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1

Health Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines recent developments in health informatics from a historical and global perspective relating to information management through the interdisciplinary application of information science and technology for the benefits of patients, staff, scientists, managers, and caregivers. Highlights include competition; the World Health Organization;…

MacDougall, Jennifer; Brittain, J. Michael

1994-01-01

2

Health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health informatics is the development and assessment of methods and systems for the acquisition, processing and interpretation of patient data with the help of knowledge from scientific research. This definition implies that health informatics is not tied to the application of computers but more generally to the entire management of information in healthcare. The focus is the patient and the

Michael Imhoff; Andrew Webb

2001-01-01

3

Health Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies current trends and issues in health informatics with examples of applications, particularly in English-speaking countries. Topics include health systems, professionals, and patients; consumer health information; electronic medical records; nursing; privacy and confidentiality; finding and using information; the Internet; e-mail;…

Russell, Marie; Brittain, J. Michael

2002-01-01

4

Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Informatics and information technology do not appear to be valued by the health industry to the degree that they are in other industries. The agenda for health informatics should be presented so that value to the health system is linked directly to required investment. The agenda should acknowledge the foundation provided by the current health system and the role of financial issues, system impediments, policy, and knowledge in effecting change. The desired outcomes should be compelling, such as improved public health, improved quality as perceived by consumers, and lower costs. Strategies to achieve these outcomes should derive from the differentia of health, opportunities to leverage other efforts, and lessons from successes inside and outside the health industry. Examples might include using logistics to improve quality, mass customization to adapt to individual values, and system thinking to change the game to one that can be won. The justification for the informatics infrastructure of a virtual health care data bank, a national health care knowledge base, and a personal clinical health record flows naturally from these strategies. PMID:10495093

Stead, William W.; Lorenzi, Nancy M.

1999-01-01

5

winter 2015 Health Informatics  

E-print Network

healthcare delivery and clinical effectiveness. UC Davis Extension, a leader in health informatics education informatics with an emphasis on its application to various clinical settings. MarK Carroll, M. traVis naGler, M.s., is a research data manager at the Biomedical informatics, Clinical

California at Davis, University of

6

Health Informatics: An Overview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews literature related to health informatics and health information management. Provides examples covering types of information, library and information services outcomes, training of informatics professionals, areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine, professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the…

MacDougall, Jennifer; And Others

1996-01-01

7

Re-Visiting Health Informatics What is Health Informatics?  

E-print Network

Re-Visiting Health Informatics HINF1100 Fall 2008 #12;What is Health Informatics? · Health the effective organization, analysis, management and use of health information to improve the delivery and practice of healthcare · Health Informatics is the study of applying information and technology to improve

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

8

Gaps in the existing public health informatics training programs: a challenge to the development of a skilled global workforce.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to explore public health informatics (PHI) training programs that currently exist to meet the growing demand for a trained global workforce. We used several search engines, scientific databases, and the websites of informatics organizations; sources included PubMed, Google, the American Medical Informatics Organization, and the International Medical Informatics Organization. The search was conducted from May to July 2011 and from January to February 2012 using key words such as informatics, public health informatics, or biomedical informatics along with academic programs, training, certificate, graduate programs, or postgraduate programs. Course titles and catalog descriptions were gathered from the program or institution websites. Variables included PHI program categories, location and mode of delivery, program credits, and costs. Each course was then categorized based on its title and description as available on the Internet. Finally, we matched course titles and descriptions with the competencies for PHIs determined by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Descriptive analysis was performed to report means and frequency distributions for continuous and categorical variables. Stratified analysis was performed to explore average credits and cost per credit among both the public and private institutions. Fifteen PHI programs were identified across 13 different institutions, the majority of which were US-based. The average number of credits and the associated costs required to obtain PHI training were much higher in private as compared to public institutions. The study results suggest that a need for online contextual and cost-effective PHI training programs exists to address the growing needs of professionals worldwide who are using technology to improve public health in their respective countries. PMID:23209452

Joshi, Ashish; Perin, Douglas Marcel Puricelli

2012-01-01

9

Challenges in Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early grand challenge papers in health informatics identified numerous challenges, many of which either remain as open questions or have been resolved within fairly narrow domains and generalized solutions have not been developed. These open questions and those resolved but not generalized remain so because underlying research issues have not been resolved. These research issues include the synthesis of information

Michael A. Shepherd

2007-01-01

10

Education and health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this contribution, the role of health informatics in the medical curriculum is discussed. Firstly, trends in healthcare are presented that may have an impact on the use of IT in healthcare and consequently on education. Then, the traditional educational system is discussed and it is argued that the educational system should be changed. The problem-based approach is presented as

A Hasman

1998-01-01

11

Standardization in health informatics in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Around the world, informatics has been cited as a key enabler of health sector reform. Recent reform programs in Canada, reflecting this global consensus, have emphasized the importance of quality information and information technology in meeting their goals. Standards are an important building block for achieving the required comprehensive and integrated health information infrastructure. This paper describes the current status

Richard C. Alvarez; Jennifer Zelmer

1998-01-01

12

NIDCR Supported Oral Health Informatics Postdoctoral Fellowship WHAT IS DENTAL INFORMATICS ?  

E-print Network

Clinical Research Informatics Applied to: Oral Systemic Research Dental and Craniofacial Research #12;The and oral microbiome samples. Clinical Research Informatics: Informatics Infrastructure for Dental PracticeNIDCR Supported Oral Health Informatics Postdoctoral Fellowship WHAT IS DENTAL INFORMATICS ? Dental

Senes, Alessandro

13

Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Open Rank Tenure Track Faculty Position in Health Informatics  

E-print Network

to public health informatics, consumer health, translational informatics linking clinical and bioinformatics, and clinical informatics with an emphasis on clinical decision support and patient outcomesIndiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Open Rank Tenure Track Faculty Position in Health

Zhou, Yaoqi

14

Health Professionals' Views of Informatics Education  

PubMed Central

Health care leaders emphasize the need to include information technology and informatics concepts in formal education programs, yet integration of informatics into health educational programs has progressed slowly. The AMIA 1999 Spring Congress was held to address informatics educational issues across health professions, including the educational needs in the various health professions, goals for health informatics education, and implementation strategies to achieve these goals. This paper presents the results from AMIA work groups focused on informatics education for non-informatics health professionals. In the categories of informatics needs, goals, and strategies, conference attendees suggested elements in these areas: educational responsibilities for faculty and students, organizational responsibilities, core computer skills and informatics knowledge, how to learn informatics skills, and resources required to implement educational strategies. PMID:11062228

Staggers, Nancy; Gassert, Carole A.; Skiba, Diane J.

2000-01-01

15

Usability and Accessibility in Consumer Health Informatics  

E-print Network

Usability and Accessibility in Consumer Health Informatics Current Trends and Future Challenges challenges in the usability and accessibility of consumer health informatics will be described. Consumer informatics (i.e., eHealth). Section 1 addresses the consumer expectations for eHealth. Section 2 discusses

Shneiderman, Ben

16

Clinical health informatics education for a 21st Century World.  

PubMed

This chapter gives an educational overview of: * health informatics competencies in medical, nursing and allied clinical health professions * health informatics learning cultures and just-in-time health informatics training in clinical work settings * major considerations in selecting or developing health informatics education and training programs for local implementation * using elearning effectively to meet the objectives of health informatics education. PMID:20407180

Liaw, Siaw Teng; Gray, Kathleen

2010-01-01

17

Health informatics: current issues and challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health informatics concerns the use of information and information and communication technologies within healthcare. Health informatics and information science need to take account of the unique aspects of health and medicine. The development of information systems and electronic records within health needs to consider the information needs and behaviour of all users. The sensitivity of personal health data raises ethical

Peter A. Bath

2008-01-01

18

The Scope and Direction of Health Informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based upon the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain is can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art" , and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information utilized in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

McGinnis, Patrick J.

2001-01-01

19

The scope and direction of health informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based on the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art," and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information used in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA-Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

McGinnis, Patrick J.

2002-01-01

20

Health care informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The health care industry is currently experiencing a fundamental change. Health care organizations are reorganizing their processes to reduce costs, be more competitive, and provide better and more personalized customer care. This new business strategy requires health care organizations to implement new technologies, such as Internet applications, enterprise systems, and mobile technologies in order to achieve their desired business changes.

Keng Siau

2003-01-01

21

Consumer Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last few decades, consumer involvement in health care has been dramatically transformed. Not the least of these transformations has been consumers’ active participation in decision making about their own health and the health of their family members. The advent and growing popularity of the Internet and its searchable World Wide Web have revolutionized consumers’ access to information. The

Deborah Lewis; Betty L. Chang; Charles P. Friedman

22

Introduction to Health InformaticsIntroduction to Health Informatics HINF1100HINF1100  

E-print Network

1 Introduction to Health InformaticsIntroduction to Health Informatics HINF1100HINF1100 Fall 2006.cs.dal.ca/~sraza) ObjectivesObjectives Understanding Health Informatics Objectives Practices 3 © Dr. Syed Sibte Raza Abidi, (www.cs.dal.ca/~sraza) Information Flow in a ClinicalInformation Flow in a Clinical Environment

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

23

Health Informatics Journal 16(3) 211223  

E-print Network

was presented at the Proceedings of the 14th International Symposium for Health Information Management ResearchArticle Health Informatics Journal 16(3) 211­223 © The Author(s) 2010 Reprints and permission, may result in identity theft, incorrect diagnosis and treatment, #12;212 Health Informatics Journal 16

Austin, Mark

24

The history of pathology informatics: A global perspective  

PubMed Central

Pathology informatics has evolved to varying levels around the world. The history of pathology informatics in different countries is a tale with many dimensions. At first glance, it is the familiar story of individuals solving problems that arise in their clinical practice to enhance efficiency, better manage (e.g., digitize) laboratory information, as well as exploit emerging information technologies. Under the surface, however, lie powerful resource, regulatory, and societal forces that helped shape our discipline into what it is today. In this monograph, for the first time in the history of our discipline, we collectively perform a global review of the field of pathology informatics. In doing so, we illustrate how general far-reaching trends such as the advent of computers, the Internet and digital imaging have affected pathology informatics in the world at large. Major drivers in the field included the need for pathologists to comply with national standards for health information technology and telepathology applications to meet the scarcity of pathology services and trained people in certain countries. Following trials by a multitude of investigators, not all of them successful, it is apparent that innovation alone did not assure the success of many informatics tools and solutions. Common, ongoing barriers to the widespread adoption of informatics devices include poor information technology infrastructure in undeveloped areas, the cost of technology, and regulatory issues. This review offers a deeper understanding of how pathology informatics historically developed and provides insights into what the promising future might hold. PMID:23869286

Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil V.; Aller, Raymond D.; Banach, Lech; Becich, Michael J.; Borkenfeld, Stephan; Carter, Alexis B.; Friedman, Bruce A.; Rojo, Marcial Garcia; Georgiou, Andrew; Kayser, Gian; Kayser, Klaus; Legg, Michael; Naugler, Christopher; Sawai, Takashi; Weiner, Hal; Winsten, Dennis; Pantanowitz, Liron

2013-01-01

25

The history of pathology informatics: A global perspective.  

PubMed

Pathology informatics has evolved to varying levels around the world. The history of pathology informatics in different countries is a tale with many dimensions. At first glance, it is the familiar story of individuals solving problems that arise in their clinical practice to enhance efficiency, better manage (e.g., digitize) laboratory information, as well as exploit emerging information technologies. Under the surface, however, lie powerful resource, regulatory, and societal forces that helped shape our discipline into what it is today. In this monograph, for the first time in the history of our discipline, we collectively perform a global review of the field of pathology informatics. In doing so, we illustrate how general far-reaching trends such as the advent of computers, the Internet and digital imaging have affected pathology informatics in the world at large. Major drivers in the field included the need for pathologists to comply with national standards for health information technology and telepathology applications to meet the scarcity of pathology services and trained people in certain countries. Following trials by a multitude of investigators, not all of them successful, it is apparent that innovation alone did not assure the success of many informatics tools and solutions. Common, ongoing barriers to the widespread adoption of informatics devices include poor information technology infrastructure in undeveloped areas, the cost of technology, and regulatory issues. This review offers a deeper understanding of how pathology informatics historically developed and provides insights into what the promising future might hold. PMID:23869286

Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil V; Aller, Raymond D; Banach, Lech; Becich, Michael J; Borkenfeld, Stephan; Carter, Alexis B; Friedman, Bruce A; Rojo, Marcial Garcia; Georgiou, Andrew; Kayser, Gian; Kayser, Klaus; Legg, Michael; Naugler, Christopher; Sawai, Takashi; Weiner, Hal; Winsten, Dennis; Pantanowitz, Liron

2013-01-01

26

International Master Classes in health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Master Classes arose within the performing arts and are now being offered in system sciences. The I?E group of faculty from six universities in Europe and the United States has offered Master Classes in health informatics to provide an integrative forum for honors students. Featured are international views of health systems, varied opportunities for student interaction and promotion of informatics

L. C. Gatewood; M. Limburg; R. M. Gardner; Reinhold Haux; Monique W. M. Jaspers; Diana Schmidt; Thomas Wetter

2004-01-01

27

Identifying a Prudent Informatics Praxis for Public Health Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tools afforded by biomedical informatics enable not only the critique of modern global intervention strategies but to offer strategies for improving sustainable health care. Often, short-term medical care trips break raise ethical concerns. The concept of 'duffle bag medicine' is introduced as ineffectual health care trips with cultural, social, and environmental flaws. Communication is identified as the mechanism through

Victor T. Nwankwo

28

Better informed: an overview of health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Healthcare informatics is increasing in importance both for healthcare administrators and medical and dental practitioners. Governments across the developed world are initiating major national health IT programmes. At the same time, future best medical and dental practice will increasingly depend on computer-based support tools, although disagreement remains about the effectiveness of current support tools. Over the longer term, future informatics

J. Harper; A. M Jenner; S. Dunne; P. A. Reynolds

2008-01-01

29

The Current Status of Health Informatics Higher Education in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are likely to be many opportunities and challenges for health informatics and health informatics higher education in China following her acceptance as a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The purpose of the article is to review the current status and consider future directions for health informatics and health informatics higher education in China. Today, China’s educators are

M. X. Wu; P Yu; J Soar

2003-01-01

30

HINF 1100: Introduction to Health Informatics Assignment 1  

E-print Network

HINF 1100: Introduction to Health Informatics Fall 2008 Assignment 1 Assignment Date: Sept 29 2008 is health informatics? (5%) 1b. Identify the role of health informatics in the healthcare process? (5%) 1c. Justify the need for health informatics in the healthcare process? (5 %) Question 2: Provide answers

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

31

Building health informatics skills for health professionals: results from the Australian Health Informatics Skill Needs Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To ascertain health professionals' per- ceptions of health informatics skills required in their roles. Design: A paper-based survey with a stratified random sample of Australian health professionals and a web-based survey open to all Australian health professionals were conducted. Measurement: A questionnaire on the health pro- fessionals' perceived degree of competency required for a total of 69 specific skills

Sebastian Garde; David Harrison; Mohammed Huque; Evelyn JS Hovenga

2006-01-01

32

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name MSc Health Informatics  

E-print Network

1 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION ­ POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES KEY FACTS Programme name MSc Health Informatics Award MSc School School of Informatics Department or equivalent Centre for Health Informatics Programme of the fundamental principles of the areas of health Informatics and cognate subjects contained within the chosen

Weyde, Tillman

33

ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Laboratory (AMIIL) Data Mining and Health Informatics in  

E-print Network

ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Laboratory (AMIIL) 1 Data Mining and Health Informatics in Cancer Medicine #12;ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Lab http://amiil.engineering.asu.edu/ 2 #12;ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Lab http://amiil.engineering.asu.edu/ 3 Oncologists Medical physicists

Li, Jing

34

[Informatics in the Croatian health care system].  

PubMed

Informatization process of the Croatian health care system started relatively early. Computer processing of data of persons not covered by health insurance started in 1968 in Zagreb. Remetinec Health Center served as a model of computer data processing (CDP) in primary health care and Sveti Duh General Hospital in inpatient CDP, whereas hospital administration and health service were first introduced to Zagreb University Hospital Center and Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital. At Varazdin Medical Center CDP for health care services started in 1970. Several registries of chronic diseases have been established: cancer, psychosis, alcoholism, and hospital registries as well as pilot registries of lung tuberculosis patients and diabetics. Health statistics reports on healthcare services, work accidents and sick-leaves as well as on hospital mortality started to be produced by CDP in 1977. Besides alphanumeric data, the modern information technology (IT) can give digital images and signals. Communication in health care system demands a standardized format of all information, especially for telemedicine. In 2000, Technical Committee for Standardization in Medical Informatics was founded in Croatia, in order to monitor the activities of the International Standardization Organization (ISO) and Comite Européen de Normalisation (CEN), and to implement their international standards in the Croatian standardization procedure. The HL7 Croatia has also been founded to monitor developments in the communication standard HL7. So far, the Republic of Croatia has a number of acts regulating informatization in general and consequently the informatization of the health care system (Act on Personal Data Confidentiality, Act on Digital Signature, Act of Standardization) enacted. The ethical aspect of data security and data protection has been covered by the Code of Ethics for medical informaticians. It has been established by the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), and the Croatian Society of Medical Informatics (CSMI) has translated it into Croatian and published it on its website. Based on a survey of medical staff attitudes toward health care system informatization, the Croatian health system appears to be ready for informatization. The only requirement is that the present and future health care providers have appropriate medical informatics education, proper computer equipment at their workplace, and an opportunity to participate in the development and/or improvement of the health information system. One of the EU health strategy priorities is the improvement of health information and knowledge. It means that integrated health information systems are required, i.e. systems able to provide key information on health and health care system to the politicians, health professionals and public in general. PMID:16095187

Kern, Josipa; Strnad, Marija

2005-01-01

35

Nursing Informatics: Decades of Contribution to Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Objectives In this paper we present a contemporary understanding of "nursing informatics" and relate it to applications in three specific contexts, hospitals, community health, and home dwelling, to illustrate achievements that contribute to the overall schema of health informatics. Methods We identified literature through database searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. Database searching was complemented by one author search and hand searches in six relevant journals. The literature review helped in conceptual clarification and elaborate on use that are supported by applications in different settings. Results Conceptual clarification of nursing data, information and knowledge has been expanded to include wisdom. Information systems and support for nursing practice benefits from conceptual clarification of nursing data, information, knowledge, and wisdom. We introduce three examples of information systems and point out core issues for information integration and practice development. Conclusions Exploring interplays of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom, nursing informatics takes a practice turn, accommodating to processes of application design and deployment for purposeful use by nurses in different settings. Collaborative efforts will be key to further achievements that support task shifting, mobility, and ubiquitous health care. PMID:23882413

Mæland Knudsen, Lina Merete

2013-01-01

36

Michigan Informatics: Informatics for the Public Health Workforce  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As health care job opportunities continue to expand, a number of institutions have been developing online training materials to help support academic public health programs. One such program is the Michigan Informatics (MI-INFO) website, which contains a variety of tutorials that deal with health information and computer skills. All told, the site contains nine tutorials which include titles like "Evidence Based Public Health", "Finding Health Statistics Online", and "Searching the Public Health Literature". Each of the tutorials features key concept overviews, exercises, and case studies. Near the bottom of the site, visitors can find a user manual for the tutorials, and a place where they can offer their own feedback. The site is rounded out by the "Other Resources" area, which contains links to other relevant sites, such as the Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Greater Midwest Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

2007-01-01

37

Health Informatics in Six Places Bill Lober, MD  

E-print Network

Health Informatics in Six Places Bill Lober, MD Director of Informatics, I-TECH Director, Clinical Constrained Settings May 19th, 2011 Jan Flowers Technical Program Manager jflow2@uw.edu Clinical Informatics Informatics Research Group Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health University of Washington lober

Anderson, Richard

38

Consumer Health Informatics: Health Information Technology for Consumers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains consumer health informatics and describes the technology advances, the computer programs that are currently available, and the basic research that addresses both the effectiveness of computer health informatics and its impact on the future direction of health care. Highlights include commercial computer products for consumers and…

Jimison, Holly Brugge; Sher, Paul Phillip

1995-01-01

39

Current trends and challenges in health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines the roles of health informatics in modern health planning and delivery and defines the key challenges and opportunities for promoting high-quality and cost-effective care. It describes the main information management and technology drivers that improve the generation, use and flow of health information, categorizing these drivers under the headings of healthcare complexity, policy and priorities, clinical support

A. C. Norris

2002-01-01

40

From Personal Health Informatics to Health Self-management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our research team is developing Salud!, an open and free infrastructure for developing and deploying personal health informatics applications. In addition, we are investigating and designing interaction techniques that support individuals engaged in health self- management. These interaction techniques make use of personal informatics applications' potential to guide

Yevgeniy Medynskiy; Elizabeth D. Mynatt

2010-01-01

41

Clinical Health Informatics Meets Medical Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical Health Informatics (CHI), including integrated electronic medical records (EMR), is playing an increasingly important role in medical practice. It is widely felt that these tools have the potential to improve the quality of medical care and patient outcomes, while increasing efficiency and controlling overall health care costs. Studies have demonstrated the ability of CHI to have a significant impact

Jeffrey Phillips

2008-01-01

42

An investigation into health informatics and related standards in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo describe the current status of and future plans for health informatics and related standards in China and analyze the problems raised in the process of standardization for health informatics.

Yuhai Zhang; Yongyong Xu; Lei Shang; Keqin Rao

2007-01-01

43

Graduate Group in Health Informatics M.S. Degree Requirements  

E-print Network

to Health Informatics MHI 202 4 units Computer Based Patient Records MHI 209 4 units Clinical Data1 Graduate Group in Health Informatics M.S. Degree Requirements Revised: 2/25/2009 Graduate Council in the field of Health Informatics. Applicants whose native language or whose academic instruction is

Ullrich, Paul

44

Machine Learning and Software Engineering in Health Informatics  

E-print Network

- text of health informatics, where the scale of clinical practice requires new engineering approachesMachine Learning and Software Engineering in Health Informatics David A. Clifton, Jeremy Gibbons--Health informatics is a field in which the disci- plines of software engineering and machine learning necessarily co

Miller, Alice

45

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

1 electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net 2010; Vol 6, No 1 (2011): e4 The electronic Journal of Health Informatics is an international journal committed to scholarly excellence and dedicated to the advancement of Health Informatics and information technology in healthcare. ISSN: 1446

Yu, Ping

46

MEDINFO 2007 Studies in Health Technology and Informatics  

E-print Network

MEDINFO 2007 #12;Studies in Health Technology and Informatics This book series was started in 1990 of the 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics Building Sustainable Health Systems Part 2 Edited to promote research conducted under the auspices of the EC programmes' Advanced Informatics in Medicine (AIM

Hansen, René Rydhof

47

Health Management and Informatics Alumni Organization An Affiliate of  

E-print Network

BYLAWS of the Health Management and Informatics Alumni Organization An Affiliate of The University The name of the organization shall be the Health Management and Informatics Organization hereinafter referred to as the Organization. ARTICLE II: PURPOSE The Health Management and Informatics Organization

Missouri-Columbia, University of

48

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

1 electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net 2009; Vol 4(1): e The electronic Journal of Health Informatics is an international journal committed to scholarly excellence and dedicated to the advancement of Health Informatics and information technology in healthcare. ISSN: 1446-4381 © Copyright

Grundy, John

49

Qualitative Evaluation in Consumer Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approaches to qualitative evaluation for consumer health informatics are much like qualitative research for any purpose. Data collection and data analysis methods are similar for all projects. This chapter provides a general overview of these methods. But because qualitative research depends heavily on the research participants and contextual setting, each project is different. Examples throughout the chapter illustrate ways in

Bonnie Kaplan

50

Capstone Project and Graduation Requirements Master of Health Informatics  

E-print Network

human subjects or clinical data in any way. Many informatics projects will be exempt from full IRBCapstone Project and Graduation Requirements Master of Health Informatics A Capstone Project is one of the requirements of the MS in Health Informatics degree at IUPUI. By the end of the first year the student

Zhou, Yaoqi

51

An international health and nursing informatics module for distance education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes why a module about health and nursing informatics is a necessary component for nursing education. Several developments in society and health care force health providers to manage the large amount of health data adequately. A module about health and nursing informatics was developed in international cooperation by three schools of nursing from Germany, The Netherlands and the

William Goossen; Stephen Timmons; Martin Mol

1998-01-01

52

Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2013-2014  

E-print Network

Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis 3 Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis ACCT 205 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 206 Introduction to Managerial Accounting HLTHST 330 Health Information Management I with lab

Barrash, Warren

53

Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2014-2015  

E-print Network

Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis 3 Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis ACCT 205 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 206 Introduction to Managerial Accounting HLTHST 330 Health Information Management I with lab

Barrash, Warren

54

Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis, 2012-2013  

E-print Network

Bachelor of Science, Health Science Studies, Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis Health Informatics and Information Management Emphasis ACCT 205 Introduction to Financial Accounting ACCT 206 Introduction to Managerial Accounting HLTHST 330 Health Information Management I with lab HLTHST

Barrash, Warren

55

The Development of Model Curricula for Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT We have developed model Health Informatics (HI) curricula for the education of three categories of pro- fessionals: Applied Health Informaticians, the profes- sionals that deploy information technologies, Re- search and Development Health Informaticians, those that develop new concepts, techniques, and solutions, and what we termed Clinicians with Health Informat- ics capabilities, providers who use HI capabilities to support their

H. Dominic Covvey; David Zitner; Robert Bernstein; Janice E. Macneill

56

Developing capacity in health informatics in a resource poor setting: lessons from Peru  

PubMed Central

The public sectors of developing countries require strengthened capacity in health informatics. In Peru, where formal university graduate degrees in biomedical and health informatics were lacking until recently, the AMAUTA Global Informatics Research and Training Program has provided research and training for health professionals in the region since 1999. The Fogarty International Center supports the program as a collaborative partnership between Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia in Peru and the University of Washington in the United States of America. The program aims to train core professionals in health informatics and to strengthen the health information resource capabilities and accessibility in Peru. The program has achieved considerable success in the development and institutionalization of informatics research and training programs in Peru. Projects supported by this program are leading to the development of sustainable training opportunities for informatics and eight of ten Peruvian fellows trained at the University of Washington are now developing informatics programs and an information infrastructure in Peru. In 2007, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia started offering the first graduate diploma program in biomedical informatics in Peru. PMID:19860918

Kimball, Ann Marie; Curioso, Walter H; Arima, Yuzo; Fuller, Sherrilynne; Garcia, Patricia J; Segovia-Juarez, Jose; Castagnetto, Jesus M; Leon-Velarde, Fabiola; Holmes, King K

2009-01-01

57

Introduction to Health Informatics FALL 2008/09  

E-print Network

1 HINF 1100 Introduction to Health Informatics FALL 2008/09 Course Outline Instructor: Raza Abidi, theory, applications and organizational perspectives of health informatics. HINF 1100 is designed Technology in the field of Health Care. The main focus of this course is to enable students to understand

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

58

Medical informatics and health care organizations.  

PubMed

A dialogue between upper management and operational elements over an organization's informatics policies and procedures could take place in an environment in which both parties could succeed. Excellent patient care practices can exist in organizational settings where upper management is not concerned with the specifics of the medical care process. But as the medical care process itself becomes costly, complex, and part of the purview of upper management, solutions to ambiguous informatics policies and practices need to be found. As the discussion of cost determination suggests, a comprehensive "top-down" solution may not be feasible. Allowing patient care expertise to drive the design and implementation of clinical computing modules without unduly restrictive specifications from above is probably the best way to proceed. But if the organization needs to know the specifics of a treatment episode, then the informatics definitions specific to treatment episodes need to be unambiguous and consistently applied. As the discussion of Social Security numbers suggests, communication of information across various parts of the organization not only requires unambiguous data structure definitions, but also suggests that the communication process not be dependent on the content of the messages. Both ideas--consistent data structure definitions for essential data and open system communication architectures--are current in the medical informatician's vocabulary. The same ideas are relevant to the management and operation of large and diffuse health care enterprises. The lessons we are learning about informatics policy and practice controls in clinical computing need to be applied to the enterprise as a whole. PMID:1921663

Holden, F M

1991-01-01

59

Assistant to Full Professor, Department of BioHealth Informatics Join the faculty of an exciting and growing academic Department of BioHealth Informatics (BHI) at the  

E-print Network

) translational biomedical and clinical informatics; or (4) consumer health and social informatics. SoAssistant to Full Professor, Department of BioHealth Informatics Join the faculty of an exciting and growing academic Department of BioHealth Informatics (BHI) at the new Indiana University School

Zhou, Yaoqi

60

Kick-Starting Health Informatics Careers – A Canadian Approach  

PubMed Central

We introduce the Applied Health Informatics Bootcamp. This is an intense, interactive on-site program, augmented by approximately 80 hours of online material. The Bootcamp is intended to introduce those with little or no knowledge of Health Informatics (HI) to the nature, key concepts, and applications of this discipline to addressing challenges in the health field. The focus of the program is on Applied Health Informatics (AHI), the discipline addressing the preparation for, and the procurement, deployment, implementation, resourcing, effective usage, and evaluation of informatics solutions in the health system. Although no program of this duration can cover all topics, we target the high profile areas of Health Informatics and point the participants in the direction of broader and deeper explorations. PMID:18693833

Fenton, Shirley; Covvey, H. Dominic

2007-01-01

61

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair Medical Health Informatics  

E-print Network

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics Schulich School of Medicine intensive universities, seeks applicants for a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics and Dentistry and Faculty of Science Western University Western University, one of Canada's leading research

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

62

Informatics critical to public health surveillance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Public health surveillance is the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of data regarding a health-related event for use in public health action to reduce morbidity and mortality and to improve health by effective response management and coordination. As new pressures for early detection of disease outbreaks have arisen, particularly for outbreaks of possible bioterrorism (BT) origin, and as electronic health data have become increasingly available, so has the demand for public health situation awareness systems. Although these systems are valuable for early warning of public health emergencies, there remains the cost of developing and managing such large and complex systems and of investigating inevitable false alarms. Whether these systems are dependable and cost effective enough and can demonstrate a significant and indispensable role in detection or prevention of mass casualty events of BT origin remains to be proven. This article will focus on the complexities of design, analysis, implementation and evaluation of public health surveillance and situation awareness systems and, in some cases, will discuss the key technologies being studied in Center for Biosecurity Informatics Research at University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston.

Mirhaji, Parsa; Zhang, Jiajie; Smith, Jack W.; Madjid, Mohammad; Casscells, Samuel W.; Lillibridge, Scott R.

2003-09-01

63

Food safety informatics: a public health imperative.  

PubMed

To date, little has been written about the implementation of utilizing food safety informatics as a technological tool to protect consumers, in real-time, against foodborne illnesses. Food safety outbreaks have become a major public health problem, causing an estimated 48 million illnesses, 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. Yet, government inspectors/regulators that monitor foodservice operations struggle with how to collect, organize, and analyze data; implement, monitor, and enforce safe food systems. Currently, standardized technologies have not been implemented to efficiently establish "near-in-time" or "just-in-time" electronic awareness to enhance early detection of public health threats regarding food safety. To address the potential impact of collection, organization and analyses of data in a foodservice operation, a wireless food safety informatics (FSI) tool was pilot tested at a university student foodservice center. The technological platform in this test collected data every six minutes over a 24 hour period, across two primary domains: time and temperatures within freezers, walk-in refrigerators and dry storage areas. The results of this pilot study briefly illustrated how technology can assist in food safety surveillance and monitoring by efficiently detecting food safety abnormalities related to time and temperatures so that efficient and proper response in "real time" can be addressed to prevent potential foodborne illnesses. PMID:23569605

Tucker, Cynthia A; Larkin, Stephanie N; Akers, Timothy A

2011-01-01

64

Evaluating Distance Learning in Health Informatics Education  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to compare academic performance between distance-learning and on-campus health informatics students. A quantitative causal-comparative research design was utilized, and academic performance was measured by final GPA scores and Registered Health Information Administrator certification exam scores. Differences in previous academic performance between the two groups were also determined by comparing overall admission GPA and math/science admission GPA. The researchers found no difference in academic performance between the two groups when final GPA scores and total certification scores were compared. However, there were statistically significant differences between the two groups in 4 of the 17 sub-domains of the certification examination, with the on-campus students scoring slightly higher than the distance students. Correlation studies were also performed, and the researchers found significant correlations between overall admission GPA, math/science admission GPA, final GPA, and certification scores. PMID:18458788

Russell, Barbara L.; Barefield, Amanda C.; Turnbull, Diane; Leibach, Elizabeth; Pretlow, Lester

2008-01-01

65

Biomedical and health informatics education at UMIT - approaches and strategies at a newly founded university  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA, http:\\/\\/www.IMIA.org) on education in health and medical informatics and on experiences in founding a new school, the University for Health Informatics and Technology Tyrol (UMIT, http:\\/\\/www.UMIT.at), at Innsbruck, Austria, questions on education in health informatics, medical informatics, and biomedical informatics are discussed.Suggestions are made on (1) appropriate approaches for

Reinhold Haux

2004-01-01

66

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

in Australian Aged Care Homes Ning Wang1 , Ping Yu1 , David Hailey1 , Deborah Oxlade2 1 Health Informatics Research Laboratory, Faculty of Informatics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia 2 RSL Care, Australia documentation in residential aged care homes. Methods: Three information sources were reviewed to explore

Yu, Ping

67

Perspectives on Information Science and Health Informatics Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theoretical discussion of what information science can contribute to the health professions addresses questions of definition and describes application and knowledge models for the emerging profession of informatics. A review of existing programs includes curriculum models and provides details on informatics programs emphasizing information…

Lunin, Lois F., Ed.; Ball, Marion J., Ed.

1989-01-01

68

2012. 1. 30 CS4HS 1Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU  

E-print Network

1/19/2012 1 2012. 1. 30 CS4HS 1Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU Outline · · · , 2Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU PART1. 3Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU Central Dogma in Biology Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU 4 http

Yeom, Heon Young

69

2012. 1. 30 CS4HS 1Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU  

E-print Network

1/19/2012 1 2012. 1. 30 CS4HS 1Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU Outline · · · , 2Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU PART1. 3Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU Central Dogma in Biology Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU 4 http

Yeom, Heon Young

70

Introduction to the Special Issue on Data Mining for Health Informatics  

E-print Network

Introduction to the Special Issue on Data Mining for Health Informatics Raymond T. Ng Department on health informatics. The ob- jectives shown above serve to distinguish health informatics from community. To promote real problems and challenges in health informatics to data mining community, we

Ng, Raymond T.

71

Health informatics and modernisation: bridging the gap.  

PubMed

This pilot initiative uses an approach that focuses on improving the whole business of primary care, its processes and its people. The Health Informatics Programme for Coronary Heart Disease (HIP for CHD) addresses the two faces of clinical governance but has a prime focus on the development of learning organisations. The project has developed a methodology and an associated set of tools that it has tested and evaluated in a small number of pilot sites. The work of HIP for CHD is focused on coronary heart disease but the methodology is equally applicable to other clinical areas. In particular, HIP for CHD provides an approach that allows the diverse strands of all of the National Service Frameworks to be handled in a joined-up way in primary care. PMID:14980060

Cowley, Cheryl; Daws, Lynette; Ellis, Beverley

2003-01-01

72

Developing a Capstone Course within a Health Informatics Program  

PubMed Central

This article discusses the ongoing development of a health informatics capstone program in a Midwest university from the hiring of a program coordinator to the development of a capstone course, through initial student results. University health informatics programs require a strong academic program to be successful but also require a spirited program coordinator to manage resources and organize an effective capstone course. This is particularly true of health informatics master's programs that support health industry career fields, whereby employers can locate and work with a pool of qualified applicants. The analysis of students’ logs confirms that students’ areas of focus and concern are consistent with course objectives and company work requirements during the work-study portion of the student capstone project. The article further discusses lessons learned and future improvements to be made in the health informatics capstone course. PMID:22783150

Hackbarth, Gary; Cata, Teuta; Cole, Laura

2012-01-01

73

Informatics  

Cancer.gov

The Cancer Imaging Program (CIP) is a driver of imaging informatics research at NCI. The CIP Informatics Team provides critical services and infrastructure to both the intramural and extramural imaging research communities. Major ongoing initiatives include:

74

Competencies for graduate curricula in health, medical and biomedical informatics: a framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid emergence of programmes in health informatics, medical informatics and biomedical informatics implies a need for core curricula in these diverse disciplines. This study investigated the recommended competencies for health and medical informatics, aiming to develop a framework for use in curricular development. Current health and medical programmes around the world were analysed to assess how these competencies are

Qi Rong Huang

2007-01-01

75

Consumer Health Informatics--integrating patients, providers, and professionals online.  

