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Sample records for global heating due

  1. Global occurrence rate of elves and ionospheric heating due to cloud-to-ground lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaes, P. R.; Marshall, R. A.; Inan, U. S.

    2016-01-01

    We present ground-based observations of elves made using an optical free-running photometer along with VLF/LF observations of the lightning electromagnetic pulse (EMP) magnetic field. We use these experimental observations to investigate the properties of the lightning return stroke that control the production of optical elve emissions. Two summers of data containing observations of over 600 elves along with the LF magnetic field of the associated lightning are analyzed. By training a classifier on features of the EMP ground wave, we find that we are able to accurately predict whether or not a stroke produced an elve. We find that the peak current of the causative discharge predicts elve production with 90% accuracy. Further, we find that the production probability of elves as a function of peak current fits a linear regression, with a 50% elve probability for peak currents of 88 kA. We use this finding along with global data from the GLD360 lightning geolocation network to extrapolate the global elve production rate; we show that ˜0.8% of all cloud-to-ground lightning discharges produce elves. Finally, using GLD360 data and a numerical model of the lightning EMP, we estimate the total amount of ionospheric heating due to lightning, amounting to approximately 2 MW of continuous power dissipated globally in the lower ionosphere.

  2. Observations of Urban Heat Island Mitigation in California Coastal Cities due to a Sea Breeze Induced Coastal-Cooling ``REVERSE-REACTION'' to Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, R. D.; Lebassi, B.; Gonzalez, J.

    2010-12-01

    The study evaluated long-term (1948-2005) air temperatures at over 300 urban and rural sites in California (CA) during summer (June-August, JJA). The aggregate CA results showed asymmetric warming, as daily min temperatures increased faster than daily max temperatures. The spatial distributions of daily max temperatures in the heavily urbanized South Coast and San Francisco Bay Area air basins, however, exhibited a complex pattern, with cooling at low-elevation (mainly urban) coastal-areas and warming at (mainly rural) inland areas. Previous studies have suggested that cooling summer max temperatures in CA were due to increased irrigation, coastal upwelling, or cloud cover. The current hypothesis, however, is that this temperature pattern arises from a “reverse-reaction” to greenhouse gas (GHG) induced global-warming. In this hypothesis, the global warming of inland areas resulted in an increased (cooling) sea breeze activity in coastal areas. That daytime summer coastal cooling was seen in coastal urban areas implies that urban heat island (UHI) warming was weaker than the reverse-reaction sea breeze cooling; if there was no UHI effect, then the cooling would have been even stronger. Analysis of daytime summer max temperatures at four adjacent pairs of urban and rural sites near the inland cooling-warming boundary, however, showed that the rural sites experienced cooling, while the urban sites showed warming due to UHI development. The rate of heat island growth was estimated as the sum of each urban warming rate and the absolute magnitude of the concurrent adjacent rural cooling rate. Values ranged from 0.12 to 0.55 K decade-1, and were proportional to changes in urban population and urban extent. As Sacramento, Modesto, Stockton, and San José have grown in aerial extent (21 to 59%) and population (40 to 118%), part of the observed increased JJA max values could be due to increased daytime UHI-intensity. Without UHI effects, the currently observed JJA SFBA

  3. Triton's Global Heat Budget.

    PubMed

    Brown, R H; Johnson, T V; Goguen, J D; Schubert, G; Ross, M N

    1991-03-22

    Internal heat flow from radioactive decay in Triton's interior along with absorbed thermal energy from Neptune total 5 to 20 percent of the insolation absorbed by Triton, thus comprising a significant fraction of Triton's surface energy balance. These additional energy inputs can raise Triton's surface temperature between approximately 0.5 and 1.5 K above that possible with absorbed sunlight alone, resulting in an increase of about a factor of approximately 1.5 to 2.5 in Triton's basal atmospheric pressure. If Triton's internal heat flow is concentrated in some areas, as is likely, local effects such as enhanced sublimation with subsequent modification of albedo could be quite large. Furthermore, indications of recent global albedo change on Triton suggest that Triton's surface temperature and pressure may not now be in steady state, further suggesting that atmospheric pressure on Triton was as much as ten times higher in the recent past. PMID:17779439

  4. Triton's global heat budget

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.H.; Johnson, T.V.; Goguen, J.D. ); Schubert, G. ); Ross, M.N. )

    1991-03-22

    Internal heat flow from radioactive decay in Triton's interior along with absorbed thermal energy from Neptune total 5 to 20% of the insolation absorbed by Triton, thus comprising a significant fraction of Triton's surface energy balance. These additional energy inputs can raise Triton's surface temperature between {approximately}0.5 and 1.5 K above that possible with adsorbed sunlight alone, resulting in an increase of about a factor of {approximately}1.5 to 2.5 in Triton's basal atmospheric pressure. If Triton's internal heat flow is concentrated in some areas, as is likely, local effects such as enhanced sublimation with subsequent modification of albedo could be quite large. Furthermore, indications of recent global albedo change on Triton suggest that Triton's surface temperature and pressure may not now be in steady state, further suggesting that atmospheric pressure on Triton was as much as ten times higher in the recent past.

  5. Triton's global heat budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.; Johnson, T. V.; Goguen, J. D.; Schubert, G.; Ross, M. N.

    1991-01-01

    Internal heat flow from radioactive decay in Triton's interior along with absorbed thermal energy from Neptune total 5 to 20 percent of the isolation absorbed by Triton, thus comprising a significant fraction of Triton's surface energy balance. These additional energy inputs can raise Triton's surface temperature between about 0.5 and 1.5 K above that possible with absorbed sunlight alone, resulting in an increase of about a factor of about 1.5 to 2.5 in Triton's basal atmospheric pressure. If Triton's internal heat flow is concentrated in some areas, as is likely, local effects such as enhanced sublimation with subsequent modification of albedo could be quite large. Furthermore, indications of recent global albedo change on Triton suggest that Triton's surface temperature and pressure may not now be in steady state, further suggesting that atmospheric pressure on Triton was as much as ten times higher in the recent past.

  6. Single grain heating due to inelasltic cotunneling.

    SciTech Connect

    Glatz, A.; Beloborodov, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Cal State Univ. at Northridge

    2010-01-25

    We study heating effects of a single metallic quantum dot weakly coupled to two leads. The dominant mechanism for heating at low temperatures is due to inelastic electron cotunneling processes. We calculate the grain temperature profile as a function of grain parameters, bias voltage, and time and show that for nanoscale size grains the heating effects are pronounced and easily measurable in experiments.

  7. Triton's global heat budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.; Johnson, T. V.; Goguen, J. D.; Schubert, Gerald; Ross, Martin N.

    1991-01-01

    Internal heat flow from radioactive decay in Triton's interior along with absorbed thermal energy from Neptune total 5 to 20 percent of the insolation absorbed by Triton, thus comprising a significant fraction of Triton's surface energy balance. These additional energy inputs can raise Triton's surface temperature between approx. 0.5 to 1.5 K above that possible with absorbed sunlight alone, resulting in a factor of approx. 1.5 to 2.5 increase in Triton's basal atmospheric pressure. If Triton's internal heatflow is concentrated in some areas, as is likely, local effects such as enhanced sublimation with subsequent modification of albedo could be quite large. Furthermore, indications of recent albedo change on Triton suggest that Triton's surface temperature and pressure may not now be in steady state, further suggesting that atmospheric pressure on Triton was as much as 10 times higher in the recent past.

  8. Heat production due to intracellular killing activity.

    PubMed

    Hayatsu, H; Masuda, S; Miyamae, T; Yamamura, M

    1990-09-01

    Using Saccharomyces ceravisiae, Candida albicans and Stapylococcus aureus, heat production during phagocytosis was measured in U937 cells which are capable of differentiating to monocytic phagocytes. No increase in heat production of non-differentiated U937 was observed since they were not phagocytic cells. However after differentiation to monocytic phagocytes by lymphokine, U937 cells produced a remarkable amount of heat during phagocytosis. Although Ehrlich ascites tumor cells sensitized with antibody were capable of engulfing S. aureus, no increase in heat nor in superoxide anion production during phagocytosis was detected. It was also found that no heat increase occurred in neutrophils from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). It can thus be concluded that the heat production during phagocytosis is due to the intercellular killing process of phagocytic cells. PMID:2131646

  9. Global Atmospheric Heat Distributions Observed from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing; Fan, Tai-Fang

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the observations of global atmospheric heat distributions using satellite measurements. Major heat components such as radiation energy, latent heat and sensible heat are considered. The uncertainties and error sources are assessed. Results show that the atmospheric heat is basically balanced, and the observed patterns of radiation and latent heat from precipitation are clearly related to general circulation.

  10. Global attention to Turkey due to desertification.

    PubMed

    Camci Cetin, S; Karaca, A; Haktanir, K; Yildiz, H

    2007-05-01

    Desertification has recognized as an environmental problem by many international organizations such as UN, NATO and FAO. Desertification in Turkey is generally caused by incorrect land use, excessive grazing, forest fires, urbanization, industry, genetic erosion, soil erosion, salinization, and uncontrolled wild type plants picking. Due to anthropogenic destruction of forest, steppe flora gradually became dominant in Anatolia. In terms of biodiversity, Turkey has a significant importance in Europe and Middle East. Nine thousands plant species naturally grown in Turkey, one third of them are endemic. Also, endemic species of vertebrates, thrive in the lakes and marshy areas. The studies of modelling simulation of vegetation on the effects of Mediterranean climate during the Roman Classical period by using vegetation history showed that, in 2000 years BP, Mediterranean countries were more humid than today. Turkey is a special place on the global concern in terms of desertification because of biodiversity, agricultural potential, high population, social and economical structure, topographical factors and strategic regional location. Communication among scientists, decision makers and international non-profit organizations must be improved. PMID:17057981

  11. Mesospheric heating due to intense tropospheric convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    A series of rocket measurements made twice daily at Wallops Island, Va., revealed a rapid heating of the mesosphere on the order of 10 K on days when thunderstorms or squall lines were in the area. This heating is explained as the result of frictional dissipation of vertically propagating internal gravity waves generated by intense tropospheric convection. Ray-tracing theory is used to determine the spectrum of gravity wave groups that actually reach mesospheric heights. This knowledge is used in an equation describing the spectral energy density of a penetrative convective element to calculate the fraction of the total energy initially available to excite those waves that do reach the level of heating. This value, converted into a vertical velocity, is used as the lower boundary condition for a multilayer model used to determine the detailed structure of the vertically propagating waves. The amount of frictional dissipation produced by the waves is calculated from the solutions of the frictionless model by use of a vertically varying eddy viscosity coefficient. The heating produced by the dissipation is then calculated from the thermodynamic equation.

  12. Globalization of agricultural pollution due to international trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, C.; Carr, J.; Seekell, D. A.; D'Odorico, P.

    2013-08-01

    Almost 90% of freshwater resources consumed globally are used to produce plant and animal commodities. Water scarce countries can balance their water needs by importing food from other countries. This process, known as virtual water transfer, represents the externalization of water use. The volume and geographic reach of virtual water transfers is increasing, but little is known about how these transfers redistribute the environmental costs of agricultural production. The grey water footprint quantifies the environmental costs of virtual water transfers. The grey water footprint is calculated as the amount of water necessary to reduce the concentrations of fertilizers and pesticides released in streams and aquifers to the allowed standards. We reconstructed the global network of virtual grey water transfers for the period 1986-2010 based on global trade data and grey water footprints for 309 commodities. We tracked changes in the structure of the grey water transfer network with network and inequality statistics. Pollution is increasing and is becoming more strongly concentrated in only a handful of countries. The global external grey water footprint, the pollution created by countries outside of their borders, increased 136% during the period. The extent of externalization of pollution is highly unequal between countries and most of this inequality is due to differences in social development status. Our results demonstrate a growing globalization of pollution due to virtual water transfers.

  13. Global optimization algorithm for heat exchanger networks

    SciTech Connect

    Quesada, I.; Grossmann, I.E. )

    1993-03-01

    This paper deals with the global optimization of heat exchanger networks with fixed topology. It is shown that if linear area cost functions are assumed, as well as arithmetic mean driving force temperature differences in networks with isothermal mixing, the corresponding nonlinear programming (NLP) optimization problem involves linear constraints and a sum of linear fractional functions in the objective which are nonconvex. A rigorous algorithm is proposed that is based on a convex NLP underestimator that involves linear and nonlinear estimators for fractional and bilinear terms which provide a tight lower bound to the global optimum. This NLP problem is used within a spatial branch and bound method for which branching rules are given. Basic properties of the proposed method are presented, and its application is illustrated with several example problems. The results show that the proposed method only requires few nodes in the branch and bound search.

  14. Globalization of agricultural pollution due to international trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bannon, C.; Carr, J.; Seekell, D. A.; D'Odorico, P.

    2014-02-01

    Almost 90% of freshwater resources consumed globally are used to produce plant and animal commodities. Water-scarce countries can balance their water needs by importing food from other countries. This process, known as virtual water transfer, represents the externalization of water use. The volume and geographic reach of virtual water transfers is increasing, but little is known about how these transfers redistribute the environmental costs of agricultural production. The grey water footprint quantifies the environmental costs of virtual water transfers. The grey water footprint is calculated as the amount of water necessary to reduce nitrogen concentrations from fertilizers and pesticides released into streams and aquifers to allowed standards. We reconstructed the global network of virtual grey water transfers for the period 1986-2010 based on international trade data and grey water footprints for 309 commodities. We tracked changes in the structure of the grey water transfer network with network and inequality statistics. Pollution is increasing and is becoming more strongly concentrated in only a handful of countries. The global external grey water footprint, the pollution created by countries outside of their borders, increased 136% during the period. The extent of externalization of pollution is highly unequal between countries, and most of this inequality is due to differences in social development status. Our results demonstrate a growing globalization of pollution due to virtual water transfers.

  15. Heating Augmentation Due to Compression Pad Cavities on the Project Orion CEV Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion CEV heat-shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and Mach 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  16. An adaptability limit to climate change due to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Steven C; Huber, Matthew

    2010-05-25

    Despite the uncertainty in future climate-change impacts, it is often assumed that humans would be able to adapt to any possible warming. Here we argue that heat stress imposes a robust upper limit to such adaptation. Peak heat stress, quantified by the wet-bulb temperature T(W), is surprisingly similar across diverse climates today. T(W) never exceeds 31 degrees C. Any exceedence of 35 degrees C for extended periods should induce hyperthermia in humans and other mammals, as dissipation of metabolic heat becomes impossible. While this never happens now, it would begin to occur with global-mean warming of about 7 degrees C, calling the habitability of some regions into question. With 11-12 degrees C warming, such regions would spread to encompass the majority of the human population as currently distributed. Eventual warmings of 12 degrees C are possible from fossil fuel burning. One implication is that recent estimates of the costs of unmitigated climate change are too low unless the range of possible warming can somehow be narrowed. Heat stress also may help explain trends in the mammalian fossil record. PMID:20439769

  17. An adaptability limit to climate change due to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Steven C.; Huber, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Despite the uncertainty in future climate-change impacts, it is often assumed that humans would be able to adapt to any possible warming. Here we argue that heat stress imposes a robust upper limit to such adaptation. Peak heat stress, quantified by the wet-bulb temperature TW, is surprisingly similar across diverse climates today. TW never exceeds 31 °C. Any exceedence of 35 °C for extended periods should induce hyperthermia in humans and other mammals, as dissipation of metabolic heat becomes impossible. While this never happens now, it would begin to occur with global-mean warming of about 7 °C, calling the habitability of some regions into question. With 11–12 °C warming, such regions would spread to encompass the majority of the human population as currently distributed. Eventual warmings of 12 °C are possible from fossil fuel burning. One implication is that recent estimates of the costs of unmitigated climate change are too low unless the range of possible warming can somehow be narrowed. Heat stress also may help explain trends in the mammalian fossil record. PMID:20439769

  18. Heating Augmentation in Laminar Flow Due to Heat-Shield Cavities on the Project Orion CEV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion CEV heat-shield at laminar conditions. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and Mach 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements on and around the compression pads using global phosphor thermography. Consistent trends in heating augmentation levels were observed in the data and correlations of average and maximum heating at the cavities were formulated in terms of the local boundary-layer parameters and cavity dimensions. Additional heating data from prior testing of Genesis and Mars Science Laboratory models were also examined to extend the parametric range of cavity heating correlations.

  19. Constraints on hydrothermal heat flux through the oceanic lithosphere from global heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    that hydrothermal heat transfer has largely ceased. Although earlier studies suggested major differences in sealing ages for different ocean basins, we find that the sealing ages for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans are similar and consistent with the sealing age for the entire data set, 65 +/- 10 Ma. The previous inference of a young (approximately 20 Ma) sealing age for the Pacific appears to have biased downward several previous estimates of the global hydrothermal flux. The heat flow data also provide indirect evidence for the mechanism by which the hydrothermal heat flux becomes small, which has often been ascribed to isolation of the igneous crust from seawater due to the hydraulic conductivity of the intervening sediment. We find, however, that even the least sedimented sites show the systematic increase of the ratio of observed to predicted heat flow with age, although the more sedimented sites have a younger sealing age. Moreover, the heat flow discrepancy persists at heavily sedimented sites until approximately 50 Ma. It thus appears that approximately 100-200 m of sediment is neither necessary nor sufficient to stop hydrothermal heat transfer. We therefore conclude that the age of the crust is the primary control on the fraction of heat transported by hydrothermal flow and that sediment thickness has a lesser effect. This inference is consistent with models in which hydrothermal flow decreases with age due to reduced crustal porosity and hence permeability.

  20. More hurricanes to hit Western Europe due to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarsma, Reindert; Hazeleger, Wilco; Severijns, Camiel; de Vries, Hylke; Ster, Andreas; Bintanja, Richard; van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan; van den Brink, Henk; Baatsen, Michiel

    2014-05-01

    Using a very high resolution global climate model (~25 km grid size) with prescribed sea surface temperatures we have investigated the change in the occurrence of hurricane-force (> 32.6 m/s) storms over Western Europe due to climate change. The results show a large increase during early autumn (Aug-Oct). The majority of these storms originate as a tropical cyclone. Using SST sensitivity experiments we have tested the hypothesis that the increase is due to the rise in Atlantic tropical SST thereby extending eastwards the breeding ground of tropical cyclones, yielding more frequent and intense hurricanes following pathways directed towards Europe. En route they transform into extra-tropical depressions and re-intensify after merging with the mid-latitude baroclinic unstable flow. Detailed analysis indicates that the development of a warm seclusion is the main mechanism for the re-intensification and that the hurricane winds are caused by a sting jet.

  1. Upper bound for heat transport due to ion temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Choi, K.

    1996-12-01

    Turbulent transport due to an ion temperature gradient is studied in the context of a fluid description in slab geometry. An upper bound on the heat transport is obtained through the use of a variational principle. The physical constraint of energy conservation that is included in the principle keeps the bound finite. Additional constraint is needed and employed for the magnetic shear effect to be accounted for. The bounding curve of the heat flux versus the ion temperature gradient, {eta}{sub {ital i}}, is presented along with the profiles of the fluctuations. The bound, after an extrapolation, is argued to be in the neighborhood of what numerical simulation predicts. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Changes in ocean vertical heat transport with global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zika, Jan D.; Laliberté, Frédéric; Mudryk, Lawrence R.; Sijp, Willem P.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2015-06-01

    Heat transport between the surface and deep ocean strongly influences transient climate change. Mechanisms setting this transport are investigated using coupled climate models and by projecting ocean circulation into the temperature-depth diagram. In this diagram, a "cold cell" cools the deep ocean through the downwelling of Antarctic waters and upwelling of warmer waters and is balanced by warming due to a "warm cell," coincident with the interhemispheric overturning and previously linked to wind and haline forcing. With anthropogenic warming, the cold cell collapses while the warm cell continues to warm the deep ocean. Simulations with increasingly strong warm cells, set by their mean Southern Hemisphere winds, exhibit increasing deep-ocean warming in response to the same anthropogenic forcing. It is argued that the partition between components of the circulation which cool and warm the deep ocean in the preindustrial climate is a key determinant of ocean vertical heat transport with global warming.

  3. Small global-mean cooling due to volcanic radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, J. M.; Andrews, T.; Good, P.; Mauritsen, T.; Forster, P. M.

    2016-03-01

    In both the observational record and atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) simulations of the last ˜ 150 years, short-lived negative radiative forcing due to volcanic aerosol, following explosive eruptions, causes sudden global-mean cooling of up to ˜ 0.3 K. This is about five times smaller than expected from the transient climate response parameter (TCRP, K of global-mean surface air temperature change per W m-2 of radiative forcing increase) evaluated under atmospheric CO2 concentration increasing at 1 % yr-1. Using the step model (Good et al. in Geophys Res Lett 38:L01703, 2011. doi: 10.1029/2010GL045208), we confirm the previous finding (Held et al. in J Clim 23:2418-2427, 2010. doi: 10.1175/2009JCLI3466.1) that the main reason for the discrepancy is the damping of the response to short-lived forcing by the thermal inertia of the upper ocean. Although the step model includes this effect, it still overestimates the volcanic cooling simulated by AOGCMs by about 60 %. We show that this remaining discrepancy can be explained by the magnitude of the volcanic forcing, which may be smaller in AOGCMs (by 30 % for the HadCM3 AOGCM) than in off-line calculations that do not account for rapid cloud adjustment, and the climate sensitivity parameter, which may be smaller than for increasing CO2 (40 % smaller than for 4 × CO2 in HadCM3).

  4. General circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating: Significance of planetary rotation and polar eddy heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-04-01

    A high significance of planetary rotation and poleward eddy heat fluxes is determined for general circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating. In a high-resolution simplified Venus general circulation model, a planetary-scale mixed Rossby-gravity wave with meridional winds across the poles produces strong poleward heat flux and indirect circulation. This strong poleward heat transport induces downward momentum transport of indirect cells in the regions of weak high-latitude jets. It also reduces the meridional temperature gradient and vertical shear of the high-latitude jets in accordance with the thermal wind relation below the cloud layer. In contrast, strong equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets form in the cloud layer in the absence of polar indirect cells in an experiment involving Titan's rotation. Both the strong midlatitude jet and meridional temperature gradient are maintained in the situation that eddy horizontal heat fluxes are weak. The presence or absence of strong poleward eddy heat flux is one of the important factors determining the slow or fast superrotation state in the cloud layer through the downward angular momentum transport and the thermal wind relation. For fast Earth rotation, a weak global-scale Hadley circulation of the low-density upper atmosphere maintains equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets above the cloud layer, whereas multiple meridional circulations suppress the zonal wind speed below the cloud layer.

  5. Earth tides, global heat flow, and tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.

    1970-01-01

    The power of a heat engine ignited by tidal energy can account for geologically reasonable rates of average magma production and sea floor spreading. These rates control similarity of heat flux over continents and oceans because of an inverse relationship between respective depth intervals for mass transfer and consequent distributions of radiogenic heat production.

  6. Transient pool boiling heat transfer due to increasing heat inputs in subcooled water at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, K.; Shiotsu, M.; Sakurai, A.

    1995-09-01

    Understanding of transient boiling phenomenon caused by increasing heat inputs in subcooled water at high pressures is necessary to predict correctly a severe accident due to a power burst in a water-cooled nuclear reactor. Transient maximum heat fluxes, q{sub max}, on a 1.2 mm diameter horizontal cylinder in a pool of saturated and subcooled water for exponential heat inputs, q{sub o}e{sup t/T}, with periods, {tau}, ranging from about 2 ms to 20 s at pressures from atmospheric up to 2063 kPa for water subcoolings from 0 to about 80 K were measured to obtain the extended data base to investigate the effect of high subcoolings on steady-state and transient maximum heat fluxes, q{sub max}. Two main mechanisms of q{sub max} exist depending on the exponential periods at low subcoolings. One is due to the time lag of the hydrodynamic instability which starts at steady-state maximum heat flux on fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), and the other is due to the heterogenous spontaneous nucleations (HSN) in flooded cavities which coexist with vapor bubbles growing up from active cavities. The shortest period corresponding to the maximum q{sub max} for long period range belonging to the former mechanism becomes longer and the q{sub max}mechanism for long period range shifts to that due the HSN on FDNB with the increase of subcooling and pressure. The longest period corresponding to the minimum q{sub max} for the short period range belonging to the latter mechanism becomes shorter with the increase in saturated pressure. On the contrary, the longest period becomes longer with the increase in subcooling at high pressures. Correlations for steady-state and transient maximum heat fluxes were presented for a wide range of pressure and subcooling.

  7. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Sultan; Cess, Robert D.; Hogan, Joseph S.

    1980-12-01

    Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al., 1978; Hameed et al., 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx, and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NOx. The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NOx, and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  8. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Hameed, S.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone and methane might increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NOx and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test this possible climatic impact, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically-averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4 and NOx. The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NOx and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could enhance global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  9. Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hameed, S.; Cess, R. D.; Hogan, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al, 1978; Hameed et al, 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NO(x), and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NO(x). The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NO(x) and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

  10. Heat Transfer of Viscoelastic Fluid Flow due to Nonlinear Stretching Sheet with Internal Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandeppanavar, M. M.; Siddalingappa, M. N.; Jyoti, H.

    2013-08-01

    In the present paper, a viscoelastic boundary layer flow and heat transfer over an exponentially stretching continuous sheet in the presence of a heat source/sink has been examined. Loss of energy due to viscous dissipation of the non-Newtonian fluid has been taken into account in this study. Approximate analytical local similar solutions of the highly non-linear momentum equation are obtained for velocity distribution by transforming the equation into Riccati-type and then solving this sequentially. Accuracy of the zero-order analytical solutions for the stream function and velocity are verified by numerical solutions obtained by employing the Runge-Kutta fourth order method involving shooting. Similarity solutions of the temperature equation for non-isothermal boundary conditions are obtained in the form of confluent hypergeometric functions. The effect of various physical parameters on the local skin-friction coefficient and heat transfer characteristics are discussed in detail. It is seen that the rate of heat transfer from the stretching sheet to the fluid can be controlled by suitably choosing the values of the Prandtl number Pr and local Eckert number E, local viscioelastic parameter k*1 and local heat source/ sink parameter β*

  11. Scaling of heat transfer augmentation due to mechanical distortions in hypervelocity boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, W.; Austin, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    We examine the response of hypervelocity boundary layers to global mechanical distortions due to concave surface curvature. Surface heat transfer and visual boundary layer thickness data are obtained for a suite of models with different concave surface geometries. Results are compared to predictions using existing approximate methods. Near the leading edge, good agreement is observed, but at larger pressure gradients, predictions diverge significantly from the experimental data. Up to a factor of five underprediction is reported in regions with greatest distortion. Curve fits to the experimental data are compared with surface equations. We demonstrate that reasonable estimates of the laminar heat flux augmentation may be obtained as a function of the local turning angle for all model geometries, even at the conditions of greatest distortion. This scaling may be explained by the application of Lees similarity. As a means of introducing additional local distortions, vortex generators are used to impose streamwise structures into the boundary layer. The response of the large scale vortices to an adverse pressure gradient is investigated. Surface streak evolution is visualized over the different surface geometries using fast response pressure sensitive paint. For a flat plate baseline case, heat transfer augmentation at similar levels to turbulent flow is measured. For the concave geometries, increases in heat transfer by factors up to 2.6 are measured over the laminar values. The scaling of heat transfer with turning angle that is identified for the laminar boundary layer response is found to be robust even in the presence of the imposed vortex structures.

  12. Plasma self-heating and saturation due to numerical instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K.; Maron, N.

    1980-06-01

    The cold-beam nonphysical instability due to the aliases produced by the numerical spatial grid is presented in detail for momentum-conserving linear weighting codes. Additions to previous work include: linear analysis dispersion diagrams showing large growth rates, ..omega../sub i/< or =0.2 ..omega../sub p/; methods for reducing ..omega../sub i/, effectively broadening the finite-size particle width; simulation results verifying the linear theory, plus plots showing the p=1 alias in phase space (..nu../sub x/, x); the growth of beam, thermal spread (..nu../sub t//sup 2/ in temperature) an loss of energy conservation; end-of-growth (saturation at small thermal spread (lambda/sub D//..delta..x=upsilon/sub t//..omega../sub p/..delta..xapprox. =0.046, for lambda/sub B//..delta..xequivalent upsilon/sub 0//..omega../sub p/..delta..x> or =0.3, i.e., upsilon/sub t/< or =0.14upsilon/sub 0/), with return to near energy conservation (stability); demonstration of no growth for a warm beam, with upsilon/sub t/(initial)> or =upsilon/sub t/(saturation); and the mechanism of stabilization (trapping). A thermal (Maxwellian) plasma, also nonphysically unstable at small lambda/sub D//..delta..x, is also found to approach stabilization by self-heating. The two-stream physical instability is affected by the grid, with the aliasing instability also present; the linear theory for this is presented, with guidelines for minimizing the effects of the grid.

  13. Can Global Warming Heat Up Environmental Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzatenta, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Bronx Community College (CUNY) launched "Global Warming Campus Awareness and Action Days" in celebration of Earth Day, 2007. The purpose of this program was to raise awareness of environmental issues in the college population, especially students. To let more students have a grasp of what Environmental Education (EE) is all about, the author…

  14. Atlas of the global distribution of atmospheric heating during the global weather experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaack, Todd K.; Johnson, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    Global distributions of atmospheric heating for the annual cycle of the Global Weather Experiment are estimated from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Level 3b data set. Distributions of monthly, seasonally, and annually averaged heating are presented for isentropic and isobaric layers within the troposphere and for the troposphere as a whole. The distributions depict a large-scale structure of atmospheric heating that appears spatially and temporally consistent with known features of the global circulation and the seasonal evolution.

  15. An analytic formula for heating due to ozone absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, R. S.; Will, D. I.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt was made to devise a simple expression or formula to describe radiative heating in the atmosphere by ozone absorption. Such absorption occurs in the Hartley, Huggins, and Chappuis bands and is only slightly temperature and pressure dependent.

  16. Comment on ``Long-Term Global Heating From Energy Use''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, James R.

    2008-12-01

    In a prominent article published in Tellus in 1969, Mikhail I. Budyko, with the Main Geophysical Observatory, Leningrad, Soviet Union, wrote that ``all the energy used by man is transformed into heat, the main portion of this energy being an additional source of heat as compared to the present radiation gain'' [Budyko, 1969, p. 618]. He pointed out that this heating was over and above any climate forcing from anthropogenic greenhouse gases and-since energy use was growing geometrically-it was likely to result in the retreat of the cryosphere, accompanied by excessive and potentially damaging global warming, perhaps in 200 years or less. Eric J. Chaisson, in Eos (``Long-Term Global Heating From Energy Use,'' 89(28), 253-254, 2008), does not acknowledge Budyko's research. Chaisson cites cosmic history and the history of the human species, but he provides no references to the conceptual history of the idea that human energy use could result in global heating. Budyko first published on the Earth's heat budget in 1948 and in 1998 received the Blue Planet Prize, sponsored by the Asahi Glass Foundation, for his lifetime accomplishments in quantitative climatology. His work on the energy budget of the Earth and anthropogenic influences really should have been cited (see a selection of key articles in the online National Science Digital Library, at http://wiki.nsdl.org/index.php/PALE:ClassicArticles/GlobalWarming).

  17. Ultrasonic verification of microstructural changes due to heat treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation was measured for polycrystalline samples of nickel and copper with various grain-size distributions produced by heat treatment. Attenuation as a function of frequency was determined for a sample having a known mean grain diameter. Once this function was determined, it could be scaled to determine the mean grain size of other samples of the same material with different mean grain diameters. These results were obtained by using broadband pulse-echo ultrasound in the 25 to 100 MHz frequency range. The results suggest an ultrasonic, nondestructive approach for verifying heat treatment of metals.

  18. Profile of heating rate due to aerosols using lidar and skyradiometer in SKYNET Hefei site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Liu, D.; Xie, C.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on climate due to their important role in modifying atmosphere energy budget. On global scale, the direct radiative forcing is estimated to be in the range of -0.9 to -0.1 Wm-2 for aerosols [1]. Yet, these estimates are subject to very large uncertainties because of uncertainties in spatial and temporal variations of aerosols. At local scales, as aerosol properties can vary spatially and temporally, radiative forcing due to aerosols can be also very different and it can exceed the global value by an order of magnitude. Hence, it is very important to investigate aerosol loading, properties, and radiative forcing due to them in detail on local regions of climate significance. Haze and dust events in Hefei, China are explored by Lidar and Skyradiometer. Aerosol optical properties including the AOD, SSA, AAE and size distribution are analysed by using the SKYRAD.PACK [2] and presented in this paper. Furthermore, the radiative forcing due to aerosols and the heating rate in the ATM are also calculated using SBDART model [3]. The results are shown that the vertical heating rate is tightly related to aerosol profile. References: 1. IPCC. 2007. Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basic. Contribution of Working Group I Contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report. Solomon S, Qing D H, Manning M, et al. eds., Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, N Y, USA. 2. Nakajima, T., G. Tonna, R. Rao, Y. Kaufman, and B. Holben, 1996: Use of sky brightness measurements from ground for remote sensing of particulate poly dispersions, Appl. Opt., 35, 2672-2686. 3. Ricchiazzi et al 1998. SBDART: a research and teaching software tool for plane-parallel radiative transfer in the Earth's atmosphere,Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society,79,2101-2114.

