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Sample records for global protein acetylation

  1. Loss of N-terminal Acetylation Suppresses A Prion Phenotype By Modulating Global Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, William M.; Mannakee, Brian K.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Serio, Tricia R.

    2014-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation is among the most ubiquitous of protein modifications in eukaryotes. While loss of N-terminal acetylation is associated with many abnormalities, the molecular basis of these effects is known for only a few cases, where acetylation of single factors has been linked to binding avidity or metabolic stability. In contrast, the impact of N-terminal acetylation for the majority of the proteome, and its combinatorial contributions to phenotypes, are unknown. Here, by studying the yeast prion [PSI+], an amyloid of the Sup35 protein, we show that loss of N-terminal acetylation promotes general protein misfolding, a redeployment of chaperones to these substrates, and a corresponding stress response. These proteostasis changes, combined with the decreased stability of unacetylated Sup35 amyloid, reduce the size of prion aggregates and reverse their phenotypic consequences. Thus, loss of N-terminal acetylation, and its previously unanticipated role in protein biogenesis, globally resculpts the proteome to create a unique phenotype. PMID:25023910

  2. Global proteomic analysis of protein acetylation affecting metabolic regulation in Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kwang; Sim, Juhee; Kim, Sun Ju; Oh, Hye Ryeung; Nam, Doo Hyun; Lee, Sangkyu

    2016-02-01

    Daphnia (Daphnia pulex) is a small planktonic crustacean and a key constituent of aquatic ecosystems. It is generally used as a model organism to study environmental toxic problems. In the past decade, genomic and proteomic datasets of Daphnia have been developed. The proteomic dataset allows for the investigation of toxicological effects in the context of "Daphnia proteomics," resulting in greater insights for toxicological research. To exploit Daphnia for ecotoxicological research, information on the post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is necessary, as this is a critical regulator of biological processes. Acetylation of lysine (Kac) is a reversible and highly regulated PTM that is associated with diverse biological functions. However, a comprehensive description of Kac in Daphnia is not yet available. To understand the cellular distribution of lysine acetylation in Daphnia, we identified 98 acetylation sites in 65 proteins by immunoprecipitation using an anti-acetyllysine antibody and a liquid chromatography system supported by mass spectroscopy. We identified 28 acetylated sites related to metabolic proteins and six acetylated enzymes associated with the TCA cycle in Daphnia. From GO and KEGG enrichment analyses, we showed that Kac in D. pulex is highly enriched in proteins associated with metabolic processes. Our data provide the first global analysis of Kac in D. pulex and is an important resource for the functional analysis of Kac in this organism. PMID:26700148

  3. The world of protein acetylation.

    PubMed

    Drazic, Adrian; Myklebust, Line M; Ree, Rasmus; Arnesen, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Acetylation is one of the major post-translational protein modifications in the cell, with manifold effects on the protein level as well as on the metabolome level. The acetyl group, donated by the metabolite acetyl-coenzyme A, can be co- or post-translationally attached to either the α-amino group of the N-terminus of proteins or to the ε-amino group of lysine residues. These reactions are catalyzed by various N-terminal and lysine acetyltransferases. In case of lysine acetylation, the reaction is enzymatically reversible via tightly regulated and metabolism-dependent mechanisms. The interplay between acetylation and deacetylation is crucial for many important cellular processes. In recent years, our understanding of protein acetylation has increased significantly by global proteomics analyses and in depth functional studies. This review gives a general overview of protein acetylation and the respective acetyltransferases, and focuses on the regulation of metabolic processes and physiological consequences that come along with protein acetylation. PMID:27296530

  4. Protein Acetylation and Acetyl Coenzyme A Metabolism in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galdieri, Luciano; Zhang, Tiantian; Rogerson, Daniella; Lleshi, Rron

    2014-01-01

    Cells sense and appropriately respond to the physical conditions and availability of nutrients in their environment. This sensing of the environment and consequent cellular responses are orchestrated by a multitude of signaling pathways and typically involve changes in transcription and metabolism. Recent discoveries suggest that the signaling and transcription machineries are regulated by signals which are derived from metabolism and reflect the metabolic state of the cell. Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) is a key metabolite that links metabolism with signaling, chromatin structure, and transcription. Acetyl-CoA is produced by glycolysis as well as other catabolic pathways and used as a substrate for the citric acid cycle and as a precursor in synthesis of fatty acids and steroids and in other anabolic pathways. This central position in metabolism endows acetyl-CoA with an important regulatory role. Acetyl-CoA serves as a substrate for lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), which catalyze the transfer of acetyl groups to the epsilon-amino groups of lysines in histones and many other proteins. Fluctuations in the concentration of acetyl-CoA, reflecting the metabolic state of the cell, are translated into dynamic protein acetylations that regulate a variety of cell functions, including transcription, replication, DNA repair, cell cycle progression, and aging. This review highlights the synthesis and homeostasis of acetyl-CoA and the regulation of transcriptional and signaling machineries in yeast by acetylation. PMID:25326522

  5. Genetic inhibition of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity increases liver fat and alters global protein acetylationa

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jenny D.Y.; Lawrence, Robert T.; Healy, Marin E.; Dominy, John E.; Liao, Jason A.; Breen, David S.; Byrne, Frances L.; Kenwood, Brandon M.; Lackner, Carolin; Okutsu, Saeko; Mas, Valeria R.; Caldwell, Stephen H.; Tomsig, Jose L.; Cooney, Gregory J.; Puigserver, Pere B.; Turner, Nigel; James, David E.; Villén, Judit; Hoehn, Kyle L.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid deposition in the liver is associated with metabolic disorders including fatty liver disease, type II diabetes, and hepatocellular cancer. The enzymes acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and ACC2 are powerful regulators of hepatic fat storage; therefore, their inhibition is expected to prevent the development of fatty liver. In this study we generated liver-specific ACC1 and ACC2 double knockout (LDKO) mice to determine how the loss of ACC activity affects liver fat metabolism and whole-body physiology. Characterization of LDKO mice revealed unexpected phenotypes of increased hepatic triglyceride and decreased fat oxidation. We also observed that chronic ACC inhibition led to hyper-acetylation of proteins in the extra-mitochondrial space. In sum, these data reveal the existence of a compensatory pathway that protects hepatic fat stores when ACC enzymes are inhibited. Furthermore, we identified an important role for ACC enzymes in the regulation of protein acetylation in the extra-mitochondrial space. PMID:24944901

  6. Interfacing protein lysine acetylation and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hue T.; Uhrig, R. Glen; Nimick, Mhairi; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition that different protein covalent modifications can operate in concert to regulate a single protein has forced us to re-think the relationship between amino acid side chain modifications and protein function. Results presented by Tran et al. 2012 demonstrate the association of a protein phosphatase (PP2A) with a histone/lysine deacetylase (HDA14) on plant microtubules along with a histone/lysine acetyltransferase (ELP3). This finding reveals a regulatory interface between two prevalent covalent protein modifications, protein phosphorylation and acetylation, emphasizing the integrated complexity of post-translational protein regulation found in nature. PMID:22827947

  7. Bacterial protein acetylation: new discoveries unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Alan J

    2016-05-01

    Nε-acetylation is emerging as an abundant post-translational modification of bacterial proteins. Two mechanisms have been identified: one is enzymatic, dependent on an acetyltransferase and acetyl-coenzyme A; the other is non-enzymatic and depends on the reactivity of acetyl phosphate. Some, but not most, of those acetylations are reversed by deacetylases. This review will briefly describe the current status of the field and raise questions that need answering. PMID:26660885

  8. Non-enzymatic protein acetylation detected by NAPPA protein arrays*

    PubMed Central

    Olia, Adam S.; Barker, Kristi; McCullough, Cheryl E.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, David W.; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    Acetylation is a post-translational modification that occurs on thousands of proteins located in many cellular organelles. This process mediates many protein functions and modulates diverse biological processes. In mammalian cells, where acetyl-CoA is the primary acetyl donor, acetylation in the mitochondria is thought to occur by chemical means due to the relatively high concentration of acetyl-CoA located in this organelle. In contrast, acetylation outside of the mitochondria is thought to be mediated predominantly by acetyltransferase enzymes. Here we address the possibility that non-enzymatic chemical acetylation outside of the mitochondria may be more common than previously appreciated. We employed the Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array platform to perform an unbiased screen for human proteins that undergo chemical acetylation, which resulted in the identification of a multitude of proteins with diverse functions and cellular localization. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that basic residues typically precede the acetylated lysine in the −7 to −3 position, and we show by mutagenesis that these basic residues contribute to chemical acetylation capacity. We propose that these basic residues lower the pKa of the substrate lysine for efficient chemical acetylation. Many of the identified proteins reside outside of the mitochondria, and have been previously demonstrated to be acetylated in vivo. As such, our studies demonstrate that chemical acetylation occurs more broadly throughout the eukaryotic cell than previously appreciated, and suggests that this post-translational protein modification may have more diverse roles in protein function and pathway regulation. PMID:26083674

  9. Protein acetylation in metabolism - metabolites and cofactors.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Keir J; Zhang, Hongbo; Katsyuba, Elena; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Reversible acetylation was initially described as an epigenetic mechanism regulating DNA accessibility. Since then, this process has emerged as a controller of histone and nonhistone acetylation that integrates key physiological processes such as metabolism, circadian rhythm and cell cycle, along with gene regulation in various organisms. The widespread and reversible nature of acetylation also revitalized interest in the mechanisms that regulate lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) and deacetylases (KDACs) in health and disease. Changes in protein or histone acetylation are especially relevant for many common diseases including obesity, diabetes mellitus, neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as for some rare diseases such as mitochondrial diseases and lipodystrophies. In this Review, we examine the role of reversible acetylation in metabolic control and how changes in levels of metabolites or cofactors, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide, coenzyme A, acetyl coenzyme A, zinc and butyrate and/or β-hydroxybutyrate, directly alter KAT or KDAC activity to link energy status to adaptive cellular and organismal homeostasis. PMID:26503676

  10. Proteomic profiling of lysine acetylation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals the diversity of acetylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry; Hardouin, Julie

    2015-07-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and highly regulated post-translational modification with the well demonstrated physiological relevance in eukaryotes. Recently, its important role in the regulation of metabolic processes in bacteria was highlighted. Here, we reported the lysine acetylproteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a proteomic approach. We identified 430 unique peptides corresponding to 320 acetylated proteins. In addition to the proteins involved in various metabolic pathways, several enzymes contributing to the lipopolysaccharides biosynthesis were characterized as acetylated. This data set illustrated the abundance and the diversity of acetylated lysine proteins in P. aeruginosa and opens opportunities to explore the role of the acetylation in the bacterial physiology. PMID:25900529

  11. Global profiling of lysine acetylation in human histoplasmosis pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Xie, Longxiang; Fang, Wenjie; Deng, Wanyan; Yu, Zhaoxiao; Li, Juan; Chen, Min; Liao, Wanqing; Xie, Jianping; Pan, Weihua

    2016-04-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is the causative agent of human histoplasmosis, which can cause respiratory and systemic mycosis in immune-compromised individuals. Lysine acetylation, a protein posttranslational protein modification, is widespread in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Although increasing evidence suggests that lysine acetylation may play critical roles in fungus physiology, very little is known about its extent and function in H. capsulatum. To comprehensively profile protein lysine acetylation in H. capsulatum, we performed a global acetylome analysis through peptide prefractionation, antibody enrichment, and LC-MS/MS analysis, identifying 775 acetylation sites on 456 acetylated proteins; and functionally analysis showing their involvement in different biological processes. We defined six types of acetylation site motifs, and the results imply that lysine residue of polypeptide with tyrosine at the -1 and +1 positions, histidine at the +1 position, and phenylalanine (F) at the +1 and +2 position is a preferred substrate of lysine acetyltransferase. Moreover, some virulence factors candidates including calmodulin and DnaK are acetylated. In conclusion, our data set may serve as an important resource for the elucidation of associations between functional protein lysine acetylation and virulence in H. capsulatum. PMID:26806293

  12. Acetyl-L-carnitine increases mitochondrial protein acetylation in the aged rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Janos; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Lee, Kwangwon; Virmani, Ashraf; Koverech, Aleardo; Cavazza, Claudio; Chance, Mark R; Hoppel, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that in vivo treatment of elderly Fisher 344 rats with acetylcarnitine abolished the age-associated defect in respiratory chain complex III in interfibrillar mitochondria and improved the functional recovery of the ischemic/reperfused heart. Herein, we explored mitochondrial protein acetylation as a possible mechanism for acetylcarnitine's effect. In vivo treatment of elderly rats with acetylcarnitine restored cardiac acetylcarnitine content and increased mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and increased the number of lysine-acetylated proteins in cardiac subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria. Enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial β-oxidation, and ATP synthase of the respiratory chain showed the greatest acetylation. Acetylation of isocitrate dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, complex V, and aspartate aminotransferase was accompanied by decreased catalytic activity. Several proteins were found to be acetylated only after treatment with acetylcarnitine, suggesting that exogenous acetylcarnitine served as the acetyl-donor. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that acetylcarnitine treatment also induced changes in mitochondrial protein amount; a two-fold or greater increase/decrease in abundance was observed for thirty one proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the first time that in the aged rat heart in vivo administration of acetylcarnitine provides acetyl groups for protein acetylation and affects the amount of mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25660059