PubMed

Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) means different things to patients, health professionals, and health care systems. A broader perspective on this new and rapidly developing field will enable us to understand and better apply its advances. This article provides an overview of CHI discussing its evolution and driving forces, along with advanced applications such as Personal Health Records, Internet transmission of personal health data, clinical e-mail, online pharmacies, and shared decision-making tools. Consumer Health Informatics will become integrated with medical care, electronic medical records, and patient education to impact the whole process and business of health care. PMID:12238015

Klein-Fedyshin, Michele S

2002-01-01

76

Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

Frisse, Mark E.

1992-01-01

77

Reducing Health Cost: Health Informatics and Knowledge Management as a Business and Communication Tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Health informatics has the potential to improve the quality and provision of care while reducing the cost of health care delivery.\\u000a However, health informatics is often falsely regarded as synonymous with information management (IM). This chapter (i) provides\\u000a a clear definition and characteristic benefits of health informatics and information management in the context of health care\\u000a delivery, (ii) identifies and

Regina Gyampoh-Vidogah; Robert Moreton; David Sallah

2010-01-01

78

Reducing Health Cost: Health Informatics and Knowledge Management as a Business and Communication Tool  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Health informatics has the potential to improve the quality and provision of care while reducing the cost of health care delivery. However, health informatics is often falsely regarded as synonymous with information management (IM). This chapter (i) provides a clear definition and characteristic benefits of health informatics and information management in the context of health care delivery, (ii) identifies and explains the difference between health informatics (HI) and managing knowledge (KM) in relation to informatics business strategy and (iii) elaborates the role of information communication technology (ICT) KM environment. This Chapter further examines how KM can be used to improve health service informatics costs, and identifies the factors that could affect its implementation and explains some of the reasons driving the development of electronic health record systems. This will assist in avoiding higher costs and errors, while promoting the continued industrialisation of KM delivery across health care communities.

Gyampoh-Vidogah, Regina; Moreton, Robert; Sallah, David

79

GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY INFORMATICS: SETTING THE SCENE FOR A \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in information and communication technology are allowing new experiences in the integration, analysis and visualization of biodiversity information, and are leading to development of a new field of research, biodiversity informatics. Although this field has great potential in diverse realms, including basic biology, human economics, and public health, much of this potential remains to be explored. The success

V. P. CANHOS; S. SOUZA; R. GIOVANNI; D. A. L. CANHOS

2004-01-01

80

Consumer Health Informatics-Integrating Patients, Providers, and Professionals Online  

Microsoft Academic Search

Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) means different things to patients, health professionals, and health care systems. A broader perspective on this new and rapidly developing field will enable us to understand and better apply its advances. This article provides an overview of CHI discussing its evolution and driving forces, along with advanced applications such as Personal Health Records, Internet transmission of

Michele S. Klein-Fedyshin

2002-01-01

81

International Health Global Health Policy--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-print Network

50 International Health Global Health Policy, effective coverage), and impact (health status); and 3.Health and foreign policy (e.g. global health architecture and governance, G8 and global health, donor commitments). Finally, the fundamental role

Miyashita, Yasushi

82

Dr. Raza Abidi, Dalhousie University2 Health Informatics (The logic of healthcare)  

E-print Network

#12;© Dr. Raza Abidi, Dalhousie University2 Health Informatics (The logic of healthcare) E-health or examinations. #12;© Dr. Raza Abidi, Dalhousie University3 Health Informatics (The logic of healthcare) E-Health Hospital Information Networks Electronic medical records Consumer health informatics (patient health

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

83

Cardiovascular health informatics: risk screening and intervention.  

PubMed

Despite enormous efforts to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the past, it remains the leading cause of death in most countries worldwide. Around two-thirds of these deaths are due to acute events, which frequently occur suddenly and are often fatal before medical care can be given. New strategies for screening and early intervening CVD, in addition to the conventional methods, are therefore needed in order to provide personalized and pervasive healthcare. In this special issue, selected emerging technologies in health informatics for screening and intervening CVDs are reported. These papers include reviews or original contributions on 1) new potential genetic biomarkers for screening CVD outcomes and high-throughput techniques for mining genomic data; 2) new imaging techniques for obtaining faster and higher resolution images of cardiovascular imaging biomarkers such as the cardiac chambers and atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries, as well as possible automatic segmentation, identification, or fusion algorithms; 3) new physiological biomarkers and novel wearable and home healthcare technologies for monitoring them in daily lives; 4) new personalized prediction models of plaque formation and progression or CVD outcomes; and 5) quantifiable indices and wearable systems to measure them for early intervention of CVD through lifestyle changes. It is hoped that the proposed technologies and systems covered in this special issue can result in improved CVD management and treatment at the point of need, offering a better quality of life to the patient. PMID:22997187

Hartley, Craig J; Naghavi, Morteza; Parodi, Oberdan; Pattichis, Constantinos S; Poon, Carmen C Y; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

2012-09-01

84

Investigating Integrated Socio-Technical Approaches to Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the socio-technical approaches being developed in the Center for Health Informatics and Computing (CHIC) for addressing issues within healthcare that necessitate the integration of information systems with clinical and managerial development. A brief description of the health provision in the UK is given as a background to understanding the need for integrated interventions and approaches in health

Christopher J. Atkinson; Tillal Eldabi; Ray J. Paul; Athanasia Pouloudi

2001-01-01

85

Education and training in health informatics: guidelines for European curricula  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guidelines are suggested for European curricula in Health Informatics that apply to both healthcare professionals and health administrative staff. These guidelines are the results of in-depth discussions and thoughts of the EU-EDUCTRA concerted action. Emphasis is placed on the way information is generated in the health domain. The guidelines also consider the various actors, their position and role in the

A. Hasman; A. Albert

1997-01-01

86

Patterns and Correlates of Public Health Informatics Capacity Among Local Health Departments: An Empirical Typology  

PubMed Central

Objective: Little is known about the nationwide patterns in the use of public health informatics systems by local health departments (LHDs) and whether LHDs tend to possess informatics capacity across a broad range of information functionalities or for a narrower range. This study examined patterns and correlates of the presence of public health informatics functionalities within LHDs through the creation of a typology of LHD informatics capacities. Methods: Data were available for 459 LHDs from the 2013 National Association of County and City Health Officials Profile survey. An empirical typology was created through cluster analysis of six public health informatics functionalities: immunization registry, electronic disease registry, electronic lab reporting, electronic health records, health information exchange, and electronic syndromic surveillance system. Three-categories of usage emerged (Low, Mid, High). LHD financial, workforce, organization, governance, and leadership characteristics, and types of services provided were explored across categories. Results: Low-informatics capacity LHDs had lower levels of use of each informatics functionality than high-informatics capacity LHDs. Mid-informatics capacity LHDs had usage levels equivalent to high-capacity LHDs for the three most common functionalities and equivalent to low-capacity LHDs for the three least common functionalities. Informatics capacity was positively associated with service provision, especially for population-focused services. Conclusion: Informatics capacity is clustered within LHDs. Increasing LHD informatics capacity may require LHDs with low levels of informatics capacity to expand capacity across a range of functionalities, taking into account their narrower service portfolio. LHDs with mid-level informatics capacity may need specialized support in enhancing capacity for less common technologies. PMID:25598871

Mac McCullough, J.; Goodin, Kate

2014-01-01

87

Global Health: World Regions  

MedlinePLUS

... Africa Americas Asia & Pacific Europe & Eurasia Middle East Global Health Topics Communicable Diseases Global Water Supply and Safety ... Global Programs & Initiatives Emergency Response Exchange Visitor Program Global Health Initiative Global Health Partners One Health PEPFAR About ...

88

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research  

E-print Network

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated water. Mark Jones #12;5 | Global Health Research We support researchers in low- and middle- income

Rambaut, Andrew

89

Education for Health Information Professionals: Perspectives from Health Informatics in the U.S.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While interest and activity in health informatics continues to increase worldwide, concerns about the most appropriate educational preparation for practice also arise. Health informatics is an interdisciplinary field that pursues effective use of data, information and knowledge to support effective decision making; in the health field, those…

Dalrymple, Prudence W.; Roderer, Nancy K.

2011-01-01

90

An Informatics Approach to Establishing a Sustainable Public Health Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This work involved the analysis of a public health system, and the design, development and deployment of enterprise informatics architecture, and sustainable community methods to address problems with the current public health system. Specifically, assessment of the Nationally Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS) was instrumental in…

Kriseman, Jeffrey Michael

2012-01-01

91

A current perspective on medical informatics and health sciences librarianship  

PubMed Central

Objective: The article offers a current perspective on medical informatics and health sciences librarianship. Narrative: The authors: (1) discuss how definitions of medical informatics have changed in relation to health sciences librarianship and the broader domain of information science; (2) compare the missions of health sciences librarianship and health sciences informatics, reviewing the characteristics of both disciplines; (3) propose a new definition of health sciences informatics; (4) consider the research agendas of both disciplines and the possibility that they have merged; and (5) conclude with some comments about actions and roles for health sciences librarians to flourish in the biomedical information environment of today and tomorrow. Summary: Boundaries are disappearing between the sources and types of and uses for health information managed by informaticians and librarians. Definitions of the professional domains of each have been impacted by these changes in information. Evolving definitions reflect the increasingly overlapping research agendas of both disciplines. Professionals in these disciplines are increasingly functioning collaboratively as “boundary spanners,” incorporating human factors that unite technology with health care delivery. PMID:15858622

Perry, Gerald J.; Roderer, Nancy K.; Assar, Soraya

2005-01-01

92

A stimulus to define informatics and health information technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Despite the growing interest by leaders, policy makers, and others, the terminology of health information technology as well as biomedical and health informatics is poorly understood and not even agreed upon by academics and professionals in the field. DISCUSSION: The paper, presented as a Debate to encourage further discussion and disagreement, provides definitions of the major terminology used in

William R Hersh

2009-01-01

93

Evaluating consumer informatics: learning from health campaign research.  

PubMed

This paper suggests that some conceptual models used in health communication campaigns as well as the "uses and gratifications" approach might be successfully integrated into the evaluation of consumer informatics. These models and tools are especially pertinent when the desired outcomes of media health interventions are therapeutic changes in public knowledge, motivations, attitudes and patient behavior PMID:15360992

Logan, Robert A

2004-01-01

94

Teaching a Web-based course in health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Librarians at Virginia Commonwealth University teach a course in Health Informatics as part of a distance learning Doctoral program for allied health professionals. This paper discusses the experience of developing and delivering a Web-based course for the curriculum. Lessons learned fall into the categories of communication, technology, and resources.

Lynne U. Turman; Phyllis C. Self; Pascal V. Calarco

2004-01-01

95

Evaluation in health informatics: social network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis comprises a set of research methods that can be used to analyze the relationships among entities such as people, departments, and organizations. The purpose of the analysis is to discover patterns of relationships that affect both individual and organizational attitudes and behavior such as the adoption, diffusion, and use of new medical informatics applications. This paper presents

James G. Anderson

2002-01-01

96

Evaluation in health informatics: computer simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evaluation of complex medical informatics applications involves not only the information system, but also its impact on the organizational environment in which it is implemented. In instances where these applications cannot be evaluated with traditional experimental methods, computer simulation provides a flexible approach to evaluation. The construction of a computer simulation model involves the development of a model that

James G. Anderson

2002-01-01

97

Consumer health informatics: a consensus description and commentary from American Medical Informatics Association members.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Although interest in Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) has increased, a consensus definition of CHI does not yet exist. PURPOSE: To conduct a hypothesis-generating survey of AMIA members regarding definition and research agenda for CHI. METHODS: We solicited participation among AMIA members in an Internet-based survey focusing on issues related to a definition of CHI. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-five AMIA members responded. Participants indicated a broad spectrum of topics important to CHI including "self-help for disease management" and "patient access to their own medical records." CHI research was felt to rely heavily on public health methods such as epidemiology and outcomes research, a paradigm shift from traditional medical informatics. Responses indicated a perceived lack of funding and need for further research in CHI. CONCLUSIONS: A working definition should emphasize the multidisciplinary nature of CHI, include consumer input into CHI design, and focus on public health approaches to evaluation. PMID:11825193

Houston, T. K.; Chang, B. L.; Brown, S.; Kukafka, R.

2001-01-01

98

Telemedicine and Medical Informatics: The Global Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Telemedicine is brought to life by contemporary changes of our world and summarizes the entire range of services that are at the crossroad of traditional healthcare and information technology. It is believed that eHealth can help in solving critical issues of rising costs, care for ageing and housebound population, staff shortage. It is a feasible tool to provide routine as

F. Lievens; M. Jordanova

2007-01-01

99

Web-enabling an Integrated Health Informatics Angel Petrovski and John Grundy  

E-print Network

Web-enabling an Integrated Health Informatics System Angel Petrovski and John Grundy Department devices [1, 2, 3]. For example, in Health Informatics there is typically a range of stakeholders who of these technologies in order to realise a prototype of the integrated health informatics system outlined above. We

Grundy, John

100

IHI 2012 CALL FOR PAPERS ACM SIGHIT International Health Informatics Symposium  

E-print Network

IHI 2012 ­ CALL FOR PAPERS 2nd ACM SIGHIT International Health Informatics Symposium January 28 Special Interest Group on Health Informatics (SIGHIT). It is ACM's premier community forum concerned highlights the most novel technical contributions in computing- oriented health informatics and the related

Xu, Jianliang

101

PhD SCHOLARSHIPS in Computers, Systems and Health Centre for Health Informatics  

E-print Network

PhD SCHOLARSHIPS in Computers, Systems and Health Innovation Centre for Health Informatics We, Candidates may have a clinical or a technical background. We welcome applications from those with a technical/biomedical informatics; 3. Potential for completing a PhD; 4. Good organisational skills and demonstrated capacity

New South Wales, University of

102

Bioengineering Undergraduate Curriculum Bioengineering Health Care Informatics (BHI)  

E-print Network

Bioengineering Undergraduate Curriculum Bioengineering Health Care Informatics (BHI) Semester 1 ENGH 101 Composition 3 BENG 101 Intro to Bioengineering 3 ECON 103 Cont. Microecon. Principles 3 CS 222 Literature Elective** 3 17 16 Semester 5 Semester 6 BENG 320 Bioengineering Signals & Sys.3 BENG 301

103

Christian Bhm University for Health Informatics and Technology  

E-print Network

Christian Böhm University for Health Informatics and Technology Powerful Database Primitives to Support High Performance Data Mining Tutorial, IEEE Int. Conf. on Data Mining, Dec/09/2002 ChristianBöhm 2 120 MotivationMotivation #12;ChristianBöhm 3 120 High Performance Data Mining Fast decisions require

Kriegel, Hans-Peter

104

electronic Journal of Health Informatics www.eJHI.net  

E-print Network

electronic Journal of Health Informatics www.eJHI.net 2012; Vol 7(2):e12 Aged Care IT in Australia of Wollongong Abstract This paper reviews the development of aged care IT innovations in Australia in the past decade. It starts with a brief description of the establishment of the Aged Care eConnect project

Yu, Ping

105

Integrated approaches to health informatics research and development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper looks at a number of approaches to health informatics that support decision-making relevant to the integrated development and management of information systems with clinical and managerial practices in healthcare. Its main aim is to explore three such approaches for integrated development, the soft information systems and technologies methodology, participative simulation modelling and stakeholder analysis. A description of the

Chris Atkinson; Tillal Eldabi; Ray J. Paul; Athanasia Pouloudi

2002-01-01

106

Decision Support Systems from a Health Informatics Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our theme in this study is decision support systems in a health informatics context. A decision support system can be approached from two major disciplinary perspectives, those of information systems science and artificial intelligence, which offer different conceptualisations of a decision support system. From an information systems science perspective, the approaches taken have been functionalist and development- and implementation-oriented, resulting

PIRKKO NYKÄNEN

2000-01-01

107

Studying health informatics from a distance: issues, problems and experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sheffield University has recently introduced a new Health Informatics Masters degree by distance learning. This paper documents the initial experiences of setting up, managing and delivering this course. The three parts of the paper cover motivation and background, design and content, and the issues, observations and problems relating to the course respectively. The latter relate to the logistics of delivery

R. Bacigalupo; P. Bath; A. Booth; B. Eaglestone; P. Procter

2001-01-01

108

UC Irvine Health Affairs Information Services, Clinical Informatics QA Portal User Guide SOP No.: CI-002  

E-print Network

UC Irvine Health Affairs Information Services, Clinical Informatics QA Portal User Guide SOP No ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Clinical Informatics User Provision Procedure Page 1/10 Step Action 1 Access to QA Portal You can access QA Analytics /Dashboards #12;UC Irvine Health Affairs Information Services, Clinical Informatics QA Portal User

George, Steven C.

109

Markov Logic Networks in Health Informatics Shalini Ghosh, Natarajan Shankar, Sam Owre, Sean David  

E-print Network

informatics. We focus on two important problems in this domain: (1) improving various clinical criteria usedMarkov Logic Networks in Health Informatics Shalini Ghosh, Natarajan Shankar, Sam Owre, Sean David , Gary Swan, Patrick Lincoln SRI International, Menlo Park, CA Abstract Health informatics is a fertile

Ghosh, Shalini

110

Global Health Seminar Series  

E-print Network

Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Moving beyond millennium targets in global health health efforts, they can also detract attention from deeper underlying challenges in global health global health "targets" and on-the-ground realities that must be addressed by global health policy

Klein, Ophir

111

Graduate Research Assistant Position in Health Informatics One Graduate Research Assistant position is available at Department of Health Management and  

E-print Network

of Health Management and Informatics University of Missouri School of Medicine CE728 Clinical Support Graduate Research Assistant Position in Health Informatics One Graduate Research Assistant position is available at Department of Health Management and Informatics (HMI) for full time resident

Noble, James S.

112

White Paper: Developing Informatics Tools and Strategies for Consumer-centered Health Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the emphasis on individuals' active partnership in health care grows, so does the public's need for effective, comprehensible consumer health resources. Consumer health informatics has the potential to provide frameworks and strategies for designing effective health communication tools that empower users and improve their health decisions. This article presents an overview of the consumer health informatics field, discusses promising

Alla Keselman; Robert Logan; Catherine Arnott-Smith; Gondy Leroy; Qing Zeng-Treitler

2008-01-01

113

A review of analytics and clinical informatics in health care.  

PubMed

Federal investment in health information technology has incentivized the adoption of electronic health record systems by physicians and health care organizations; the result has been a massive rise in the collection of patient data in electronic form (i.e. "Big Data"). Health care systems have leveraged Big Data for quality and performance improvements using analytics-the systematic use of data combined with quantitative as well as qualitative analysis to make decisions. Analytics have been utilized in various aspects of health care including predictive risk assessment, clinical decision support, home health monitoring, finance, and resource allocation. Visual analytics is one example of an analytics technique with an array of health care and research applications that are well described in the literature. The proliferation of Big Data and analytics in health care has spawned a growing demand for clinical informatics professionals who can bridge the gap between the medical and information sciences. PMID:24696396

Simpao, Allan F; Ahumada, Luis M; Gálvez, Jorge A; Rehman, Mohamed A

2014-04-01

114

Global health diplomacy.  

PubMed

A variety of shifts emergent with globalization, which are reflected in part by nascent programs in "Global Public Health," "Global Health Sciences," and "Global Health," are redefining international public health. We explore three of these shifts as a critical discourse and intervention in global health diplomacy: the expansion in non-governmental organization participation in international health programs, the globalization of science and pharmaceutical research, and the use of militarized languages of biosecurity to recast public health programs. Using contemporary anthropological and international health literature, we offer a critical yet hopeful exploration of the implications of these shifts for critical inquiry, health, and the health professions. PMID:18958783

Adams, Vincanne; Novotny, Thomas E; Leslie, Hannah

2008-01-01

115

Education and training in health informatics: the IT-EDUCTRA project  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this contribution both the EDUCTRA project of the European Advanced Informatics in Medicine Programme and the IT-EDUCTRA project of the Telematics Applications Programme (Health Sector) are described. EDUCTRA had as aim to investigate which gaps in knowledge health professionals have with respect to health informatics and to suggest ways to remedy this. It was assumed that health professionals had

A. Hasman

1998-01-01

116

WHO views on perspectives in health informatics.  

PubMed

The wider use of telematics in public health and patient care will be a very important strategy for Member States, and one that can help bring expert knowledge to new areas and institutions in a cost-effective and rapid manner. However, such a strategy should take into account a number of elements that are given below. Health telematics systems and services should be dictated by health need s and by clinical and public health standards, not be technology-driven. The values and principles of Health for All (HFA), notably equity, sustainability, participation and accountability, should apply fully to the development of health telematics. Health telematics requires new skills from the relevant decision-makers , operators and users, calling for a mix of participatory education, skills training, continuing professional education and lifelong learning. Given the fast rate of technological obsolescence and changing price-performance ratios, countries will benefit from closer collaboration on the development of technological standards, compatibility, open architecture, competitive prices and pilot applications. Managing health information developments in an effective and rational way at the level of the European Region will require the major organizations active in this field to enter into more formal agreements of cooperation than is the case today; most importantly, this will involve World Health Organization (WHO), the European Commission and Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). PMID:10978905

Roger France, F H

2000-09-01

117

Unobtrusive sensing and wearable devices for health informatics.  

PubMed

The aging population, prevalence of chronic diseases, and outbreaks of infectious diseases are some of the major challenges of our present-day society. To address these unmet healthcare needs, especially for the early prediction and treatment of major diseases, health informatics, which deals with the acquisition, transmission, processing, storage, retrieval, and use of health information, has emerged as an active area of interdisciplinary research. In particular, acquisition of health-related information by unobtrusive sensing and wearable technologies is considered as a cornerstone in health informatics. Sensors can be weaved or integrated into clothing, accessories, and the living environment, such that health information can be acquired seamlessly and pervasively in daily living. Sensors can even be designed as stick-on electronic tattoos or directly printed onto human skin to enable long-term health monitoring. This paper aims to provide an overview of four emerging unobtrusive and wearable technologies, which are essential to the realization of pervasive health information acquisition, including: (1) unobtrusive sensing methods, (2) smart textile technology, (3) flexible-stretchable-printable electronics, and (4) sensor fusion, and then to identify some future directions of research. PMID:24759283

Zheng, Ya-Li; Ding, Xiao-Rong; Poon, Carmen Chung Yan; Lo, Benny Ping Lai; Zhang, Heye; Zhou, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Zhao, Ni; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

2014-05-01

118

Developing Informatics Tools and Strategies for Consumer-centered Health Communication  

PubMed Central

As the emphasis on individuals' active partnership in health care grows, so does the public's need for effective, comprehensible consumer health resources. Consumer health informatics has the potential to provide frameworks and strategies for designing effective health communication tools that empower users and improve their health decisions. This article presents an overview of the consumer health informatics field, discusses promising approaches to supporting health communication, and identifies challenges plus direction for future research and development. The authors' recommendations emphasize the need for drawing upon communication and social science theories of information behavior, reaching out to consumers via a range of traditional and novel formats, gaining better understanding of the public's health information needs, and developing informatics solutions for tailoring resources to users' needs and competencies. This article was written as a scholarly outreach and leadership project by members of the American Medical Informatics Association's Consumer Health Informatics Working Group. PMID:18436895

Keselman, Alla; Logan, Robert; Smith, Catherine Arnott; Leroy, Gondy; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

2008-01-01

119

The state public health informatics in saudi arabia.  

PubMed

The purpose of this exploratory study is to provide an overview on the state of Public health informatics (PHI) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The study defines PHI and discusses the current status and future challenges which face the Saudi health system. Data collection methods included interviews with public health and PHI experts, and database search, using relevant keyword terms in PubMed. Results of this research show that public health information systems (PHIS) are not well-developed to deliver efficient health care in Saudi Arabia. There are several challenges that need to be addressed with the implementation of PHIS such as the need for readiness assessment, resistant to change, integration of systems, and confidentiality and privacy of health information. Future challenges include profiling users, developing a national PHIS and monitoring the impact of PHIS on healthcare outcomes need to be addressed. PMID:25000065

Bahkali, Salwa; Almaiman, Ahmad; Almadani, Wedad; Househ, Mowafa; El Metwally, Ashraf

2014-01-01

120

Health Informatics and Nursing in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

ursing's role in managing information in health service organizations and care facilities in Canada is similar to that of other developed countries. The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) has taken the position that \\

Kathryn J. Hannah

121

STARE-HI - Statement on reporting of evaluation studies in Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Development of guidelines for publication of evaluation studies of Health Infor- matics applications. Methods: An initial list of issues to be addressed in reports on evaluation studies was drafted based on experiences as editors and reviewers of journals in Health Informatics and as authors of systematic reviews of Health Informatics studies, taking into account guide- lines for reporting of

Jan L. Talmon; Elske Ammenwerth; Jytte Brender; Nicolette De Keizer; Pirkko Nykänen; Michael Rigby

2009-01-01

122

Clinical Research Informatics and Electronic Health Record Data  

PubMed Central

Summary Objectives The goal of this survey is to discuss the impact of the growing availability of electronic health record (EHR) data on the evolving field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI), which is the union of biomedical research and informatics. Results Major challenges for the use of EHR-derived data for research include the lack of standard methods for ensuring that data quality, completeness, and provenance are sufficient to assess the appropriateness of its use for research. Areas that need continued emphasis include methods for integrating data from heterogeneous sources, guidelines (including explicit phenotype definitions) for using these data in both pragmatic clinical trials and observational investigations, strong data governance to better understand and control quality of enterprise data, and promotion of national standards for representing and using clinical data. Conclusions The use of EHR data has become a priority in CRI. Awareness of underlying clinical data collection processes will be essential in order to leverage these data for clinical research and patient care, and will require multi-disciplinary teams representing clinical research, informatics, and healthcare operations. Considerations for the use of EHR data provide a starting point for practical applications and a CRI research agenda, which will be facilitated by CRI’s key role in the infrastructure of a learning healthcare system. PMID:25123746

Horvath, M. M.; Rusincovitch, S. A.

2014-01-01

123

Consumer health informatics: the medical librarian's role.  

PubMed

Growing consumer interest in health-related information has created a need for professionals to manage, provide, and interpret such material. In preparing for the new demands of the market, HIM professionals can learn from the example of medical librarians, who are already working to meet those needs. PMID:10182505

Martin, E R

1998-09-01

124

State Mental Health Authorities and Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

As state mental health authorities (SMHAs) attempt to promote evidence-based practices within their systems of care, they often ignore the enormous potential of information technology. Most of the tasks that Charles Rapp and colleagues have expertly identified in the preceding article can be addressed more efficiently with computerized approaches than with traditional approaches to education, implementation, training, and quality assurance.

Robert E. Drake; Gregory B. Teague; Ken Gersing

2005-01-01

125

Two human-centered approaches to health informatics: Cognitive systems engineering and usability  

E-print Network

Two human-centered approaches to health informatics: Cognitive systems engineering and usability the approaches and methods that will meet their needs. Keywords: health information systems, human offers new insights into human-centered health information systems research. However, because

Boyer, Edmond

126

Global Health Field Experience  

E-print Network

Global Health Field Experience Guide Yale College Center for International and Professional in global health and looking for guidance on where to begin. It provides valuable information about choosing of global health field work. With the suggestions and tools listed here, we hope that students new to global

127

Global Health Seminar Series  

E-print Network

Bay Area Global Health Seminar Series Global HIV/AIDS at the crossroads: Where do we go from here? Join us for the inaugural Bay Area Global Health Seminar, a quarterly series of moderated salon seminar will feature a different global health topic and be hosted by one of the four participating

Klein, Ophir

128

Evidence-based Patient Choice and Consumer health informatics in the Internet age  

PubMed Central

In this paper we explore current access to and barriers to health information for consumers. We discuss how computers and other developments in information technology are ushering in the era of consumer health informatics , and the potential that lies ahead. It is clear that we witness a period in which the public will have unprecedented ability to access information and to participate actively in evidence-based health care. We propose that consumer health informatics be regarded as a whole new academic discipline, one that should be devoted to the exploration of the new possibilities that informatics is creating for consumers in relation to health and health care issues. PMID:11720961

2001-01-01

129

Management and Evaluation of a Pan-Canadian Graduate Training Program in Health Informatics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eight Canadian universities partnered to establish a Collaborative Health Informatics PhD/Postdoc Strategic Training Program (CHPSTP). The 6-year goal was to increase research capacity in health informatics in Canada. Three cohorts of 20 trainees participated in the training, which included online Research Learning Experiences, annual face-to-face…

Hebert, Marilynne; Lau, Francis

2010-01-01

130

The State and Profile of Open Source Software Projects in health and medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeLittle has been published about the application profiles and development patterns of open source software (OSS) in health and medical informatics. This study explores these issues with an analysis of health and medical informatics related OSS projects on SourceForge, a large repository of open source projects.

Balaji Janamanchi; Evangelos Katsamakas; Wullianallur Raghupathi; Wei Gao

2009-01-01

131

The New Global Health  

PubMed Central

Global health reflects the realities of globalization, including worldwide dissemination of infectious and noninfectious public health risks. Global health architecture is complex and better coordination is needed between multiple organizations. Three overlapping themes determine global health action and prioritization: development, security, and public health. These themes play out against a background of demographic change, socioeconomic development, and urbanization. Infectious diseases remain critical factors, but are no longer the major cause of global illness and death. Traditional indicators of public health, such as maternal and infant mortality rates no longer describe the health status of whole societies; this change highlights the need for investment in vital registration and disease-specific reporting. Noncommunicable diseases, injuries, and mental health will require greater attention from the world in the future. The new global health requires broader engagement by health organizations and all countries for the objectives of health equity, access, and coverage as priorities beyond the Millennium Development Goals are set. PMID:23876365

Simone, Patricia M.; Davison, Veronica; Slutsker, Laurence

2013-01-01

132

Ethics and Health Informatics: Users, Standards, and Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a After reading this chapter, you should know the answers to these questions:\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Why is ethics important to informatics?\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a What are the leading ethical issues that arise in health care informatics?\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a What are examples of appropriate and inappropriate uses and users for health-related software?\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Why does the establishment of standards touch on ethical issues?\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Why does

Kenneth W. Goodman; Randolph A. Miller

133

GLOBAL HEALTH STUDENTTRAVELPOLICY FORPRESENTINGATPROFESSIONALCONFERENCES  

E-print Network

1 GLOBAL HEALTH STUDENTTRAVELPOLICY FORPRESENTINGATPROFESSIONALCONFERENCES If you are invited to present global health research at a national conference, you may be eligible to have some of the costs, subject to the limitations described below, funded by the Global Health Center. If you wish to apply

Bukauskas, Feliksas

134

Global Oral Health Inequalities  

PubMed Central

Despite impressive worldwide improvements in oral health, inequalities in oral health status among and within countries remain a daunting public health challenge. Oral health inequalities arise from a complex web of health determinants, including social, behavioral, economic, genetic, environmental, and health system factors. Eliminating these inequalities cannot be accomplished in isolation of oral health from overall health, or without recognizing that oral health is influenced at multiple individual, family, community, and health systems levels. For several reasons, this is an opportune time for global efforts targeted at reducing oral health inequalities. Global health is increasingly viewed not just as a humanitarian obligation, but also as a vehicle for health diplomacy and part of the broader mission to reduce poverty, build stronger economies, and strengthen global security. Despite the global economic recession, there are trends that portend well for support of global health efforts: increased globalization of research and development, growing investment from private philanthropy, an absolute growth of spending in research and innovation, and an enhanced interest in global health among young people. More systematic and far-reaching efforts will be required to address oral health inequalities through the engagement of oral health funders and sponsors of research, with partners from multiple public and private sectors. The oral health community must be “at the table” with other health disciplines and create opportunities for eliminating inequalities through collaborations that can harness both the intellectual and financial resources of multiple sectors and institutions. PMID:21490232

Garcia, I.; Tabak, L.A.

2011-01-01

135

The State of Information and Communication Technology and Health Informatics in Ghana  

PubMed Central

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has become a major tool in delivery of health services and has had an innovative impact on quality of life. ICT is affecting the way healthcare is delivered to clients. In this paper, we discuss the state of ICT and health informatics in Ghana. We also discuss the state of various relevant infrastructures for the successful implementation of ehealth projects. We analyse the past and present state of health informatics in Ghana, in comparison to other African countries. We also review the challenges facing successful implementation of health informatics projects in Ghana and suggest possible solutions. PMID:23569633

Achampong, Emmanuel Kusi

2012-01-01

136

The Future of Public Health Informatics: Alternative Scenarios and Recommended Strategies  

PubMed Central

Background: In October 2013, the Public Health Informatics Institute (PHII) and Institute for Alternative Futures (IAF) convened a multidisciplinary group of experts to evaluate forces shaping public health informatics (PHI) in the United States, with the aim of identifying upcoming challenges and opportunities. The PHI workshop was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as part of its larger strategic planning process for public health and primary care. Workshop Context: During the two-day workshop, nine experts from the public and private sectors analyzed and discussed the implications of four scenarios regarding the United States economy, health care system, information technology (IT) sector, and their potential impacts on public health in the next 10 years, by 2023. Workshop participants considered the potential role of the public health sector in addressing population health challenges in each scenario, and then identified specific informatics goals and strategies needed for the sector to succeed in this role. Recommendations and Conclusion: Participants developed recommendations for the public health informatics field and for public health overall in the coming decade. These included the need to rely more heavily on intersectoral collaborations across public and private sectors, to improve data infrastructure and workforce capacity at all levels of the public health enterprise, to expand the evidence base regarding effectiveness of informatics-based public health initiatives, and to communicate strategically with elected officials and other key stakeholders regarding the potential for informatics-based solutions to have an impact on population health.

Edmunds, Margo; Thorpe, Lorna; Sepulveda, Martin; Bezold, Clem; Ross, David A.

2014-01-01

137

DESIGNING AND DELIVERING A MEDICAL INFORMATICS COURSE TO GRADUATE HEALTH MANAGEMENT STUDENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical Informatics is a rapidly growing field that lies at the intersection of patient care, the healthcare system environment, and information and communication technologies. In this paper, we report on the development of a required graduate course in Medical Informatics. The overall objective of the course is to provide the students with knowledge of: a) the organization of health information

Sathasivam Mathiyalakan

138

Population Health Sciences/Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 650 Introduction to SAS Programming for Population Health  

E-print Network

1 Population Health Sciences/Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 650 Introduction to SAS using the DATA step and.Import Wizard. 4. Use SAS libraries to create and manage permanent SAS datasets and data steps to manage and analyze research data. 12. Understand the basis of using Macros in SAS 13. Use

Sheridan, Jennifer

139

Global Health/International Global Health/International Experiences Experiences  

E-print Network

Global Health/International Global Health/International Experiences Experiences Year Out Opportunities Year Out Opportunities Nancy Biller Nancy Biller Global Health Programs Office Global Health Programs Office nbiller@exchange.upenn.edu nbiller@exchange.upenn.edu Global Health/International Global

Bushman, Frederic

140

A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

We present a searchable repository of codes of ethics and standards in health informatics. It is built using state-of-the-art search algorithms and technologies. The repository will be potentially beneficial for public health practitioners, researchers, and software developers in finding and comparing ethics topics of interest. Public health clinics, clinicians, and researchers can use the repository platform as a one-stop reference for various ethics codes and standards. In addition, the repository interface is built for easy navigation, fast search, and side-by-side comparative reading of documents. Our selection criteria for codes and standards are two-fold; firstly, to maintain intellectual property rights, we index only codes and standards freely available on the internet. Secondly, major international, regional, and national health informatics bodies across the globe are surveyed with the aim of understanding the landscape in this domain. We also look at prevalent technical standards in health informatics from major bodies such as the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our repository contains codes of ethics from the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), the iHealth Coalition (iHC), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Australasian College of Health Informatics (ACHI), the British Computer Society (BCS), and the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP), with room for adding more in the future. Our major contribution is enhancing the findability of codes and standards related to health informatics ethics by compilation and unified access through the health informatics ethics repository. PMID:25422725

Zaïane, Osmar R.

2014-01-01

141

Requirements for Realizing the Full Potential of Informatics in the Field of Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper proposes a zero concept, health-oriented approach to applying informatics to two health care problems: first, the lack of easily understood and used terminology linking health problems and interventions to the concept of "health"; and second, the lack of a unifying principle on which to base all aspects of health care. (DB)

Wittenstrom, John C.

