (28%) reported finding the site via web search, and 8% discovered it via web links. Users represented different fields: medicine (46%), public health (15%), and nursing (11%) were most common. All cases in the curriculum were evaluated favorably. Conclusions The curriculum is meeting a critical need for an introduction to the ethical issues in short-term global health training. Future work will integrate this curriculum within more comprehensive curricula for global health and evaluate specific knowledge and behavioral effects, including at training sites abroad. PMID:23410089

2013-01-01

379

A global travelers' electronic health record template standard for personal health records.  

PubMed

Tourism as well as international business travel creates health risks for individuals and populations both in host societies and home countries. One strategy to reduce health-related risks to travelers is to provide travelers and relevant caregivers timely, ongoing access to their own health information. Many websites offer health advice for travelers. For example, the WHO and US Department of State offer up-to-date health information about countries relevant to travel. However, little has been done to assure travelers that their medical information is available at the right place and time when the need might arise. Applications of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) utilizing mobile phones for health management are promising tools both for the delivery of healthcare services and the promotion of personal health. This paper describes the project developed by international informaticians under the umbrella of the International Medical Informatics Association. A template capable of becoming an international standard is proposed. This application is available free to anyone who is interested. Furthermore, its source code is made open. PMID:21849333

Li, Yu-Chuan; Detmer, Don E; Shabbir, Syed-Abdul; Nguyen, Phung Anh; Jian, Wen-Shan; Mihalas, George I; Shortliffe, Edward H; Tang, Paul; Haux, Reinhold; Kimura, Michio

2012-01-01

380

65THE FOURTH PARADIGM HEALTH AND WELLBEING  

E-print Network

65THE FOURTH PARADIGM HEALTH AND WELLBEING B ringing intelligent healthcare informatics to bear to delivery. Simple, high-impact deliverable interventions such as universal childhood immunization for independent and contestable monitoring of health indicators in an era of global initiatives that are target

Narasayya, Vivek

381

Flat Medicine? Exploring Trends in the Globalization of Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Trailing nearly every other industry, health care is finally globalizing. Highly trained and experienced,expatriate health care professionals are returning to their home,countries from training in the West or are staying home,to work,in newly developed,corporate health care delivery systems that can compete,quite favorably with less-than-perfect providers in Europe and North America. In turn, these health care systems are attracting patients

Robert K. Crone

2008-01-01

382

Global trade and health: key linkages and future challenges.  

PubMed Central

Globalization of trade, marketing and investment has important implications for public health, both negative and positive. This article considers the implications of the single package of World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements for public health research and policy, focusing on three themes: commodities, intellectual property rights, and health services. The main aims of the analysis are as follows: to identify how trade issues are associated with the transnationalization of health risks and possible benefits; to identify key areas of research; and to suggest policy-relevant advice and interventions on trade and health issues. The next wave of international trade law will need to take more account of global public health issues. However, to become more engaged in global trade debates, the public health community must gain an understanding of the health effects of global trade agreements. It must also ensure that its own facts are correct, so that public health is not blindly used for political ends, such as justifying unwarranted economic protectionism. "Healthy trade" policies, based on firm empirical evidence and designed to improve health status, are an important step towards reaching a more sustainable form of trade liberalization. PMID:10885181

Bettcher, D. W.; Yach, D.; Guindon, G. E.

2000-01-01

383

Global Health Observatory (GHO): HIV/AIDS  

MedlinePLUS

... Data repository Reports Country statistics Map gallery Standards HIV/AIDS Global situation and trends : Since the beginning ... image jpg, 292kb fact buffet People living with HIV/AIDS 35.3 million people living with HIV/ ...

384

Global health education in U.S. Medical schools  

PubMed Central

Interest in global health (GH) among medical students worldwide is measurably increasing. There is a concomitant emphasis on emphasizing globally-relevant health professions education. Through a structured literature review, expert consensus recommendations, and contact with relevant professional organizations, we review the existing state of GH education in US medical schools for which data were available. Several recommendations from professional societies have been developed, along with a renewed emphasis on competencies in global health. The implementation of these recommendations was not observed as being uniform across medical schools, with variation noted in the presence of global health curricula. Recommendations for including GH in medical education are suggested, as well as ways to formalize GH curricula, while providing flexibility for innovation and adaptation PMID:23331630

2013-01-01

385

www.sciam.com SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN 49 Entrepreneurial Global Health  

E-print Network

www.sciam.com SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN 49 Entrepreneurial Global Health Green Cars Alzheimer camouflage demonstrates the depth of ingenuity of the 2006 Scientific American 50 awards new devices that might outperform silicon electronics. TRENDS COPYRIGHT 2006 SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, INC

Grizzle, Jessy W.

386

Community Informatics in Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter provides a reflection on Community Informatics (CI) practice as a means of contextualising its role in emerging civil society and its governance at the local or regional level. CI is more than electronically enabled interpersonal communication; it has a pluralistic potential, it is ubiquitous and it comes bundled with paradoxes. It does not sit easily with the existing

Wal Taylor

387

Medical informatics: reasoning methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The progress of medical informatics has been characterized by the development of a wide range of reasoning methods. These reasoning methods are based on organizing principles that make use of the various relations existing in medical domains: associations, probabilities, causality, functional relationships, temporal relations, locality, similarity, and clinical practice. Some, such as those based on associations and probabilities have been

William J. Long

2001-01-01

388

Cancer Imaging Informatics  

Cancer.gov

Informatics Workshop September 25-27, 2002 Ellen Feigal, M.D. Acting Director, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, NCI Imaging is Key to Cancer Research The ability to detect, through imaging, the molecular changes associated with a tumor cell will improve our ability to detect and stage tumors, select appropriate treatments, monitor the effectiveness of a treatment, and determine prognosis.

389

Business, Economics & Informatics  

E-print Network

Master School of Law School of Science School of Business, Economics & Informatics School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy School of Arts Professional Services Department of History of Art and Screen Media Department of Media and Cultural Studies Department of European Cultures and Languages

Cocea, Mihaela

390

Business, Economics & Informatics  

E-print Network

Master School of Law School of Science School of Business, Economics & Informatics School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy School of Arts Professional Services Department of History of Art Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies Department of Cultures and Languages Department of English

Crawford, Ian

391

A Short History of Medical Informatics in Bosnia and Herzegovina  

PubMed Central

The health informatics profession in Bosnia and Herzegovina has relatively long history. Thirty five years from the introduction of the first automatic manipulation of data, thirty years from the establishment of Society for Medical Informatics BiH, twenty years from the establishment of the Scientific journal “Acta Informatica Medica (Acta Inform Med”, indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central Scopus, Embase, etc.), twenty years on from the establishment of the first Cathedra for Medical Informatics on Biomedical Faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina, ten years on from the introduction of the method of “Distance learning” in medical curriculum. The author of this article is eager to mark the importance of the above mentioned Anniversaries in the development of Health informatics in Bosnia and Herzegovina and have attempted, very briefly, to present the most significant events and persons with essential roles throughout this period. PMID:24648621

Masic, Izet

2014-01-01

392

New study program: Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics.  