  13. Dynamic Protein Acetylation in Plant–Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gaoyuan; Walley, Justin W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen infection triggers complex molecular perturbations within host cells that results in either resistance or susceptibility. Protein acetylation is an emerging biochemical modification that appears to play central roles during host–pathogen interactions. To date, research in this area has focused on two main themes linking protein acetylation to plant immune signaling. Firstly, it has been established that proper gene expression during defense responses requires modulation of histone acetylation within target gene promoter regions. Second, some pathogens can deliver effector molecules that encode acetyltransferases directly within the host cell to modify acetylation of specific host proteins. Collectively these findings suggest that the acetylation level for a range of host proteins may be modulated to alter the outcome of pathogen infection. This review will focus on summarizing our current understanding of the roles of protein acetylation in plant defense and highlight the utility of proteomics approaches to uncover the complete repertoire of acetylation changes triggered by pathogen infection. PMID:27066055

  14. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Zhao, Yun; Ruan, Songlin; Zhang, Hengmu; Yan, Chengqi; Jin, Liang; Cao, Lingling; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Huasheng; Cheng, Zhongyi

    2015-01-01

    Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways, and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants. PMID:26442052

  15. Emerging Functions for N-Terminal Protein Acetylation in Plants.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    N-terminal (Nt-) acetylation is a widespread but poorly understood co-translational protein modification. Two reports now shed light onto the proteome-wide dynamics and protein-specific consequences of Nt-acetylation in relation to plant development, stress-response, and protein stability, identifying this modification as a key regulator of diverse aspects of plant growth and behaviour. PMID:26319188

  16. Protein lysine acetylation in bacteria: Current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins are key events in cellular metabolism and physiology regulation. Lysine acetylation is one of the best studied protein modifications in eukaryotes, but, until recently, ignored in bacteria. However, proteomic advances have highlighted the diversity of bacterial lysine-acetylated proteins. The current data support the implication of lysine acetylation in various metabolic pathways, adaptation and virulence. In this review, we present a broad overview of the current knowledge of lysine acetylation in bacteria. We emphasize particularly the significant contribution of proteomics in this field. PMID:26390373

  17. Antemortem stress regulates protein acetylation and glycolysis in postmortem muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongwen; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhenyu; Shen, Qingwu W; Zhang, Dequan

    2016-07-01

    Although exhaustive research has established that preslaughter stress is a major factor contributing to pale, soft, exudative (PSE) meat, questions remain regarding the biochemistry of postmortem glycolysis. In this study, the influence of preslaughter stress on protein acetylation in relationship to glycolysis was studied. The data show that antemortem swimming significantly enhanced glycolysis and the total acetylated proteins in postmortem longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of mice. Inhibition of protein acetylation by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors eliminated stress induced increase in glycolysis. Inversely, antemortem injection of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and nicotinamide (NAM), further increased protein acetylation early postmortem and the glycolysis. These data provide new insight into the biochemistry of postmortem glycolysis by showing that protein acetylation regulates glycolysis, which may participate in the regulation of preslaughter stress on glycolysis in postmortem muscle. PMID:26920270

  18. Manipulation of the host protein acetylation network by human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Mark Y.; Ali, Ibraheem; Ott, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, protein acetylation has emerged as a globally important post-translational modification that fine-tunes major cellular processes in many life forms. This dynamic regulatory system is critical both for complex eukaryotic cells and for the viruses that infect them. HIV-1 accesses the host acetylation network by interacting with several key enzymes, thereby promoting infection at multiple steps during the viral life cycle. Inhibitors of host histone deacetylases and bromodomain-containing proteins are now being pursued as therapeutic strategies to enhance current antiretroviral treatment. As more acetylation-targeting compounds are reaching clinical trials, it is timely to review the role of reversible protein acetylation in HIV-infected CD4+ T cells. PMID:26329395

  19. Protein kinase C coordinates histone H3 phosphorylation and acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Darieva, Zoulfia; Webber, Aaron; Warwood, Stacey; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    The re-assembly of chromatin following DNA replication is a critical event in the maintenance of genome integrity. Histone H3 acetylation at K56 and phosphorylation at T45 are two important chromatin modifications that accompany chromatin assembly. Here we have identified the protein kinase Pkc1 as a key regulator that coordinates the deposition of these modifications in S. cerevisiae under conditions of replicative stress. Pkc1 phosphorylates the histone acetyl transferase Rtt109 and promotes its ability to acetylate H3K56. Our data also reveal novel cross-talk between two different histone modifications as Pkc1 also enhances H3T45 phosphorylation and this modification is required for H3K56 acetylation. Our data therefore uncover an important role for Pkc1 in coordinating the deposition of two different histone modifications that are important for chromatin assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09886.001 PMID:26468616

  20. Mass spectrometry-based detection of protein acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Skinner, Mary E.; Lombard, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Improved sample preparation techniques and increasingly sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) analysis have revolutionized the study of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). Here, we describe a general approach for immunopurification and MS-based identification of acetylated proteins in biological samples. This approach is useful characterizing changes in the acetylome in response to biological interventions (1). PMID:24014401

  1. Acetylation of RNA Processing Proteins and Cell Cycle Proteins in Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Carol; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Huang, Feilei; Pan, Jing; Josic, Djuro; Yu-Lee, Li-yuan

    2010-01-01

    Mitosis is a highly regulated process in which errors can lead to genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer. During this phase of the cell cycle, transcription is silent and RNA translation is inhibited. Thus, mitosis is largely driven by posttranslational modification of proteins, including phosphorylation, methylation, ubiquitination and sumoylation. Here, we show that protein acetylation is prevalent during mitosis. To identify proteins that are acetylated, we synchronized HeLa cells in early prometaphase and immunoprecipitated lysine-acetylated proteins with anti-acetyl-lysine antibody. The immunoprecipitated proteins were identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. These include proteins involved in RNA translation, RNA processing, cell cycle regulation, transcription, chaperone function, DNA damage repair, metabolism, immune response and cell structure. Immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analyses confirmed that two RNA processing proteins, eIF4G and RNA helicase A, and several cell cycle proteins, including APC1, anillin and NudC, were acetylated in mitosis. We further showed that acetylation of APC1 and NudC was enhanced by apicidin treatment, suggesting that their acetylation was regulated by histone deacetylase. Moreover, treating mitotic cells with apicidin or trichostatin A induced spindle abnormalities and cytokinesis failure. These studies suggest that protein acetylation/deacetylation is likely an important regulatory mechanism in mitosis. PMID:20812760

  2. SIAH-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of acetyl-transferases regulate the p53 response and protein acetylation.

    PubMed

    Grishina, Inna; Debus, Katherina; García-Limones, Carmen; Schneider, Constanze; Shresta, Amit; García, Carlos; Calzado, Marco A; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2012-12-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins by lysine acetylation regulates many biological processes ranging from signal transduction to chromatin compaction. Here we identify the acetyl-transferases CBP/p300, Tip60 and PCAF as new substrates for the ubiquitin E3 ligases SIAH1 and SIAH2. While CBP/p300 can undergo ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent degradation by SIAH1 and SIAH2, the two other acetyl-transferases are exclusively degraded by SIAH2. Accordingly, SIAH-deficient cells show enhanced protein acetylation, thus revealing SIAH proteins as indirect regulators of the cellular acetylation status. Functional experiments show that Tip60/PCAF-mediated acetylation of the tumor suppressor p53 is antagonized by the p53 target gene SIAH2 which mediates ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated degradation of both acetyl-transferases and consequently diminishes p53 acetylation and transcriptional activity. The p53 kinase HIPK2 mediates hierarchical phosphorylation of SIAH2 at 5 sites, which further boosts its activity as a ubiquitin E3 ligase for several substrates and therefore dampens the late p53 response. PMID:23044042

  3. Protein Acetylation Is Involved in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Virulence.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yu; Ren, Jie; Ni, Jinjing; Tao, Jing; Lu, Jie; Yao, Yu-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Salmonella causes a range of diseases in different hosts, including enterocolitis and systemic infection. Lysine acetylation regulates many eukaryotic cellular processes, but its function in bacteria is largely unexplored. The acetyltransferase Pat and NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase CobB are involved in the reversible protein acetylation in Salmonella Typhimurium. Here, we used cell and animal models to evaluate the virulence of pat and cobB deletion mutants in S. Typhimurium and found that pat is critical for bacterial intestinal colonization and systemic infection. Next, to understand the underlying mechanism, genome-wide transcriptome was analyzed. RNA sequencing data showed that the expression of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) is partially dependent on pat In addition, we found that HilD, a key transcriptional regulator of SPI-1, is a substrate of Pat. The acetylation of HilD by Pat maintained HilD stability and was essential for the transcriptional activation of HilA. Taken together, these results suggest that a protein acetylation system regulates SPI-1 expression by controlling HilD in a posttranslational manner to mediate S. Typhimurium virulence. PMID:26810370

  4. An Acetylation Switch Regulates SUMO-Dependent Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, Rebecca; Chien, Christopher D.; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura; Muller, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The attachment of the SUMO modifier to proteins controls cellular signaling pathways through noncovalent binding to SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs). Canonical SIMs contain a core of hydrophobic residues that bind to a hydrophobic pocket on SUMO. Negatively charged residues of SIMs frequently contribute to binding by interacting with a basic surface on SUMO. Here we define acetylation within this basic interface as a central mechanism for the control of SUMO-mediated interactions. The acetyl-mediated neutralization of basic charges on SUMO prevents binding to SIMs in PML, Daxx, and PIAS family members but does not affect the interaction between RanBP2 and SUMO. Acetylation is controlled by HDACs and attenuates SUMO- and PIAS-mediated gene silencing. Moreover, it affects the assembly of PML nuclear bodies and restrains the recruitment of the corepressor Daxx to these structures. This acetyl-dependent switch thus expands the regulatory repertoire of SUMO signaling and determines the selectivity and dynamics of SUMO-SIM interactions. PMID:22578841

  5. Therapeutics Targeting Protein Acetylation Perturb Latency of Human Viruses.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Ryan J; Ott, Melanie

    2016-03-18

    Persistent viral infections are widespread and represent significant public health burdens. Some viruses endure in a latent state by co-opting the host epigenetic machinery to manipulate viral gene expression. Small molecules targeting epigenetic pathways are now in the clinic for certain cancers and are considered as potential treatment strategies to reverse latency in HIV-infected individuals. In this review, we discuss how drugs interfering with one epigenetic pathway, protein acetylation, perturb latency of three families of pathogenic human viruses-retroviruses, herpesviruses, and papillomaviruses. PMID:26845514

  6. Lysine Acetylation Is a Widespread Protein Modification for Diverse Proteins in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysine acetylation (LysAc), a form of reversible protein post translational modification previously known only for histone proteins in plants, is shown to be wide spread in Arabidopsis. Sixty five lysine modification sites were identified on 58 proteins, which operate in a wide variety of pathways/...

  7. Protein acetylation sites mediated by Schistosoma mansoni GCN5

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes Maciel, Renata de; Furtado Madeiro da Costa, Rodrigo; Meirelles Bastosde Oliveira, Francisco; Rumjanek, Franklin David; Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado

    2008-05-23

    The transcriptional co-activator GCN5, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), is part of large multimeric complexes that are required for chromatin remodeling and transcription activation. As in other eukaryotes, the DNA from the parasite Schistosome mansoni is organized into nucleosomes and the genome encodes components of chromatin-remodeling complexes. Using a series of synthetic peptides we determined that Lys-14 of histone H3 was acetylated by the recombinant SmGCN5-HAT domain. SmGCN5 was also able to acetylate schistosome non-histone proteins, such as the nuclear receptors SmRXR1 and SmNR1, and the co-activator SmNCoA-62. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of SmGCN5 protein in the nuclei of vitelline cells. Within the nucleus, SmGCN5 was found to be located in interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs), which are transcriptionally active structures. The data suggest that SmGCN5 is involved in transcription activation.