1991-01-01

142

Global health research strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of health systems analysis points to the need to specify theoretically the circumstances under which health disparities exist in the USA as well as in other countries. This paper highlights the importance of developing major themes in global health research and formulating research strategies to investigate the dynamic forces of health status change and human adaptation in small

Thomas T. H. Wan

2010-01-01

143

About the Global Health Minor Global Health Minor Goals  

E-print Network

About the Global Health Minor Global Health Minor Goals The Global Health (GLBHL) minor is designed strategies for addressing a range of contemporary global health problems. Upon completion of the GLBHL minor, students will: Have a greater critical understanding of the complexity of contemporary global health

Guiltinan, Mark

144

By: Latarsha Chisholm, MSW, Ph.D. Department of Health Management & Informatics  

E-print Network

report their health as fair or poor compared to White women Black, Hispanic, and American IndianBy: Latarsha Chisholm, MSW, Ph.D. Department of Health Management & Informatics University of Central Florida #12;Health Disparities Health disparities refers to population-specific differences

Wu, Shin-Tson

145

Globalization and Health.  

PubMed

This debut editorial of Globalization and Health introduces the journal, briefly delineating its goals and objectives and outlines its scope of subject matter. 'Open Access' publishing is expected to become an increasingly important format for peer reviewed academic journals and that Globalization and Health is 'Open Access' is appropriate. The rationale behind starting a journal dedicated to globalization and health is three fold:Firstly: Globalization is reshaping the social geography within which we might strive to create health or prevent disease. The determinants of health - be they a SARS virus or a predilection for fatty foods - have joined us in our global mobility. Driven by economic liberalization and changing technologies, the phenomenon of 'access' is likely to dominate to an increasing extent the unfolding experience of human disease and wellbeing.Secondly: Understanding globalization as a subject matter itself needs certain benchmarks and barometers of its successes and failings. Health is one such barometer. It is a marker of social infrastructure and social welfare and as such can be used to either sound an alarm or give a victory cheer as our interconnectedness hurts and heals the populations we serve.And lastly: In as much as globalization can have an effect on health, it is also true that health and disease has an effect on globalization as exemplified by the existence of quarantine laws and the devastating economic effects of the AIDS pandemic.A balanced view would propose that the effects of globalization on health (and health systems) are neither universally good nor bad, but rather context specific. If the dialogue pertaining to globalization is to be directed or biased in any direction, then it must be this: that we consider the poor first. PMID:15847699

Martin, Greg

2005-04-22

146

Information Systems Methodology for Building Theory in Health Informatics: The Argument for a Structured Approach to Case Study Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The health care environment is frequently described as hyperturbulent and information intensive. However, is the health care systems environment significantly different from the information systems environment in other industries? Are the methodologies and frameworks developed within the context of Information Systems research applicable to Health Informatics? This paper compares and contrasts the disciplines of Information Systems and Health Informatics including

A. Alison Plummer

2001-01-01

147

Global Health Policy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Information on global health conditions online is quite extensive, though it can be hard to separate the wheat from the chaff. Created and operated by the Kaiser Family Foundation (with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), the Global Health Policy site is designed for journalists and the general public. The site is a frequently-updated and high-quality resource on information about the global health situation regarding HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. The site provides country-level data on these conditions, along recent articles on these matters. Additionally, visitors can sign up to receive email notifications and RSS feeds.

148

NN. Joint JD/MHI (Master of Health Informatics) Degree Program: NKU Chase College of Law and the NKU College of Informatics offer a joint JD/MHI degree.  

E-print Network

addresses both areas of clinical informatics and health information systems, with a focus organizations, learn various clinical informatics datahandling methods, and solve particular problemsNN. Joint JD/MHI (Master of Health Informatics) Degree Program: NKU Chase College of Law

Acosta, Charles A.

149

Healthcare Informatics for Mental Health Recent Advances and the Outlook for the Future  

E-print Network

Healthcare Informatics for Mental Health Recent Advances and the Outlook for the Future Hamed and their surrounding environment (e.g., by monitoring their CO2 level [13]). Mental health care has seen less. Electronic records are relatively recent in mental health care and tend to be poorly integrated in clinical

Purver, Matthew

150

Global Health Council  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created in 1972, the Global Health Council (then known as the National Council of International Health) was created to identify priority world health problems and report on them to a wide range of parties, including government agencies and the global health community. In order to disseminate its findings and keep the public informed, the Council has created this well-organized website. The homepage offers visitors the basic layout of the site's contents, as it includes a selection of news briefs dealing with world health concerns and information on the most recent accomplishments of the Council. The top of the homepage offers subject links to the main programmatic areas of interest to the Council: women's health, child health, HIV/AIDS, and infectious disease. Of course, there is a strong publication section, which includes such timely documents as "Faith in Action: Examining the Role of Faith-Based Organizations in Addressing HIV/AIDS" and "Preventing Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Persons".

151

Health Informatics: Building a Healthcare Future Through Trusted Information J. Maeder and F. J. Martin-Sanchez, (Eds)  

E-print Network

Health Informatics: Building a Healthcare Future Through Trusted Information J. Maeder and F. J. This paper uses empirical examples from two Australian health informatics projects to illustrate. Martin-Sanchez, (Eds) IOS Press, 2012. pp. 58- 63 1 Managing collaboration across boundaries in health

Yu, Ping

152

Global Focus Microscope The Global Health Challenge  

E-print Network

Summer 2006 BIKE RIDE FOR GLOBAL HEALTH ANATOMY RECONFIGURED ALUMNI NEWS AND FEATURES Goldfor Teaching to raise money for and awareness of global health issues. I trust you'll find this a "moving" issue Bike Ride for Global Health 14 NJMS Student Pursues Research at NIH 14 Accolades 15 A Large Step

153

Globalism and Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the advent of twenty-four-hour news media, local, state, and national agencies' warnings and with the explosive role of the Internet, people are more aware of global health concerns that may have significant consequences for the world's population. As international travel continues to increase, health care professionals around the world are…

Rowland, Michael L.

2011-01-01

154

STARE-HI – Statement on Reporting of Evaluation Studies in Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Improving the quality of reporting of evaluation studies in health informatics is an important requirement towards the vision of evidence-based health informatics. The STARE-HI – Statement on Reporting of Evaluation Studies in health informatics, published in 2009, provides guidelines on the elements to be contained in an evaluation study report. Objectives To elaborate on and provide a rationale for the principles of STARE-HI and to guide authors and readers of evaluation studies in health informatics by providing explanatory examples of reporting. Methods A group of methodologists, researchers and editors prepared the present elaboration of the STARE-HI statement and selected examples from the literature. Results The 35 STARE-HI items to be addressed in evaluation papers describing health informatics interventions are discussed one by one and each is extended with examples and elaborations. Conclusion The STARE-HI statement and this elaboration document should be helpful resources to improve reporting of both quantitative and qualitative evaluation studies. Evaluation manuscripts adhering to the principles will enable readers of such papers to better place the studies in a proper context and judge their validity and generalizability, and thus in turn optimize the exploitation of the evidence contained therein. Limitations This paper is based on experiences of a group of editors, reviewers, authors of systematic reviews and readers of the scientific literature. The applicability of the details of these principles has to evolve as a function of their use in practice. PMID:24155788

Brender, J.; Talmon, J.; de Keizer, N.; Nykänen, P.; Rigby, M.; Ammenwerth, E.

2013-01-01

155

Global Health Center MICROGRANT PROGRAM  

E-print Network

Global Health Center MICROGRANT PROGRAM Request for Applications The Einstein Global Health Center Microgrant Program aims to provide small grants to help jumpstart faculty members' global health efforts. It is expected that the microgrants will lead to creation of new global health initiatives or further leveraging

Yates, Andrew

156

Global Health/International Experiences  

E-print Network

Global Health/International Experiences Year Out Opportunities Nancy Biller Global Health Programs Office nbiller@exchange.upenn.edu http://www.med.upenn.edu/globalhealth/index.shtml #12;Global Health-Fellowships-for-Medical-Students/ Fogarty Global Health Program for Fellows & Scholars (mainly for individuals from low-resource areas

Bushman, Frederic

157

Adapting social media as a scaffolding tool for teaching health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health informatics is an applied hybrid discipline of health and life sciences, computer science and business. Teaching this subject to undergraduate students, presents the challenge of learning without the assistance of internship or work experience that enable placing the learning in context. We used the university's learning management software as a form of social medium to stimulate discussions in preparation

Karen Day; Stewart Wells

2009-01-01

158

The informatics nurse specialist role in electronic health record usability evaluation.  

PubMed

Health information technology is revolutionizing the way we interact with health-related data. One example of this can be seen in the rising adoption rates of electronic health records by healthcare providers. Nursing plays a vital role in electronic health record adoption, not only because of their numbers but also their intimate understanding of workflow. The success of an electronic health record also relies on how usable the software is for clinicians, and a thorough usability evaluation is needed before implementing a system within an organization. Not all nurses have the knowledge and skills to perform extensive usability testing; therefore, the informatics nurse specialist plays a critical role in the process. This article will discuss core usability principles, provide a framework for applying these concepts, and explore the role of the informatics nurse specialist in electronic health record evaluation. Health information technology is fundamentally changing the clinical practice environment, and many nurses are seeking leadership positions in the field of informatics. As technology and software become more sophisticated, usability principles must be used under theguidance of the informatics nurse specialist to provide a relevant, robust, and well-designed electronic health record to address the needs of the busy clinician. PMID:24473121

Rojas, Crystal L; Seckman, Charlotte A

2014-05-01

159

Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Health Informatics Masters Program at KSAU-HS University, Saudi Arabia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Saudi health sector has witnessed a significant progress in recent decades with some Saudi hospitals receiving international recognition. However, this progress has not been accompanied by the same advancement in the health informatics field whose applications have become a necessity for hospitals in order to achieve important objectives such…

Majid, Altuwaijri

2007-01-01

160

Health informatics education for clinicians and managers - What's holding up progress?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports outcomes of a national survey of health informatics (HI) education and training carried out in the UK. A questionnaire to elicit details of HI and IT skills teaching was derived from a national consensus document (Learning to Manage Health Information, LtMHI). Forms were sent to all pre-qualification medical and nursing schools and to a stratified sample of

Jeannette Murphy; Katja Stramer; Susan Clamp; Penny Grubb; Julian Gosland; Sue Davis

2004-01-01

161

Technical Aspects of Data Protection in Health Care Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data protection comprises availability and data integrity as well as data confidentiality and privacy. We first consider security problems and their causes, and then measures against them. Finally, we recommend actions which should be taken independently of the construction of specific systems. Our main subject is distributed systems and medical networks: At present, most applications of informatics (computer science) in

Andreas Pfitzmann; Birgit Pfitzmann

1992-01-01

162

Informatics and Telematics in Health. Present and Potential Uses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report focuses on technical issues associated with informatics--a term covering all aspects of the development and operations of information systems, the supporting computer methodology and technology, and the supporting telecommunications links. The first of six chapters discusses the purpose of the report together with basic assumptions…

World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

163

MSc Nutrition for Global Health  

E-print Network

MSc Nutrition for Global Health The Mission of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine for Global Health 2009. formerly MSc Public Health Nutrition (PHN) #12;Aims and Objectives This course trains

Maizels, Rick

164

Globalization and Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Open-access peer-reviewed journals continue to grow in number and in scope, and those dealing with the future of public health are no exception. One of the latest is Globalization and Health, which provides â??a platform for research, knowledge sharing and debate on the topic of globalization and its effects on health, both positive and negative.â? With such a broad range, it is no surprise that the journal has included articles on the tobacco industry, intellectual property rights, the effect of trade agreements on health, and the dissemination of Western diets across the globe. The journal currently publishes everything from book reviews to debate articles, so interested parties should definitely take a look at their work and requirements for publication consideration.

165

A curricula-based comparison of biomedical and health informatics programs in the USA  

PubMed Central

Objective The field of Biomedical and Health Informatics (BMHI) continues to define itself, and there are many educational programs offering ‘informatics’ degrees with varied foci. The goal of this study was to develop a scheme for systematic comparison of programs across the entire BMHI spectrum and to identify commonalities among informatics curricula. Design Guided by several published competency sets, a grounded theory approach was used to develop a program/curricula categorization scheme based on the descriptions of 636 courses offered by 73 public health, nursing, health, medical, and bioinformatics programs in the USA. The scheme was then used to compare the programs in the aforementioned five informatics disciplines. Results The authors developed a Course-Based Informatics Program Categorization (CBIPC) scheme that can be used both to classify coursework for any BMHI educational program and to compare programs from the same or related disciplines. The application of CBIPC scheme to the analysis of public health, nursing, health, medical, and bioinformatics programs reveals distinct intradisciplinary curricular patterns and a common core of courses across the entire BMHI education domain. Limitations The study is based on descriptions of courses from the university's webpages. Thus, it is limited to sampling courses at one moment in time, and classification for the coding scheme is based primarily on course titles and course descriptions. Conclusion The CBIPC scheme combines empirical data about educational curricula from diverse informatics programs and several published competency sets. It also provides a foundation for discussion of BMHI education as a whole and can help define subdisciplinary competencies. PMID:21292707

Hemminger, Bradley M

2011-01-01

166

Beyond information access: Support for complex cognitive activities in public health informatics tools.  

PubMed

Public health professionals work with a variety of information sources to carry out their everyday activities. In recent years, interactive computational tools have become deeply embedded in such activities. Unlike the early days of computational tool use, the potential of tools nowadays is not limited to simply providing access to information; rather, they can act as powerful mediators of human-information discourse, enabling rich interaction with public health information. If public health informatics tools are designed and used properly, they can facilitate, enhance, and support the performance of complex cognitive activities that are essential to public health informatics, such as problem solving, forecasting, sense-making, and planning. However, the effective design and evaluation of public health informatics tools requires an understanding of the cognitive and perceptual issues pertaining to how humans work and think with information to perform such activities. This paper draws on research that has examined some of the relevant issues, including interaction design, complex cognition, and visual representations, to offer some human-centered design and evaluation considerations for public health informatics tools. PMID:23569645

Sedig, Kamran; Parsons, Paul; Dittmer, Mark; Ola, Oluwakemi

2012-01-01

167

On Determining Factors for Good Research in Biomedical and Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Summary Objective What are the determining factors for good research in medical informatics or, from a broader perspective, in biomedical and health informatics? Method From the many lessons learned during my professional career, I tried to identify a fair sampling of such factors. On the occasion of giving the IMIA Award of Excellence lecture during MedInfo 2013, they were presented for discussion. Results Sixteen determining factors (df) have been identified: early identification and promotion (df1), appropriate education (df2), stimulating persons and environments (df3), sufficient time and backtracking opportunities (df4), breadth of medical informatics competencies (df5), considering the necessary preconditions for good medical informatics research (df6), easy access to high-quality knowledge (df7), sufficient scientific career opportunities (df8), appropriate conditions for sustainable research (df9), ability to communicate and to solve problems (df10), as well as to convey research results (df11) in a highly inter- and multidisciplinary environment, ability to think for all and, when needed, taking the lead (df12), always staying unbiased (df13), always keeping doubt (df14), but also always trying to provide solutions (df15), and, finally, being aware that life is more (df16). Conclusions Medical Informatics is an inter- and multidisciplinary discipline “avant la lettre”. Compared to monodisciplinary research, inter- and multidisciplinary research does not only provide significant opportunities for solving major problems in science and in society. It also faces considerable additional challenges for medical informatics as a scientific field. The determining factors, presented here, are in my opinion crucial for conducting successful research and for developing a research career. Since medical informatics as a field has today become an important driving force for research progress, especially in biomedicine and health care, but also in fields like computer science, it may be helpful to consider such factors in relation with research and education in our discipline. PMID:24853031

2014-01-01

168

Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH  

E-print Network

Graduate Certificate in Global Health Fact Sheet · College of Public Health GRADUATE EDUCATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH Graduate Certificate in Global Health A UGA Graduate Program What is Global Health? Global boundaries. Our Mission The Center for Global Health, located within the College of Public Health

Arnold, Jonathan

169

Powerful concepts in global health  

PubMed Central

In this paper we emphasize the importance of questioning the global validity of significant concepts underpinning global health policy. This implies questioning the concept of global health as such and accepting that there is no global definition of the global. Further, we draw attention to ‘quality’ and ‘empowerment’ as examples of world-forming concepts. These concepts are exemplary for the gentle and quiet forms of power that underpin our reasoning within global health. PMID:25674576

Engebretsen, Eivind; Heggen, Kristin

2015-01-01

170

Facilitating informatics knowledge dissemination: targeted implementation resources for health care providers.  

PubMed

The AHRQ National Resource Center for Health IT (NRC) maintains a public Web site with a large repository of diverse informatics knowledge resources. The NRC recently added a new tool -- the Health IT Bibliography -- to better disseminate key resources to health care organizations. The bibliography filters resources from the NRC's larger online knowledge library, providing quicker access for those who desire to learn more about implementing clinical IT applications. PMID:18998794

Dixon, Brian E; Zafar, Atif; Whipple, Elizabeth C; Cravens, Gary D; McGowan, Julie J

2008-01-01

171

Online Social Networks for Personal Informatics to Promote Positive Health Behavior  

E-print Network

Online Social Networks for Personal Informatics to Promote Positive Health Behavior Noreen Kamal. This paper presents a survey of the literature on the models for the use of online social networks and models. INTRODUCTION Today, the explosion of on-line social network services has demonstrated that individuals

British Columbia, University of

172

Offering Distance Education in Health Informatics: The State of the Web Sites.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within the framework of a bi-national project, between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and four Israeli universities, a prototype database of programs and courses in health informatics was implemented. Examined Web sites particularly for courses offered via distance education and discusses results of a content analysis. (Author/LRW)

Lazinger, Susan; Handzel, Ruth

2003-01-01

173

Global Health and the Global Economic Crisis  

PubMed Central

Although the resources and knowledge for achieving improved global health exist, a new, critical paradigm on health as an aspect of human development, human security, and human rights is needed. Such a shift is required to sufficiently modify and credibly reduce the present dominance of perverse market forces on global health. New scientific discoveries can make wide-ranging contributions to improved health; however, improved global health depends on achieving greater social justice, economic redistribution, and enhanced democratization of production, caring social institutions for essential health care, education, and other public goods. As with the quest for an HIV vaccine, the challenge of improved global health requires an ambitious multidisciplinary research program. PMID:21330597

Gill, Stephen; Bakker, Isabella

2011-01-01

174

Why mental health matters to global health.  

PubMed

Global health has been defined as an area of study, research, and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. This article provides an overview of some central issues in global mental health in three parts. The first part demonstrates why mental health is relevant to global health by examining three key principles of global health: priority setting based on the burden of health problems, health inequalities and its global scope in particular in relation to the determinants and solutions for health problems. The second part considers and addresses the key critiques of global mental health: (a) that the "diagnoses" of mental disorders are not valid because there are no biological markers for these conditions; (b) that the strong association of social determinants undermines the use of biomedical interventions; (c) that the field is a proxy for the expansion of the pharmaceutical industry; and (d) that the actions of global mental health are equivalent to "medical imperialism" and it is a "psychiatric export." The final part discusses the opportunities for the field, piggybacking on the surge of interest in global health more broadly and on the growing acknowledgment of mental disorders as a key target for global health action. PMID:24595266

Patel, Vikram

2014-12-01

175

Security Informatics Security Informatics  

E-print Network

engineering, management information systems, economics, informatics or related disciplines. Our graduates is managed or with security incident response teams? #12;Sample M.S. Security Informatics Program of Study 1Security Informatics Security Informatics Security Informatics is the study and design

Camp, L. Jean

176

GLOBAL HEALTH Paying the poor  

E-print Network

GLOBAL HEALTH Paying the poor Using cash incentives to encourage healthy behaviour among poor communities is being hailed as a new silver bullet in global health. Megan Tan and GavinYamey investigate why this popular idea went so badly wrong in Guatemala Megan Tan masters student, Global Health Sciences, Gavin

Klein, Ophir

177

Excellence in Public & Global Health  

E-print Network

Excellence in Public & Global Health The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine & purpose 4 Strategic themes & actions 7 1 Research: Addressing public & global health needs 8 2 Education systems v Facilities vi Communications Assessing progress 17 Excellence in Public & Global Health

Maizels, Rick

178

INFORMATICS 4TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE  

E-print Network

, MBBS, MD, MS 12:30 Lunch, included in tuition #12;4th ANNUAL heALth iNformAtics 1:45 Clinical VirtualHEALTH INFORMATICS PROGRAM 4TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE The Integration of Care: Innovations and Informatics Office of Continuing Medical Education and the UC Davis Health Informatics Program www

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

179

Global Health Threats: Global Warming in Perspective  

E-print Network

Some authorities have claimed that global warming is one of the most—if not the most—important public health threat of this century. They do not, however, support this assertion by comparative analysis of the relative magnitude and severity of various health threats. Such an analysis, presented here, shows that other global health threats outrank global warming at present, and are likely to continue to do so through the foreseeable future, even under the warmest scenario developed by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Exaggerated and unsupported claims about the importance of global warming risk skewing the world’s public health priorities away from real, urgent health problems. Policies curbing global warming would, moreover, increase energy prices and reduce its usage, retarding both economic development and advances in human wellbeing. That would slow advances in society’s adaptive capacity to deal not only with the effects of global warming, but all other sources of adversity. Through the foreseeable future, global health would be advanced farther, faster, more surely, and more economically if efforts are focused not on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, but on reducing vulnerability to today’s urgent health problems that may be exacerbated by global warming, while increasing adaptive capacity, particularly of developing countries, through economic development.

Indur M. Goklany, Ph.D.

180

News from the Health Services Administration Alumni Chapter Fall 2008 Department of Health Management and Informatics College of Health and Public Affairs  

E-print Network

Management and Informatics · College of Health and Public Affairs in the College of Health and Public Affairs for health services administration graduate students. Scholarships of development and alumni relations for the College of Health and Public Affairs, at (407) 823-1600 or kkorkosz

Wu, Shin-Tson

181

Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education  

PubMed Central

Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search) and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. PMID:25057246

Hersh, William R; Gorman, Paul N; Biagioli, Frances E; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Mejicano, George C

2014-01-01

182

A United Nations Global Health Panel for Global Health Governance.  

PubMed

The World Health Organization now relies upon voluntary contributions tied to specific projects, underwriting 75% of operations. A resulting cacophony of non-governmental, foundation, and private sector actors have emerged overlapping and fractionating WHO programs. In this expanding world of "global health organizations," WHO's role must be redefined. We propose coordination of global health initiatives through a United Nations Global Health Panel with active participation of WHO. Given recent events, the UN is poised to take a greater leadership role in global health. PMID:23121855

Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A

2013-01-01

183

Global Health Observatory (GHO): Life Expectancy  

MedlinePLUS

... Feed Youtube Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store Global Health Observatory (GHO) Menu Global Health Observatory data Data ... years on average in 2012 MORE MORTALITY AND GLOBAL HEALTH ESTIMATES DATA PRODUCTS Maps About Global Health Estimates ...

184

The Global Health Chronicles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How do global diseases get eradicated? It's a fascinating query and one that is explored in-depth on this website sponsored by the Center for Disease Control and Emory University. The site focuses on three diseases (smallpox, Guinea worm, and malaria) to create a portrait of the various resources and individuals that were instrumental in addressing these epidemics. Each section contains oral histories, photographs, documents, and other media. The Malaria Control section is fascinating as it contains a detailed profile of the ways in which the U.S. Public Health Service dealt with this problem in the southeastern states. From here, visitors can click on Media to watch an animated film titled, "Criminal at Large,� and several interesting training films. It's easy to see how these resources might be used in history of science courses or by public health professionals interested in such matters.

185

Embedded librarian within an online health informatics graduate research course: a case study.  

PubMed

The Health Sciences Library and the Department of Health Informatics & Information Management at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis piloted an embedded librarian project in summer 2012. The value and effectiveness of the pilot project was evaluated by analyzing the content of e-mail questions received from the students and the students' answers to the pre- and post-class surveys. The project received positive feedback from the students and course faculty. Librarians collaborating with teaching faculty and interacting one-on-one with students in health information-intensive courses proved to be helpful for student learning. PMID:24528264

Kumar, Sajeesh; Wu, Lin; Reynolds, Rebecca

2014-01-01

186

Uncovering patterns of technology use in consumer health informatics  

PubMed Central

Internet usage and accessibility has grown at a staggering rate, influencing technology use for healthcare purposes. The amount of health information technology (Health IT) available through the Internet is immeasurable and growing daily. Health IT is now seen as a fundamental aspect of patient care as it stimulates patient engagement and encourages personal health management. It is increasingly important to understand consumer health IT patterns including who is using specific technologies, how technologies are accessed, factors associated with use, and perceived benefits. To fully uncover consumer patterns it is imperative to recognize common barriers and which groups they disproportionately affect. Finally, exploring future demand and predictions will expose significant opportunities for health IT. The most frequently used health information technologies by consumers are gathering information online, mobile health (mHealth) technologies, and personal health records (PHRs). Gathering health information online is the favored pathway for healthcare consumers as it is used by more consumers and more frequently than any other technology. In regard to mHealth technologies, minority Americans, compared with White Americans utilize social media, mobile Internet, and mobile applications more frequently. Consumers believe PHRs are the most beneficial health IT. PHR usage is increasing rapidly due to PHR integration with provider health systems and health insurance plans. Key issues that have to be explicitly addressed in health IT are privacy and security concerns, health literacy, unawareness, and usability. Privacy and security concerns are rated the number one reason for the slow rate of health IT adoption. PMID:24904713

Hung, Man; Conrad, Jillian; Hon, Shirley D.; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D.; Tang, Philip

2014-01-01

187

Uncovering patterns of technology use in consumer health informatics.  

PubMed

Internet usage and accessibility has grown at a staggering rate, influencing technology use for healthcare purposes. The amount of health information technology (Health IT) available through the Internet is immeasurable and growing daily. Health IT is now seen as a fundamental aspect of patient care as it stimulates patient engagement and encourages personal health management. It is increasingly important to understand consumer health IT patterns including who is using specific technologies, how technologies are accessed, factors associated with use, and perceived benefits. To fully uncover consumer patterns it is imperative to recognize common barriers and which groups they disproportionately affect. Finally, exploring future demand and predictions will expose significant opportunities for health IT. The most frequently used health information technologies by consumers are gathering information online, mobile health (mHealth) technologies, and personal health records (PHRs). Gathering health information online is the favored pathway for healthcare consumers as it is used by more consumers and more frequently than any other technology. In regard to mHealth technologies, minority Americans, compared with White Americans utilize social media, mobile Internet, and mobile applications more frequently. Consumers believe PHRs are the most beneficial health IT. PHR usage is increasing rapidly due to PHR integration with provider health systems and health insurance plans. Key issues that have to be explicitly addressed in health IT are privacy and security concerns, health literacy, unawareness, and usability. Privacy and security concerns are rated the number one reason for the slow rate of health IT adoption. PMID:24904713

Hung, Man; Conrad, Jillian; Hon, Shirley D; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Tang, Philip

2013-11-01

188

Consortium for Oral Health-Related Informatics: Improving Dental Research, Education, and Treatment  

PubMed Central

Advances in informatics, particularly the implementation of electronic health records (EHR), in dentistry have facilitated the exchange of information. The majority of dental schools in North America use the same EHR system, providing an unprecedented opportunity to integrate these data into a repository that can be used for oral health education and research. In 2007, fourteen dental schools formed the Consortium for Oral Health-Related Informatics (COHRI). Since its inception, COHRI has established structural and operational processes, governance and bylaws, and a number of work groups organized in two divisions: one focused on research (data standardization, integration, and analysis), and one focused on education (performance evaluations, virtual standardized patients, and objective structured clinical examinations). To date, COHRI (which now includes twenty dental schools) has been successful in developing a data repository, pilot-testing data integration, and sharing EHR enhancements among the group. This consortium has collaborated on standardizing medical and dental histories, developing diagnostic terminology, and promoting the utilization of informatics in dental education. The consortium is in the process of assembling the largest oral health database ever created. This will be an invaluable resource for research and provide a foundation for evidence-based dentistry for years to come. PMID:20930236

Stark, Paul C.; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; White, Joel M.; Walji, Muhammad F.; Stewart, Denice C.L.; Kimmes, Nicole; Meng, Thomas R.; Willis, George P.; DeVries, Ted; Chapman, Robert J.

2011-01-01

189

Global Health Observatory (GHO)  

MedlinePLUS

... Essential medicines Governance and aid effectiveness Essential health technologies Service delivery Public health and environment Health Equity Monitor International Health Regulations (2005) Monitoring ...

190

Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health  

E-print Network

5th Annual Women's Health Forum Global Women's Health Hosted by The Stanford WSDM* Center May 21;3 Welcome to the 5th Annual Women's Health Forum - hosted by the Stanford WSDM Center, also known acknowledges the wisdom of conducting research and expanding knowledge about women's health and sex differences

Kay, Mark A.

191

Protecting the patient by promoting end-user competence in health informatics systems - moves towards a generic health computer user \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness and quality of health informatics systems’ support to healthcare delivery are largely determined by two factors—the suitability of the system installed, and the competence of the users. However, the profile of users of large-scale clinical health systems is significantly different from the profile of end-users in other enterprises such as the finance sector, insurance, travel or retail sales.

Michael Rigby

2004-01-01

192

Introducing a technology-enabled problem-based learning approach into a health informatics curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To investigate the effect on learner satisfaction of introducing a technology-enabled problem-based learning (PBL) approach into a health informatics curriculum. Course redesign was undertaken to prepare students for three 4-month work terms and a rapidly changing professional environment upon graduation. Methods: Twenty-six Canadian undergraduate students of a redesigned course in biomedical fundamentals completed a midterm questionnaire in 2002. Eight

Carolyn J. Green; Geraldine H. Van Gyn; Jochen R. Moehr; Francis Y. Lau; Patricia M. Coward

2004-01-01

193

Globalisation of health and medical informatics education - what are the issues?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: We are witnessing a paradigm shift in higher education as a result of technological advances, adoption of on-line learning and a greater participation in e-commerce by higher education providers. Given the dearth of academics with high-level expertise in health informatics in many countries, we need to explore how best to use our scarce resources to have the greatest possible

Evelyn J. S. Hovenga

2004-01-01

194

Design and Evaluation of a Health-Focused Personal Informatics Application with Support for Generalized Goal Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The practice of health self-management offers behavioral and problem-solving strategies that can effectively promote responsibility for one's own wellbeing, improve one's health outcomes, and decrease the cost of health services. Personal informatics applications support health self-management by allowing their users to easily track…

Medynskiy, Yevgeniy

2012-01-01

195

Integrating Governance of Research Informatics and Health Care IT Across an Enterprise: Experiences from the Trenches  

PubMed Central

Advances in health information technology and biomedical informatics have laid the groundwork for significant improvements in healthcare and biomedical research. For instance, Electronic Health Records can help improve the delivery of evidence-based care, enhance quality, and contribute to discoveries and evidence generation. Despite this promise, there are many challenges to achieving the vision and missions of our healthcare and research enterprises. Given the challenges inherent in doing so, institutions are increasingly moving to establish dedicated leadership and governance models charged with designing, deploying and leveraging various information resources to advance research and advanced care activities at AHCs. Some institutions have even created a new leadership position to oversee such activities, such as the Chief Research Information Officer. This panel will include research informatics leaders discussing their experiences from the proverbial trenches as they work to operationalize such cross-mission governance models. Panelists will start by providing an overview their respective positions and environments, discuss their experiences, and share lessons learned through their work at the intersection of clinical and translational research informatics and Health IT. PMID:24303236

Embi, Peter J.; Tachinardi, Umberto; Lussier, Yves; Starren, Justin; Silverstein, Jonathan

196

HIC 2008 Australia's Health Informatics Conference Editor: Heather Grain  

E-print Network

of highest demand on hospital beds;patient arrival time in the ED,which represents a staffing impact Australian E-Health Research Centre, CSIRO ICT Centre, 2 Gold Coast Hospital, Queensland Health, 3 Toowoomba Hospital, Queensland Health 4 Griffith University, 5 Queensland University ofTechnology Abstract We

Chen, Zhuo

197

Epidemiologic Approaches to Global Health  

PubMed Central

In this introduction to volume 32 of Epidemiologic Reviews, the authors highlight the diversity and complexity of global health concerns, and they frame the 12 articles included in this issue within the diverse topics of research in this emerging and ever-expanding field. The authors emphasize the need for ongoing research related to the methods used in global health and for comprehensive surveillance, and they offer suggestions for future directions in global health research. PMID:20581220

Quinn, Thomas C.; Samet, Jonathan M.

2010-01-01

198

The development of a model curriculum for applied health informatics.  

PubMed Central

Applied Health Informaticians (AHIs) are professionals that deploy information technologies in support of health system processes. AHIs require both a well-developed knowledge base that encompasses the health system, computer science, and health information systems-related topics (what is known as the "Body of Knowledge"), as well as a set of intellectual and procedural skills (what we call the "Body of Skills") and preparatory experiences. The availability of skilled and knowledgeable AHIs has become a critical issue in today's health system. PMID:11079939

MacNeill, J. E.; Covvey, H. D.

2000-01-01

199

Overview of health care and nursing informatics in the Netherlands  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes developments in the use of information technology (IT) in Dutch health care. Since it is impossible to cover all current initiatives in the nations' health care system, the developments are described from the viewpoint of the nursing profession. Therefore the focus centres on users, clinical systems and nursing systems. However, more 'technology driven' issues are addressed as

W. T. F. Goossen

1996-01-01

200

Health informatics education – working across the professional boundaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examines requirements of information professionals in the health sector, and ways career development can be enhanced. Includes analysis of job descriptions, categorising skills and roles, mapping profiles to other criteria, including health sector, and two statements for standards in higher education. Interviews with nine professionals confirmed findings of the job description analysis. There is a spectrum of skills, with clumps

Andrew Pearson; Christine Urquhart

2002-01-01

201

Turning electronic health record data into meaningful information using SQL and nursing informatics.  

PubMed

The combination of nursing informatics knowledge with SQL code writing in an electronic health record is a powerful partnership to obtain meaningful information and improve healthcare. The purpose of this project is to use SQL and nursing informatics to identify the underpinnings and scope of present-on-patient-admission pressure ulcer documentation incongruence within the inpatient medical-surgical unit of a rural hospital. Project results reveal a 76% incidence rate of incongruent nurse and physician documentation of pressure ulcers as present on admission. However, the scope of such incongruence affects only 3% for the inpatient population. The high incidence rate of nurse-documented present-on-admission pressure ulcers without a physician diagnoses indicates a potential for lost rural hospital reimbursement and risk to patient care. PMID:25010052

Moerbe, Miriam; Kelemen, Arpad

2014-08-01

202

Accepted Special Issue of Methods of Information in Medicine Journal: Health and Medical Informatics Applications Educational Aspects,  

E-print Network

Accepted Special Issue of Methods of Information in Medicine Journal: Health and Medical Informatics Applications ­ Educational Aspects, August 2005 Revised May 2006 Selected eHealth Applications, Cyprus (2) Department of Computer Science, University of Cyprus, Cyprus (3) Ministry of Health, Cyprus

Pitsillides, Andreas

203

CHESS: 10 years of research and development in consumer health informatics for broad populations, including the underserved  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the research and development around a consumer health informatics system CHESS (The Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System) developed and tested by the Center for Health Systems Research and Analysis at the University of Wisconsin. The review places particular emphasis on what has been found with regard to the acceptance and use of such systems by high risk

David H. Gustafson; Robert P. Hawkins; Eric W. Boberg; Fiona Mctavish; Betta Owens; Meg Wise; Haile Berhe; Suzanne Pingree

2002-01-01

204

Evolving Health Informatics Semantic Frameworks and Metadata-Driven Architectures  

E-print Network

tuberculosis, now confirmed in 37 countries; and regular epidemics of meningococcal serogroup A disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The International Health Regulations 2005 address exactly this issue. By June 2012, each country

Melham, Tom

205

Global Health Curriculum Guide Spring 2012  

E-print Network

Global Health Curriculum Guide Spring 2012 #12;Global Health Curriculum Guide | Spring 2012 | page 2 Introduction The Global Health Curriculum Guide provides a listing of the current global health in the field of global health. Students should work with their faculty advisors to select the appropriate

Subramanian, Venkat

206

GLOBAL HEALTH PROGRAMS ANNUAL REPORT CY 13  

E-print Network

GLOBAL HEALTH PROGRAMS ANNUAL REPORT CY 13 Contents · Global health options · International: Issues in Global Health (PUBH 519), Fall · Course: Frontiers Challenges in Global Health (FRO 503), Spring · Students from international medical schools · Afya Bora Fellowship GLOBAL HEALTH OPTIONS

Bushman, Frederic

207

A Vision of Health Care and Informatics in 2008  

Microsoft Academic Search

By the year 2008, a major reorganization of health care services in the United States will have evolved from the solo- and group-practice models of the 1940s, with fee-for-service and insurer-indemnification financing and paper-based information systems, to nationwide managed care plans employing enhanced computer-based information systems.