PubMed

Paper presents an overview of the EU funded Project of Curriculum Development for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics named MEDINFO to be introduced in Croatia. The target group for the program is formed by professionals in any of the areas of medicine, IT professionals working on applications of IT for health and researchers and teachers in medical informatics. In addition to Croatian students, the program will also provide opportunity for enrolling students from a wider region of Southeast Europe. Project partners are two faculties of the University of Zagreb - Faculty of Organization and Informatics from Varaždin and School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health from Zagreb with the Croatian Society for Medical Informatics, Croatian Chamber of Economy, and Ericsson Nikola Tesla Company as associates. PMID:24743088

Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Simi?, Diana; Božikov, Jadranka; Vondra, Petra

2014-01-01

393

Regulatory underpinnings of Global Health security: FDA's roles in preventing, detecting, and responding to global health threats.  

PubMed

In February 2014, health officials from around the world announced the Global Health Security Agenda, a critical effort to strengthen national and global systems to prevent, detect, and respond to infectious disease threats and to foster stronger collaboration across borders. With its increasing global roles and broad range of regulatory responsibilities in ensuring the availability, safety, and security of medical and food products, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is engaged in a range of efforts in support of global health security. This article provides an overview of FDA's global health security roles, focusing on its responsibilities related to the development and use of medical countermeasures (MCMs) for preventing, detecting, and responding to global infectious disease and other public health emergency threats. The article also discusses several areas-antimicrobial resistance, food safety, and supply chain integrity-in which FDA's global health security roles continue to evolve and extend beyond MCMs and, in some cases, beyond traditional infectious disease threats. PMID:25254912

Courtney, Brooke; Bond, Katherine C; Maher, Carmen

2014-01-01

394

HUMAN RIGHTS AND GLOBAL HEALTH: A RESEARCH PROGRAM  

Microsoft Academic Search

One-third of all human lives end in early death from poverty-related causes. Most of these premature deaths are avoidable through global institutional reforms that would eradicate extreme poverty. Many are also avoidable through global health-system reform that would make medical knowledge freely available as a global public good. The rules should be redesigned so that the development of any new

Thomas W. Pogge

2005-01-01

395

Global health and neonatal nursing: a personal journey.  

PubMed

The need for improvement of neonatal nursing care is a global issue. Neonatal nurses have an important role in optimizing these health outcomes for neonates and their families. This article describes the personal journey of one nurse and her mentee. It describes how a passion for neonates led to global policy work. PMID:22895204

Kenner, Carole; Boykova, Marina

2012-09-01

396

Globalization and social determinants of health: The role of the global marketplace (part 2 of 3)  

PubMed Central

Globalization is a key context for the study of social determinants of health (SDH): broadly stated, SDH are the conditions in which people live and work, and that affect their opportunities to lead healthy lives. In the first article in this three part series, we described the origins of the series in work conducted for the Globalization Knowledge Network of the World Health Organization's Commission on Social Determinants of Health and in the Commission's specific concern with health equity. We identified and defended a definition of globalization that gives primacy to the drivers and effects of transnational economic integration, and addressed a number of important conceptual and methodological issues in studying globalization's effects on SDH and their distribution, emphasizing the need for transdisciplinary approaches that reflect the complexity of the topic. In this second article, we identify and describe several, often interacting clusters of pathways leading from globalization to changes in SDH that are relevant to health equity. These involve: trade liberalization; the global reorganization of production and labour markets; debt crises and economic restructuring; financial liberalization; urban settings; influences that operate by way of the physical environment; and health systems changed by the global marketplace. PMID:17578569

Labonte, Ronald; Schrecker, Ted

2007-01-01

397

Climate change. A global threat to cardiopulmonary health.  

PubMed

Recent changes in the global climate system have resulted in excess mortality and morbidity, particularly among susceptible individuals with preexisting cardiopulmonary disease. These weather patterns are projected to continue and intensify as a result of rising CO2 levels, according to the most recent projections by climate scientists. In this Pulmonary Perspective, motivated by the American Thoracic Society Committees on Environmental Health Policy and International Health, we review the global human health consequences of projected changes in climate for which there is a high level of confidence and scientific evidence of health effects, with a focus on cardiopulmonary health. We discuss how many of the climate-related health effects will disproportionally affect people from economically disadvantaged parts of the world, who contribute relatively little to CO2 emissions. Last, we discuss the financial implications of climate change solutions from a public health perspective and argue for a harmonized approach to clean air and climate change policies. PMID:24400619

Rice, Mary B; Thurston, George D; Balmes, John R; Pinkerton, Kent E

2014-03-01

398

Global public goods and health: taking the agenda forward.  

PubMed Central

We examined recent special health initiatives to control HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and make four policy recommendations for improving the sustainability of such initiatives. First, international cooperation on health should be seen as an issue of global public goods that concerns both poor and rich countries. Second, national health and other sector budgets should be tapped to ensure that global health concerns are fully and reliably funded; industrialized countries should lead the way. Third, a global research council should be established to foster more efficient health-related knowledge management. Fourth, managers for specific disease issues should be appointed, to facilitate policy partnerships. Policy changes in these areas have already begun and can provide a basis for further reform. PMID:11584736

Kaul, I.; Faust, M.

2001-01-01

399

Neonatal Informatics: Transforming Neonatal Care Through Translational Bioinformatics  

PubMed Central

The future of neonatal informatics will be driven by the availability of increasingly vast amounts of clinical and genetic data. The field of translational bioinformatics is concerned with linking and learning from these data and applying new findings to clinical care to transform the data into proactive, predictive, preventive, and participatory health. As a result of advances in translational informatics, the care of neonates will become more data driven, evidence based, and personalized. PMID:22924023

Palma, Jonathan P.; Benitz, William E.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Butte, Atul J.; Longhurst, Christopher A.