  8. Two Arabidopsis Proteins Synthesize Acetylated Xylan in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Urbanowicz, Breeanna R.; Peña, Maria J.; Moniz, Heather A.; Moremen, Kelley W.; York, William S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Xylan is the third most abundant glycopolymer on earth after cellulose and chitin. As a major component of wood, grain and forage, this natural biopolymer has far-reaching impacts on human life. This highly acetylated cell wall polysaccharide is a vital component of the plant cell wall, which functions as a molecular scaffold, providing plants with mechanical strength and flexibility. Mutations that impair synthesis of the xylan backbone give rise to plants that fail to grow normally due to collapsed xylem cells in the vascular system. Phenotypic analysis of these mutants has implicated many proteins in xylan biosynthesis. However, the enzymes directly responsible for elongation and acetylation of the xylan backbone have not been unambiguously identified. Here we provide direct biochemical evidence that two Arabidopsis thaliana proteins, IRREGULAR XYLEM 10-L (IRX10-L) and ESKIMO1/ TRICOME BIREFRINGENCE 29 (ESK1/TBL29), catalyze these respective processes in vitro. By identifying the elusive xylan synthase and establishing ESK1/TBL29 as the archetypal plant polysaccharide O-acetyltransferase, we have resolved two long-standing questions in plant cell wall biochemistry. These findings shed light on integral steps in the molecular pathways utilized by plants to synthesize a major component of the world's biomass and expand our toolkit for producing glycopolymers with valuable properties. PMID:25141999

  9. Pro-autophagic polyphenols reduce the acetylation of cytoplasmic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Federico; Mariño, Guillermo; Lissa, Delphine; Vacchelli, Erika; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Zamzami, Naoufal; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol contained in red wine that has been amply investigated for its beneficial effects on organismal metabolism, in particular in the context of the so-called “French paradox,” i.e., the relatively low incidence of coronary heart disease exhibited by a population with a high dietary intake of cholesterol and saturated fats. At least part of the beneficial effect of resveratrol on human health stems from its capacity to promote autophagy by activating the NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1. However, the concentration of resveratrol found in red wine is excessively low to account alone for the French paradox. Here, we investigated the possibility that other mono- and polyphenols contained in red wine might induce autophagy while affecting the acetylation levels of cellular proteins. Phenolic compounds found in red wine, including anthocyanins (oenin), stilbenoids (piceatannol), monophenols (caffeic acid, gallic acid) glucosides (delphinidin, kuronamin, peonidin) and flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, myricetin), were all capable of stimulating autophagy, although with dissimilar potencies. Importantly, a robust negative correlation could be established between autophagy induction and the acetylation levels of cytoplasmic proteins, as determined by a novel immunofluorescence staining protocol that allows for the exclusion of nuclear components from the analysis. Inhibition of sirtuin 1 by both pharmacological and genetic means abolished protein deacetylation and autophagy as stimulated by resveratrol, but not by piceatannol, indicating that these compounds act through distinct molecular pathways. In support of this notion, resveratrol and piceatannol synergized in inducing autophagy as well as in promoting cytoplasmic protein deacetylation. Our results highlight a cause-effect relationship between the deacetylation of cytoplasmic proteins and autophagy induction by red wine components. PMID:23070521

  10. Proteome-wide analysis reveals widespread lysine acetylation of major protein complexes in the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Cobbold, Simon A.; Santos, Joana M.; Ochoa, Alejandro; Perlman, David H.; Llinás, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification in many organisms including the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, yet the full extent of acetylation across the parasite proteome remains unresolved. Moreover, the functional significance of acetylation or how specific acetyl-lysine sites are regulated is largely unknown. Here we report a seven-fold expansion of the known parasite ‘acetylome’, characterizing 2,876 acetylation sites on 1,146 proteins. We observe that lysine acetylation targets a diverse range of protein complexes and is particularly enriched within the Apicomplexan AP2 (ApiAP2) DNA-binding protein family. Using quantitative proteomics we determined that artificial perturbation of the acetate/acetyl-CoA balance alters the acetyl-lysine occupancy of several ApiAP2 DNA-binding proteins and related transcriptional proteins. This metabolic signaling could mediate significant downstream transcriptional responses, as we show that acetylation of an ApiAP2 DNA-binding domain ablates its DNA-binding propensity. Lastly, we investigated the acetyl-lysine targets of each class of lysine deacetylase in order to begin to explore how each class of enzyme contributes to regulating the P. falciparum acetylome. PMID:26813983

  11. Data for global lysine-acetylation analysis in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yehui; Zhang, Kai; Cheng, Zhongyi; Wang, Guo-Liang; Liu, Wende

    2016-06-01

    Rice is one of the most important crops for human consumption and is a staple food for over half of the world׳s population (Yu et al., 2002) [1]. A systematic identification of the lysine acetylome was performed by our research (Xiong et al., 2016) [2]. Rice plant samples were collected from 5 weeks old seedlings (Oryza sativa, Nipponbare). After the trypsin digestion and immunoaffinity precipitation, LC-MS/MS approach was used to identify acetylated peptides. After the collected MS/MS data procession and GO annotation, the InterProScan was used to annotate protein domain. Subcellular localization of the identified acetylated proteins was predicted by WoLF PSORT. The KEGG pathway database was used to annotate identified acetylated protein interactions, reactions, and relations. The data, supplied in this article, are related to "A comprehensive catalog of the lysine-acetylation targets in rice (O. sativa) based on proteomic analyses" by Xiong et al. (2016) [2]. PMID:26977447

  12. Lysine Acetylation: Elucidating the Components of an Emerging Global Signaling Pathway in Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Victoria Lucia; Serra, Esteban Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In the past ten years the number of acetylated proteins reported in literature grew exponentially. Several authors have proposed that acetylation might be a key component in most eukaryotic signaling pathways, as important as phosphorylation. The enzymes involved in this process are starting to emerge; acetyltransferases and deacetylases are found inside and outside the nuclear compartment and have different regulatory functions. In trypanosomatids several of these enzymes have been described and are postulated to be novel antiparasitic targets for the rational design of drugs. In this paper we overview the most important known acetylated proteins and the advances made in the identification of new acetylated proteins using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Also, we summarize what is known so far about the acetyltransferases and deacetylases in eukaryotes, focusing on trypanosomes and their potential use as chemotherapeutic targets. PMID:23093844

  13. The Acetyl Group Buffering Action of Carnitine Acetyltransferase Offsets Macronutrient-induced Lysine Acetylation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael N.; Kjalarsdottir, Lilja; Thompson, J. Will; Dubois, Laura G.; Stevens, Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Brosnan, M. Julia; Rolph, Timothy P.; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation (AcK), a posttranslational modification wherein a two-carbon acetyl group binds covalently to a lysine residue, occurs prominently on mitochondrial proteins and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction. An emergent theory suggests mitochondrial AcK occurs via mass action rather than targeted catalysis. To test this hypothesis we performed mass spectrometry-based acetylproteomic analyses of quadriceps muscles from mice with skeletal muscle-specific deficiency of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), an enzyme that buffers the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA pool by converting short-chain acyl-CoAs to their membrane permeant acylcarnitine counterparts. CrAT deficiency increased tissue acetyl-CoA levels and susceptibility to diet-induced AcK of broad-ranging mitochondrial proteins, coincident with diminished whole body glucose control. Sub-compartment acetylproteome analyses of muscles from obese mice and humans showed remarkable overrepresentation of mitochondrial matrix proteins. These findings reveal roles for CrAT and L-carnitine in modulating the muscle acetylproteome and provide strong experimental evidence favoring the nonenzymatic carbon pressure model of mitochondrial AcK. PMID:26748706

  14. A bioinformatics-based overview of protein Lys-Ne-acetylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among posttranslational modifications, there are some conceptual similarities between Lys-N'-acetylation and Ser/Thr/Tyr O-phosphorylation. Herein we present a bioinformatics-based overview of reversible protein Lys-acetylation, including some comparisons with reversible protein phosphorylation. T...

  15. Lysine acetylation stabilizes SP2 protein in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Chengcheng; Sheng, Qing; Jiang, Caiying; Chen, Qin; Lv, Zhengbing; Yao, Juming; Nie, Zuoming

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation (Kac) is a vital post-translational modification that plays an important role in many cellular processes in organisms. In the present study, the nutrient storage proteins in hemolymph were first found to be highly acetylated-particularly SP2 protein, which contains 20 potential Kac sites. Further results confirmed that lysine acetylation could stabilize and up-regulate the protein level of anti-apoptosis protein SP2, thereby improving the survival of H2O2-treated BmN cells and suppressing the apoptosis induced by H2O2. The potential mechanism involved in the inhibition of ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation by crosstalk between lysine acetylation and ubiquitination. Our results showed that the increase in the acetylation level by TSA could decrease the ubiquitination and improve the protein level of SP2, indicating that lysine acetylation could influence the SP2 protein level through competition between ubiquitination and the suppression of ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation, thereby stabilizing the protein. SP2 is a major nutrient storage protein from hemolymph for amino acid storage and utilization. The crosstalk between lysine acetylation and ubiquitination of SP2 might imply an important role of lysine acetylation for nutrient storage and utilization in silkworm. PMID:27374983

  16. N-Ace: using solvent accessibility and physicochemical properties to identify protein N-acetylation sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Yi; Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Lin, Feng-Mao; Chang, Wen-Chi; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2010-11-30

    Protein acetylation, which is catalyzed by acetyltransferases, is a type of post-translational modification and crucial to numerous essential biological processes, including transcriptional regulation, apoptosis, and cytokine signaling. As the experimental identification of protein acetylation sites is time consuming and laboratory intensive, several computational approaches have been developed for identifying the candidates of experimental validation. In this work, solvent accessibility and the physicochemical properties of proteins are utilized to identify acetylated alanine, glycine, lysine, methionine, serine, and threonine. A two-stage support vector machine was applied to learn the computational models with combinations of amino acid sequences, and the accessible surface area and physicochemical properties of proteins. The predictive accuracy thus achieved is 5% to 14% higher than that of models trained using only amino acid sequences. Additionally, the substrate specificity of the acetylated site was investigated in detail with reference to the subcellular colocalization of acetyltransferases and acetylated proteins. The proposed method, N-Ace, is evaluated using independent test sets in various acetylated residues and predictive accuracies of 90% were achieved, indicating that the performance of N-Ace is comparable with that of other acetylation prediction methods. N-Ace not only provides a user-friendly input/output interface but also is a creative method for predicting protein acetylation sites. This novel analytical resource is now freely available at http://N-Ace.mbc.NCTU.edu.tw/. PMID:20839302

  17. System-wide Studies of N-Lysine Acetylation in Rhodopseudomonas palustris Reveals Substrate Specificity of Protein Acetyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Heidi A; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein acetylation is widespread in prokaryotes. Results: Six new acyl-CoA synthetases whose activities are controlled by acetylation were identified, and their substrate preference established. A new protein acetyltransferase was also identified and its substrate specificity determined. Conclusion: Protein acetyltransferases acetylate a conserved lysine residue in protein substrates. Significance: The R. palustris Pat enzyme specifically acetylates AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases and regulates fatty acid metabolism.

  18. An Artificial Reaction Promoter Modulates Mitochondrial Functions via Chemically Promoting Protein Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Yutaka; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Hotta, Kohji; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation, which modulates protein function, is an important process in intracellular signalling. In mitochondria, protein acetylation regulates a number of enzymatic activities and, therefore, modulates mitochondrial functions. Our previous report showed that tributylphosphine (PBu3), an artificial reaction promoter that promotes acetylransfer reactions in vitro, also promotes the reaction between acetyl-CoA and an exogenously introduced fluorescent probe in mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that PBu3 induces the acetylation of mitochondrial proteins and a decrease in acetyl-CoA concentration in PBu3-treated HeLa cells. This indicates that PBu3 can promote the acetyltransfer reaction between acetyl-CoA and mitochondrial proteins in living cells. PBu3-induced acetylation gradually reduced mitochondrial ATP concentrations in HeLa cells without changing the cytoplasmic ATP concentration, suggesting that PBu3 mainly affects mitochondrial functions. In addition, pyruvate, which is converted into acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and transiently increases ATP concentrations in the absence of PBu3, elicited a further decrease in mitochondrial ATP concentrations in the presence of PBu3. Moreover, the application and removal of PBu3 reversibly alternated mitochondrial fragmentation and elongation. These results indicate that PBu3 enhances acetyltransfer reactions in mitochondria and modulates mitochondrial functions in living cells. PMID:27374857

  19. An Artificial Reaction Promoter Modulates Mitochondrial Functions via Chemically Promoting Protein Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Yutaka; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Hotta, Kohji; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation, which modulates protein function, is an important process in intracellular signalling. In mitochondria, protein acetylation regulates a number of enzymatic activities and, therefore, modulates mitochondrial functions. Our previous report showed that tributylphosphine (PBu3), an artificial reaction promoter that promotes acetylransfer reactions in vitro, also promotes the reaction between acetyl-CoA and an exogenously introduced fluorescent probe in mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that PBu3 induces the acetylation of mitochondrial proteins and a decrease in acetyl-CoA concentration in PBu3-treated HeLa cells. This indicates that PBu3 can promote the acetyltransfer reaction between acetyl-CoA and mitochondrial proteins in living cells. PBu3-induced acetylation gradually reduced mitochondrial ATP concentrations in HeLa cells without changing the cytoplasmic ATP concentration, suggesting that PBu3 mainly affects mitochondrial functions. In addition, pyruvate, which is converted into acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and transiently increases ATP concentrations in the absence of PBu3, elicited a further decrease in mitochondrial ATP concentrations in the presence of PBu3. Moreover, the application and removal of PBu3 reversibly alternated mitochondrial fragmentation and elongation. These results indicate that PBu3 enhances acetyltransfer reactions in mitochondria and modulates mitochondrial functions in living cells. PMID:27374857

  20. Crystal structure of tabtoxin resistance protein complexed with acetyl coenzyme A reveals the mechanism for {beta}-lactam acetylation.

    SciTech Connect

    He, H.; Ding, Y.; Bartlam, M.; Sun, F.; Le, Y.; Qin, X.; Tang, H.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Liu, J.; Zhao, N.; Rao, Z.; Biosciences Division; Tsinghua Univ.; Chinese Academy of Science

    2003-01-31

    Tabtoxin resistance protein (TTR) is an enzyme that renders tabtoxin-producing pathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae, tolerant to their own phytotoxins. Here, we report the crystal structure of TTR complexed with its natural cofactor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to 1.55 {angstrom} resolution. The binary complex forms a characteristic 'V' shape for substrate binding and contains the four motifs conserved in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily, which also includes the histone acetyltransferases (HATs). A single-step mechanism is proposed to explain the function of three conserved residues, Glu92, Asp130 and Tyr141, in catalyzing the acetyl group transfer to its substrate. We also report that TTR possesses HAT activity and suggest an evolutionary relationship between TTR and other GNAT members.