  19. Global Dormancy of Metastases Due to Systemic Inhibition of Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Benzekry, Sébastien; Gandolfi, Alberto; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Autopsy studies of adults dying of non-cancer causes have shown that virtually all of us possess occult, cancerous lesions. This suggests that, for most individuals, cancer will become dormant and not progress, while only in some will it become symptomatic disease. Meanwhile, it was recently shown in animal models that a tumor can produce both stimulators and inhibitors of its own blood supply. To explain the autopsy findings in light of the preclinical research data, we propose a mathematical model of cancer development at the organism scale describing a growing population of metastases, which, together with the primary tumor, can exert a progressively greater level of systemic angiogenesis-inhibitory influence that eventually overcomes local angiogenesis stimulation to suppress the growth of all lesions. As a departure from modeling efforts to date, we look not just at signaling from and effects on the primary tumor, but integrate over this increasingly negative global signaling from all sources to track the development of total tumor burden. This in silico study of the dynamics of the tumor/metastasis system identifies ranges of parameter values where mutual angio-inhibitory interactions within a population of tumor lesions could yield global dormancy, i.e., an organism-level homeostatic steady state in total tumor burden. Given that mortality arises most often from metastatic disease rather than growth of the primary per se, this finding may have important therapeutic implications. PMID:24465399

  20. Short Communication: Genotype by Environment Interaction Due to Heat Stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress was evaluated as a factor in differences between regional evaluations for milk yield in the United States. The national data set (NA) consisted of 56 million first-parity test-day milk yields on 6 million Holsteins. The Northeastern subset (NE) included 12.5 million records on 1.3 millio...

  1. Global diabatic heating during FGGE SOP-1 and SOP-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Baker, Wayman E.

    1986-01-01

    With the increase in the observational data provided by FGGE and the use of global circulation models with full physics for the data assimilation, it is now becoming feasible to attempt to estimate globally the atmospheric diabatic heating. The thermodynamic equation in isobaric coordinates and the data generated by the FGGE III-b analysis of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) are employed to serve this purpose. The results of the present study generally agree with other previous investigations. However, some important differences are also revealed. (1) The diabatic heating obtained in the tropics in the present study is larger than that obtained elsewhere; (2) the relatively large heating over the mountainous areas shown in other studies does not appear; (3) no significant negative values of diabatic heating are found in the polar regions; and (4) unlike other studies, cooling is noted over parts of Eurasia in the summer.

  2. Global warming due to increasing absorbed solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Fasullo, John T.

    2009-04-01

    Global climate models used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) are examined for the top-of-atmosphere radiation changes as carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases build up from 1950 to 2100. There is an increase in net radiation absorbed, but not in ways commonly assumed. While there is a large increase in the greenhouse effect from increasing greenhouse gases and water vapor (as a feedback), this is offset to a large degree by a decreasing greenhouse effect from reducing cloud cover and increasing radiative emissions from higher temperatures. Instead the main warming from an energy budget standpoint comes from increases in absorbed solar radiation that stem directly from the decreasing cloud amounts. These findings underscore the need to ascertain the credibility of the model changes, especially insofar as changes in clouds are concerned.

  3. On the global variations of terrestrial heat-flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, W.H.K.

    1969-01-01

    Over 3 500 measurements of surface heat-flux have been catalogued and analyzed to study the large-scale variations of terrestrial heat-flow. It was found that heat-flow values are correlated with major geologic provinces: higher averages and scattered values in active tectonic regions, and lower averages and more uniform values in stable areas. Analyzing the data in the light of new global tectonics shows that the variations of heat-flow are consistent with the hypotheses of sea-floor spreading and plate tectonics. The observed heat-flow across the mid-oceanic ridges can be accounted for by a simple model of a spreading sea floor. ?? 1970.

  4. Thermal design of spiral heat exchangers and heat pipes through global best algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgut, Oğuz Emrah; Çoban, Mustafa Turhan

    2016-07-01

    This study deals with global best algorithm based thermal design of spiral heat exchangers and heat pipes. Spiral heat exchangers are devices which are highly efficient in extremely dirty and fouling process duties. Spirals inherent in design maintain high heat transfer coefficients while avoiding hazardous effects of fouling and uneven fluid distribution in the channels. Heat pipes have wide usage in industry. Thanks to the two phase cycle which takes part in operation, they can transfer high amount of heat with a negligible temperature gradient. In this work, a new stochastic based optimization method global best algorithm is applied for multi objective optimization of spiral heat exchangers as well as single objective optimization for heat pipes. Global best algorithm is easy-to-implement, free of derivatives and it can be reliably applied to any optimization problem. Case studies taken from the literature approaches are solved by the proposed algorithm and results obtained from the literature approaches are compared with thosed acquired by GBA. Comparisons reveal that GBA attains better results than literature studies in terms of solution accuracy and efficiency.

  5. Spacecraft microbial burden reduction due to atmospheric entry heating: Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Jaworski, W.; Mcronald, A. S.; Hoffman, A. R.

    1973-01-01

    Planetary quarantine analyses performed for recent unmanned Mars and Venus missions assumed that the probability of contamination by a spacecraft given accidental impact was equivalent to one. However, in the case of the gaseous outer planets, the heat generated during the inadvertent entry of a spacecraft into the planetary atmosphere might be sufficient to cause significant microbial burden reduction. This could affect navigation strategy by reducing the necessity for biasing the aim point away from the planets. An effort has been underway to develop the tools necessary to predict temperature histories for a typical spacecraft during inadvertent entry. In order that the results have general applicability, parametric analyses were performed. The thermal response of the spacecraft components and debris resulting from disintegration was determined. The temperature histories of small particles and composite materials, such as thermal blankets and an antenna, were given special attention. Guidelines are given to indicate the types of components and debris most likely to contain viable organisms, which could contaminate the lower layers of the Jovian atmosphere (approximately one atmosphere of pressure).

  6. Distinctive climate signals in reanalysis of global ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmaseda, Magdalena A.; Trenberth, Kevin E.; KäLléN, Erland

    2013-05-01

    The elusive nature of the post-2004 upper ocean warming has exposed uncertainties in the ocean's role in the Earth's energy budget and transient climate sensitivity. Here we present the time evolution of the global ocean heat content for 1958 through 2009 from a new observation-based reanalysis of the ocean. Volcanic eruptions and El Niño events are identified as sharp cooling events punctuating a long-term ocean warming trend, while heating continues during the recent upper-ocean-warming hiatus, but the heat is absorbed in the deeper ocean. In the last decade, about 30% of the warming has occurred below 700 m, contributing significantly to an acceleration of the warming trend. The warming below 700 m remains even when the Argo observing system is withdrawn although the trends are reduced. Sensitivity experiments illustrate that surface wind variability is largely responsible for the changing ocean heat vertical distribution.

  7. Global Crustal Heat Flow Using Random Decision Forest Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. J.; Wood, W. T.; Martin, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have applied supervised learning with random decision forests (RDF) to estimate, or predict, a global, densely spaced grid of crustal heat flow. The results are similar to global heat flow predictions that have been previously published but are more accurate and offer higher resolution. The training inputs are measurement values and uncertainties of existing sparsely sampled, (~8,000 locations), geographically biased, yet globally extensive, datasets of crustal heat flow. The RDF estimate is a highly non-linear empirical relationship between crustal heat flow and dozens of other parameters (attributes) that we have densely sampled, global, estimates of (e.g., crustal age, water depth, crustal thickness, seismic sound speed, seafloor temperature, sediment thickness, and sediment grain type). Synthetic attributes were key to obtaining good results using the RDF method. We created synthetic attributes by applying physical intuition and statistical analyses to the fundamental attributes. Statistics include median, kurtosis, and dozens of other functions, all calculated at every node and averaged over a variety of ranges from 5 to 500km. Other synthetic attributes are simply plausible, (e.g., distance from volcanoes, seafloor porosity, mean grain size). More than 600 densely sampled attributes are used in our prediction, and for each we estimated their relative importance. The important attributes included all those expected from geophysics, (e.g., inverse square root of age, gradient of depth, crustal thickness, crustal density, sediment thickness, distance from trenches), and some unexpected but plausible attributes, (e.g., seafloor temperature), but none that were unphysical. The simplicity of the RDF technique may also be of great interest beyond the discipline of crustal heat flow as it allows for more geologically intelligent predictions, decreasing the effect of sampling bias, and improving predictions in regions with little or no data, while rigorously

  8. Time-convoluted hotspot temperature field on a metal skin due to sustained arc stroke heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. S.; Su, W. Y.

    A previously developed time-convoluted heat-conduction theory is applied to the case of a metal plate whose heat source is sustained over time. Integral formulas are formally derived, and their utilization in practical arc-heating work is examined. The results are compared with experimental ones from titanium and aluminum plates subjected to sustained heating due to step switch-on dc arc sources, and reasonable agreement is found.

  9. Wintertime urban heat island modified by global climate change over Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, M.

    2015-12-01

    Urban thermal environment change, especially, surface air temperature (SAT) rise in metropolitan areas, is one of the major recent issues in urban areas. The urban thermal environmental change affects not only human health such as heat stroke, but also increasing infectious disease due to spreading out virus vectors habitat and increase of industry and house energy consumption. The SAT rise is mostly caused by global climate change and urban heat island (hereafter UHI) by urbanization. The population in Tokyo metropolitan area is over 30 millions and the Tokyo metropolitan area is one of the biggest megacities in the world. The temperature rise due to urbanization seems comparable to the global climate change in the major megacities. It is important to project how the urbanization and the global climate change affect to the future change of urban thermal environment to plan the adaptation and mitigation policy. To predict future SAT change in urban scale, we should estimate future UHI modified by the global climate change. This study investigates change in UHI intensity (UHII) of major metropolitan areas in Japan by effects of the global climate change. We performed a series of climate simulations. Present climate simulations with and without urban process are conducted for ten seasons using a high-resolution numerical climate model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Future climate projections with and without urban process are also conducted. The future projections are performed using the pseudo global warming method, assuming 2050s' initial and boundary conditions estimated by a GCM under the RCP scenario. Simulation results indicated that UHII would be enhanced more than 30% in Tokyo during the night due to the global climate change. The enhancement of urban heat island is mostly caused by change of lower atmospheric stability.

  10. Absorption of intense microwaves and ion acoustic turbulence due to heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    De Groot, J.S.; Liu, J.M.; Matte, J.P.

    1994-02-04

    Measurements and calculations of the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of intense microwaves are presented. The isotropic component of the electron distribution becomes flat-topped in agreement with detailed Fokker-Planck calculations. The plasma heating is reduced due to the flat-topped distributions in agreement with calculations. The calculations show that the heat flux at high microwave powers is very large, q{sub max} {approx} 0.3 n{sub e}v{sub e}T{sub e}. A new particle model to, calculate the heat transport inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence in ICF plasmas is also presented. One-dimensional PIC calculations of ion acoustic turbulence excited due to heat transport are presented. The 2-D PIC code is presently being used to perform calculations of heat flux inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence.

  11. Global crop yield response to extreme heat stress under multiple climate change futures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryng, D.; Conway, D.; Ramankutty, N.; Price, J.; Warren, R.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme heat stress during the crop reproductive period can be critical for crop productivity. Projected changes in the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events are expected to negatively impact crop yields and global food production. This study applies the global crop model PEGASUS to quantify, for the first time at the global scale, impacts of extreme heat stress on maize, spring wheat and soybean yields resulting from 72 climate change scenarios for the 21st century. Our results project maize to face progressively worse impacts under a range of RCPs but spring wheat and soybean to improve globally through to the 2080s due to CO2 fertilization effects, even though parts of the tropic and sub-tropic regions could face substantial yield declines. We find extreme heat stress at anthesis (HSA) by the 2080s (relative to the 1980s) under RCP 8.5, taking into account CO2 fertilization effects, could double global losses of maize yield (dY = -12.8 ± 6.7% versus -7.0 ± 5.3% without HSA), reduce projected gains in spring wheat yield by half (dY = 34.3 ± 13.5% versus 72.0 ± 10.9% without HSA) and in soybean yield by a quarter (dY = 15.3 ± 26.5% versus 20.4 ± 22.1% without HSA). The range reflects uncertainty due to differences between climate model scenarios; soybean exhibits both positive and negative impacts, maize is generally negative and spring wheat generally positive. Furthermore, when assuming CO2 fertilization effects to be negligible, we observe drastic climate mitigation policy as in RCP 2.6 could avoid more than 80% of the global average yield losses otherwise expected by the 2080s under RCP 8.5. We show large disparities in climate impacts across regions and find extreme heat stress adversely affects major producing regions and lower income countries.

  12. Global crop yield response to extreme heat stress under multiple climate change futures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryng, Delphine; Conway, Declan; Ramankutty, Navin; Price, Jeff; Warren, Rachel

    2014-03-01

    Extreme heat stress during the crop reproductive period can be critical for crop productivity. Projected changes in the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events are expected to negatively impact crop yields and global food production. This study applies the global crop model PEGASUS to quantify, for the first time at the global scale, impacts of extreme heat stress on maize, spring wheat and soybean yields resulting from 72 climate change scenarios for the 21st century. Our results project maize to face progressively worse impacts under a range of RCPs but spring wheat and soybean to improve globally through to the 2080s due to CO2 fertilization effects, even though parts of the tropic and sub-tropic regions could face substantial yield declines. We find extreme heat stress at anthesis (HSA) by the 2080s (relative to the 1980s) under RCP 8.5, taking into account CO2 fertilization effects, could double global losses of maize yield (ΔY = -12.8 ± 6.7% versus - 7.0 ± 5.3% without HSA), reduce projected gains in spring wheat yield by half (ΔY = 34.3 ± 13.5% versus 72.0 ± 10.9% without HSA) and in soybean yield by a quarter (ΔY = 15.3 ± 26.5% versus 20.4 ± 22.1% without HSA). The range reflects uncertainty due to differences between climate model scenarios; soybean exhibits both positive and negative impacts, maize is generally negative and spring wheat generally positive. Furthermore, when assuming CO2 fertilization effects to be negligible, we observe drastic climate mitigation policy as in RCP 2.6 could avoid more than 80% of the global average yield losses otherwise expected by the 2080s under RCP 8.5. We show large disparities in climate impacts across regions and find extreme heat stress adversely affects major producing regions and lower income countries.

  13. Plasma heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Quest, K. B.; Tanaka, M.; Wu, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability, which is the finite beta (ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure) extension of the modified two stream instability, is studied. Heating rates are derived from quasi-linear theory and compared with results from particle simulations to show that electron heating relative to ion heating and heating parallel to the magnetic field relative to perpendicular heating for both the electrons and ions increase with beta. The simulations suggest that electron dynamics determine the saturation level of the instability, which is manifested by the formation of a flattop electron distribution parallel to the magnetic field. As a result, both the saturation levels of the fluctuations and the heating rates decrease sharply with beta. Applications of these results to plasma heating in simulations of shocks and the earth's bow shock are described.

  14. Intercomparison of Latent Heat Fluxes Over Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Nelkin, Eric; Ardizzone, Joe; Atlas, Robert M.; Chou, Ming-Dah

    2003-01-01

    Turbulent fluxes of momentum, moisture, and heat at the air-sea interface are essential for climate studies. Version 2 Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF2) has been derived from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) radiance measurements. This dataset, covering the period July 1987-December 2000 over global oceans, has a spatial resolution of 1 deg x 1 deg lat-long and a temporal resolution of 1 day. Turbulent fluxes are derived from the SSM/I surface winds and surface air humidity, as well as the 2-m air and sea surface temperatures (SST) of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, using a bulk aerodynamic algorithm based on the surface layer similarity theory. The GSSTF2 bulk flux model, and retrieved daily wind stress, latent heat flux, wind speed, and surface air humidity validate well with ship observations of ten field experiments over the tropical and midlatitude oceans during 1991-99. The global distributions of 1988-2000 annual- and seasonal-mean turbulent fluxes show reasonable patterns related to the atmospheric general circulation and seasonal variations. Latent heat fluxes and related input parameters over global oceans during 1992-93 have been compared among GSSTF1 (version 1), GSSTF2, HOAPS (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data), NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, and one based on COADS (Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set). Our analyses suggest that the GSSTF2 latent heat flux, surface air humidity, surface wind, and SST are quite realistic compared to the other four flux datasets examined. However, significant differences are found among these five flux datasets. The GSSTF2, available at http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/CAMPAIGN_DOCS/hydrology/hd_gsstf2.O.html, is useful for climate studies.

  15. Transports and budgets of volume, heat, and salt from a global eddy-resolving ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, M.P.; Semtner, A.J. Jr.; Chervin, R.M.

    1994-07-01

    The results from an integration of a global ocean circulation model have been condensed into an analysis of the volume, heat, and salt transports among the major ocean basins. Transports are also broken down between the model`s Ekman, thermocline, and deep layers. Overall, the model does well. Horizontal exchanges of mass, heat, and salt between ocean basins have reasonable values: and the volume of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) transport is in general agreement with what limited observations exist. On a global basis the zonally integrated meridional heat transport is poleward at all latitudes except for the latitude band 30{degrees}S to 45{degrees}S. This anomalous transport is most likely a signature of the model`s inability to form Antarctic Intermediate (AAIW) and Antarctic bottom water (AABW) properly. Eddy heat transport is strong at the equator where its convergence heats the equatorial Pacific about twice as much as it heats the equatorial Atlantic. The greater heating in the Pacific suggests that mesoscale eddies may be a vital mechanism for warming and maintaining an upwelling portion of the global conveyor-belt circulation. The model`s fresh water transport compares well with observations. However, in the Atlantic there is an excessive southward transport of fresh water due to the absence of the Mediterranean outflow and weak northward flow of AAIW. Perhaps the model`s greatest weakness is the lack of strong AAIW and AABW circulation cells. Accurate thermohaline forcing in the North Atlantic (based on numerous hydrographic observations) helps the model adequately produce NADW. In contrast, the southern ocean is an area of sparse observation. Better thermohaline observations in this area may be needed if models such as this are to produce the deep convection that will achieve more accurate simulations of the global 3-dimensional circulation. 41 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The impact of Global Warming on global crop yields due to changes in pest pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battisti, D. S.; Tewksbury, J. J.; Deutsch, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    A billion people currently lack reliable access to sufficient food and almost half of the calories feeding these people come from just three crops: rice, maize, wheat. Insect pests are among the largest factors affecting the yield of these three crops, but models assessing the effects of global warming on crops rarely consider changes in insect pest pressure on crop yields. We use well-established relationships between temperature and insect physiology to project climate-driven changes in pest pressure, defined as integrated population metabolism, for the three major crops. By the middle of this century, under most scenarios, insect pest pressure is projected to increase by more than 50% in temperate areas, while increases in tropical regions will be more modest. Yield relationships indicate that the largest increases in insect pest pressure are likely to occur in areas where yield is greatest, suggesting increased strain on global food markets.

  17. Human health risk assessment due to global warming--a case study of the Gulf countries.

    PubMed

    Husain, Tahir; Chaudhary, Junaid Rafi

    2008-12-01

    Accelerated global warming is predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climatic Change (IPCC) due to increasing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The climate changes are anticipated to have a long-term impact on human health, marine and terrestrial ecosystems, water resources and vegetation. Due to rising sea levels, low lying coastal regions will be flooded, farmlands will be threatened and scarcity of fresh water resources will be aggravated. This will in turn cause increased human suffering in different parts of the world. Spread of disease vectors will contribute towards high mortality, along with the heat related deaths. Arid and hot climatic regions will face devastating effects risking survival of the fragile plant species, wild animals, and other desert ecosystems. The paper presents future changes in temperature, precipitation and humidity and their direct and indirect potential impacts on human health in the coastal regions of the Gulf countries including Yemen, Oman, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Bahrain. The analysis is based on the long-term changes in the values of temperature, precipitation and humidity as predicted by the global climatic simulation models under different scenarios of GHG emission levels. Monthly data on temperature, precipitation, and humidity were retrieved from IPCC databases for longitude 41.25 degrees E to 61.875 degrees E and latitude 9.278 degrees N to 27.833 degrees N. Using an average of 1970 to 2000 values as baseline, the changes in the humidity, temperature and precipitation were predicted for the period 2020 to 2050 and 2070 to 2099. Based on epidemiological studies on various diseases associated with the change in temperature, humidity and precipitation in arid and hot regions, empirical models were developed to assess human health risk in the Gulf region to predict elevated levels of diseases and mortality rates under different emission scenarios as developed by the IPCC.The preliminary assessment indicates

  18. Human Health Risk Assessment due to Global Warming – A Case Study of the Gulf Countries

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Tahir; Chaudhary, Junaid Rafi

    2008-01-01

    Accelerated global warming is predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climatic Change (IPCC) due to increasing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The climate changes are anticipated to have a long-term impact on human health, marine and terrestrial ecosystems, water resources and vegetation. Due to rising sea levels, low lying coastal regions will be flooded, farmlands will be threatened and scarcity of fresh water resources will be aggravated. This will in turn cause increased human suffering in different parts of the world. Spread of disease vectors will contribute towards high mortality, along with the heat related deaths. Arid and hot climatic regions will face devastating effects risking survival of the fragile plant species, wild animals, and other desert ecosystems. The paper presents future changes in temperature, precipitation and humidity and their direct and indirect potential impacts on human health in the coastal regions of the Gulf countries including Yemen, Oman, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Bahrain. The analysis is based on the long-term changes in the values of temperature, precipitation and humidity as predicted by the global climatic simulation models under different scenarios of GHG emission levels. Monthly data on temperature, precipitation, and humidity were retrieved from IPCC databases for longitude 41.25°E to 61.875°E and latitude 9.278°N to 27.833°N. Using an average of 1970 to 2000 values as baseline, the changes in the humidity, temperature and precipitation were predicted for the period 2020 to 2050 and 2070 to 2099. Based on epidemiological studies on various diseases associated with the change in temperature, humidity and precipitation in arid and hot regions, empirical models were developed to assess human health risk in the Gulf region to predict elevated levels of diseases and mortality rates under different emission scenarios as developed by the IPCC. The preliminary assessment indicates increased mortality rates

  19. Global Intercomparison of 12 Land Surface Heat Flux Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, C.; Prigent, C.; Mueller, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.; McCabe, M. F.; Wood, E. F.; Rossow, W. B.; Balsamo, G.; Betts, A. K.; Dirmeyer, P. A.; Fisher, J. B.; Jung, M.; Kanamitsu, M.; Reichle, R. H.; Reichstein, M.; Rodell, M.; Sheffield, J.; Tu, K.; Wang, K.

    2011-01-01

    A global intercomparison of 12 monthly mean land surface heat flux products for the period 1993-1995 is presented. The intercomparison includes some of the first emerging global satellite-based products (developed at Paris Observatory, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, University of California Berkeley, University of Maryland, and Princeton University) and examples of fluxes produced by reanalyses (ERA-Interim, MERRA, NCEP-DOE) and off-line land surface models (GSWP-2, GLDAS CLM/ Mosaic/Noah). An intercomparison of the global latent heat flux (Q(sub le)) annual means shows a spread of approx 20 W/sq m (all-product global average of approx 45 W/sq m). A similar spread is observed for the sensible (Q(sub h)) and net radiative (R(sub n)) fluxes. In general, the products correlate well with each other, helped by the large seasonal variability and common forcing data for some of the products. Expected spatial distributions related to the major climatic regimes and geographical features are reproduced by all products. Nevertheless, large Q(sub le)and Q(sub h) absolute differences are also observed. The fluxes were spatially averaged for 10 vegetation classes. The larger Q(sub le) differences were observed for the rain forest but, when normalized by mean fluxes, the differences were comparable to other classes. In general, the correlations between Q(sub le) and R(sub n) were higher for the satellite-based products compared with the reanalyses and off-line models. The fluxes were also averaged for 10 selected basins. The seasonality was generally well captured by all products, but large differences in the flux partitioning were observed for some products and basins.

  20. Continental Heat Gain in the Global Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerdon, J. E.; Beltrami, H.; Pollack, H. N.; Huang, S.

    2001-12-01

    Observed increases in 20th century surface-air temperatures are one consequence of a net energy flux into all major components of the Earth climate system including the atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, and lithosphere. Levitus et al. [2001] have estimated the heat gained by the atmosphere, ocean and cryosphere as 18.2x1022 J, 6.6x1021 J, and 8.1x1021 J, respectively, over the past half-century. However the heat gain of the lithosphere via a heat flux across the solid surface of the continents (30% of the Earth's surface) was not addressed in the Levitus analysis. Here we calculate that final component of Earth's changing energy budget, using ground-surface temperature reconstructions for the continents [Huang et al., 2000]. These reconstructions have shown a warming of at least 0.5 K in the 20th century and were used to determine the flux estimates presented here. In the last half-century, the interval of time considered by Levitus et al., there was an average flux of 40 mW/m2 across the land surface into the subsurface, leading to 9.2x1021 J absorbed by the ground. This amount of heat is significantly less than the energy transferred into the oceans, but of the same magnitude as the energy absorbed by the atmosphere or cryosphere. The heat inputs into all the major components of the climate system - atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, lithosphere - conservatively sum to more than 20x1022 J during the last half-century, and reinforce the conclusion that the warming in this interval has been truly global. Huang, S., Pollack, H.N., and Shen, P.-Y. 2000. Temperature trends over the past five centuries reconstructed from borehole temperatures. Nature. 403. 756-758 Levitus, S., Antonov, J., Wang, J., Delworth, T. L., Dixon, K. and Broccoli, A. 2001. Anthropogenic warming of the Earth's climate system. Science, 292, 267-270

  1. Small scale changes of geochemistry and flow field due to transient heat storage in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S.; Boockmeyer, A.; Li, D.; Beyer, C.

    2013-12-01

    Heat exchangers in the subsurface are increasingly installed for transient heat storage due to the need of heating or cooling of buildings as well as the interim storage of heat to compensate for the temporally fluctuating energy production by wind or solar energy. For heat storage to be efficient, high temperatures must be achieved in the subsurface. Significant temporal changes of the soil and groundwater temperatures however effect both the local flow field by temperature dependent fluid parameters as well as reactive mass transport through temperature dependent diffusion coefficients, geochemical reaction rates and mineral equilibria. As the use of heat storage will be concentrated in urban areas, the use of the subsurface for (drinking) water supply and heat storage will typically coincide and a reliable prognosis of the processes occurring is needed. In the present work, the effects of a temporal variation of the groundwater temperature, as induced by a local heat exchanger introduced into a groundwater aquifer, are studied. For this purpose, the coupled non-isothermal groundwater flow, heat transport and reactive mass transport is simulated in the near filed of such a heat exchanger. By explicitly discretizing and incorporating the borehole, the borehole cementation and the heat exchanger tubes, a realistic geometrical and process representation is obtained. The numerical simulation code OpenGeoSys is used in this work, which incorporates the required processes of coupled groundwater flow, heat and mass transport as well as temperature dependent geochemistry. Due to the use of a Finite Element Method, a close representation of the geometric effects can be achieved. Synthetic scenario simulations for typical settings of salt water formations in northern Germany are used to investigate the geochemical effects arising from a high temperature heat storage by quantifying changes in groundwater chemistry and overall reaction rates. This work presents the

  2. A detailed evaluation of the stratospheric heat budget: 2. Global radiation balance and diabatic circulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Portmann, Robert W.

    1999-03-01

    We present a detailed evaluation of radiative heating, radiative cooling, net heating, global radiation balance, radiative relaxation times, and diabatic circulations in the stratosphere using temperature and minor constituent data provided by instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) between 1991 and 1993 and by the limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere (LIMS) instrument which operated on the Nimbus-7 spacecraft in 1978-1979. Included in the calculations are heating due to absorption of solar radiation from ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths and radiative cooling due to emission by carbon dioxide, water vapor, and ozone from 0 to 3000 cm-1 (∞ - 3.3 μm). Infrared radiative effects of Pinatubo aerosols are also considered in some detail. In general, we find the stratosphere to be in a state of global mean radiative equilibrium on monthly timescales to within the uncertainty of the satellite-provided measurements. Radiative relaxation times are found to be larger in the lower stratosphere during UARS than LIMS because of the presence of Pinatubo aerosols. The meridional circulations in the upper stratosphere as diagnosed from the calculated fields of net heating are generally stronger in the UARS period than during the LIMS period, while the lower stratosphere meridional circulations are stronger during the LIMS period. A climatology of these calculations is available to the community via a World Wide Web interface described herein.

  3. Continued Development of a Global Heat Transfer Measurement System at AEDC Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurits, Inna; Lewis, M. J.; Hamner, M. P.; Norris, Joseph D.

    2007-01-01

    Heat transfer rates are an extremely important consideration in the design of hypersonic vehicles such as atmospheric reentry vehicles. This paper describes the development of a data reduction methodology to evaluate global heat transfer rates using surface temperature-time histories measured with the temperature sensitive paint (TSP) system at AEDC Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9. As a part of this development effort, a scale model of the NASA Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) was painted with TSP and multiple sequences of high resolution images were acquired during a five run test program. Heat transfer calculation from TSP data in Tunnel 9 is challenging due to relatively long run times, high Reynolds number environment and the desire to utilize typical stainless steel wind tunnel models used for force and moment testing. An approach to reduce TSP data into convective heat flux was developed, taking into consideration the conditions listed above. Surface temperatures from high quality quantitative global temperature maps acquired with the TSP system were then used as an input into the algorithm. Preliminary comparison of the heat flux calculated using the TSP surface temperature data with the value calculated using the standard thermocouple data is reported.

  4. Surface urban heat island across 419 global big cities.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shushi; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Ottle, Catherine; Bréon, François-Marie; Nan, Huijuan; Zhou, Liming; Myneni, Ranga B

    2012-01-17

    Urban heat island is among the most evident aspects of human impacts on the earth system. Here we assess the diurnal and seasonal variation of surface urban heat island intensity (SUHII) defined as the surface temperature difference between urban area and suburban area measured from the MODIS. Differences in SUHII are analyzed across 419 global big cities, and we assess several potential biophysical and socio-economic driving factors. Across the big cities, we show that the average annual daytime SUHII (1.5 ± 1.2 °C) is higher than the annual nighttime SUHII (1.1 ± 0.5 °C) (P < 0.001). But no correlation is found between daytime and nighttime SUHII across big cities (P = 0.84), suggesting different driving mechanisms between day and night. The distribution of nighttime SUHII correlates positively with the difference in albedo and nighttime light between urban area and suburban area, while the distribution of daytime SUHII correlates negatively across cities with the difference of vegetation cover and activity between urban and suburban areas. Our results emphasize the key role of vegetation feedbacks in attenuating SUHII of big cities during the day, in particular during the growing season, further highlighting that increasing urban vegetation cover could be one effective way to mitigate the urban heat island effect. PMID:22142232

  5. Heat flux due to poloidal electric field in the banana regime

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M. )

    1992-02-01

    The heat flux due to poloidally varying electrostatic potential is calculated in the banana regime. This electrostatic potential determined self-consistently from charge neutrality is shown to increase the electron heat flux by a factor {radical}{ital m}{sub {ital i}}/{ital m}{sub {ital e}} compared with that when this potential is neglected, where {ital m}{sub {ital e}} and {ital m}{sub {ital i}} are the masses of electron and ion, respectively.

  6. Nanoscale radiative heat flow due to surface plasmons in graphene and doped silicon.

    PubMed

    van Zwol, P J; Thiele, S; Berger, C; de Heer, W A; Chevrier, J

    2012-12-28

    Owing to its two-dimensional electronic structure, graphene exhibits many unique properties. One of them is a wave vector and temperature dependent plasmon in the infrared range. Theory predicts that due to these plasmons, graphene can be used as a universal material to enhance nanoscale radiative heat exchange for any dielectric substrate. Here we report on radiative heat transfer experiments between SiC and a SiO2 sphere that have nonmatching phonon polariton frequencies, and thus only weakly exchange heat in near field. We observed that the heat flux contribution of graphene epitaxially grown on SiC dominates at short distances. The influence of plasmons on radiative heat transfer is further supported with measurements for doped silicon. These results highlight graphene's strong potential in photonic near field and energy conversion devices. PMID:23368565

  7. Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM): Global Structure and Dynamics Driven by Auroral and Joule Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Waite, J. H.; Majeed, T.; Gladstone, G. R.