2012-01-01

400

Is globalization healthy: a statistical indicator analysis of the impacts of globalization on health  

PubMed Central

It is clear that globalization is something more than a purely economic phenomenon manifesting itself on a global scale. Among the visible manifestations of globalization are the greater international movement of goods and services, financial capital, information and people. In addition, there are technological developments, more transboundary cultural exchanges, facilitated by the freer trade of more differentiated products as well as by tourism and immigration, changes in the political landscape and ecological consequences. In this paper, we link the Maastricht Globalization Index with health indicators to analyse if more globalized countries are doing better in terms of infant mortality rate, under-five mortality rate, and adult mortality rate. The results indicate a positive association between a high level of globalization and low mortality rates. In view of the arguments that globalization provides winners and losers, and might be seen as a disequalizing process, we should perhaps be careful in interpreting the observed positive association as simple evidence that globalization is mostly good for our health. It is our hope that a further analysis of health impacts of globalization may help in adjusting and optimising the process of globalization on every level in the direction of a sustainable and healthy development for all. PMID:20849605

2010-01-01

401

Managing Software Development for Global Health  

E-print Network

. · Safer childbirth and healthy children. · Health equity for women, among the world's most vulnerable--and influential--populations. · The basic protection of vaccines for women and children around the world. 3 · Immunization & vaccine technologies · Diagnostic tests for diseases · Reproductive health technologies

Anderson, Richard

402

G7: a framework for international cooperation in medical informatics.  

PubMed Central

The world's major economic powers, the G7, have initiated a collaborative International research and demonstration program to exploit the benefits of information and communications technology for society. The Global Healthcare Applications Project (GHAP) is investigating a variety of informatics applications in disease specific domains, telemedicine, and multilingual textual and image database systems. This paper summarizes the nine GHAP sub-projects undertaken to date, with emphasis on those in which the U.S. is a participant. The growing use of smart card technology, especially in Europe, is adding new impetus for similar medical and health experiments in the U.S. A pilot project now underway in several Western states is described. PMID:9929177

Lindberg, D. A.; Siegel, E. R.

1998-01-01

403

Global health impacts of policies: lessons from the UK  

PubMed Central

Background The UK government committed to undertaking impact assessments of its policies on the health of populations in low and middle-income countries in its cross-government strategy “Health is Global”. To facilitate this process, the Department of Health, in collaboration with the National Heart Forum, initiated a project to pilot the use of a global health impact assessment guidance framework and toolkit for policy-makers. This paper aims to stimulate debate about the desirability and feasibility of global health impact assessments by describing and drawing lessons from the first stage of the project. Discussion Despite the attraction of being able to assess and address potential global health impacts of policies, there is a dearth of existing information and experience. A literature review was followed by discussions with policy-makers and an online survey about potential barriers, preferred support mechanisms and potential policies on which to pilot the toolkit. Although policy-makers were willing to engage in hypothetical discussions about the methodology, difficulties in identifying potential pilots suggest a wider problem in encouraging take up without legislative imperatives. This is reinforced by the findings of the survey that barriers to uptake included lack of time, resources and expertise. We identified three lessons for future efforts to mainstream global health impact assessments: 1) Identify a lead government department and champion – to some extent, this role was fulfilled by the Department of Health, however, it lacked a high-level cross-government mechanism to support implementation. 2) Ensure adequate resources and consider embedding the goals and principles of global health impact assessments into existing processes to maximise those resources. 3) Develop an effective delivery mechanism involving both state actors, and non-state actors who can ensure a “voice” for constituencies who are affected by government policies and also provide the “demand” for the assessments. Summary This paper uses the initial stages of a study on global health impact assessments to pose the wider question of incentives for policy-makers to improve global health. It highlights three lessons for successful development and implementation of global health impact assessments in relation to stewardship, resources, and delivery mechanisms. PMID:24612523

2014-01-01

404

Global mental health and its discontents: An inquiry into the making of global and local scale.  

PubMed

Global Mental Health's (GMH) proposition to "scale up" evidence-based mental health care worldwide has sparked a heated debate among transcultural psychiatrists, anthropologists, and GMH proponents; a debate characterized by the polarization of "global" and "local" approaches to the treatment of mental health problems. This article highlights the institutional infrastructures and underlying conceptual assumptions that are invested in the production of the "global" and the "local" as distinct, and seemingly incommensurable, scales. It traces how the conception of mental health as a "global" problem became possible through the emergence of Global Health, the population health metric DALY, and the rise of evidence-based medicine. GMH also advanced a moral argument to act globally emphasizing the notion of humanity grounded in a shared biology and the universality of human rights. However, despite the frequent criticism of GMH promoting the "bio"-medical model, we argue that novel logics have emerged which may be more important for establishing global applicability than arguments made in the name of "nature": the procedural standardization of evidence and the simplification of psychiatric expertise. Critical scholars, on the other hand, argue against GMH in the name of the "local"; a trope that underlines specificity, alterity, and resistance against global claims. These critics draw on the notions of "culture," "colonialism," the "social," and "community" to argue that mental health knowledge is locally contingent. Yet, paying attention to the divergent ways in which both sides conceptualize the "social" and "community" may point to productive spaces for an analysis of GMH beyond the "global/local" divide. PMID:24981580

Bemme, Doerte; D'souza, Nicole A

2014-12-01

405

University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZCHS) Lauren Maggio, Global Health Librarian  

E-print Network

the MEPI Executive Committee and the National Institute of Health on the need to foster medical education with the health science librarians to discuss future plans for spanning Information Literacy training for studentsUniversity of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZCHS) Lauren Maggio, Global Health Librarian

Sonnenburg, Justin L.

406

Tufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program  

E-print Network

Tufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program Tufts University School of Medicine's Public Health and Professional Degree Programs is now accepting to today's public health challenges. The Tufts DrPH degree offers students a foundation in the public

Dennett, Daniel

407

Tufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program  

E-print Network

Tufts Public HealthWORKING ACROSS DISCIPLINES AND GLOBAL BOUNDARIES Doctor of Public Health Program Tufts University School of Medicine's Public Health and Professional Degree Programs is accepting to today's public health challenges. The Tufts DrPH degree offers students a foundation in the public

Dennett, Daniel

408

Operationalizing the One Health approach: the global governance challenges.  

PubMed

While there has been wide-ranging commitment to the One Health approach, its operationalisation has so far proven challenging. One Health calls upon the human, animal and environmental health sectors to cross professional, disciplinary and institutional boundaries, and to work in a more integrated fashion. At the global level, this paper argues that this vision is hindered by dysfunctions characterising current forms of global health governance (GHG), namely institutional proliferation, fragmentation, competition for scarce resources, lack of an overarching authority, and donor-driven vertical programmes. This has contributed, in part, to shortcomings in how One Health has been articulated to date. An agreed operational definition of One Health among key global institutions, efforts to build One Health institutions from the ground up, comparative case studies of what works or does not work institutionally, and high-level global support for research, training and career opportunities would all help to enable One Health to help remedy, and not be subsumed by, existing dysfunctions in GHG. PMID:23221123

Lee, Kelley; Brumme, Zabrina L

2013-10-01

409

Amit Chandra, MD "Emergency Medicine, Global Health, and Africa  

E-print Network

global health education, HIV emergencies, ICT applications for health, and trauma and road safety is accredited by the American Council for Continuing Medical education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education to physicians The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania designates

Bushman, Frederic

410

Soil health and global sustainability: translating science into practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interest in the quality and health of soil has been stimulated by recent awareness that soil is vital to both production of food and fiber and global ecosystems function. Soil health, or quality, can be broadly defined as the capacity of a living soil to function, within natural or managed ecosystem boundaries, to sustain plant and animal productivity, maintain or

John W. Doran

2002-01-01

411

GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #32: HEALTH SECTOR ASSESSMENT PUBLISHED  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA's Global Change Research Program is pleased to announce the publication of the Health Sector Assessment, conducted as part of the First U.S. National Assessment. The report has been published as a Special Issue of Environmental Health Perspectives. The Special Issue contains ...