  1. Global Histone H4 Acetylation in the Olfactory Bulb of Lactating Rats with Different Patterns of Maternal Behavior.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Ana Carolina; da Silva, Ivy Reichert Vital; Reinaldo, Gustavo; Dani, Caroline; Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Giovenardi, Márcia

    2016-10-01

    In rats, variations in the levels of neuromodulatory molecules and in the expression of their receptors are observed during pregnancy and postpartum. These changes may contribute to the development and management of maternal behavior. The frequency of licking the pups is used to evaluate maternal care, having mothers with low licking (LL) and high licking (HL) frequencies. Previously, we found that HL had increased levels of transcriptional expression of the receptors for serotonin (HTR1a, HTR1b), estrogen (Erα), dopamine (D1a), and prolactin (Prlr) than LL in the olfactory bulb (OB); however, the molecular mechanisms behind this phenomenon are unknown. Since evidences pointed out that epigenetic marks, which may alter gene expression, are modulated by environmental factors such as exercise, diet, maternal care, and xenobiotic exposure, our objective was to verify the acetylation levels of histone-H4 in the OB of LL and HL rats. Maternal behavior was studied for the first 7 postpartum days. LL (n = 4) and HL (n = 5) mothers were selected according to the behavior of licking their pups. Acetylation levels of histone-H4 were determined using the Global Histone-H4 Acetylation Assay Kit and expressed as ng/mg protein (mean ± SD). Analysis revealed that HL (278.36 ± 68.95) had increased H4 acetylation levels than LL (183.24 ± 73.05; p = 0.045). The enhanced expression of the previously studied receptors in the OB could be related, at least in part, to the hyperacetylation status of histone-H4 here observed. Afterward, the modulation of histone acetylation levels could exert a pivotal role through molecular mechanisms involved in the different patterns of maternal behavior. PMID:26620050

  2. Identification and Analysis of the Acetylated Status of Poplar Proteins Reveals Analogous N-Terminal Protein Processing Mechanisms with Other Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Cai; Zhu, Hang-Yong; Dong, Xiu-Mei; Ning, De-Li; Wang, Hong-Xia; Li, Wei-Hua; Yang, Chuan-Ping; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Background The N-terminal protein processing mechanism (NPM) including N-terminal Met excision (NME) and N-terminal acetylation (Nα-acetylation) represents a common protein co-translational process of some eukaryotes. However, this NPM occurred in woody plants yet remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To reveal the NPM in poplar, we investigated the Nα-acetylation status of poplar proteins during dormancy by combining tandem mass spectrometry with TiO2 enrichment of acetylated peptides. We identified 58 N-terminally acetylated (Nα-acetylated) proteins. Most proteins (47, >81%) are subjected to Nα-acetylation following the N-terminal removal of Met, indicating that Nα-acetylation and NME represent a common NPM of poplar proteins. Furthermore, we confirm that poplar shares the analogous NME and Nα-acetylation (NPM) to other eukaryotes according to analysis of N-terminal features of these acetylated proteins combined with genome-wide identification of the involving methionine aminopeptidases (MAPs) and N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nat) enzymes in poplar. The Nα-acetylated reactions and the involving enzymes of these poplar proteins are also identified based on those of yeast and human, as well as the subcellular location information of these poplar proteins. Conclusions/Significance This study represents the first extensive investigation of Nα-acetylation events in woody plants, the results of which will provide useful resources for future unraveling the regulatory mechanisms of Nα-acetylation of proteins in poplar. PMID:23536812

  3. Cell shape regulates global histone acetylation in human mammaryepithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Le Beyec, Johanne; Xu, Ren; Lee, Sun-Young; Nelson, Celeste M.; Rizki, Aylin; Alcaraz, Jordi; Bissell, Mina J.

    2007-02-28

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell morphology and gene expression in vivo; these relationships are maintained in three-dimensional (3D) cultures of mammary epithelial cells. In the presence of laminin-rich ECM (lrECM), mammary epithelial cells round up and undergo global histone deacetylation, a process critical for their functional differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether lrECM-dependent cell rounding and global histone deacetylation are indeed part of a common physical-biochemical pathway. Using 3D cultures as well as nonadhesive and micropatterned substrata, here we showed that the cell 'rounding' caused by lrECM was sufficient to induce deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the absence of biochemical cues. Microarray and confocal analysis demonstrated that this deacetylation in 3D culture is associated with a global increase in chromatin condensation and a reduction in gene expression. Whereas cells cultured on plastic substrata formed prominent stress fibers, cells grown in 3D lrECM or on micropatterns lacked these structures. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D phenocopied the lrECM-induced cell rounding and histone deacetylation. These results reveal a novel link between ECM-controlled cell shape and chromatin structure, and suggest that this link is mediated by changes in the actin cytoskeleton.

  4. Data for global lysine-acetylation analysis in rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yehui; Zhang, Kai; Cheng, Zhongyi; Wang, Guo-Liang; Liu, Wende

    2016-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important crops for human consumption and is a staple food for over half of the world׳s population (Yu et al., 2002) [1]. A systematic identification of the lysine acetylome was performed by our research (Xiong et al., 2016) [2]. Rice plant samples were collected from 5 weeks old seedlings (Oryza sativa, Nipponbare). After the trypsin digestion and immunoaffinity precipitation, LC–MS/MS approach was used to identify acetylated peptides. After the collected MS/MS data procession and GO annotation, the InterProScan was used to annotate protein domain. Subcellular localization of the identified acetylated proteins was predicted by WoLF PSORT. The KEGG pathway database was used to annotate identified acetylated protein interactions, reactions, and relations. The data, supplied in this article, are related to “A comprehensive catalog of the lysine-acetylation targets in rice (O. sativa) based on proteomic analyses” by Xiong et al. (2016) [2]. PMID:26977447

  5. Reduced Wall Acetylation Proteins Play Vital and Distinct Roles in Cell Wall O-Acetylation in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yuzuki; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Gille, Sascha; Harholt, Jesper; Chong, Sun-Li; Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.; Tenkanen, Maija; Cheng, Kun; Pauly, Markus; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2013-01-01

    The Reduced Wall Acetylation (RWA) proteins are involved in cell wall acetylation in plants. Previously, we described a single mutant, rwa2, which has about 20% lower level of O-acetylation in leaf cell walls and no obvious growth or developmental phenotype. In this study, we generated double, triple, and quadruple loss-of-function mutants of all four members of the RWA family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In contrast to rwa2, the triple and quadruple rwa mutants display severe growth phenotypes revealing the importance of wall acetylation for plant growth and development. The quadruple rwa mutant can be completely complemented with the RWA2 protein expressed under 35S promoter, indicating the functional redundancy of the RWA proteins. Nevertheless, the degree of acetylation of xylan, (gluco)mannan, and xyloglucan as well as overall cell wall acetylation is affected differently in different combinations of triple mutants, suggesting their diversity in substrate preference. The overall degree of wall acetylation in the rwa quadruple mutant was reduced by 63% compared with the wild type, and histochemical analysis of the rwa quadruple mutant stem indicates defects in cell differentiation of cell types with secondary cell walls. PMID:24019426

  6. Chronic ethanol consumption induces mitochondrial protein acetylation and oxidative stress in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Peter S.; Roy, Samantha R.; Coughlan, Christina; Orlicky, David J.; Liang, Yongliang; Shearn, Colin T.; Roede, James R.; Fritz, Kristofer S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present the novel findings that chronic ethanol consumption induces mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation in the kidney and correlates with significantly increased renal oxidative stress. A major proteomic footprint of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is an increase in hepatic mitochondrial protein acetylation. Protein hyperacetylation has been shown to alter enzymatic function of numerous proteins and plays a role in regulating metabolic processes. Renal mitochondrial targets of hyperacetylation include numerous metabolic and antioxidant pathways, such as lipid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, and amino acid metabolism, as well as glutathione and thioredoxin pathways. Disruption of protein lysine acetylation has the potential to impair renal function through metabolic dysregulation and decreased antioxidant capacity. Due to a significant elevation in ethanol-mediated renal oxidative stress, we highlight the acetylation of superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxins, glutathione reductase, and glutathione transferase enzymes. Since oxidative stress is a known factor in ethanol-induced nephrotoxicity, we examined biochemical markers of protein hyperacetylation and oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate increased protein acetylation concurrent with depleted glutathione, altered Cys redox potential, and the presence of 4-HNE protein modifications in our 6-week model of early-stage alcoholic nephrotoxicity. These findings support the hypothesis that ethanol metabolism causes an influx of mitochondrial metabolic substrate, resulting in mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation with the potential to impact mitochondrial metabolic and antioxidant processes. PMID:26177469

  7. Acetylation of glucokinase regulatory protein decreases glucose metabolism by suppressing glucokinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo-Man; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Jo, Seong-Ho; Kim, Mi-Young; Ahn, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), mainly expressed in the liver and pancreatic β-cells, is critical for maintaining glucose homeostasis. GK expression and kinase activity, respectively, are both modulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Post-translationally, GK is regulated by binding the glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP), resulting in GK retention in the nucleus and its inability to participate in cytosolic glycolysis. Although hepatic GKRP is known to be regulated by allosteric mechanisms, the precise details of modulation of GKRP activity, by post-translational modification, are not well known. Here, we demonstrate that GKRP is acetylated at Lys5 by the acetyltransferase p300. Acetylated GKRP is resistant to degradation by the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway, suggesting that acetylation increases GKRP stability and binding to GK, further inhibiting GK nuclear export. Deacetylation of GKRP is effected by the NAD+-dependent, class III histone deacetylase SIRT2, which is inhibited by nicotinamide. Moreover, the livers of db/db obese, diabetic mice also show elevated GKRP acetylation, suggesting a broader, critical role in regulating blood glucose. Given that acetylated GKRP may affiliate with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), understanding the mechanism of GKRP acetylation in the liver could reveal novel targets within the GK-GKRP pathway, for treating T2DM and other metabolic pathologies. PMID:26620281

  8. The HTLV-1-encoded protein HBZ directly inhibits the acetyl transferase activity of p300/CBP

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Torsten; Wright, Diana G.; Polakowski, Nicholas; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Lemasson, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    The homologous cellular coactivators p300 and CBP contain intrinsic lysine acetyl transferase (termed HAT) activity. This activity is responsible for acetylation of several sites on the histones as well as modification of transcription factors. In a previous study, we found that HBZ, encoded by the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), binds to multiple domains of p300/CBP, including the HAT domain. In this study, we found that HBZ inhibits the HAT activity of p300/CBP through the bZIP domain of the viral protein. This effect correlated with a reduction of H3K18 acetylation, a specific target of p300/CBP, in cells expressing HBZ. Interestingly, lower levels of H3K18 acetylation were detected in HTLV-1 infected cells compared to non-infected cells. The inhibitory effect of HBZ was not limited to histones, as HBZ also inhibited acetylation of the NF-κB subunit, p65, and the tumor suppressor, p53. Recent studies reported that mutations in the HAT domain of p300/CBP that cause a defect in acetylation are found in certain types of leukemia. These observations suggest that inhibition of the HAT activity by HBZ is important for the development of adult T-cell leukemia associated with HTLV-1 infection. PMID:22434882

  9. Evidence for lysine acetylation in the coat protein of a Polerovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virions of the RPV strain of Cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV-RPV) were purified from infected oat tissue and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Two conserved residues, K147 and K181, residing in the virus coat protein, were confidently identified to contain epsilon-N-acetyl groups. While no functional ...

  10. Acetylation of pregnane X receptor protein determines selective function independent of ligand activation

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Arunima; Pasquel, Danielle; Tyagi, Rakesh Kumar; Mani, Sridhar

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Pregnane X receptor (PXR), a major regulatory protein, is modified by acetylation. {yields} PXR undergoes dynamic deacetylation upon ligand-mediated activation. {yields} SIRT1 partially mediates PXR deacetylation. {yields} PXR deacetylation per se induces lipogenesis mimicking ligand-mediated activation. -- Abstract: Pregnane X receptor (PXR), like other members of its class of nuclear receptors, undergoes post-translational modification [PTM] (e.g., phosphorylation). However, it is unknown if acetylation (a major and common form of protein PTM) is observed on PXR and, if it is, whether it is of functional consequence. PXR has recently emerged as an important regulatory protein with multiple ligand-dependent functions. In the present work we show that PXR is indeed acetylated in vivo. SIRT1 (Sirtuin 1), a NAD-dependent class III histone deacetylase and a member of the sirtuin family of proteins, partially mediates deacetylation of PXR. Most importantly, the acetylation status of PXR regulates its selective function independent of ligand activation.

  11. The role of the plant-specific ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 protein in Arabidopsis cell wall polysaccharide O-acetylation.