Morris F Collen

1999-01-01

208

Organizational issues in health informatics: a model approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present a model that describes the stages of the implementation of an information system in a health care organization. The model offers no explanation of the implementation process but rather describes in a cyclic order the domains that are relevant when implementing a system. The model offers thus an opportunity to identify gaps in our knowledge

Jos Aarts; Victor Peel; Graham Wright

1998-01-01

209

ARTEMIS: a research testbed for collaborative health care informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient centred healthcare delivery is an inherently collaborative and information-intensive process. It involves a wide range of individuals and organizations with different roles. The key to cost reduction and quality improvement in health care is effective management of this collaborative process. The Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC) developed a number of key technologies to enable collaborative processes. These technologies, integrated

R. Reddy; V. Jagannathan; K. Srinivas; R. Karinthi; S. M. Reddy; C. Gollapudy; S. Friedman

1993-01-01

210

Ideas in ACTION, Solving Global Health Problems Solutions for Global Health  

E-print Network

Ideas in ACTION, Solving Global Health Problems Solutions for Global Health Global South contributions to human development in the global South and that has provided solutions to global health problems

211

WHO: Global Health Observatory: Mental Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While more than 800,000 people die from suicide globally each year, the median amount of the health budget allocated to mental health in 2011 was 2.8%. In Afghanistan, six out of every 100,000 men committed suicide. In the United States, that number was 19. These and other data can be gleaned from the age-standardized suicide rates interactive graph on the World Health Organizationâ??s Global Health Observatory website dedicated to issues of Mental Health. Additionally, the page provides links to reports on Policy and financing of mental health, Human resources (in terms of the number of psychiatrists available per 100,000 people in a given country), and Mental health care delivery.

212

Connecting Health and Humans The 10th International Congress on Nursing Informatics Nursing Informatics; is IT for all nurses?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the definition of nursing informatics it should be a core activity for all nurses, and seen as a tool to support high quality care giving. Three studies reported in this paper show that this is not the case. Qualified nurses are perceived as having poor skills and knowledge, and as being resistant to IT as it takes them away

Carol S

213

Scale and context: issues in ontologies to link health- and bio-informatics.  

PubMed

Bridging levels of scale and context are key problems for integrating Bio- and Health Informatics. Formal, logic-based ontologies using expressive formalisms are naturally "fractal" and provide new methods to support these aims. The basic notion of composition can be used to bridge scales; axioms can be used to carry implicit information; specific context markers can be included in definitions; and a hierarchy of semantic links can be used to represent subtle differences in point of view. Experience with OpenGALEN, the UK Drug Ontology and new experiments with the Gene Ontology and Foundational Model of Anatomy suggest that these are powerful tools provide practical solutions. PMID:12463902

Rector, Alan L; Rogers, Jeremy; Roberts, Angus; Wroe, Chris

2002-01-01

214

Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report  

E-print Network

Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report March 29, 2010 Rev. 8.30.2010 Report Orientation Checklist (Draft)................................XII #12;Clinical Research Informatics Systems Submitted to: Dr. Joyce Mitchell Chair, Department of Medical Informatics Associate Vice President, Health

Provancher, William

215

UCSF Global Health Sciences 2011 Annual Report  

E-print Network

UCSF Global Health Sciences 2011 Annual Report #12;UCSF Global Health Sciences 2011 Annual Report Fieldwork Project Sites | 10 The Global Health Group | 12 Prevention & Public Health Group | 17 Cross-Campus Initiatives | 21 Global Health Leadership | 23 GHS Financials | 25 GHS Governance | 26 GHS Partners & Funders

Klein, Ophir

216

Values in global health governance.  

PubMed

In the 60 years since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was promulgated, the promise of achieving respect for the human rights, health and well being of all is becoming an ever more distant prospect. We have not even remotely met the challenge of improving health for a large proportion of the world's population, and the prospects for improving global health seem to be receding in the current deteriorating economic and political climate. As global health remains one of the most pressing problems of our time, we must question the values that direct our actions and current approaches, which proclaim 'human rights to health' but which subsume these rights to a broader paradigm of unregulated global market economics and national politics, rather than working to make these oft-contradictory goals mutually compatible through justifiable and accountable global governance processes. We suggest that a new balance of values and new ways of thinking and acting are needed. These must transcend national and institutional boundaries and recognise that health in the most privileged nations is closely linked to health and disease in impoverished countries. Sustainable development of health and well-being is a necessity for all, and values for health should permeate every area of social and economic activity. PMID:20213564

Benatar, S R; Lister, G; Thacker, S C

2010-01-01

217

Alumni's perception of public health informatics competencies: lessons from the Graduate Program of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia.  

PubMed

Public health informatics has been defined as the systematic application of information and computer science and technology to public health practice, research, and learning [1]. Unfortunately, limited reports exist concerning to the capacity building strategies to improve public health informatics workforce in limited-resources setting. In Indonesia, only three universities, including Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM), offer master degree program on related public health informatics discipline. UGM started a new dedicated master program on Health Management Information Systems in 2005, under the auspice of the Graduate Program of Public Health at the Faculty of Medicine. This is the first tracer study to the alumni aiming to a) identify the gaps between curriculum and the current jobs and b) describe their perception on public health informatics competencies. We distributed questionnaires to 114 alumni with 36.84 % response rate. Despite low response rate, this study provided valuable resources to set up appropriate competencies, curriculum and capacity building strategies of public health informatics workforce in Indonesia. PMID:23920850

Fuad, Anis; Sanjaya, Guardian Yoki; Lazuardi, Lutfan; Rahmanti, Annisa Ristya; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

2013-01-01

218

Comprehensive Environmental Informatics System (CEIS) Integrating Crew and Vehicle Environmental Health  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) systems have been pursued as highly integrated systems that include smart sensors, diagnostic and prognostics software for assessments of real-time and life-cycle vehicle health information. Inclusive to such a system is the requirement to monitor the environmental health within the vehicle and the occupants of the vehicle. In this regard an enterprise approach to informatics is used to develop a methodology entitled, Comprehensive Environmental Informatics System (CEIS). The hardware and software technologies integrated into this system will be embedded in the vehicle subsystems, and maintenance operations, to provide both real-time and life-cycle health information of the environment within the vehicle cabin and of its occupants. This comprehensive information database will enable informed decision making and logistics management. One key element of the CEIS is interoperability for data acquisition and archive between environment and human system monitoring. With comprehensive components the data acquired in this system will use model based reasoning systems for subsystem and system level managers, advanced on-board and ground-based mission and maintenance planners to assess system functionality. Knowledge databases of the vehicle health state will be continuously updated and reported for critical failure modes, and routinely updated and reported for life cycle condition trending. Sufficient intelligence, including evidence-based engineering practices which are analogous to evidencebased medicine practices, will be included in the CEIS to result in more rapid recognition of off-nominal operation to enable quicker corrective actions. This will result from better information (rather than just data) for improved crew/operator situational awareness, which will produce significant vehicle and crew safety improvements, as well as increasing the chance for mission success, future mission planning as well as training. Other benefits include improved reliability, increase safety in operations and cost of operations. The cost benefits stem from significantly reduced processing and operations manpower, predictive maintenance for systems and subjects. The improvements in vehicle functionality and cost will result from increased prognostic and diagnostic capability due to the detailed total human exploration system health knowledge from CEIS. A collateral benefit is that there will be closer observations of the vehicle occupants as wrist watch sized devices are worn for continuous health monitoring. Additional database acquisition will stem from activities in countermeasure practices to ensure peak performance capability by occupants of the vehicle. The CEIS will provide data from advanced sensing technologies and informatics modeling which will be useful in problem troubleshooting, and improving NASA s awareness of systems during operation.

Nall, Mark E.

2006-01-01

219

Consumer Health Informatics: The Application of ICT in Improving Patient-Provider Partnership for a Better Health Care  

PubMed Central

Background There is a growing interest concerning the potential of ICT solutions that are customized to consumers. This emerging discipline referred to as consumer health informatics (CHI) plays a major role in providing information to patients and the public, and facilitates the promotion of self-management. The concept of CHI has emerged out of the desire of most patients to shoulder responsibilities regarding their health and a growing desire of health practitioners to fully appreciate the potential of the patient. Aim To describe the role of ICT in improving the patient-provider partnership in consumer health informatics. Methods Systematic reviewing of literature, identification of reference sources and formulation of search strategies and manual search regarding the significance of developed CHI applications in healthcare delivery. Results New consumer health IT applications have been developed to be used on a variety of different platforms, including the Web, messaging systems, PDAs, and cell phones. These applications assists patients with self-management through reminders and prompts, delivery of real-time data on a patient’s health condition to patients and providers, web-based communication and personal electronic health information. Conclusion New tools are being developed for the purposes of providing information to patients and the public which has enhanced decision making in health matters and an avenue for clinicians and consumers to exchange health information for personal and public use. This calls for corroboration among healthcare organizations, governments and the ICT industry to develop new research and IT innovations which are tailored to the health needs of the consumer. PMID:25422724

Larweh, Benjamin Teye

2014-01-01

220

Geospatial resources for supporting data standards, guidance and best practice in health informatics  

PubMed Central

Background The 1980s marked the occasion when Geographical Information System (GIS) technology was broadly introduced into the geo-spatial community through the establishment of a strong GIS industry. This technology quickly disseminated across many countries, and has now become established as an important research, planning and commercial tool for a wider community that includes organisations in the public and private health sectors. The broad acceptance of GIS technology and the nature of its functionality have meant that numerous datasets have been created over the past three decades. Most of these datasets have been created independently, and without any structured documentation systems in place. However, search and retrieval systems can only work if there is a mechanism for datasets existence to be discovered and this is where proper metadata creation and management can greatly help. This situation must be addressed through support mechanisms such as Web-based portal technologies, metadata editor tools, automation, metadata standards and guidelines and collaborative efforts with relevant individuals and organisations. Engagement with data developers or administrators should also include a strategy of identifying the benefits associated with metadata creation and publication. Findings The establishment of numerous Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs), and other Internet resources, is a testament to the recognition of the importance of supporting good data management and sharing practices across the geographic information community. These resources extend to health informatics in support of research, public services and teaching and learning. This paper identifies many of these resources available to the UK academic health informatics community. It also reveals the reluctance of many spatial data creators across the wider UK academic community to use these resources to create and publish metadata, or deposit their data in repositories for sharing. The Go-Geo! service is introduced as an SDI developed to provide UK academia with the necessary resources to address the concerns surrounding metadata creation and data sharing. The Go-Geo! portal, Geodoc metadata editor tool, ShareGeo spatial data repository, and a range of other support resources, are described in detail. Conclusions This paper describes a variety of resources available for the health research and public health sector to use for managing and sharing their data. The Go-Geo! service is one resource which offers an SDI for the eclectic range of disciplines using GIS in UK academia, including health informatics. The benefits of data management and sharing are immense, and in these times of cost restraints, these resources can be seen as solutions to find cost savings which can be reinvested in more research. PMID:21269487

2011-01-01

221

1 | the GLOBAL heALth GROUP The Global Health Group  

E-print Network

1 | the GLOBAL heALth GROUP The Global Health Group UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO GLOBAL in this brochure courtesy of the Global Health Group and Global Health Sciences faculty, staff, students an impact on human lives. Yet, since our founding in 2007, the Global health Group at the University

Klein, Ophir

222

Global Trade and Public Health  

PubMed Central

Global trade and international trade agreements have transformed the capacity of governments to monitor and to protect public health, to regulate occupational and environmental health conditions and food products, and to ensure affordable access to medications. Proposals under negotiation for the World Trade Organization’s General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) and the regional Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) agreement cover a wide range of health services, health facilities, clinician licensing, water and sanitation services, and tobacco and alcohol distribution services. Public health professionals and organizations rarely participate in trade negotiations or in resolution of trade disputes. The linkages among global trade, international trade agreements, and public health deserve more attention than they have received to date. PMID:15623854

Shaffer, Ellen R.; Waitzkin, Howard; Brenner, Joseph; Jasso-Aguilar, Rebeca

2005-01-01

223

UNIVERSITY OF GLOBAL HEALTH  

E-print Network

vitamin D levels could have more painful labours 4 Mother's gestational dia- betes linked to daughters, events and news. Our goal is to keep you informed on Mater- nal, Neonatal, and Child Health Care

MacMillan, Andrew

224

Telecommunications and informatics contributions to the future of public health: a forecast  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much of public health consists of information transfer to support the mission of disease prevention and health promotion. A focused needs-specific application of telecommunication and information technologies to this discipline would enhance the ability to transmit information and improve global health. Although tele-health processes and communications systems have been evolving in effectiveness, accessibility and simplicity, and applied to a variety

Victoria Garshnek; Frederick M. Burkle

1998-01-01

225

UCSF Global Health Sciences 2013 Annual Report  

E-print Network

of UCSF Global Health Sciences 2013 Annual Report #12;UCSF Global Health Sciences 2013 Annual that produced a call to action: Global Health 2035: The World Converging within a Generation. As a commissioner with the passion and creativity that they bring to educating the next generation of global health leaders. It

Klein, Ophir

226

GLOBAL HEALTH CENTER Request For Applications  

E-print Network

GLOBAL HEALTH CENTER Request For Applications Funding for Global Health-related Pilot projects To: Einstein Faculty From: Global Health Center Date: July 20, 2012 Re: Request for Applications for funding of Global Health Pilot Projects Details: Up to $30,000/project per year to be awarded Deadline: September 24

Emmons, Scott

227

October 2014 CERTIFICATE IN GLOBAL HEALTH FOR  

E-print Network

October 2014 CERTIFICATE IN GLOBAL HEALTH FOR ANTHROPOLOGY MAJORS AND ANTHROPOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS The Certificate in Global Health was established as part of the Framework for Global Health Curricula, which is coordinated by the Center for Global Health and Diseases in the School of Medicine

Rollins, Andrew M.

228

Visual Approaches to Global Health Course Syllabus  

E-print Network

Visual Approaches to Global Health Course Syllabus Instructor: Jonathan Smith, E: jonathan.p.smith@yale.edu P: 706.402.6297 Overview Visual Approaches to Global Health is a novel global health course offered, where students will learn to analyze global health issues through the prism of film and media. Students

229

UCSF Global Health Sciences 2012 Annual Report  

E-print Network

UCSF Global Health Sciences 2012 Annual Report UCSF making an impact around the world Meet in global health. APRIL GHG hosts Bay Area World Malaria Day The Global Health Group co-hosted the firstM gift to build global health hub at Mission Bay GHS received a $20 million gift from Chuck Feeney

Klein, Ophir

230

A review of user-centered design for diabetes-related consumer health informatics technologies.  

PubMed

User-centered design (UCD) is well recognized as an effective human factor engineering strategy for designing ease of use in the total customer experience with products and information technology that has been applied specifically to health care information technology systems. We conducted a literature review to analyze the current research regarding the use of UCD methods and principles to support the development or evaluation of diabetes-related consumer health informatics technology (CHIT) initiatives. Findings indicate that (1) UCD activities have been applied across the technology development life cycle stages, (2) there are benefits to incorporating UCD to better inform CHIT development in this area, and (3) the degree of adoption of the UCD process is quite uneven across diabetes CHIT studies. In addition, few to no studies report on methods used across all phases of the life cycle with process detail. To address that void, the Appendix provides an illustrative case study example of UCD techniques across development stages. PMID:23911188

LeRouge, Cynthia; Wickramasinghe, Nilmini

2013-07-01

231

UNIVERSITY OF GLOBAL HEALTH  

E-print Network

Resources 4 Announcements 5 The Ebola crisis has left health systems reel- ing, increasing threats story http:// www.scientificamerican.com/article/ebola- strikes-a-blow-against-pregnant-women-and- maternal-care/ Welcome to the 8th Issue of our Newsletter Ebola strikes a blow against pregnant women

MacMillan, Andrew

232

UNIVERSITY OF GLOBAL HEALTH  

E-print Network

is deeply concerned with the unprecedent- ed rate at which the Ebola virus is spreading and the dire effect-governmental organizations on the ground. To Read more http:// www.ctvnews.ca/health/five-ways-canada-is- contributing-to-the-fight-against-ebola against Ebola In this issue we include updates and some recent publications and news. Our goal is to keep

MacMillan, Andrew

233

Sensor, Signal, and Imaging Informatics: Big Data and Smart Health Technologies  

PubMed Central

Summary Objectives This synopsis presents a selection for the IMIA (International Medical Informatics Association) Yearbook 2014 of excellent research in the broad field of Sensor, Signal, and Imaging Informatics published in the year 2013, with a focus on Big Data and Smart Health Technologies Methods We performed a systematic initial selection and a double blind peer review process to find the best papers in this domain published in 2013, from the PubMed and Web of Science databases. A set of MeSH keywords provided by experts was used. Results Big Data are collections of large and complex datasets which have the potential to capture the whole variability of a study population. More and more innovative sensors are emerging, allowing to enrich these big databases. However they become more and more challenging to process (i.e. capture, store, search, share, transfer, exploit) because traditional tools are not adapted anymore. Conclusions This review shows that it is necessary not only to develop new tools specifically designed for Big Data, but also to evaluate their performance on such large datasets. PMID:25123735

Moreau-Gaudry, A.

2014-01-01

234

Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care  

PubMed Central

The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population. PMID:24465229

Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K.

2013-01-01

235

Examining the Impact of Non-Technical Security Management Factors on Information Security Management in Health Informatics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Complexity of information security has become a major issue for organizations due to incessant threats to information assets. Healthcare organizations are particularly concerned with security owing to the inherent vulnerability of sensitive information assets in health informatics. While the non-technical security management elements have been at…

Imam, Abbas H.

2013-01-01

236

Factors in the Development of Clinical Informatics Competence in Early Career Health Sciences Professionals in Australia: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their…

Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

2011-01-01

237

A National Informatics Agenda for Nursing Education and Practice. Report to the Secretary of the Department of Health & Human Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nursing informatics is a specialty whose activities center around information management and processing for the nursing profession. The Division of Nursing of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice (NACNEP) recognized a need to identify initiatives that would more…

National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.

238

Contemporary Issues in Medicine--Medical Informatics and Population Health: Report II of the Medical School Objectives Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report of the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical School Objectives Program presents the work of two expert panels. One, on medical informatics, identified five important physician roles: lifelong learner, clinician, educator, researcher, and manager. Another panel established a definition for "population health perspective"…

Academic Medicine, 1999

1999-01-01

239

The future of health IT innovation and informatics: a report from AMIA's 2010 policy meeting.  

PubMed

While much attention has been paid to the short-term impact that widespread adoption of health information technology (health IT) will have on the healthcare system, there is a corresponding need to look at the long-term effects that extant policies may have on health IT system resilience, innovation, and related ethical, social/legal issues. The American Medical Informatics Association's 2010 Health Policy Conference was convened to further the national discourse on the issues surrounding these longer-term considerations. Conference participants self-selected into three broad categories: resilience in healthcare and health IT; ethical, legal, and social challenges; and innovation, adoption, and sustainability. The discussions about problem areas lead to findings focusing on the lack of encouragement for long-term IT innovation that may result from current health IT policies; the potential impact of uneven adoption of health IT based on the exclusions of the current financial incentives; the weaknesses of contingency and risk mitigation planning that threaten system resilience; and evolving standards developed in response to challenges relating to the security, integrity, and availability of electronic health information. This paper discusses these findings and also offers recommendations that address the interwoven topics of innovation, resilience, and adoption. The goal of this paper is to encourage public and private sector organizations that have a role in shaping health information policy to increase attention to developing a national strategy that assures that health IT innovation and resilience are not impeded by shorter-term efforts to implement current approaches emphasizing adoption and meaningful use of electronic health records. PMID:22037887

McGowan, Julie J; Cusack, Caitlin M; Bloomrosen, Meryl

2012-01-01

240

Factors in the development of clinical informatics competence in early career health sciences professionals in Australia: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their university education and during workplace learning and training. This study is based on a broad review of the literature on clinical informatics education and training; its findings support international analyses and suggest that new strategic efforts among stakeholders in the healthcare system are required to make progress in building workforce capacity in this field, in Australia and elsewhere. PMID:20544387

Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

2011-03-01

241

Metropolis revisited: the evolving role of librarians in informatics education for the health professions  

PubMed Central

Objective: The authors' goal was to assess changes in the role of librarians in informatics education from 2004 to 2013. This is a follow-up to “Metropolis Redux: The Unique Importance of Library Skills in Informatics,” a 2004 survey of informatics programs. Methods: An electronic survey was conducted in January 2013 and sent to librarians via the MEDLIB-L email discussion list, the library section of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the Medical Informatics Section of the Medical Library Association, the Information Technology Interest Group of the Association of College and Research Libraries/New England Region, and various library directors across the country. Results: Librarians from fifty-five institutions responded to the survey. Of these respondents, thirty-four included librarians in nonlibrary aspects of informatics training. Fifteen institutions have librarians participating in leadership positions in their informatics programs. Compared to the earlier survey, the role of librarians has evolved. Conclusions: Librarians possess skills that enable them to participate in informatics programs beyond a narrow library focus. Librarians currently perform significant leadership roles in informatics education. There are opportunities for librarian interdisciplinary collaboration in informatics programs. Implications: Informatics is much more than the study of technology. The information skills that librarians bring to the table enrich and broaden the study of informatics in addition to adding value to the library profession itself. PMID:25552939

King, Samuel B.; Lapidus, Mariana

2015-01-01

242

Military Research Needs in Biomedical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 2001 U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) Biomedical Informatics Roadmap Meeting was devoted to developing a strategic plan in four focus areas: Hospital and Clinical Informatics, E-Health, Combat Health Informatics, and Bioinformatics and Biomedical Computation. The driving force of this Roadmap Meeting was the recent accelerated pace of change in biomedical informatics in which emerging technologies have

Jaques Reifman; Gary R Gilbert; Lawrence Fagan; Richard Satava

2002-01-01

243

A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health  

E-print Network

? #12;A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics 2 Medical ethics a document covering the principles of medical ethics, but this has no provision for electronic health records (5). Also, the American Medical Association's (AMA) Code of Medical Ethics identifies physician

Zaiane, Osmar R.

244

Computing and Global Health: Bridging Health System Needs and  

E-print Network

10/13/2010 1 Computing and Global Health: Bridging Health System Needs and Computing Solutions of computing in PATH's portfolio? 10/12/2010 14CSEColloquium Bridging between Global Health and ComputingCSEColloquium Computing and Global Health · Broad interest in introducing computing based solutions to health

Anderson, Richard

245

A prototype informatics system integrating weather and health data to manage meningitis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation will describe progress in developing the informatics system that will support a newly funded project designed to integrate health and environmental data for health-related decision-making in Africa. This infromatics system supports a project in which the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), the International Research Institute for Climate and Society, and North Carolina State University in the United States, and the Navrongo Health Research Centre in Ghana will build and implement a prototype decision-support system that integrates two- to 14-day weather forecasts and epidemiological data to provide actionable information that can be used to contain the spread of meningitis epidemics in Ghana. By applying a preliminary economic evaluation of this decision support system, we will also assess the potential benefit of using environmental data to improve public health outcomes, help prioritize continuing investment in meningitis management in Ghana and throughout the Meningitis Belt, and determine the appropriateness of extending the prototype to other diseases, nations, and continents. This effort is a small piece of an overall Google.org effort to develop an Earth-gauging System that will integrate environmental, health and development data into products that stakeholders and researchers can use to monitor variables, analyze trends and identify relationships among different variables. The Earth-gauging System will support the prediction of emerging threats, and provide the basis for an robust early-warning system that will improve health, food security, and development and conservation outcomes. For the informatics session, our presentation will focus on the projects' leveraging of current UCAR Unidata data management software to create and populate an archive of meteorological and epidemiological data. We will also describe strategies to extend the Unidata network for data distribution - which currently provides real-time access to over 2.6 GB/hr of meteorological data to 160 Universities in North and South America - to support the development and dissemination of weather and health information in Ghana. Finally, we will describe how Unidata tools will provide a vehicle for delivering meningitis decision support to stakeholders and decision makers in Ghana, via GoogleEarth and other mechanisms.

Pandya, R.; Yoksas, T.; Hayden, M.; Hopson, T.; Laing, A.; Lazo, J.; Warner, T.; Rice, J.; Adams-Forgor, A.; Hodgson, A.; Semazzi, F.; Mera, R.; Thomson, M.; Trzaska, S.; Lamptey, B.

2009-04-01

246

Cancer Control and Global Health:  

Cancer.gov

In conjunction with a high-level United Nations meeting on non-communicable diseases in the developing world, NCI Director Harold Varmus, M.D., and Edward L. Trimble, M.D., NCI, have published a commentary in Science Translational Medicine on “Integrating Cancer Control into Global Health

247

Global Health and Cancer Epidemiology  

Cancer.gov

In 2012, there were 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million new cancer deaths. The World Health Organization (WHO) projected that by 2035, these figures could increase to 24 million new cases and 14.6 million cancer deaths worldwide. The majority of the global cancer burden is shifting from the more developed world to economically disadvantaged countries.

248

Why Global Health Security Matters  

MedlinePLUS

... immunization —through the cross-cutting global health security activities around the world. These activities include helping build better lab systems; create faster and more accurate data sharing; establish and improve emergency operations centers that can respond more quickly to all public ...

249

Third generation participatory design in health informatics - Making user participation applicable to large-scale information system projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Participatory Design (PD) methods,in the field of health informatics have mainly,been applied to the development,of small-scale sys- tems with homogeneous user groups in local settings. Meanwhile, health service organizations are becoming increasingly large and com- plex in character, making it necessary to extend the scope of the systems that are used for managing data, information and knowledge. This study

Sofie Pilemalm; Toomas Timpka

2008-01-01

250

The Role of e-Health and Consumer Health Informatics for Evidence-Based Patient Choice in the 21st Century  

Microsoft Academic Search

onsumer health informatics and e-health (ie, electronic health information and services avail- able over networks such as the Internet1,2 and related technologies such as digital TV\\/WebTV, wire- less media such as Web-compatible mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs)) are emerging trends that will redefine health care in the 21st century. The desire of (most) consumers to assume more responsi-

GUNTHER EYSENBACH; THOMAS L. DIEPGEN

2001-01-01

251

Global health: governance and policy development.  

PubMed

Global health policy is now being influenced by an ever-increasing number of nonstate and non-intergovernmental actors to include influential foundations, multinational corporations, multi-sectoral partnerships, and civil society organizations. This article reviews how globalization is a key driver for the ongoing evolution of global health governance. It describes the massive increases in bilateral and multilateral investments in global health and it highlights the current global and US architecture for performing global health programs. The article closes describing some of the challenges and prospects that characterize global health governance today. PMID:21628057

Kelley, Patrick W

2011-06-01

252

UCSF GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES BURKE FAMILY GLOBAL HEALTH FACULTY SCHOLARS AWARD  

E-print Network

UCSF GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES BURKE FAMILY GLOBAL HEALTH FACULTY SCHOLARS AWARD 2013 ­ 2014 | Description & Application Guidelines GENERAL SUMMARY The Global Health Sciences (GHS) Burke Family Global for junior faculty members whose research focuses on basic science and its applications in global health

Mullins, Dyche

253

Contemporary issues in medicine--medical informatics and population health: report II of the Medical School Objectives Project.  

PubMed

The Association of American Medical Colleges established the Medical School Objectives Project (MSOP) to set forth program-level learning objectives that medical school deans and faculties can use as guides in reviewing their medical student education programs (initial phase), and to suggest strategies that they might employ in implementing agreed-upon changes in those programs (implementation phase). The publication of MSOP Report I in 1998 concluded the initial phase of the project by presenting 30 program-level learning objectives that represent a consensus within the medical education community on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that students should possess before graduation from medical school. Report II, published here, is the work of two expert panels that focus on the two interrelated topics of medical informatics and population health for which Report I developed learning objectives. The Medical Informatics Panel identified five roles played by physicians--lifelong learner, clinician, educator-communicator, researcher, and manager--in which medical informatics plays a vital part, and defined one or more informatics learning objectives important for each role (e.g., the successful medical school graduate, in his or her role as a clinician, should be able to retrieve patient-specific information from a clinical information system). The panel then identified ways that schools might implement educational programs to address the various informatics learning objectives and to eventually embed informatics experiences throughout the curriculum rather than relying on an informatics course to achieve some or all of the objectives. The Population Health Perspective Panel developed a consensus definition of "population health perspective" (PHP); chose four types of populations to discuss (e.g., the geographic community); reviewed pressures for and against the implementation of a PHP in the curriculum (e.g., the cross-disciplinary nature of the topic is a barrier); named the fields that encompass training in a PHP (e.g., public health); listed several educational objectives, three principles to govern the design of educational activities, and a number of recommendations; and closed with a list of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that should be instilled by a successful PHP curriculum. PMID:10065054

1999-02-01

254

What Is Nursing Informatics?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology has developed to the point of providing a means to manage nursing and related health-care data effectively for nursing administrators, educators, practitioners, and researchers. Therefore, the newly recognized area of nursing informatics is important to the nursing profession as a whole. Nursing informatics is defined as the…

McGonigle, D.; And Others

255

Computing and Global Health: Bridging Health System Needs and  

E-print Network

Computing and Global Health: Bridging Health System Needs and Computing Solutions Richard Anderson is the role of computing in PATH's portfolio? 10/12/2010 14CSE Colloquium #12;Bridging between Global HealthCSE Colloquium #12;Computing and Global Health · Broad interest in introducing computing based

Anderson, Richard

256

Bubble CPAP System Global Health Challenge  

E-print Network

Bubble CPAP System Global Health Challenge Respiratory failure is a leading cause of infant for the advancement of appropriate, high-value innovations in global health biotechnology August 2011 Rice University

257

Improving musculoskeletal health: global issues.  

PubMed

Musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders are among the leading reasons why patients consult a family or primary health practitioner, take time off work and become disabled. Many of the MSK disorders are more common in the elderly. Thus, as the proportion of the elderly increases all over the world, MSK disorders will make a greater contribution to the global burden of disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that the spectrum of MSK disorders in developing countries is similar to that seen in industrialised countries, but the burden of disease tends to be higher due to a delay in diagnosis or lack of access to adequate health-care facilities for effective treatment. Musculoskeletal pain is very common in the community while fibromyalgia is being recognised as part of a continuum of chronic widespread pain rather than a narrowly defined entity. This will allow research to improve our understanding of pain in a variety of diffuse pain syndromes. The availability of newer more effective therapies has resulted in efforts to initiate therapy at an earlier stage of diseases. The new criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and the diagnosis of axial and peripheral involvement in spondyloarthritis, permit an earlier diagnosis without having to wait for radiological changes. One of the major health challenges is the global shortage of health workers, and based on current training of health workers and traditional models of care for service delivery, the global situation is unlikely to change in the near future. Thus, new models of care and strategies to train community health-care workers and primary health-care practitioners to detect and initiate the management of patients with MSK disorders at an earlier stage are required. There is also a need for prevention strategies with campaigns to educate and raise awareness among the entire population. Lifestyle interventions such as maintaining an ideal body weight to prevent obesity, regular exercises, avoidance of smoking and alcohol abuse, intake of a balanced diet and nutrients to include adequate calcium and vitamin D, modification of the work environment and avoidance of certain repetitive activities will prevent or ameliorate disorders such as osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout and MSK pain syndromes including low back pain and work-related pain syndromes. These prevention strategies also contribute to reducing the prevalence and outcome of diseases such as hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and respiratory diseases. Thus, prevention strategies require urgent attention globally. PMID:22794096

Mody, Girish M; Brooks, Peter M

2012-04-01

258

New Realities for Global Health 2013  

E-print Network

#12;New Realities for Global Health 2013 Rapporteur's Report Graham Lister Canada-UK Colloquium, 21-UK Council #12;II /NEW REALITIES FOR GLOBAL HEALTH 2013 © The Canada-UK Council, 2014 #12;GRAHAM LISTER / III /NEW REALITIES FOR GLOBAL HEALTH 2013 #12;GRAHAM LISTER / V About the Author Graham Lister MSc Ph

Abolmaesumi, Purang

259

The Global Health Group The Malaria Elimination  

E-print Network

The Global Health Group The Malaria Elimination Initiative, Mission Hall, 550 16th Street, 3F, Box 1224 San Francisco, CA 94158 UCSF Global Health Group ­ Malaria Elimination Initiative: 2015 Paid Internship Opportunity The UCSF Global Health Group (GHG) seeks a candidate, preferably with experience

Derisi, Joseph

260

Attachment A Certificate in Global Health  

E-print Network

Attachment A Certificate in Global Health Core Competencies Candidates who successfully complete the Certificate in Global Health will have achieved the following educational benchmarks: Expansion and discussion of their knowledge of major themes and trends in global health; Enhancement of their communication skills for trans

Sheridan, Jennifer

261

Synergy between medical informatics and bioinformatics: facilitating genomic medicine for future health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we review the results of BIOINFOMED, a study funded by the European Commission (EC) with the purpose to analyse the different issues and challenges in the area where Medical Informatics and Bioinformatics meet. Traditionally, Medical Informatics has been focused on the intersection between computer science and clinical medicine, whereas Bioinformatics have been predominantly centered on the intersection

Fernando Martín-sánchez; Ilias Iakovidis; S. Nørager; Victor Maojo; Piet C. De Groen; Johan Van Der Lei; T. Jones; Klaus Abraham-fuchs; R. Apweiler; Ankica Babic; R Baud; V Breton; P Cinquin; P Doupi; M Dugas; R Eils; R Engelbrecht; P Ghazal; P Jehenson; C Kulikowski; K Lampe; G De Moor; S Orphanoudakis; N Rossing; B Sarachan; A Sousa; G Spekowius; G Thireos; G Zahlmann; J Zvárová; I Hermosilla; F. J Vicente

2004-01-01

262

A future without health? Health dimension in global scenario  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the health dimension and sociocultural, economic, and ecological determinants of health in existing global scenario studies. Not even half of the 31 scenarios reviewed gave a good description of future health developments and the different scenario studies did not handle health in a consistent way. Most of the global driving forces of health are addressed adequately in

Maud Huynen

2003-01-01

263

Improving Global Health Education: Development of a Global Health Competency Model  

PubMed Central

Although global health is a recommended content area for the future of education in public health, no standardized global health competency model existed for master-level public health students. Without such a competency model, academic institutions are challenged to ensure that students are able to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) needed for successful performance in today's global health workforce. The Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) sought to address this need by facilitating the development of a global health competency model through a multistage modified-Delphi process. Practitioners and academic global health experts provided leadership and guidance throughout the competency development process. The resulting product, the Global Health Competency Model 1.1, includes seven domains and 36 competencies. The Global Health Competency Model 1.1 provides a platform for engaging educators, students, and global health employers in discussion of the KSAs needed to improve human health on a global scale. PMID:24445206

Ablah, Elizabeth; Biberman, Dorothy A.; Weist, Elizabeth M.; Buekens, Pierre; Bentley, Margaret E.; Burke, Donald; Finnegan, John R.; Flahault, Antoine; Frenk, Julio; Gotsch, Audrey R.; Klag, Michael J.; Lopez, Mario Henry Rodriguez; Nasca, Philip; Shortell, Stephen; Spencer, Harrison C.

2014-01-01

264

Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship Application Guidelines Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship Application Guidelines  

E-print Network

4/23/2012 1 Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship Application Guidelines Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship Application Guidelines Introduction The Global Health Equity Scholars (GHES) fellowship and professional school (MD, DVM, DrPH, DDS, PharmD) students. It is part of the Global Health Program for Fellows

Healy, Kevin Edward

265

Factors in the development of clinical informatics competence in early career health sciences professionals in Australia: a qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying\\u000a essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences\\u000a of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their university education and during\\u000a workplace learning and training. This study is based on

Kathleen Gray; Jenny Sim

2011-01-01

266

Roadmap: Public Health Global Health Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Global Health­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH Requirement 3 Semester Two: [16 Credit Hours] PH 10002 Introduction to Global Health 3 Fulfills global: Public Health ­ Global Health­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH-BSPH-PH-GLHL] College of Public

Sheridan, Scott

267

Macropsychology, policy, and global health.  