412

Beyond trade: taking globalization to the health sector.  

PubMed

The pace of globalization has brought the world to the brink of a new era in international relations. While the world has outgrown traditional mechanisms for addressing global issues, it has not yet developed new forms of effective governance. This temporary void poses threats and enormous opportunities. The public health sector will play a crucial "formal" role--that is, carried out by existing bodies such as WHO and the UN. But WHO does not necessarily represent the full spectrum of views and its members necessarily work, to some degree, for separate national interests. The formal dimension must be supplemented. Globalization is not synonymous with lack of regulation. Many responsible businesses would welcome a transparent and universally applied regulatory regime to prevent a race to the lowest standards. The economic benefits of globalization may hit a glass ceiling if societies outside the global economy become progressively poorer and less healthy. The business community is recognizing that good health is essential for economic growth and social stability. Globalization may cause millions to migrate for economic opportunity. The private sector's forward-thinkers recognize the health threats of migration and are beginning to view global health promotion as a means to ensure optimal market access. PMID:17208720

Daulaire, Nils

2003-01-01

413

Toward a new architecture for global mental health.  

PubMed

Current efforts in global mental health (GMH) aim to address the inequities in mental health between low-income and high-income countries, as well as vulnerable populations within wealthy nations (e.g., indigenous peoples, refugees, urban poor). The main strategies promoted by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other allies have been focused on developing, implementing, and evaluating evidence-based practices that can be scaled up through task-shifting and other methods to improve access to services or interventions and reduce the global treatment gap for mental disorders. Recent debates on global mental health have raised questions about the goals and consequences of current approaches. Some of these critiques emphasize the difficulties and potential dangers of applying Western categories, concepts, and interventions given the ways that culture shapes illness experience. The concern is that in the urgency to address disparities in global health, interventions that are not locally relevant and culturally consonant will be exported with negative effects including inappropriate diagnoses and interventions, increased stigma, and poor health outcomes. More fundamentally, exclusive attention to mental disorders identified by psychiatric nosologies may shift attention from social structural determinants of health that are among the root causes of global health disparities. This paper addresses these critiques and suggests how the GMH movement can respond through appropriate modes of community-based practice and ongoing research, while continuing to work for greater equity and social justice in access to effective, socially relevant, culturally safe and appropriate mental health care on a global scale. PMID:25358524

Kirmayer, Laurence J; Pedersen, Duncan

2014-12-01

414

Immunology and world health: key contributions from the global community.  

PubMed

The contributions of immunology to world health must be seen in the context of the severe disadvantage prevailing in many countries. Low life expectancy, high infant and maternal mortality rates, and continued prevalence of infections as causes of preventable deaths highlight what vaccines can do to improve the situation. This paper will briefly review some major new international health programs, including the GAVI Alliance; the Global Polio Eradication Initiative; the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief; and the Global Malaria Action Plan. It will also outline the state of research progress for vaccines that are not yet licensed but that, in many cases, appear within reach. Of course, vaccines are not the be-all and the end-all of global health, so brief reference will be made to nutrition, vector biology and control, and the emergence of noncommunicable diseases as threats. PMID:23387415

Nossal, G J V

2013-04-01

415

PHS 904 Topics in Epidemiology: Global Health SYLLABUS (11/19/011 VERSION) 1 PHS 904 Topics in Epidemiology: Global Health, Syllabus 11/19/2011  

E-print Network

PHS 904 Topics in Epidemiology: Global Health SYLLABUS (11/19/011 VERSION) 1 PHS 904 Topics in Epidemiology: Global Health, Syllabus ­ 11/19/2011 FALL SEMESTER, Module 2, Nov 2-Dec 14, 2011 Wed, 4 of epidemiology in evaluating population health, and developing interventions to improve global health and reduce

Sheridan, Jennifer

416

Creating a global observatory for health R&D.  

PubMed

A global map of health R&D activity would improve the coordination of research and help to match limited resources with public health priorities, such as combating antimicrobial resistance. The challenges of R&D mapping are large because there are few standards for research classification and governance and limited capacity to report on R&D data, especially in low-income countries. Nevertheless, based on developments in semantic classification, and with better reporting of funded research though the Internet, it is now becoming feasible to create a global observatory for health R&D. PMID:25214621

Terry, Robert F; Salm, José F; Nannei, Claudia; Dye, Christopher

2014-09-12

417

[The impact of globalization on mental health].  

PubMed

Psychosis, dementias, anxiety, depression, suicide and suicide attempts, as well as psychiatric disorders associated to violence and poverty have increased the global burden of disease. Other related problems associated to special diets, body image, compulsive use of computers and mobile phones, and those frequently observed in migrants subjected to intense distress are reviewed as well. Information and communication technologies may have undesirable side effects affecting some individuals in their conduct and social interactions. PMID:23254719

de la Fuente, Juan Ramón

2012-01-01

418

Global health educational engagement - a tale of two models.  

PubMed

Global health learning experiences for medical students sit at the intersection of capacity building, ethics, and education. As interest in global health programs during medical school continues to rise, Northwestern University Alliance for International Development, a student-led and -run organization at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, has provided students with the opportunity to engage in two contrasting models of global health educational engagement.Eleven students, accompanied by two Northwestern physicians, participated in a one-week trip to Matagalpa, Nicaragua, in December 2010. This model allowed learning within a familiar Western framework, facilitated high-volume care, and focused on hands-on experiences. This approach aimed to provide basic medical services to the local population.In July 2011, 10 other Feinberg students participated in a four-week program in Puerto Escondido, Mexico, which was coordinated by Child Family Health International, a nonprofit organization that partners with native health care providers. A longer duration, homestays, and daily language classes hallmarked this experience. An intermediary, third-party organization served to bridge the cultural and ethical gap between visiting medical students and the local population. This program focused on providing a holistic cultural experience for rotating students.Establishing comprehensive global health curricula requires finding a balance between providing medical students with a fulfilling educational experience and honoring the integrity of populations that are medically underserved. This article provides a rich comparison between two global health educational models and aims to inform future efforts to standardize global health education curricula. PMID:24072106

Rassiwala, Jasmine; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Kupershtok, Mania; Castillo, Frank M; Evert, Jessica

2013-11-01

419

An international course on strategic information management for medical informatics students: aim, content, structure, and experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on a course for medical informatics students on hospital information systems, especially on its strategic information management. Starting as course at the Medical Informatics Program of the University of Heidelberg\\/University of Applied Sciences Heilbronn, it is now organized as international course in the framework of the International Partnership for Health Informatics Education (http:\\/\\/www.iphie.org) jointly for medical information science

Reinhold Haux; Elske Ammenwerth; W. J. Ter Burg; J. Pilz; Monique W. M. Jaspers

2004-01-01

420

Globalization and the challenges to health systems.  