    PubMed

    Schultink, Alex; Naylor, Dan; Dama, Murali; Pauly, Markus

    2015-04-01

    A mutation in the ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 (AXY9) gene was found to be causative for the decreased xyloglucan acetylation phenotype of the axy9.1 mutant, which was identified in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants. The axy9.1 mutant also exhibits decreased O-acetylation of xylan, implying that the AXY9 protein has a broad role in polysaccharide acetylation. An axy9 insertional mutant exhibits severe growth defects and collapsed xylem, demonstrating the importance of wall polysaccharide O-acetylation for normal plant growth and development. Localization and topological experiments indicate that the active site of the AXY9 protein resides within the Golgi lumen. The AXY9 protein appears to be a component of the plant cell wall polysaccharide acetylation pathway, which also includes the REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION and TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins. The AXY9 protein is distinct from the TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins, reported to be polysaccharide acetyltransferases, but does share homology with them and other acetyltransferases, suggesting that the AXY9 protein may act to produce an acetylated intermediate that is part of the O-acetylation pathway. PMID:25681330

  12. System-wide Studies of N-Lysine Acetylation in Rhodopseudomonas palustris Reveal Substrate Specificity of Protein Acetyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Heidi A.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2012-01-01

    N-Lysine acetylation is a posttranslational modification that has been well studied in eukaryotes and is likely widespread in prokaryotes as well. The central metabolic enzyme acetyl-CoA synthetase is regulated in both bacteria and eukaryotes by acetylation of a conserved lysine residue in the active site. In the purple photosynthetic α-proteobacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris, two protein acetyltransferases (RpPat and the newly identified RpKatA) and two deacetylases (RpLdaA and RpSrtN) regulate the activities of AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases. In this work, we used LC/MS/MS to identify other proteins regulated by the N-lysine acetylation/deacetylation system of this bacterium. Of the 24 putative acetylated proteins identified, 14 were identified more often in a strain lacking both deacetylases. Nine of these proteins were members of the AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetase family. RpPat acetylated all nine of the acyl-CoA synthetases identified by this work, and RpLdaA deacetylated eight of them. In all cases, acetylation occurred at the conserved lysine residue in the active site, and acetylation decreased activity of the enzymes by >70%. Our results show that many different AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases are regulated by N-lysine acetylation. Five non-acyl-CoA synthetases were identified as possibly acetylated, including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and Rpa1177, a putative 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase. Neither RpPat nor RpKatA acetylated either of these proteins in vitro. It has been reported that Salmonella enterica Pat (SePat) can acetylate a number of metabolic enzymes, including GAPDH, but we were unable to confirm this claim, suggesting that the substrate range of SePat is not as broad as suggested previously. PMID:22416131

  13. A Method to determine lysine acetylation stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles

    2014-07-21

    A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the lack of stoichiometry information. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of lysine acetylation on proteins globally. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy on hundreds of acetylated peptides from cell lysates and cross-validated the measurements via immunoblotting.

  14. The extracellular release of Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 nuclear protein is mediated by acetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Coutinho Carneiro, Vitor; Moraes Maciel, Renata de; Caetano de Abreu da Silva, Isabel; Furtado Madeira da Costa, Rodrigo; Neto Paiva, Claudia; Torres Bozza, Marcelo; Rosado Fantappie, Marcelo

    2009-12-25

    Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 (SmHMGB1) was revealed to be a substrate for the parasite histone acetyltransferases SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. We found that full-length SmHMGB1, as well as its HMG-box B (but not HMG-box A) were acetylated in vitro by SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. However, SmCBP1 was able to acetylate both substrates more efficiently than SmGCN5. Interestingly, the removal of the C-terminal acidic tail of SmHMGB1 (SmHMGB1{Delta}C) resulted in increased acetylation of the protein. We showed by mammalian cell transfection assays that SmHMGB1 and SmHMGB1{Delta}C were transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after sodium butyrate (NaB) treatment. Importantly, after NaB treatment, SmHMGB1 was also present outside the cell. Together, our data suggest that acetylation of SmHMGB1 plays a role in cellular trafficking, culminating with its secretion to the extracellular milieu. The possible role of SmHMGB1 acetylation in the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis is discussed.

  15. Flavonoid apigenin is an inhibitor of the NAD+ ase CD38: implications for cellular NAD+ metabolism, protein acetylation, and treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Escande, Carlos; Nin, Veronica; Price, Nathan L; Capellini, Verena; Gomes, Ana P; Barbosa, Maria Thereza; O'Neil, Luke; White, Thomas A; Sinclair, David A; Chini, Eduardo N

    2013-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a growing health problem worldwide. It is therefore imperative to develop new strategies to treat this pathology. In the past years, the manipulation of NAD(+) metabolism has emerged as a plausible strategy to ameliorate metabolic syndrome. In particular, an increase in cellular NAD(+) levels has beneficial effects, likely because of the activation of sirtuins. Previously, we reported that CD38 is the primary NAD(+)ase in mammals. Moreover, CD38 knockout mice have higher NAD(+) levels and are protected against obesity and metabolic syndrome. Here, we show that CD38 regulates global protein acetylation through changes in NAD(+) levels and sirtuin activity. In addition, we characterize two CD38 inhibitors: quercetin and apigenin. We show that pharmacological inhibition of CD38 results in higher intracellular NAD(+) levels and that treatment of cell cultures with apigenin decreases global acetylation as well as the acetylation of p53 and RelA-p65. Finally, apigenin administration to obese mice increases NAD(+) levels, decreases global protein acetylation, and improves several aspects of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Our results show that CD38 is a novel pharmacological target to treat metabolic diseases via NAD(+)-dependent pathways. PMID:23172919

  16. Mitochondrial protein acetylation as a cell-intrinsic, evolutionary driver of fat storage: chemical and metabolic logic of acetyl-lysine modifications.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Sirisha; Grossmann, Ruth E; Brenner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Hormone systems evolved over 500 million years of animal natural history to motivate feeding behavior and convert excess calories to fat. These systems produced vertebrates, including humans, who are famine-resistant but sensitive to obesity in environments of persistent overnutrition. We looked for cell-intrinsic metabolic features, which might have been subject to an evolutionary drive favoring lipogenesis. Mitochondrial protein acetylation appears to be such a system. Because mitochondrial acetyl-coA is the central mediator of fuel oxidation and is saturable, this metabolite is postulated to be the fundamental indicator of energy excess, which imprints a memory of nutritional imbalances by covalent modification. Fungal and invertebrate mitochondria have highly acetylated mitochondrial proteomes without an apparent mitochondrially targeted protein lysine acetyltransferase. Thus, mitochondrial acetylation is hypothesized to have evolved as a nonenzymatic phenomenon. Because the pKa of a nonperturbed Lys is 10.4 and linkage of a carbonyl carbon to an ε amino group cannot be formed with a protonated Lys, we hypothesize that acetylation occurs on residues with depressed pKa values, accounting for the propensity of acetylation to hit active sites and suggesting that regulatory Lys residues may have been under selective pressure to avoid or attract acetylation throughout animal evolution. In addition, a shortage of mitochondrial oxaloacetate under ketotic conditions can explain why macronutrient insufficiency also produces mitochondrial hyperacetylation. Reduced mitochondrial activity during times of overnutrition and undernutrition would improve fitness by virtue of resource conservation. Micronutrient insufficiency is predicted to exacerbate mitochondrial hyperacetylation. Nicotinamide riboside and Sirt3 activity are predicted to relieve mitochondrial inhibition. PMID:24050258

  17. Keap1-Independent Regulation of Nrf2 Activity by Protein Acetylation and a BET Bromodomain Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Tian, Min; Spirohn, Kerstin; Boutros, Michael; Bohmann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian BET proteins comprise a family of bromodomain-containing epigenetic regulators with complex functions in chromatin organization and gene regulation. We identified the sole member of the BET protein family in Drosophila, Fs(1)h, as an inhibitor of the stress responsive transcription factor CncC, the fly ortholog of Nrf2. Fs(1)h physically interacts with CncC in a manner that requires the function of its bromodomains and the acetylation of CncC. Treatment of cultured Drosophila cells or adult flies with fs(1)h RNAi or with the BET protein inhibitor JQ1 de-represses CncC transcriptional activity and engages protective gene expression programs. The mechanism by which Fs(1)h inhibits CncC function is distinct from the canonical mechanism that stimulates Nrf2 function by abrogating Keap1-dependent proteasomal degradation. Consistent with the independent modes of CncC regulation by Keap1 and Fs(1)h, combinations of drugs that can specifically target these pathways cause a strong synergistic and specific activation of protective CncC- dependent gene expression and boosts oxidative stress resistance. This synergism might be exploitable for the design of combinatorial therapies to target diseases associated with oxidative stress or inflammation. PMID:27233051

  18. Acetylation of cell wall is required for structural integrity of the leaf surface and exerts a global impact on plant stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Nafisi, Majse; Stranne, Maria; Fimognari, Lorenzo; Atwell, Susanna; Martens, Helle J.; Pedas, Pai R.; Hansen, Sara F.; Nawrath, Christiane; Scheller, Henrik V.; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2015-01-01

    The epidermis on leaves protects plants from pathogen invasion and provides a waterproof barrier. It consists of a layer of cells that is surrounded by thick cell walls, which are partially impregnated by highly hydrophobic cuticular components. We show that the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants of REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION 2 (rwa2), previously identified as having reduced O-acetylation of both pectins and hemicelluloses, exhibit pleiotrophic phenotype on the leaf surface. The cuticle layer appeared diffused and was significantly thicker and underneath cell wall layer was interspersed with electron-dense deposits. A large number of trichomes were collapsed and surface permeability of the leaves was enhanced in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. A massive reprogramming of the transcriptome was observed in rwa2 as compared to the wild type, including a coordinated up-regulation of genes involved in responses to abiotic stress, particularly detoxification of reactive oxygen species and defense against microbial pathogens (e.g., lipid transfer proteins, peroxidases). In accordance, peroxidase activities were found to be elevated in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. These results indicate that cell wall acetylation is essential for maintaining the structural integrity of leaf epidermis, and that reduction of cell wall acetylation leads to global stress responses in Arabidopsis. PMID:26257757

  19. Acetylation of cell wall is required for structural integrity of the leaf surface and exerts a global impact on plant stress responses

    SciTech Connect

    Nafisi, Majse; Stranne, Maria; Fimognari, Lorenzo; Atwell, Susanna; Martens, Helle J.; Pedas, Pai R.; Hansen, Sara F.; Nawrath, Christiane; Scheller, Henrik V.; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2015-07-22

    Here we report that the epidermis on leaves protects plants from pathogen invasion and provides a waterproof barrier. It consists of a layer of cells that is surrounded by thick cell walls, which are partially impregnated by highly hydrophobic cuticular components. We show that the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants of REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION 2 (rwa2), previously identified as having reduced O-acetylation of both pectins and hemicelluloses, exhibit pleiotrophic phenotype on the leaf surface. The cuticle layer appeared diffused and was significantly thicker and underneath cell wall layer was interspersed with electron-dense deposits. A large number of trichomes were collapsed and surface permeability of the leaves was enhanced in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. A massive reprogramming of the transcriptome was observed in rwa2 as compared to the wild type, including a coordinated up-regulation of genes involved in responses to abiotic stress, particularly detoxification of reactive oxygen species and defense against microbial pathogens (e.g., lipid transfer proteins, peroxidases). In accordance, peroxidase activities were found to be elevated in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. These results indicate that cell wall acetylation is essential for maintaining the structural integrity of leaf epidermis, and that reduction of cell wall acetylation leads to global stress responses in Arabidopsis.

  20. Acetylation of cell wall is required for structural integrity of the leaf surface and exerts a global impact on plant stress responses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nafisi, Majse; Stranne, Maria; Fimognari, Lorenzo; Atwell, Susanna; Martens, Helle J.; Pedas, Pai R.; Hansen, Sara F.; Nawrath, Christiane; Scheller, Henrik V.; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.; et al

    2015-07-22

    Here we report that the epidermis on leaves protects plants from pathogen invasion and provides a waterproof barrier. It consists of a layer of cells that is surrounded by thick cell walls, which are partially impregnated by highly hydrophobic cuticular components. We show that the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants of REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION 2 (rwa2), previously identified as having reduced O-acetylation of both pectins and hemicelluloses, exhibit pleiotrophic phenotype on the leaf surface. The cuticle layer appeared diffused and was significantly thicker and underneath cell wall layer was interspersed with electron-dense deposits. A large number of trichomes were collapsed andmore » surface permeability of the leaves was enhanced in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. A massive reprogramming of the transcriptome was observed in rwa2 as compared to the wild type, including a coordinated up-regulation of genes involved in responses to abiotic stress, particularly detoxification of reactive oxygen species and defense against microbial pathogens (e.g., lipid transfer proteins, peroxidases). In accordance, peroxidase activities were found to be elevated in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. These results indicate that cell wall acetylation is essential for maintaining the structural integrity of leaf epidermis, and that reduction of cell wall acetylation leads to global stress responses in Arabidopsis.« less

  1. Acetylation of cell wall is required for structural integrity of the leaf surface and exerts a global impact on plant stress responses.