    2005-05-01

    A growing multi-spectral database plus recent Galileo descent measurements are being used to construct a self-consistent picture of the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system. The proper characterization of Jupiter's upper atmosphere, imbedded ionosphere, and auroral features requires the examination of underlying processes including the feedbacks of energetics, neutral-ion dynamics, composition, and magnetospheric coupling. A fully 3-D Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM) has been developed and is being exercised to address global temperatures, 3-component neutral winds, and neutral-ion specie distributions. The domain of this JTGCM extends from 20-microbar (capturing hydrocarbon cooling) to 0.1-picobar (including auroral/Joule heating processes). The resulting JTGCM has been fully spun-up and integrated for 40-60 Jupiter rotations. Results from two JTGCM cases incorporating moderate auroral heating, ion drag, and moderate to strong Joule heating processes are presented. The neutral horizontal winds at ionospheric heights vary from 0.5 km/s to 1.2 km/s, atomic hydrogen is transported equatorward, and auroral exospheric temperatures range from ~1200-1300 K to above 3000 K depending on the magnitude of Joule heating. The equatorial temperature profiles from the JTGCM are compared with the measured temperature structure from the Galileo ASI dataset. The best fit to the Galileo data implies that the major energy source for maintaining the equatorial temperatures is due to dynamical heating induced by the low latitude convergence of the high-latitude driven thermospheric circulation. The magnitude of this equatorial heating, and the strength of the underlying global thermospheric circulation, are strongly dependent upon magnetospheric coupling which regulates Joule heating. Simulated fields and diagnostics from the JTGCM are compared to available multi-spectral and spacecraft observations.

  8. Comparison of retrospective analyses of the global ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurin, Gennady A.; Carton, James A.

    1999-07-01

    In this study, we compare seven retrospective analyses of basin- to global-scale upper ocean temperature. The analyses span a minimum of 10 years during the 50-year period since World War II. Three of the analyses (WOA-94, WHITE, BMRC) are based on objective analysis and thus, do not rely on a numerical forecast model. The remaining four (NCEP, WAJSOWICZ, ROSATI, SODA) are based on data assimilation in which the numerical forecast is provided by some form of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Modular Ocean Model driven by historical winds. The comparison presented here is limited to heat content in the upper 250 m, information that is available for all analyses. The results are presented in three frequency bands: seasonal, interannual (periods of 1-5 years), and decadal (periods of 5-25 years). At seasonal frequencies, all of the analyses are quite similar. Otherwise, the differences among analyses are limited to the regions of the western boundary currents, and some regions in the Southern Hemisphere. At interannual frequencies, significant differences appear between the objective analyses and the data assimilation analyses. Along the equator in the Pacific, where variability is dominated by El Niño, the objective analyses have somewhat noisier fields, as well as reduced variance prior to 1980 due to lack of observations. Still, the correlation among analyses generally exceeds 80% in this region. Along the equator in the Atlantic, the correlation is lower (30-60%) although inspection of the time series shows that the same biennial progression of warm and cool events appears in all analyses since 1980. In the midlatitude Pacific agreement among objective analyses and data assimilation analyses is good. The analysis of Rosati et al. [Rosati, A., Gudgel, R., Miyakoda, K., 1995. Decadal analysis produced from an ocean assimilation system. Mon. Weather Rev., 123, 2, 206.] differs somewhat from the others apparently because in this analysis, the forecast model

  9. Freshwater and heat transports from global ocean synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, M.; Haines, K.; Zuo, H.; Lea, D.

    2014-01-01

    An eddy-permitting ¼° global ocean reanalysis based on the Operational Met Office FOAM data assimilation system has been run for 1989-2010 forced by ERA-Interim meteorology. Freshwater and heat transports are compared with published estimates globally and in each basin, with special focus on the Atlantic. The meridional transports agree with observations within errors at most locations, but where eddies are active the transports by the mean flow are nearly always in better agreement than the total transports. Eddy transports are down gradient and are enhanced relative to a free run. They may oppose or reinforce mean transports and provide 40-50% of the total transport near midlatitude fronts, where eddies with time scales <1 month provide up to 15%. Basin-scale freshwater convergences are calculated with the Arctic/Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans north of 32°S, all implying net evaporation of 0.33 ± 0.04 Sv, 0.65 ± 0.07 Sv, and 0.09 ± 0.04 Sv, respectively, within the uncertainty of observations in the Atlantic and Pacific. The Indian is more evaporative and the Southern Ocean has more precipitation (1.07 Sv). Air-sea fluxes are modified by assimilation influencing turbulent heat fluxes and evaporation. Generally, surface and assimilation fluxes together match the meridional transports, indicating that the reanalysis is close to a steady state. Atlantic overturning and gyre transports are assessed with overturning freshwater transports southward at all latitudes. At 26°N eddy transports are negligible, overturning transport is 0.67 ± 0.19 Sv southward and gyre transport is 0.44 ± 0.17 Sv northward, with divergence between 26°N and the Bering Strait of 0.13 ± 0.23 Sv over 2004-2010.

  10. Heat dissipation due to ferromagnetic resonance in a ferromagnetic metal monitored by electrical resistance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanoi, Kazuto; Yokotani, Yuki; Kimura, Takashi

    2015-11-02

    The heat dissipation due to the resonant precessional motion of the magnetization in a ferromagnetic metal has been investigated. We demonstrated that the temperature during the ferromagnetic resonance can be simply detected by the electrical resistance measurement of the Cu strip line in contact with the ferromagnetic metal. The temperature change of the Cu strip due to the ferromagnetic resonance was found to exceed 10 K, which significantly affects the spin-current transport. The influence of the thermal conductivity of the substrate on the heating was also investigated.

  11. Global Analysis of Heat Shock Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabra, S.R.; He, Q.; Huang, K.H.; Gaucher, S.P.; Alm, E.J.; He,Z.; Hadi, M.Z.; Hazen, T.C.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Arkin, A.P.; Singh, A.K.

    2005-09-16

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough belongs to a class ofsulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and is found ubiquitously in nature.Given the importance of SRB-mediated reduction for bioremediation ofmetal ion contaminants, ongoing research on D. vulgaris has been in thedirection of elucidating regulatory mechanisms for this organism under avariety of stress conditions. This work presents a global view of thisorganism's response to elevated growth temperature using whole-celltranscriptomics and proteomics tools. Transcriptional response (1.7-foldchange or greater; Z>1.5) ranged from 1,135 genes at 15 min to 1,463genes at 120 min for a temperature up-shift of 13oC from a growthtemperature of 37oC for this organism and suggested both direct andindirect modes of heat sensing. Clusters of orthologous group categoriesthat were significantly affected included posttranslationalmodifications; protein turnover and chaperones (up-regulated); energyproduction and conversion (down-regulated), nucleotide transport,metabolism (down-regulated), and translation; ribosomal structure; andbiogenesis (down-regulated). Analysis of the genome sequence revealed thepresence of features of both negative and positive regulation whichincluded the CIRCE element and promoter sequences corresponding to thealternate sigma factors ?32 and ?54. While mechanisms of heat shockcontrol for some genes appeared to coincide with those established forEscherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the presence of unique controlschemes for several other genes was also evident. Analysis of proteinexpression levels using differential in-gel electrophoresis suggestedgood agreement with transcriptional profiles of several heat shockproteins, including DnaK (DVU0811), HtpG (DVU2643), HtrA (DVU1468), andAhpC (DVU2247). The proteomics study also suggested the possibility ofposttranslational modifications in the chaperones DnaK, AhpC, GroES(DVU1977), and GroEL (DVU1976) and also several periplasmic ABCtransporters.

  12. Global Earthquake Casualties due to Secondary Effects: A Quantitative Analysis for Improving PAGER Losses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and fire for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey’s (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/significant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER’s overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We find that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra–Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our findings, we have built country-specific disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability.

  13. Global earthquake casualties due to secondary effects: A quantitative analysis for improving rapid loss analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marano, K.D.; Wald, D.J.; Allen, T.I.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a quantitative and geospatial description of global losses due to earthquake-induced secondary effects, including landslide, liquefaction, tsunami, and fire for events during the past 40 years. These processes are of great importance to the US Geological Survey's (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system, which is currently being developed to deliver rapid earthquake impact and loss assessments following large/significant global earthquakes. An important question is how dominant are losses due to secondary effects (and under what conditions, and in which regions)? Thus, which of these effects should receive higher priority research efforts in order to enhance PAGER's overall assessment of earthquakes losses and alerting for the likelihood of secondary impacts? We find that while 21.5% of fatal earthquakes have deaths due to secondary (non-shaking) causes, only rarely are secondary effects the main cause of fatalities. The recent 2004 Great Sumatra-Andaman Islands earthquake is a notable exception, with extraordinary losses due to tsunami. The potential for secondary hazards varies greatly, and systematically, due to regional geologic and geomorphic conditions. Based on our findings, we have built country-specific disclaimers for PAGER that address potential for each hazard (Earle et al., Proceedings of the 14th World Conference of the Earthquake Engineering, Beijing, China, 2008). We will now focus on ways to model casualties from secondary effects based on their relative importance as well as their general predictability. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  14. Distortion of Crabbed Bunch Due to Electron Cloud and Global Crabbing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Cai, Y.; /SLAC

    2008-08-01

    Crab cavities may be used improve the luminosity in colliding beam colliders with crab crossing. In a global crab crossing correction, only one crab cavity is installed in each ring and the crab cavities generate a horizontally titled bunch oscillating around the ring. The electron cloud in positively charged rings may distort the crabbed bunch and cause the luminosity drop. This paper briefly estimates the distortion of positron bunch due to the electron cloud with global crab and estimates the effect in the KEKB and possible LHC upgrades.

  15. Compressible Heating in the Condense Phase due to Pore Collapse in HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ju; Jackson, Thomas

    Axisymmetric pore collapse in HMX is studied numerically by solving multi-phase reactive Euler equations. The generation of hot spots in the condense phase due to compressible heating is examined. The motivation is to improve the understanding of the role of embedded cavities in the initiation of reaction in explosives, and to investigate the effect of hot spots in the condense phase due to compressible heating alone, complementing previous study on hot spots due to the reaction in the gas phase and at the interface. It is found that the shock-cavity interaction results in pressures and thus temperatures that are substantially higher than the post-shock values in the condense phase. However, these hot spots in the condense phase due to compressible heating alone do not seem to be sufficiently hot to lead to ignition at shock pressures of 1-3 GPa. Thus, compressible heating in the condense phase may be excluded as a mechanism for initiation of explosives. It should be pointed out that the ignition threshold for the temperature, the so-called ``switch-on'' temperature, of hot spots depend on chemistry kinetics parameters. Switch-on temperature is lower for faster reaction rate. The current chemistry kinetics parameters are based on previous experimental work. This work was supported in part by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. TEMPERATURE-HUMIDITY INDICES AS INDICATORS OF MILK PRODUCTION LOSSES DUE TO HEAT STRESS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meteorological data (1993 to 2004) from two public weather stations in Phoenix, AZ and Athens, GA were analyzed with test day milk yield data from herds nearby the weather stations to identify the most appropriate temperature humidity index (THI) to measure losses in milk production due to heat stre...

  17. 75 FR 34171 - Trueheat, Inc., a Subsidiary of Global Heating Solutions, Inc., Currently Known as Truheat, a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...., Currently Known as Truheat, a Division of Three Heat LLC, Allegan, MI; Electro-Heat, Inc., a Subsidiary of Global Heating Solutions, Inc., Currently Known as Truheat, a Division of Three Heat LLC, Allegan, MI..., applicable to workers of TrueHeat, Inc., a subsidiary of Global Heating Solutions, Inc., Allegan,...

  18. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming.

    PubMed

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-02-26

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  19. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming

    PubMed Central

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-01-01

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  20. Beam heat load due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance in COLDDIAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalbuoni, S.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2012-11-01

    One of the still open issues for the development of superconductive insertion devices is the understanding of the heat intake from the electron beam. With the aim of measuring the beam heat load to a cold bore and the hope to gain a deeper understanding in the underlying mechanisms, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) was built. It is equipped with the following instrumentation: retarding field analyzers to measure the electron flux, temperature sensors to measure the beam heat load, pressure gauges, and mass spectrometers to measure the gas content. Possible beam heat load sources are: synchrotron radiation, wakefield effects due to geometrical and resistive wall impedance and electron/ion bombardment. The flexibility of the engineering design will allow the installation of the cryostat in different synchrotron light sources. COLDDIAG was first installed in the Diamond Light Source (DLS) in 2011. Due to a mechanical failure of the thermal transition of the cold liner, the cryostat had to be removed after one week of operation. After having implemented design changes in the thermal liner transition, COLDDIAG has been reinstalled in the DLS at the end of August 2012. In order to understand the beam heat load mechanism it is important to compare the measured COLDDIAG parameters with theoretical expectations. In this paper we report on the analytical and numerical computation of the COLDDIAG beam heat load due to coupling impedances deriving from unavoidable step transitions, ports used for pumping and diagnostics, surface roughness, and resistive wall. The results might have an important impact on future technological solutions to be applied to cold bore devices.

  1. Global energy confinement scaling for neutral-beam-heated tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.; Goldston, R.J.

    1984-10-01

    A total of 677 representative discharges from seven neutral-beam-heated tokamaks has been used to study the parametric scaling of global energy confinement time. Contributions to this data base were from ASDEX, DITE, D-III, ISX-B, PDX, PLT, and TFR, and were taken from results of gettered, L-mode type discharges. Assuming a power law dependence of tau/sub E/ on discharge parameters kappa, I/sub p/, B/sub t/, anti n/sub e/ P/sub tot/, a, and R/a, standard multiple linear regression techniques were used in two steps to determine the scaling. The results indicate that the discharges used in the study are well described by the scaling tau/sub E/ ..cap alpha.. kappa/sup 0.28/ B/sub T//sup -0.09/ I/sub p//sup 1.24/anti n/sub e//sup -0.26/ P/sub tot//sup -0.58/ a/sup 1.16/ (R/a)/sup 1.65/.

  2. Modeling of Urban Heat Island at Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KC, B.; Ruth, M.

    2015-12-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) is the temperature difference between urban and its rural background temperature. At the local level, the choice of building materials and urban geometry are vital in determining the UHI magnitude of a city. At the city scale, economic growth, population, climate, and land use dynamics are the main drivers behind changes in UHIs. The main objective of this paper is to provide a comprehensive assessment of UHI based on these "macro variables" at regional and global scale. We based our analysis on published research for Europe, North America, and Asia, reporting data for 83 cities across the globe with unique climatic, economic, and environmental conditions. Exploratory data analysis including Pearson correlation was performed to explore the relationship between UHI and PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤5 microns), PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤10 microns), vegetation per capita, built area, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), population density and population. Additionally, dummy variables were used to capture potential influences of climate types (based on Koppen classifications) and the ways by which UHI was measured. We developed three linear regression models, one for each of the three continents (Asia, Europe, and North America) and one model for all the cities across these continents. This study provides a unique perspective for predicting UHI magnitudes at large scales based on economic activity and pollution levels of a city, which has important implications in urban planning.

  3. Heat transfer deterioration in tubes caused by bulk flow acceleration due to thermal and frictional influences

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J. D.

    2012-07-01

    Severe deterioration of forced convection heat transfer can be encountered with compressible fluids flowing through strongly heated tubes of relatively small bore as the flow accelerates and turbulence is reduced because of the fluid density falling (as the temperature rises and the pressure falls due to thermal and frictional influence). The model presented here throws new light on how the dependence of density on both temperature and pressure can affect turbulence and heat transfer and it explains why the empirical equations currently available for calculating effectiveness of forced convection heat transfer under conditions of strong non-uniformity of fluid properties sometimes fail to reproduce observed behaviour. It provides a criterion for establishing the conditions under which such deterioration of heat transfer might be encountered and enables heat transfer coefficients to be determined when such deterioration occurs. The analysis presented here is for a gaseous fluid at normal pressure subjected strong non-uniformity of fluid properties by the application of large temperature differences. Thus the model leads to equations which describe deterioration of heat transfer in terms of familiar parameters such as Mach number, Reynolds number and Prandtl number. It is applicable to thermal power plant systems such as rocket engines, gas turbines and high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. However, the ideas involved apply equally well to fluids at supercritical pressure. Impairment of heat transfer under such conditions has become a matter of growing interest with the active consideration now being given to advanced water-cooled nuclear reactors designed to operate at pressures above the critical value. (authors)

  4. Coupling of an acoustic wave to shear motion due to viscous heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J.

    2016-07-01

    Viscous heating due to shear motion in a plasma can result in the excitation of a longitudinal acoustic wave, if the shear motion is modulated in time. The coupling mechanism is a thermal effect: time-dependent shear motion causes viscous heating, which leads to a rarefaction that can couple into a longitudinal wave, such as an acoustic wave. This coupling mechanism is demonstrated in an electrostatic three-dimensional (3D) simulation of a dusty plasma, in which a localized shear flow is initiated as a pulse, resulting in a delayed outward propagation of a longitudinal acoustic wave. This coupling effect can be profound in plasmas that exhibit localized viscous heating, such as the dusty plasma we simulated using parameters typical of the PK-4 experiment. We expect that a similar phenomenon can occur with other kinds of plasma waves.

  5. Filler bar heating due to stepped tiles in the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, D. H.; Smith, D. M.; Edwards, C. L. W.; Patten, A. B.; Hamilton, H. H., II

    1983-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to investigate the excessive heating in the tile to tile gaps of the Shuttle Orbiter Thermal Protection System due to stepped tiles. The excessive heating was evidence by visible discoloration and charring of the filler bar and strain isolation pad that is used in the attachment of tiles to the aluminum substrate. Two tile locations on the Shuttle orbiter were considered, one on the lower surface of the fuselage and one on the lower surface of the wing. The gap heating analysis involved the calculation of external and internal gas pressures and temperatures, internal mass flow rates, and the transient thermal response of the thermal protection system. The results of the analysis are presented for the fuselage and wing location for several step heights. The results of a study to determine the effectiveness of a half height ceramic fiber gap filler in preventing hot gas flow in the tile gaps are also presented.

  6. Heat transfer enhancement due to a longitudinal vortex produced by a single winglet in a pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Oyakawa, Kenyu; Senaha, Izuru; Ishikawa, Shuji; Hokama, Mashashige

    1999-07-01

    Longitudinal vortices were artificially generated by a single winglet vortex generator in a pipe. The purpose of this study is to analyze the motion of longitudinal vortices and their effects on heat transfer enhancement. The flow pattern was visualized by means of both fluorescein and rhodamine B as traces in a water flow. The main vortex was moved spirally along the circumference and the behavior of the other vortices was observed. Streamwise and circumferential heat transfer coefficients on the wall, wall static pressure, and velocity distribution in an overall cross section were also measured for the air flow in a range of Reynolds numbers from 18,800 to 62,400. The distributions of the streamwise heat transfer coefficient had a periodic pattern, and the peaks in the distribution were circumferentially moved due to the spiral motion of the main vortex. Lastly, the relationships between the iso-velocity distribution, wall static pressure, and heat transfer characteristics was shown. In the process of forming the vortex behind the winglet vortex generator, behaviors of both the main vortex and the corner vortex were observed as streak lines. The vortex being raised along the end of the winglet, and the vortex ring being rolled up to the main vortex were newly observed. Both patterns of the streamwise velocity on a cross-section and the static pressure on the wall show good correspondences to phenomena of the main vortex spirally flowing downstream. The increased ratio of the heat transfer is similar to that of the friction factor based on the shear stress on the wall surface of the pipe. The quantitative analogy between the heat transfer and the shear stress is confirmed except for some regions, where the effects of the down-wash or blow-away of the secondary flows is caused due to the main vortex.

  7. Meltwater production due to strain heating in Storglaciären, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Andy; Blatter, Heinz

    2005-12-01

    Storglaciären, northern Sweden, is temperate in most parts except for a cold surface layer in the ablation zone. One of four possible sources for liquid water in temperate ice is melting due to strain heating. Velocity fields are calculated with an ice flow model, so that calculated and observed surface velocities agree. Meltwater accumulation is computed by integrating strain heating along trajectories starting at the surface in the accumulation area and ending at the cold-temperate transition surface in the ablation zone. The distribution of moisture content due to strain heating alone is mapped in a longitudinal section of Storglaciären. Values reach more than 10 g of water per kilogram ice-water mixture in the lowest parts of the temperate domain. For this moisture content the rate factor is more than 3 times higher than for water-free ice, and therefore water production by strain heating is important for the modeling of temperate and polythermal glaciers.

  8. Numerical study on the effective heating due to inertial cavitation in microbubble-enhanced HIFU therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Kohei; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2015-10-01

    The enhancement of heating due to inertial cavitation was focused in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. The influences of the rectified diffusion on microbubble-enhanced HIFU were examined numerically. A bubble dynamics equation in consideration of the spherical shell bubble and the elasticity of surrounding tissue was employed. Mass and heat transfer between the surrounding medium and the bubble were considered. The basic equations were discretized by finite difference method. The mixture phase and bubbles are coupled by the Euler-Lagrange method to take into account the interaction between ultrasound and bubbles. The mass transfer rate of gas from the surrounding medium to the bubble was examined as function of the initial bubble radius and the driving pressure amplitude. As the results, the pressure required to bubble growth was decreases with increasing the initial bubble radius. Thus, the injection of microbubble reduces the cavitation threshold pressure. On the other hand, the influence of the rectified diffusion on the triggered HIFU therapy which generates cavitation bubbles by high-intensity burst and induces the localized heating owing to cavitation bubble oscillation by low-intensity continuous waves. The calculation showed that the localized heating was enhanced by the increase of the equilibrium bubble size due to the rectified diffusion.

  9. Investigating sea level rise due to global warming in the teaching laboratory using Archimedes’ principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen; Pearce, Darren

    2015-11-01

    A teaching laboratory experiment is described that uses Archimedes’ principle to precisely investigate the effect of global warming on the oceans. A large component of sea level rise is due to the increase in the volume of water due to the decrease in water density with increasing temperature. Water close to 0 °C is placed in a beaker and a glass marble hung from an electronic balance immersed in the water. As the water warms, the weight of the marble increases as the water is less buoyant due to the decrease in density. In the experiment performed in this paper a balance with a precision of 0.1 mg was used with a marble 40.0 cm3 and mass of 99.3 g, yielding water density measurements with an average error of -0.008 ± 0.011%.

  10. Global heating distributions for January 1979 calculated from GLA assimilated and simulated model-based datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaack, Todd K.; Lenzen, Allen J.; Johnson, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    This study surveys the large-scale distribution of heating for January 1979 obtained from five sources of information. Through intercomparison of these distributions, with emphasis on satellite-derived information, an investigation is conducted into the global distribution of atmospheric heating and the impact of observations on the diagnostic estimates of heating derived from assimilated datasets. The results indicate a substantial impact of satellite information on diagnostic estimates of heating in regions where there is a scarcity of conventional observations. The addition of satellite data provides information on the atmosphere's temperature and wind structure that is important for estimation of the global distribution of heating and energy exchange.

  11. Global direct radiative forcing due to multicomponent anthropogenic and natural aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2001-01-01

    Global simulations of the composition of and direct forcing due to aerosols containing natural and/or anthropogenic sulfate, nitrate, chloride, carbonate, ammonium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, potassium, black carbon, organic matter, silica, ferrous oxide, and aluminum oxide were carried out. Chloride and natural sulfate were found to be the most important natural aerosol constituents in the atmosphere in terms of solar plus thermal-infrared forcing. Sea spray was the most important natural aerosol type, indicating that it should be accounted for in weather and climate calculations. Ammonium was found to have a positive direct forcing, since it reduces water uptake in sulfate-containing solutions; thus, anthropogenic ammonium contributes to global warming. The magnitudes of ammonium and nitrate forcing were smaller than those of chloride or sulfate forcing. When organics were divided into three groups with different assumed UV absorption characteristics, total aerosol direct forcing at the tropopause increased by about +0.03 to +0.05 W m-2 (direct forcing by organics remained negative), suggesting that UV absorption by organics is a nontrivial component of the global energy balance. Gypsum [CaSO4-2H2O], sal ammoniac [NH4Cl], halite [NaCl], halite, and nitrum [KNO3] were estimated to be the most common sulfate-, ammonium-, sodium-, chloride-, and nitrate-containing solid-phase aerosol constituents, respectively, in the global atmosphere. Solid formation in aerosols was found to increase total-aerosol direct forcing by +0.03 to +0.05 W m-2. Spatial and vertical forcing estimates, sensitivities of forcing to relative humidity and concentration, and estimates of global aerosol liquid water content are given. Modeled aerosol optical properties are compared with satellite and field measurements.

  12. Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM): Global Structure and Dynamics Driven by Auroral and Joule Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; J. Il. Waite, Jr.; Majeed, T.

    2005-01-01

    A growing multispectral database plus recent Galileo descent measurements are being used to construct a self-consistent picture of the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system. The proper characterization of Jupiter s upper atmosphere, embedded ionosphere, and auroral features requires the examination of underlying processes, including the feedbacks of energetics, neutral-ion dynamics, composition, and magnetospheric coupling. A fully 3-D Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM) has been developed and exercised to address global temperatures, three-component neutral winds, and neutral-ion species distributions. The domain of this JTGCM extends from 20-microbar (capturing hydrocarbon cooling) to 1.0 x 10(exp -4) nbar (including aurora/Joule heating processes). The resulting JTGCM has been fully spun-up and integrated for greater than or equal to40 Jupiter rotations. Results from three JTGCM cases incorporating moderate auroral heating, ion drag, and moderate to strong Joule heating processes are presented. The neutral horizontal winds at ionospheric heights vary from 0.5 km/s to 1.2 km/s, atomic hydrogen is transported equatorward, and auroral exospheric temperatures range from approx.1200-1300 K to above 3000 K, depending on the magnitude of Joule heating. The equatorial temperature profiles from the JTGCM are compared with the measured temperature structure from the Galileo AS1 data set. The best fit to the Galileo data implies that the major energy source for maintaining the equatorial temperatures is due to dynamical heating induced by the low-latitude convergence of the high-latitude-driven thermospheric circulation. Overall, the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system is highly variable and is shown to be strongly dependent on magnetospheric coupling which regulates Joule heating.

  13. Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM): Global structure and dynamics driven by auroral and Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Waite, J. H.; Majeed, T.; Gladstone, G. R.

    2005-04-01

    A growing multispectral database plus recent Galileo descent measurements are being used to construct a self-consistent picture of the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system. The proper characterization of Jupiter's upper atmosphere, embedded ionosphere, and auroral features requires the examination of underlying processes, including the feedbacks of energetics, neutral-ion dynamics, composition, and magnetospheric coupling. A fully 3-D Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM) has been developed and exercised to address global temperatures, three-component neutral winds, and neutral-ion species distributions. The domain of this JTGCM extends from 20-μbar (capturing hydrocarbon cooling) to 1.0 × 10-4 nbar (including auroral/Joule heating processes). The resulting JTGCM has been fully spun-up and integrated for >=40 Jupiter rotations. Results from three JTGCM cases incorporating moderate auroral heating, ion drag, and moderate to strong Joule heating processes are presented. The neutral horizontal winds at ionospheric heights vary from 0.5 km/s to 1.2 km/s, atomic hydrogen is transported equatorward, and auroral exospheric temperatures range from ~1200-1300 K to above 3000 K, depending on the magnitude of Joule heating. The equatorial temperature profiles from the JTGCM are compared with the measured temperature structure from the Galileo ASI data set. The best fit to the Galileo data implies that the major energy source for maintaining the equatorial temperatures is due to dynamical heating induced by the low-latitude convergence of the high-latitude-driven thermospheric circulation. Overall, the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system is highly variable and is shown to be strongly dependent on magnetospheric coupling which regulates Joule heating.

  14. Temperatures of individual ion species and heating due to charge exchange in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jhoon; Nagy, Andrew F.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    The coupled electron and multispecies ion energy equations were solved for daytime conditions in the Venus ionosphere. The heating rates due to charge exchange between hot oxygen atoms and thermal oxygen ions were calculated and incorporated into the energy equations. The combination of the traditional EUV heating and this hot oxygen energy source leads to calculated electron and individual ion temperatures significantly lower than the measured values during solar cycle maximum conditions. Calculations were also carried out for solar cycle minimum conditions, which led to considerably lower temperatures; no data are available which would allow direct comparisons of these results with measurements. In order to obtain calculated temperature values consistent with the observed ones, for solar cycle maximum conditions, topside heat inflows into the ion and electron gases have to be introduced or the thermal conductivity must be reduced by considering the effect of steady and fluctuating magnetic fields, as was done in previous studies. The addition of hot oxygen heating leads to minor increases in the calculated ion temperatures except for the case of reduced thermal conductivities. Separate temperatures were calculated for each ion species for a number of different conditions and in general the differences were found to be relatively small.

  15. Decrease in penicillin susceptibility due to heat shock protein ClpL in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kwon, Hyog-Young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Ki-Woo; Briles, David E; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2011-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance and tolerance are increasing threats to global health as antibiotic-resistant bacteria can cause severe morbidity and mortality and can increase treatment cost 10-fold. Although several genes contributing to antibiotic tolerance among pneumococci have been identified, we report here that ClpL, a major heat shock protein, could modulate cell wall biosynthetic enzymes and lead to decreased penicillin susceptibility. On capsular type 1, 2, and 19 genetic backgrounds, mutants lacking ClpL were more susceptible to penicillin and had thinner cell walls than the parental strains, whereas a ClpL-overexpressing strain showed a higher resistance to penicillin and a thicker cell wall. Although exposure of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to penicillin inhibited expression of the major cell wall synthesis gene pbp2x, heat shock induced a ClpL-dependent increase in the mRNA levels and protein synthesized by pbp2x. Inducible ClpL expression correlated with PBP2x expression and penicillin susceptibility. Fractionation and electron micrograph data revealed that ClpL induced by heat shock is localized at the cell wall, and the ΔclpL showed significantly reduced net translocation of PBP2x into the cell wall. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation with either ClpL or PBP2x antibody followed by reprobing with ClpL or PBP2x antibody showed an interaction between ClpL and PBP2x after heat stress. This interaction was confirmed by His tag pulldown assay with either ClpLHis₆ or PBP2xHis₆. Thus, ClpL stabilized pbp2x expression, interacted with PBP2x, and facilitated translocation of PBP2x, a key protein of cell wall synthesis process, contributing to the decrease of antibiotic susceptibility in S. pneumoniae. PMID:21422206

  16. Parametric Study of Preferential Ion Heating Due to Intermittent Magnetic Fields in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajal Gomez, L.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Watkins, N. W.

    2014-12-01

    In situ observations and remote measurements of the solar wind show strong preferential heating of ions along the ambient magnetic field. Understanding the mechanism for this heating process is an open problem. The observed broad-band spectrum of Alfven waves permeating the fast solar wind provide a candidate mechanism for this preferential heating through wave-particle interactions on ion kinetic scales. Previous analytical and numerical studies have considered a single pump wave [1, 2] or a turbulent, broad-band spectra of Alfven waves [3, 4, 5] to drive the ion heating. The latter studies investigated the effects on ion heating due to different initial 1/fγpower spectral exponents and number of modes and the signals were random phase. However, the observed solar wind fluctuations are intermittent so that the phases of the modes comprising the power spectrum are not random. Non-Gaussian fluctuations are seen both on scales identified with the inertial range of Alfvenic turbulence [6], and on longer scales typified by '1/f' spectra [7]. We present results of the first parametric numerical simulations on the effects of different levels of intermittency of the broad-band spectra of Alfven waves on the preferential heating of ions in the solar wind. We performed hybrid simulations for the local heating of the solar wind, which resolves the full kinetic physics of the ions and treats the electrons as a charge-neutralizing fluid. Our simulations evolve the full vector velocities and electromagnetic fields in one configuration space coordinate and in time.We compare the efficiency of different levels of intermittency of the initial turbulent fields and their effect on the efficiency of the wave-particle interactions which are a mechanism for driving preferential ion heating in the solar wind. [1] J. A. Araneda, E. Marsh, A. F. Viñas, J. Geophys. Res. 112, A04104 (2007). [2] J. A. Araneda, E. Marsh, A. F. Viñas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 125003 (2008) [3] Y. G. Maneva, A

  17. Image current heating on a metal surface due to charged bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xintian E.; Whittum, David H.