PubMed

The shift of human affairs from the nation-state to the vast theater of planet Earth is changing the nature of health challenges. In addition to their own domestic problems, all countries must now deal with the international transfer of risks. These new challenges are demanding novel forms of international cooperation, which, if developed, may also help to reconcile general national self-interest with international mutual interest. This paper discusses the possibility of using health as an instrument of foreign policy and of developing new forms of cooperation around three key elements: exchange of experiences around common problems, evidence on alternatives, and empathy. PMID:12025979

Frenk, Julio; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio

2002-01-01

421

A global health perspective on the future of tobacco control.  

PubMed

In this age of globalization, the outcome of tobacco control in one country is connected to events on the global stage. Tobacco control has become an increasingly consolidated global movement, catalyzed by the global tobacco control treaty, the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) as well as the Bloomberg Initiative. This global collective effort is necessary in the face of an increasingly aggressive tobacco industry that has consolidated into a small number of very large multinational corporations, operating globally to expand their markets. Looming issues for tobacco control include the success with which the FCTC is implemented within individual nations, finding the proper role of harm reduction approaches, and using "lessons learned" from experience in the United States with tobacco product regulation. PMID:22689164

Samet, Jonathan M

2012-06-01

422

Antecedents of the People and Organizational Aspects of Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Abstract People and organizational issues are critical in both implementing medical informatics systems and in dealing with the altered organizations that new systems often create. The people and organizational issues area—like medical informatics itself—is a blend of many disciplines. The academic disciplines of psychology, sociology, social psychology, social anthropology, organizational behavior and organizational development, management, and cognitive sciences are rich with research with significant potential to ease the introduction and on-going use of information technology in today's complex health systems. These academic areas contribute research data and core information for better understanding of such issues as the importance of and processes for creating future direction; managing a complex change process; effective strategies for involving individuals and groups in the informatics effort; and effectively managing the altered organization. This article reviews the behavioral and business referent disciplines that can potentially contribute to improved implementations and on-going management of change in the medical informatics arena. PMID:9067874

Lorenzi, Nancy M.; Riley, Robert T.; Blyth, Andrew J. C.; Southon, Gray; Dixon, Bradley J.

1997-01-01

423

Meeting Highlights: Genome Informatics  

PubMed Central

We bring you the highlights of the second Joint Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Wellcome Trust ‘Genome Informatics’ Conference, organized by Ewan Birney, Suzanna Lewis and Lincoln Stein. There were sessions on in silico data discovery, comparative genomics, annotation pipelines, functional genomics and integrative biology. The conference included a keynote address by Sydney Brenner, who was awarded the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (jointly with John Sulston and H. Robert Horvitz) a month later. PMID:18629014

Ashurst, Jennifer

2003-01-01

424

Managing Software Development for Global Health  

E-print Network

-resource settings, by the people who will use them. · Safer childbirth and healthy children. · Health equity of vaccines for women and children around the world. 3/10/2010 6CSESoftware EngineeringResearchGroup #12;3/12/2010 2 Technology Solutions Primary areas of focus · Immunization & vaccine technologies · Diagnostic

Anderson, Richard

425

Global Water Pollution and Human Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water quality issues are a major challenge that humanity is facing in the twenty-first century. Here, we review the main groups of aquatic contaminants, their effects on human health, and approaches to mitigate pollution of freshwater resources. Emphasis is placed on chemical pollution, particularly on inorganic and organic micropollutants including toxic metals and metalloids as well as a large variety

René P. Schwarzenbach; Thomas Egli; Thomas B. Hofstetter; Urs von Gunten; Bernhard Wehrli

426

Global Water Pollution and Human Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Water quality issues are a major challenge that humanity is facing in the twenty-first century. Here, we review the main groups of aquatic contaminants, their effects on human health, and approaches to mitigate pollution of freshwater resources. Emphasis is placed on chemical pollution, particularly on inorganic and organic micropollutants including toxic metals and metalloids as well as a large variety

René P. Schwarzenbach; Thomas Egli; Thomas B. Hofstetter; Urs von Gunten; Bernhard Wehrli

2010-01-01

427

Global infectious disease surveillance and health intelligence.  

PubMed

Current concerns about the spread of infectious diseases, especially unexpected ("emerging") infections such as pandemic influenza or severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), have renewed focus on the critical importance of global early warning and rapid response. Although considerable progress has been made, many gaps remain. A number of the gaps can be addressed through increased political will, resources for reporting, improved coordination and sharing of information, raising clinicians' awareness, and additional research to develop more rigorous triggers for action. The increasing availability of communications and information technologies worldwide offers new opportunities for reporting even in low-capacity settings. PMID:17630449

Morse, Stephen S

2007-01-01

428

Why Global Health Matters The world is economically, politically, culturally, and  

E-print Network

Why Global Health Matters The world is economically, politically, culturally, and technologically, language, and measurement tools used in global health � ethics and global health � the global cultural and approaches must also take a global approach, and individuals with these perspectives will be in high demand

Saldin, Dilano

429

US medical specialty global health training and the global burden of disease  

PubMed Central

Background Rapid growth in global health activity among US medical specialty education programs has lead to heterogeneity in types of activities and global health training models. The breadth and scope of this activity is not well chronicled. Methods Using a standardized search protocol, we examined the characteristics of US medical residency global health programs by number of programs, clinical specialty, nature of activity (elective, research, extended curriculum based field training), and geographic location across seven different clinical medical residency education specialties. We tabulated programmatic activity by clinical discipline, region and country. We calculated the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient to estimate the association between programmatic activity and country–level disease burden. Results Of the 1856 programs assessed between January and June 2011, there were 380 global health residency training programs (20%) working in 141 countries. 529 individual programmatic activities (elective–based rotations, research programs, extended curriculum–based field training, or other) occurred at 1337 specific sites. The majority of the activities consisted of elective–based rotations. At the country level, disease burden had a statistically significant association with programmatic activity (Spearman's ??=?0.17) but only explained 3% of the total variation between countries. Conclusions There were a substantial number of US medical specialty global health programs, but a relative paucity of surgical and mental health programs. Elective–based programs were more common than programs that offer longitudinal experiences. Despite heterogeneity, there was a small but statistically significant association between program location and the global burden of disease. Areas for further study include the degree to which US–based programs develop partnerships with their program sites, the significance of this activity for training, and number and breadth of programs in medical specialty global health education in other countries around the world. PMID:24363924

Kerry, Vanessa B.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Tsai, Alexander C.; Bergmark, Regan W.; Bergmark, Brian A.; Rouse, Chaturia; Bangsberg, David R.