PubMed

In this article I argue for the development of a macro perspective within psychology, akin to that found in macroeconomics. Macropsychology is the application of psychology to factors that influence the settings and conditions of our lives. As policy concerns the strategic allocation of resources—who gets what and why?—it should be an area of particular interest for macropsychology. I review ways in which psychology may make a contribution to policy within the field of global health. Global health emphasizes human rights, equity, social inclusion, and empowerment; psychology has much to contribute to these areas, both at the level of policy and practice. I review the sorts of evidence and other factors that influence policymakers, along with the content, process, and context of policymaking, with a particular focus on the rights of people with disabilities in the low- and middle-income countries of Africa and Asia. These insights are drawn from collaborations with a broad range of practitioners, governments, United Nations agencies, civil society organizations, the private sector and researchers. Humanitarian work psychology is highlighted as an example of a new area of psychology that embraces some of the concerns of macropsychology. The advent of "big data" presents psychology with an opportunity to ask new types of questions, and these should include "understanding up," or how psychological factors can contribute to human well-being, nationally and globally. PMID:25486176

MacLachlan, Malcolm

2014-11-01

268

A comparative analysis of moral principles and behavioral norms in eight ethical codes relevant to health sciences librarianship, medical informatics, and the health professions  

PubMed Central

Objective: Based on the authors' shared interest in the interprofessional challenges surrounding health information management, this study explores the degree to which librarians, informatics professionals, and core health professionals in medicine, nursing, and public health share common ethical behavior norms grounded in moral principles. Methods: Using the “Principlism” framework from a widely cited textbook of biomedical ethics, the authors analyze the statements in the ethical codes for associations of librarians (Medical Library Association [MLA], American Library Association, and Special Libraries Association), informatics professionals (American Medical Informatics Association [AMIA] and American Health Information Management Association), and core health professionals (American Medical Association, American Nurses Association, and American Public Health Association). This analysis focuses on whether and how the statements in these eight codes specify core moral norms (Autonomy, Beneficence, Non-Maleficence, and Justice), core behavioral norms (Veracity, Privacy, Confidentiality, and Fidelity), and other norms that are empirically derived from the code statements. Results: These eight ethical codes share a large number of common behavioral norms based most frequently on the principle of Beneficence, then on Autonomy and Justice, but rarely on Non-Maleficence. The MLA and AMIA codes share the largest number of common behavioral norms, and these two associations also share many norms with the other six associations. Implications: The shared core of behavioral norms among these professions, all grounded in core moral principles, point to many opportunities for building effective interprofessional communication and collaboration regarding the development, management, and use of health information resources and technologies. PMID:25349543

Byrd, Gary D.; Winkelstein, Peter

2014-01-01

269

Increasing women in leadership in global health.  

PubMed

Globally, women experience a disproportionate burden of disease and death due to inequities in access to basic health care, nutrition, and education. In the face of this disparity, it is striking that leadership in the field of global health is highly skewed towards men and that global health organizations neglect the issue of gender equality in their own leadership. Randomized trials demonstrate that women in leadership positions in governmental organizations implement different policies than men and that these policies are more supportive of women and children. Other studies show that proactive interventions to increase the proportion of women in leadership positions within businesses or government can be successful. Therefore, the authors assert that increasing female leadership in global health is both feasible and a fundamental step towards addressing the problem of women's health. In this Perspective, the authors contrast the high proportion of young female trainees who are interested in academic global health early in their careers with the low numbers of women successfully rising to global health leadership roles. The authors subsequently explore reasons for female attrition from the field of global health and offer practical strategies for closing the gender gap in global health leadership. The authors propose solutions aimed to promote female leaders from both resource-wealthy and resource-poor countries, including leadership training grants, mentorship from female leaders in global professions, strengthening health education in resource-poor countries, research-enabling grants, and altering institutional policies to support women choosing a global health career path. PMID:24918761

Downs, Jennifer A; Reif, Lindsey K; Hokororo, Adolfine; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

2014-08-01

270

Big Heart Data: Advancing Health Informatics through Data Sharing in Cardiovascular Imaging.  

PubMed

The burden of heart disease is rapidly worsening due to increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Data sharing and open database resources for heart health informatics are important for advancing our understanding of cardiovascular function, disease progression and therapeutics. Data sharing enables valuable information, often obtained at considerable expense and effort, to be re-used beyond the specific objectives of the original study. Many government funding agencies and journal publishers are requiring data re-use, and are providing mechanisms for data curation and archival. Tools and infrastructure are available to archive anonymous data from a wide range of studies, from descriptive epidemiological data to gigabytes of imaging data. Metaanalyses can be performed to combine raw data from disparate studies to obtain unique comparisons or to enhance statistical power. Open benchmark datasets are invaluable for validating data analysis algorithms and objectively comparing results. This review provides a rationale for increased data sharing and surveys recent progress in the cardiovascular domain. We also highlight the potential of recent large cardiovascular epidemiological studies enabling collaborative efforts to facilitate data sharing, algorithms benchmarking, disease modeling and statistical atlases. PMID:25415993

Suinesiaputra, Avan; Cowan, Brett; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Young, Alistair

2014-11-14

271

Rethinking the 'global' in global health: a dialectic approach  

PubMed Central

Background Current definitions of 'global health' lack specificity about the term 'global'. This debate presents and discusses existing definitions of 'global health' and a common problem inherent therein. It aims to provide a way forward towards an understanding of 'global health' while avoiding redundancy. The attention is concentrated on the dialectics of different concepts of 'global' in their application to malnutrition; HIV, tuberculosis & malaria; and maternal mortality. Further attention is payed to normative objectives attached to 'global health' definitions and to paradoxes involved in attempts to define the field. Discussion The manuscript identifies denotations of 'global' as 'worldwide', as 'transcending national boundaries' and as 'holistic'. A fourth concept of 'global' as 'supraterritorial' is presented and defined as 'links between the social determinants of health anywhere in the world'. The rhetorical power of the denotations impacts considerably on the object of 'global health', exemplified in the context of malnutrition; HIV, tuberculosis & malaria; and maternal mortality. The 'global' as 'worldwide', as 'transcending national boundaries' and as 'holistic' house contradictions which can be overcome by the fourth concept of 'global' as 'supraterritorial'. The 'global-local-relationship' inherent in the proposed concept coheres with influential anthropological and sociological views despite the use of different terminology. At the same time, it may be assembled with other views on 'global' or amend apparently conflicting ones. The author argues for detaching normative objectives from 'global health' definitions to avoid so called 'entanglement-problems'. Instead, it is argued that the proposed concept constitutes an un-euphemistical approach to describe the inherently politicised field of 'global health'. Summary While global-as-worldwide and global-as-transcending-national-boundaries are misleading and produce redundancy with public and international health, global-as-supraterritorial provides 'new' objects for research, education and practice while avoiding redundancy. Linked with 'health' as a human right, this concept preserves the rhetorical power of the term 'global health' for more innovative forms of study, research and practice. The dialectic approach reveals that the contradictions involved in the different notions of the term 'global' are only of apparent nature and not exclusive, but have to be seen as complementary to each other if expected to be useful in the final step. PMID:21029401

2010-01-01

272

Medical informatics academia and industry: a symbiotic relationship that may assure survival of both through health care reform.  

PubMed

There are often clear lines drawn identifying the demilitarized zone between medical informatics academics and industry. Academics were "pure" intellectuals sequestered in ivory towers that effectively shielded them from the realities of the world. Industry has historically focused on creating effective products that produce financial return to the corporation. Both the paradigms of academia and industry are quickly becoming dinosaurs in the era of health care reform where both medical informatics academia and industry are under increasing pressure to develop and prove that medical informatics has a positive impact on health care both in terms of the quality of care as well as cost. Unfortunately, neither academia or industry alone are going to be able to successfully complete this task. The purpose of this paper is to describe such a collaborative effort that has produced a computerized decision support system for the management of mechanical ventilation in patients with the Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) that is now installed and supported on three different commercial CIS platforms. This collaborative effort has allowed us to successfully mount a large multi-center clinical trial designed to determine efficacy. PMID:8563277

East, T D; Wallace, C J; Franklin, M A; Kinder, T; Sailors, R M; Carlson, D; Bradshaw, R; Morris, A H

1995-01-01

273

Global Mental Health 1 No health without mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

About 14% of the global burden of disease has been attributed to neuropsychiatric disorders, mostly due to the chronically disabling nature of depression and other common mental disorders, alcohol-use and substance-use disorders, and psychoses. Such estimates have drawn attention to the importance of mental disorders for public health. However, because they stress the separate contributions of mental and physical disorders

Martin Prince; Vikram Patel; Shekhar Saxena; Mario Maj; Joanna Maselko; Michael R Phillips; Atif Rahman

274

Locating global health in social medicine.  

PubMed

Global health's goal to address health issues across great sociocultural and socioeconomic gradients worldwide requires a sophisticated approach to the social root causes of disease and the social context of interventions. This is especially true today as the focus of global health work is actively broadened from acute to chronic and from infectious to non-communicable diseases. To respond to these complex biosocial problems, we propose the recent expansion of interest in the field of global health should look to the older field of social medicine, a shared domain of social and medical sciences that offers critical analytic and methodological tools to elucidate who gets sick, why and what we can do about it. Social medicine is a rich and relatively untapped resource for understanding the hybrid biological and social basis of global health problems. Global health can learn much from social medicine to help practitioners understand the social behaviour, social structure, social networks, cultural difference and social context of ethical action central to the success or failure of global health's important agendas. This understanding - of global health as global social medicine - can coalesce global health's unclear identity into a coherent framework effective for addressing the world's most pressing health issues. PMID:24819951

Holmes, Seth M; Greene, Jeremy A; Stonington, Scott D

2014-01-01

275

Analysis of Complex Decision-Making Processes in Health Care: Cognitive Approaches to Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decision making by health care professionals is often complicated by the need to integrate ill-structured, uncertain, and potentially conflicting information from various sources. In this paper cognitive approaches to the study of decision making are presented within the context of a variety of complex health care applications. In recent years it has become increasingly accepted that in order to build

Andre W. Kushniruk

2001-01-01

276

Origins of Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Medical informatics is a new knowledge domain of computer and information science, engineering and technology in all fields of health and medicine, including research, education and practice. Medical informatics has evolved over the past 30 years as medicine learned to exploit the extraordinary capabilities of the electronic digital computer to better meet its complex information needs. The first articles on this subject appeared in the 1950s, the number of publications rapidly increased in the 1960s and medical informatics was identified as a new specialty in the 1970s. PMID:3544507

Collen, Morris F.

1986-01-01

277

Informatics Resources to Support Health Care Quality Improvement in the Veterans Health Administration  

PubMed Central

Information systems are increasingly important for measuring and improving health care quality. A number of integrated health care delivery systems use advanced information systems and integrated decision support to carry out quality assurance activities, but none as large as the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The VHA's Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) is a large-scale, multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative designed to ensure excellence in all areas where VHA provides health care services, including inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care settings. In this paper, we describe the role of information systems in the VHA QUERI process, highlight the major information systems critical to this quality improvement process, and discuss issues associated with the use of these systems. PMID:15187063

Hynes, Denise M.; Perrin, Ruth A.; Rappaport, Steven; Stevens, Joanne M.; Demakis, John G.

2004-01-01

278

Global warming and reproductive health.  

PubMed

The largest absolute numbers of maternal deaths occur among the 40-50 million women who deliver annually without a skilled birth attendant. Most of these deaths occur in countries with a total fertility rate of greater than 4. The combination of global warming and rapid population growth in the Sahel and parts of the Middle East poses a serious threat to reproductive health and to food security. Poverty, lack of resources, and rapid population growth make it unlikely that most women in these countries will have access to skilled birth attendants or emergency obstetric care in the foreseeable future. Three strategies can be implemented to improve women's health and reproductive rights in high-fertility, low-resource settings: (1) make family planning accessible and remove non-evidenced-based barriers to contraception; (2) scale up community distribution of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage and, where it is legal, for medical abortion; and (3) eliminate child marriage and invest in girls and young women, thereby reducing early childbearing. PMID:22883918

Potts, Malcolm; Henderson, Courtney E

2012-10-01

279

Global Health Workshop Dr. Sameen Siddiqi  

E-print Network

Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office, World Health Organization Thursday June 13, 2013 Blusson Hall RoomGlobal Health Workshop Dr. Sameen Siddiqi Director, Department of Health Systems Development 9660, Mowafaghian Theatre (note room change and time change) 3:00-4:00 Towards Universal Health

Handy, Todd C.

280

Roadmap: Public Health Global Health Bachelor of Science in Public Health  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Public Health ­ Global Health­ Bachelor of Science in Public Health [PH Hours] PH 10002 Introduction to Global Health 3 Kent Core Requirement 3 See Kent Core Summary on page 2 General Electives 6 See note 2 on pages 2 and 3 #12;Roadmap: Public Health ­ Global Health­ Bachelor

Sheridan, Scott

281

Announcing Global Health Equity Scholars Program The NIH/Fogarty International Center Global Health Fellows and Scholars program, which is called Global  

E-print Network

Announcing Global Health Equity Scholars Program The NIH/Fogarty International Center Global Health Fellows and Scholars program, which is called Global Health by the Global Health Program for Fellows and Scholars funded by the Fogarty International

Healy, Kevin Edward

282

Rural TeleHealth: Telemedicine, Distance Education and Informatics for Rural Health Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides an overview of the various telecommunications and information technologies available for rural communities to use in their health care systems. The first section explains the principal technologies of telecommunications such as the telephone, computer networking, audiographics, and video. It describes transmission systems…

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO. Western Cooperative for Educational Communications.

283

Health informatics as a tool to improve quality in non-acute care — new opportunities and a matching need for a new evaluation paradigm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whilst most health care is delivered to people living at home, the focus of innovation in health informatics concepts has been largely on acute hospitals. However, delivery of services in community settings, and often related to long-term conditions, is complex, and involves multiple professions and agencies, delivery of care in several locations including home settings, and individually tailored care for

Michael Rigby

1999-01-01

284

Building global health through a center-without-walls: the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Institute for Global Health at Vanderbilt enables the expansion and coordination of global health research, service, and training, reflecting the university's commitment to improve health services and outcomes in resource-limited settings. Global health encompasses both prevention via public health and treatment via medical care, all nested within a broader community-development context. This has fostered university-wide collaborations to address education,

Sten H. Vermund; Vikrant V. Sahasrabuddhe; Sheetal Khedkar; Yujiang Jia; Carol Etherington; Alfredo Vergara

2008-01-01

285

UC Irvine Global Health Framework Request for Proposals Global Health Research and Travel Fellowships for UCI Students and Junior Scientists  

E-print Network

UC Irvine Global Health Framework Request for Proposals Global Health Research and Travel of the National Institutes of Health, the UC Irvine Global Health Framework was established in 2008-2009. The overarching objective of the Global Health Framework program is to coordinate and enhance the global health

Loudon, Catherine

286

Ethics in collaborative global health researchhealth research  

E-print Network

in developing countries ­Global health inequalities­Global health inequalities ­Disproportionate burden is not the whole story ·There is a need to complement research with other interventions ­ social, economic practice in an imperfect world · What are the ethical obligations of researchers in an imperfect world

Oxford, University of

287

Medicalization of global health 2: the medicalization of global mental health  

PubMed Central

Once an orphan field, ‘global mental health’ now has wide acknowledgement and prominence on the global health agenda. Increased recognition draws needed attention to individual suffering and the population impacts, but medicalizing global mental health produces a narrow view of the problems and solutions. Early framing by advocates of the global mental health problem emphasised biological disease, linked psychiatry with neurology, and reinforced categories of mental health disorders. Universality of biomedical concepts across culture is assumed in the globalisation of mental health but is strongly disputed by transcultural psychiatrists and anthropologists. Global mental health movement priorities take an individualised view, emphasising treatment and scale-up and neglecting social and structural determinants of health. To meet international targets and address the problem's broad social and cultural dimensions, the global mental health movement and advocates must develop more comprehensive strategies and include more diverse perspectives. PMID:24848660

Clark, Jocalyn

2014-01-01

288

Medicalization of global health 2: The medicalization of global mental health.  

PubMed

Once an orphan field, 'global mental health' now has wide acknowledgement and prominence on the global health agenda. Increased recognition draws needed attention to individual suffering and the population impacts, but medicalizing global mental health produces a narrow view of the problems and solutions. Early framing by advocates of the global mental health problem emphasised biological disease, linked psychiatry with neurology, and reinforced categories of mental health disorders. Universality of biomedical concepts across culture is assumed in the globalisation of mental health but is strongly disputed by transcultural psychiatrists and anthropologists. Global mental health movement priorities take an individualised view, emphasising treatment and scale-up and neglecting social and structural determinants of health. To meet international targets and address the problem's broad social and cultural dimensions, the global mental health movement and advocates must develop more comprehensive strategies and include more diverse perspectives. PMID:24848660

Clark, Jocalyn

2014-01-01

289

Global Health Governance at a Crossroads  

PubMed Central

This review takes stock of the global health governance (GHG) literature. We address the transition from international health governance (IHG) to global health governance, identify major actors, and explain some challenges and successes in GHG. We analyze the framing of health as national security, human security, human rights, and global public good, and the implications of these various frames. We also establish and examine from the literature GHG’s major themes and issues, which include: 1) persistent GHG problems; 2) different approaches to tackling health challenges (vertical, horizontal, and diagonal); 3) health’s multisectoral connections; 4) neoliberalism and the global economy; 5) the framing of health (e.g. as a security issue, as a foreign policy issue, as a human rights issue, and as a global public good); 6) global health inequalities; 7) local and country ownership and capacity; 8) international law in GHG; and 9) research gaps in GHG. We find that decades-old challenges in GHG persist and GHG needs a new way forward. A framework called shared health governance offers promise. PMID:24729828

Ng, Nora Y.; Ruger, Jennifer Prah

2014-01-01

290

Medicalization of global health 4: the universal health coverage campaign and the medicalization of global health  

PubMed Central

Universal health coverage (UHC) has emerged as the leading and recommended overarching health goal on the post-2015 development agenda, and is promoted with fervour. UHC has the backing of major medical and health institutions, and is designed to provide patients with universal access to needed health services without financial hardship, but is also projected to have ‘a transformative effect on poverty, hunger, and disease’. Multiple reports and resolutions support UHC and few offer critical analyses; but among these are concerns with imprecise definitions and the ability to implement UHC at the country level. A medicalization lens enriches these early critiques and identifies concerns that the UHC campaign contributes to the medicalization of global health. UHC conflates health with health care, thus assigning undue importance to (biomedical) health services and downgrading the social and structural determinants of health. There is poor evidence that UHC or health care alone improves population health outcomes, and in fact health care may worsen inequities. UHC is reductionistic because it focuses on preventative and curative actions delivered at the individual level, and ignores the social and political determinants of health and right to health that have been supported by decades of international work and commitments. UHC risks commodifying health care, which threatens the underlying principles of UHC of equity in access and of health care as a collective good. PMID:24848662

Clark, Jocalyn

2014-01-01

291

Global health in the 21st century  

PubMed Central

Introduction Since the end of the 1990s, globalization has become a common term, facilitated by the social media of today and the growing public awareness of life-threatening problems common to all people, such as global warming, global security and global divides. Review For the main parameters of health like the burden of disease, life expectancy and healthy life expectancy, extreme discrepancies are observed across the world. Infant mortality, malnutrition and high fertility go hand in hand. Civil society, as an indispensable activator of public health development, mainly represented by non-governmental organisations (NGOs), is characterised by a high degree of fragmentation and lack of public accountability. The World Federation of Public Health Associations is used as an example of an NGO with a global mission and fostering regional cooperation as an indispensable intermediate level. The lack of a globally valid terminology of basic public health functions is prohibitive for coordinated global and regional efforts. Attempts to harmonise essential public health functions, services and operations are under way to facilitate communication and mutual understanding. Recommendations 1) Given the limited effects of the Millennium Development Goal agenda, the Post-2015 Development Goals should focus on integrated regional development. 2) A code of conduct for NGOs should be urgently developed for the health sector, and NGOs should be registered and accredited. 3) The harmonisation of the basic terminology for global public health essentials should be enhanced. PMID:24560267

Laaser, Ulrich; Brand, Helmut

2014-01-01

292

International environmental law and global public health.  

PubMed Central

The environment continues to be a source of ill-health for many people, particularly in developing countries. International environmental law offers a viable strategy for enhancing public health through the promotion of increased awareness of the linkages between health and environment, mobilization of technical and financial resources, strengthening of research and monitoring, enforcement of health-related standards, and promotion of global cooperation. An enhanced capacity to utilize international environmental law could lead to significant worldwide gains in public health. PMID:12571726

Schirnding, Yasmin von; Onzivu, William; Adede, Andronico O.

2002-01-01

293

The state of global health in 2014.  

PubMed

The global health landscape looks more promising than ever, although progress has been uneven. Here, we describe the current global burden of disease throughout the life cycle, highlighting regional differences in the unfinished agenda of communicable diseases and reproductive, maternal, and child health and the additive burden of emerging noncommunicable diseases and injuries. Understanding this changing landscape is an essential starting point for effective allocation of both domestic and international resources for health. PMID:25214611

Sepúlveda, Jaime; Murray, Christopher

2014-09-12

294

OHSU Global Health Center Frequent Flyer Donation Form  

E-print Network

OHSU Global Health Center Frequent Flyer Donation Form The OHSU Global Health Center Frequent Flyer to volunteer in global health. Activities include research, field activities, service projects, and life affirming experiences that have positive impact on education and global health. The OHSU Global Health

Chapman, Michael S.

295

OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY Certificate in Global Health (Online Program)  

E-print Network

OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY Certificate in Global Health (Online Program) Global Health aims to show us the big picture. Mistakenly, people assume that the target of "Global Health program aims to provide comprehensive training in Global Health. The Global Health Certificate is designed

296

Global health politics: neither solidarity nor policy  

PubMed Central

The global health agenda has been dominating the current global health policy debate. Furthermore, it has compelled countries to embrace strategies for tackling health inequalities in a wide range of public health areas. The article by Robert and colleagues highlights that although globalization has increased opportunities to share and spread ideas, there is still great asymmetry of power according to the countries’ economic and political development. It also emphasizes how policy diffusion from High Income Countries (HICs) to Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs) have had flaws at understanding their political, economic, and cultural backgrounds while they are pursuing knowledge translation. Achieving a fair global health policy diffusion of ideas would imply a call for a renewal on political elites worldwide at coping global health politics. Accordingly, moving towards fairness in disseminating global health ideas should be driven by politics not only as one of the social determinants of health, but the main determinant of health and well-being among—and within—societies. PMID:25114949

Méndez, Claudio A.

2014-01-01

297

Informatics competencies for nursing and healthcare leaders.  

PubMed

Historically, educational preparation did not address informatics competencies; thus managers, administrators, or executives may not be prepared to use or lead change in the use of health information technologies. A number of resources for informatics competencies exist, however, a comprehensive list addressing the unique knowledge and skills required in the role of a manager or administrator was not found. The purpose of this study was to develop informatics competencies for nursing leaders. A synthesis of the literature and a Delphi approach using three rounds of surveys with an expert panel resulted in identification of informatics competencies for nursing leaders that address computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. PMID:18998803

Westra, Bonnie L; Delaney, Connie W; Delaney, Connie

2008-01-01

298

Clinical research informatics: a conceptual perspective  

PubMed Central

Clinical research informatics is the rapidly evolving sub-discipline within biomedical informatics that focuses on developing new informatics theories, tools, and solutions to accelerate the full translational continuum: basic research to clinical trials (T1), clinical trials to academic health center practice (T2), diffusion and implementation to community practice (T3), and ‘real world’ outcomes (T4). We present a conceptual model based on an informatics-enabled clinical research workflow, integration across heterogeneous data sources, and core informatics tools and platforms. We use this conceptual model to highlight 18 new articles in the JAMIA special issue on clinical research informatics. PMID:22523344

Weng, Chunhua

2012-01-01

299

Global Environmental Change and Human Health  

E-print Network

Global Environmental Change and Human Health Science Plan and Implementation Strategy ESSPReport and Human Health Co-Chairs: Ulisses Confalonieri Anthony McMichael Planning Team: Surinder Aggarwal (India Change and Human Health (2007) Science Plan and Implementation Strategy. Earth System Science Partnership

Lopez-Carr, David

300

www.abdn.ac.uk/study Global Health  

E-print Network

www.abdn.ac.uk/study Global Health & Management Master of Science/Postgraduate Diploma MSc on Health Systems and Policy, Managing for Health and Global Health. Global Health topics include: · Poverty these intersect with broader structural issues. The aim is to develop multidimensional views of global health

Levi, Ran

301

The role of nursing informatics on promoting quality of health care and the need for appropriate education.  

PubMed

In today's dynamic health systems, technology plays an important role in education and nursing work. So it seems necessary to study the role of nurses and highlight the need for appropriate information technology educational programs to integrate with the ever-increasing pace of technology. A review accompanied by an extensive literature search in databases and a library search focused on the keywords were used. The criteria used for selecting studies primarily focused on nursing informatics and the importance of expertise in the effective use of information technology in all aspects of the nursing profession. In a critical assessment of emerging technologies, the key elements of nursing informatics implementation were considered as healthcare promotion, advanced systems, internet and network. In view of the nature and the development of the information age, it is required to receive necessary IT training for all categories of nurses. Due to the fast development of technology, in order to effectively take advantage of information technology in nursing outcome and quality of health care and to empower nurses; educational arrangement is recommended to set short-term and long-term specialized courses focusing on four target groups: studying, working, graduate, senior undergraduate, and graduate doctoral. The result of this study is expected to assist educational providers with program development. PMID:25363114

Darvish, Asieh; Bahramnezhad, Fatemeh; Keyhanian, Sara; Navidhamidi, Mojdeh

2014-11-01

302

Operationalizing a One Health approach to global health challenges.  

PubMed

The One Health approach, which recognizes the interconnectedness of human, animal and ecosystem health, encourages collaboration between diverse disciplines to address complex health problems. The advantages and challenges posed by these interdisciplinary collaborations are described in this review. Learning networks where diverse participants can openly share processes, best practices, and case studies are discussed as a strategy for conducting transdisciplinary One Health research and tackling complex global health problems. The 11 papers in this special issue are also introduced as they illustrate how a One Health approach can be applied to better understand and control zoonotic pathogens, engage community stakeholders in One Health research and utilize wildlife species, most notably sea otters and birds, as sentinels of ecosystem health. Collaboration is rarely without complications; however, drawing on these insights may benefit the process of operationalizing the One Health approach to address today's global health challenges. PMID:23711930

Conrad, Patricia A; Meek, Laura A; Dumit, Joe

2013-05-01

303

Framing health and foreign policy: lessons for global health diplomacy  

PubMed Central

Global health financing has increased dramatically in recent years, indicative of a rise in health as a foreign policy issue. Several governments have issued specific foreign policy statements on global health and a new term, global health diplomacy, has been coined to describe the processes by which state and non-state actors engage to position health issues more prominently in foreign policy decision-making. Their ability to do so is important to advancing international cooperation in health. In this paper we review the arguments for health in foreign policy that inform global health diplomacy. These are organized into six policy frames: security, development, global public goods, trade, human rights and ethical/moral reasoning. Each of these frames has implications for how global health as a foreign policy issue is conceptualized. Differing arguments within and between these policy frames, while overlapping, can also be contradictory. This raises an important question about which arguments prevail in actual state decision-making. This question is addressed through an analysis of policy or policy-related documents and academic literature pertinent to each policy framing with some assessment of policy practice. The reference point for this analysis is the explicit goal of improving global health equity. This goal has increasing national traction within national public health discourse and decision-making and, through the Millennium Development Goals and other multilateral reports and declarations, is entering global health policy discussion. Initial findings support conventional international relations theory that most states, even when committed to health as a foreign policy goal, still make decisions primarily on the basis of the 'high politics' of national security and economic material interests. Development, human rights and ethical/moral arguments for global health assistance, the traditional 'low politics' of foreign policy, are present in discourse but do not appear to dominate practice. While political momentum for health as a foreign policy goal persists, the framing of this goal remains a contested issue. The analysis offered in this article may prove helpful to those engaged in global health diplomacy or in efforts to have global governance across a range of sectoral interests pay more attention to health equity impacts. PMID:20727211

2010-01-01

304

Don E. Detmer and the American Medical Informatics Association: An Appreciation  

PubMed Central

Don E. Detmer has served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) for the past five years, helping to set a course for the organization and demonstrating remarkable leadership as AMIA has evolved into a vibrant and influential professional association. On the occasion of Dr. Detmer's retirement, we fondly reflect on his professional life and his many contributions to biomedical informatics and, more generally, to health care in the U.S. and globally. PMID:19574463

Shortliffe, Edward H.; Bates, David W.; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Greenwood, Karen; Safran, Charles; Steen, Elaine B.; Tang, Paul C.; Williamson, Jeffrey J.

2009-01-01

305

Postdoctoral Bursaries Available Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS)  

E-print Network

1 Postdoctoral Bursaries Available Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS) What is GHRCAPS? The Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS to the national and international development of global health research by recruiting and training

Barthelat, Francois

306

Doctoral Bursaries Available Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS)  

E-print Network

1 Doctoral Bursaries Available Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS) What is GHRCAPS? The Global Health Research Capacity Strengthening Program (GHRCAPS to the national and international development of global health research by recruiting and training

Barthelat, Francois

307

For general information about the Certificate in Global Health, please  

E-print Network

For general information about the Certificate in Global Health, please contact: Robin Eric Mittenthal Global Health Administrative Program Manager 272 Nutritional Sciences 1415 Linden Dr. TEL: 608 appointments. OR Sweta Shrestha Education Programs Associate Global Health Institute 1026 Medical Sciences

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

308

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES  

E-print Network

1 UCSF-GHS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES MASTERS OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES Student Handbook 2012-2013 #12;2 WELCOME FROM THE GHS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR......................................4 UCSF GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES .................................................................5

Mullins, Dyche

309

Global Health Technologies The George R. Brown School of Engineering,  

E-print Network

1 Global Health Technologies The George R. Brown School of Engineering, The Weiss School of Natural°: Institute for Global Health Technologies collaborates with a number of departments to offer Rice undergraduate students a minor in global health technologies

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

310

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES  

E-print Network

1 UCSF-GHS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES MASTERS OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES Student Handbook 2014-2015 #12;2 WELCOME FROM THE GHS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR...................................... 4 UCSF GLOBAL HEALTH SCIENCES .................................................................5

Mullins, Dyche

311

Data Management for Meeting Global Health Challenges Tapan S. Parikh  

E-print Network

Data Management for Meeting Global Health Challenges Tapan S. Parikh UC Berkeley School global health challenges are becoming increasingly data driven. Governments and donors are demanding activities, and responding to remote outbreaks of disease. Data challenges in global health intersect

Parikh, Tapan S.

312

Software and Global Health: Assessing Vaccine Cold Chains from  

E-print Network

Software and Global Health: Assessing Vaccine Cold Chains from National Equipment Inventories of inventory based cold chain planning to global health 2. Stakeholders for global health software 3. Software

Anderson, Richard

313

Global Health Technologies The George R. Brown School of Engineering,  

E-print Network

Global Health Technologies The George R. Brown School of Engineering, The Weiss School of Natural°: Institute for Global Health Technologies collaborates with a number of departments to offer Rice undergraduate students a minor in global health technologies

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

314

2012 update on meaningful use of electronic health records: recommendations from the AAO-HNS Medical Informatics Committee.  

PubMed

In 2011, the US federal government implemented an oversight program to encourage the adoption and meaningful use of electronic health records (EHRs). Otolaryngologists may receive as much as $44,000 under Medicare or $63,750 under Medicaid as part of this law. To receive this full benefit, otolaryngologists must acquire a certified EHR and demonstrate stage 1 meaningful use requirements by the end of 2012. Furthermore, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT intends to advance meaningful use requirements to stage 2 (estimated to go in effect in 2014) and stage 3 requirements. This commentary discusses updated recommendations from the Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Medical Informatics Committee for implementing meaningful use of EHRs, receiving incentive payments, and preparing for potential stage 2 and stage 3 requirements. PMID:22241788

Sun, Gordon H; Eisenberg, Lee D; Ermini, Edward B; Lee, K J; Nielsen, David R; Rubin, Koryn Y; Das, Subinoy

2012-04-01

315

Reducing global health inequalities. Part 1  

PubMed Central

This paper summarizes four UK reviews of socially stratified health inequalities that were undertaken during the past five decades. It describes the background of misplaced optimism and false hopes which characterized the UK's own record of health inequalities; the broken promises on debt cancellations which was the experience of developing countries. It describes why the UK's past leadership record in international health provides grounds for optimism for the future and for benefits for both developed and developing countries through the adoption of more collaborative approaches to global health than have characterized international relationships in the past. It recalls the enthusiasm generated in the UK, and internationally, by the establishment of the Global Commission on the Social Determinants of Health. It promotes the perception of health both as a global public good and as a developmental issue and why a focus on poverty is essential to the address of global health issues. It sees the designing of appropriate strategies and partnerships towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals as an important first step for achieving successful address to global public health issues. PMID:21816930

Stuart, Kenneth; Soulsby, EJL

2011-01-01

316

DCCPS International and Global Health Activities  

Cancer.gov

Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Tobacco Control Research Home DCCPS International and Global Health Activities About the Project About the

317

Non-communicable diseases and global health governance: enhancing global processes to improve health development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper assesses progress in the development of a global framework for responding to non-communicable diseases, as reflected in the policies and initiatives of the World Health Organization (WHO), World Bank and the UN: the institutions most capable of shaping a coherent global policy. Responding to the global burden of chronic disease requires a strategic assessment of the global processes

Roger S Magnusson

2007-01-01

318

Informatics Moments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The informatics moment is the moment when a person seeks help in using some digital technology that is new to him or her. This article examines the informatics moment in people's everyday lives as they sought help at a branch public library. Four types of literacy were involved: basic literacy (reading and writing), computer literacy (use of a…

Williams, Kate

2012-01-01

319

Strategic planning of the master programme in health informatics at Aalborg University: targeting and updating the programme, to meet explicit customer needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Education is essentially giving people new skills and qualifications to fulfil certain tasks. In planning and managing educational programmes it is crucial to know what skills and what qualifications are needed to carry out the tasks in question, not to mention the importance of knowing what tasks are relevant to carry out. The programme in health informatics at Aalborg University

Christian Nøhr; Ann Bygholm; Ole Hejlesen

1998-01-01

320

Progress with Formalization in Medical Informatics?  

PubMed Central

The prevailing view of medical informatics as a primarily subservient discipline in health care is challenged. Developments in both general informatics and medical informatics are described to identify desirable properties of modeling languages and tools needed to solve key problems in the application field. For progress in medical informatics, it is considered essential to develop far more formal modeling languages, modeling techniques, and tools. A major aim of this development should be to expel ambiguity from concepts essential to medicine, positioning medical informatics “at the heart of health care.” PMID:11230381

van der Maas, Arnoud A.F.; Ten Hoopen, A. Johannes; Ter Hofstede, Arthur H.M.

2001-01-01

321

A competency matrix for global oral health.  

PubMed

The Lancet Commission on Education of Health Professionals for the 21(st) Century calls for enhancing health education for the needs and challenges of the 21st century to improve health status globally. To complement the Lancet report, this article makes recommendations for including core global health competencies in the education of health care professionals and specific groups of the public who are relevant to oral health in a global context in order to tackle the burden of oral diseases. Experts from various professional backgrounds developed global oral health competencies for four target groups: Group 1 was defined as dental students, residents/trainee specialists (or equivalent), and dentists; Group 2 was community health workers, dental hygienists, and dental therapists (or the equivalent); Group 3 was health professionals such as physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists; and Group 4 was non-health professionals in the public arena such as parents, teachers, decision makers, key opinion leaders, and health and consumer advocates. Key competencies for members of each of the four target groups are presented in a matrix. The suggested competency matrix shows that many other health professions and groups in society have potentially crucial roles in the prevention, control, and management of oral diseases globally. Workforce models including a wider range of professionals working together as a team will be needed to tackle the burden of oral diseases in an integrated way in the broader context of non-communicable diseases. Further discussion and research should be conducted to validate or improve the competencies proposed here with regard to their relevance, appropriateness, and completeness. PMID:25838005

Benzian, Habib; Greenspan, John S; Barrow, Jane; Hutter, Jeffrey W; Loomer, Peter M; Stauf, Nicole; Perry, Dorothy A

2015-04-01

322

Global Public Health Surveillance under New International Health Regulations  

PubMed Central

The new International Health Regulations adopted by the World Health Assembly in May 2005 (IHR 2005) represents a major development in the use of international law for public health purposes. One of the most important aspects of IHR 2005 is the establishment of a global surveillance system for public health emergencies of international concern. This article assesses the surveillance system in IHR 2005 by applying well-established frameworks for evaluating public health surveillance. The assessment shows that IHR 2005 constitutes a major advance in global surveillance from what has prevailed in the past. Effectively implementing the IHR 2005 surveillance objectives requires surmounting technical, resource, governance, legal, and political obstacles. Although IHR 2005 contains some provisions that directly address these obstacles, active support by the World Health Organization and its member states is required to strengthen national and global surveillance capabilities. PMID:16836821

Fidler, David P.