    2000-10-01

    When charged particles pass through a metal pipe, they are accompanied by an image current on the metal surface. With intense short bunches passing near or even into the metal surface, the peak image current density can be very high. This current may result in substantial temperature rise on the surface, especially in high peak current, multibunch operation. In this paper, we derive an explicit formula for the surface temperature rise due to this previously unrecognized pulsed heating effect and show that this effect dominates the proposed linear coherent light source collimator spoiler and wire scanner heating. Without proper account, it can result in component and instrument failures. The result also applies to optical transition radiation screens, profile screens, wire scanners, exit windows, and targets, which the beam crosses.

  18. Modeling of Heat Transfer and Ablation of Refractory Material Due to Rocket Plume Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael F.; Vu, Bruce T.

    2012-01-01

    CR Tech's Thermal Desktop-SINDA/FLUINT software was used in the thermal analysis of a flame deflector design for Launch Complex 39B at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The analysis of the flame deflector takes into account heat transfer due to plume impingement from expected vehicles to be launched at KSC. The heat flux from the plume was computed using computational fluid dynamics provided by Ames Research Center in Moffet Field, California. The results from the CFD solutions were mapped onto a 3-D Thermal Desktop model of the flame deflector using the boundary condition mapping capabilities in Thermal Desktop. The ablation subroutine in SINDA/FLUINT was then used to model the ablation of the refractory material.

  19. On the existence of motion-induced heat flux due to thermoelastic waves in a one-dimensional solid rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semperlotti, Fabio; Sen, Mihir

    2014-03-01

    In this Letter, we show the existence of motion-induced heat transfer in homogeneous isotropic solids due to the propagation of thermoelastic waves. In particular, using the linearized governing equations for thermoelastic waves, we show that heat transfer in a one-dimensional rod is not only due to conduction but also to the local particle displacement a phenomenon which, in principle, is similar to advective heat transfer in fluids. It is found that the time-averaged heat transfer is dependent on both the material properties and the external excitation parameters. This mechanism can potentially be useful in ultrasonic welding and in the development of solid state refrigerators or heat pumps.

  20. Increased heat transfer to elliptical leading edges due to spanwise variations in the freestream momentum - Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Van Fossen, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the effect of spanwise variation on leading edge heat transfer is presented. Experimental and numerical results are given for a circular leading edge and for a 3:1 elliptical leading edge. It is demonstrated that increases in leading edge heat transfer due to spanwise variations in freestream momentum are comparable to those due to freestream turbulence.

  1. Near-field induction heating of metallic nanoparticles due to infrared magnetic dipole contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Laroche, Marine; Volz, Sebastian; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2008-03-01

    We revisit the electromagnetic heat transfer between a metallic nanoparticle and a highly conductive metallic semi-infinite substrate, commonly studied using the electric dipole approximation. For infrared and microwave frequencies, we find that the magnetic polarizability of the particle is larger than the electric one. We also find that the local density of states in the near field is dominated by the magnetic contribution. As a consequence, the power absorbed by the particle in the near field is due to dissipation by fluctuating eddy currents. These results show that a number of near-field effects involving metallic particles should be affected by the fluctuating magnetic fields.

  2. Quantitative Global Heat Transfer in a Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John P.; Schneider, Steven P.; Liu, Tianshu; Rubal, Justin; Ward, Chris; Dussling, Joseph; Rice, Cody; Foley, Ryan; Cai, Zeimin; Wang, Bo; Woodiga, Sudesh

    2012-01-01

    This project developed quantitative methods for obtaining heat transfer from temperature sensitive paint (TSP) measurements in the Mach-6 quiet tunnel at Purdue, which is a Ludwieg tube with a downstream valve, moderately-short flow duration and low levels of heat transfer. Previous difficulties with inferring heat transfer from TSP in the Mach-6 quiet tunnel were traced to (1) the large transient heat transfer that occurs during the unusually long tunnel startup and shutdown, (2) the non-uniform thickness of the insulating coating, (3) inconsistencies and imperfections in the painting process and (4) the low levels of heat transfer observed on slender models at typical stagnation temperatures near 430K. Repeated measurements were conducted on 7 degree-half-angle sharp circular cones at zero angle of attack in order to evaluate the techniques, isolate the problems and identify solutions. An attempt at developing a two-color TSP method is also summarized.

  3. Subsurface Ocean Climate Data Records: Global Ocean Heat and Freshwater Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, T.; Locarnini, R. A.; Mishonov, A. V.; Reagan, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean is the main sink of excess heat in the Earth's climate system. It absorbs more than 90% of the Top of the Atmosphere imbalance between incoming solar radiation and outgoing long-wave radiation. The ocean, covering more than 70% of the Earth's surface, is also the major component of the planet's freshwater cycle. More than 60 years of in situ subsurface temperature and salinity data have been compiled and quality controlled in World Ocean Database of the National Centers for Environmental Information. These data have been used to calculate time series of global heat and salt changes in the ocean. Salt changes can be used to calculate freshwater changes, including from melting continental glaciers. Both time series provide a measure of the changes in the Earth's climate system: from heat sequestered in the ocean, to the rise of sea level due to thermosteric and halosteric components. The time series are updated every three months and are widely used in climate related studies. Method of quality control of the data, calculation of the time series, and dissemination and use of the time series are discussed.

  4. Biophysical Climate Forcings due to Recent Changes in Global Forest Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescatti, A.; Alkama, R.

    2015-12-01

    Deforestation impacts climate in two major ways: affecting the atmospheric CO2 concentration and modulating the land-atmosphere fluxes of energy and water vapor. Given the important role of forests in the global carbon cycle, climate treaties account for land-based mitigation options like afforestation, reforestation and avoided deforestation or forest degradation. On the contrary, predicted climate impacts of biophysical processes, such as the exchange of energy and water vapor, are still uncertain in sign and magnitude, and therefore have not been considered in climate negotiations to date. Direct observations of the biophysical climate effects of forest losses and gains are therefore required to constrain model predictions, reduce the uncertainty of model ensembles, and provide robust recommendations to climate policy. In this work we report an observation-driven global analysis of the biophysical impacts of forest losses and gains on the local climate, based on a combination of Earth observations of recent changes in forest cover, surface radiometric temperatures and in-situ air temperatures. Our study documents that deforestation causes local changes in skin and air temperature that varies in sign and magnitude according to the climate zone. Results show that forest losses amplify the diurnal temperature variation and increase the mean and maximum air temperature, with the largest signal in arid zones, followed by temperate, tropical and boreal zones. In the decade 2003-2012, variations of forest cover generated a global biophysical warming corresponding to 31% of the biogeochemical signal due to CO2 emission from land use change. These experimental evidences provide a global and robust quantification of the local climate sensitivities to deforestation and a novel assessment of the mitigation potentials of forests on mean/maximum air temperatures and on the diurnal temperature variations. Overall, the observation-driven, global quantification of the

  5. Stratospheric cooling and polar ozone loss due to H2 emissions of a global hydrogen economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feck, T.; Grooß, J.-U.; Riese, M.; Vogel, B.

    2009-04-01

    "Green" hydrogen is seen as a major element of the future energy supply to reduce greenhouse gas emissions substantially. However, due to the possible interactions of hydrogen (H2) with other atmospheric constituents there is a need to analyse the implications of additional atmospheric H2 that could result from hydrogen leakage of a global hydrogen infrastructure. Emissions of molecular H2 can occur along the whole hydrogen process chain which increase the tropospheric H2 burden. Across the tropical tropopause H2 reaches the stratosphere where it is oxidised and forms water vapour (H2O). This causes increased IR-emissions into space and hence a cooling of the stratosphere. Both effects, the increase of stratospheric H2O and the cooling, enhances the potential of chlorine activation on liquid sulfate aerosol and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), which increase polar ozone destruction. Hence a global hydrogen economy could provoke polar ozone loss and could lead to a substantial delay of the current projected recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. Our investigations show that even if 90% of the current global fossil primary energy input could be replaced by hydrogen and approximately 9.5% of the product gas would leak to the atmosphere, the ozone loss would be increased between 15 to 26 Dobson Units (DU) if the stratospheric CFC loading would retain unchanged. A consistency check of the used approximation methods with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) shows that this additional ozone loss can probably be treated as an upper limit. Towards more realistic future H2 leakage rate assumptions (< 3%) the additional ozone loss would be rather small (? 10 DU). However, in all cases the full damage would only occur if stratospheric CFC-levels would retain unchanged. Due to the CFC-prohibition as a result of the Montreal Protocol the forecasts suggest a decline of the stratospheric CFC loading about 50% until 2050. In this case our calculations

  6. Global assessment of heat wave magnitudes from 1901 to 2010 and implications for the river discharge of the Alps.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Matteo; Russo, Simone; di Sabatino, Silvana; Michetti, Melania; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Gualdi, Silvio

    2016-11-15

    Heat waves represent one of the most significant climatic stressors for ecosystems, economies and societies. A main topic of debate is whether they have increased or not in intensity and/or their duration due to the observed climate change. Firstly, this is because of the lack of reliable long-term daily temperature data at the global scale; secondly, because of the intermittent nature of such phenomena. Long datasets are required to produce a reliable and meaningful assessment. In this study, we provide a global estimate of heat wave magnitudes based on the three most appropriate datasets currently available, derived from models and observations (i.e. the 20th Century Reanalyses from NOAA and ECMWF), spanning the last century and before. The magnitude of the heat waves is calculated by means of the Heat Wave Magnitude Index daily (HWMId), taking into account both duration and amplitude. We compare the magnitude of the most severe heat waves occurred across different regions of the world and we discuss the decadal variability of the larger events since the 1850s. We concentrate our analysis from 1901 onwards, where all datasets overlap. Our results agree with other studies focusing on heat waves that have occurred in the recent decades, but using different data. In addition, we found that the percentage of global area covered by heat wave exceeding a given magnitude has increased almost three times, in the last decades, with respect to that measured in the early 20th century. Finally, we discuss the specific implications of the heat waves on the river runoff generated in the Alps, for which comparatively long datasets exist, affecting the water quality and availability in a significant portion of the European region in summer. PMID:27418520

  7. Model of Artificial Ionospheric Ducts due to the HF-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.; Demekhov, A. G.; Papadopoulos, K.; Huba, J.; Joyce, G. R.

    2009-12-01

    The presence of field aligned density striations plays a critical role in the propagation of whistler waves in the ionosphere. Such density structures have often been observed to extend over distances covering entire magnetic field lines, trapping, channeling and reflecting whistler waves between conjugate regions. The possibility for artificially creating such trans-hemispheric ducts was first discussed by Perrine et al. [2006]. They showed that long term (> 15 minutes) continuous HF-heating of the F-region by powerful ionospheric heaters such as HAARP generates a strong thermal wave in the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma. This thermal wave propagates along the magnetic field line through the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere, driving ion outflows, displacing the ambient plasma and leading to the formation of density ducts. Two recent experiments detected large scale ducts caused by the HF-heating. One experiment was conducted at HAARP and used the low orbit satellite DEMETER as a diagnostic tool [Milikh et al., 2008]. The experiment shows in situ detected plasma ducts with the spatial scale of a few tens kilometers. Another heating experiment was conducted at the EISCAT HF facility and used UHF radar as a diagnostic tool [Rietveld et al., 2003]. As a result vertical profiles of electron and ion temperature were obtained in the height range 150-600 km. It is the objective of this paper to present the first detailed model of the formation of ionospheric ducts due to HF-heating. The model is checked against the observations made at EISCAT. The results show a good agreement between the model and observations. Milikh, G.M., K. Papadopoulos, et al. (2008), Geophys. Res. Lett, 35, doi:10.1029/2008GL034630. Perrine, R.P., G.M. Milikh, K. Papadopoulos, et al., Radio Sci. (2006), 41, doi:10.1029/2005RS003371. Rietveld, M.T., M.J. Kosch, et al., J. Geophys. Res. (2003), 108, doi:10.1029/2002JA009543.

  8. Parametric investigation of heating due to magnetic fluid hyperthermia in a tumor with blood perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a cancer treatment that can selectively elevate the tumor temperature without significantly damaging the surrounding healthy tissue. Optimal MFH design requires a fundamental parametric investigation of the heating of soft materials by magnetic fluids. We model the problem of a spherical tumor and its surrounding healthy tissue that are heated by exciting a homogeneous dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles infused only into the tumor with an external AC magnetic field. The key dimensionless parameters influencing thermotherapy are the Péclet, Fourier, and Joule numbers. Analytical solutions for transient and steady hyperthermia provide correlations between these parameters and the portions of tumor and healthy tissue that are subjected to a threshold temperature beyond which they are damaged. Increasing the ratio of the Fourier and Joule numbers also increases the tumor temperature, but doing so can damage the healthy tissue. Higher magnetic heating is required for larger Péclet numbers due to the larger convection heat loss that occurs through blood perfusion. A comparison of the model predictions with previous experimental data for MFH applied to rabbit tumors shows good agreement. The optimal MFH conditions are identified based on two indices, the fraction IT of the tumor volume in which the local temperature is above a threshold temperature and the ratio IN of the damaged normal tissue volume to the tumor tissue volume that also lies above it. The spatial variation in the nanoparticle concentration is also considered. A Gaussian distribution provides efficacy while minimizing the possibility of generating a tumor hot spot. Varying the thermal properties of tumor and normal tissue alters ITand IN but the nature of the temperature distribution remains unchanged.

  9. Variation in mouthguard thickness due to different heating conditions during fabrication: part 2.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Koide, Kaoru; Mizuhashi, Fumi

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine changes in the thickness of mouthguard sheets under different heating conditions during fabrication. Mouthguards were fabricated with polyolefin-polystyrene co-polymer (OS) and olefin co-polymer (OL) sheets (4.0-mm thick) utilizing a vacuum-forming machine under the following three conditions: (A) the sheet was moulded when it sagged 15 mm below the sheet frame (i.e. the normally used position); (B) the sheet frame was lowered to and heated at 30 mm below the top of the post and moulded when it sagged by 15 mm; and (C) the sheet frame was lowered to and heated at 50 mm below the top of the post and moulded when it sagged by 15 mm. The working model was trimmed to a height of 20 mm at the incisor and 15 mm at the first molar. Post-moulding thickness was determined for the incisal portion (incisal edge and labial surface) and molar portion (cusp, central groove and buccal surface). Dimensions were measured, and differences in the change in thickness due to heating condition were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Under condition C, OS and OL decreased in thickness from 0.36-0.54 mm to 0.26-0.30 mm, respectively, at the incisal portion and from 0.34-0.66 mm to 0.17-0.47 mm, respectively, at the molar portion. It may be clinically useful when moulding a mouthguard to maintain the thickness of the incisal and molar portions by adjusting the height of the sheet frame. PMID:25039434

  10. Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis due to fungi other than Aspergillus: a global overview.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Anuradha; Agarwal, Kshitij; Kathuria, Shallu; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Randhawa, Harbans Singh; Meis, Jacques F

    2014-02-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) is a hypersensitivity-mediated disease of worldwide distribution. We reviewed 143 reported global cases of ABPM due to fungi other than aspergilli. The commonest etiologic agent was Candida albicans, reported in 60% of the cases, followed by Bipolaris species (13%), Schizophyllum commune (11%), Curvularia species (8%), Pseudallescheria boydii species complex (3%) and rarely, Alternaria alternata, Fusarium vasinfectum, Penicillium species, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Stemphylium languinosum, Rhizopus oryzae, C. glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Trichosporon beigelii. India accounted for about 47% of the globally reported cases of ABPM, attributed predominantly to C. albicans, followed by Japan (16%) where S. commune predominates, and the remaining one-third from the USA, Australia and Europe. Notably, bronchial asthma was present in only 32% of ABPM cases whereas its association with development of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is known to be much more frequent. The cases reviewed herein revealed a median IgE value threefold higher than that of ABPA, suggesting that the etiologic agents of ABPM incite a stronger immunological response than that by aspergilli in ABPA. ABPM is currently underdiagnosed, warranting comprehensive basic and clinical studies in order to elucidate its epidemiology and to devise a more effective therapy. PMID:23383677

  11. Countermeasures to Urban Heat Islands: A Global View

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan

    2006-07-17

    An important milestone was passed this year when the fraction of the world's population living in cities exceeded 50%. This shift from the countryside to urban areas is certain to continue and, for many, the destination will be large cities. Already there are over 400 cities with populations greater than one million inhabitants and twenty cities with populations greater than ten million inhabitants. With a growing fraction of the population living in an urban environment, the unique aspects of an urban climate also rise in importance. These include features like air pollution and increased humidity. Another unique feature of the urban climate is the phenomenon of the urban heat island. The urban heat island phenomenon was first observed over one hundred years ago in northern latitude cities, where the city centers were slightly warmer than the suburbs. (Instantaneous communications probably played a role in its identification, much as it did for other weather-related events.) For these cities, a heat island was generally a positive effect because it resulted in reduced heating requirements during the winters. It was only in the 1960s, as air conditioning and heavy reliance on automobiles grew, that the negative impacts of heat islands became apparent. The heat islands made summer conditions much less comfortable and increased air conditioning energy use. Since then the summer heat island has become the dominant environmental concern. Measurements in thousands of sites, plus the development of sophisticated dynamic simulations of urban air basins, has enabled us to better understand the relationships between urban temperatures, sunlight, and rates of formation of air pollutants. These models have also given us insights into the roles of vegetation and other characteristics of the land surface. More recently-roughly the last fifteen years-it has become possible to quantify the roles of the major features influencing the formation and persistence of urban heat islands

  12. A Simple Calorimetric Experiment that Highlights Aspects of Global Heat Retention and Global Warming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Joel D.; Johnston, Harold S.

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, general chemistry students measure the heating curves for three different systems: (i) 500 g of room-temperature water heated by a small desk lamp, (ii) 500 g of an ice-water mixture warmed by conduction with room-temperature surroundings, and (iii) 500 g of an ice-water mixture heated by a small desk lamp and by…

  13. Uncertainties in global aerosols and climate effects due to biofuel emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodros, J. K.; Scott, C. E.; Farina, S. C.; Lee, Y. H.; L'Orange, C.; Volckens, J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-08-01

    Aerosol emissions from biofuel combustion impact both health and climate; however, while reducing emissions through improvements to combustion technologies will improve health, the net effect on climate is largely unconstrained. In this study, we examine sensitivities in global aerosol concentration, direct radiative climate effect, and cloud-albedo aerosol indirect climate effect to uncertainties in biofuel emission factors, optical mixing state, and model nucleation and background secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We use the Goddard Earth Observing System global chemical-transport model (GEOS-Chem) with TwO Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics. The emission factors include amount, composition, size, and hygroscopicity, as well as optical mixing-state properties. We also evaluate emissions from domestic coal use, which is not biofuel but is also frequently emitted from homes. We estimate the direct radiative effect assuming different mixing states (homogeneous, core-shell, and external) with and without absorptive organic aerosol (brown carbon). We find the global-mean direct radiative effect of biofuel emissions ranges from -0.02 to +0.06 W m-2 across all simulation/mixing-state combinations with regional effects in source regions ranging from -0.2 to +0.8 W m-2. The global-mean cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect (AIE) ranges from +0.01 to -0.02 W m-2 with regional effects in source regions ranging from -1.0 to -0.05 W m-2. The direct radiative effect is strongly dependent on uncertainties in emissions mass, composition, emissions aerosol size distributions, and assumed optical mixing state, while the indirect effect is dependent on the emissions mass, emissions aerosol size distribution, and the choice of model nucleation and secondary organic aerosol schemes. The sign and magnitude of these effects have a strong regional dependence. We conclude that the climate effects of biofuel aerosols are largely unconstrained, and the overall sign of the aerosol

  14. Uncertainties in global aerosols and climate effects due to biofuel emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodros, J. K.; Scott, C. E.; Farina, S. C.; Lee, Y. H.; L'Orange, C.; Volckens, J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol emissions from biofuel combustion impact both health and climate; however, while reducing emissions through improvements to combustion technologies will improve health, the net effect on climate is largely unconstrained. In this study, we examine sensitivities in global aerosol concentration, direct radiative climate effect, and cloud-albedo aerosol indirect climate effect to uncertainties in biofuel emission factors, optical mixing-state, and model nucleation and background SOA. We use the Goddard Earth Observing System global chemical-transport model (GEOS-Chem) with TwO Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics. The emission factors include: amount, composition, size and hygroscopicity, as well as optical mixing-state properties. We also evaluate emissions from domestic coal use, which is not biofuel but is also frequently emitted from homes. We estimate the direct radiative effect assuming different mixing states (internal, core-shell, and external) with and without absorptive organic aerosol (brown carbon). We find the global-mean direct radiative effect of biofuel emissions ranges from -0.02 to +0.06 W m-2 across all simulation/mixing state combinations with regional effects in source regions ranging from -0.2 to +1.2 W m-2. The global-mean cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect ranges from +0.01 to -0.02 W m-2 with regional effects in source regions ranging from -1.0 to -0.05 W m-2. The direct radiative effect is strongly dependent on uncertainties in emissions mass, composition, emissions aerosol size distributions and assumed optical mixing state, while the indirect effect is dependent on the emissions mass, emissions aerosol size distribution and the choice of model nucleation and secondary organic aerosol schemes. The sign and magnitude of these effects have a strong regional dependence. We conclude that the climate effects of biofuel aerosols are largely unconstrained, and the overall sign of the aerosol effects is unclear due to uncertainties

  15. Climate. Varying planetary heat sink led to global-warming slowdown and acceleration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianyao; Tung, Ka-Kit

    2014-08-22

    A vacillating global heat sink at intermediate ocean depths is associated with different climate regimes of surface warming under anthropogenic forcing: The latter part of the 20th century saw rapid global warming as more heat stayed near the surface. In the 21st century, surface warming slowed as more heat moved into deeper oceans. In situ and reanalyzed data are used to trace the pathways of ocean heat uptake. In addition to the shallow La Niña-like patterns in the Pacific that were the previous focus, we found that the slowdown is mainly caused by heat transported to deeper layers in the Atlantic and the Southern oceans, initiated by a recurrent salinity anomaly in the subpolar North Atlantic. Cooling periods associated with the latter deeper heat-sequestration mechanism historically lasted 20 to 35 years. PMID:25146282

  16. First neonatal case of fungaemia due to Pseudozyma aphidis and a global literature review.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Anupam; Wankhede, Sandeep; Singh, Pradeep K; Agarwal, Kshitij; Kathuria, Shallu; Sengupta, Sharmila; Barman, Purabi; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    The Ustilaginomycetous basidiomycete yeast, Pseudozyma aphidis has recently been implicated in potentially fatal disorders ranging from subcutaneous mycoses to disseminated infections. Till date a solitary case of P. aphidis fungaemia in a paediatric patient has been reported. We present a case of fungaemia due to P. aphidis in a rhesus factor-isoimmunised, low-birth-weight neonate. The isolate was identified by sequencing the D1/D2 domain of the LSU region. Antifungal susceptibility of the isolate revealed susceptibility to amphotericin B, voriconazole, itraconazole, isavuconazole and posaconazole. It had high minimum inhibitory concentrations of fluconazole and was resistant to flucytosine and echinocandins. Consequently, the patient was successfully treated with intravenous amphotericin B. Although the source of infection could not be traced, as the neonate developed fungaemia on the first day of life, it could possibly be from the maternal urogenital tract or intrahospital transmission. A review of previously published cases revealed that risk factors for invasive Pseudozyma spp. infections were similar to those previously reported for non-albicans Candida spp. Pseudozyma species are underreported due to the difficulty of identifying this rare yeast pathogen by commercial identification systems. Considering that Pseudozyma spp. cause invasive fungal infections globally and are resistant to flucytosine, fluconazole and echinocandins, this pathogen assumes a greater clinical significance. PMID:23834440

  17. Global transcriptome analysis of the heat shock response ofshewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Sarah; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tinfeng; Wu, Liyou; Alm, Eric; Arkin, Adam P.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2004-04-30

    Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities. However, the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of S. oneidensis to survive and adapt to various environmentally relevant stresses is poorly understood. To define this organism's molecular response to elevated growth temperatures, temporal gene expression profiles were examined in cells subjected to heat stress using whole-genome DNA microarrays for S. oneidensis MR-1. Approximately 15 percent (711) of the predicted S. oneidensis genes represented on the microarray were significantly up- or down-regulated (P < 0.05) over a 25-min period following shift to the heat shock temperature (42 C). As expected, the majority of S. oneidensis genes exhibiting homology to known chaperones and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were highly and transiently induced. In addition, a number of predicted genes encoding enzymes in glycolys is and the pentose cycle, [NiFe] dehydrogenase, serine proteases, transcriptional regulators (MerR, LysR, and TetR families), histidine kinases, and hypothetical proteins were induced in response to heat stress. Genes encoding membrane proteins were differentially expressed, suggesting that cells possibly alter their membrane composition or structure in response to variations in growth temperature. A substantial number of the genes encoding ribosomal proteins displayed down-regulated co-expression patterns in response to heat stress, as did genes encoding prophage and flagellar proteins. Finally, based on computational comparative analysis of the upstream promoter regions of S.oneidensis heat-inducible genes, a putative regulatory motif, showing high conservation to the Escherichia coli sigma 32-binding consensus sequence, was identified.

  18. Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2001-02-01

    Aerosols affect the Earth's temperature and climate by altering the radiative properties of the atmosphere. A large positive component of this radiative forcing from aerosols is due to black carbon-soot-that is released from the burning of fossil fuel and biomass, and, to a lesser extent, natural fires, but the exact forcing is affected by how black carbon is mixed with other aerosol constituents. From studies of aerosol radiative forcing, it is known that black carbon can exist in one of several possible mixing states; distinct from other aerosol particles (externally mixed) or incorporated within them (internally mixed), or a black-carbon core could be surrounded by a well mixed shell. But so far it has been assumed that aerosols exist predominantly as an external mixture. Here I simulate the evolution of the chemical composition of aerosols, finding that the mixing state and direct forcing of the black-carbon component approach those of an internal mixture, largely due to coagulation and growth of aerosol particles. This finding implies a higher positive forcing from black carbon than previously thought, suggesting that the warming effect from black carbon may nearly balance the net cooling effect of other anthropogenic aerosol constituents. The magnitude of the direct radiative forcing from black carbon itself exceeds that due to CH4, suggesting that black carbon may be the second most important component of global warming after CO2 in terms of direct forcing.

  19. Transient Convection Due to Imposed Heat Flux: Application to Liquid-Acquisition Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Chato, David J.; Doherty, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    A model problem is considered that addresses the effect of heat load from an ambient laboratory environment on the temperature rise of liquid nitrogen inside an enclosure. This model has applications to liquid acquisition devices inside the cryogenic storage tanks used to transport vapor-free propellant to the main engine. We show that heat loads from Q = 0.001 to 10 W, with corresponding Rayleigh numbers from Ra = 109 to 1013, yield a range of unsteady convective states and temperature rise in the liquid. The results show that Q = 1 to 10 W (Ra = 1012 to 1013) yield temperature distributions along the enclosure height that are similar in trend to experimental measurements. Unsteady convection, which shows selfsimilarity in its planforms, is predicted for the range of heat-load conditions. The onset of convection occurs from a free-convection-dominated base flow that becomes unstable against convective instability generated at the bottom of the enclosure while the top of the enclosure is convectively stable. A number of modes are generated with small-scale thermals at the bottom of the enclosure in which the flow selforganizes into two symmetric modes prior to the onset of the propagation of the instability. These symmetric vertical modes transition to asymmetric modes that propagate as a traveling-wave-type motion of convective modes and are representative of the asymptotic convective state of the flow field. Intense vorticity production is created in the core of the flow field due to the fact that there is shear instability between the vertical and horizontal modes. For the higher Rayleigh numbers, 1012 to 1013, there is a transition from a stationary to a nonstationary response time signal of the flow and temperature fields with a mean value that increases with time over various time bands and regions of the enclosure.

  20. Ion heating in a dusty plasma due to the dust/ion acoustic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.; Jones, M.E.

    1995-08-01

    The drift of plasma ions relative to charged grains in a dusty plasma can give rise to a dust/ion acoustic instability. The authors investigate the linear properties of the instability by numerically solving an appropriate linear dispersion equation and examine the nonlinear behavior through one-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations, in which the plasma and dust ions are treated as discrete particles and the electrons are modeled as a Boltzmann fluid. The instability is slightly weaker when the dust particles have a range of sizes, and corresponding range of charges and masses. It is argued that due to dust particles that comprise planetary rings, this process can contribute to ion heating and diffusion observed in the linear magnetosphere of Saturn. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Global Warming: If You Can't Stand the Heat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    Global warming is the progressive, gradual rise of the earth's average surface temperature, thought to be caused in part by increased concentrations of "greenhouse" gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere. According to the National Academy of Sciences, the Earth's temperature has risen by about one degree Fahrenheit in the past century, with accelerated…

  2. More Than Taking the Heat: Crops and Global Change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain production per unit of land will need to more than double over this century to address rising population and demand. This at a time when the procedures that have delivered increased yields over the past 50 years may have reached their ceiling. Rising global temperature and more frequent drough...

  3. Global Vision Impairment and Blindness Due to Uncorrected Refractive Error, 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Leasher, Janet; Bourne, Rupert R; Flaxman, Seth R; Jonas, Jost B; Keeffe, Jill; Limburg, Hans; Pesudovs, Konrad; Price, Holly; White, Richard A; Wong, Tien Y; Taylor, Hugh R; Resnikoff, Serge

    2016-03-01

    : The purpose of this systematic review was to estimate worldwide the number of people with moderate and severe visual impairment (MSVI; presenting visual acuity <6/18, ≥3/60) or blindness (presenting visual acuity <3/60) due to uncorrected refractive error (URE), to estimate trends in prevalence from 1990 to 2010, and to analyze regional differences. The review focuses on uncorrected refractive error which is now the most common cause of avoidable visual impairment globally. : The systematic review of 14,908 relevant manuscripts from 1990 to 2010 using Medline, Embase, and WHOLIS yielded 243 high-quality, population-based cross-sectional studies which informed a meta-analysis of trends by region. The results showed that in 2010, 6.8 million (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.7-8.8 million) people were blind (7.9% increase from 1990) and 101.2 million (95% CI: 87.88-125.5 million) vision impaired due to URE (15% increase since 1990), while the global population increased by 30% (1990-2010). The all-age age-standardized prevalence of URE blindness decreased 33% from 0.2% (95% CI: 0.1-0.2%) in 1990 to 0.1% (95% CI: 0.1-0.1%) in 2010, whereas the prevalence of URE MSVI decreased 25% from 2.1% (95% CI: 1.6-2.4%) in 1990 to 1.5% (95% CI: 1.3-1.9%) in 2010. In 2010, URE contributed 20.9% (95% CI: 15.2-25.9%) of all blindness and 52.9% (95% CI: 47.2-57.3%) of all MSVI worldwide. The contribution of URE to all MSVI ranged from 44.2 to 48.1% in all regions except in South Asia which was at 65.4% (95% CI: 62-72%). : We conclude that in 2010, uncorrected refractive error continues as the leading cause of vision impairment and the second leading cause of blindness worldwide, affecting a total of 108 million people or 1 in 90 persons. PMID:26905537

  4. Compression and Cavitation of Externally Applied Magnetic Field on a Hohlraum due to Non-Local Heat Flow Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Archis; Thomas, Alec; Ridgers, Chris; Kingham, Rob

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we present full-scale 2D kinetic modeling of externally imposed magnetic fields on hohlraums with laser heating. We observe magnetic field cavitation and compression due to thermal energy transport. Self-consistent modeling of the electron momentum equation allows for a complete treatment of the heat flow equation and Ohm's Law. A complete Ohm's Law contains magnetic field advection through the Nernst mechanism that arises due to the heat flow. Magnetic field amplification by a factor of 3 occurs due to magnetic flux pile-up from Nernst convection. The magnetic field cavitates towards the hohlraum axis over a 0.5 ns time scale due to Nernst convection. This results in significantly different magnetic field profiles and slower cavitation than can be expected due to the plasma bulk flow. Non-local electrons contribute to the heat flow down the density gradient resulting in an augmented Nernst convection mechanism that is included self-consistently through kinetic modeling. In addition to showing the prevalence of non-local heat flows, we show effects such as anomalous heat flow up the density gradient induced by inverse bremsstrahlung heating. This research was supported by the DOE through Grant No. DE SC0010621 and in part through computational resources and services provided by Advanced Research Computing at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

  5. Constitutive relationships and physical basis of fault strength due to flash heating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Goldsby, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    We develop a model of fault strength loss resulting from phase change at asperity contacts due to flash heating that considers a distribution of contact sizes and nonsteady state evolution of fault strength with displacement. Laboratory faulting experiments conducted at high sliding velocities, which show dramatic strength reduction below the threshold for bulk melting, are well fit by the model. The predicted slip speed for the onset of weakening is in the range of 0.05 to 2 m/s, qualitatively consistent with the limited published observations. For this model, earthquake stress drops and effective shear fracture energy should be linearly pressure-dependent, whereas the onset speed may be pressure-independent or weakly pressure-dependent. On the basis of the theory, flash weakening is expected to produce large dynamic stress drops, small effective shear fracture energy, and undershoot. Estimates of the threshold slip speed, stress drop, and fracture energy are uncertain due to poor knowledge of the average ontact dimension, shear zone thickness and gouge particle size at seismogenic depths. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Investigating the performance of simplified neutral-ion collisional heating rate in a global IT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    The Joule heating rate has usually been used as an approximate form of the neutral-ion collisional heating rate in the thermospheric energy equation in global thermosphere-ionosphere models. This means that the energy coupling has ignored the energy gained by the ions from collisions with electrons. It was found that the globally averaged thermospheric temperature (Tn) was underestimated in simulations using the Joule heating rate, by about 11% when F10.7=110 solar flux unit (sfu, 1 sfu = 10-22 W m-2 Hz-1) in a quiet geomagnetic condition. The underestimation of Tn was higher at low latitudes than high latitudes, and higher at F region altitudes than at E region altitudes. It was found that adding additional neutral photoelectron heating in a global IT model compensated for the underestimation of Tn using the Joule heating approximation. Adding direct photoelectron heating to the neutrals compensated for the indirect path for the energy that flows from the electrons to the ions then to the neutrals naturally and therefore was an adequate compensation over the dayside. There was a slight dependence of the underestimation of Tn on F10.7, such that larger activity levels resulted in a need for more compensation in direct photoelectron heating to the neutrals to make up for the neglected indirect heating through ions and electrons.