    PubMed

    Nafisi, Majse; Stranne, Maria; Fimognari, Lorenzo; Atwell, Susanna; Martens, Helle J; Pedas, Pai R; Hansen, Sara F; Nawrath, Christiane; Scheller, Henrik V; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2015-01-01

    The epidermis on leaves protects plants from pathogen invasion and provides a waterproof barrier. It consists of a layer of cells that is surrounded by thick cell walls, which are partially impregnated by highly hydrophobic cuticular components. We show that the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants of REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION 2 (rwa2), previously identified as having reduced O-acetylation of both pectins and hemicelluloses, exhibit pleiotrophic phenotype on the leaf surface. The cuticle layer appeared diffused and was significantly thicker and underneath cell wall layer was interspersed with electron-dense deposits. A large number of trichomes were collapsed and surface permeability of the leaves was enhanced in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. A massive reprogramming of the transcriptome was observed in rwa2 as compared to the wild type, including a coordinated up-regulation of genes involved in responses to abiotic stress, particularly detoxification of reactive oxygen species and defense against microbial pathogens (e.g., lipid transfer proteins, peroxidases). In accordance, peroxidase activities were found to be elevated in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. These results indicate that cell wall acetylation is essential for maintaining the structural integrity of leaf epidermis, and that reduction of cell wall acetylation leads to global stress responses in Arabidopsis. PMID:26257757

  2. Small GTP-binding protein Ran is regulated by posttranslational lysine acetylation

    PubMed Central

    de Boor, Susanne; Knyphausen, Philipp; Kuhlmann, Nora; Wroblowski, Sarah; Brenig, Julian; Scislowski, Lukas; Baldus, Linda; Nolte, Hendrik; Krüger, Marcus; Lammers, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ran is a small GTP-binding protein of the Ras superfamily regulating fundamental cellular processes: nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, nuclear envelope formation and mitotic spindle assembly. An intracellular Ran•GTP/Ran•GDP gradient created by the distinct subcellular localization of its regulators RCC1 and RanGAP mediates many of its cellular effects. Recent proteomic screens identified five Ran lysine acetylation sites in human and eleven sites in mouse/rat tissues. Some of these sites are located in functionally highly important regions such as switch I and switch II. Here, we show that lysine acetylation interferes with essential aspects of Ran function: nucleotide exchange and hydrolysis, subcellular Ran localization, GTP hydrolysis, and the interaction with import and export receptors. Deacetylation activity of certain sirtuins was detected for two Ran acetylation sites in vitro. Moreover, Ran was acetylated by CBP/p300 and Tip60 in vitro and on transferase overexpression in vivo. Overall, this study addresses many important challenges of the acetylome field, which will be discussed. PMID:26124124

  3. Acetylation of Surface Lysine Groups of a Protein Alters the Organization and Composition of Its Crystal Contacts.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyungtae; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Fox, Jerome M; Snyder, Phillip W; Moustakas, Demetri T; Whitesides, George M

    2016-07-14

    This paper uses crystals of bovine carbonic anhydrase (CA) and its acetylated variant to examine (i) how a large negative formal charge can be accommodated in protein-protein interfaces, (ii) why lysine residues are often excluded from them, and (iii) how changes in the surface charge of a protein can alter the structure and organization of protein-protein interfaces. It demonstrates that acetylation of lysine residues on the surface of CA increases the participation of polar residues (particularly acetylated lysine) in protein-protein interfaces, and decreases the participation of nonpolar residues in those interfaces. Negatively charged residues are accommodated in protein-protein interfaces via (i) hydrogen bonds or van der Waals interactions with polar residues or (ii) salt bridges with other charged residues. The participation of acetylated lysine in protein-protein interfaces suggests that unacetylated lysine tends to be excluded from interfaces because of its positive charge, and not because of a loss in conformational entropy. Results also indicate that crystal contacts in acetylated CA become less constrained geometrically and, as a result, more closely packed (i.e., more tightly clustered spatially) than those of native CA. This study demonstrates a physical-organic approach-and a well-defined model system-for studying the role of charges in protein-protein interactions. PMID:27292012

  4. Calorie restriction and SIRT3 trigger global reprogramming of the mitochondrial protein acetylome

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Alexander S.; Dittenhafer-Reed, Kristin E.; Yu, Wei; Bailey, Derek J.; Selen, Ebru Selin; Boersma, Melissa D.; Carson, Joshua J.; Tonelli, Marco; Balloon, Allison; Higbee, Alan J.; Westphall, Michael S.; Pagliarini, David J.; Prolla, Tomas A.; Assadi-Porter, Fariba; Roy, Sushmita; Denu, John M.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan in diverse species. Mitochondria play a key role in CR adaptation, however, the molecular details remain elusive. We developed and applied a quantitative mass spectrometry method to probe the liver mitochondrial acetyl-proteome during CR vs. control diet in mice that were wild-type or lacked the protein deacetylase SIRT3. Quantification of 3,285 acetylation sites −2,193 from mitochondrial proteins rendered a comprehensive atlas of the acetyl-proteome and enabled global site-specific, relative acetyl occupancy measurements between all four experimental conditions. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses provided additional support for the effects of specific acetylation on mitochondrial protein function. Our results (1) reveal widespread reprogramming of mitochondrial protein acetylation in response to CR and SIRT3, (2) identify three biochemically distinct classes of acetylation sites, and (3) provide evidence that SIRT3 is a prominent regulator in CR adaptation by coordinately deacetylating proteins involved in diverse pathways of metabolism and mitochondrial maintenance. PMID:23201123

  5. Topical acetyl salicylate and dipyrone attenuate neurogenic protein extravasation in rat skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, M; Weber, S; Kress, M

    2000-08-18

    The effect of topically applied acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and dipyrone on capsaicin-evoked protein extravasation was investigated by dermal microdialysis in rat. After a baseline of 75 min, capsaicin (1%) was applied epicutaneously under occlusion for 75 min above the capillaries. Topical capsaicin stimulation induced neurogenic protein extravasation with a mean increase of protein concentration in the perfusate of 165+/-27% (mean+/-SEM; n=15), whereas in sham-stimulated sites protein concentration decreased to 73+/-7% of the prestimulation value (n=6). ASA (2-200 mg/ml) and dipyrone (3-300 mg/ml) dose-dependently reduced the capsaicin induced protein extravasation to 118+/-23% (ASA, 200 mg/ml; n=8) and 72+/-9% (dipyrone, 300 mg/ml; n=8) of the prestimulation value. ASA and dipyrone antagonized the excitatory effects of capsaicin on skin nociceptors and thus suppressed the neurogenic protein extravasation. PMID:10925174

  6. Heat-shock protein 90 promotes nuclear transport of herpes simplex virus 1 capsid protein by interacting with acetylated tubulin.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Meigong; Zheng, Kai; Chen, Maoyun; Xiang, Yangfei; Jin, Fujun; Ma, Kaiqi; Qiu, Xianxiu; Wang, Qiaoli; Peng, Tao; Kitazato, Kaio; Wang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Although it is known that inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) can inhibit herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 entry and the antiviral mechanisms of Hsp90 inhibitors remain unclear. In this study, we found that Hsp90 inhibitors have potent antiviral activity against standard or drug-resistant HSV-1 strains and viral gene and protein synthesis are inhibited in an early phase. More detailed studies demonstrated that Hsp90 is upregulated by virus entry and it interacts with virus. Hsp90 knockdown by siRNA or treatment with Hsp90 inhibitors significantly inhibited the nuclear transport of viral capsid protein (ICP5) at the early stage of HSV-1 infection. In contrast, overexpression of Hsp90 restored the nuclear transport that was prevented by the Hsp90 inhibitors, suggesting that Hsp90 is required for nuclear transport of viral capsid protein. Furthermore, HSV-1 infection enhanced acetylation of α-tubulin and Hsp90 interacted with the acetylated α-tubulin, which is suppressed by Hsp90 inhibition. These results demonstrate that Hsp90, by interacting with acetylated α-tubulin, plays a crucial role in viral capsid protein nuclear transport and may provide novel insight into the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 infection and offer a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance. PMID:24901434

  7. Activation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase by glutamate and Mg2+ is mediated by protein phosphatase-2A.

    PubMed Central

    Gaussin, V; Hue, L; Stalmans, W; Bollen, M

    1996-01-01

    The activation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase by Na(+)-cotransported amino acids such as glutamine has been attributed mainly to the stimulation of its dephosphorylation by accumulating dicarboxylic acids, e.g. glutamate. We report here on a hepatic species of protein phosphatase-2A that activates acetyl-CoA carboxylase in the presence of physiological concentrations of glutamate or Mg2+ and, under these conditions, accounts for virtually all the hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphatase activity. Glutamate also stimulated the dephosphorylation of a synthetic pentadecapeptide encompassing the Ser-79 phosphorylation site of rat acetyl-CoA carboxylase, but did not affect the dephosphorylation of other substrates such as phosphorylase. Conversely, protamine, which stimulated the dephosphorylation of phosphorylase, inhibited the activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. A comparison with various species of muscle protein phosphatase-2A showed that the stimulatory effects of glutamate and Mg2+ on the acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphatase activity are largely mediated by the regulatory A subunit. Glutamate and Mg2+ emerge from our study as novel regulators of protein phosphatase-2A when acting on acetyl-CoA carboxylase. PMID:8645208

  8. Acetylation-dependent function of human single-stranded DNA binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuanzhong; Chen, Hongxia; Lu, Jinping; Zhang, Meifang; Zhang, Ruhua; Duan, Tingmei; Wang, Xin; Huang, Jun; Kang, Tiebang

    2015-01-01

    Human single-stranded DNA binding protein 1 (hSSB1) plays a critical role in responding to DNA damage and maintaining genome stability. However, the regulation of hSSB1 remains poorly studied. Here, we determined that hSSB1 acetylation at K94 mediated by the acetyltransferase p300 and the deacetylases SIRT4 and HDAC10 impaired its ubiquitin-mediated degradation by proteasomes. Moreover, we demonstrated that the hSSB1-K94R mutant had reduced cell survival in response to DNA damage by radiation or chemotherapy drugs. Furthermore, the p300/CBP inhibitor C646 significantly enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs, and a positive correlation between hSSB1 and p300 level was observed in clinical colorectal cancer samples. Acetylation, a novel regulatory modification of hSSB1, is crucial for its function under both physiological and pathological conditions. This finding supports the notion that the combination of chemotherapy drugs with acetylation inhibitors may benefit cancer patients. PMID:26170237

  9. Binding of TATA Binding Protein to a Naturally Positioned Nucleosome Is Facilitated by Histone Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Sewack, Gerald F.; Ellis, Thomas W.; Hansen, Ulla

    2001-01-01

    The TATA sequence of the human, estrogen-responsive pS2 promoter is complexed in vivo with a rotationally and translationally positioned nucleosome (NUC T). Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrate that TATA binding protein (TBP) does not detectably interact with this genomic binding site in MCF-7 cells in the absence of transcriptional stimuli. Estrogen stimulation of these cells results in hyperacetylation of both histones H3 and H4 within the pS2 chromatin encompassing NUC T and the TATA sequence. Concurrently, TBP becomes associated with the pS2 promoter region. The relationship between histone hyperacetylation and the binding of TBP was assayed in vitro using an in vivo-assembled nucleosomal array over the pS2 promoter. With chromatin in its basal state, the binding of TBP to the pS2 TATA sequence at the edge of NUC T was severely restricted, consistent with our in vivo data. Acetylation of the core histones facilitated the binding of TBP to this nucleosomal TATA sequence. Therefore, we demonstrate that one specific, functional consequence of induced histone acetylation at a native promoter is the alleviation of nucleosome-mediated repression of the binding of TBP. Our data support a fundamental role for histone acetylation at genomic promoters in transcriptional activation by nuclear receptors and provide a general mechanism for rapid and reversible transcriptional activation from a chromatin template. PMID:11158325

  10. Modulation of Protein Phosphorylation, N-Glycosylation and Lys-Acetylation in Grape (Vitis vinifera) Mesocarp and Exocarp Owing to Lobesia botrana Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Melo-Braga, Marcella N.; Verano-Braga, Thiago; León, Ileana R.; Antonacci, Donato; Nogueira, Fábio C. S.; Thelen, Jay J.; Larsen, Martin R.; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) is an economically important fruit crop that is subject to many types of insect and pathogen attack. To better elucidate the plant response to Lobesia botrana pathogen infection, we initiated a global comparative proteomic study monitoring steady-state protein expression as well as changes in N-glycosylation, phosphorylation, and Lys-acetylation in control and infected mesocarp and exocarp from V. vinifera cv Italia. A multi-parallel, large-scale proteomic approach employing iTRAQ labeling prior to three peptide enrichment techniques followed by tandem mass spectrometry led to the identification of a total of 3059 proteins, 1135 phosphorylation sites, 323 N-linked glycosylation sites and 138 Lys-acetylation sites. Of these, we could identify changes in abundance of 899 proteins. The occupancy of 110 phosphorylation sites, 10 N-glycosylation sites and 20 Lys-acetylation sites differentially changed during L. botrana infection. Sequence consensus analysis for phosphorylation sites showed eight significant motifs, two of which containing up-regulated phosphopeptides (X-G-S-X and S-X-X-D) and two containing down-regulated phosphopeptides (R-X-X-S and S-D-X-E) in response to pathogen infection. Topographical distribution of phosphorylation sites within primary sequences reveal preferential phosphorylation at both the N- and C termini, and a clear preference for C-terminal phosphorylation in response to pathogen infection suggesting induction of region-specific kinase(s). Lys-acetylation analysis confirmed the consensus X-K-Y-X motif previously detected in mammals and revealed the importance of this modification in plant defense. The importance of N-linked protein glycosylation in plant response to biotic stimulus was evident by an up-regulated glycopeptide belonging to the disease resistance response protein 206. This study represents a substantial step toward the understanding of protein and PTMs-mediated plant-pathogen interaction shedding