2006-01-01

323

China's distinctive engagement in global health.  

PubMed

China has made rapid progress in four key domains of global health. China's health aid deploys medical teams, constructs facilities, donates drugs and equipment, trains personnel, and supports malaria control mainly in Africa and Asia. Prompted by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003, China has prioritised the control of cross-border transmission of infectious diseases and other health-related risks. In governance, China has joined UN and related international bodies and has begun to contribute to pooled multilateral funds. China is both a knowledge producer and sharer, offering lessons based on its health accomplishments, traditional Chinese medicine, and research and development investment in drug discovery. Global health capacity is being developed in medical universities in China, which also train foreign medical students. China's approach to global health is distinctive; different from other countries; and based on its unique history, comparative strength, and policies driven by several governmental ministries. The scope and depth of China's global engagement are likely to grow and reshape the contours of global health. PMID:25176550

Liu, Peilong; Guo, Yan; Qian, Xu; Tang, Shenglan; Li, Zhihui; Chen, Lincoln

2014-08-30

324

Global health governance and the World Bank  

PubMed Central

With the Paul Wolfowitz era behind it and new appointee Robert Zoellick at the helm, it is time for the World Bank to better define its role in an increasingly crowded and complex global health architecture, says Jennifer Prah Ruger, health economist and former World Bank speechwriter. PMID:17972367

Ruger, Jennifer Prah

2014-01-01

325

Globalization and health: results and options.  

PubMed Central

The last two decades have witnessed the emergence and consolidation of an economic paradigm which emphasizes domestic deregulation and the removal of barriers to international trade and finance. If properly managed, such an approach can lead to perceptible gains in health status. Where markets are non-exclusionary, regulatory institutions strong and safety nets in place, globalization enhances the performance of countries with a good human and physical infrastructure but narrow domestic markets. Health gains in China, Costa Rica, the East Asian "tiger economies" and Viet Nam can be attributed in part to their growing access to global markets, savings and technology. However, for most of the remaining countries, many of them in Africa, Latin America and Eastern Europe, globalization has not lived up to its promises due to a combination of poor domestic conditions, an unequal distribution of foreign investments and the imposition of new conditions further limiting the access of their exports to the OECD markets. In these developing countries, the last twenty years have brought about a slow, unstable and unequal pattern of growth and stagnation in health indicators. Autarky is not the answer to this situation, but neither is premature, unconditional and unselective globalization. Further unilateral liberalization is unlikely to help them to improve their economic performance and health conditions. For them, a gradual and selective integration into the world economy linked to the removal of asymmetries in global markets and to the creation of democratic institutions of global governance is preferable to instant globalization. PMID:11584731

Cornia, G. A.

2001-01-01

326

Health Promotion: An Effective Tool for Global Health  

PubMed Central

Health promotion is very relevant today. There is a global acceptance that health and social wellbeing are determined by many factors outside the health system which include socioeconomic conditions, patterns of consumption associated with food and communication, demographic patterns, learning environments, family patterns, the cultural and social fabric of societies; sociopolitical and economic changes, including commercialization and trade and global environmental change. In such a situation, health issues can be effectively addressed by adopting a holistic approach by empowering individuals and communities to take action for their health, fostering leadership for public health, promoting intersectoral action to build healthy public policies in all sectors and creating sustainable health systems. Although, not a new concept, health promotion received an impetus following Alma Ata declaration. Recently it has evolved through a series of international conferences, with the first conference in Canada producing the famous Ottawa charter. Efforts at promoting health encompassing actions at individual and community levels, health system strengthening and multi sectoral partnership can be directed at specific health conditions. It should also include settings-based approach to promote health in specific settings such as schools, hospitals, workplaces, residential areas etc. Health promotion needs to be built into all the policies and if utilized efficiently will lead to positive health outcomes. PMID:22529532

Kumar, Sanjiv; Preetha, GS

2012-01-01

327

Evaluation of a joint Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics international course in Peru  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: New technologies that emerge at the interface of computational and biomedical science could drive new advances in global health, therefore more training in technology is needed among health care workers. To assess the potential for informatics training using an approach designed to foster interaction at this interface, the University of Washington and the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia developed and

Walter H Curioso; Jacquelyn R Hansen; Arturo Centurion-Lara; Patricia J Garcia; Fredric M Wolf; Sherrilynne Fuller; King K Holmes; Ann Marie Kimball

2008-01-01

328

Globalisation and global health governance: implications for public health.  

PubMed

Globalisation is a defining economic and social trend of the past several decades. Globalisation affects health directly and indirectly and creates economic and health disparities within and across countries. The political response to address these disparities, exemplified by the Millennium Development Goals, has put pressure on the global community to redress massive inequities in health and other determinants of human capability across countries. This, in turn, has accelerated a transformation in the architecture of global health governance. The entrance of new actors, such as private foundations and multi-stakeholder initiatives, contributed to a doubling of funds for global health between 2000 and 2010. Today the governance of public health is in flux, with diminished leadership from multilateral institutions, such as the WHO, and poor coherence in policy and programming that undermines the potential for sustainable health gains. These trends pose new challenges and opportunities for global public health, which is centrally concerned with identifying and addressing threats to the health of vulnerable populations worldwide. PMID:22621678

Kruk, Margaret E

2012-01-01

329

A future without health? Health dimension in global scenario studies.  

PubMed Central

This paper reviews the health dimension and sociocultural, economic, and ecological determinants of health in existing global scenario studies. Not even half of the 31 scenarios reviewed gave a good description of future health developments and the different scenario studies did not handle health in a consistent way. Most of the global driving forces of health are addressed adequately in the selected scenarios, however, and it therefore would have been possible to describe the future developments in health as an outcome of these multiple driving forces. To provide examples on how future health can be incorporated in existing scenarios, we linked the sociocultural, economic, and environmental developments described in three sets of scenarios (special report on emission scenarios (SRES), global environmental outlook-3 (GEO3), and world water scenarios (WWS)) to three potential, but imaginary, health futures ("age of emerging infectious diseases", "age of medical technology", and "age of sustained health"). This paper provides useful insights into how to deal with future health in scenarios and shows that a comprehensive picture of future health evolves when all important driving forces and pressures are taken into account. PMID:14997242

Martens, Pim; Huynen, Maud

2003-01-01

330

Communications satellites in the national and global health care information infrastructure: their role, impact, and issues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health care services delivered from a distance, known collectively as telemedicine, are being increasingly demonstrated on various transmission media. Telemedicine activities have included diagnosis by a doctor at a remote location, emergency and disaster medical assistance, medical education, and medical informatics. The ability of communications satellites to offer communication channels and bandwidth on demand, connectivity to mobile, remote and under served regions, and global access will afford them a critical role for telemedicine applications within the National and Global Information Infrastructure (NII/GII). The importance that communications satellites will have in telemedicine applications within the NII/GII the differences in requirements for NII vs. GII, the major issues such as interoperability, confidentiality, quality, availability, and costs, and preliminary conclusions for future usability based on the review of several recent trails at national and global levels are presented.

Zuzek, J. E.; Bhasin, K. B.

1996-01-01

331

Informatic system for a global tissue-fluid biorepository with a graph theory-oriented graphical user interface.  

PubMed

The Richard Floor Biorepository supports collaborative studies of extracellular vesicles (EVs) found in human fluids and tissue specimens. The current emphasis is on biomarkers for central nervous system neoplasms but its structure may serve as a template for collaborative EV translational studies in other fields. The informatic system provides specimen inventory tracking with bar codes assigned to specimens and containers and projects, is hosted on globalized cloud computing resources, and embeds a suite of shared documents, calendars, and video-conferencing features. Clinical data are recorded in relation to molecular EV attributes and may be tagged with terms drawn from a network of externally maintained ontologies thus offering expansion of the system as the field matures. We fashioned the graphical user interface (GUI) around a web-based data visualization package. This system is now in an early stage of deployment, mainly focused on specimen tracking and clinical, laboratory, and imaging data capture in support of studies to optimize detection and analysis of brain tumour-specific mutations. It currently includes 4,392 specimens drawn from 611 subjects, the majority with brain tumours. As EV science evolves, we plan biorepository changes which may reflect multi-institutional collaborations, proteomic interfaces, additional biofluids, changes in operating procedures and kits for specimen handling, novel procedures for detection of tumour-specific EVs, and for RNA extraction and changes in the taxonomy of EVs. We have used an ontology-driven data model and web-based architecture with a graph theory-driven GUI to accommodate and stimulate the semantic web of EV science. PMID:25317275

Butler, William E; Atai, Nadia; Carter, Bob; Hochberg, Fred

2014-01-01

332

Informatic system for a global tissue–fluid biorepository with a graph theory–oriented graphical user interface  

PubMed Central

The Richard Floor Biorepository supports collaborative studies of extracellular vesicles (EVs) found in human fluids and tissue specimens. The current emphasis is on biomarkers for central nervous system neoplasms but its structure may serve as a template for collaborative EV translational studies in other fields. The informatic system provides specimen inventory tracking with bar codes assigned to specimens and containers and projects, is hosted on globalized cloud computing resources, and embeds a suite of shared documents, calendars, and video-conferencing features. Clinical data are recorded in relation to molecular EV attributes and may be tagged with terms drawn from a network of externally maintained ontologies thus offering expansion of the system as the field matures. We fashioned the graphical user interface (GUI) around a web-based data visualization package. This system is now in an early stage of deployment, mainly focused on specimen tracking and clinical, laboratory, and imaging data capture in support of studies to optimize detection and analysis of brain tumour–specific mutations. It currently includes 4,392 specimens drawn from 611 subjects, the majority with brain tumours. As EV science evolves, we plan biorepository changes which may reflect multi-institutional collaborations, proteomic interfaces, additional biofluids, changes in operating procedures and kits for specimen handling, novel procedures for detection of tumour-specific EVs, and for RNA extraction and changes in the taxonomy of EVs. We have used an ontology-driven data model and web-based architecture with a graph theory–driven GUI to accommodate and stimulate the semantic web of EV science. PMID:25317275

Butler, William E.; Atai, Nadia; Carter, Bob; Hochberg, Fred

2014-01-01

333

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200  

E-print Network

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200 San Francisco, CA 94105, USA tel: 415.597.4660 fax: 415.597.8299 UCSF Global Health Group Research Assistant (limited hire) The UCSF Global Health Group (http://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/global-health-group) seeks a candidate with experience

Derisi, Joseph

334

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE GLOBAL HEALTH FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION  

E-print Network

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE GLOBAL HEALTH FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION CLASS of deadline is in December). Check one: Summer Global Health_____ Medical Spanish_______ Senior Global Health attendance at 2-3 seminars before leaving for project (dates and times TBD) on topics in global health

Yates, Andrew

335

CERTIFICATE IN GLOBAL HEALTH FOR ANTHROPOLOGY MAJORS AND ANTHROPOLOGY  

E-print Network

CERTIFICATE IN GLOBAL HEALTH FOR ANTHROPOLOGY MAJORS AND ANTHROPOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS The Certificate in Global Health was established as part of the Framework for Global Health Curricula, which is coordinated by the Center for Global Health and Diseases in the School of Medicine. The Certificate

Rollins, Andrew M.

336

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200  

E-print Network

The Global Health Group 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200 San Francisco, CA 94105, USA tel: 415.597.4660 fax: 415.597.8299 UCSF Global Health Group Research Assistant (limited hire) The UCSF Global Health Group (http://globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/global-health-group) seeks

Klein, Ophir

337

Informatics: A Brief Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a brief survey of informatics, defined as the application of information technology to various fields, with respect to its historical background, disciplinary identity, fundamental aspects, applications, and challenges. Highlights include biological, clinical, dental, environmental, geomatics, health, legal, management, medical, museum,…

He, Shaoyi

2003-01-01

338

[Globalization, international trade, and health equity].  

PubMed

Globalization and international trade are having an increasingly evident impact on the day-to-day duties of the health sector, and the phenomenon has aroused a great deal of interest among governments, nongovernmental organizations, international organizations, and the mass media. Up to this point the heated and polemical debate on the subject has seriously hindered objective discourse on the health implications of globalization and international trade. This piece examines the possible impact of the two processes on health in the Region of the Americas, in order to foster policies for equity that are adopted within the framework of public health in the Americas. The piece considers the relationships among globalization, trade, and health in general and then focuses on the special case of trade in health goods and services. The piece looks at the possible impact on health equity of the agreements for integration and free trade that are being negotiated in the Americas. The piece concludes with a summary of the activities that the Pan American Health Organization has been carrying out in this area. PMID:12162840

Vieira, Cesar

2002-01-01

339

Curricula in medical informatics.  

PubMed

Education in medical informatics is needed not only for those who want to become specialist in this area but also for health professionals. Since students, depending on the program they are enlisted in, require different types of knowledge and skills in medical informatics, curricula should be adapted to those needs. The curriculum structure also depends on the expert level the students want to attain. This contribution presents the knowledge and skills levels for different groups of students and presents two examples of curricula. PMID:15718674

Hasman, Arie; Haux, Reinhold

2004-01-01

340

ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND GLOBAL HEALTH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Energy and energy technologies have a central role in social and economic development at all scales, from household and community to regional and national. Among its welfare effects, energy is closely linked with public health both positively and negatively, the latter through environmental pollution and degradation. We review the current research on how energy use and energy technologies influence public

Majid Ezzati; Robert Bailis; Daniel M. Kammen; Tracey Holloway; Lynn Price; Luis A. Cifuentes; Brendon Barnes; Akanksha Chaureyy; Kiran N. Dhanapala

2004-01-01

341

Museum Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses museum informatics that studies how information science and technology affect the museum environment. Examines digital technology; information organization and access; digitization, personal computers, and the Internet; data sharing; standards; social impacts of new technologies; collaboration; consortia; multimedia exhibits; virtual…

Marty, Paul F.; Rayward, W. Boyd; Twidale, Michael B.

2003-01-01

342

www.globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu UCSF Global Health Sciences  

E-print Network

www.globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu UCSF Global Health Sciences 50 Beale Street, Suite 1200 San that train students to become future leaders in global health--not only as clinicians, but also as policy health challenges. Global Health Sciences leverages UCSF's unparalleled expertise in the health

Klein, Ophir

343

Global mental health: from science to action.  

PubMed

This article charts the historical development of the discipline of global mental health, whose goal is to improve access to mental health care and reduce inequalities in mental health outcomes between and within nations. The article begins with an overview of the contribution of four scientific foundations toward the discipline's core agenda: to scale up services for people with mental disorders and to promote their human rights. Next, the article highlights four recent, key events that are indicative of the actions shaping the discipline: the Mental Health Gap Action Programme to synthesize evidence on what treatments are effective for a range of mental disorders; the evidence on task shifting to nonspecialist health workers to deliver these treatments; the Movement for Global Mental Health's efforts to build a common platform for professionals and civil society to advocate for their shared goal; and the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health, which has identified the research priorities that, within the next decade, can lead to substantial improvements in the lives of people living with mental disorders. The article ends by examining the major challenges for the field, and the opportunities for addressing them in the future. PMID:22335178

Patel, Vikram

2012-01-01

344

Global ovarian cancer health disparities  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of this article is to broadly review the scientific literature and summarize the most up-to-date findings on ovarian cancer health disparities worldwide and in the United States (U.S.). Methods The present literature on disparities in ovarian cancer was reviewed. Original research and relevant review articles were included. Results Ovarian cancer health disparities exist worldwide and in the U.S. Ovarian cancer disproportionately affect African American women at all stages of the disease, from presentation through treatment, and ultimately increased mortality and decreased survival, compared to non-Hispanic White women. Increased mortality is likely to be explained by unequal access to care and non-standard treatment regimens frequently administered to African American women, but may also be attributed to genetic susceptibility, acquired co-morbid conditions and increased frequency of modifiable risk factors, albeit to substantially lesser extent. Unequal access to care is, in turn, largely a consequence of lower socioeconomic status and lack of private health insurance coverage among the African American population. Conclusions Our findings suggest the need for policy changes aimed at facilitating equal access to quality medical care. At the same time, further research is necessary to fully resolve racial disparities in ovarian cancer. PMID:23266352

Chornokur, Ganna; Amankwah, Ernest K.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Phelan, Catherine M.

2013-01-01

345

National health expenditures: a global analysis.  

PubMed Central

As part of the background research to the World development report 1993: investing in health, an effort was made to estimate public, private and total expenditures on health for all countries of the world. Estimates could be found for public spending for most countries, but for private expenditure in many fewer countries. Regressions were used to predict the missing values of regional and global estimates. These econometric exercises were also used to relate expenditure to measures of health status. In 1990 the world spent an estimated US$ 1.7 trillion (1.7 x 10(12) on health, or $1.9 trillion (1.9 x 10(12)) in dollars adjusted for higher purchasing power in poorer countries. This amount was about 60% public and 40% private in origin. However, as incomes rise, public health expenditure tends to displace private spending and to account for the increasing share of incomes devoted to health. PMID:7923542

Murray, C. J.; Govindaraj, R.; Musgrove, P.

1994-01-01

346

The World Health Organization and Global Health Governance: post-1990.  

PubMed

This article takes a historical perspective on the changing position of WHO in the global health architecture over the past two decades. From the early 1990s a number of weaknesses within the structure and governance of the World Health Organization were becoming apparent, as a rapidly changing post Cold War world placed more complex demands on the international organizations generally, but significantly so in the field of global health. Towards the end of that decade and during the first half of the next, WHO revitalized and played a crucial role in setting global health priorities. However, over the past decade, the organization has to some extent been bypassed for funding, and it lost some of its authority and its ability to set a global health agenda. The reasons for this decline are complex and multifaceted. Some of the main factors include WHO's inability to reform its core structure, the growing influence of non-governmental actors, a lack of coherence in the positions, priorities and funding decisions between the health ministries and the ministries overseeing development assistance in several donor member states, and the lack of strong leadership of the organization. PMID:24388640

Lidén, J

2014-02-01

347

Medicalization of global health 1: has the global health agenda become too medicalized?  

PubMed Central

Medicalization analyses have roots in sociology and have critical usefulness for understanding contemporary health issues including the ‘post-2015 global health agenda’. Medicalization is more complex than just ‘disease mongering’ – it is a process and not only an outcome; has both positive and negative elements; can be partial rather than complete; and is often sought or challenged by patients or others in the health field. It is understood to be expanding rather than contracting, plays out at the level of interaction or of definitions and agenda-setting, and is said to be largely harmful and costly to individuals and societies. Medicalization of global health issues would overemphasise the role of health care to health; define and frame issues in relation to disease, treatment strategies, and individual behaviour; promote the role of medical professionals and models of care; find support in industry or other advocates of technologies and pharmaceuticals; and discount social contexts, causes, and solutions. In subsequent articles, three case studies are explored, which critically examine predominant issues on the global health agenda: global mental health, non-communicable disease, and universal health coverage. A medicalization lens helps uncover areas where the global health agenda and its framing of problems are shifted toward medical and technical solutions, neglecting necessary social, community, or political action. PMID:24848659

Clark, Jocalyn

2014-01-01

348

Family health nursing: a response to the global health challenges.  

PubMed

The European Family Health Nursing Project is a revitalized World Health Organization initiative led by the University of the West of Scotland. Partner countries include Armenia, Austria, Germany, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, and Spain. European Union Lifelong Learning funding was received in 2011 to facilitate a consistency of approach in the development of a definition of family health nursing, required core competencies and capabilities, and consequent education and training requirements. Global health challenges have informed the development of the project: increasingly aging populations, the increasing incidence in noncommunicable diseases that are currently the main cause of death, and the significant progress made in the way health systems have developed to meet the demands in relation to access and equality of health services. Governments and policy makers should develop a health workforce based on the principles of teamwork and interdisciplinarity while recognizing the core contribution of the "specialist generalist" role in the primary care setting. PMID:23288887

Martin, Paul; Duffy, Tim; Johnston, Brian; Banks, Pauline; Harkess-Murphy, Eileen; Martin, Colin R

2013-02-01

349

Comparisons among Health Behavior Surveys: Implications for the Design of Informatics Infrastructures That Support Comparative Effectiveness Research  

PubMed Central

Introduction: To address the electronic health data fragmentation that is a methodological limitation of comparative effectiveness research (CER), the Washington Heights Inwood Informatics Infrastructure for Comparative Effectiveness Research (WICER) project is creating a patient-centered research data warehouse (RDW) by linking electronic clinical data (ECD) from New York Presbyterian Hospital’s clinical data warehouse with ECD from ambulatory care, long-term care, and home health settings and the WICER community health survey (CHS). The purposes of the research were to identify areas of overlap between the WICER CHS and two other surveys that include health behavior data (the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey and the New York City Community Health Survey (NYC CHS)) and to identify gaps in the current WICER RDW that have the potential to affect patient-centered CER. Methods: We compared items across the three surveys at the item and conceptual levels. We also compared WICER RDW (ECD and WICER CHS), BRFSS, and NYC CHS to the County Health Ranking framework. Results: We found that 22 percent of WICER items were exact matches with BRFSS and that there were no exact matches between WICER CHS and NYC CHS items not also contained in BRFSS. Conclusions: The results suggest that BRFSS and, to a lesser extent, NYC CHS have the potential to serve as population comparisons for WICER CHS for some health behavior-related data and thus may be particularly useful for considering the generalizability of CER study findings. Except for one measure related to health behavior (motor vehicle crash deaths), the WICER RDW’s comprehensive coverage supports the mortality, morbidity, and clinical care measures specified in the County Health Ranking framework but is deficient in terms of some socioeconomic factors and descriptions of the physical environment as captured in BRFSS. Linkage of these data in the WICER RDW through geocoding can potentially facilitate patient-centered CER that integrates important socioeconomic and physical environment influences on health outcomes. The research methods and findings may be relevant to others interested in either integrating health behavior data into RDWs to support patient-centered CER or conducting population-level comparisons.

Yoon, Sunmoo; Wilcox, Adam B.; Bakken, Suzanne

2013-01-01

350

Implementing the global health security agenda: lessons from global health and security programs.  

PubMed

The Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) describes a vision for a world that is safe and secure from infectious disease threats; it underscores the importance of developing the international capacity to prevent, detect, and respond to pandemic agents. In February 2014, the United States committed to support the GHSA by expanding and intensifying ongoing efforts across the US government. Implementing these goals will require interagency coordination and harmonization of diverse health security elements. Lessons learned from the Global Health Initiative (GHI), the President's Emergency Program for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and the Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) program underscore that centralized political, technical, and fiscal authority will be key to developing robust, sustainable, and integrated global health security efforts across the US government. In this article, we review the strengths and challenges of GHI, PEPFAR, and CTR and develop recommendations for implementing a unified US global health security program. PMID:25812424

Paranjape, Suman M; Franz, David R

2015-01-01

351

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA 348 Undergraduate Catalog 2014-2015 Health Informatics and Information Management -  

E-print Network

hrs) HIM 3006 Foundations of Health Information Management (HIM) 3 hrs HIM 4508C Quality Management 3 and Information Management - Minor College of Health and Public Affairs Department of Health Management hrs HIM 4656C Health Information Management Systems 3 hrs HSC 3537 Medical Terminology 3 hrs HIM 4226C

Wu, Shin-Tson

352

About NCI Center for Global Health  

Cancer.gov

Provides assistance and guidance to nations as they develop and implement cancer control plans, trains international investigators, and strengthens U.S. national, regional, multilateral, and bilateral collaboration in health research, cancer research, and cancer control to advance global cancer research, build expertise, and reduce cancer deaths worldwide.

353

Globalization and health: results and options  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The last two decades have witnessed the emergence and consolidation of an economic paradigm which emphasizes domestic deregulation and the removal of barriers to international trade and finance. If properly managed, such an approach can lead to perceptible gains in health status. Where markets are non-exclusionary, regulatory institutions strong and safety nets in place, globalization enhances the performance of

Giovanni Andrea Cornia

354

Botswana Clinical Elective Global Health Programs  

E-print Network

/lung abscess Empyema Diarrhea Rheumatic heart disease Congestive heart failure Malignant hypertension build capacity in: Clinical Care Education Research To offer opportunities in global health for Penn diseases. ~ 100 fulltime BUP employees in Botswana 2. Education in collaboration with new UB School

Bushman, Frederic

355

The World at Your Fingertips Global Health Information Resources  

E-print Network

The World at Your Fingertips Global Health Information Resources: An Introductory Tour Gurpreet K. Rana, MLIS Global Health Coordinator Taubman Health Sciences Library preet@umich.edu #12;· establishing long-term goals and effective strategies to meet global health objectives · developing partnerships

Eustice, Ryan

356

Amit Chandra, MD "Emergency Medicine, Global Health, and Africa  

E-print Network

Amit Chandra, MD "Emergency Medicine, Global Health, and Africa: The Botswana Experience" Amit Chandra MD, MSc, FACEP is an emergency physician and global health specialist. He recently completed a two global health education, HIV emergencies, ICT applications for health, and trauma and road safety

Bushman, Frederic

357

OPENING PLENARY SECOND PLENARY THIRD PLENARYWater Crisis Global Health Governance  

E-print Network

OPENING PLENARY SECOND PLENARY THIRD PLENARYWater Crisis Global Health Governance Marjorie GriffinOpOliS experience Associate Dean, Research, Director of Global Health and Professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences SiMon FraSer UniverSity Professor of Global Health Policy London SChooL oF hyGiene and tropi

Haykin, Simon

358

Basch, Paul F. General References: Global Health and Development  

E-print Network

Basch, Paul F. General References: Global Health and Development Textbook of International Health. America's Vital Interest in Global Health. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1997. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1119101/ http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1119101/pdf/1361.pdf Chen, et al., eds. Global Health

Sheridan, Jennifer

359

PATHWAYS TO GLOBAL HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGIC PLAN 2008-2012  

E-print Network

PATHWAYS TO GLOBAL HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGIC PLAN 2008-2012 THE JOHN E. FOGARTY INTERNATIONAL CENTER ADVANCING SCIENCE FOR GLOBAL HEALTH U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National the Disease Control Priorities Project. GOAL III: Develop human capital to meet global health challenges

Bandettini, Peter A.

360

Knowledge, politics and power in global health  

PubMed Central

This article agrees with recent arguments suggesting that normative and epistemic power is rife within global health policy and provides further examples of such. However, in doing so, it is argued that it is equally important to recognize that global health is, and always will be, deeply political and that some form of power is not only necessary for the system to advance, but also to try and control the ways in which power within that system operates. In this regard, a better focus on health politics can both expose illegitimate sources of power, but also provide better recommendations to facilitate deliberations that can, although imperfectly, help legitimate sources of influence and power. PMID:25674575

Brown, Garrett Wallace

2015-01-01

361

World Health Organization global policy for improvement of oral health - World Health Assembly 2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Oral Health Programme has worked hard over the past five years to increase the awareness of oral health worldwide as an important component of general health and quality of life. Meanwhile, oral disease is still a major public health problem in high income countries and the burden of oral disease is growing in many

Poul Erik Petersen

2008-01-01

362

August 23September 26, 2010 Introduction to IM Motivational Interviewing Legal Issues Leadership Health Care Informatics  

E-print Network

January 10­March 20, 2011 Mind-Body Medicine · Spirituality · *Introduction to Integrative Mental Health · Approaches to ADHD and Austism January 16­March 4, 2012 Approaches to Women's Health · Approaches to Men

Wong, Pak Kin

363

BERNARDO RAMIREZ, M.D., M.B.A. Department of Health Management and Informatics  

E-print Network

; Managerial Epidemiology; Issues and Trends for the Health Professions; The U.S.A. Healthcare System). Courses Developed: International Healthcare Systems; Strategic Management; Health Ethics, Managed Care; Managerial Epidemiology; Interdisciplinary Study Abroad in Costa Rica; The Costa Rican Healthcare System

Wu, Shin-Tson

364

Building Global Health Through a Center-Without-Walls: The Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health  

PubMed Central

The Institute for Global Health at Vanderbilt enables the expansion and coordination of global health research, service, and training, reflecting the university's commitment to improve health services and outcomes in resource-limited settings. Global health encompasses both prevention via public health and treatment via medical care, all nested within a broader community-development context. This has fostered university-wide collaborations to address education, business/economics, engineering, nursing, and language training, among others. The institute is a natural facilitator for team building and has been especially helpful in organizing institutional responses to global health solicitations from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and other funding agencies. This center-without-walls philosophy nurtures noncompetitive partnerships among and within departments and schools. With extramural support from the NIH and from endowment and developmental investments from the school of medicine, the institute funds new pilot projects to nurture global educational and research exchanges related to health and development. Vanderbilt's newest programs are a CDC-supported HIV/AIDS service initiative in Africa and an overseas research training program for health science graduate students and clinical fellows. New opportunities are available for Vanderbilt students, staff, and faculty to work abroad in partnership with international health projects through a number of Tennessee institutions now networked with the institute. A center-without-walls may be a model for institutions contemplating strategic investments to better organize service and teaching opportunities abroad, and to achieve greater successes in leveraging extramural support for overseas and domestic work focused on tropical medicine and global health. PMID:18303361

Vermund, Sten H.; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Khedkar, Sheetal; Jia, Yujiang; Etherington, Carol; Vergara, Alfredo

2008-01-01

365

Global Health Sciences and CTSI-GHP Global Research Enterprise Support  

E-print Network

Global Health Sciences and CTSI-GHP Global Research Enterprise Support (G-RES) Coordinating and point of overall coordination of international research on behalf of Global Health Sciences and the OSR. The Coordinating Committee will report to the Director of Research, Global Health, Nina Agabian, who will report

Mullins, Dyche

366

Globalization of public health law and ethics.  

PubMed

The Constitution of the World Health Organization (1946) states that the "enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social position." The international legal framework for this right was laid by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and reaffirmed in the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (1966) and the Declaration of Alma-Ata (1978). In recent years, the framework has been developed on 10 key elements: national and international human rights, laws, norms, and standards; resource constraints and progressive realization; obligations of immediate effect; freedoms and entitlements; available, accessible, acceptable, and good quality; respect, protect, and fulfill; non-discrimination, equality, and vulnerability; active and informed participation; international assistance and cooperation; and monitoring and accountability. Whereas public health law plays an essential role in the protection and promotion of the right to health, the emergence of SARS (2003) highlighted the urgent need to reform national public health laws and international obligations relating to public health in order to meet the new realities of a globalized world, leading to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (2003) and the revision of the WHO International Health Regulations (2005). The Asian Institute for Bioethics and Health Law, in conjunction with the Republic of Korea's Ministry of Health and Welfare and the WHO International Digest of Health Legislation, conducted a comparative legal analysis of national public health laws in various countries through a project entitled Domestic Profiles of Public/Population Health Legislation (2006), which underscored the importance of recognizing the political and social contexts of distinct legal cultures, including Western, Asian, Islamic, and African. PMID:23093515

Sohn, Myongsei

2012-09-01

367

Public engagement on global health challenges  

PubMed Central

Background Experience with public engagement activities regarding the risks and benefits of science and technology (S&T) is growing, especially in the industrialized world. However, public engagement in the developing world regarding S&T risks and benefits to explore health issues has not been widely explored. Methods This paper gives an overview about public engagement and related concepts, with a particular focus on challenges and benefits in the developing world. We then describe an Internet-based platform, which seeks to both inform and engage youth and the broader public on global water issues and their health impacts. Finally, we outline a possible course for future action to scale up this and similar online public engagement platforms. Results The benefits of public engagement include creating an informed citizenry, generating new ideas from the public, increasing the chances of research being adopted, increasing public trust, and answering ethical research questions. Public engagement also fosters global communication, enables shared experiences and methodology, standardizes strategy, and generates global viewpoints. This is especially pertinent to the developing world, as it encourages previously marginalized populations to participate on a global stage. One of the core issues at stake in public engagement is global governance of science and technology. Also, beyond benefiting society at large, public engagement in science offers benefits to the scientific enterprise itself. Conclusion Successful public engagement with developing world stakeholders will be a critical part of implementing new services and technologies. Interactive engagement platforms, such as the Internet, have the potential to unite people globally around relevant health issues. PMID:18492256

Cohen, Emma RM; Masum, Hassan; Berndtson, Kathryn; Saunders, Vicki; Hadfield, Tom; Panjwani, Dilzayn; Persad, Deepa L; Minhas, Gunjeet S; Daar, Abdallah S; Singh, Jerome A; Singer, Peter A

2008-01-01

368

Health in global context; beyond the social determinants of health?  

PubMed Central

The rise of the social determinants of health (SDH) discourse on the basis of statistical evidence that correlates ill health to SDH and pictures causal pathways in comprehensive theoretical frameworks led to widespread awareness that health and health disparities are the outcome of complex pathways of interconnecting SDH. In this paper we explore whether and how SDH frameworks can be translated to effectively inform particular national health policies. To this end we identified major challenges for this translation followed by reflections on ways to overcome them. Most important challenges affecting adequate translation of these frameworks into concrete policy and intervention are 1) overcoming the inclination to conceptualize SDH as mere barriers to health behavior to be modified by lifestyle interventions by addressing them as structural factors instead; 2) obtaining sufficient in-depth insight in and evidence for the exact nature of the relationship between SDs and health; 3) to adequately translate the general determinants and pathways into explanations for ill health and limited access to health care in local settings; 4) to develop and implement policies and other interventions that are adjusted to those local circumstances. We conclude that to transform generic SDH models into useful policy tools and to prevent them to transform in SDH themselves, in depth understanding of the unique interplay between local, national and global SDH in a local setting, gathered by ethnographic research, is needed to be able to address structural SD in the local setting and decrease health inequity.

Krumeich, Anja; Meershoek, Agnes

2014-01-01

369

Global health funding and economic development.  

PubMed

The impact of increased national wealth, as measured by Gross Domestic Product (GDP), on public health is widely understood, however an equally important but less well-acclaimed relationship exists between improvements in health and the growth of an economy. Communicable diseases such as HIV, TB, Malaria and the Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) are impacting many of the world's poorest and most vulnerable populations, and depressing economic development. Sickness and disease has decreased the size and capabilities of the workforce through impeding access to education and suppressing foreign direct investment (FDI). There is clear evidence that by investing in health improvements a significant increase in GDP per capita can be attained in four ways: Firstly, healthier populations are more economically productive; secondly, proactive healthcare leads to decrease in many of the additive healthcare costs associated with lack of care (treating opportunistic infections in the case of HIV for example); thirdly, improved health represents a real economic and developmental outcome in-and-of itself and finally, healthcare spending capitalises on the Keynesian 'economic multiplier' effect. Continued under-investment in health and health systems represent an important threat to our future global prosperity. This editorial calls for a recognition of health as a major engine of economic growth and for commensurate investment in public health, particularly in poor countries. PMID:22490207

Martin, Greg; Grant, Alexandra; D'Agostino, Mark

2012-01-01

370

Global health funding and economic development  

PubMed Central

The impact of increased national wealth, as measured by Gross Domestic Product (GDP), on public health is widely understood, however an equally important but less well-acclaimed relationship exists between improvements in health and the growth of an economy. Communicable diseases such as HIV, TB, Malaria and the Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) are impacting many of the world's poorest and most vulnerable populations, and depressing economic development. Sickness and disease has decreased the size and capabilities of the workforce through impeding access to education and suppressing foreign direct investment (FDI). There is clear evidence that by investing in health improvements a significant increase in GDP per capita can be attained in four ways: Firstly, healthier populations are more economically productive; secondly, proactive healthcare leads to decrease in many of the additive healthcare costs associated with lack of care (treating opportunistic infections in the case of HIV for example); thirdly, improved health represents a real economic and developmental outcome in-and-of itself and finally, healthcare spending capitalises on the Keynesian 'economic multiplier' effect. Continued under-investment in health and health systems represent an important threat to our future global prosperity. This editorial calls for a recognition of health as a major engine of economic growth and for commensurate investment in public health, particularly in poor countries. PMID:22490207

2012-01-01

371

Ethical issues in public health informatics: implications for system design when sharing geographic information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Public health programs today constitute a multi-professional inter-organizational environment, where both health service and other organizations are involved. Developing information systems, including the IT security measures needed to suit this complex context, is a challenge. To ensure that all involved organizations work together towards a common goal, i.e., promotion of health, an intuitive strategy would be to share information

Christina Ölvingson; Jonas Hallberg; Toomas Timpka; Kent Lindqvist

2002-01-01

372

Cancer Research from Molecular Discovery and Diagnosis to Global Health:  

Cancer.gov

A science writers' seminar to discuss the latest research in cancer genetics and global health efforts, including talks from leaders of NCI’s new centers of cancer genomics and global health will be held Dec. 13, 2011, at NCI.