  7. Toward a Quantitative Estimate of Future Heat Wave Mortality under Global Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Roger D.; Bobb, Jennifer F.; Tebaldi, Claudia; McDaniel, Larry; Bell, Michelle L.; Dominici, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    Background Climate change is anticipated to affect human health by changing the distribution of known risk factors. Heat waves have had debilitating effects on human mortality, and global climate models predict an increase in the frequency and severity of heat waves. The extent to which climate change will harm human health through changes in the distribution of heat waves and the sources of uncertainty in estimating these effects have not been studied extensively. Objectives We estimated the future excess mortality attributable to heat waves under global climate change for a major U.S. city. Methods We used a database comprising daily data from 1987 through 2005 on mortality from all nonaccidental causes, ambient levels of particulate matter and ozone, temperature, and dew point temperature for the city of Chicago, Illinois. We estimated the associations between heat waves and mortality in Chicago using Poisson regression models. Results Under three different climate change scenarios for 2081–2100 and in the absence of adaptation, the city of Chicago could experience between 166 and 2,217 excess deaths per year attributable to heat waves, based on estimates from seven global climate models. We noted considerable variability in the projections of annual heat wave mortality; the largest source of variation was the choice of climate model. Conclusions The impact of future heat waves on human health will likely be profound, and significant gains can be expected by lowering future carbon dioxide emissions. PMID:21193384

  8. Correlations for Boundary-Layer Transition on Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle Due to Heat-Shield Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Liechty, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of cavities (for attachment bolts) on the heat-shield of the proposed Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle has been investigated experimentally and computationally in order to develop a criterion for assessing whether the boundary layer becomes turbulent downstream of the cavity. Wind tunnel tests were conducted on the 70-deg sphere-cone vehicle geometry with various cavity sizes and locations in order to assess their influence on convective heating and boundary layer transition. Heat-transfer coefficients and boundary-layer states (laminar, transitional, or turbulent) were determined using global phosphor thermography.

  9. Monitoring ocean heat content from the current generation of global ocean observing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schuckmann, K.; Sallée, J.-B.; Chambers, D.; Le Traon, P.-Y.; Cabanes, C.; Gaillard, F.; Speich, S.; Hamon, M.

    2013-06-01

    Variations in the world's ocean heat storage and its associated volume changes are a key factor to gauge global warming and to assess the Earth's energy budget. It is also directly link to sea level change, which has a direct impact on coastal populations. Understanding and monitoring heat and sea level change is therefore one of the major legacies of current global ocean observing systems. In this study, we present an inter-comparison of the three of these global ocean observing systems: the ocean temperature/salinity network Argo, the gravimeter GRACE and the satellite altimeters. Their consistency is investigated at global and regional scale during the period 2005-2010 of overlapping time window of re-qualified data. These three datasets allow closing the recent global ocean sea level budget within uncertainties. However, sampling inconsistencies need to be corrected for an accurate budget at global scale. The Argo network allows estimating global ocean heat content and global sea level and reveals a positive change of 0.5 ± 0.1W m-2 and 0.5 ± 0.1 mm yr-1 over the last 8 yr (2005-2012). Regional inter-comparison of the global observing systems highlights the importance of specific ocean basins for the global estimates. Specifically, the Indonesian Archipelago appears as a key region for the global ocean variability. Both the large regional variability and the uncertainties in the current observing systems, prevent us to shed light, from the global sea level perspective, on the climatically important deep ocean changes. This emphasises, once more, the importance of continuing sustained effort in measuring the deep ocean from ship platforms and by setting up a much needed automated deep-Argo network.

  10. An examination of heat rate improvements due to waste heat integration in an oxycombustion pulverized coal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Joshua M.

    Oxyfuel, or oxycombustion, technology has been proposed as one carbon capture technology for coal-fired power plants. An oxycombustion plant would fire coal in an oxidizer consisting primarily of CO2, oxygen, and water vapor. Flue gas with high CO2 concentrations is produced and can be compressed for sequestration. Since this compression generates large amounts of heat, it was theorized that this heat could be utilized elsewhere in the plant. Process models of the oxycombustion boiler, steam cycle, and compressors were created in ASPEN Plus and Excel to test this hypothesis. Using these models, heat from compression stages was integrated to the flue gas recirculation heater, feedwater heaters, and to a fluidized bed coal dryer. All possible combinations of these heat sinks were examined, with improvements in coal flow rate, Qcoal, net power, and unit heat rate being noted. These improvements would help offset the large efficiency impacts inherent to oxycombustion technology.

  11. Multi-crease Self-folding by Global Heating.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Onal, Cagdas D; Rus, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates a new approach to autonomous folding for the body of a 3D robot from a 2D sheet, using heat. We approach this challenge by folding a 0.27-mm sheetlike material into a structure. We utilize the thermal deformation of a contractive sheet sandwiched by rigid structural layers. During this baking process, the heat applied on the entire sheet induces contraction of the contracting layer and thus forms an instructed bend in the sheet. To attain the targeted folding angles, the V-fold spans method is used. The targeted angle θout can be kinematically encoded into crease geometry. The realization of this angle in the folded structure can be approximately controlled by a contraction angle θin. The process is non-reversible, is reliable, and is relatively fast. Our method can be applied simultaneously to all the folds in multi-crease origami structures. We demonstrate the use of this method to create a lightweight mobile robot. PMID:26545159

  12. Factors Contributing to Urban Heat Island Development: A Global Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, W.; Snyder, P. K.; Twine, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) are the result of the urban core of a city encountering temperatures that are warmer than the surrounding rural areas. Temperature in the urban core can be 2-5°C warmer during the day and as much as 10°C warmer at night compared to outlying areas. This modification of the local climate can contribute to significant health-related impacts during heat waves, increased energy consumption, a decrease in air quality, deteriorating urban ecosystems, and enhancing the thermal pollution into urban water bodies. To understand the mechanisms contributing to the formation of UHIs and to identify sound mitigation strategies requires examining the UHIs of cities around the world to look for factors that enhance or minimize the heat island effect. Numerous factors influence the strength of the UHI, and vary from city to city. Population size and density influence the magnitude and spatial extent of the UHI. The ecosystem in which the city resides affects the rural climatology. Regional weather patterns can also influence the development of UHIs, with the frequency of certain types of weather conducive to the development of strong UHIs. Local geography such as proximity to water bodies and topography can influence UHI development. Cultural and regional influences such as the use of certain types of building materials, architecture, and the density of vegetation can all contribute towards the strength of a city's UHI. To better understand how UHIs develop and to understand the factors that influence them, we have undertaken the Islands in the Sun project, which includes an analysis of the UHIs of the largest cities in the world. In this study we examine how different factors have influenced the structure of the UHI and to identify factors that can mitigate and minimize their impact. Here we present a preliminary analysis of four metropolitan areas: Minneapolis-St. Paul, Buenos Aires, Riyadh, and Jakarta. In this study we investigate how various factors

  13. Intensity of heat stress in winter wheat—phenology compensates for the adverse effect of global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyshi Rezaei, Ehsan; Siebert, Stefan; Ewert, Frank

    2015-02-01

    Higher temperatures during the growing season are likely to reduce crop yields with implications for crop production and food security. The negative impact of heat stress has also been predicted to increase even further for cereals such as wheat under climate change. Previous empirical modeling studies have focused on the magnitude and frequency of extreme events during the growth period but did not consider the effect of higher temperature on crop phenology. Based on an extensive set of climate and phenology observations for Germany and period 1951-2009, interpolated to 1 × 1 km resolution and provided as supplementary data to this article (available at stacks.iop.org/ERL/10/024012/mmedia), we demonstrate a strong relationship between the mean temperature in spring and the day of heading (DOH) of winter wheat. We show that the cooling effect due to the 14 days earlier DOH almost fully compensates for the adverse effect of global warming on frequency and magnitude of crop heat stress. Earlier heading caused by the warmer spring period can prevent exposure to extreme heat events around anthesis, which is the most sensitive growth stage to heat stress. Consequently, the intensity of heat stress around anthesis in winter crops cultivated in Germany may not increase under climate change even if the number and duration of extreme heat waves increase. However, this does not mean that global warning would not harm crop production because of other impacts, e.g. shortening of the grain filling period. Based on the trends for the last 34 years in Germany, heat stress (stress thermal time) around anthesis would be 59% higher in year 2009 if the effect of high temperatures on accelerating wheat phenology were ignored. We conclude that climate impact assessments need to consider both the effect of high temperature on grain set at anthesis but also on crop phenology.

  14. Heating of baryons due to scattering with dark matter during the dark ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Julian B.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine

    2015-10-01

    We explore the effects of elastic scattering between dark matter and baryons on the 21-cm signal during the dark ages. In particular, we consider a dark-matter-baryon interaction with a cross section of the form σ =σ0v-4 , in which case the effect of the drag force between the dark matter and baryon fluids grows with time. We show that, as opposed to what was previously thought, this effect heats up the baryons due to the relative velocity between dark matter and baryons. This creates an additional source of fluctuations, which can potentially make interactions easier to detect by 21-cm measurements than by using the cosmic microwave background and the Lyman-α forest. Our forecasts show that the magnitude of the cross section can be probed to σ0˜3 ×1 0-42 cm2 for mχ≪1 GeV and σ0˜2 ×1 0-41(mχ/10 GeV ) cm2 for mχ≫1 GeV with next generation experiments, and improved to σ0˜4 ×1 0-44 cm2 for mχ≪1 GeV and σ0˜4 ×1 0-43(mχ/10 GeV ) cm2 for mχ≫1 GeV with futuristic experiments.

  15. January and July global distributions of atmospheric heating for 1986, 1987, and 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaack, Todd K.; Johnson, Donald R.

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional global distributions of atmospheric heating are estimated for January and July of the 3-year period 1986-88 from the European Center for Medium Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) assimilated datasets. Emphasis is placed on the interseasonal and interannual variability of heating both locally and regionally. Large fluctuations in the magnitude of heating and the disposition of maxima/minima in the Tropics occur over the 3-year period. This variability, which is largely in accord with anomalous precipitation expected during the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle, appears realistic. In both January and July, interannual differences of 1.0-1.5 K/day in the vertically averaged heating occur over the tropical Pacific. These interannual regional differences are substantial in comparison with maximum monthly averaged heating rates of 2.0-2.5 K/day. In the extratropics, the most prominent interannual variability occurs along the wintertime North Atlantic cyclone track. Vertical profiles of heating from selected regions also reveal large interannual variability. Clearly evident is the modulation of the heating within tropical regions of deep moist convection associated with the evolution of the ENSO cycle. The heating integrated over continental and oceanic basins emphasizes the impact of land and ocean surfaces on atmospheric energy balance and depicts marked interseasonal and interannual large-scale variability.

  16. Global existence of weak solution to the heat and moisture transport system in fibrous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Buyang; Sun, Weiwei; Wang, Yi

    This paper is concerned with theoretical analysis of a heat and moisture transfer model arising from textile industries, which is described by a degenerate and strongly coupled parabolic system. We prove the global (in time) existence of weak solution by constructing an approximate solution with some standard smoothing. The proof is based on the physical nature of gas convection, in which the heat (energy) flux in convection is determined by the mass (vapor) flux in convection.

  17. Measurement of Heat Flux and Heat Transfer Coefficient Due to Spray Application for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant spray application experiments were conducted for the die casting process. The heat flux was measured in situ using a differential thermopile sensor for three application techniques. First, the lubricant was applied under a constant flowrate while the nozzle was held in the same position. Second, the lubricant was applied in a pulsed, static manner, in which the nozzle was held over the same surface while it was turned on and off several times. Third, the lubricant was applied in a sweeping manner, in which the nozzle was moved along the die surface while it was held open. The experiments were conducted at several die temperatures and at sweep speeds of 20, 23, and 68 cm/s. The heat flux data, which were obtained with a sensor that was located in the centre of the test plate, were presented and discussed. The sensor can be used to evaluate lubricants, monitor the consistency of die lubrication process, and obtain useful process data, such as surface temperature, heat flux, and heat transfer coefficients. The heat removed from the die surface during lubricant application is necessary for (a) designing the cooling channels in the die, i.e. their size and placement, and (b) performing accurate numerical simulations of the die casting process.

  18. The role of polar regions in global climate, and a new parameterization of global heat transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, R. S.; Farrell, B.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the transport of heat between polar regions and other latitudes on climate sensitivity and stability are examined within the framework of simple energy balance models. New heat transport parameterizations adjust radiative equilibrium distributions of temperature with latitude on the basis of Hadley cells and baroclinically unstable eddies; including the effects of static stability changes with latitude eliminates the possible error in estimating the pole-equator temperature difference. It is found that climate sensitivity and stability for the new transport parameterizations can differ from other models, and is capable of simulating the sensitivity required by existing climate data.

  19. CFD-Predicted Tile Heating Bump Factors Due to Tile Overlay Repairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    2006-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics investigation of the Orbiter's Tile Overlay Repair (TOR) is performed to assess the aeroheating Damage Assessment Team's (DAT) existing heating correlation method for protuberance interference heating on the surrounding thermal protection system. Aerothermodynamic heating analyses are performed for TORs at the design reference damage locations body points 1800 and 1075 for a Mach 17.9 and a=39deg STS-107 flight trajectory point with laminar flow. Six different cases are considered. The computed peak heating bump factor on the surrounding tiles are below the DAT's heating bump factor values for smooth tile cases. However, for the uneven tiles cases the peak interference heating is shown to be considerably higher than the existing correlation prediction.

  20. Projected shifts in Coffea arabica suitability among major global producing regions due to climate change.

    PubMed

    Ovalle-Rivera, Oriana; Läderach, Peter; Bunn, Christian; Obersteiner, Michael; Schroth, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Regional studies have shown that climate change will affect climatic suitability for Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) within current regions of production. Increases in temperature and changes in precipitation patterns will decrease yield, reduce quality and increase pest and disease pressure. This is the first global study on the impact of climate change on suitability to grow Arabica coffee. We modeled the global distribution of Arabica coffee under changes in climatic suitability by 2050s as projected by 21 global circulation models. The results suggest decreased areas suitable for Arabica coffee in Mesoamerica at lower altitudes. In South America close to the equator higher elevations could benefit, but higher latitudes lose suitability. Coffee regions in Ethiopia and Kenya are projected to become more suitable but those in India and Vietnam to become less suitable. Globally, we predict decreases in climatic suitability at lower altitudes and high latitudes, which may shift production among the major regions that produce Arabica coffee. PMID:25875230

  1. Projected Shifts in Coffea arabica Suitability among Major Global Producing Regions Due to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Ovalle-Rivera, Oriana; Läderach, Peter; Bunn, Christian; Obersteiner, Michael; Schroth, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Regional studies have shown that climate change will affect climatic suitability for Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) within current regions of production. Increases in temperature and changes in precipitation patterns will decrease yield, reduce quality and increase pest and disease pressure. This is the first global study on the impact of climate change on suitability to grow Arabica coffee. We modeled the global distribution of Arabica coffee under changes in climatic suitability by 2050s as projected by 21 global circulation models. The results suggest decreased areas suitable for Arabica coffee in Mesoamerica at lower altitudes. In South America close to the equator higher elevations could benefit, but higher latitudes lose suitability. Coffee regions in Ethiopia and Kenya are projected to become more suitable but those in India and Vietnam to become less suitable. Globally, we predict decreases in climatic suitability at lower altitudes and high latitudes, which may shift production among the major regions that produce Arabica coffee. PMID:25875230

  2. Global variation of sonic boom overpressure due to seasonal changes in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Obayashi, Shigeru

    2012-09-01

    Global variation of sonic boom overpressures with the realistic atmospheric gradients was discussed. The atmospheric gradients were estimated by upper-air observational radiosonde data and a simple N-wave was extrapolated through all seasonal atmospheric gradients without winds around the world. Results demonstrated that sonic boom overpressure varies widely with season and geographic position compared to that of the standard atmospheric condition. The results also showed the tendencies of the global variation in overpressure.

  3. Erythema Ab Igne due to Heating Pad Use: A Case Report and Review of Clinical Presentation, Prevention, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Milchak, Marissa; Smucker, Joanne; Chung, Catherine G.; Seiverling, Elizabeth V.

    2016-01-01

    Erythema ab igne is an asymptomatic cutaneous condition caused by exposure to heat. Cases of erythema ab igne may prove to be diagnostically challenging due to lack of familiarity with the condition. While this dermatosis carries a favorable prognosis, nonmelanoma skin cancers have been reported to arise within lesions of erythema ab igne. Erythema ab igne is preventable, and, thus, clinicians should provide education regarding safe use of heating devices to patients using these products in both outpatient and inpatient settings. PMID:26880929

  4. Self-Regulated Plasma Heat Flux Mitigation Due to Liquid Sn Vapor Shielding.

    PubMed

    van Eden, G G; Morgan, T W; Aussems, D U B; van den Berg, M A; Bystrov, K; van de Sanden, M C M

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state high-flux H or He plasma beam was balanced against the pressure of a Sn vapor cloud for the first time, resulting in a self-regulated heat flux intensity near the liquid surface. A temperature response of the liquid surface characterized by a decoupling from the received heating power and significant cooling of the plasma in the neutral Sn cloud were observed. The plasma heat flux impinging on the target was found to be mitigated, as heat was partially dissipated by volumetric processes in the vapor cloud rather than wholly by surface effects. These results motivate further exploration of liquid metal solutions to the critical challenge of heat and particle flux handling in fusion power plants. PMID:27081983

  5. Self-Regulated Plasma Heat Flux Mitigation Due to Liquid Sn Vapor Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eden, G. G.; Morgan, T. W.; Aussems, D. U. B.; van den Berg, M. A.; Bystrov, K.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state high-flux H or He plasma beam was balanced against the pressure of a Sn vapor cloud for the first time, resulting in a self-regulated heat flux intensity near the liquid surface. A temperature response of the liquid surface characterized by a decoupling from the received heating power and significant cooling of the plasma in the neutral Sn cloud were observed. The plasma heat flux impinging on the target was found to be mitigated, as heat was partially dissipated by volumetric processes in the vapor cloud rather than wholly by surface effects. These results motivate further exploration of liquid metal solutions to the critical challenge of heat and particle flux handling in fusion power plants.

  6. Change in the Specific Heat Capacity of Parenchymal Tissues of Apples due to Dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailik, V. A.; Dmitrenko, N. V.; Snezhkin, Yu. F.

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of measurements of the heat capacity of parenchymal tissues of apples by the differential scanning calorimetry method. An analytical dependence of the specific heat capacity of these tissues on their temperature (10-90°C) and moisture (6.8-90%) is proposed. We have considered the boundary conditions under which it is possible to calculate the heat capacity of moist parenchymal tissues of apples containing simultaneously free and bound water by an additive model. Reliable values of the heat capacity of tissues containing only bound water can be obtained only experimentally. In parenchymal tissues of apples with a low moisture content (0.6-0.43%) in the positive temperature range, a stepwise change in the heat capacity has been revealed.

  7. Distribution of heating in an LVRF bundle due to dysprosium in the central element

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, K.; Buijs, A.

    2006-07-01

    The computer code MCNP was used to establish the effect of adding dysprosium to the central pin of the proposed BRUCE-B CANFLEX{sup R} Low-Void-Reactivity Fuel (LVRF) on the heat load of the central pin and the heat balance inside the fuel bundle. The Dy generates heat through radiative capture of thermal neutrons, as well as through beta decay of {sup 165}Dy to {sup 165}Ho. We conclude that for fresh fuel, the presence of Dy contributes 26% of the overall heat to the central pin, and 0.5% to the whole fuel bundle. These percentages decrease to 11% and 0.5% at the end-of-life burnup condition. A second, operational quantity is the HPFP ratio (heating-power to fission-power ratio). This ratio is 1.63 for fresh fuel and decreases to 1.19 for fuel at the end-of-life burnup condition. (authors)

  8. Millennial-scale projection of oceanic oxygen change due to global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akitomo; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Shigemitsu, Masahito; Oka, Akira; Takahashi, Kunio; Ohgaito, Rumi; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Global warming is expected to globally decrease ocean oxygen concentrations by sea surface warming and ocean circulation change. Oxygen reduction is expected to persist for a thousand years or more, even after atmospheric carbon dioxide stops rising. However, long-term changes in ocean oxygen and circulation are still unclear. Here we simulate multimillennium changes in ocean circulation and oxygen under doubling and quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide, using GCM (MIROC) and an offline biogeochemical model. In the first 500 years, global oxygen concentration decreases, consistent with previous studies. Thereafter, however, the oxygen concentration in the deep ocean globally recovers and overshoots at the end of the simulations, despite surface oxygen decrease and weaker AMOC. This is because, after the initial cessation, the recovery and overshooting of deep ocean convection in the Weddell Sea enhance ventilation and supply oxygen-rich surface waters to deep ocean. Another contributor to deep ocean oxygenation is seawater warming, which reduces the export production and shifts the organic matter remineralization to the upper water column. Our results indicate that the change in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean potentially drives millennial-scale oxygenation in deep ocean, which is opposite to the centennial-scale global oxygen reduction and general expectation.

  9. Illustrating a new approach to estimating potential reduction in fish species richness due to flow alteration on a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, S.; Yanagawa, A.; Khajuria, A.; Sui, P.; Iwasaki, Y.; Hirano, K.; Mahendran, R.; Koirala, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.; Yoshimura, C.; Kanae, S.

    2013-06-01

    Changes in river discharge due to human activities and climate change would affect the sustainability of freshwater ecosystem. In order to globally assess the future status of freshwater ecosystem under regime shifts in river discharge, global-scale hydrological simulations need to be connected with a model to estimate the soundness of freshwater ecosystem. However, the explicit combination of those two on a global scale is still in its infancy. A couple of statistical models are introduced here to link flow regimes to fish species richness (FSR): one based on a linear relationship between FSR and mean river discharge, and the other based on a relationship between FSR and ecologically relevant flow indices involving other several flow characteristics as well as mean river discharge. The former one has been sometimes used in global simulation studies, but the latter one is newly introduced here in the context of global simulation. These statistical models for estimating FSR were combined with a set of global river discharge simulations to evaluate the potential impact of flow alterations due to climate change on FSR changes. Generally, future reductions in FSR by the latter method are larger and much more scattered rather than by the former method. In arid regions, both models provide reductions in FSR because mean discharge is projected to decrease from past to future, although the magnitude of reduction in FSR is different. On the other hand, large reductions in FSR only by the latter model are detected in heavy-snow regions due to the increases of mean discharge and frequency of low and high flows. Although we need further research to conclude which is more relevant, this study demonstrates that the new model could show a considerably different behavior in assessing the global impact of flow alteration on freshwater ecosystem change.

  10. Constraints on the transient climate response from observed global temperature and ocean heat uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutti, Reto; Tomassini, Lorenzo

    2008-05-01

    Projections of future transient global temperature increase in climate models for a known forcing depend on the strength of the atmospheric feedbacks and the rate of transient ocean heat uptake. A Bayesian framework and an intermediate complexity climate model are used to calculate a probability density function (PDF) of the transient climate response (TCR), constrained by observations of global surface warming and ocean heat uptake. The PDF constrained by observations is wider than the TCR range of current climate models, and has a slightly lower mean. Uncertainties in the observed ocean warming are shown to potentially affect the TCR. It is proposed, however, that even if models were found to overestimate ocean heat uptake, correcting that bias would lead to revisions in surface temperature projections over the twenty-first century that are smaller than the uncertainties introduced by poorly quantified atmospheric feedbacks.

  11. Heightening of efficiency fuel using installations due to external recuperation units of waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konahina, I. A.; Gil'manshin, I. R.; Safin, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    Energy saving activity on installation of heat exchangers for utilization of afterheat of smoke fumes of industrial furnaces and steam generating units is offered. Problems of their maintenance and methods of elimination of the given problems are considered.

  12. A global overview of drought and heat-induced tree mortality reveals emerging climate change risks for forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, C.D.; Macalady, A.K.; Chenchouni, H.; Bachelet, D.; McDowell, N.; Vennetier, M.; Kitzberger, T.; Rigling, A.; Breshears, D.D.; Hogg, E.H.(T.); Gonzalez, P.; Fensham, R.; Zhang, Z.; Castro, J.; Demidova, N.; Lim, J.-H.; Allard, G.; Running, S.W.; Semerci, A.; Cobb, N.

    2010-01-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions have significantly altered global climate, and will continue to do so in the future. Increases in the frequency, duration, and/or severity of drought and heat stress associated with climate change could fundamentally alter the composition, structure, and biogeography of forests in many regions. Of particular concern are potential increases in tree mortality associated with climate-induced physiological stress and interactions with other climate-mediated processes such as insect outbreaks and wildfire. Despite this risk, existing projections of tree mortality are based on models that lack functionally realistic mortality mechanisms, and there has been no attempt to track observations of climate-driven tree mortality globally. Here we present the first global assessment of recent tree mortality attributed to drought and heat stress. Although episodic mortality occurs in the absence of climate change, studies compiled here suggest that at least some of the world's forested ecosystems already may be responding to climate change and raise concern that forests may become increasingly vulnerable to higher background tree mortality rates and die-off in response to future warming and drought, even in environments that are not normally considered water-limited. This further suggests risks to ecosystem services, including the loss of sequestered forest carbon and associated atmospheric feedbacks. Our review also identifies key information gaps and scientific uncertainties that currently hinder our ability to predict tree mortality in response to climate change and emphasizes the need for a globally coordinated observation system. Overall, our review reveals the potential for amplified tree mortality due to drought and heat in forests worldwide.

  13. Analysis of gap heating due to stepped tiles in the shuttle thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, D. H.; Smith, D. M.; Edwards, C. L. W.; Carlson, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical methods used to investigate entry gap heating in the Shuttle orbiter thermal protection system are described. Analytical results are given for a fuselage lower-surface location and a wing lower-surface location. These are locations where excessive gap heating occurred on the first flight of the Shuttle. The results of a study to determine the effectiveness of a half-height ceramic fiber gap filler in preventing hot-gas flow in the tile gaps are also given.

  14. Wind Tunnel Measurements of Shuttle Orbiter Global Heating with Comparisons to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Merski, N. Ronald; Blanchard, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    An aerothermodynamic database of global heating images was acquired of the Shuttle Orbiter in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. These results were obtained for comparison to the global infrared images of the Orbiter in flight from the infrared sensing aeroheating flight experiment (ISAFE). The most recent ISAFE results from STS-103, consisted of port side images, at hypersonic conditions, of the surface features that result from the strake vortex scrubbing along the side of the vehicle. The wind tunnel results were obtained with the phosphor thermography system, which also provides global information and thus is ideally suited for comparison to the global flight results. The aerothermodynamic database includes both windward and port side heating images of the Orbiter for a range of angles of attack (20 to 40 deg), freestream unit Reynolds number (1 x 10(exp 6))/ft to 8 x 10(exp 6)/ft, body flap deflections (0, 5, and 10 deg), speed brake deflections (0 and 45 deg), as well as with boundary layer trips for forced transition to turbulence heating results. Sample global wind tunnel heat transfer images were extrapolated to flight conditions for comparison to Orbiter flight data. A windward laminar case for an angle of attack of 40 deg was extrapolated to Mach 11.6 flight conditions for comparison to STS-2 flight thermocouple results. A portside wind tunnel image for an angle of attack of 25 deg was extrapolated for Mach 5 flight conditions for comparison to STS-103 global surface temperatures. The comparisons showed excellent qualitative agreement, however the extrapolated wind tunnel results over-predicted the flight surface temperatures on the order of 5% on the windward surface and slightly higher on the portside.

  15. The Uncertainty of Long-term Linear Trend in Global SST Due to Internal Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Tao

    2016-04-01

    In most parts of the global ocean, the magnitude of the long-term linear trend in sea surface temperature (SST) is much smaller than the amplitude of local multi-scale internal variation. One can thus use the record of a specified period to arbitrarily determine the value and the sign of the long-term linear trend in regional SST, and further leading to controversial conclusions on how global SST responds to global warming in the recent history. Analyzing the linear trend coefficient estimated by the ordinary least-square method indicates that the linear trend consists of two parts: One related to the long-term change, and the other related to the multi-scale internal variation. The sign of the long-term change can be correctly reproduced only when the magnitude of the linear trend coefficient is greater than a theoretical threshold which scales the influence from the multi-scale internal variation. Otherwise, the sign of the linear trend coefficient will depend on the phase of the internal variation, or in the other words, the period being used. An improved least-square method is then proposed to reduce the theoretical threshold. When apply the new method to a global SST reconstruction from 1881 to 2013, we find that in a large part of Pacific, the southern Indian Ocean and North Atlantic, the influence from the multi-scale internal variation on the sign of the linear trend coefficient can-not be excluded. Therefore, the resulting warming or/and cooling linear trends in these regions can-not be fully assigned to global warming.

  16. Model calculated global, regional and megacity premature mortality due to air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Barlas, C.; Giannadaki, D.; Pozzer, A.

    2013-07-01

    Air pollution by fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) has increased strongly with industrialization and urbanization. We estimate the premature mortality rates and the years of human life lost (YLL) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 and O3 in 2005 for epidemiological regions defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). This is based upon high-resolution global model calculations that resolve urban and industrial regions in greater detail compared to previous work. Results indicate that 69% of the global population is exposed to an annual mean anthropogenic PM2.5 concentration of >10 μg m-3 (WHO guideline) and 33% to > 25 μg m-3 (EU directive). We applied an epidemiological health impact function and find that especially in large countries with extensive suburban and rural populations, air pollution-induced mortality rates have been underestimated given that previous studies largely focused on the urban environment. We calculate a global respiratory mortality of about 773 thousand/year (YLL ≈ 5.2 million/year), 186 thousand/year by lung cancer (YLL ≈ 1.7 million/year) and 2.0 million/year by cardiovascular disease (YLL ≈ 14.3 million/year). The global mean per capita mortality caused by air pollution is about 0.1% yr-1. The highest premature mortality rates are found in the Southeast Asia and Western Pacific regions (about 25% and 46% of the global rate, respectively) where more than a dozen of the most highly polluted megacities are located.

  17. Numerical study of heat and mass transfer in an anisotropic porous enclosure due to constant heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, P.; Eswaran, V.; Singh, P.

    1998-12-01

    Combined heat and mass transfer in porous media occurs in many natural phenomena and engineering applications, such as the migration of moisture through air contained in insulation, the spreading of chemical pollutants in saturated soil, and the extraction of geothermal energy. Here, double-diffusive natural convective flow within a rectangular enclosure has been studied for an anisotropic porous medium using a non-Darcy extension. The principal direction of the permeability tensor has been taken oblique to the gravity vector. The spectral element method has been used to solve the problem numerically. The method has been validated using existing analytical and numerical results. Parametric studies are presented for isotropic and anisotropic cases for different fundamental parameters, e.g., buoyancy ratio, Lewis number, Rayleigh number, Darcy number. The results show that anisotropy causes significant changes in the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. In particular, the present analysis shows that permeability orientation angle has a significant effect on the flow rate and, consequently, on the heat and mass transfer.