  11. Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Increases Protein Acetylation and Accelerates Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Karamanlidis, Georgios; Lee, Chi Fung; Garcia-Menendez, Lorena; Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Suthammarak, Wichit; Gong, Guohua; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Morgan, Philip G.; Wang, Wang; Tian, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis of multiple diseases including heart failure but the specific mechanisms for this link remain largely elusive. We modeled the impairment of mitochondrial respiration by inactivation of the Ndufs4 gene, a protein critical for Complex I (C-I) assembly, in the mouse heart (cKO). While C-I supported respiration decreased by >40%, the cKO mice maintained normal cardiac function in vivo and high-energy phosphate content in isolated perfused hearts. However, the cKO mice developed accelerated heart failure after pressure overload or repeated pregnancy. Decreased NAD+/NADH ratio by C-I deficiency inhibited Sirt3 activity, leading to increase in protein acetylation, and sensitization of the permeability transition in mitochondria (mPTP). NAD+ precursor supplementation to cKO mice partially normalized the NAD+/NADH ratio, protein acetylation and mPTP sensitivity. These findings describe a mechanism connecting mitochondrial dysfunction to the susceptibility to diseases and propose a potential therapeutic target. PMID:23931755

  12. Molecular mechanisms of nutlin-3 involve acetylation of p53, histones and heat shock proteins in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The small-molecule MDM2 antagonist nutlin-3 has proved to be an effective p53 activating therapeutic compound in several preclinical cancer models, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We and others have previously reported a vigorous acetylation of the p53 protein by nutlin-treatment. In this study we aimed to investigate the functional role of this p53 acetylation in nutlin-sensitivity, and further to explore if nutlin-induced protein acetylation in general could indicate novel targets for the enhancement of nutlin-based therapy. Results Nutlin-3 was found to enhance the acetylation of p53 in the human AML cell line MOLM-13 (wild type TP53) and in TP53 null cells transfected with wild type p53 cDNA. Stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with immunoprecipitation using an anti-acetyl-lysine antibody and mass spectrometry analysis identified increased levels of acetylated Histone H2B, Hsp27 and Hsp90 in MOLM-13 cells after nutlin-treatment, accompanied by downregulation of total levels of Hsp27 and Hsp90. Intracellular levels of heat shock proteins Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90α were correlated to nutlin-sensitivity for primary AML cells (n = 40), and AML patient samples with low sensitivity to nutlin-3 tended to express higher levels of heat shock proteins than more responsive samples. Combination therapy of nutlin-3 and Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin demonstrated synergistic induction of apoptosis in AML cell lines and primary AML cells. Finally, TP53 null cells transfected with a p53 acetylation defective mutant demonstrated decreased heat shock protein acetylation and sensitivity to nutlin-3 compared to wild type p53 expressing cells. Conclusions Altogether, our results demonstrate that nutlin-3 induces acetylation of p53, histones and heat shock proteins, and indicate that p53 acetylation status and the levels of heat shock proteins may participate in modulation of nutlin-3 sensitivity in AML

  13. N-Acetylaspartate reductions in brain injury: impact on post-injury neuroenergetics, lipid synthesis, and protein acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, John R.; Arun, Peethambaran; Ariyannur, Prasanth S.; Namboodiri, Aryan M. A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Acetylaspartate (NAA) is employed as a non-invasive marker for neuronal health using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). This utility is afforded by the fact that NAA is one of the most concentrated brain metabolites and that it produces the largest peak in MRS scans of the healthy human brain. NAA levels in the brain are reduced proportionately to the degree of tissue damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the reductions parallel the reductions in ATP levels. Because NAA is the most concentrated acetylated metabolite in the brain, we have hypothesized that NAA acts in part as an extensive reservoir of acetate for acetyl coenzyme A synthesis. Therefore, the loss of NAA after TBI impairs acetyl coenzyme A dependent functions including energy derivation, lipid synthesis, and protein acetylation reactions in distinct ways in different cell populations. The enzymes involved in synthesizing and metabolizing NAA are predominantly expressed in neurons and oligodendrocytes, respectively, and therefore some proportion of NAA must be transferred between cell types before the acetate can be liberated, converted to acetyl coenzyme A and utilized. Studies have indicated that glucose metabolism in neurons is reduced, but that acetate metabolism in astrocytes is increased following TBI, possibly reflecting an increased role for non-glucose energy sources in response to injury. NAA can provide additional acetate for intercellular metabolite trafficking to maintain acetyl CoA levels after injury. Here we explore changes in NAA, acetate, and acetyl coenzyme A metabolism in response to brain injury. PMID:24421768

  14. Global market for dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Lagrange, Veronique; Whitsett, Dacia; Burris, Cameron

    2015-03-01

    This review examines the global market for dairy ingredients by assessing the global demand for dairy products in relation to major dairy ingredient categories. Each broad category of dairy ingredients is reviewed including its definition, production and trade status, key applications, and future trends. Ingredient categories examined include whole and skim milk powders (WMPs, SMPs), whey protein concentrates (WPCs) and whey protein isolates (WPIs), milk protein concentrates (MPCs) and milk protein isolates (MPIs), caseins, and caseinates. Increases in world population and improvements in socioeconomic conditions will continue to drive the demand for dairy products and ingredients in the future. Dairy proteins are increasingly recognized to have nutritional and functional advantages compared to many protein sources, and the variety of ingredients with different protein concentrations, functionality, and flavor can meet the needs of the increasingly global dairy consumption. A thorough understanding of the variety of ingredients, how the ingredients are derived from milk, and how the demand from particular markets affects the supply situation are critical elements in understanding the current ingredient marketplace. PMID:25757893

  15. Acetylation of TUG Protein Promotes the Accumulation of GLUT4 Glucose Transporters in an Insulin-responsive Intracellular Compartment*

    PubMed Central

    Belman, Jonathan P.; Bian, Rachel R.; Habtemichael, Estifanos N.; Li, Don T.; Jurczak, Michael J.; Alcázar-Román, Abel; McNally, Leah J.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Bogan, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin causes the exocytic translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporters to stimulate glucose uptake in fat and muscle. Previous results support a model in which TUG traps GLUT4 in intracellular, insulin-responsive vesicles termed GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Insulin triggers TUG cleavage to release the GSVs; GLUT4 then recycles through endosomes during ongoing insulin exposure. The TUG C terminus binds a GSV anchoring site comprising Golgin-160 and possibly other proteins. Here, we report that the TUG C terminus is acetylated. The TUG C-terminal peptide bound the Golgin-160-associated protein, ACBD3 (acyl-CoA-binding domain-containing 3), and acetylation reduced binding of TUG to ACBD3 but not to Golgin-160. Mutation of the acetylated residues impaired insulin-responsive GLUT4 trafficking in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ACBD3 overexpression enhanced the translocation of GSV cargos, GLUT4 and insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP), and ACBD3 was required for intracellular retention of these cargos in unstimulated cells. Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), a NAD+-dependent deacetylase, bound TUG and deacetylated the TUG peptide. SIRT2 overexpression reduced TUG acetylation and redistributed GLUT4 and IRAP to the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Mutation of the acetylated residues in TUG abrogated these effects. In mice, SIRT2 deletion increased TUG acetylation and proteolytic processing. During glucose tolerance tests, glucose disposal was enhanced in SIRT2 knock-out mice, compared with wild type controls, without any effect on insulin concentrations. Together, these data support a model in which TUG acetylation modulates its interaction with Golgi matrix proteins and is regulated by SIRT2. Moreover, acetylation of TUG enhances its function to trap GSVs within unstimulated cells and enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:25561724

  16. Acetylation of TUG protein promotes the accumulation of GLUT4 glucose transporters in an insulin-responsive intracellular compartment.

    PubMed

    Belman, Jonathan P; Bian, Rachel R; Habtemichael, Estifanos N; Li, Don T; Jurczak, Michael J; Alcázar-Román, Abel; McNally, Leah J; Shulman, Gerald I; Bogan, Jonathan S

    2015-02-13

    Insulin causes the exocytic translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporters to stimulate glucose uptake in fat and muscle. Previous results support a model in which TUG traps GLUT4 in intracellular, insulin-responsive vesicles termed GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Insulin triggers TUG cleavage to release the GSVs; GLUT4 then recycles through endosomes during ongoing insulin exposure. The TUG C terminus binds a GSV anchoring site comprising Golgin-160 and possibly other proteins. Here, we report that the TUG C terminus is acetylated. The TUG C-terminal peptide bound the Golgin-160-associated protein, ACBD3 (acyl-CoA-binding domain-containing 3), and acetylation reduced binding of TUG to ACBD3 but not to Golgin-160. Mutation of the acetylated residues impaired insulin-responsive GLUT4 trafficking in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ACBD3 overexpression enhanced the translocation of GSV cargos, GLUT4 and insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP), and ACBD3 was required for intracellular retention of these cargos in unstimulated cells. Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, bound TUG and deacetylated the TUG peptide. SIRT2 overexpression reduced TUG acetylation and redistributed GLUT4 and IRAP to the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Mutation of the acetylated residues in TUG abrogated these effects. In mice, SIRT2 deletion increased TUG acetylation and proteolytic processing. During glucose tolerance tests, glucose disposal was enhanced in SIRT2 knock-out mice, compared with wild type controls, without any effect on insulin concentrations. Together, these data support a model in which TUG acetylation modulates its interaction with Golgi matrix proteins and is regulated by SIRT2. Moreover, acetylation of TUG enhances its function to trap GSVs within unstimulated cells and enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:25561724

  17. Potential Prognostic Value of Histone Deacetylase 6 and Acetylated Heat-Shock Protein 90 in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Younghee; Lee, Kyu Sang; Park, So Yeon; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Sung Won; Eom, Keon Young; Kim, Jae Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is an enzyme that deacetylates heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90). Many studies have investigated the role of HDAC6 and HSP90 in tumorigenesis and in the prognosis of cancer patients. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of HDAC6 and acetylated HSP90 (acetyl-HSP90) in a cohort of breast cancer patients. Methods Immunohistochemical analysis of 314 surgical specimens obtained from patients with invasive breast cancer was carried out to assess standard pathologic factors and the expression of HDAC6 and acetyl-HSP90. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the association between HDAC6, acetyl-HSP90, and conventional clinicopathological factors, and the prognostic values of these factors were evaluated. Results HDAC6 expression did not show any correlation with other clinicopathological factors, but acetyl-HSP90 was significantly correlated with histologic grade (p=0.001) and the Ki-67 index (p=0.015). HDAC6 and acetyl-HSP90 expression were significantly associated with each other (p=0.047). Although HDAC6 was not prognostic for disease-free survival (DFS), some patients with high expression of HDAC6 experienced recurrence 5 years after diagnosis, while there was no recurrent disease after 5 years in those with low expression. Acetyl-HSP90 was significantly associated with the DFS of all patients (p=0.016) and with high HDAC6 expression (p=0.017), but not with low expression. Conclusion Expression of HDAC6 and acetyl-HSP90 are correlated. HDAC6 is proposed to be a possible predictive marker of late recurrence, and acetyl-HSP90 has prognostic value in predicting the DFS of breast cancer patients. PMID:26472975

  18. Protein N-terminal acetylation is required for embryogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinlin; Li, Ruiqi; Yu, Junya; Ma, Shuangshuang; Wu, Chunyan; Li, Yan; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2016-08-01

    Early embryonic development generates precursors of all major cell types in Arabidopsis. Among these precursors, the hypophysis divides asymmetrically to form the progenitors of the quiescent center and columella stem cells. A great deal has been learnt about the mechanisms that control the asymmetric division of the hypophysis and embryogenesis at the transcriptional level; however, no evidence of regulation at the co- or post-translational level has been reported. Here, we show that mutation of the catalytic subunit (Naa10) or auxiliary subunit (Naa15) of NatA, an N-terminal acetyltransferase that catalyzes protein N-terminal acetylation, produces an embryo-lethal phenotype. In addition, Naa10 and Naa15 were found to interact physically in planta Further analysis revealed that the observed embryonic patterning defects started at the early globular stage and that the asymmetric division of the hypophysis was irregular; thus, no quiescent center progenitor cells were generated in naa10 and naa15 embryos. We further observed that the polar distributions of auxin and its efflux carrier PIN1 were disturbed in naa10 embryos. Our results suggest that NatA is required for asymmetric division of the hypophysis and early embryonic patterning in Arabidopsis, and provides a link between protein N-terminal acetylation and embryogenesis in plants. PMID:27385766

  19. Protein N-terminal acetylation is required for embryogenesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jinlin; Li, Ruiqi; Yu, Junya; Ma, Shuangshuang; Wu, Chunyan; Li, Yan; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2016-01-01

    Early embryonic development generates precursors of all major cell types in Arabidopsis. Among these precursors, the hypophysis divides asymmetrically to form the progenitors of the quiescent center and columella stem cells. A great deal has been learnt about the mechanisms that control the asymmetric division of the hypophysis and embryogenesis at the transcriptional level; however, no evidence of regulation at the co- or post-translational level has been reported. Here, we show that mutation of the catalytic subunit (Naa10) or auxiliary subunit (Naa15) of NatA, an N-terminal acetyltransferase that catalyzes protein N-terminal acetylation, produces an embryo-lethal phenotype. In addition, Naa10 and Naa15 were found to interact physically in planta. Further analysis revealed that the observed embryonic patterning defects started at the early globular stage and that the asymmetric division of the hypophysis was irregular; thus, no quiescent center progenitor cells were generated in naa10 and naa15 embryos. We further observed that the polar distributions of auxin and its efflux carrier PIN1 were disturbed in naa10 embryos. Our results suggest that NatA is required for asymmetric division of the hypophysis and early embryonic patterning in Arabidopsis, and provides a link between protein N-terminal acetylation and embryogenesis in plants. PMID:27385766