2013-01-01

430

N456 Community Health Nursing Global Health Opportunity What is N456: Community Health Nursing is a required 8-credit course, consisting of 2 credits of  

E-print Network

N456 Community Health Nursing ­ Global Health Opportunity What is N456: Community Health Nursing is the term prior to starting your senior year. You can also earn credit for a global health field experience 2013 N456 Community Health Nursing Global Health experience in Quito, go to http

Eustice, Ryan

431

globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu UCSF Global HealtH SCienCeS  

E-print Network

globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu UCSF Global HealtH SCienCeS 2010 AnnuAl RepoRt #12;UCSF Global HealtH........................................................................................10 education andtraining 10 leadership and Strategic initiatives 12 Global Health Group (GHG) 14.......................................................................................................22 GHS advisory Council 23 Graduate Group in Global Health Sciences (GGGHS) 24 GHS leadership Group

Klein, Ophir

432

PHS 644(010) Global Health and Disease in Latin America (*Regional Sections are shaded)  

E-print Network

PHS 644(010) Global Health and Disease in Latin America (*Regional Sections are shaded) Field income countries Cynthia Haq 6:30-7:30pm Global Health Careers Panel Section Leaders February 1st 5:30-6:15pm Historical Perspectives on Global health Richard Keller 6:30-7:30pm UW Madison Global Health Field

Sheridan, Jennifer

433

Three Decades of Research on Computer Applications in Health Care : Medical Informatics Support at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and its predecessor organizations—collectively referred to here as AHRQ—have a productive history of funding research and development in the field of medical informatics, with grant investments since 1968 totaling $107 million. Many computerized interventions that are commonplace today, such as drug interaction alerts, had their genesis in early AHRQ initiatives.This review provides a

J Michael Fitzmaurice; Karen Adams; John M Eisenberg

2002-01-01

434

Childhood Obesity: A Global Public Health Crisis  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Childhood obesity is a major public health crisis nationally and internationally. The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased over few years. It is caused by imbalance between calorie intake and calories utilized. One or more factors (genetic, behavioral, and environmental) cause obesity in children. Physical, psychological, and social health problems are caused due to childhood obesity. Hence, effective intervention strategies are being used to prevent and control obesity in children. The purpose of this manuscript is to address various factors influencing childhood obesity, a variety of interventions and governmental actions addressing obesity and the challenges ahead for managing this epidemic. Methods: In order to collect materials for this review a detailed search of CINAHL, MEDLINE, ERIC, Academic Search Premier databases was carried out for the time period 1999-2011. Results: Some of the interventions used were family based, school based, community based, play based, and hospital based. The effective school-based interventions were seen targeting physical activity along with healthy diet education. The major challenges faced by these intervention programs are financial, along with stigmatization of obese children. Governments along with other health care organizations are taking effective actions like policy changing and environmentally safe interventions for children to improve physical activity. Conclusions: In conclusion, childhood obesity can be tackled at the population level by education, prevention and sustainable interventions related to healthy nutrition practices and physical activity promotion. PMID:22506094

Karnik, Sameera; Kanekar, Amar

2012-01-01

435

Global development challenges and health care reform.  

PubMed

Changes in the role of the state and private sector are seen as central to success of many health care reforms. The article argues for a more focused "stewardship" function of governments in securing equity, efficiency, and quality objectives through more effective policy making (steering), regulating, contracting, and ensuring that adequate financing arrangements are available for the whole population. At the same time, the author argues a strong case for greater private participation in providing health services (rowing). The article reviews related reform trends in health care financing, generation of inputs and service providers. It concludes that reforms often fail, not because of a flawed technical design, but because of other factors. These include a lack of political commitment to change, resistance from vested stakeholders who fear loosing some of their existing benefits, and a failure by policymakers to translate successful aspects of the reforms into something visible that ordinary people and the public can see with their own eyes when next they use the reformed services. PMID:11858008

Preker, A S

2001-01-01

436

Global public goods and the global health agenda: problems, priorities and potential.  

PubMed

The 'global public good' (GPG) concept has gained increasing attention, in health as well as development circles. However, it has suffered in finding currency as a general tool for global resource mobilisation, and is at risk of being attached to almost anything promoting development. This overstretches and devalues the validity and usefulness of the concept. This paper first defines GPGs and describes the policy challenge that they pose. Second, it identifies two key areas, health R&D and communicable disease control, in which the GPG concept is clearly relevant and considers the extent to which it has been applied. We point out that that, while there have been many new initiatives, it is not clear that additional resources from non-traditional sources have been forthcoming. Yet achieving this is, in effect, the entire purpose of applying the GPG concept in global health. Moreover, the proliferation of disease-specific programs associated with GPG reasoning has tended to promote vertical interventions at the expense of more general health sector strengthening. Third, we examine two major global health policy initiatives, the Global Fund against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) and the bundling of long-standing international health goals in the form of Millennium Development Goals (MDG), asking how the GPG perspective has contributed to defining objectives and strategies. We conclude that both initiatives are best interpreted in the context of traditional development assistance and, one-world rhetoric aside, have little to do with the challenge posed by GPGs for health. The paper concludes by considering how the GPG concept can be more effectively used to promote global health. PMID:17888173

Smith, Richard D; MacKellar, Landis

2007-01-01

437

Ethical and legal challenges for health telematics in a global world: telehealth and the technological imperative.  