  18. One-dimensional analysis of unsteady flows due to supercritical heat addition in high speed condensing steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, N. A.; Hasini, H.; Yusoff, M. Z.

    2013-06-01

    Unsteadiness in supersonic flow in nozzles can be generated by the release of heat due to spontaneous condensation. The heat released is termed "supercritical" and may be responsible for turbine blades failure in turbine cascade as it causes a supersonic flow to decelerate. When the Mach number is reduced to unity, the flow can no longer sustain the additional heat and becomes unstable. This paper aims to numerically investigate the unsteadiness caused by supercritical heat addition in one-dimensional condensing flows. The governing equations for mass, momentum and energy, coupled with the equations describing the wetness fraction and droplet growth are integrated and solved iteratively to reveal the final solution. Comparison is made with well-established experimental and numerical solution done by previous researchers that shows similar phenomena.

  19. Calculations of Solar Shortwave Heating Rates due to Black Carbon and Ozone Absorption Using in Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Swartz, W. H.; Spackman, J. R.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Aikin, K. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Bui, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the solar heating rates in ambient air due to absorption by black-carbon (BC) containing particles and ozone are presented as calculated from airborne observations made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in January-February 2006. The method uses airborne in situ observations of BC particles, ozone and actinic flux. Total BC mass is obtained along the flight track by summing the masses of individually detected BC particles in the range 90 to 600-nm volume-equivalent diameter, which includes most of the BC mass. Ozone mixing ratios and upwelling and partial downwelling solar actinic fluxes were measured concurrently with BC mass. Two estimates used for the BC wavelength-dependent absorption cross section yielded similar heating rates. For mean altitudes of 16.5, 17.5, and 18.5 km (0.5 km) in the tropics, average BC heating rates were near 0.0002 K/d. Observed BC coatings on individual particles approximately double derived BC heating rates. Ozone heating rates exceeded BC heating rates by approximately a factor of 100 on average and at least a factor of 4, suggesting that BC heating rates in this region are negligible in comparison.

  20. Unsteady Turbine Blade and Tip Heat Transfer Due to Wake Passing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Rigby, David L.; Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Heidmann, James; Fabian, John C.

    2007-01-01

    The geometry and the flow conditions of the first stage turbine blade of GE s E3 engine have been used to obtain the unsteady three-dimensional blade and tip heat transfer. The isothermal wall boundary condition was used. The effect of the upstream wake of the first stage vane was of interest and was simulated by provision of a gust type boundary condition upstream of the blades. A one blade periodic domain was used. The consequence of this choice was explored in a preliminary study which showed little difference in the time mean heat transfer between 1:1 and 2:3 vane/blade domains. The full three-dimensional computations are of the blade having a clearance gap of 2 percent the span. Comparison between the time averaged unsteady and steady heat transfer is provided. It is shown that there is a significant difference between the steady and time mean of unsteady blade heat transfer in localized regions. The differences on the suction side of the blade in the near hub and near tip regions were found to be rather significant. Steady analysis underestimated the blade heat transfer by as much as 20 percent as compared to the time average obtained from the unsteady analysis. As for the blade tip, the steady analysis and the unsteady analysis gave results to within 2 percent.

  1. Modelling of labour productivity loss due to climate change: HEAT-SHIELD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Daanen, Hein

    2016-04-01

    Climate change will bring higher heat levels (temperature and humidity combined) to large parts of the world. When these levels reach above thresholds well defined by human physiology, the ability to maintain physical activity levels decrease and labour productivity is reduced. This impact is of particular importance in work situations in areas with long high intensity hot seasons, but also affects cooler areas during heat waves. Our modelling of labour productivity loss includes climate model data of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Inter-comparison Project (ISI-MIP), calculations of heat stress indexes during different months, estimations of work capacity loss and its annual impacts in different parts of the world. Different climate models will be compared for the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and the outcomes of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21) agreements. The validation includes comparisons of modelling outputs with actual field studies using historical heat data. These modelling approaches are a first stage contribution to the European Commission funded HEAT-SHIELD project.

  2. Estimating Temperature Rise Due to Flashlamp Heating Using Irreversible Temperature Indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the nondestructive thermography inspection techniques uses photographic flashlamps. The flashlamps provide a short duration (about 0.005 sec) heat pulse. The short burst of energy results in a momentary rise in the surface temperature of the part. The temperature rise may be detrimental to the top layer of the part being exposed. Therefore, it is necessary to ensure the nondestructive nature of the technique. Amount of the temperature rise determines whether the flashlamp heating would be detrimental to the part. A direct method for the temperature measurement is to use of an infrared pyrometer that has much shorter response time than the flash duration. In this paper, an alternative technique is given using the irreversible temperature 'indicators. This is an indirect technique and it measures the temperature rise on the irreversible temperature indicators and computes the incident heat flux. Once the heat flux is known, the temperature rise on the part can be computed. A wedge shaped irreversible temperature indicator for measuring the heat flux is proposed. A procedure is given to use the wedge indicator.

  3. A new analytical approach for heat generation in tissue due to laser excitation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkol, Hakan; Nouizi, Farouk; Luk, Alex T.; Unlu, Mehmet B.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we present a fast analytical approach for laser induced temperature increase in biological tissue. The whole problem consists of two main steps. These steps are the light propagation and heat transfer in tissue. We first obtain a detailed analytical solution for the diffusion equation based on an integral approach for specific boundary conditions. Secondly, we also solve the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation analytically using the separation of variables technique and obtain the temperature induced by optical absorption of tissue. Here, heat source term consists of the local absorption and photon density, which will be determined from the diffusion equation. We find a very comprehensive solution for the diffusion equation by using an integral method for the Robin boundary condition. In other words, we obtain a particular Green's function in a different way. Next, we use this solution as a source term in the Pennes' bio-heat equation by utilizing the heat convection boundary condition. It is important to note that these boundary conditions are good approximations for imaging of biological tissue. As a result, we obtain spatio-temporal temperature distribution inside the medium. First, our approach is validated by a numerical approach using a Finite Element Method (FEM). Next, we also validate our method by performing phantom and tissue experiments. Experimental data corresponding to spatio-temporal temperature distribution are recorded using magnetic resonance thermometry. The analytical results obtained by our method are in a very good agreement with ones obtained by the FEM and experiment.

  4. Kinetic heating due to a skewed shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrez, G.

    1981-01-01

    A flat/finned plate arrangement test configuration with both a sharp and a blunt fin was studied. The plate was set at angles of incidence of 7,4, and 0 degrees relative to the wind tunnel axis providing three different Mach numbers for the undisturbed flow over the flat plate (5.00, 5.53, and 6.07). Experimental data were obtained for three different shock generator angles of incidence 5,10, and 15 degrees and for three Mach numbers. Very satisfactory pressure and heat distributions were predicted by Schuderi's method. The blunting of the fin's heading edge resulted is an outward displacement of the pressure and heat transfer distribution caused by the outward displacement of the inviscid shock wave. The peak pressure was considerably reduced and the peak pressure and peak heating positions coincided.

  5. Transient thermal stresses due to periodically moving line heat source of composite hollow cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.S.; Chu, H.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The transient thermal stress distribution of a finite composite hollow cylinder, which is heated by a periodically moving line source on its inner boundary and cooled convectively on the outer surface, is analyzed in this paper. The heat sources are assumed to be axisymmetric, moving along the axis of the hollow cylinder with constant velocity. To solve the temperature distribution of the hollow cylinder, the Laplace transform and eigenfunction expansion methods are used. The associated thermal stress distributions are then obtained by solving the thermoelastic displacement function and the Love function. Finally, a numerical scheme, the Fourier series technique, is utilized to calculate the inverse transform. The numerical results of the temperature and thermal stress distribution are presented, which demonstrate the effects of thermal conductivity ratio, shear modulus ratio, Biot number, and period of the moving heat source. 13 refs.

  6. Projection of Heat Waves over China under Different Global Warming Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaojun; Luo, Yong; Huang, Jianbin; Zhao, Zongci

    2015-04-01

    Global warming targets, which are determined in terms of global mean temperature increases relative to pre-industrial temperature levels, have been one of the heated issues recently. And the climate change (especially climate extremes) and its impacts under different targets have been paid extensive concerns. In this study, evaluation and projection of heat waves in China were carried out by five CMIP5 global climate models (GCMs) with a 0.5°×0.5° horizontal resolution which were derived from EU WATCH project. A new daily observed gridded dataset CN05.1 (0.5°×0.5°) was also used to evaluate the GCMs. And four indices (heat waves frequency, longest heat waves duration, heat waves days and high temperature days) were adopted to analyze the heat waves. Compared with the observations, the five GCMs and its Multi-Model Ensemble (MME) have a remarkable capacity of reproducing the spatial and temporal characteristic of heat waves. The time correlation coefficients between MME and the observation results can all reach 0.05 significant levels. Based on the projection data of five GCMs, both the median year of crossing 1.5°C, 2°C, 2.5°, 3°C, 3.5°C, 4°C, 4.5°C and 5°C global warming targets and the corresponding climate change over China were analyzed under RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 scenarios, respectively. The results show that when the global mean surface air temperature rise to different targets with respect to the pre-industrial times (1861-1880), the frequency and intensity of heat waves will increase dramatically. To take the high emission scenario RCP8.5 as an example, under the RCP8.5 scenario, the warming rate over China is stronger than that over the globe, the temperature rise(median year) over China projected by MME are 1.77°C(2025), 2.63°C(2039), 3.39°C(2050), 3.97°C(2060), 4.82°C(2070), 5.47°C(2079) and 6.2°C(2089) under 1.5°C, 2°C, 2.5°C, 3°C, 3.5°C, 4°C and 4.5°C global warming targets, respectively. With the increase of the global

  7. Changes In The Heating Degree-days In Norway Due Toglobal Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaugen, T. E.; Tveito, O. E.; Hanssen-Bauer, I.

    A continuous spatial representation of temperature improves the possibility topro- duce maps of temperature-dependent variables. A temperature scenario for the period 2021-2050 is obtained for Norway from the Max-Planck-Institute? AOGCM, GSDIO ECHAM4/OPEC 3. This is done by an ?empirical downscaling method? which in- volves the use of empirical links between large-scale fields and local variables to de- duce estimates of the local variables. The analysis is obtained at forty-six sites in Norway. Spatial representation of the anomalies of temperature in the scenario period compared to the normal period (1961-1990) is obtained with the use of spatial interpo- lation in a GIS. The temperature scenario indicates that we will have a warmer climate in Norway in the future, especially during the winter season. The heating degree-days (HDD) is defined as the accumulated Celsius degrees be- tween the daily mean temperature and a threshold temperature. For Scandinavian countries, this threshold temperature is 17 Celsius degrees. The HDD is found to be a good estimate of accumulated cold. It is therefore a useful index for heating energy consumption within the heating season, and thus to power production planning. As a consequence of the increasing temperatures, the length of the heating season and the HDD within this season will decrease in Norway in the future. The calculations of the heating season and the HDD is estimated at grid level with the use of a GIS. The spatial representation of the heating season and the HDD can then easily be plotted. Local information of the variables being analysed can be withdrawn from the spatial grid in a GIS. The variable is prepared for further spatial analysis. It may also be used as an input to decision making systems.

  8. Measuring the heat capacity in a Bose-Einstein condensation using global variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, R. F.; Telles, G. D.; Castilho, P.; Poveda-Cuevas, F. J.; Muniz, S. R.; Roati, G.; Romero-Rochin, V.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2014-10-01

    Phase transitions are well understood and generally followed by the behavior of the associated thermodynamic quantities, such as in the case of the λ -point superfluid transition of liquid He, which is observed in its heat capacity. In the case of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate, the heat capacity cannot be directly measured. In this work, we present a technique capable of determining the global heat capacity from the density distribution of a weakly interacting gas trapped in an inhomogeneous potential. This approach represents an alternative to models based on the local density approximation. By defining a pair of global conjugate variables, we determine the total internal energy and its temperature derivative, the heat capacity. We then apply the technique to a trapped 87Rb BEC, and a λ -type transition dependent on the atom number is observed, and the deviations from the noninteracting, ideal gas case are discussed. Finally, we discuss the chances of using this method to study the heat capacity at T →0 .

  9. Transient motion of a confined rarefied gas due to wall heating or cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadsworth, Dean C.; Erwin, Daniel A.; Muntz, E. P.

    1993-01-01

    The direct Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the transient motion of a confined rarefied gas as a container wall is rapidly heated or cooled. Results show that, for the rapid wall temperature changes, the gas response is better measured by an acoustic, rather than conduction, timescale, with steady state conditions being achieved after about ten wave crossing times.

  10. Effects of Unsteadiness Due to Wake Passing on Rotor Blade Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Rigby, David L.; Heidmann, James; Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Fabian, John C.

    2007-01-01

    14. ABSTRACT In a gas turbine engine, the turbine rotor blades are buffeted by the wakes of the vanes located upstream. There is a transient effect from the passing of wakes on the blade heat transfer. This transient effect has been computed for a representative rotor by introducing a wake upstream via an unsteady inlet flow boundary condition, or "gust" condition. Two cases of turbulent flow and laminar flow with Reynolds numbers of 385,000 and 385 respectively were considered. For the turbulent flow case a quasi-steady calculation was also performed. The variation in the unsteady heat transfer coefficient was found to be as high as 120 percent of the mean. For the turbulent flow case a quasisteady calculation was also performed. The time mean of the unsteady heat transfer, the mean of the quasi-steady variations and the steady results agree reasonably well on all blade locations except for the turbulent results which differ near the leading edge. The quasi-steady heat transfer results do not agree with the instantaneous unsteady results, although the time-mean values are similar.

  11. Enhanced O2+ loss at Mars due to an ambipolar electric field from electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; McEnulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (Te) in Mars' dayside ionosphere above ~180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to ~500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher Te (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher Te may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced Te in Mars' ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (eΦ) of several kBTe, which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron, and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  12. Augmentation of Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Due to Turbulence From a DLN Can Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanFossen, G. James; Bunker, Ronald S.

    2000-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements have been made in the stagnation region of a flat plate with a circular leading edge. Electrically heated aluminum strips placed symmetrically about the leading edge stagnation region were used to measure spanwise averaged heat transfer coefficients. The maximum Reynolds number obtained, based on leading edge diameter, was about 100,000. The model was immersed in the flow field downstream of an approximately half scale model of a can-type combustor from a low NO(x), ground based power-generating turbine. The tests were conducted with room temperature air; no fuel was added. Room air flowed into the combustor through six vane type fuel/air swirlers. The combustor can contained no dilution holes. The fuel/air swirlers all swirled the incoming airflow in a counter clockwise direction (facing downstream). A 5-hole probe flow field survey in the plane of the model stagnation point showed the flow was one big vortex with flow angles up to 36' at the outer edges of the rectangular test section. Hot wire measurements showed test section flow had very high levels of turbulence, around 28.5 percent, and had a relatively large axial-length scale-to-leading edge diameter ratio of 0.5. X-wire measurements showed the turbulence to be nearly isotropic. Stagnation heat transfer augmentation over laminar levels was around 77 percent and was about 14 percent higher than predicted by a previously developed correlation for isotropic grid generated turbulence.

  13. Total Human-Caused Global Ocean Heat Uptake Nearly Doubles During Recent Surface Warming Hiatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, P. J.; Durack, P. J.; Stouffer, R. J.; Johnson, G. C.; Forest, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Formal detection and attribution studies have used observations and climate models to identify an anthropogenic warming signature in the upper (0­-700 m) ocean. Recently, as a result of the so-called surface warming hiatus, there has been considerable interest in global ocean heat content (OHC) changes in the deeper ocean, including natural and anthropogenically forced changes evidenced in observational, modelling, and data re-analysis studies. We rely on OHC change estimates from a diverse collection of measurement systems including data from the 19th Century Challenger expedition, a multi-decadal record of ship-based in-situ mostly upper ocean measurements, the more recent near-global Argo floats profiling to intermediate (2000m) depths, and full-depth repeated transoceanic sections. By diagnosing simulated global OHC changes in historically-forced climate models in three depth layers, we show that the current generation of climate models is broadly consistent with multi-decadal estimates of upper, intermediate (700­-2000m) and deep (2000m - ­bottom) global OHC changes as well as with Argo-based estimates over the most recent period. Our results suggest that nearly half of the 1860-­present human-caused increases in global ocean heat content may have occurred since 1998.

  14. Global methane and nitrous oxide emissions from terrestrial ecosystems due to multiple environmental changes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tian, Hanqin; Chen, Guangsheng; Lu, Chaoqun; Xu, Xiaofeng; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Bowen; Banger, Kamaljit; Tao, Bo; Pan, Shufen; Chu, Mingliang; et al

    2015-03-16

    Greenhouse gas (GHG)-induced climate change is among the most pressing sustainability challenges facing humanity today, posing serious risks for ecosystem health. Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the two most important GHGs after carbon dioxide (CO2), but their regional and global budgets are not well known. In this paper, we applied a process-based coupled biogeochemical model to concurrently estimate the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of CH4 and N2O fluxes as driven by multiple environmental changes, including climate variability, rising atmospheric CO2, increasing nitrogen deposition, tropospheric ozone pollution, land use change, and nitrogen fertilizer use.

  15. Predictive study on the risk of malaria spreading due to global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masaji

    1996-12-31

    Global warming will bring about a temperature elevation, and the habitat of vectors of infectious diseases, such as malaria and dengue fever, will spread into subtropical or temperate zone. The purpose of this study is to simulate the spreading of these diseases through reexamination of existing data and collection of some additional information by field survey. From these data, the author will establish the relationship between meteorological conditions, vector density and malaria occurrence. And then he will simulate and predict the malaria epidemics in case of temperature elevation in southeast Asia and Japan.

  16. Illustrating a new global-scale approach to estimating potential reduction in fish species richness due to flow alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, S.; Yanagawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Sui, P.; Koirala, S.; Hirano, K.; Khajuria, A.; Mahendran, R.; Hirabayashi, Y.; Yoshimura, C.; Kanae, S.

    2014-02-01

    Changes in river discharge due to human activities and climate change would affect the sustainability of freshwater ecosystems. To globally assess how changes in river discharge will affect the future status of freshwater ecosystems, global-scale hydrological simulations need to be connected with a model to estimate the durability of freshwater ecosystems. However, the development of this specific modelling combination for the global scale is still in its infancy. In this study, two statistical methods are introduced to link flow regimes to fish species richness (FSR): one is based on a linear relationship between FSR and mean river discharge (hereafter, FSR-MAD method), and the other is based on a multi-linear relationship between FSR and ecologically relevant flow indices involving several other flow characteristics and mean river discharge (FSR-FLVAR method). The FSR-MAD method has been used previously in global simulation studies. The FSR-FLVAR method is newly introduced here. These statistical methods for estimating FSR were combined with a set of global river discharge simulations to evaluate the potential impact of climate-change-induced flow alterations on FSR changes. Generally, future reductions in FSR with the FSR-FLVAR method are greater and much more scattered than with the FSR-MAD method. In arid regions, both methods indicate reductions in FSR because mean discharge is projected to decrease from past to future, although the magnitude of reductions in FSR is different between the two methods. In contrast, in heavy-snow regions a large reduction in FSR is shown by the FSR-FLVAR method due to increases in the frequency of low and high flows. Although further research is clearly needed to conclude which method is more appropriate, this study demonstrates that the FSR-FLVAR method could produce considerably different results when assessing the global role of flow alterations in changing freshwater ecosystems.

  17. Mapping Uncertainty Due to Missing Data in the Global Ocean Health Index.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Melanie; Longo, Catherine; Halpern, Benjamin S

    2016-01-01

    Indicators are increasingly used to measure environmental systems; however, they are often criticized for failing to measure and describe uncertainty. Uncertainty is particularly difficult to evaluate and communicate in the case of composite indicators which aggregate many indicators of ecosystem condition. One of the ongoing goals of the Ocean Health Index (OHI) has been to improve our approach to dealing with missing data, which is a major source of uncertainty. Here we: (1) quantify the potential influence of gapfilled data on index scores from the 2015 global OHI assessment; (2) develop effective methods of tracking, quantifying, and communicating this information; and (3) provide general guidance for implementing gapfilling procedures for existing and emerging indicators, including regional OHI assessments. For the overall OHI global index score, the percent contribution of gapfilled data was relatively small (18.5%); however, it varied substantially among regions and goals. In general, smaller territorial jurisdictions and the food provision and tourism and recreation goals required the most gapfilling. We found the best approach for managing gapfilled data was to mirror the general framework used to organize, calculate, and communicate the Index data and scores. Quantifying gapfilling provides a measure of the reliability of the scores for different regions and components of an indicator. Importantly, this information highlights the importance of the underlying datasets used to calculate composite indicators and can inform and incentivize future data collection. PMID:27483378

  18. Mapping Uncertainty Due to Missing Data in the Global Ocean Health Index

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Catherine; Halpern, Benjamin S.

    2016-01-01

    Indicators are increasingly used to measure environmental systems; however, they are often criticized for failing to measure and describe uncertainty. Uncertainty is particularly difficult to evaluate and communicate in the case of composite indicators which aggregate many indicators of ecosystem condition. One of the ongoing goals of the Ocean Health Index (OHI) has been to improve our approach to dealing with missing data, which is a major source of uncertainty. Here we: (1) quantify the potential influence of gapfilled data on index scores from the 2015 global OHI assessment; (2) develop effective methods of tracking, quantifying, and communicating this information; and (3) provide general guidance for implementing gapfilling procedures for existing and emerging indicators, including regional OHI assessments. For the overall OHI global index score, the percent contribution of gapfilled data was relatively small (18.5%); however, it varied substantially among regions and goals. In general, smaller territorial jurisdictions and the food provision and tourism and recreation goals required the most gapfilling. We found the best approach for managing gapfilled data was to mirror the general framework used to organize, calculate, and communicate the Index data and scores. Quantifying gapfilling provides a measure of the reliability of the scores for different regions and components of an indicator. Importantly, this information highlights the importance of the underlying datasets used to calculate composite indicators and can inform and incentivize future data collection. PMID:27483378

  19. Hemolysis in sickle cell mice causes pulmonary hypertension due to global impairment in nitric oxide bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Hunter C.; Campbell-Lee, Sally A.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Manci, Elizabeth A.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Schimel, Daniel M.; Cochard, Audrey E.; Wang, Xunde; Schechter, Alan N.; Noguchi, Constance T.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a highly prevalent complication of sickle cell disease and is a strong risk factor for early mortality. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to pulmonary vasculopathy remain unclear. Transgenic mice provide opportunities for mechanistic studies of vascular pathophysiology in an animal model. By microcardiac catheterization, all mice expressing exclusively human sickle hemoglobin had pulmonary hypertension, profound pulmonary and systemic endothelial dysfunction, and vascular instability characterized by diminished responses to authentic nitric oxide (NO), NO donors, and endothelium-dependent vasodilators and enhanced responses to vasoconstrictors. However, endothelium-independent vasodilation in sickle mice was normal. Mechanisms of vasculopathy in sickle mice involve global dysregulation of the NO axis: impaired constitutive nitric oxide synthase activity (NOS) with loss of endothelial NOS (eNOS) dimerization, increased NO scavenging by plasma hemoglobin and superoxide, increased arginase activity, and depleted intravascular nitrite reserves. Light microscopy and computed tomography revealed no plexogenic arterial remodeling or thrombi/emboli. Transplanting sickle marrow into wild-type mice conferred the same phenotype, and similar pathobiology was observed in a nonsickle mouse model of acute alloimmune hemolysis. Although the time course is shorter than typical pulmonary hypertension in human sickle cell disease, these results demonstrate that hemolytic anemia is sufficient to produce endothelial dysfunction and global dysregulation of NO. PMID:17158223

  20. Heat generation in an elastic binder system with embedded discrete energetic particles due to high-frequency, periodic mechanical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, J. O.; Miller, J. K.; Gunduz, I. E.; Rhoads, J. F.; Son, S. F.

    2014-11-01

    High-frequency mechanical excitation can induce heating within energetic materials and may lead to advances in explosives detection and defeat. In order to examine the nature of this mechanically induced heating, samples of an elastic binder (Sylgard 184) were embedded with inert and energetic particles placed in a fixed spatial pattern and were subsequently excited with an ultrasonic transducer at discrete frequencies from 100 kHz to 20 MHz. The temperature and velocity responses of the sample surfaces suggest that heating due to frictional effects occurred near the particles at excitation frequencies near the transducer resonance of 215 kHz. An analytical solution involving a heat point source was used to estimate heating rates and temperatures at the particle locations in this frequency region. Heating located near the sample surface at frequencies near and above 1 MHz was attributed to viscoelastic effects related to the surface motion of the samples. At elevated excitation parameters near the transducer resonance frequency, embedded particles of ammonium perchlorate and cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine were driven to chemical decomposition.

  1. A second-order theory for transverse ion heating and momentum coupling due to electrostatic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ronald H.; Winske, Dan; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A second-order theory for electrostatic instabilities driven by counterstreaming ion beams is developed which describes momentum coupling and heating of the plasma via wave-particle interactions. Exchange rates between the waves and particles are derived, which are suitable for the fluid equations simulating microscopic effects on macroscopic scales. Using a fully kinetic simulation, the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability due to counterstreaming H(+) beams has been simulated. A power spectrum from the kinetic simulation is used to evaluate second-order exchange rates. The calculated heating and momentum loss from second-order theory is compared to the numerical simulation.

  2. Flow regulation and river fragmentation in large basins due to global dam development (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, G. O.; Lehner, B.

    2013-12-01

    Dam construction has recently received new interest as an alternative and renewable source of energy, especially in developing countries, and as a means to provide water security in regions with naturally variable water flows. On the other hand, the negative effects from increased fragmentation of the world's large rivers through hydropower and irrigation dams is a matter of great concern for ecologists and conservationists. The main negative effects of dams result from their role as a barrier for migratory fish species, as well as the alteration of the natural flow regime owing to artificial water release schedules. While the trade-offs between these antagonistic effects are usually assessed locally by conducting environmental impact assessments at and in the vicinity of the construction site, the cumulative effects of multiple dams located in the same basin are generally neglected in such plans. To address the cumulative effects at the scale of large river networks, we developed a new impact assessment approach by combining state-of-the-art global scale hydrographic (HydroSHEDS) and hydrological models (WaterGAP) with a river routing scheme (HydroROUT). This combination enables modelers to simulate scenarios for historic, current and future conditions that allow for comparisons between the large river basins of the world. We derive indices that can describe the relative impact of individual and multiple dams regarding flow alteration and habitat fragmentation at a global scale. Our model also allows for the application of tailor-made weighting schemes to include information of eco-hydrological classifications, as well as species richness and diversity. Furthermore, we include natural barriers such as waterfalls, and examine their effect on river network connectivity. Results for the Greater Mekong Region show that ecosystem connectivity and flow alteration are most strongly affected by dams located at the mainstream rivers, particularly for basins where the main

  3. Postponement of incipient collapse due to work-induced heat stress by limited cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blockley, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Four subjects completed five treadmill training sessions under comfortable to cool conditions and were calibrated to find an optimum combination of speed and grade on the treadmill which would produce a metabolic rate of 2000 Btu-hr. Dressed in an Apollo liquid cooling garment, each man underwent a total of four experiments in which the rate of heat extraction from the liquid cooling garment was adjusted to an amount which would cause a storage within the body of 1000 Btu/hr. Physiological measurements included skin temperature at 9 locations, rectal and ear canal probes, and heart rate. The increases in tolerance time for the various subjects and the various methods of emergency cooling, ranged from a low of six minutes to a high of 48 minutes, or from 8 to 102% of the baseline tolerance times. The largest gains were achieved in a subject whose tolerance endpoint was atypical, and whose baseline heat tolerance was unsually low.

  4. BPM Button Optimization to Minimize Distortion Due to Trapped Mode Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron,P.; Blednyk, A.; Kosciuk, B.; Pinayev, I.; Ravindranath, I.; Singh, O

    2009-05-04

    The outer circumference of a BPM button and the inner circumference of the button housing comprise a transmission line. This transmission line typically presents an impedance of a few tens of ohms to the beam, and couples very weakly to the 50 ohm coaxial transmission line that comprises the signal path out of the button. The modes which are consequently excited and trapped often have quality factors of several hundred, permitting resonant excitation by the beam. The thermal distortion resulting from trapped mode heating is potentially problematic for achieving the high precision beam position measurements needed to provide the sub-micron beam position stability required by light source users. We present a button design that has been optimized via material selection and component geometry to minimize both the trapped mode heating and the resulting thermal distortion.

  5. Aerodynamic heating on AFE due to nonequilibrium flow with variable entropy at boundary layer edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, P. C.; Rochelle, W. C.; Bouslog, S. A.; Tam, L. T.; Scott, C. D.; Curry, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A method of predicting the aerobrake aerothermodynamic environment on the NASA Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle is described. Results of a three dimensional inviscid nonequilibrium solution are used as input to an axisymmetric nonequilibrium boundary layer program to predict AFE convective heating rates. Inviscid flow field properties are obtained from the Euler option of the Viscous Reacting Flow (VRFLO) code at the boundary layer edge. Heating rates on the AFE surface are generated with the Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMP) code for a partially catalytic surface composed of Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) times. The 1864 kg AFE will fly an aerobraking trajectory, simulating return from geosynchronous Earth orbit, with a 75 km perigee and a 10 km/sec entry velocity. Results of this analysis will provide principal investigators and thermal analysts with aeroheating environments to perform experiment and thermal protection system design.

  6. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H. )

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  7. Global methane and nitrous oxide emissions from terrestrial ecosystems due to multiple environmental changes

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hanqin; Chen, Guangsheng; Lu, Chaoqun; Xu, Xiaofeng; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Bowen; Banger, Kamaljit; Tao, Bo; Pan, Shufen; Chu, Mingliang; Zhang, Chi; Bruhwiler, Lori; Wofsy, Steven

    2015-03-16

    Greenhouse gas (GHG)-induced climate change is among the most pressing sustainability challenges facing humanity today, posing serious risks for ecosystem health. Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the two most important GHGs after carbon dioxide (CO2), but their regional and global budgets are not well known. In this paper, we applied a process-based coupled biogeochemical model to concurrently estimate the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of CH4 and N2O fluxes as driven by multiple environmental changes, including climate variability, rising atmospheric CO2, increasing nitrogen deposition, tropospheric ozone pollution, land use change, and nitrogen fertilizer use.

  8. Global spatiotemporal order and induced stochastic resonance due to a locally applied signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoletov, A.; Chaplain, M.; Levi, V.

    2004-04-01

    We study the phenomenon of spatiotemporal stochastic resonance (STSR) in a chain of diffusively coupled bistable oscillators. In particular, we examine the situation in which the global STSR response is controlled by a locally applied signal and reveal a wave-front propagation. In order to deepen the understanding of the system dynamics, we introduce, on the time scale of STSR, the study of the effective statistical renormalization of a generic lattice system. Using this technique we provide a criterion for STSR, and predict and observe numerically a bifurcationlike behavior that reflects the difference between the most probable value of the local quasiequilibrium density and its mean value. Our results, tested with a chain of nonlinear oscillators, appear to possess some universal qualities and may stimulate a deeper search for more generic phenomena.

  9. Experimental investigation of heating phenomena in linac mechanical interfaces due to RF field penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a high duty-factor, high-current, drift-tube linear accelerator, a critical interface exists between the drift-tube stem and the tank wall. This interface must provide vacuum integrity and RF continuity, while simultaneously allowing alignment flexibility. Because of past difficulties with RF heating of vacuum bellows and RF joints encountered by others, a paucity of available information, and the high reliability requirement for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator, a program was initiated to study the problem. Because RF heating is the common failure mode, an attempt was made to find a correlation between the drift-tube-stem/linac-tank interface geometry and RF field penetration from the tank into the interface region. Experiments were performed at 80 MHz on an RF structure designed to simulate the conditions to which a drift-tube stem and vacuum bellows are exposed in a drift-tube linac. Additional testing was performed on a 367-MHz model of the FMIT prototype drift-tube linac. Experimental results, and a method to predict excessive RF heating, is presented. An experimentally tested solution to the problem is discussed.