373

NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers  

MedlinePLUS

... Section NIH Abroad: Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... turn Javascript on. Inspiring the Next Generation of Global Health Researchers Fogarty scholar helps Zambians fight cervical cancer ...

374

DoseRight Syringe Clip The Global Health Challenge  

E-print Network

DoseRight Syringe Clip The Global Health Challenge Accurate liquid dosing is a necessity in cases in global health biotechnology The simple, elegant design of the device is what gives it the possibility

375

Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance  

E-print Network

- 1 - Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance January 31, 2011 officials in responding to a global health crisis. "The HTLN project provides an opportunity to deploy high

376

Global health education in U.S. Medical schools  

E-print Network

Abstract Interest in global health (GH) among medical students worldwide is measurably increasing. There is a concomitant emphasis on emphasizing globally-relevant health professions education. Through a structured literature review, expert...

Khan, Omar A; Guerrant, Richard; Sanders, James; Carpenter, Charles; Spottswood, Margaret; Jones, David S; O’Callahan, Cliff; Brewer, Timothy F; Markuns, Jeffrey F; Gillam, Stephen; O’Neill, Joseph; Nathanson, Neal; Wright, Stephen

2013-01-18

377

Combating healthcare corruption and fraud with improved global health governance  

PubMed Central

Corruption is a serious threat to global health outcomes, leading to financial waste and adverse health consequences. Yet, forms of corruption impacting global health are endemic worldwide in public and private sectors, and in developed and resource-poor settings alike. Allegations of misuse of funds and fraud in global health initiatives also threaten future investment. Current domestic and sectorial-level responses are fragmented and have been criticized as ineffective. In order to address this issue, we propose a global health governance framework calling for international recognition of “global health corruption” and development of a treaty protocol to combat this crucial issue. PMID:23088820

2012-01-01

378

Agile informatics: application of agile project management to the development of a personal health application.  

PubMed

We describe the application of the Agile method-- a short iteration cycle, user responsive, measurable software development approach-- to the project management of a modular personal health record, iHealthSpace, to be deployed to the patients and providers of a large academic primary care practice. PMID:18694014

Chung, Jeanhee; Pankey, Evan; Norris, Ryan J

2007-01-01

379

Health Informatics Systemic changes enabled by electronic record keeping, networked databases, and  

E-print Network

online health information. Ritu Agarwal studies IT issues in the healthcare industry, including, and the Internet have radically changed the way healthcare providers, researchers, and the public analyze, distribute, and consume health information. But the healthcare industry is still far behind other sectors

Hill, Wendell T.

380

An “App Store” for Health Care — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

381

Globalization and social determinants of health: Promoting health equity in global governance (part 3 of 3)  

PubMed Central

This article is the third in a three-part review of research on globalization and the social determinants of health (SDH). In the first article of the series, we identified and defended an economically oriented definition of globalization and addressed a number of important conceptual and metholodogical issues. In the second article, we identified and described seven key clusters of pathways relevant to globalization's influence on SDH. This discussion provided the basis for the premise from which we begin this article: interventions to reduce health inequities by way of SDH are inextricably linked with social protection, economic management and development strategy. Reflecting this insight, and against the background of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), we focus on the asymmetrical distribution of gains, losses and power that is characteristic of globalization in its current form and identify a number of areas for innovation on the part of the international community: making more resources available for health systems, as part of the more general task of expanding and improving development assistance; expanding debt relief and taking poverty reduction more seriously; reforming the international trade regime; considering the implications of health as a human right; and protecting the policy space available to national governments to address social determinants of health, notably with respect to the hypermobility of financial capital. We conclude by suggesting that responses to globalization's effects on social determinants of health can be classified with reference to two contrasting visions of the future, reflecting quite distinct values. PMID:17578570

Labonté, Ronald; Schrecker, Ted

2007-01-01

382

Globalization and Health: Exploring the opportunities and constraints for health arising from globalization.  

PubMed

The tremendous benefits which have been conferred to almost 5 billion people through improved technologies and knowledge highlights the concomitant challenge of bringing these changes to the 1 billion people living mostly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia who are yet to benefit. There is a growing awareness of the need to reduce human suffering and of the necessary participation of governments, non-government organizations and industry within this process. This awareness has recently translated into new funding mechanisms to address HIV/Aids and vaccines, a global push for debt relief and better trade opportunities for the poorest countries, and recognition of how global norms that address food safety, infectious diseases and tobacco benefit all. 'Globalization and Health' will encourage an exchange of views on how the global architecture for health governance needs to changes in the light of global threats and opportunities. PMID:15847700

Yach, Derek

2005-04-22

383

November 1315 | Montreal, Canada Advancing health equity in the 21st Century2011Global Health Conference  

E-print Network

November 13­15 | Montreal, Canada Advancing health equity in the 21st Century2011Global Health Conference Hosted by the Global Health Education Consortium, the Canadian Society for International Health, and the Consortium of Universities for Global Health Meeting Venue: Hilton Montreal Bonaventure, Montreal Information

Barthelat, Francois

384

PhotobyStePhanietache Bay Area Global Health Summit  

E-print Network

PhotobyStePhanietache Bay Area Global Health Summit: Innovation and action for the next decade OCTOBER 13, 2010, University of California, San Francisco PhotobyZachiSdahl #12;Bay Area Global Health Summit Program | 3 | Welcome Welcome to the first annual Bay Area Global Health Summit: Innovation

Klein, Ophir

385

Science & Engineering for Global Health 2014 CEND Research Fellowship  

E-print Network

Science & Engineering for Global Health 2014 CEND Research Fellowship The "Science & Engineering for Global Health" Fellowship provides $10, 000 for PhD candidates and postdocs interested background, aims, methods, global health significance · Curriculum Vitae (2 pages) · Budget (1 page): include

386

Harvard Medical School AbundanceFound Global Health  

E-print Network

Harvard Medical School AbundanceFound Global Health Loan Forgiveness Program for Graduating who have an intention of pursuing careers in global health delivery. This program is designed and who have demonstrated intention to pursue a career in global health delivery following residency

Lahav, Galit

387

Discussions in Global Health (MED 232) Course syllabus  

E-print Network

Discussions in Global Health (MED 232) Course syllabus Units: 2 Schedule: Fall Quarter 2013 within global health and the roles of various entities, including NGOs, governments, and healthcare providers. Case studies will be used to examine a broad range of topics in global health including

Sonnenburg, Justin L.

388

SAVING LIVESUniversities transforming global health Stories by John Donnelly  

E-print Network

SAVING LIVESUniversities transforming global health #12;Stories by John Donnelly Cover photographs for Global Health (CUGH) Email: info@cugh.org Web: www.cugh.org Printed in USA, 2009 Printed on recycled paper. © 2009 Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) All rights reserved. Front cover

Goldberg, Bennett

389

GLOBAL HEALTH FACULTY RESEARCH SEMINAR MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013  

E-print Network

GLOBAL HEALTH FACULTY RESEARCH SEMINAR MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2013 4:00-5:00 p.m. Location: Foege D-209 Grace John-Stewart, MD, MPH, PhD Departments of Global Health, Medicine, Epidemiology, and Pediatrics University of Washington Please join us for the monthly Global Health Faculty Research Seminar

Kaminsky, Werner

390

Supercourse: Epidemiology, the Internet, and Global Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by dedicated staff members at the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center at the University of Pittsburgh, Supercourse is "a repository of lectures on global health and prevention designed to improve the teaching of prevention." The group's network of experts includes over 56,000 scientists in 174 countries who have produced well over 5,000 lectures in 31 languages. It's quite impressive, and first-time visitors may wish to click on the Lecture of the Week on the homepage. Visitors can also search the lectures, where they will find a range of topics from "Urbanization and spatial inequalities in health in Brazil and India" to "A Simple Model for Improving Global Health Education." Researchers and others can use the Publications area to find out where some of the work offered here has been published over the years. Visitors shouldn't miss the Special Lectures area. Here they can look over some of the Supercourse Golden Lectures, which include talks in Chinese, Arabic, Croatian, and Albanian.

391

Global climate change and children's health.  

PubMed

There is broad scientific consensus that Earth's climate is warming rapidly and at an accelerating rate. Human activities, primarily the burning of fossil fuels, are very likely (>90% probability) to be the main cause of this warming. Climate-sensitive changes in ecosystems are already being observed, and fundamental, potentially irreversible, ecological changes may occur in the coming decades. Conservative environmental estimates of the impact of climate changes that are already in process indicate that they will result in numerous health effects to children. The nature and extent of these changes will be greatly affected by actions taken or not taken now at the global level. Physicians have written on the projected effects of climate change on public health, but little has been written specifically on anticipated effects of climate change on children's health. Children represent a particularly vulnerable group that is likely to suffer disproportionately from both direct and indirect adverse health effects of climate change. Pediatric health care professionals should understand these threats, anticipate their effects on children's health, and participate as children's advocates for strong mitigation and adaptation strategies now. Any solutions that address climate change must be developed within the context of overall sustainability (the use of resources by the current generation to meet current needs while ensuring that future generations will be able to meet their needs). Pediatric health care professionals can be leaders in a move away from a traditional focus on disease prevention to a broad, integrated focus on sustainability as synonymous with health. This policy statement is supported by a technical report that examines in some depth the nature of the problem of climate change, likely effects on children's health as a result of climate change, and the critical importance of responding promptly and aggressively to reduce activities that are contributing to this change. PMID:17967923

Shea, Katherine M

2007-11-01

392

Global health post-2015: the case for universal health equity  

PubMed Central

Set in 2000, with a completion date of 2015, the deadline for the Millennium Development Goals is approaching, at which time a new global development infrastructure will become operational. Unsurprisingly, the discussions on goals, topics, priorities and monitoring and evaluation are gaining momentum. But this is a critical juncture. Over a decade of development programming offers a unique opportunity to reflect on its structure, function and purpose in a contemporary global context. This article examines the topic from an analytical health perspective and identifies universal health equity as an operational and analytical priority to encourage attention to the root causes of unnecessary and unfair illness and disease from the perspectives of those for whom the issues have most direct relevance. PMID:23561031

D'Ambruoso, Lucia

2013-01-01

393

Sponsored by: UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM  

E-print Network

and e-Health Journal William Hersh, MD Professor and Chair Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Informatics Graduate Program HEALTH INFORMATICS 7TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2013 Educating the Informatics Workforce, California #12;Friday, March 22, 2013 Faculty HEALTH INFORMATICS 2013: EDUCATING THE INFORMATICS WORKFORCE 7

California at Davis, University of

394

Sponsored by: UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM  

E-print Network

Hersh, MD Professor and Chair Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology Oregon Health Informatics Graduate Program HEALTH INFORMATICS 7TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2013 Educating the Informatics Workforce, California #12;Friday, March 22, 2013 Faculty HEALTH INFORMATICS 2013: EDUCATING THE INFORMATICS WORKFORCE 7

Nguyen, Danh

395

Non-communicable diseases and global health governance: enhancing global processes to improve health development  

PubMed Central

This paper assesses progress in the development of a global framework for responding to non-communicable diseases, as reflected in the policies and initiatives of the World Health Organization (WHO), World Bank and the UN: the institutions most capable of shaping a coherent global policy. Responding to the global burden of chronic disease requires a strategic assessment of the global processes that are likely to be most effective in generating commitment to policy change at country level, and in influencing industry behaviour. WHO has adopted a legal process with tobacco (the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control), but a non-legal, advocacy-based approach with diet and physical activity (the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health). The paper assesses the merits of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the FCTC as distinct global processes for advancing health development, before considering what lessons might be learned for enhancing the implementation of the Global Strategy on Diet. While global partnerships, economic incentives, and international legal instruments could each contribute to a more effective global response to chronic diseases, the paper makes a special case for the development of international legal standards in select areas of diet and nutrition, as a strategy for ensuring that the health of future generations does not become dependent on corporate charity and voluntary commitments. A broader frame of reference for lifestyle-related chronic diseases is needed: one that draws together WHO's work in tobacco, nutrition and physical activity, and that envisages selective use of international legal obligations, non-binding recommendations, advocacy and policy advice as tools of choice for promoting different elements of the strategy. PMID:17519005

Magnusson, Roger S

2007-01-01

396

Office of Global Public Health www.globalhealth.utah.edu  

E-print Network

of the Month 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine Division of Public Health 375 Medicine Division of Public Health, 375 Chipeta Way Classroom 203 Or Join Us via GoToWebinar PleaseOffice of Global Public Health www.globalhealth.utah.edu Global Public Health Grand Rounds

Tipple, Brett

397

Building Global Health Research Competencies at the Undergraduate Level  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Faculty from the University of Calgary's bachelor of health sciences (BHSc) Global Health Program argue for the development of "global health research competencies" to prepare students for international placements in low- and middle-income countries. These competencies include the ability to define and describe (a) how to use the concept of health…

Hatfield, Jennifer M.; Hecker, Kent G.; Jensen, Ashley E.

2009-01-01

398

Moving toward a United States strategic plan in primary care informatics: a White Paper of the Primary Care Informatics Working Group, American Medical Informatics Association.  

PubMed

The Primary Care Informatics Working Group (PCIWG) of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) has identified the absence of a national strategy for primary care informatics. Under PCIWG leadership, major national and international societies have come together to create the National Alliance for Primary Care Informatics (NAPCI), to promote a connection between the informatics community and the organisations that support primary care. The PCIWG clinical practice subcommittee has recognised the necessity of a global needs assessment, and proposed work in point-of-care technology, clinical vocabularies, and ambulatory electronic medical record development. Educational needs include a consensus statement on informatics competencies, recommendations for curriculum and teaching methods, and methodologies to evaluate their effectiveness. The research subcommittee seeks to define a primary care informatics research agenda, and to support and disseminate informatics research throughout the primary care community. The AMIA board of directors has enthusiastically endorsed the conceptual basis for this White Paper. PMID:14567875

Little, David R; Zapp, John A; Mullins, Henry C; Zuckerman, Alan E; Teasdale, Sheila; Johnson, Kevin B

2003-01-01

399

Consumer health informatics: knowledge engineering and evaluation studies of medical HouseCall.  

PubMed

The changes in reimbursement structure in health care have given rise to a rapidly growing focus on the consumer and this recent increase has been fueled by the advent of the Web. Consumer health information (CHI) systems empower the consumer and aim to improve doctor-patient communication. We present HouseCall, a CHI system. First, this paper reviews how a consumer information system can be derived from an existing physician knowledge base (Iliad). Second, it presents evaluation studies that: 1) show how consumers are eager for non 'dumbed-down' content with easy access, 2) demonstrate the large spectrum of topics of interest and the 'natural' search strategies of health care consumers. PMID:9929292

Bouhaddou, O; Lambert, J G; Miller, S

1998-01-01

400

Office of Global Public Health www.globalhealth.utah.edu  

E-print Network

and Preventive Medicine Division of Public Health, 375 Chipeta Way Classroom 203.m. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine Division of Public Health 375 Chipeta Office of Global Public Health www

401

Controlling alcohol-related global health problems.  

PubMed

Alcohol's adverse public health impact includes disease, injury, violence, disability, social problems, psychiatric illness, drunk driving, drug use, unsafe sex, and premature death. Furthermore, alcohol is a confirmed human carcinogen. The International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that alcohol causes cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, esophagus, liver, colon-rectum, and breast. World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research concluded that the evidence justifies recommending avoidance of consuming any alcohol, even in small quantities. Despite being responsible for 3.8% of global deaths (2,255,000 deaths) and 4.6% of global disability-adjusted life years in 2004, alcohol consumption is increasing rapidly in China and Asia. Contrary to the World Health Assembly's call for global control action, Hong Kong has reduced wine and beer taxes to zero since 2008. An International Framework Convention on Alcohol Control is urgently needed. Increasing alcohol taxation and banning alcohol advertisement and promotion are among the most effective policies. PMID:20566555

Lam, Tai Hing; Chim, David

2010-07-01

402

Climate Informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The impacts of present and potential future climate change will be one of the most important scientific and societal challenges in the 21st century. Given observed changes in temperature, sea ice, and sea level, improving our understanding of the climate system is an international priority. This system is characterized by complex phenomena that are imperfectly observed and even more imperfectly simulated. But with an ever-growing supply of climate data from satellites and environmental sensors, the magnitude of data and climate model output is beginning to overwhelm the relatively simple tools currently used to analyze them. A computational approach will therefore be indispensable for these analysis challenges. This chapter introduces the fledgling research discipline climate informatics: collaborations between climate scientists and machine learning researchers in order to bridge this gap between data and understanding. We hope that the study of climate informatics will accelerate discovery in answering pressing questions in climate science.

Monteleoni, Claire; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Alexander, Francis J.; Niculescu-Mizil, Alexandru; Steinhaeuser, Karsten; Tippett, Michael; Banerjee, Arindam; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Ganguly, Auroop R.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Tedesco, Marco

2013-01-01

403

Health informatics from theory to practice: lessons from a case study in a developing country.  

PubMed

Implementation of IT in developing countries has had successes and failures. The theory of successful implementation has mainly been researched in developed countries. There is now evidence that there are other issues that are of importance to developing country health systems. Case studies allow us to identify pitfalls that implementors can fall into. The implementation of a computerized Field Health Information System in the Philippines provides insight into some factors of importance. While there are similarities to issues in developed countries, there are also many differences. PMID:8591511

Jayasuriya, R

1995-01-01

404

[Ebola and the global governance of health].  

PubMed

The high state of anxiety about Ebola virus and its possible spread in the Western world has seemingly changed the route of the disease, for which effective vaccines and medicines do not exist. The rapid spread of the virus provides a paradigmatic narrative about the failure of today's governance for health, grounded on a series of global initiatives focussed on pathologies prioritized by the donors' community, at the detriment of health promotion and the strengthening of health systems in countries. The Ebola crisis also delivers a powerful account about the consequences of the de-potentiation of the World Health Organization (WHO), once the leading organization in public health policy-making. Today, the WHO is increasingly weak technically, politically and financially. While the virus remains out of control, the WHO's capacity to play a role in accompanying the development of the new essential vaccines and in brokering the conditions for accessibility and availability of the new medical tools remains to be questioned. PMID:25424232

Dentico, Nicoletta

2014-11-01

405

Online social networks for personal informatics to promote positive health behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network services are becoming increasingly popular, and people are using these networks to obtain and share information. The application of social network and social media to the collection, storage and review of personal information presents opportunities for improved personal health management. This paper presents a survey of the literature on the models for the use of online social networks

Noreen Kamal; Sidney Fels; Kendall Ho

2010-01-01

406

Interdisciplinary Collaborations from a Health Informatics Prospective Katie A. Siek and Kay Connelly  

E-print Network

, by motivating them to exercise [1]? Can we empower people with diabetes to understand how their past choices Connelly 1 Introduction Can we prevent young adults from developing chronic illness, such as diabetes affect their current health state [2]? Can we provide people with advanced diabetes a means to strictly

Connelly, Kay

407

Juris Doctor/Master of science in HealtH inforMatics (JD/MHi)  

E-print Network

of law and technology. The JD/MHI combines practice-focused expertise in healthcare information systems of healthcare law, whether in law firms, business, or government settings. Using Technology to Improve Health and technology, and law, providing you the knowledge and skills to be prepared for the modern practice

Acosta, Charles A.

408

Rating the Raters: Legal Exposure of Trustmark Authorities in the Context of Consumer Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

There are three areas of potential legal exposure for an organization such as a trustmark authority involved in e-health quality rating. First, an e-health provider may make a complaint about negative or impliedly negative ratings rendered by the ratings body (false negative). Typically, a negative ratings complaint would rely on defamation or product disparagement causes of action. In some cases such complaints could be defended on the basis of absence of malice (US). Second, the rating body might render a positive rating on e-health data that a third party allegedly relied upon and suffered injury (false positive). While the primary cause of action would be against the e-health data provider, questions may arise as to the possible liability of the trustmark authority. For example, some US liability exposure is possible based on cases involving the potential liability of product warrantors, trade associations, and certifiers or endorsers. Third, a ratings body may face public law liability for its own web misfeasance. Several risk management approaches are possible and would not necessarily be mutually exclusive. These approaches will require careful investigation to assess their risk reduction potential and, in some cases, the introduction of legislation. PMID:11720941

2000-01-01

409

Transforming Global Health with Mobile Technologies and Social Enterprises  

PubMed Central

More than 2,000 people convened for the ninth annual Global Health and Innovation Conference at Yale University on April 21-22, 2012. Participants discussed the latest innovations, ideas in development, lessons learned, opportunities and challenges in global health activities. Several themes emerged, including the important role of frontline workers, strengthening health systems, leveraging social media, and sustainable and impact-driven philanthropy. Overall, the major outcome of the conference was the increased awareness of the potential of mobile technologies and social enterprises in transforming global health. Experts warned that donations and technological advances alone will not transform global health unless there are strong functioning health infrastructures and improved workforce. It was noted that there is a critical need for an integrated systems approach to global health problems and a need for scaling up promising pilot projects. Lack of funding, accountability, and sustainability were identified as major challenges in global health. PMID:23012591

Kayingo, Gerald

2012-01-01

410

Core Content for the Subspecialty of Clinical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Core Content for Clinical Informatics defines the boundaries of the discipline and informs the Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in Clinical Informatics. The Core Content includes four major categories: fundamentals, clinical decision making and care process improvement, health information systems, and leadership and management of change. The AMIA Board of Directors approved the Core Content for Clinical Informatics in

REED M. GARDNER; J. MARC OVERHAGE; ELAINE B. STEEN; BENSON S. MUNGER; JOHN H. HOLMES; JEFFREY J. WILLIAMSON; E. DETMER

411

Imaging Informatics: Essential Tools for the Delivery of Imaging Services  

E-print Network

clinical and molecular, require sophisticated informatics tools. The health of the individualImaging Informatics: Essential Tools for the Delivery of Imaging Services David S. Mendelson, MD informatics tools and developments can help the radiologist respond to the drive for safety, quality

Rubin, Daniel L.

412

Foundations for Global Health Practice Population Health Sciences 640, Spring 2012  

E-print Network

Foundations for Global Health Practice Population Health Sciences 640, Spring 2012 Wednesdays, 3:30-4:45pm, HSLC 1244 Dates: January 25; February 1,8,22,and 29; March 14th (Global Health Symposium), March Description: Foundations for Global Health Practice is a 1-credit interdisciplinary course designed to prepare

Sheridan, Jennifer

413

Global health: the importance of evidence-based medicine  

PubMed Central

Global health is a varied field that comprises research, evaluation and policy that, by its definition, also occurs in disparate locations across the world. This forum article is introduced by our guest editor of the Medicine for Global Health article collection, Gretchen Birbeck. Here, experts based across different settings describe their personal experiences of global health, discussing how evidence-based medicine in resource-limited settings can be translated into improved health outcomes. PMID:24228722

2013-01-01

414

Global health initiative investments and health systems strengthening: a content analysis of global fund investments  

PubMed Central

Background Millions of dollars are invested annually under the umbrella of national health systems strengthening. Global health initiatives provide funding for low- and middle-income countries through disease-oriented programmes while maintaining that the interventions simultaneously strengthen systems. However, it is as yet unclear which, and to what extent, system-level interventions are being funded by these initiatives, nor is it clear how much funding they allocate to disease-specific activities – through conventional ‘vertical-programming’ approach. Such funding can be channelled to one or more of the health system building blocks while targeting disease(s) or explicitly to system-wide activities. Methods We operationalized the World Health Organization health system framework of the six building blocks to conduct a detailed assessment of Global Fund health system investments. Our application of this framework framework provides a comprehensive quantification of system-level interventions. We applied this systematically to a random subset of 52 of the 139 grants funded in Round 8 of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (totalling approximately US$1 billion). Results According to the analysis, 37% (US$ 362 million) of the Global Fund Round 8 funding was allocated to health systems strengthening. Of that, 38% (US$ 139 million) was for generic system-level interventions, rather than disease-specific system support. Around 82% of health systems strengthening funding (US$ 296 million) was allocated to service delivery, human resources, and medicines & technology, and within each of these to two to three interventions. Governance, financing, and information building blocks received relatively low funding. Conclusions This study shows that a substantial portion of Global Fund’s Round 8 funds was devoted to health systems strengthening. Dramatic skewing among the health system building blocks suggests opportunities for more balanced investments with regard to governance, financing, and information system related interventions. There is also a need for agreement, by researchers, recipients, and donors, on keystone interventions that have the greatest system-level impacts for the cost-effective use of funds. Effective health system strengthening depends on inter-agency collaboration and country commitment along with concerted partnership among all the stakeholders working in the health system. PMID:23889824

2013-01-01

415

Supercourse: Epidemiology, the Internet and Global Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Supercourse website contains thousands of lectures on global health and prevention "designed to improve the teaching of prevention." Their network includes174 countries, and is available in no less than 30 languages. The site is located at the University of Pittsburgh and its core developers include Ronald LaPorte, Faina Linkov, Mita Lovalekar, and Eugene Shubnikov. It's a tremendous undertaking, and first-time visitors may wish to start by clicking through the "What is the Supercourse?" introduction section. After reading a bit about their work, visitors can move on to the "Supercourse Lectures" section. The lectures here are organized topically into headings that include epidemiology, public health, and special diseases. Additionally, visitors can browse the lectures by author or keywords. Further down the homepage, visitors will find the "Special Lectures" area and information for potential authors who would like to become part of this initiative.

LaPorte, Ronald

416

BioInformatics BioInformatics  

E-print Network

BigRoc The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open Club The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open Bioinformatics group, Utrecht University, the Netherlands Patterns in genome and regulome evolution: insights

Shamir, Ron

417

Variation in Information Needs and Quality: Implications for Public Health Surveillance and Biomedical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Understanding variation among users’ information needs and the quality of information in an electronic system is important for informaticians to ensure data are fit-for-use in answering important questions in clinical and public health. To measure variation in satisfaction with currently reported data, as well as perceived importance and need with respect to completeness and timeliness, we surveyed epidemiologists and other public health professionals across multiple jurisdictions. We observed consensus for some data elements, such as county of residence, which respondents perceived as important and felt should always be reported. However information needs differed for many data elements, especially when comparing notifiable diseases such as chlamydia to seasonal (influenza) and chronic (diabetes) diseases. Given the trend towards greater volume and variety of data as inputs to surveillance systems, variation of information needs impacts system design and practice. Systems must be flexible and highly configurable to accommodate variation, and informaticians must measure and improve systems and business processes to accommodate for variation of both users and information. PMID:24551368

Dixon, Brian E.; Lai, Patrick T. S.; Grannis, Shaun J.

2013-01-01

418

Dental Informatics: An Emerging Biomedical Informatics Discipline  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biomedical informatics is a maturing discipline. During the last forty years, it has developed into a research discipline of significant scale and scope. One of its subdisciplines, dental informatics, is beginning to emerge as its own entity. While there is a growing cadre of trained dental informaticians, dental faculty and administrators in general are not very familiar with dental informatics

Titus K. L. Schleyer

2003-01-01

419

Creating an Online Global Health Course and Game  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a college course, global public health covers topics that affect individuals' welfare and thus should be accessible to the public, providing information to help people make informed decisions about their health. This article discusses the creation of DMP 844: Global Health, a graduate-level course in the College of Veterinary Medicine's…

Anders, Brent A.; Briggs, Deborah J.; Hai-Jew, Shalin; Caby, Zachary; Werick, Mary

2011-01-01

420

A Research-Based Narrative Assignment for Global Health Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a paucity of research on novel approaches to classroom-based global health education despite the growing popularity of this topic in health professional curricula. The purpose of the following paper is to (1) describe the rationale underlying the use of a research-based narrative assignment for global health education, and (2) describe…

Lencucha, Raphael

2014-01-01

421

Nursing and the informatics revolution.  

PubMed

The Institute of Medicine's quality initiatives have collectively emphasized the importance of information technology to the transformation of health care. Not coincidentally, federal initiatives in 2004 have signaled the start of "the decade of health information technology." Building on those reports, this article describes the informatics revolution in process, and nursing's readiness to move in that direction. The promise of informatics in reshaping practice is sketched out in terms of seven aims for improvement, followed by a listing of some of the issues that must be addressed for nursing to realize those possibilities. In similar fashion, changes in academia are discussed both in terms of the promise of informatics applications and the barriers to achieving that preferred future. The article ends with some policy recommendations and reflections on opportunities at hand, particularly the growing emphasis on patient self-management support. PMID:16115510

McBride, Angela Barron

2005-01-01

422

http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca  

E-print Network

http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca www.medicine.dal.ca www at the level of Assistant Professor. Medical Informatics in the Faculty of Medicine was established in 1996 in the Medical Informatics Program, program development in the Faculty of Medicine and in the Health Informatics

Adl, Sina

423

Defining Health Diplomacy: Changing Demands in the Era of Globalization  

PubMed Central

Context: Accelerated globalization has produced obvious changes in diplomatic purposes and practices. Health issues have become increasingly preeminent in the evolving global diplomacy agenda. More leaders in academia and policy are thinking about how to structure and utilize diplomacy in pursuit of global health goals. Methods: In this article, we describe the context, practice, and components of global health diplomacy, as applied operationally. We examine the foundations of various approaches to global health diplomacy, along with their implications for the policies shaping the international public health and foreign policy environments. Based on these observations, we propose a taxonomy for the subdiscipline. Findings: Expanding demands on global health diplomacy require a delicate combination of technical expertise, legal knowledge, and diplomatic skills that have not been systematically cultivated among either foreign service or global health professionals. Nonetheless, high expectations that global health initiatives will achieve development and diplomatic goals beyond the immediate technical objectives may be thwarted by this gap. Conclusions: The deepening links between health and foreign policy require both the diplomatic and global health communities to reexamine the skills, comprehension, and resources necessary to achieve their mutual objectives. PMID:21933277

Katz, Rebecca; Kornblet, Sarah; Arnold, Grace; Lief, Eric; Fischer, Julie E

2011-01-01

424

Conceptualising global health: theoretical issues and their relevance for teaching  

PubMed Central

Background There has long been debate around the definition of the field of education, research and practice known as global health. In this article we step back from attempts at definition and instead ask what current definitions tell us about the evolution of the field, identifying gaps and points of debate and using these to inform discussions of how global health might be taught. Discussion What we now know as global health has its roots in the late 19th century, in the largely colonial, biomedical pursuit of ‘international health’. The twentieth century saw a change in emphasis of the field towards a much broader conceptualisation of global health, encompassing broader social determinants of health and a truly global focus. The disciplinary focus has broadened greatly to include economics, anthropology and political science, among others. There have been a number of attempts to define the new field of global health. We suggest there are three central areas of contention: what the object of knowledge of global health is, the types of knowledge to be used and around the purpose of knowledge in the field of global health. We draw a number of conclusions from this discussion. First, that definitions should pay attention to differences as well as commonalities in different parts of the world, and that the definitions of global health themselves depend to some extent on the position of the definer. Second, global health’s core strength lies in its interdisciplinary character, in particular the incorporation of approaches from outside biomedicine. This approach recognises that political, social and economic factors are central causes of ill health. Last, we argue that definition should avoid inclusion of values. In particular we argue that equity, a key element of many definitions of global health, is a value-laden concept and carries with it significant ideological baggage. As such, its widespread inclusion in the definitions of global health is inappropriate as it suggests that only people sharing these values may be seen as ‘doing’ global health. Nevertheless, discussion of values should be a key part of global health education. Summary Our discussions lead us to emphasise the importance of an approach to teaching global health that is flexible, interdisciplinary and acknowledges the different interpretations and values of those practising and teaching the field. PMID:23148788

2012-01-01

425

In the Name of Global Health: Trends in Academic Institutions  

E-print Network

In the Name of Global Health: Trends in Academic Institutions S A R A H B . M A C F A R L A N E 1 , M A R I A N J A C O B S , 2 a n d E P H ATA E . K A AYA 3 1 Global Health Sciences, University Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania Correspondence: Sarah B. Macfarlane, Global Health Sciences, University

Klein, Ophir

426

Education for public health in Europe and its global outreach  

PubMed Central

Introduction At the present time, higher education institutions dealing with education for public health in Europe and beyond are faced with a complex and comprehensive task of responding to global health challenges. Review Literature reviews in public health and global health and exploration of internet presentations of regional and global organisations dealing with education for public health were the main methods employed in the work presented in this paper. Higher academic institutions are searching for appropriate strategies in competences-based education, which will increase the global attractiveness of their academic programmes and courses for continuous professional development. Academic professionals are taking advantage of blended learning and new web technologies. In Europe and beyond they are opening up debates about the scope of public health and global health. Nevertheless, global health is bringing revitalisation of public health education, which is recognised as one of the core components by many other academic institutions involved in global health work. More than ever, higher academic institutions for public health are recognising the importance of institutional partnerships with various organisations and efficient modes of cooperation in regional and global networks. Networking in a global setting is bringing new opportunities, but also opening debates about global harmonisation of competence-based education to achieve functional knowledge, increase mobility of public health professionals, better employability and affordable performance. Conclusions As public health opportunities and threats are increasingly global, higher education institutions in Europe and in other regions have to look beyond national boundaries and participate in networks for education, research and practice. PMID:24560263

Bjegovic-Mikanovic, Vesna; Jovic-Vranes, Aleksandra; Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Otok, Robert

2014-01-01

427

Information empowerment: predeparture resource training for students in global health*  

PubMed Central

The Taubman Health Sciences Library (THL) collaborates with health sciences schools to provide information skills instruction for students preparing for international experiences. THL enhances students' global health learning through predeparture instruction for students who are involved in global health research, clinical internships, and international collaborations. This includes teaching international literature searching skills, providing country-specific data sources, building awareness of relevant mobile resources, and encouraging investigation of international news. Information skills empower creation of stronger global partnerships. Use of information resources has enhanced international research and training experiences, built lifelong learning foundations, and contributed to the university's global engagement. THL continues to assess predeparture instruction. PMID:24860266

Rana, Gurpreet K.

2014-01-01

428

World Health Organization: Global Malaria Programme  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The World Health Organization (WHO) created the Global Malaria Programme to craft malaria policy and strategy formulation, along with creating guidelines for malaria prevention and control across the world. On their homepage, visitors can learn about their work through their annual reports and their specific prevention efforts targeted towards pregnant woman and infants. A good way to get started on the site is by looking at the list of themes on the left-hand side of the homepage. One area that's worth perusing is the "Diagnosis and Treatment". Here visitors can learn about the most effective way to treat malaria and how the disease can be managed over time. Those persons travelling to malarial areas will want to click on the "Malaria and travelers" section. This area provides a section of tips for those entering such regions, along with information about areas currently dealing with malarial outbreaks.

429

"Globalized public health." A transdisciplinary comprehensive framework for analyzing contemporary globalization's influences on the field of public health.  