PubMed

Telehealth is one of the more recent applications of ICT to health care. It promises to be both cost-effective and efficient. However, there lies a danger that focusing mainly on pragmatic considerations will ignore fundamental ethical issues with legal implications that could undermine its success. Implicated here are, among others, changes in the nature of the health care professional patient relationship and informed consent, etc. The position of health informatics professionals as well as hard- and software providers is also affected. A further complicating factor is outsourcing. This paper identifies relevant issues and outlines some of their implications. PMID:21067967

Kluge, Eike-Henner W

2011-02-01

438

Burn injury and the impact on global health  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundBurn injury is a serious and under-recognized global public health problem. Citizens of low and middle income countries (LMIC) bear the largest burden, accounting for 95% of fatal fire-related burns. Measuring the impact of burn injury may facilitate a rational approach to prevention and treatment.ObjectiveReview and summarise global literature on fatal and disabling burn injury in LMIC.MethodsWe conducted a literature

B E Ebel; T Nelp; M B Klein; N Gibran; F P Rivara

2010-01-01

439

Feminization of Migration: A Global Health Challenge  

PubMed Central

Demographers are slowly bringing the migration of women to the forefront as women become the majority of migrants worldwide. Migration can provide new opportunities for women on their own or jointly with their spouses to improve their lives, escape oppressive social relations, and support children and other family members who are left behind. It also can expose women to new vulnerabilities resulting from their precarious legal status, abusive working conditions, and health risks.1 Migrant women are triply disadvantaged by race/ethnicity, their status as nonnationals, and gender inequalities.2 PMID:24416688

2013-01-01

440

Democracy - the real 'ghost' in the machine of global health policy: Comment on "A ghost in the machine? politics in global health policy".  

PubMed

Politics is not the ghost in the machine of global health policy. Conceptually, it makes little sense to argue otherwise, while history is replete with examples of individuals and movements engaging politically in global health policy. Were one looking for ghosts, a more likely candidate would be democracy, which is currently under attack by a new global health technocracy. Civil society movements offer an opportunity to breathe life into a vital, but dying, political component of global health policy. PMID:25197680

Harmer, Andrew

2014-08-01

441

Worldly approaches to global health: 1851 to the present.  

PubMed

The tension between managing episodic, acute, and deadly pandemics and the arduous path to ameliorating the chronic maladies and social conditions that kill many more people, but in far less dramatic ways, has always shaped the agenda and work of the World Health Organization. Yet the historical record amply demonstrates how international efforts to control infectious disease, beginning in the mid-nineteenth century and extending to the present, have dominated global health policies, regulations, agendas and budgets: often at the expense of addressing more chronic health and environmental concerns. How these challenges have affected present circumstances and created demands for an entirely new conception and execution of 21st century global health efforts is the focus of this paper. PMID:24412079

Markel, H

2014-02-01

442

Capacity Building in Global Mental Health: Professional Training  

PubMed Central

We suggest that the optimal approach to building capacity in global mental health care will require partnerships between professional resources in high-income countries and promising health-related institutions in low- and middle-income countries. The result of these partnerships will be sustainable academic relationships that can educate a new generation of in-country primary care physicians and, eventually, specialized health professionals. Research capabilities will be an essential educational component to inform policy and practice, and to ensure careful outcome measurements of training and of intervention, prevention, and promotion strategies. The goal of these academic centers of excellence will be to develop quality, in-country clinical and research professionals, and to build a productive environment for these professionals to advance their careers locally. In sum, this article discusses human capacity building in global mental health, provides recommendations for training, and offers examples of recent initiatives. (Harv Rev Psychiatry 2012;20:47–57.) PMID:22335182

Fricchione, Gregory L; Borba, Christina P C; Alem, Atalay; Shibre, Teshome; Carney, Julia R; Henderson, David C

2012-01-01

443

Protecting Pakistan's health during the global economic crisis.  

PubMed

The world is facing an unprecedented global economic crisis, with many countries needing to reconsider their level of health care spending. This paper explores the many consequences of the global economic turndown on Pakistan's health, including reduced government and donor spending and increased poverty with the consequent diversion of funds away from health. Nevertheless, these challenges may provide opportunities not only to mitigate the adverse effects of the economic crisis but also to institute some much-needed reforms that may not receive political support during more affluent times. Our suggestions focus on setting priorities based on the national disease burden, prioritizing prevention interventions, demanding results, curbing corruption, experimenting with innovative funding mechanisms, advocating for increased funding by presenting health spending as an investment rather than an expense and by selected recourse to civil society interventions and philanthropy to bridge the gap between available and needed resources. PMID:22574485

Jooma, R; Khan, A; Khan, A A

2012-03-01

444

The unknown role of mental health in global development.  

PubMed

In this paper, the author contrasts the substantial impact of mental health problems on global disability with the limited attention and resources these problems receive. The author discusses possible reasons for the disparity: Compared to physical disorders, mental health problems are considered less important, perhaps due to lower priority of disorders that primarily cause dysfunction rather than mortality, and skepticism that mental disorders are treatable in low-resource countries. He argues that achieving improved global health and development requires addressing problems causing disability, particularly mental health problems among populations in which the common mental disorders are frequent due to deprivation, war, and disasters. The author contends that services addressing the common mental disorders could be made widely and relatively cheaply accessible if provided by non-professional workers at the community level. PMID:25191140

Bolton, Paul A

2014-09-01

445

Vaccines and future global health needs  

PubMed Central

Increased international support for both research into new vaccines and their deployment in developing countries has been evident over the past decade. In particular, the GAVI Alliance has had a major impact in increasing uptake of the six common infant vaccines as well as those against hepatitis B and yellow fever. It further aims to introduce pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines in the near future and several others, including those against human papillomavirus, meningococcal disease, rubella and typhoid not long after that. In addition, there is advanced research into vaccines against malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis. By 2030, we may have about 20 vaccines that need to be used in the developing world. Finding the requisite funds to achieve this will pose a major problem. A second and urgent question is how to complete the job of global polio eradication. The new strategic plan calls for completion by 2013, but both pre-eradication and post-eradication challenges remain. Vaccines will eventually become available beyond the field of infectious diseases. Much interesting work is being done in both autoimmunity and cancer. Cutting across disease groupings, there are issues in methods of delivery and new adjuvant formulations. PMID:21893548

Nossal, G. J. V.

2011-01-01

446

Training Residents in Medical Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an eight-step process for developing or refining a family-medicine informatics curriculum: needs assessment, review of expert recommendations, enlisting faculty and local institutional support, espousal of a human-centered approach, integrating informatics into the larger curriculum, easy access to computers, practical training, and…

Jerant, Anthony F.