  10. Mega-heatwave temperatures due to combined soil desiccation and atmospheric heat accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, Diego G.; Teuling, Adriaan J.; van Heerwaarden, Chiel C.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    The recent European mega-heatwaves of 2003 and 2010 broke temperature records across Europe. Although events of this magnitude were unprecedented from a historical perspective, they are expected to become common by the end of the century. However, our understanding of extreme heatwave events is limited and their representation in climate models remains imperfect. Here we investigate the physical processes underlying recent mega-heatwaves using satellite and balloon measurements of land and atmospheric conditions from the summers of 2003 in France and 2010 in Russia, in combination with a soil-water-atmosphere model. We find that, in both events, persistent atmospheric pressure patterns induced land-atmosphere feedbacks that led to extreme temperatures. During daytime, heat was supplied by large-scale horizontal advection, warming of an increasingly desiccated land surface and enhanced entrainment of warm air into the atmospheric boundary layer. Overnight, the heat generated during the day was preserved in an anomalous kilometres-deep atmospheric layer located several hundred metres above the surface, available to re-enter the atmospheric boundary layer during the next diurnal cycle. This resulted in a progressive accumulation of heat over several days, which enhanced soil desiccation and led to further escalation in air temperatures. Our findings suggest that the extreme temperatures in mega-heatwaves can be explained by the combined multi-day memory of the land surface and the atmospheric boundary layer.

  11. Transient heat transfer in helium II due to a sudden vacuum break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosque, Ernesto S.; Dhuley, Ram C.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    To ensure future cryogenic devices meet safety and operational specifications, significant value is gained from a developed understanding of the transient heat fluxes that result from failure of an insulating vacuum jacket around a helium II (He II)-cooled device. A novel, one-dimensional experiment is successfully performed examining the phenomena immediately following a vacuum rupture onto a cryosurface. In the experiment, a fast-opening (˜10 ms) valve isolates a rigid container of ultra high purity nitrogen (N2) gas kept at room temperature and adjustable pressure from a vertically oriented, highly evacuated (˜10-3 Pa) tube roughly 1 m in length. The bottom of the evacuated tube is sealed via a 2.54 mm thick copper disk, whose bottom surface is in intimate contact with an open column of He II (˜1.8 K). The evacuated tube, disk, and He II column share a diameter of 24 mm. Opening the valve results in a vacuum rupture. N2 gas is immediately drawn into the evacuated space and cryopumped onto the disk as a growing layer of solid cryodeposit. Various coupled transient heat transfer processes proceed as the internal energy of the warm gas is transferred through the growing layer of solid N2, through the copper disk, and into the He II column. This work examines the qualitative nature of these transient phenomena and the magnitude of the heat fluxes present through each of the series of thermal resistances.

  12. Transient heat transfer in helium II due to a sudden vacuum break

    SciTech Connect

    Bosque, Ernesto S.; Dhuley, Ram C.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-29

    To ensure future cryogenic devices meet safety and operational specifications, significant value is gained from a developed understanding of the transient heat fluxes that result from failure of an insulating vacuum jacket around a helium II (He II)-cooled device. A novel, one-dimensional experiment is successfully performed examining the phenomena immediately following a vacuum rupture onto a cryosurface. In the experiment, a fast-opening (∼10 ms) valve isolates a rigid container of ultra high purity nitrogen (N{sub 2}) gas kept at room temperature and adjustable pressure from a vertically oriented, highly evacuated (∼10{sup −3} Pa) tube roughly 1 m in length. The bottom of the evacuated tube is sealed via a 2.54 mm thick copper disk, whose bottom surface is in intimate contact with an open column of He II (∼1.8 K). The evacuated tube, disk, and He II column share a diameter of 24 mm. Opening the valve results in a vacuum rupture. N{sub 2} gas is immediately drawn into the evacuated space and cryopumped onto the disk as a growing layer of solid cryodeposit. Various coupled transient heat transfer processes proceed as the internal energy of the warm gas is transferred through the growing layer of solid N{sub 2}, through the copper disk, and into the He II column. This work examines the qualitative nature of these transient phenomena and the magnitude of the heat fluxes present through each of the series of thermal resistances.

  13. Global map of heat flow on a 2 degree grid - digitally available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. Huw

    2014-05-01

    A global map of surface heat flow is developed on a 2° by 2° equal area grid, and is made available digitally. It is based on a global heat flow data set of over 38,000 measurements, very similar to that used in Davies & Davies (2010). The map consists of three components. Firstly, in regions of young ocean crust (<67.7Ma) the model estimate uses a half-space conduction model based on the age of the oceanic crust, using parameters of Jaupart et al., (2007). This is done since it is well known that raw data measurements are frequently influenced by significant hydrothermal circulation. Secondly in other regions of data coverage the estimate is based on data measurements. At the map resolution these two categories (young ocean, data covered) cover 65% of Earth's surface. The estimate has been developed in two different ways. In one way the mean value is used and in the second the median is used. The median estimate might be expected to be less sensitive to outliers. Thirdly, for all other regions the estimate is based on the assumption that there is a correlation between heat-flow and geology. This is undertaken using the CCGM (2000) digital geology map. This assumption is assessed and the correlation is found to provide a minor improvement over assuming that heat flow would be represented by the global average. The estimate for Antarctica is guided by proxy measurements. All the work is undertaken using GIS methods. Estimates are made of the errors for all components. The results have been made available as digital files, including shapefiles and tab-delimited and csv ASCII files. In addition to the equal area grid, the results are also available on an equal longitude grid. The map has been published -Davies (2013). The digital files are available in the supplementary information of the publication. Commission for the Geological Map of the World (2000), Geological Map of the World at 1:25000000, UNESCO/CCGM, Paris. Davies, JH, (2013) A global map of solid Earth

  14. Impacts of Soil-aquifer Heat and Water Fluxes on Simulated Global Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krakauer, N.Y.; Puma, Michael J.; Cook, B. I.

    2013-01-01

    Climate models have traditionally only represented heat and water fluxes within relatively shallow soil layers, but there is increasing interest in the possible role of heat and water exchanges with the deeper subsurface. Here, we integrate an idealized 50m deep aquifer into the land surface module of the GISS ModelE general circulation model to test the influence of aquifer-soil moisture and heat exchanges on climate variables. We evaluate the impact on the modeled climate of aquifer-soil heat and water fluxes separately, as well as in combination. The addition of the aquifer to ModelE has limited impact on annual-mean climate, with little change in global mean land temperature, precipitation, or evaporation. The seasonal amplitude of deep soil temperature is strongly damped by the soil-aquifer heat flux. This not only improves the model representation of permafrost area but propagates to the surface, resulting in an increase in the seasonal amplitude of surface air temperature of >1K in the Arctic. The soil-aquifer water and heat fluxes both slightly decrease interannual variability in soil moisture and in landsurface temperature, and decrease the soil moisture memory of the land surface on seasonal to annual timescales. The results of this experiment suggest that deepening the modeled land surface, compared to modeling only a shallower soil column with a no-flux bottom boundary condition, has limited impact on mean climate but does affect seasonality and interannual persistence.

  15. Measurements of global and localized ion heating during impulsive reconnection in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadhara, S.; Craig, D.; Ennis, D. A.; den Hartog, D. J.; Almagri, A. F.; Chapman, B. E.; Fiksel, G.; Prager, S. C.

    2006-10-01

    In the MST reversed field pinch, impulsive reconnection occurs at (a) sawtooth crashes in standard plasmas, in which many large tearing modes are present, and (b) bursts of edge-resonant tearing modes with poloidal mode number m = 0 in enhanced confinement plasmas. In both cases, magnetic energy decreases while ion thermal energy increases. Fast, localized measurements of the impurity ion temperature (Ti) are made using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. Ion heating is observed to be limited to the outer half of the plasma for an m=0 burst, and is strongest near the m=0 resonant surface. Conversely, ion heating occurs at all radii during a sawtooth crash, as Ti more than doubles over ˜ 100 μs. The results suggest that ions are heated primarily near the reconnection layer, and that global heating during a crash arises from activity at multiple reconnection sites throughout the plasma. Both the heating profile and degree of heating during a crash vary strongly with plasma current, density, the reversal parameter, and ion species. At high plasma current (0.5 MA), the large Ti (> 1 keV on-axis) generated during a crash can be sustained by reduction of magnetic fluctuations using auxiliary current drive. Work supported by U.S.D.O.E. and N.S.F.

  16. Changes in US background ozone due to global anthropogenic emissions from 1970 to 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nopmongcol, Uarporn; Jung, Jaegun; Kumar, Naresh; Yarwood, Greg

    2016-09-01

    Estimates of North American and US Background (NAB and USB) ozone (O3) are critical in setting and implementing the US National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and therefore influence population exposure to O3 across the US. NAB is defined as the O3 concentration in the absence of anthropogenic O3 precursor emissions from North America whereas USB excludes anthropogenic emissions inside the US alone. NAB and USB vary geographically and with time of year. Analyses of O3 trends at rural locations near the west coast suggest that background O3 is rising in response to increasing non-US emissions. As the O3 NAAQS is lowered, rising background O3 would make attaining the NAAQS more difficult. Most studies of changing US background O3 have inferred trends from observations whereas air quality management decisions tend to rely on models. Thus, it is important that the models used to develop O3 management strategies are able to represent the changes in background O3 in order to increase confidence that air quality management strategies will succeed. We focus on how changing global emissions influence USB rather than the effects of inter-annual meteorological variation or long-term climate change. We use a regional model (CAMx) nested within a global model (GEOS-Chem) to refine our grid resolution over high terrain in the western US and near US borders where USB tends to be higher. We determine USB from CAMx simulations that exclude US anthropogenic emissions. Over five decades, from 1970 to 2020, estimated USB for the annual fourth highest maximum daily 8-h average O3 (H4MDA8) in the western US increased from mostly in the range of 40-55 ppb to 45-60 ppb, but remained below 45 ppb in the eastern US. USB increases in the southwestern US are consistent with rising emissions in Asia and Mexico. USB decreases in the northeast US after 1990 follow declining Canadian emissions. Our results show that the USB increases both for the top 30 MDA8 days and the H4MDA8 (the former

  17. Investigation of Neutral Wind Effects on the Global Joule Heating Rate Using MHD and TI Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalafatoglu, E.; Kaymaz, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Precise calculation of global Joule heating rate is a long standing question in thermosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. The absence of the complete and direct, in-situ measurements of the parameters involved in the calculation of Joule heating such as the conductivity of the medium, small-scale variations of electric fields, and neutral winds at the ionospheric heights poses a great uncertainty in its determination. In this work, we study the effects of the neutral wind on the global Joule heating rate. Most of the time, owing to above mentioned difficulties the effects of the neutral wind have been neglected in the calculations. We investigate their effects using BATSRUS MHD model, TIEGCM and GITM. Using horizontal current density, Cowling conductivity, and Pedersen conductivities from the MHD model, we calculate the joule heating rate with and without the neutral wind contribution. We apply the procedure for March 2008 magnetospheric substorm events and quantify the differences to show the neutral wind contribution. We compare the results with those obtained using neutral wind velocities from TIEGCM and GITM models. This way while we compare and demonstrate the discrepancies between the models, we also provide an assessment for the integration of thermospheric and magnetospheric models.

  18. Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) heat exchange project: A summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Niiler, P. P.

    1985-01-01

    A pilot data center to compute ocean atmosphere heat exchange over the tropical ocean is prposed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in response to the scientific needs of the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Program. Optimal methods will be used to estimate sea surface temperature (SET), surface wind speed, and humidity from spaceborne observations. A monthly summary of these parameters will be used to compute ocean atmosphere latent heat exchanges. Monthly fields of surface heat flux over tropical oceans will be constructed using estimations of latent heat exchanges and short wave radiation from satellite data. Verification of all satellite data sets with in situ measurements at a few locations will be provided. The data center will be an experimental active archive where the quality and quantity of data required for TOGA flux computation are managed. The center is essential to facilitate the construction of composite data sets from global measurements taken from different sensors on various satellites. It will provide efficient utilization and easy access to the large volume of satellite data available for studies of ocean atmosphere energy exchanges.

  19. Industrial-era global ocean heat uptake doubles in recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, Peter J.; Durack, Paul J.; Stouffer, Ronald J.; Johnson, Gregory C.; Forest, Chris E.

    2016-04-01

    Formal detection and attribution studies have used observations and climate models to identify an anthropogenic warming signature in the upper (0-700 m) ocean. Recently, as a result of the so-called surface warming hiatus, there has been considerable interest in global ocean heat content (OHC) changes in the deeper ocean, including natural and anthropogenically forced changes identified in observational, modelling and data re-analysis studies. Here, we examine OHC changes in the context of the Earth’s global energy budget since early in the industrial era (circa 1865-2015) for a range of depths. We rely on OHC change estimates from a diverse collection of measurement systems including data from the nineteenth-century Challenger expedition, a multi-decadal record of ship-based in situ mostly upper-ocean measurements, the more recent near-global Argo floats profiling to intermediate (2,000 m) depths, and full-depth repeated transoceanic sections. We show that the multi-model mean constructed from the current generation of historically forced climate models is consistent with the OHC changes from this diverse collection of observational systems. Our model-based analysis suggests that nearly half of the industrial-era increases in global OHC have occurred in recent decades, with over a third of the accumulated heat occurring below 700 m and steadily rising.

  20. Predicted changes in energy demands for heating and cooling due to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinar, Mojca; Vidrih, Boris; Kajfež-Bogataj, Lučka; Medved, Sašo

    In the last 3 years in Slovenia we experienced extremely hot summers and demand for cooling the buildings have risen significantly. Since climate change scenarios predict higher temperatures for the whole country and for all seasons, we expect that energy demand for heating would decrease while demand for cooling would increase. An analysis for building with permitted energy demand and for low-energy demand building in two typical urban climates in Slovenia was performed. The transient systems simulation program (TRNSYS) was used for simulation of the indoor conditions and the energy use for heating and cooling. Climate change scenarios were presented in form of “future” Test Reference Years (TRY). The time series of hourly data for all meteorological variables for different scenarios were chosen from actual measurements, using the method of highest likelihood. The climate change scenarios predicted temperature rise (+1 °C and +3 °C) and solar radiation increase (+3% and +6%). With the selection of these scenarios we covered the spectra of possible predicted climate changes in Slovenia. The results show that energy use for heating would decrease from 16% to 25% (depends on the intensity of warming) in subalpine region, while in Mediterranean region the rate of change would not be significant. In summer time we would need up to six times more energy for cooling in subalpine region and approximately two times more in Mediterranean region. low-energy building proved to be very economical in wintertime while on average higher energy consumption for cooling is expected in those buildings in summertime. In case of significant warmer and more solar energy intensive climate, the good isolated buildings are more efficient than standard buildings. TRY proved not to be efficient for studying extreme conditions like installed power of the cooling system.

  1. Global alteration of ocean ecosystem functioning due to increasing human CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Nagelkerken, Ivan; Connell, Sean D

    2015-10-27

    Rising anthropogenic CO2 emissions are anticipated to drive change to ocean ecosystems, but a conceptualization of biological change derived from quantitative analyses is lacking. Derived from multiple ecosystems and latitudes, our metaanalysis of 632 published experiments quantified the direction and magnitude of ecological change resulting from ocean acidification and warming to conceptualize broadly based change. Primary production by temperate noncalcifying plankton increases with elevated temperature and CO2, whereas tropical plankton decreases productivity because of acidification. Temperature increases consumption by and metabolic rates of herbivores, but this response does not translate into greater secondary production, which instead decreases with acidification in calcifying and noncalcifying species. This effect creates a mismatch with carnivores whose metabolic and foraging costs increase with temperature. Species diversity and abundances of tropical as well as temperate species decline with acidification, with shifts favoring novel community compositions dominated by noncalcifiers and microorganisms. Both warming and acidification instigate reduced calcification in tropical and temperate reef-building species. Acidification leads to a decline in dimethylsulfide production by ocean plankton, which as a climate gas, contributes to cloud formation and maintenance of the Earth's heat budget. Analysis of responses in short- and long-term experiments and of studies at natural CO2 vents reveals little evidence of acclimation to acidification or temperature changes, except for microbes. This conceptualization of change across whole communities and their trophic linkages forecast a reduction in diversity and abundances of various key species that underpin current functioning of marine ecosystems. PMID:26460052

  2. Global alteration of ocean ecosystem functioning due to increasing human CO2 emissions

    PubMed Central

    Nagelkerken, Ivan; Connell, Sean D.

    2015-01-01

    Rising anthropogenic CO2 emissions are anticipated to drive change to ocean ecosystems, but a conceptualization of biological change derived from quantitative analyses is lacking. Derived from multiple ecosystems and latitudes, our metaanalysis of 632 published experiments quantified the direction and magnitude of ecological change resulting from ocean acidification and warming to conceptualize broadly based change. Primary production by temperate noncalcifying plankton increases with elevated temperature and CO2, whereas tropical plankton decreases productivity because of acidification. Temperature increases consumption by and metabolic rates of herbivores, but this response does not translate into greater secondary production, which instead decreases with acidification in calcifying and noncalcifying species. This effect creates a mismatch with carnivores whose metabolic and foraging costs increase with temperature. Species diversity and abundances of tropical as well as temperate species decline with acidification, with shifts favoring novel community compositions dominated by noncalcifiers and microorganisms. Both warming and acidification instigate reduced calcification in tropical and temperate reef-building species. Acidification leads to a decline in dimethylsulfide production by ocean plankton, which as a climate gas, contributes to cloud formation and maintenance of the Earth’s heat budget. Analysis of responses in short- and long-term experiments and of studies at natural CO2 vents reveals little evidence of acclimation to acidification or temperature changes, except for microbes. This conceptualization of change across whole communities and their trophic linkages forecast a reduction in diversity and abundances of various key species that underpin current functioning of marine ecosystems. PMID:26460052

  3. The exterior unsteady viscous flow and heat transfer due to a porous expanding or contracting cylinder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Si, Xinhui; Shen, Yanan; Zheng, Liancun; Lin, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Since the vessels in the biological tissues are characterized by low seepage Reynolds numbers and contracting or expanding walls, more attention is paid on the viscous flow outside the porous pipe with small expansion or contraction. This paper presents a numerical solution of the flow and heat transfer outside an expanding or contracting porous cylinder. The coupled nonlinear similarity equations are solved by Bvp4c, which is a collocation method with MATLAB. The effects of the different physical parameters, namely the permeability Reynolds number,the expansion ratio and the Prandtl number, on the velocity and temperature distribution are obtained and the results are shown graphically. PMID:26406014

  4. Heat transfer from a liquid bath due to an impinging gas jet: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, F.; Farouk, B.; Mutharasan, R.

    1995-12-31

    An impinging gasjet on a liquid surface is found in many industrial processes such as electric arc furnace steel-making and welding. Fundamental understanding of the interaction of a gas or plasmajet impinging on a liquid pool can provide important insights into process behavior resulting in improved efficiency. A numerical model is developed for solving both the impinging gas jet and the liquid pool temperature and flow fields along with the deformed interface shape for the above processing operation. Using curvilinear coordinates, the Navier-Stokes equations of each phase are solved separately and then coupled via continuity of static pressure, shear stress, temperature and heat flux at the interface.

  5. Solar Effects on Global Climate Due to Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Raeder, J.; DAuria, R.

    2005-01-01

    Although the work reported here does not directly connect solar variability with global climate change, this research establishes a plausible quantitative causative link between observed solar activity and apparently correlated variations in terrestrial climate parameters. Specifically, we have demonstrated that ion-mediated nucleation of atmospheric particles is a likely, and likely widespread, phenomenon that relates solar variability to changes in the microphysical properties of clouds. To investigate this relationship, we have constructed and applied a new model describing the formation and evolution of ionic clusters under a range of atmospheric conditions throughout the lower atmosphere. The activation of large ionic clusters into cloud nuclei is predicted to be favorable in the upper troposphere and mesosphere, and possibly in the lower stratosphere. The model developed under this grant needs to be extended to include additional cluster families, and should be incorporated into microphysical models to further test the cause-and-effect linkages that may ultimately explain key aspects of the connections between solar variability and climate.

  6. Global pattern of soil carbon losses due to the conversion of forests to agricultural land.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaorong; Shao, Mingan; Gale, William; Li, Linhai

    2014-01-01

    Several reviews have analyzed the factors that affect the change in soil organic C (SOC) when forest is converted to agricultural land; however, the effects of forest type and cultivation stage on these changes have generally been overlooked. We collated observations from 453 paired or chronosequential sites where forests have been converted to agricultural land and then assessed the effects of forest type, cultivation stage, climate factors, and soil properties on the change in the SOC stock and the SOC turnover rate constant (k). The percent decrease in SOC stocks and the turnover rate constants both varied significantly according to forest type and cultivation stage. The largest decrease in SOC stocks was observed in temperate regions (52% decrease), followed by tropical regions (41% decrease) and boreal regions (31% decrease). Climate and soil factors affected the decrease in SOC stocks. The SOC turnover rate constant after the conversion of forests to agricultural land increased with the mean annual precipitation and temperature. To our knowledge, this is the first time that original forest type was considered when evaluating changes in SOC after being converted to agricultural land. The differences between forest types should be considered when calculating global changes in SOC stocks. PMID:24513580

  7. Histopathologic alterations associated with global gene expression due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure in juvenile zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Cariou, Ronan; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Jiang, Nan; Goetz, Giles; Hutz, Reinhold J; Tonellato, Peter J; Carvan, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the effects and possible developmental disease implication of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on global gene expression anchored to histopathologic analysis in juvenile zebrafish by functional genomic, histopathologic and analytic chemistry methods. Specifically, juvenile zebrafish were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb, and fish were sampled following 0, 7, 14, 28 and 42 d after initiation of the exposure. TCDD accumulated in a dose- and time-dependent manner and 100 ppb TCDD caused TCDD accumulation in female (15.49 ppb) and male (18.04 ppb) fish at 28 d post exposure. Dietary TCDD caused multiple lesions in liver, kidney, intestine and ovary of zebrafish and functional dysregulation such as depletion of glycogen in liver, retrobulbar edema, degeneration of nasal neurosensory epithelium, underdevelopment of intestine, and diminution in the fraction of ovarian follicles containing vitellogenic oocytes. Importantly, lesions in nasal epithelium and evidence of endocrine disruption based on alternatively spliced vasa transcripts are two novel and significant results of this study. Microarray gene expression analysis comparing vehicle control to dietary TCDD revealed dysregulated genes involved in pathways associated with cardiac necrosis/cell death, cardiac fibrosis, renal necrosis/cell death and liver necrosis/cell death. These baseline toxicological effects provide evidence for the potential mechanisms of developmental dysfunctions induced by TCDD and vasa as a biomarker for ovarian developmental disruption. PMID:24988445

  8. Histopathologic Alterations Associated with Global Gene Expression Due to Chronic Dietary TCDD Exposure in Juvenile Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Cariou, Ronan; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Jiang, Nan; Goetz, Giles; Hutz, Reinhold J.; Tonellato, Peter J.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the effects and possible developmental disease implication of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on global gene expression anchored to histopathologic analysis in juvenile zebrafish by functional genomic, histopathologic and analytic chemistry methods. Specifically, juvenile zebrafish were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb, and fish were sampled following 0, 7, 14, 28 and 42 d after initiation of the exposure. TCDD accumulated in a dose- and time-dependent manner and 100 ppb TCDD caused TCDD accumulation in female (15.49 ppb) and male (18.04 ppb) fish at 28 d post exposure. Dietary TCDD caused multiple lesions in liver, kidney, intestine and ovary of zebrafish and functional dysregulation such as depletion of glycogen in liver, retrobulbar edema, degeneration of nasal neurosensory epithelium, underdevelopment of intestine, and diminution in the fraction of ovarian follicles containing vitellogenic oocytes. Importantly, lesions in nasal epithelium and evidence of endocrine disruption based on alternatively spliced vasa transcripts are two novel and significant results of this study. Microarray gene expression analysis comparing vehicle control to dietary TCDD revealed dysregulated genes involved in pathways associated with cardiac necrosis/cell death, cardiac fibrosis, renal necrosis/cell death and liver necrosis/cell death. These baseline toxicological effects provide evidence for the potential mechanisms of developmental dysfunctions induced by TCDD and vasa as a biomarker for ovarian developmental disruption. PMID:24988445

  9. Global Simulation of Proton Precipitation Due to Field Line Curvature During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, M. L.; Raeder, J.; Donovan, E.; Ge, Y. S.; Kepko, L.

    2012-01-01

    The low latitude boundary of the proton aurora (known as the Isotropy Boundary or IB) marks an important boundary between empty and full downgoing loss cones. There is significant evidence that the IB maps to a region in the magnetosphere where the ion gyroradius becomes comparable to the local field line curvature. However, the location of the IB in the magnetosphere remains in question. In this paper, we show simulated proton precipitation derived from the Field Line Curvature (FLC) model of proton scattering and a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation during two substorms. The simulated proton precipitation drifts equatorward during the growth phase, intensifies at onset and reproduces the azimuthal splitting published in previous studies. In the simulation, the pre-onset IB maps to 7-8 RE for the substorms presented and the azimuthal splitting is caused by the development of the substorm current wedge. The simulation also demonstrates that the central plasma sheet temperature can significantly influence when and where the azimuthal splitting takes place.

  10. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam Chakhmachi, Amir; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-15

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  11. Study of heat transfer due to turbulent flow of nanofluids through rib-groove channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shamani, A. N.; Sopian, K.; Abed, A. M.; Alghoul, M. A.; Ruslan, M. H.; Mat, S.

    2015-09-01

    Nanofluids for improve characteristics flow in a rib-groove channel are investigate. The continuity, momentum and energy equations were solved by FLUENT program. The bottom wall of channel is heated while the upper wall is symmetry, the left side velocity inlet, and the right side is outlet (pressure out). Four different rib-groove shapes are used. Four different types of nanoparticles, Al2O3, CuO, SiO2, and ZnO with different volumes fractions in the range of 1% to 4% and different nanoparticle diameter in the range of 25 nm to 70 nm, are dispersed in the base fluid water are used. In this paper, several parameters such as different Reynolds numbers in the range of 10000 < Re < 40000 are investigated. The numerical results indicate that the trapezoidal with increasing height in the flow direction rib- trapezoidal groove has the best heat transfer and high Nusselt number; the nanofluids with SiO2 have the best behavior. The Nusselt number increases as the volume fraction increases and it decreases as the nanoparticle diameter increases.

  12. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Chakhmachi, Amir; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-01

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  13. Globally coupled stochastic two-state oscillators: fluctuations due to finite numbers.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Italo'Ivo Lima Dias; Escaff, Daniel; Harbola, Upendra; Rosas, Alexandre; Lindenberg, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Infinite arrays of coupled two-state stochastic oscillators exhibit well-defined steady states. We study the fluctuations that occur when the number N of oscillators in the array is finite. We choose a particular form of global coupling that in the infinite array leads to a pitchfork bifurcation from a monostable to a bistable steady state, the latter with two equally probable stationary states. The control parameter for this bifurcation is the coupling strength. In finite arrays these states become metastable: The fluctuations lead to distributions around the most probable states, with one maximum in the monostable regime and two maxima in the bistable regime. In the latter regime, the fluctuations lead to transitions between the two peak regions of the distribution. Also, we find that the fluctuations break the symmetry in the bimodal regime, that is, one metastable state becomes more probable than the other, increasingly so with increasing array size. To arrive at these results, we start from microscopic dynamical evolution equations from which we derive a Langevin equation that exhibits an interesting multiplicative noise structure. We also present a master equation description of the dynamics. Both of these equations lead to the same Fokker-Planck equation, the master equation via a 1/N expansion and the Langevin equation via standard methods of Itô calculus for multiplicative noise. From the Fokker-Planck equation we obtain an effective potential that reflects the transition from the monomodal to the bimodal distribution as a function of a control parameter. We present a variety of numerical and analytic results that illustrate the strong effects of the fluctuations. We also show that the limits N → ∞ and t → ∞ (t is the time) do not commute. In fact, the two orders of implementation lead to drastically different results. PMID:25353775

  14. Final Technical Report for "Radiative Heating Associated with Tropical Convective Cloud Systems: Its Importance at Meso and Global Scales"

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Courtney

    2012-12-13

    Heating associated with tropical cloud systems drive the global circulation. The overall research objectives of this project were to i) further quantify and understand the importance of heating in tropical convective cloud systems with innovative observational techniques, and ii) use global models to determine the large-scale circulation response to variability in tropical heating profiles, including anvil and cirrus cloud radiative forcing. The innovative observational techniques used a diversity of radar systems to create a climatology of vertical velocities associated with the full tropical convective cloud spectrum along with a dissection of the of the total heating profile of tropical cloud systems into separate components (i.e., the latent, radiative, and eddy sensible heating). These properties were used to validate storm-scale and global climate models (GCMs) and were further used to force two different types of GCMs (one with and one without interactive physics). While radiative heating was shown to account for about 20% of the total heating and did not have a strong direct response on the global circulation, the indirect response was important via its impact on convection, esp. in how radiative heating impacts the tilt of heating associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a phenomenon that accounts for most tropical intraseasonal variability. This work shows strong promise in determining the sensitivity of climate models and climate processes to heating variations associated with cloud systems.

  15. The synchronous instability of a compressor rotor due to bearing journal differential heating

    SciTech Connect

    Jongh, F.M. de; Morton, P.G.

    1996-10-01

    The paper describes a synchronous vibration instability problem encountered on a centrifugal compressor with oil-lubricated bearings. The problem was solved by modification of the compressor rotor; however, the root cause was not completely understood at that time. A possible explanation was based on a theory that suggested differential heating of the bearing journals. It was decided to verify this theory by experiments. Therefore a test rotor was designed with identical rotor dynamic characteristics to those of the compressor rotor. To fill a gap in the published research on bearing thermohydrodynamics, an experimental technique was devised to measure the surface temperature variations around one of the journals of this rotor. The dependence of significant temperature differentials across the journal upon its orbit was confirmed.

  16. Numerical analysis of the electrical failure of a metallic nanowire mesh due to Joule heating

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    To precisely examine the electrical failure behavior of a metallic nanowire mesh induced by Joule heating (i.e., melting), a previously developed numerical method was modified with regard to the maximum temperature in the mesh and the electrical resistivity of the nanowire. A sample case of an Ag nanowire mesh under specific working conditions was analyzed with highly accurate numerical results. By monitoring the temperature in the mesh, the current required to trigger the melting of a mesh segment (i.e., the melting current) could be obtained. The melting process of a mesh equipped with a current source during actual operation was predicted on the basis of the obtained relationship between the melting current and the corresponding melting voltage in the numerical melting process. Local unstable and stable melting could be precisely identified for both the current-controlled and voltage-controlled current sources in the present example. PMID:23992528

  17. Limited impact of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on marine productivity due to biogeochemical feedbacks in a global ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somes, Christopher J.; Landolfi, Angela; Koeve, Wolfgang; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The impact of increasing anthropogenic atmospheric nitrogen deposition on marine biogeochemistry is uncertain. We performed simulations to quantify its effect on nitrogen cycling and marine productivity in a global 3-D ocean biogeochemistry model. Nitrogen fixation provides an efficient feedback by decreasing immediately to deposition, whereas water column denitrification increases more gradually in the slowly expanding oxygen deficient zones. Counterintuitively, nitrogen deposition near oxygen deficient zones causes a net loss of marine nitrogen due to the stoichiometry of denitrification. In our idealized atmospheric deposition simulations that only account for nitrogen cycle perturbations, these combined stabilizing feedbacks largely compensate deposition and suppress the increase in global marine productivity to <2%, in contrast to a simulation that neglects nitrogen cycle feedbacks that predicts an increase of >15%. Our study emphasizes including the dynamic response of nitrogen fixation and denitrification to atmospheric nitrogen deposition to predict future changes of the marine nitrogen cycle and productivity.

  18. Multiple stable states of tree cover in a global land surface model due to a fire-vegetation feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasslop, G.; Brovkin, V.; Reick, C. H.; Bathiany, S.; Kloster, S.

    2016-06-01

    The presence of multiple stable states has far-reaching consequences for a system's susceptibility to disturbances, including the possibility of abrupt transitions between stable states. The occurrence of multiple stable states of vegetation is supported by ecological theory, models, and observations. Here we describe the occurrence of multiple stable states of tree cover in a global dynamic vegetation model and provide the first global picture on multiple stable states of tree cover due to a fire-vegetation feedback. The multiple stable states occur in the transition zones between grasslands and forests, mainly in Africa and Asia. By sensitivity simulations and simplifying the relevant model equations we show that the occurrence of multiple states is caused by the sensitivity of the fire disturbance rate to the presence of woody plant types.

  19. Available potential energy gain from mixing due to the nonlinearity of the equation of state in a global ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakawa, L. S.; Saenz, J. A.; Hogg, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    Densification in the ocean interior upon mixing at high latitudes, due to the nonlinear equation of state (EoS) of seawater, enhances the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). However, recent calculations using numerical simulations of global ocean circulation have shown that the nonlinearity of the EoS leads to a sink of gravitational potential energy (PE), from which one might infer that there is less energy available to be released to the MOC. Here the available PE (APE) budget of the global ocean is investigated using a numerical model with a nonlinear EoS under a realistic configuration. The results show that, while the nonlinearity of the EoS leads to a loss of gravitational PE, it is a source of APE. For the model used in this study, nonlinearity of the EoS is as significant as surface buoyancy forcing in generating APE.