PubMed

The current phase of globalization represents a "double-edged sword" challenge facing public health practitioners and health policy makers. The first "edge" throws light on two constructs in the field of public health: global health (formerly international health) and globalized public health. The second "edge" is that of global governance, and raises the question, "how can we construct public health regulations that adequately respond to both global and local complexities related to the two constructs mentioned earlier (global health and globalized public health)?" The two constructs call for the development of norms that will assure sustained population-wide health improvement and these two constructs have their own conceptual tools and theoretical models that permit a better understanding of them. In this paper, we introduce the "globalized public health" construct and we present an interactive comprehensive framework for critically analyzing contemporary globalization's influences on the field of public health. "Globalized public health", simultaneously a theoretical model and a conceptual framework, concerns the transformation of the field of public health in the sociohistorical context of globalization. The model is the fruit of an original theoretical research study conducted from 2005 to 2008 ("contextualized research," Gibbons' Mode II of knowledge production), founded on a QUAL-quant sequential mixed-method design. This research also reflects our political and ideological position, fuelled with aspirations of social democracy and cosmopolitical values. It is profoundly anchored in the pragmatic approach to globalization, looking to "reconcile" the market and equity. The model offers several features to users: (1) it is transdisciplinary; (2) it is interactive (CD-ROM); (3) it is nonlinear (nonlinear interrelations between the contextual globalization and the field of public health); (4) it is synchronic/diachronic (a double-crossed perspective permits analysis of global social change, the emergence of global agency and the transmutation of the field of public health, in the full complexity of their nonlinear interaction); (5) it offers five characteristics as an auto-eco-organized system of social interactions, or dynamic, nonlinear sociohistorical system. The model features a visual interface (five interrelated figures), a structure of 30 "integrator concepts" that integrates 114 other element-parts via 1,300 hypertext links. The model is both a knowledge translation tool and an interactive heuristic guide designed for practitioners and researchers in public health/community health/population health, as well as for decision-makers at all levels. PMID:22312210

Lapaige, Véronique

2009-01-01

430

ARCS FOUNDATION GLOBAL IMPACT AWARD Global Health, Public Good and Graduate Education  

E-print Network

1 ARCS FOUNDATION GLOBAL IMPACT AWARD Global Health, Public Good and Graduate Education Case multiple disciplines that cross the biomedical and social sciences, humanities and public health. Advancing accomplishment in biomedical and public health related research directed towards preventing, treating or curing

Arnold, Jonathan

431

ARCS FOUNDATION GLOBAL IMPACT AWARD Global Health, Public Good and Graduate Education  

E-print Network

ARCS FOUNDATION GLOBAL IMPACT AWARD Global Health, Public Good and Graduate Education Case multiple disciplines that cross the biomedical and social sciences, humanities and public health. Advancing accomplishment in biomedical and public health related research directed towards preventing, treating or curing

Arnold, Jonathan

432

Human Health and Global Security. Relevance to Medical Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Programs in human health and global security should be incorporated into medical school curricula. Information about nuclear arms proliferation and unmet human health needs will help physicians exert a critical leadership role. (SK)

Kornfeld, Howard

1984-01-01

433

Office of Global Public Health www.globalhealth.utah.edu  

E-print Network

.m. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine Division of Public Health, 375 Chipeta of the Month 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. Department of Family and Preventive Medicine Office of Global Public Health www

Tipple, Brett

434

Translational Research from an Informatics Perspective  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clinical and translational research (CTR) is an essential part of a sustainable global health system. Informatics is now recognized as an important en-abler of CTR and informaticians are increasingly called upon to help CTR efforts. The US National Institutes of Health mandated biomedical informatics activity as part of its new national CTR grant initiative, the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). Traditionally, translational re-search was defined as the translation of laboratory discoveries to patient care (bench to bedside). We argue, however, that there are many other kinds of translational research. Indeed, translational re-search requires the translation of knowledge dis-covered in one domain to another domain and is therefore an information-based activity. In this panel, we will expand upon this view of translational research and present three different examples of translation to illustrate the point: 1) bench to bedside, 2) Earth to space and 3) academia to community. We will conclude with a discussion of our local translational research efforts that draw on each of the three examples.

Bernstam, Elmer; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Turley, James P.; Smith, Jack W.

2007-01-01

435

Meeting global health challenges through operational research and management science  

PubMed Central

Abstract This paper considers how operational research and management science can improve the design of health systems and the delivery of health care, particularly in low-resource settings. It identifies some gaps in the way operational research is typically used in global health and proposes steps to bridge them. It then outlines some analytical tools of operational research and management science and illustrates how their use can inform some typical design and delivery challenges in global health. The paper concludes by considering factors that will increase and improve the contribution of operational research and management science to global health. PMID:21897489

2011-01-01

436

The workforce for health in a globalized context – global shortages and international migration  

PubMed Central

The ‘crisis in human resources’ in the health sector has been described as one of the most pressing global health issues of our time. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the world faces a global shortage of almost 4.3 million doctors, midwives, nurses, and other healthcare professionals. A global undersupply of these threatens the quality and sustainability of health systems worldwide. This undersupply is concurrent with globalization and the resulting liberalization of markets, which allow health workers to offer their services in countries other than those of their origin. The opportunities of health workers to seek employment abroad has led to a complex migration pattern, characterized by a flow of health professionals from low- to high-income countries. This global migration pattern has sparked a broad international debate about the consequences for health systems worldwide, including questions about sustainability, justice, and global social accountabilities. This article provides a review of this phenomenon and gives an overview of the current scope of health workforce migration patterns. It further focuses on the scientific discourse regarding health workforce migration and its effects on both high- and low-income countries in an interdependent world. The article also reviews the internal and external factors that fuel health worker migration and illustrates how health workforce migration is a classic global health issue of our time. Accordingly, it elaborates on the international community's approach to solving the workforce crisis, focusing in particular on the WHO Code of Practice, established in 2010. PMID:24560265

Aluttis, Christoph; Bishaw, Tewabech; Frank, Martina W.

2014-01-01

437

Global mental health: perspectives from Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Background Global mental health (GMH) advocates for access to and the equitable provision of mental health care. Although the treatment gap is a useful construct to measure access and equitability of care, it fails to communicate the real-life consequences of the treatment gap and the urgent need to address care disparities. Objective The aim of this article is to present a perspective on the practical application of the principles of GMH to understand the real-life impact of the treatment gap and the approaches taken to improve treatment coverage in Ethiopia. Design A case study method is used. Results Multiple international collaborations undertaken in Ethiopia and facilitated by GMH to improve care, capacity, and the evidence base for increased treatment coverage are described briefly. A series of steps taken at the local and national levels to address the treatment gap are highlighted. The stories of two patients are also presented to illustrate the real-life consequences of the treatment gap and the potential transformational impact of addressing the treatment gap on patients, families, and communities. Conclusions GMH has a key role to play in addressing the treatment gap, which improves the life of people with mental disorders, their families, and their communities. However, national-level policy support and coordination are essential for any realistic improvement in treatment coverage. The reflections offered through the case examples may have utility in similar low-income settings. PMID:25280740

Fekadu, Abebaw; Thornicroft, Graham

2014-01-01

438

The global view of reproductive health.  

PubMed

Reproductive health is a condition in which the reproductive process is accomplished in a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and is not merely the absence of disease or disorders of the reproductive process. The Daily Reproductive Health News in our global village does not paint a bright picture. The past few decades have witnessed a revolution in reproductive behaviour, with a major expansion in contraceptive use in developing countries. Between 1960-65 and 1985-90, the number of contraceptive users in all developing countries has increased from an estimate of 31 million to 381 million. The major expansion in contraceptive use in developing countries has consequences for the quality of life, for the present and for the future, for the society at large and for the individuals and their families. Major challenges, however, still lie ahead. There is a major unmet need for family planning. The rhetoric about population and family planning is not matched by allocation of resources. PMID:7848204

Fathalla, M F

1994-06-01

439

Global citizenship is key to securing global health: the role of higher education.  

PubMed

Despite growing public awareness, health systems are struggling under the escalating burden of non-communicable diseases. While personal responsibility is crucial, alone it is insufficient. We argue that one must place themselves within the broader/global context to begin to truly understand the health implications of personal choices. Global citizenship competency has become an integral part of the higher education discourse; this discourse can and should be extended to include global health. A global citizen is someone who is (1) aware of global issues, (2) socially responsible, and (3) civically engaged. From this perspective, personal health is not solely an individual, self-serving act; rather, the consequences of our lifestyle choices and behaviors have far-reaching implications. This paper will argue that, through consciously identifying global health within the constructs of global citizenship, institutions of higher education can play an instrumental role in fostering civically engaged students capable of driving social change. PMID:24836370

Stoner, Lee; Perry, Lane; Wadsworth, Daniel; Stoner, Krystina R; Tarrant, Michael A

2014-07-01

440

A question of trust: user-centered design requirements for an informatics intervention to promote the sexual health of African-American youth  

PubMed Central

Objective We investigated the user requirements of African-American youth (aged 14–24?years) to inform the design of a culturally appropriate, network-based informatics intervention for the prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). Materials and Methods We conducted 10 focus groups with 75 African-American youth from a city with high HIV/STI prevalence. Data analyses involved coding using qualitative content analysis procedures and memo writing. Results Unexpectedly, the majority of participants’ design recommendations concerned trust. Youth expressed distrust towards people and groups, which was amplified within the context of information technology-mediated interactions about HIV/STI. Participants expressed distrust in the reliability of condoms and the accuracy of HIV tests. They questioned the benevolence of many institutions, and some rejected authoritative HIV/STI information. Therefore, reputational information, including rumor, influenced HIV/STI-related decision making. Participants’ design requirements also focused on trust-related concerns. Accordingly, we developed a novel trust-centered design framework to guide intervention design. Discussion Current approaches to online trust for health informatics do not consider group-level trusting patterns. Yet, trust was the central intervention-relevant issue among African-American youth, suggesting an important focus for culturally informed design. Our design framework incorporates: intervention objectives (eg, network embeddedness, participation); functional specifications (eg, decision support, collective action, credible question and answer services); and interaction design (eg, member control, offline network linkages, optional anonymity). Conclusions Trust is a critical focus for HIV/STI informatics interventions for young African Americans. Our design framework offers practical, culturally relevant, and systematic guidance to designers to reach this underserved group better. PMID:23512830

Veinot, Tiffany C; Campbell, Terrance R; Kruger, Daniel J; Grodzinski, Alison

2013-01-01

441

The Role of Health Education Specialists in Supporting Global Health and the Millennium Development Goals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Knowledge and skills for global health program design, implementation and monitoring is an expectation for practicing public health professionals. Major health education professional organizations including American Association for Health Education (AAHE), Society of Public Health Education (SOPHE) and International Union for Health Promotion and…

Geiger, Brian F.; Davis, Thomas M.; Beric, Bojana; Devlin, Michele K.

2011-01-01

442

Indiana University Department of Informatics  

E-print Network

East 226) · HCI/d Informatics students will meet with Erik Stolterman, Director of HCI/d (INFO 107 of Informatics · HCI Informatics students will meet with Erik Stolterman, Professor of Informatics · Security

Dalkilic, Mehmet

443

Globalization and health: a framework for analysis and action.  

PubMed Central

Globalization is a key challenge to public health, especially in developing countries, but the linkages between globalization and health are complex. Although a growing amount of literature has appeared on the subject, it is piecemeal, and suffers from a lack of an agreed framework for assessing the direct and indirect health effects of different aspects of globalization. This paper presents a conceptual framework for the linkages between economic globalization and health, with the intention that it will serve as a basis for synthesizing existing relevant literature, identifying gaps in knowledge, and ultimately developing national and international policies more favourable to health. The framework encompasses both the indirect effects on health, operating through the national economy, household economies and health-related sectors such as water, sanitation and education, as well as more direct effects on population-level and individual risk factors for health and on the health care system. Proposed also is a set of broad objectives for a programme of action to optimize the health effects of economic globalization. The paper concludes by identifying priorities for research corresponding with the five linkages identified as critical to the effects of globalization on health. PMID:11584737

Woodward, D.; Drager, N.; Beaglehole, R.; Lipson, D.

2001-01-01

444

Global diets link environmental sustainability and human health  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diets link environmental and human health. Rising incomes and urbanization are driving a global dietary transition in which traditional diets are replaced by diets higher in refined sugars, refined fats, oils and meats. By 2050 these dietary trends, if unchecked, would be a major contributor to an estimated 80 per cent increase in global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions from food production and to global land clearing. Moreover, these dietary shifts are greatly increasing the incidence of type II diabetes, coronary heart disease and other chronic non-communicable diseases that lower global life expectancies. Alternative diets that offer substantial health benefits could, if widely adopted, reduce global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions, reduce land clearing and resultant species extinctions, and help prevent such diet-related chronic non-communicable diseases. The implementation of dietary solutions to the tightly linked diet-environment-health trilemma is a global challenge, and opportunity, of great environmental and public health importance.

Tilman, David; Clark, Michael

2014-11-01

445

Grassroots-to-global champions for maternal health.  

PubMed

Holistic nurses are called to think globally and contribute to the improvement of all communities. Often, the front lines of caring are beyond our physical reach, yet we can still make a difference by supporting global health both energetically and by raising our public voices. The Daring, Caring and Sharing to Save Mothers' Lives campaign is one example of holistic nurses who are raising awareness and expanding universal consciousness by daring to tell the untold and forgotten stories of global health. PMID:24575519

Beck, Deva-Marie; Dossey, Barbara

2013-10-01

446

GLOBAL HEALTH CONNECT PROBLEM: Global health data have grown exponentially and, in the next five years, Big Data  

E-print Network

years, Big Data (e.g. genomics, proteomics) is expected to grow by 800%. While data and informationGLOBAL HEALTH CONNECT PROBLEM: Global health data have grown exponentially and, in the next five of consolidation and coordination in sharing information and data. There is no single web-based site where a user

Bezrukov, Sergey M.

447

Clinical Social Franchising Case Study Series: DKT's Andalan Indonesia 1 The Global Health Group  

E-print Network

Clinical Social Franchising Case Study Series: DKT's Andalan Indonesia 1 The Global Health GroupKt's andalan indonesia #12;Copyright © 2012 The Global Health Group The Global Health Group Global Health Email: ghg@globalhealth.ucsf.edu Website: globalhealthsciences.ucsf.edu/global-health-group Ordering

Klein, Ophir

448

The Informatics Opportunities at the Intersection of Patient Safety and Clinical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Health care providers have a basic responsibility to protect patients from accidental harm. At the institutional level, creating safe health care organizations necessitates a systematic approach. Effective use of informatics to enhance safety requires the establishment and use of standards for concept definitions and for data exchange, development of acceptable models for knowledge representation, incentives for adoption of electronic health records, support for adverse event detection and reporting, and greater investment in research at the intersection of informatics and patient safety. Leading organizations have demonstrated that health care informatics approaches can improve safety. Nevertheless, significant obstacles today limit optimal application of health informatics to safety within most provider environments. The authors offer a series of recommendations for addressing these challenges. PMID:18436896

Kilbridge, Peter M.; Classen, David C.

2008-01-01

449

The Indian and Chinese health biotechnology industries: potential champions of global health?  

PubMed

India and China have made major progress toward establishing research- and innovation-based health biotechnology sectors. Local health needs, including diseases that predominantly affect the poor, have driven much of this success. We argue that emerging domestic firms can play an important role as reliable and high-quality suppliers of existing products and as innovators for global health needs. Indeed, these firms' participation may make existing global health approaches more sustainable. However, global health stakeholders, including international donors and the Indian and Chinese governments, will need to fashion incentives for these companies to retain a strategic focus on the global poor. PMID:18607038

Frew, Sarah E; Kettler, Hannah E; Singer, Peter A

2008-01-01

450

Understanding the Development and Perception of Global Health for More Effective Student Education  

PubMed Central

The concept of “global health” that led to the establishment of the World Health Organization in the 1940s is still promoting a global health movement 70 years later. Today’s global health acts first as a guiding principle for our effort to improve people’s health across the globe. Furthermore, global health has become a branch of science, “global health science,” supporting institutionalized education. Lastly, as a discipline, global health should focus on medical and health issues that: 1) are determined primarily by factors with a cross-cultural, cross-national, cross-regional, or global scope; 2) are local but have global significance if not appropriately managed; and 3) can only be efficiently managed through international or global efforts. Therefore, effective global health education must train students 1) to understand global health status; 2) to investigate both global and local health issues with a global perspective; and 3) to devise interventions to deal with these issues. PMID:25191139

Chen, Xinguang

2014-01-01

451

Model Formulation: Health@HomeThe Work of Health Information Management in the Household (HIMH): Implications for Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) Innovations  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveContemporary health care places enormous health information management demands on laypeople. Insights into their skills and habits complements current developments in consumer health innovations, including personal health records. Using a five-element human factors model of work, health information management in the household (HIMH) is characterized by the tasks completed by individuals within household organizations, using certain tools and technologies in

Anne Moen; Patricia Flatley Brennan

2005-01-01

452

The Center for Global Health integrates global health education programming and faculty research initiatives within the Feinberg School of Medicine. The Center works closely with Feinberg students and  

E-print Network

The Center for Global Health integrates global health education programming and faculty researchGaw residents and fellows to facilitate meaningful engagement in global health via research projects, supervised clinics, and International Non-Governmental Organizations around the world. The global health programs

Chisholm, Rex L.

453

The Center for Global Health integrates global health education programming and faculty re-search initiatives within the Feinberg School of Medicine (FSM), and encourages medical stu-  

E-print Network

The Center for Global Health integrates global health education programming and faculty re- search Center residents to engage in global health in a meaningful way via research projects, supervised professionals with global health interests to collaborate on research opportunities and new proposals

Chisholm, Rex L.

454

UCSD Global Health Minor Field Experiences Academic Programs International (API)  

E-print Network

or we could even organize Preventive Health fairs in several communities to do some general checkupsUCSD Global Health Minor Field Experiences Academic Programs International (API) Academic Programs consists of a 6-week internship in health services - Students work directly with patients - Includes on

Tsien, Roger Y.

455

Assessing and Comparing Global Health Competencies in Rehabilitation Students  

PubMed Central

Purpose. Globalization is contributing to changes in health outcomes and healthcare use in many ways, including health professionals' practices. The objective of this study was to assess and compare global health competencies in rehabilitation students. Method. Online cross-sectional survey of physiotherapy and occupational therapy students from five universities within Ontario. We used descriptive statistics to analyze students' perceived knowledge, skills, and learning needs in global health. We used Chi-square tests, with significance set at P < 0.05, to compare results across professions. Results. One hundred and sixty-six students completed the survey. In general, both physiotherapy and occupational therapy students scored higher on the “relationship between work and health,” “relationship between income and health,” and “socioeconomic position (SEP) and impact on health” and lower on “Access to healthcare for low income nations,” “mechanisms for why racial and ethnic disparities exist,” and “racial stereotyping and medical decision making.” Occupational therapy students placed greater importance on learning concerning social determinants of health (P = 0.03). Conclusion. This paper highlights several opportunities for improvement in global health education for rehabilitation students. Educators and professionals should consider developing strategies to address these needs and provide more global health opportunities in rehabilitation training programs. PMID:24381763

Ramsay, Tim

2013-01-01

456

Accessibility: Global Gateway to Health Literacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health literacy, cited as essential to achieving Healthy People 2010’s goals to “increase quality and years of healthy life” and to “eliminate health disparities,” is defined by Healthy People as “the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.” Accessibility, by definition, the aforementioned “capacity

Ellen Perlow

2010-01-01

457

Global health disparities: crisis in the diaspora.  

PubMed Central

The United States spends more than the rest of the world on healthcare. In 2000, the U.S. health bill was 1.3 trillion dollars, 14.5% of its gross domestic product. Yet, according to the WHO World Health Report 2000, the United States ranked 37th of 191 member nations in overall health system performance. Racial/ethnic disparities in health outcomes are the most obvious examples of an unbalanced healthcare system. This presentation will examine health disparities in the United States and reveal how health disparities among and within countries affect the health and well-being of the African Diaspora. PMID:15101675

Cox, Raymond L.

2004-01-01

458

Guiding the Design of Evaluations of Innovations in Health Informatics: a Framework and a Case Study of the SMArt SHARP Evaluation  

PubMed Central

Development of health information systems innovations is necessary to create a better future for health and health care, but evaluating them is challenging. This paper examines the problem of evaluating health IT projects in which innovation is agile, adaptive, and emergent, and in which innovation diffusion and production are interlinked. We introduce a typology of mindsets for evaluation design that are typically used in health informatics: optimality, contingency, and usefulness, and make the case for a modularity mindset. We propose a model that shifts the unit of analysis from an evaluation as a whole, to specific modules of an evaluation, such as purpose, target, and methods. We then use retrospective participant observation to illustrate the approach using a case study: the ONC SHARP Harvard project developing the SMArt platform (smartplaforms.org). We find that the proposed modular approach to evaluation design provides a balanced alternative to standard archetypical designs on the one hand, and fully custom-made designs, on the other hand. PMID:23304417

Ramly, Edmond; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

2012-01-01

459

Guiding the design of evaluations of innovations in health informatics: a framework and a case study of the SMArt SHARP evaluation.  

PubMed

Development of health information systems innovations is necessary to create a better future for health and health care, but evaluating them is challenging. This paper examines the problem of evaluating health IT projects in which innovation is agile, adaptive, and emergent, and in which innovation diffusion and production are interlinked. We introduce a typology of mindsets for evaluation design that are typically used in health informatics: optimality, contingency, and usefulness, and make the case for a modularity mindset. We propose a model that shifts the unit of analysis from an evaluation as a whole, to specific modules of an evaluation, such as purpose, target, and methods. We then use retrospective participant observation to illustrate the approach using a case study: the ONC SHARP Harvard project developing the SMArt platform (smartplaforms.org). We find that the proposed modular approach to evaluation design provides a balanced alternative to standard archetypical designs on the one hand, and fully custom-made designs, on the other hand. PMID:23304417

Ramly, Edmond; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

2012-01-01

460

Global health diplomacy, 'smart power', and the new world order.  

PubMed

Both the theory and practice of foreign policy and diplomacy, including systems of hard and soft power, are undergoing paradigm shifts, with an increasing number of innovative actors and strategies contributing to international relations outcomes in the 'New World Order'. Concurrently, global health programmes continue to ascend the political spectrum in scale, scope and influence. This concatenation of circumstances has demanded a re-examination of the existing and potential effectiveness of global health programmes in the 'smart power' context, based on adherence to a range of design, implementation and assessment criteria, which may simultaneously optimise their humanitarian, foreign policy and diplomatic effectiveness. A synthesis of contemporary characteristics of 'global health diplomacy' and 'global health as foreign policy', grouped by common themes and generated in the context of related field experiences, are presented in the form of 'Top Ten' criteria lists for optimising both diplomatic and foreign policy effectiveness of global health programmes, and criteria are presented in concert with an examination of implications for programme design and delivery. Key criteria for global health programmes that are sensitised to both diplomatic and foreign policy goals include visibility, sustainability, geostrategic considerations, accountability, effectiveness and alignment with broader policy objectives. Though diplomacy is a component of foreign policy, criteria for 'diplomatically-sensitised' versus 'foreign policy-sensitised' global health programmes were not always consistent, and were occasionally in conflict, with each other. The desirability of making diplomatic and foreign policy criteria explicit, rather than implicit, in the context of global health programme design, delivery and evaluation are reflected in the identified implications for (1) international security, (2) programme evaluation, (3) funding and resource allocation decisions, (4) approval systems and (5) training. On this basis, global health programmes are shown to provide a valuable, yet underutilised, tool for diplomacy and foreign policy purposes, including their role in the pursuit of benign international influence. A corresponding alignment of resources between 'hard' and 'smart' power options is encouraged. PMID:24953683

Kevany, Sebastian

2014-01-01

461

Using integrated bio-physiotherapy informatics in home health-care settings: A qualitative analysis of a point-of-care decision support system.  

PubMed

The growing need to gain efficiencies within a home care setting has prompted home care practitioners to focus on health informatics to address the needs of an aging clientele. The remote and heterogeneous nature of the home care environment necessitates the use of non-intrusive client monitoring and a portable, point-of-care graphical user interface. Using a grounded theory approach, this article examines the simulated use of a graphical user interface by practitioners in a home care setting to explore the salient features of monitoring the activity of home care clients. The results demonstrate the need for simple, interactive displays that can provide large amounts of geographical and temporal data relating to patient activity. Additional emerging themes from interviews indicate that home care professionals would use a graphical user interface of this type for patient education and goal setting as well as to assist in the decision-making process of home care practitioners. PMID:24835146

Canally, Culum; Doherty, Sean; Doran, Diane M; Goubran, Rafik A

2014-05-16

462

Crossing the Chasm: Information Technology to Biomedical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Accelerating the translation of new scientific discoveries to improve human health and disease management is the overall goal of a series of initiatives integrated in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) “Roadmap for Medical Research.” The Clinical and Translational Research Award (CTSA) program is, arguably, the most visible component of the NIH Roadmap providing resources to institutions to transform their clinical and translational research enterprises along the goals of the Roadmap. The CTSA program emphasizes biomedical informatics as a critical component for the accomplishment of the NIH’s translational objectives. To be optimally effective, emerging biomedical informatics programs must link with the information technology (IT) platforms of the enterprise clinical operations within academic health centers. This report details one academic health center’s transdisciplinary initiative to create an integrated academic discipline of biomedical informatics through the development of its infrastructure for clinical and translational science infrastructure and response to the CTSA mechanism. This approach required a detailed informatics strategy to accomplish these goals. This transdisciplinary initiative was the impetus for creation of a specialized biomedical informatics core, the Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBI). Development of the CBI codified the need to incorporate medical informatics including quality and safety informatics and enterprise clinical information systems within the CBI. This paper describes the steps taken to develop the biomedical informatics infrastructure, its integration with clinical systems at one academic health center, successes achieved, and barriers encountered during these efforts. PMID:21383632

Fahy, Brenda G.; Balke, C. William; Umberger, Gloria H.; Talbert, Jeffery; Canales, Denise Niles; Steltenkamp, Carol L.; Conigliaro, Joseph

2011-01-01

463

Crossing the chasm: information technology to biomedical informatics.  

PubMed

Accelerating the translation of new scientific discoveries to improve human health and disease management is the overall goal of a series of initiatives integrated in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) "Roadmap for Medical Research." The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program is, arguably, the most visible component of the NIH Roadmap providing resources to institutions to transform their clinical and translational research enterprises along the goals of the Roadmap. The CTSA program emphasizes biomedical informatics as a critical component for the accomplishment of the NIH's translational objectives. To be optimally effective, emerging biomedical informatics programs must link with the information technology platforms of the enterprise clinical operations within academic health centers.This report details one academic health center's transdisciplinary initiative to create an integrated academic discipline of biomedical informatics through the development of its infrastructure for clinical and translational science infrastructure and response to the CTSA mechanism. This approach required a detailed informatics strategy to accomplish these goals. This transdisciplinary initiative was the impetus for creation of a specialized biomedical informatics core, the Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBI). Development of the CBI codified the need to incorporate medical informatics including quality and safety informatics and enterprise clinical information systems within the CBI. This article describes the steps taken to develop the biomedical informatics infrastructure, its integration with clinical systems at one academic health center, successes achieved, and barriers encountered during these efforts. PMID:21383632

Fahy, Brenda G; Balke, C William; Umberger, Gloria H; Talbert, Jeffery; Canales, Denise Niles; Steltenkamp, Carol L; Conigliaro, Joseph

2011-06-01

464

THE FACULTY OF BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND LAW Surrey Informatics Summer School -SISS  

E-print Network

to introducing multilevel models Clinical INFORMATICS & HEALTH OUTCOMES RESEARCH GROUP ­ www.clininf.eu The course is hosted by the Clinical Informatics and Health Outcomes Research group: Taught by leadingTHE FACULTY OF BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND LAW Surrey Informatics Summer School - SISS Building

Doran, Simon J.

465

Informatics School COMSC This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental  

E-print Network

of the School and will include a number of in-depth case studies involving: geoinformatics, health informatics technologies. § Health informatics: The design and implementation of healthcare information systemsInformatics School COMSC This module aims to provide students with an understanding

Martin, Ralph R.

466

Promoting global population health while constraining the environmental footprint.  

PubMed

Populations today face increasing health risks from human-induced regional and global environmental changes and resultant ecological nonsustainability. Localized environmental degradation that has long accompanied population growth, industrialization, and rising consumerism has now acquired a global and often systemic dimension (e.g., climate change, disrupted nitrogen cycling, biodiversity loss). Thus, the economic intensification and technological advances that previously contributed to health gains have now expanded such that humanity's environmental (and ecological) footprint jeopardizes global population health. International data show, in general, a positive correlation of a population's health with level of affluence and size of per-person footprint. Yet, beyond a modest threshold, larger footprints afford negligible health gain and may impair health (e.g., via the rise of obesity). Furthermore, some lower-income countries have attained high levels of health. Many changes now needed to promote ecological (and social) sustainability will benefit local health. Continued improvement of global health could thus coexist with an equitably shared global environmental footprint. PMID:21219161

McMichael, A J; Butler, C D

2011-01-01

467

8/29/2014 Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship Application Guidelines 2015-2016  

E-print Network

8/29/2014 1 Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship Application Guidelines 2015-2016 Application Guidelines for the Global Health Equity Scholars Fellowship 2015-2016 Introduction The Global Health Equity Scholars (GHES

Kay, Mark A.

468

The Global Health Group Page 1 of 2 Private Sector Healthcare Initiative Postdoctoral Fellow Position Description  

E-print Network

The Global Health Group Page 1 of 2 Private Sector Healthcare Initiative Postdoctoral Fellow ­ Position Description The Global Health Group University of California, San Francisco The Global Health Group (GHG) at the University of California, San

Mullins, Dyche

469

Consumer Informatics Supporting Patients as Co-Producers of Quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The track entitled “Consumer Informatics Supporting Patients as Co-Producers of Quality” at the AMIA Spring 2000 Congress was devoted to examining the new field of consumer health informatics. This area is developing rapidly, as worldwide changes are occurring in the organization and delivery of health care and in the traditional roles of patient and provider. This paper describes the key

Bonnie Kaplan; Patricia Flatley Brennan

2001-01-01

470

Chemical Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Collaboratory A project funded by the  

E-print Network

. Answers to health-related problems are buried in the data, and the computer techniques of informatics canPage 0 Chemical Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Collaboratory A project funded by the National Institutes of Health under the NIH Roadmap Molecular Libraries Initiative for Exploratory Centers (P20

471

Globalization and Health at the United States–Mexico Border  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We studied the impact of globalization on the making of health policy. Globalization is understood as economic interdependence among nations. The North American Free Trade Agreement is used as a marker to assess the effects of economic interdependence on binational health cooperation along the United States–Mexico border. Methods. We observed participants and conducted in-depth interviews with policymakers, public health specialists, representatives of professional organizations, and unions. Results. Globalization has not promoted binational health policy cooperation. Barriers that keep US and Mexican policymakers apart prevail while health problems that do not recognize international borders go unresolved. Conclusions. If international health problems are to be solved, political, cultural, and social interdependence need to be built with the same impetus by which policymakers promote international trade. PMID:14652325

Homedes, Núria; Ugalde, Antonio

2003-01-01

472

An ethics curriculum for short-term global health trainees  

PubMed Central

Background Interest in short-term global health training and service programs continues to grow, yet they can be associated with a variety of ethical issues for which trainees or others with limited global health experience may not be prepared to address. Therefore, there is a clear need for educational interventions concerning these ethical issues. Methods We developed and evaluated an introductory curriculum, “Ethical Challenges in Short-term Global Health Training.” The curriculum was developed through solicitation of actual ethical issues experienced by trainees and program leaders; content drafting; and external content review. It was then evaluated from November 1, 2011, through July 1, 2012, by analyzing web usage data and by conducting user surveys. The survey included basic demographic data; prior experience in global health and global health ethics; and assessment of cases within the curriculum. Results The ten case curriculum is freely available at http://ethicsandglobalhealth.org. An average of 238 unique visitors accessed the site each month (standard deviation, 19). Of users who had been abroad before for global health training or service, only 31% reported prior ethics training related to short-term work. Most users (62%) reported accessing the site via personal referral or their training program; however, a significant number (28%) reported finding the site via web search, and 8% discovered it via web links. Users represented different fields: medicine (46%), public health (15%), and nursing (11%) were most common. All cases in the curriculum were evaluated favorably. Conclusions The curriculum is meeting a critical need for an introduction to the ethical issues in short-term global health training. Future work will integrate this curriculum within more comprehensive curricula for global health and evaluate specific knowledge and behavioral effects, including at training sites abroad. PMID:23410089

2013-01-01

473

Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: There is a growing body of evidence linking health and well-being to key business issues. Despite this, corporate uptake of workplace health promotion programmes has been slow outside the USA. One possible reason for this is the lack of a generally available health risk measure that is quick and easy to administer and produces data that is rich enough

Peter R Mills

474

GLOBAL PRESCRIPTIONS Gendering Health and Human Rights  

E-print Network

the agendas for women's health in international and national settings. The book reviews a decade of women of profit over people' - Barbara Klugman, Women's Health Project, South Africa Contents Preface and Acknowledgements 1. Transnationalizing Women's Health Movements 2. UN Conferences as Sites of Discursive Struggle

Qiu, Weigang

475

Global Health in the Social Studies Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It may surprise students to realize that health problems in other countries affect them, too. Where people live and the conditions under which they live directly affect their health. The health of a population can also offer insight into a region's social, political, and economic realities. As a powerful lens into how human societies function,…

Smith, David J.

2005-01-01

476

Automated utility assessment of global health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of an automated utility assessment instrument for measuring preferences for overall health. The study population consisted of 83 subjects recruited from the cafeteria of a large tertiary care hospital. We assessed utilities for current health relative to perfect health and death using the rating scale, time tradeoff and standard gamble

R. F. Nease Jr; R. Tsai; L. M. Hynes; B. Littenberg

1996-01-01

477

Global trade and health: key linkages and future challenges.  

PubMed Central

Globalization of trade, marketing and investment has important implications for public health, both negative and positive. This article considers the implications of the single package of World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements for public health research and policy, focusing on three themes: commodities, intellectual property rights, and health services. The main aims of the analysis are as follows: to identify how trade issues are associated with the transnationalization of health risks and possible benefits; to identify key areas of research; and to suggest policy-relevant advice and interventions on trade and health issues. The next wave of international trade law will need to take more account of global public health issues. However, to become more engaged in global trade debates, the public health community must gain an understanding of the health effects of global trade agreements. It must also ensure that its own facts are correct, so that public health is not blindly used for political ends, such as justifying unwarranted economic protectionism. "Healthy trade" policies, based on firm empirical evidence and designed to improve health status, are an important step towards reaching a more sustainable form of trade liberalization. PMID:10885181

Bettcher, D. W.; Yach, D.; Guindon, G. E.

2000-01-01

478

Why Global Health Matters The world is economically, politically, culturally, and  

E-print Network

Why Global Health Matters The world is economically, politically, culturally, and technologically. Certificate Overview An undergraduate certificate in Global Health provides students with knowledge of, language, and measurement tools used in global health · ethics and global health · the global cultural

Saldin, Dilano

479

Facilitative governance: transforming global health through complexity theory.  

PubMed

Any initiative to coordinate actions, plans, or initiatives to improve the interaction between global health stakeholders finds itself feeding into a vastly complex global system. By utilising complexity theory as part of a new scientific paradigm, complex adaptive behaviour can emerge to create coherence. A suggested global health convention facilitating incremental regime development could be a way to create good governance processes. Minimum specifications could provide wide space for innovation and encourage shared action. Such specifications would be both a product of, and a facilitator for, future generative relationships. The potential empowerment of individuals as a result of this has the potential to transform global health by creating an arena for continual cooperation, interaction and mutual dependence among global stakeholders. PMID:22248181

Haffeld, Just

2012-01-01

480

Global health education in U.S. Medical schools  

PubMed Central

Interest in global health (GH) among medical students worldwide is measurably increasing. There is a concomitant emphasis on emphasizing globally-relevant health professions education. Through a structured literature review, expert consensus recommendations, and contact with relevant professional organizations, we review the existing state of GH education in US medical schools for which data were available. Several recommendations from professional societies have been developed, along with a renewed emphasis on competencies in global health. The implementation of these recommendations was not observed as being uniform across medical schools, with variation noted in the presence of global health curricula. Recommendations for including GH in medical education are suggested, as well as ways to formalize GH curricula, while providing flexibility for innovation and adaptation PMID:23331630

2013-01-01

481

The problem with competencies in global health education.  

PubMed

The demand for global health educational opportunities among students and trainees in high-income countries (HICs) has led to a proliferation of available global health programs. In keeping with the drive towards competency-based medical education, many of these programs have been defining their own global health competencies. Developing such competencies presents several unique challenges, including (1) a failure to take sufficient account of local contexts coupled with a lack of inclusiveness in developing these competencies, (2) the disjunction between the learning approaches of "individualism" in HICs and the relative "collectivism" of most host countries, and (3) shortcomings associated with assessing competencies in resource-limited settings. To meet these challenges, the author recommends reenvisioning the approach to competencies in global health using fresh metaphors, innovative modes of assessment, and the creation of more appropriate competency domains. PMID:25692558

Eichbaum, Quentin

2015-04-01

482

Office of Global Public Health www.globalhealth.utah.edu  

E-print Network

of Haiti Pre- and Post-Earthquake" Jeffrey Randle, MD Founder, Healing Hands Healing Hands for Haiti "Caring for the Physically Disabled of Haiti Pre- and Post-Earthquake" Armenia Global Public Health Student Highlight Zach

483

Knowledge and networks – key sources of power in global health  

PubMed Central

Shiffman rightly raises questions about who exercises power in global health, suggesting power is a complex concept, and the way it is exercised is often opaque. Power