1999-01-01

447

Latvian Education Informatization System LIIS  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Latvian Education Informatization System LIIS project covers the whole information grid: education content, management, information services, infrastructure and user training at several levels--schools, school boards and Ministry of Education and Science. Informatization is the maintained process of creating the technical, economical and…

Bicevskis, Janis; Andzans, Agnis; Ikaunieks, Evalds; Medvedis, Inga; Straujums, Uldis; Vezis, Viesturs

2004-01-01

448

The 2005 Australian Informatics Competition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the Australian Informatics Competition (AIC), a non-programming competition aimed at identifying students with potential in programming and algorithmic design. It is the first step in identifying students to represent Australia at the International Olympiad in Informatics. The main aim of the AIC is to increase awareness of…

Clark, David

2006-01-01

449

School of Informatics Course Questionnaire  

E-print Network

School of Informatics Course Questionnaire The School of Informatics welcomes constructive comments Organisation office on Appleton Tower level 4. If you prefer, you can also complete this questionnaire online: http://www.inf.ed.ac.uk/admin/ITO/questionnaires You can also provide feedback directly to your

Koehn, Philipp

450

XML Databases and Biomedical Informatics  

E-print Network

XML Databases and Biomedical Informatics A report by James Lindsay for UCONN CSE 300, Spring 2008 Web Consortium, as a free and open standard [13-16]. In the field of biomedical informatics one of the long standing open problems is finding a way to share medical data across a variety of mediums. XML has

Demurjian, Steven A.

451

Page 1 of 10 Informatics  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 10 Informatics University of Edinburgh, Nov 26, 2008 Steve McLaughlin Signals & Spectrum and Relay Communications Steve McLaughlin IDCOM, School of Engineering & Electronics #12;Page 2 of 10 Informatics University of Edinburgh, Nov 26, 2008 Steve McLaughlin Steve McLaughlin · Signals and Spectrum

Edinburgh, University of

452

Preparing for Global Women’s Health Work  

PubMed Central

Interest in global maternal health has steadily increased over the past decade. Medical schools are offering courses on this subject, residencies are incorporating international elective rotations into their practices, and retiring practitioners are opting to spend a year or two in low-resource settings. Although interest is growing, sometimes wellmeaning health practitioners are not entirely prepared for their new experience. Prior to departure, a multistep process is necessary to prepare physicians for living and practicing overseas. PMID:24358408

Nour, Nawal M

2013-01-01

453

Global health education in U.S. Medical schools  

E-print Network

of lessons learned, and collaborations, in medical school and residency [28-32]. However, this consensus stops short of a standardized, testable GH curriculum for all medical schools, although some experts have issued a call for standardization... : international collaboration at ICDDR, B. J Health Pop Nutr 2010, 28(6):533–536. 40. Khan OA, Marmot M, Nathanson N, Plotkin S, Seffrin J, Chowdhury M, Castillo C, et al: Assoc Ed. Readings in global health. Washington DC: APHA Press; 2008. 41. Skolnik R...

Khan, Omar A; Guerrant, Richard; Sanders, James; Carpenter, Charles; Spottswood, Margaret; Jones, David S; O’Callahan, Cliff; Brewer, Timothy F; Markuns, Jeffrey F; Gillam, Stephen; O’Neill, Joseph; Nathanson, Neal; Wright, Stephen

2013-01-18

454

The United States and global health: inseparable and synergistic? The Institute of Medicine's report on global health  

PubMed Central

In the wake of dynamic economic and political transitions worldwide, the Institute of Medicine recently released its report advocating investments in global health from the United States (US). The expert panel reinforces the ‘transnational and interdisciplinary’ nature of global health research and practice as an endeavor ‘to improve health and achieve greater equity for all people worldwide.’ This report was judiciously timed given the growing recognition of global health, and is also acknowledged for incorporating themes that are particularly pertinent to the twenty-first century. New paradigms are introduced, denouncing the dichotomous distinction between rich and poor countries with the rapidly transitioning countries emerging as global powers, and affirming the need for models of respectful partnership and wider translation of science into practice. Cultivating sustainable partnerships and investing in the understanding and combat of diseases worldwide will become increasingly important for the US to maintain its global competitiveness, and may offer lessons in innovation, efficiency, and organization of institutions and human resources. PMID:20027251

Ali, Mohammed K.; Venkat Narayan, K.M.

2009-01-01

455

Global Health: A Successful Context for Precollege Training and Advocacy  

PubMed Central

Despite a flourishing biomedical and global health industry [1] too few of Washington state's precollege students are aware of this growing sector and emerging ideas on bacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses. Against the backdrop of numerous reports regarding declining precollege student interest in science [2], a precollege program was envisioned at Seattle Biomedical Research Institute (as of 2010, Seattle BioMed) to increase youth engagement in biomedical research and global health, increase community interest in infectious diseases and mobilize a future biomedical workforce. Since 2005, 169 rising high school juniors have participated in the BioQuest Academy precollege immersion program at Seattle BioMed. Assembling in groups of 12, students conduct laboratory experiments (e.g., anopheline mosquito dissection, gene expression informed tuberculosis drug design and optimizing HIV immunization strategies) related to global health alongside practicing scientific mentors, all within the footprint the institute. Laudable short-term impacts of the program include positive influences on student interest in global health (as seen in the students' subsequent school projects and their participation in Seattle BioMed community events), biomedical careers and graduate school (e.g., 16.9% of teens departing 2008–2009 Academy report revised goals of attaining a doctorate rather than a baccalaureate diploma). Long-term, 97% of alumni (2005–2008) are attending postsecondary schools throughout North America; eight graduates have already published scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals and/or presented their scientific data at national and international meetings, and 26 have been retained by Seattle BioMed researchers as compensated technicians and interns. Providing precollege students with structured access to practicing scientists and authentic research environments within the context of advancing global health has been a robust means of both building a future pool of talented leaders and engaged citizenry and increasing the visibility of health disparities within the community. PMID:21072198

Gervassi, Ana L.; Collins, Laura J.; Britschgi, Theresa B.

2010-01-01

456

Tobacco control, global health policy and development: towards policy coherence in global governance.  

PubMed

The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) demonstrates the international political will invested in combating the tobacco pandemic and a newfound prominence for tobacco control within the global health agenda. However, major difficulties exist in managing conflicts with foreign and trade policy priorities, and significant obstacles confront efforts to create synergies with development policy and avoid tensions with other health priorities. This paper uses the concept of policy coherence to explore congruence and inconsistencies in objectives, policy, and practice between tobacco control and trade, development and global health priorities. Following the inability of the FCTC negotiations to satisfactorily address the relationship between trade and health, several disputes highlight the challenges posed to tobacco control policies by multilateral and bilateral agreements. While the work of the World Bank has demonstrated the potential contribution of tobacco control to development, the absence of non-communicable diseases from the Millennium Development Goals has limited scope to offer developing countries support for FCTC implementation. Even within international health, tobacco control priorities may be hard to reconcile with other agendas. The paper concludes by discussing the extent to which tobacco control has been pursued via a model of governance very deliberately different from those used in other health issues, in what can be termed 'tobacco exceptionalism'. The analysis developed here suggests that non-communicable disease (NCD) policies, global health, development and tobacco control would have much to gain from re-examining this presumption of difference. PMID:22345267

Collin, Jeff

2012-03-01