  20. Increased heat transfer to elliptical leading edges due to spanwise variations in the freestream momentum: Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the effect of spanwise variation in momentum on leading edge heat transfer is discussed. Numerical and experimental results are presented for both a circular leading edge and a 3:1 elliptical leading edge. Reynolds numbers in the range of 10,000 to 240,000 based on leading edge diameter are investigated. The surface of the body is held at a constant uniform temperature. Numerical and experimental results with and without spanwise variations are presented. Direct comparison of the two-dimensional results, that is, with no spanwise variations, to the analytical results of Frossling is very good. The numerical calculation, which uses the PARC3D code, solves the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, assuming steady laminar flow on the leading edge region. Experimentally, increases in the spanwise-averaged heat transfer coefficient as high as 50 percent above the two-dimensional value were observed. Numerically, the heat transfer coefficient was seen to increase by as much as 25 percent. In general, under the same flow conditions, the circular leading edge produced a higher heat transfer rate than the elliptical leading edge. As a percentage of the respective two-dimensional values, the circular and elliptical leading edges showed similar sensitivity to span wise variations in momentum. By equating the root mean square of the amplitude of the spanwise variation in momentum to the turbulence intensity, a qualitative comparison between the present work and turbulent results was possible. It is shown that increases in leading edge heat transfer due to spanwise variations in freestream momentum are comparable to those due to freestream turbulence.

  1. Wind-chill-equivalent temperatures: regarding the impact due to the variability of the environmental convective heat transfer coefficient.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    The wind-chill index (WCI), developed in Antarctica in the 1940s and recently updated by the weather services in the USA and Canada, expresses the enhancement of heat loss in cold climates from exposed body parts, e.g., face, due to wind. The index provides a simple and practical means for assessing the thermal effects of wind on humans outdoors. It is also used for indicating weather conditions that may pose adverse risks of freezing at subfreezing environmental temperatures. Values of the WCI depend on a number of parameters, i.e, temperatures, physical properties of the air, wind speed, etc., and on insolation and evaporation. This paper focuses on the effects of various empirical correlations used in the literature for calculating the convective heat transfer coefficients between humans and their environment. Insolation and evaporation are not included in the presentation. Large differences in calculated values among these correlations are demonstrated and quantified. Steady-state wind-chill-equivalent temperatures (WCETs) are estimated by a simple, one-dimensional heat-conducting hollow-cylindrical model using these empirical correlations. Partial comparison of these values with the published "new" WCETs is presented. The variability of the estimated WCETs, due to different correlations employed to calculate them, is clearly demonstrated. The results of this study clearly suggest the need for establishing a "gold standard" for estimating convective heat exchange between exposed body elements and the cold and windy environment. This should be done prior to the introduction and adoption of further modifications to WCETs and indices. Correlations to estimate the convective heat transfer coefficients between exposed body parts of humans in windy and cold environments influence the WCETs and need to be standardized. PMID:16397760

  2. Wind-chill-equivalent temperatures: regarding the impact due to the variability of the environmental convective heat transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    The wind-chill index (WCI), developed in Antarctica in the 1940s and recently updated by the weather services in the USA and Canada, expresses the enhancement of heat loss in cold climates from exposed body parts, e.g., face, due to wind. The index provides a simple and practical means for assessing the thermal effects of wind on humans outdoors. It is also used for indicating weather conditions that may pose adverse risks of freezing at subfreezing environmental temperatures. Values of the WCI depend on a number of parameters, i.e, temperatures, physical properties of the air, wind speed, etc., and on insolation and evaporation. This paper focuses on the effects of various empirical correlations used in the literature for calculating the convective heat transfer coefficients between humans and their environment. Insolation and evaporation are not included in the presentation. Large differences in calculated values among these correlations are demonstrated and quantified. Steady-state wind-chill-equivalent temperatures (WCETs) are estimated by a simple, one-dimensional heat-conducting hollow-cylindrical model using these empirical correlations. Partial comparison of these values with the published “new” WCETs is presented. The variability of the estimated WCETs, due to different correlations employed to calculate them, is clearly demonstrated. The results of this study clearly suggest the need for establishing a “gold standard” for estimating convective heat exchange between exposed body elements and the cold and windy environment. This should be done prior to the introduction and adoption of further modifications to WCETs and indices. Correlations to estimate the convective heat transfer coefficients between exposed body parts of humans in windy and cold environments influence the WCETs and need to be standardized.

  3. Multiple stable states of tree cover in a global land surface model due to fire - vegetation feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasslop, Gitta; Brovkin, Victor; Reick, Christian; Bathiany, Sebastian; Kloster, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    The presence of multiple stable states has far reaching consequences for a system's susceptibility to disturbances, including the possibility of abrupt transitions between the stable states. Tree cover is an ecosystem characteristic for which the occurrence of multiple stable states is supported by ecological theory, conceptual simple models and global satellite observations. Fire has been identified as an important process in those ecosystems. Global dynamic vegetation models usually represent the vegetation dynamics in a simplified way with only one equilibrium state for certain environmental conditions. The equilibrium state then does not depend on the history and vegetation would always recover to the equilibrium state. Here, we describe the occurrence of multiple stable states in a global simulation with the JSBACH-SPITFIRE model, the land surface model in the MPI-ESM. With the improved process representation of fire, the equilibrium state of vegetation depends on the initial conditions. Model initialization with only woody species leads to a higher global tree covered area in equilibrium compared to an initialization with only grass species. The potential bistability occurs for gridcells with intermediately strong fire regimes in the transition zones between grasslands and forests. We find regions in mainly Africa and Asia to have multiple stable vegetation states. By performing sensitivity simulations and simplifying the relevant model equations we show that the multiple states occur due to a strong feedback between fire and forest cover. This is corroborated by comparing the model behavior to a fire model without fire-vegetation feedback in which no multiple stable states occur. Our results support the view that changes in vegetation cover can be irreversible due to the fire-vegetation feedback.

  4. Estimating heat stress from climate-based indicators: present-day biases and future spreads in the CMIP5 global climate model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Ducharne, A.; Sultan, B.; Braconnot, P.; Vautard, R.

    2015-08-01

    The increased exposure of human populations to heat stress is one of the likely consequences of global warming, and it has detrimental effects on health and labor capacity. Here, we consider the evolution of heat stress under climate change using 21 general circulation models (GCMs). Three heat stress indicators, based on both temperature and humidity conditions, are used to investigate present-day model biases and spreads in future climate projections. Present day estimates of heat stress indicators from observational data shows that humid tropical areas tend to experience more frequent heat stress than other regions do, with a total frequency of heat stress 250-300 d yr-1. The most severe heat stress is found in the Sahel and south India. Present-day GCM simulations tend to underestimate heat stress over the tropics due to dry and cold model biases. The model based estimates are in better agreement with observation in mid to high latitudes, but this is due to compensating errors in humidity and temperature. The severity of heat stress is projected to increase by the end of the century under climate change scenario RCP8.5, reaching unprecedented levels in some regions compared with observations. An analysis of the different factors contributing to the total spread of projected heat stress shows that spread is primarily driven by the choice of GCMs rather than the choice of indicators, even when the simulated indicators are bias-corrected. This supports the utility of the multi-model ensemble approach to assess the impacts of climate change on heat stress.

  5. Geoid Height Time Dependence Due to Global Glacial Isostatic Adjustment: The Critical Influence of Rotational Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, W.

    2006-05-01

    It has recently been suggested in Mitrovica, Wahr et al.(2005. Geophys. J. Int. 161, 491-506) that the theory previously developed to predict the Earth's rotational response to the Late Quaternary glaciation-deglaciation cycle may require modification. This theory was initially described in Peltier (1982, Advances in Geophysics 24, 1-146) and in Wu and Peltier (1984, Geophys. J. R. astr. Soc. 76, 202-242). Its importance for understanding the GIA contribution to the modern rate of geoid height time dependence that is currently being measured by the GRACE satellite system lies in the fact that the polar wander induced by the ice-age cycle contributes to this field in an important way. It has proven possible to test the quality of the original form of the theory in a definitive way by employing Holocene inferences of relative sea level history based upon radio- carbon dated sea level index points. This test relies upon data from a wide range of sites on the Earth's surface, sites located in regions that are expcted to be most strongly influenced by the feedback of the polar wander component of the Earth's rotatonal response to the glaciation cycle onto sea level history itself. Application of the test demonstrates that the claims made in the Mitrovica, Wahr et al. paper concerning the existence of a flaw in the theory are incorrect. The previously published ICE-5G(VM2)prediction of the expected geoid height time dependence due to the GIA process is therefor secure (see Peltier, 2005. QSR 24, 1655- 1671).

  6. Interannual and Spatial Variability of Global Ocean Heat/Freshwater Content Identified from GTSPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, P. C.; Sun, C.

    2013-12-01

    Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) is a cooperative international project since 1990. The GTSPP handles all temperature and salinity profile data including XBT, CTDs, thermistor chain data, and Argo observations. Near-real time gridded (T, S) dataset was established from GTSPP since 1990 with horizontal resolution of (1o×1o) and temporal increment of 1 month using the recently developed optimal spectral decomposition (OSD) method. With this new monthly varying gridded dataset, the upper ocean (surface to 300 m depth) heat content OHC300 and freshwater content FWC300 were calculated at each horizontal grid point. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was conducted on the temporally varying global 2D OHC300 anomaly relative to its seasonal variation. A new phenomenon, global ocean tripole, was discovered. The EOF-1 mode (44.2% variance) represents the classical El Nino/La Nina phenomenon. The EOF-2 mode (14.6%) represents the Indian Ocean Dipole mode and the El Nino Modoki. Its features and connection to climate variability is also discussed. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was conducted on the temporally varying global 2D FWC300 anomaly relative to its seasonal variation. The EOF-1 mode (73.7% variance) represents near global-scale variability with the largest anomaly appearing in the Indian Ocean near southeast of Africa. The first principal component (PC1) shows decadal variability. The temporal-spatial variability represented by the EOF-1 mode shows rapid increasing of global FWC300 from 1999 to 2005 and sustaining the high values after 2005. Interpretations of the observational results to recent global warming will also be presented.

  7. Sensitivity of global ocean heat content from reanalyses to the atmospheric reanalysis forcing: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storto, Andrea; Yang, Chunxue; Masina, Simona

    2016-05-01

    The global ocean heat content evolution is a key component of the Earth's energy budget and can be consistently determined by ocean reanalyses that assimilate hydrographic profiles. This work investigates the impact of the atmospheric reanalysis forcing through a multiforcing ensemble ocean reanalysis, where the ensemble members are forced by five state-of-the-art atmospheric reanalyses during the meteorological satellite era (1979-2013). Data assimilation leads the ensemble to converge toward robust estimates of ocean warming rates and significantly reduces the spread (1.48 ± 0.18 W/m2, per unit area of the World Ocean); hence, the impact of the atmospheric forcing appears only marginal for the global heat content estimates in both upper and deeper oceans. A sensitivity assessment performed through realistic perturbation of the main sources of uncertainty in ocean reanalyses highlights that bias correction and preprocessing of in situ observations represent the most crucial component of the reanalysis, whose perturbation accounts for up to 60% of the ocean heat content anomaly variability in the pre-Argo period. Although these results may depend on the single reanalysis system used, they reveal useful information for the ocean observation community and for the optimal generation of perturbations in ocean ensemble systems.

  8. Gravity wave forcing in the middle atmosphere due to reduced ozone heating during a solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, D.C.; Zhangai Luo )

    1993-02-20

    The authors present an analysis of the gravity wave structure and the associated forcing of the middle atmosphere induced by the screening of the ozone layer from solar heating during a solar eclipse. Fourier integral techniques and numerical evaluation of the integral solutions were used to assess the wave field structure and to compute the gravity wave forcing of the atmosphere at greater heights. Their solutions reveal dominant periods of a few hours, characteristic horizontal and vertical scales of [approximately]5,000 to 10,000 km and 200 km, respectively, and an integrated momentum flux in the direction of eclipse motion of [approximately]5.6 [times] 10[sup 8] N at each height above the forcing level. These results suggest that responses to solar eclipses may be difficult to detect above background gravity wave and tidal fluctuations until well into the thermosphere. Conversely, the induced body forces may penetrate to considerable heights because of the large wave scales and will have significant effects at levels where the wave field is dissipated. 38 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Increased heat transfer to a cylindrical leading edge due to spanwise variations in the freestream velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The present study numerically demonstrates how small spanwise variations in velocity upstream of a body can cause relatively large increases in the spanwise-averaged heat transfer to the leading edge. Vorticity introduced by spanwise variations, first decays as it drifts downstream, then amplifies in the stagnation region as a result of vortex stretching. This amplification can cause a periodic array of 3 D structures, similar to horseshoe vortices, to form. The numerical results indicate that, for the given wavelength, there is an amplitude threshold below which a structure does not form. A one-dimensional analysis, to predict the decay of vorticity in the absence of the body, in conjunction with the full numerical results indicated that the threshold is more accurately stated as minimum level of vorticity required in the leading edge region for a structure to form. It is possible, using the one-dimensional analysis, to compute an optimum wavelength in terms of the maximum vorticity reaching the leading edge region for given amplitude. A discussion is presented which relates experimentally observed trends to the trends of the present phenomena.

  10. Gravity wave forcing in the middle atmosphere due to reduced ozone heating during a solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Luo, Zhangai

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of the gravity wave structure and the associated forcing of the middle atmosphere induced by the screening of the ozone layer from solar heating during a solar eclipse. Fourier integral techniques and numerical evaluation of the integral solutions were used to assess the wave field structure and to compute the gravity wave forcing of the atmosphere at greater heights. Our solutions reveal dominant periods of a few hours, characteristic horizontal and vertical scales of about 5000 to 10,000 km and 200 km, respectively, and an integrated momentum flux in the direction of eclipse motion of about 5.6 x 10 exp 8 N at each height above the forcing level. These results suggest that responses to solar eclipses may be difficult to detect above background gravity wave and tidal fluctuations until well into the thermosphere. Conversely, the induced body forces may penetrate to considerable heights because of the large wave scales and will have significant effects at levels where the wave field is dissipated.

  11. Cold tolerance in sealworm ( Pseudoterranova decipiens) due to heat-shock adaptations.

    PubMed

    Stormo, S K; Praebel, K; Elvevoll, E O

    2009-09-01

    Third-stage larvae of Pseudoterranova decipiens commonly infect whitefish such as cod, and the parasite can be transferred to humans through lightly prepared (sushi) meals. Because little is known about the nematode's cold tolerance capacity, we examined the nematode's ability to supercool, and whether or not cold acclimation could induce physiological changes that might increase its ability to tolerate freezing conditions. Even if third-stage Pseudoterranova decipiens larvae have some supercooling ability, they show no potential for freezing avoidance because they are not able to withstand inoculative freezing. Still, they have the ability to survive freezing at high subzero temperatures, something which suggests that these nematodes have a moderate freeze tolerance. We also show that acclimation to high temperatures triggers trehalose accumulation to an even greater extent than cold acclimation. Trehalose is a potential cryoprotectant which has been shown to play a vital role in the freeze tolerance of nematodes. We suggest that the trehalose accumulation observed for the cold acclimation is a general response to thermal stress, and that the nematode's moderate freeze tolerance may be acquired through adaptation to heat rather than coldness. PMID:19627634

  12. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patch, S. K.; Hull, D.; Thomas, M.; Griep, SK; Jacobsohn, K.; See, WA

    2015-01-01

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology.

  13. Thermoacoustic Contrast of Prostate Cancer due to Heating by Very High Frequency Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hull, D; Thomas, M; Griep, SK; Jacobsohn, K; See, WA

    2015-01-01

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo thermoacoustic computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology. PMID:25554968

  14. Heating in the MRI environment due to superparamagnetic fluid suspensions in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantillon-Murphy, P.; Wald, L. L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2010-03-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle's time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle's magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad/s. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid's temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4 and 7 degree Centigrade above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid's temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors (approximately 1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002-0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1-10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful selection of the rotating or sinusoidal field parameters (field frequency and amplitude). The work indicates that it may be feasible to combine low-field MRI with a magnetic hyperthermia system using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

  15. Heating in the MRI environment due to superparamagnetic fluid suspensions in a rotating magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Wald, L.L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle’s time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle’s magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad/s. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid’s temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4°C and 7°C above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid’s temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors (~1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002 to 0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1 to 10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful selection of the rotating or sinusoidal field parameters (field frequency and amplitude). The work indicates that it may be feasible to combine low-field MRI with a magnetic hyperthermia system using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:20161608

  16. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation.

    PubMed

    Patch, S K; Hull, D; Thomas, M; Griep, S K; Jacobsohn, K; See, W A

    2015-01-21

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology. PMID:25554968

  17. Behavior of Propagation and Heating Due to Absorption of Ultrasound in Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaya, Chiaki; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    Recently, ultrasound waves have been put to practical use not only in diagnostic equipment but also in thermotherapy that uses the effect of ultrasound waves in a living body. The analysis of temperature rise due to the absorption of ultrasound in a soft tissue medium is an important analyzing object for the clarification of the effect of ultrasound waves in biological tissues and the estimation of medium constants. Three-dimensional simulations by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method which used the equations that considers the absorption attenuation based on acoustic basic equations (ABEs) and the Westervelt equation have been performed. The consistency between the ABEs and the Westervelt equation is confirmed. The results of temperature measurement that uses glycerin as the absorbing medium of ultrasound are compared with those of FDTD simulation. The temperature distribution obtained by FDTD simulation almost corresponds to that obtained by experiment.

  18. Estimating Orion Heat Shield Failure Due To Ablator Cracking During The EFT-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Kam, Jeremy C.; Gage, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Orion EFT-1 heatshield suffered from two major certification challenges: First, the mechanical properties used in design were not evident in the flight hardware and second, the flight article itself cracked during fabrication. The combination of these events motivated the Orion Program to pursue an engineering-level Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) as part of heatshield certification rationale. The PRA provided loss of Mission (LOM) likelihoods considering the probability of a crack occurring during the mission and the likelihood of subsequent structure over-temperature. The methods and input data for the PRA are presented along with a discussion of the test data used to anchor the results. The Orion program accepted an EFT-1 Loss of Vehicle (LOV) risk of 1-in-160,000 due to in-mission Avcoat cracking based on the results of this analysis. Conservatisms in the result, along with future considerations for Exploration Missions (EM) are also addressed.

  19. Illustrating a New Global-scale Approach to Estimating Potential Reduction in Fish Species Richness due to Flow Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Sayaka; Yanagawa, Aki; Iwasaki, Yuichi; Sui, Pengzhe; Koirala, Sujan; Khajuria, Anupam; Hirano, Kazunari; Mahendran, Roobavannan; Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Kanae, Shinjiro

    2014-05-01

    Changes in river discharge due to human activities and climate change would affect the sustainability of freshwater ecosystems. To globally assess how changes in river discharge will affect the future status of freshwater ecosystems, global-scale hydrological simulations need to be connected with a model to estimate the durability of freshwater ecosystems. However, the development of this specific modelling combination for the global scale is still in its infancy. In this study, two statistical methods are introduced to link flow regimes to fish species richness (FSR): one is based on a linear relationship between FSR and mean river discharge (hereafter, FSR-MAD method), and the other is based on a multi-linear relationship between FSR and ecologically relevant flow indices involving several other flow characteristics and mean river discharge (FSR-FLVAR method). The FSR-MAD method has been used previously in global simulation studies. The FSR-FLVAR method is newly introduced here. These statistical methods for estimating FSR were combined with a set of state-of-art global river discharge simulations using latest outputs of 11 coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models to evaluate the potential impact of climate- change-induced flow alterations on FSR changes. Generally, future reductions in FSR with the FSR-FLVAR method are greater and much more scattered than those with the FSR-MAD method. In arid regions, both methods indicate reductions in FSR because mean discharge is projected to decrease in the future, although the magnitude of reductions in FSR is different between the two methods. In contrast, in heavy-snow regions a large reduction in FSR is shown by the FSR-FLVAR method due to increases in the frequency of low and high flows. Although we cannot determine only by this study which this prediction is more reliable, it can be argued that efforts to take plural ecologically relevant flow indices into account would lead to more appropriate methods for

  20. Uncertainties in global ocean surface heat flux climatologies derived from ship observations

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P.J.; Weare, B.C.

    1995-08-01

    A methodology to define uncertainties associated with ocean surface heat flux calculations has been developed and applied to a revised version of the Oberhuber global climatology, which utilizes a summary of the COADS surface observations. Systematic and random uncertainties in the net oceanic heat flux and each of its four components at individual grid points and for zonal averages have been estimated for each calendar month and the annual mean. The most important uncertainties of the 2{degree} x 2{degree} grid cell values of each of the heat fluxes are described. Annual mean net shortwave flux random uncertainties associated with errors in estimating cloud cover in the tropics yield total uncertainties which are greater than 25 W m{sup {minus}2}. In the northern latitudes, where the large number of observations substantially reduce the influence of these random errors, the systematic uncertainties in the utilized parameterization are largely responsible for total uncertainties in the shortwave fluxes which usually remain greater than 10 W m{sup {minus}2}. Systematic uncertainties dominate in the zonal means because spatial averaging has led to a further reduction of the random errors. The situation for the annual mean latent heat flux is somewhat different in that even for grid point values the contributions of the systematic uncertainties tend to be larger than those of the random uncertainties at most all latitudes. Latent heat flux uncertainties are greater than 20 W m{sup {minus}2} nearly everywhere south of 40{degree}N, and in excess of 30 W m{sup {minus}2} over broad areas of the subtropics, even those with large numbers of observations. Resulting zonal mean latent heat flux uncertainties are largest ({approximately}30 W m{sup {minus}2}) in the middle latitudes and subtropics and smallest ({approximately}10--25 W m{sup {minus}2}) near the equator and over the northernmost regions.

  1. Global Warming Impacts on Heating and Cooling Degree-Days in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Y.; Caldeira, K.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is expected to significantly alter residential air conditioning and space heating requirements, which account for 41% of U.S. household energy expenditures. The degree-day method can be used for reliable estimation of weather related building energy consumption and costs, as well as outdoor climatic thermal comfort. Here, we use U.S. Climate Normals developed by NOAA based on weather station observations along with Climate Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) multi-model ensemble simulations. We add the projected change in heating and cooling degree-days based on the climate models to the estimates based on the NOAA U.S. Climate Normals to project future heating and cooling degree-days. We find locations with the lowest and highest combined index of cooling (CDDs) and heating degree-days (HDDs) for the historical period (1981 - 2010) and future period (2080 - 2099) under the Representation Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) climate change scenario. Our results indicate that in both time frames and among the lower 48 states, coastal areas in the West and South California will have the smallest degree-day sum (CDD + HDD), and hence from a climatic perspective become the best candidates for residential real estate. The Rocky Mountains region in Wyoming, in addition to northern Minnesota and North Dakota, will have the greatest CDD + HDD. While global warming is projected to reduce the median heating and cooling demand (- 5%) at the end of the century, CDD + HDD will decrease in the North, with an opposite effect in the South. This work could be helpful in deciding where to live in the United States based on present and future thermal comfort, and could also provide a basis for estimates of changes in heating and cooling energy demand.

  2. Shock-induced heating and millisecond boiling in gels and tissue due to high intensity focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Michael S.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Bessonova, Olga V.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear propagation causes high intensity ultrasound waves to distort and generate higher harmonics, which are more readily absorbed and converted to heat than the fundamental frequency. Although such nonlinear effects have previously been investigated and found not to significantly alter high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments, two results reported here change this paradigm. One is that at clinically relevant intensity levels, HIFU waves not only become distorted but form shock waves in tissue. The other is that the generated shock waves heat the tissue to boiling in much less time than predicted for undistorted or weakly distorted waves. In this study, a 2-MHz HIFU source operating at peak intensities up to 25,000 W/cm2 was used to heat transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo bovine liver samples. Initiation of boiling was detected using high-speed photography, a 20-MHz passive cavitation detector, and fluctuation of the drive voltage at the HIFU source. The time to boil obtained experimentally was used to quantify heating rates and was compared to calculations using weak shock theory and the shock amplitudes obtained from nonlinear modeling and from measurements with a fiber optic hydrophone. As observed experimentally and predicted by calculations, shocked focal waveforms produced boiling in as little as 3 ms and the time to initiate boiling was sensitive to small changes in HIFU output. Nonlinear heating due to shock waves is therefore important to HIFU and clinicians should be aware of the potential for very rapid boiling since it alters treatments. PMID:20018433

  3. Low-frequency variability of sea level as related to the heat balance of global oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Niiler, P.; Patzert, W.

    1991-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON mission will determine global changes of sea level with unprecedented accuracy. Our main objective is the use TOPEX/POSEIDON data, concurrent in situ ocean measurements, and other satellite observations to document and diagnose physical processes by which heat is exchanged with the atmosphere, stored in the ocean, or transported by ocean circulation. During the prelaunch period, our objectives are to advise the project on an improved method of retrieving sea level data and prepare for the application of TOPEX/POSEIDON data by developing a diagnostic model using in situ measurements and altimeter observations from Geosat and the European Remote Sensing satellite.

  4. Global distribution of moisture, evaporation-precipitation, and diabatic heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Global archives were established for ECMWF 12-hour, multilevel analysis beginning 1 January 1985; day and night IR temperatures, and solar incoming and solar absorbed. Routines were written to access these data conveniently from NASA/MSFC MASSTOR facility for diagnostic analysis. Calculations of diabatic heating rates were performed from the ECMWF data using 4-day intervals. Calculations of precipitable water (W) from 1 May 1985 were carried out using the ECMWF data. Because a major operational change on 1 May 1985 had a significant impact on the moisture field, values prior to that date are incompatible with subsequent analyses.

  5. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release Over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs S. America) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  6. Reduced efficacy of marine cloud brightening geoengineering due to in-plume aerosol coagulation: parameterization and global implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, G. S.; Stevens, R. G.; Partanen, A.-I.; Jenkins, A. K. L.; Korhonen, H.; Forster, P. M.; Spracklen, D. V.; Pierce, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    The intentional enhancement of cloud albedo via controlled sea-spray injection from ships (marine cloud brightening) has been proposed as a possible method to control anthropogenic global warming; however, there remains significant uncertainty in the efficacy of this method due to, amongst other factors, uncertainties in aerosol and cloud microphysics. A major assumption used in recent cloud- and climate-modeling studies is that all sea spray was emitted uniformly into some oceanic grid boxes, and thus these studies did not account for subgrid aerosol coagulation within the sea-spray plumes. We explore the evolution of these sea-salt plumes using a multi-shelled Gaussian plume model with size-resolved aerosol coagulation. We determine how the final number of particles depends on meteorological conditions, including wind speed and boundary-layer stability, as well as the emission rate and size distribution of aerosol emitted. Under previously proposed injection rates and typical marine conditions, we find that the number of aerosol particles is reduced by over 50%, but this reduction varies from under 10% to over 90% depending on the conditions. We provide a computationally efficient parameterization for cloud-resolving and global-scale models to account for subgrid-scale coagulation, and we implement this parameterization in a global-scale aerosol-climate model. While designed to address subgrid-scale coagulation of sea-salt particles, the parameterization is generally applicable for coagulation of subgrid-scale aerosol from point sources. We find that accounting for this subgrid-scale coagulation reduces cloud droplet number concentrations by 46% over emission regions, and reduces the global mean radiative flux perturbation from -1.5 W m-2 to -0.8 W m-2.

  7. Reduced efficacy of marine cloud brightening geoengineering due to in-plume aerosol coagulation: parameterization and global implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, G. S.; Stevens, R. G.; Partanen, A.-I.; Jenkins, A. K. L.; Korhonen, H.; Forster, P. M.; Spracklen, D. V.; Pierce, J. R.

    2013-07-01

    The intentional enhancement of cloud albedo via controlled sea-spray injection from ships (Marine Cloud Brightening) has been proposed as a possible method to control anthropogenic global warming; however, there remains significant uncertainty in the efficacy of this method due to, amongst other factors, uncertainties in aerosol and cloud microphysics. A major assumption used in recent cloud- and climate-modeling studies is that all sea spray was emitted uniformly into some oceanic grid boxes, and thus these studies did not account for sub-grid aerosol coagulation within the sea-spray plumes. We explore the evolution of these sea-salt plumes using a multi-shelled Gaussian plume model with size-resolved aerosol coagulation. We determine how the final number of particles depends on meteorological conditions, including wind speed and boundary-layer stability, as well as the emission rate and size distribution of aerosol emitted. Under previously proposed injection rates and typical marine conditions, we find that the number of aerosol particles is reduced by over 50%, but this reduction varies from under 10% to over 90% depending on the conditions. We provide a computationally efficient parameterization for cloud-resolving and global-scale models to account for sub-grid scale coagulation, and we implement this parameterization in a global-scale aerosol-climate model. We find that accounting for this sub-grid scale coagulation reduces cloud droplet number concentrations by 46% over emission regions, and reduces the global mean radiative flux perturbation from -1.5 W m-2 to -0.8 W m-2.

  8. Influence of surface character change of substrate due to heating on flattening behavior of thermal sprayed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, M.; Nagai, H.; Yasui, T.

    2006-12-01

    The authors have confirmed that in the thermal spraying of practical powder materials, the splat shape changes with increasing substrate temperature to a circular disk shape from a fringe shape with splashing at a critical substrate temperature, T t. The increase of the substrate temperature may accompany a kind of essential change on the substrate surface, because the effect is maintained until the substrate is cooled down to room temperature. However, the nature of the substrate surface change due to the heating has not been clearly understood yet. In this study, AISI 304 stainless steel was used as a substrate material, and the substrate was heated in an air at mosphere or laser treated as a pretreatment. Substrate surface topography in nanometer scale was analyzed precisely by atomic force microscope (AFM). The relationship between surface topography in nanometer scale and splat morphology was discussed. Moreover, to evaluate the effect of chemical composition of the substrate surface, gold was coated onto the substrate surface by physical vapor deposition (PVD) after the heat treatment. The effect of adsorbate/condensate on the substrate surface on the flattening behavior of thermal sprayed particles was also verified.

  9. Satellite-based detection of global urban heat-island temperature influence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallo, K.P.; Adegoke, Jimmy O.; Owen, T.W.; Elvidge, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    This study utilizes a satellite-based methodology to assess the urban heat-island influence during warm season months for over 4400 stations included in the Global Historical Climatology Network of climate stations. The methodology includes local and regional satellite retrievals of an indicator of the presence green photosynthetically active vegetation at and around the stations. The difference in local and regional samples of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to estimate differences in mean air temperature. Stations classified as urban averaged 0.90??C (N. Hemisphere) and 0.92??C (S. Hemisphere) warmer than the surrounding environment on the basis of the NDVI-derived temperature estimates. Additionally, stations classified as rural averaged 0.19??C (N. Hemisphere) and 0.16??C (S. Hemisphere) warmer than the surrounding environment. The NDVI-derived temperature estimates were found to be in reasonable agreement with temperature differences observed between climate stations. The results suggest that satellite-derived data sets can be used to estimate the urban heat-island temperature influence on a global basis and that a more detailed analysis of rural stations and their surrounding environment may be necessary to assure that temperature trends derived from assumed rural environments are not influenced by changes in land use/land cover. Copyright 2002 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Stage-specific heat effects: timing and duration of heat waves alter demographic rates of a global insect pest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Rudolf, Volker H W; Ma, Chun-Sen

    2015-12-01

    The frequency and duration of periods with high temperatures are expected to increase under global warming. Thus, even short-lived organisms are increasingly likely to experience periods of hot temperatures at some point of their life-cycle. Despite recent progress, it remains unclear how various temperature experiences during the life-cycle of organisms affect demographic traits. We simulated hot days (daily mean temperature of 30 °C) increasingly experienced under field conditions and investigated how the timing and duration of such hot days during the life cycle of Plutella xylostella affects adult traits. We show that hot days experienced during some life stages (but not all) altered adult lifespan, fecundity, and oviposition patterns. Importantly, the effects of hot days were contingent on which stage was affected, and these stage-specific effects were not always additive. Thus, adults that experience different temporal patterns of hot periods (i.e., changes in timing and duration) during their life-cycle often had different demographic rates and reproductive patterns. These results indicate that we cannot predict the effects of current and future climate on natural populations by simply focusing on changes in the mean temperature. Instead, we need to incorporate the temporal patterns of heat events relative to the life-cycle of organisms to describe population dynamics and how they will respond to future climate change. PMID:26255274