  20. The Hbo1-Brd1/Brpf2 complex is responsible for global acetylation of H3K14 and required for fetal liver erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Yuta; Miyagi, Satoru; Saraya, Atsunori; Negishi, Masamitsu; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Endo, Takaho A; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Shinga, Jun; Katsumoto, Takuo; Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Kitabayashi, Issay; Koseki, Haruhiko; Iwama, Atsushi

    2011-09-01

    The histone acetyltransferases (HATs) of the MYST family include TIP60, HBO1, MOZ/MORF, and MOF and function in multisubunit protein complexes. Bromodomain-containing protein 1 (BRD1), also known as BRPF2, has been considered a subunit of the MOZ/MORF H3 HAT complex based on analogy with BRPF1 and BRPF3. However, its physiologic function remains obscure. Here we show that BRD1 forms a novel HAT complex with HBO1 and regulates erythropoiesis. Brd1-deficient embryos showed severe anemia because of impaired fetal liver erythropoiesis. Biochemical analyses revealed that BRD1 bridges HBO1 and its activator protein, ING4. Genome-wide mapping in erythroblasts demonstrated that BRD1 and HBO1 largely colocalize in the genome and target key developmental regulator genes. Of note, levels of global acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 14 (H3K14) were profoundly decreased in Brd1-deficient erythroblasts and depletion of Hbo1 similarly affected H3K14 acetylation. Impaired erythropoiesis in the absence of Brd1 accompanied reduced expression of key erythroid regulator genes, including Gata1, and was partially restored by forced expression of Gata1. Our findings suggest that the Hbo1-Brd1 complex is the major H3K14 HAT required for transcriptional activation of erythroid developmental regulator genes. PMID:21753189

  1. In vitro acetylation of HMGB-1 and -2 proteins by CBP: the role of the acidic tail.

    PubMed

    Pasheva, Evdokia; Sarov, Mihail; Bidjekov, Kiril; Ugrinova, Iva; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Pashev, Iliya G

    2004-03-16

    Histone acetyltransferases CBP, PCAF, and Tip60 have been tested for their ability to in vitro acetylate HMGB-1 and -2 proteins and their truncated forms lacking the C-terminal tail. It was found that these proteins were substrates for CBP only. Analyses of modified proteins by electrophoresis, amino acid sequencing, and mass spectrometry showed that full-length HMGB-1 and -2 were monoacetylated at Lys2. Removal of the C terminus resulted in (i) an increased incorporation of radiolabeled acetate within the proteins to a level close to that observed with histones H3/H4 and (ii) creation of a novel target site at Lys81. Acetylated and nonmodified HMGB-1 and -2 protein lacking the acidic tail were compared relative to their binding affinity to distorted DNA and the ability to bend linear DNA. Both proteins showed similar affinities to cisplatin-damaged DNA; the acetylated protein, however, was 3-fold more effective in inducing ligase-mediated circularization of a 111-bp DNA fragment. The alterations in the acetylation pattern of HMGB-1 and -2 upon removal of the C-terminal tail are regarded as a means by which the acidic domain modulates some properties of these proteins. PMID:15005629

  2. Lysine-acetylation as a fundamental regulator of Ran function: Implications for signaling of proteins of the Ras-superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Knyphausen, Philipp; Kuhlmann, Nora; de Boor, Susanne; Lammers, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The small GTP-binding protein Ran is involved in the regulation of essential cellular processes in interphase but also in mitotic cells: Ran controls the nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins and RNA, it regulates mitotic spindle formation and nuclear envelope assembly. Deregulations in Ran dependent processes were implicated in the development of severe diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. To understand how Ran-function is regulated is therefore of highest importance. Recently, several lysine-acetylation sites in Ran were identified by quantitative mass-spectrometry, some being located in highly important regions such as the P-loop, switch I, switch II and the G5/SAK motif. We recently reported that lysine-acetylation regulates nearly all aspects of Ran-function such as RCC1 catalyzed nucleotide exchange, intrinsic nucleotide hydrolysis, its interaction with NTF2 and the formation of import- and export-complexes. As a hint for its biological importance, we identified Ran-specific lysine-deacetylases (KDACs) and -acetyltransferases (KATs). Also for other small GTPases such as Ras, Rho, Cdc42, and for many effectors and regulators thereof, lysine-acetylation sites were discovered. However, the functional impact of lysine-acetylation as a regulator of protein function has only been marginally investigated so far. We will discuss recent findings of lysine-acetylation as a novel modification to regulate Ras-protein signaling. PMID:26507377

  3. Prolonged fasting identifies heat shock protein 10 as a Sirtuin 3 substrate: elucidating a new mechanism linking mitochondrial protein acetylation to fatty acid oxidation enzyme folding and function.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhongping; Chen, Yong; Aponte, Angel M; Battaglia, Valentina; Gucek, Marjan; Sack, Michael N

    2015-01-23

    Although Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), a mitochondrially enriched deacetylase and activator of fat oxidation, is down-regulated in response to high fat feeding, the rate of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial protein acetylation are invariably enhanced in this dietary milieu. These paradoxical data implicate that additional acetylation modification-dependent levels of regulation may be operational under nutrient excess conditions. Because the heat shock protein (Hsp) Hsp10-Hsp60 chaperone complex mediates folding of the fatty acid oxidation enzyme medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, we tested whether acetylation-dependent mitochondrial protein folding contributes to this regulatory discrepancy. We demonstrate that Hsp10 is a functional SIRT3 substrate and that, in response to prolonged fasting, SIRT3 levels modulate mitochondrial protein folding. Acetyl mutagenesis of Hsp10 lysine 56 alters Hsp10-Hsp60 binding, conformation, and protein folding. Consistent with Hsp10-Hsp60 regulation of fatty acid oxidation enzyme integrity, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and fat oxidation are elevated by Hsp10 acetylation. These data identify acetyl modification of Hsp10 as a nutrient-sensing regulatory node controlling mitochondrial protein folding and metabolic function. PMID:25505263

  4. NAT10, a nucleolar protein, localizes to the midbody and regulates cytokinesis and acetylation of microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Qi; Zheng, Xingzheng; McNutt, Michael A.; Guang, Lizhao; Sun, Ying; Wang, Jiaochen; Gong, Yilei; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Bo

    2009-06-10

    The midbody is a structural organelle formed in late phase mitosis which is responsible for completion of cytokinesis. Although various kinds of proteins have been found to distribute or immigrate to this organelle, their functions have still not been completely worked out. In this study, we demonstrated that NAT10 (N-acetyltransferase 10, NAT10) is not only predominantly distributed in the nucleolus in interphase, but is also concentrated in the mitotic midbody during telophase. The domain in N-terminal residues 549-834 of NAT10 specifically mediated its subcellular localization. Treatment with genotoxic agents or irradiation increased concentration of NAT10 in both the nucleolus and midbody. Moreover, DNA damage induced increase of NAT10 in the midbody apparently accompanied by in situ elevation of the level of acetylated {alpha}-tubulin, suggesting that it plays a role in maintaining or enhancing stability of {alpha}-tubulin. The depletion of NAT10 induced defects in nucleolar assembly, cytokinesis and decreased acetylated {alpha}-tubulin, leading to G2/M cell cycle arrest or delay of mitotic exit. In addition, over-expression of NAT10 was found in a variety of soft tissue sarcomas, and correlated with tumor histological grading. These results indicate that NAT10 may play an important role in cell division through facilitating reformation of the nucleolus and midbody in the late phase of cell mitosis, and stabilization of microtubules.

  5. Comparative Large Scale Characterization of Plant versus Mammal Proteins Reveals Similar and Idiosyncratic N-α-Acetylation Features*

    PubMed Central

    Bienvenut, Willy V.; Sumpton, David; Martinez, Aude; Lilla, Sergio; Espagne, Christelle; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal modifications play a major role in the fate of proteins in terms of activity, stability, or subcellular compartmentalization. Such modifications remain poorly described and badly characterized in proteomic studies, and only a few comparison studies among organisms have been made available so far. Recent advances in the field now allow the enrichment and selection of N-terminal peptides in the course of proteome-wide mass spectrometry analyses. These targeted approaches unravel as a result the extent and nature of the protein N-terminal modifications. Here, we aimed at studying such modifications in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to compare these results with those obtained from a human sample analyzed in parallel. We applied large scale analysis to compile robust conclusions on both data sets. Our data show strong convergence of the characterized modifications especially for protein N-terminal methionine excision, co-translational N-α-acetylation, or N-myristoylation between animal and plant kingdoms. Because of the convergence of both the substrates and the N-α-acetylation machinery, it was possible to identify the N-acetyltransferases involved in such modifications for a small number of model plants. Finally, a high proportion of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins feature post-translational N-α-acetylation of the mature protein after removal of the transit peptide. Unlike animals, plants feature in a dedicated pathway for post-translational acetylation of organelle-targeted proteins. The corresponding machinery is yet to be discovered. PMID:22223895

  6. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  7. Global Proteome Analyses of Lysine Acetylation and Succinylation Reveal the Widespread Involvement of both Modification in Metabolism in the Embryo of Germinating Rice Seed.

    PubMed

    He, Dongli; Wang, Qiong; Li, Ming; Damaris, Rebecca Njeri; Yi, Xingling; Cheng, Zhongyi; Yang, Pingfang

    2016-03-01

    Regulation of rice seed germination has been shown to mainly occur at post-transcriptional levels, of which the changes on proteome status is a major one. Lysine acetylation and succinylation are two prevalent protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) involved in multiple biological processes, especially for metabolism regulation. To investigate the potential mechanism controlling metabolism regulation in rice seed germination, we performed the lysine acetylation and succinylation analyses simultaneously. Using high-accuracy nano-LC-MS/MS in combination with the enrichment of lysine acetylated or succinylated peptides from digested embryonic proteins of 24 h after imbibition (HAI) rice seed, a total of 699 acetylated sites from 389 proteins and 665 succinylated sites from 261 proteins were identified. Among these modified lysine sites, 133 sites on 78 proteins were commonly modified by two PTMs. The overlapped PTM sites were more likely to be in polar acidic/basic amino acid regions and exposed on the protein surface. Both of the acetylated and succinylated proteins cover nearly all aspects of cellular functions. Ribosome complex and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis-related proteins were significantly enriched in both acetylated and succinylated protein profiles through KEGG enrichment and protein-protein interaction network analyses. The acetyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA metabolism-related enzymes were found to be extensively modified by both modifications, implying the functional interaction between the two PTMs. This study provides a rich resource to examine the modulation of the two PTMs on the metabolism pathway and other biological processes in germinating rice seed. PMID:26767346

  8. The Role of the Plant-Specific ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 Protein in Arabidopsis Cell Wall Polysaccharide O-Acetylation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schultink, Alex; Naylor, Dan; Dama, Murali; Pauly, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A mutation in the ALTERED XYLOGLUCAN9 (AXY9) gene was found to be causative for the decreased xyloglucan acetylation phenotype of the axy9.1 mutant, which was identified in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants. The axy9.1 mutant also exhibits decreased O-acetylation of xylan, implying that the AXY9 protein has a broad role in polysaccharide acetylation. An axy9 insertional mutant exhibits severe growth defects and collapsed xylem, demonstrating the importance of wall polysaccharide O-acetylation for normal plant growth and development. Localization and topological experiments indicate that the active site of the AXY9 protein resides within the Golgi lumen. The AXY9 protein appears to be a component of the plant cell wall polysaccharide acetylation pathway, which also includes the REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION and TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins. The AXY9 protein is distinct from the TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE proteins, reported to be polysaccharide acetyltransferases, but does share homology with them and other acetyltransferases, suggesting that the AXY9 protein may act to produce an acetylated intermediate that is part of the O-acetylation pathway. PMID:25681330

  9. Mitogenic and Oncogenic Stimulation of K433 Acetylation Promotes PKM2 Protein Kinase Activity and Nuclear Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Lei; Xu, Yan-Ping; Zhao, Di; Li, Fu-Long; Wang, Wei; Sasaki, Naoya; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Xin; Li, Ting-Ting; Guan, Kun-Liang; Lei, Qun-Ying; Xiong, Yue

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Alternative splicing of the PKM2 gene produces two isoforms, M1 and M2, which are preferentially expressed in adult and embryonic tissues, respectively. The M2 isoform is reexpressed in human cancer and has nonmetabolic functions in the nucleus as a protein kinase. Here, we report that PKM2 is acetylated by p300 acetyltransferase at K433, which is unique to PKM2 and directly contacts its allosteric activator, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). Acetylation prevents PKM2 activation by interfering with FBP binding and promotes the nuclear accumulation and protein kinase activity of PKM2. Acetylationmimetic PKM2(K433) mutant promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. K433 acetylation is decreased by serum starvation and cell-cell contact, increased by cell cycle stimulation, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and oncoprotein E7, and enriched in breast cancers. Hence, K433 acetylation links cell proliferation and transformation to the switch of PKM2 from a cytoplasmic metabolite kinase to a nuclear protein kinase. PMID:24120661

  10. Arsenic Trioxide Reduces Global Histone H4 Acetylation at Lysine 16 through Direct Binding to Histone Acetyltransferase hMOF in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Da; Wu, Donglu; Zhao, Linhong; Yang, Yang; Ding, Jian; Dong, Liguo; Hu, Lianghai; Wang, Fei; Zhao, Xiaoming; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modification heritably regulates gene expression involved in most cellular biological processes. Experimental studies suggest that alteration of histone modifications affects gene expression by changing chromatin structure, causing various cellular responses to environmental influences. Arsenic (As), a naturally occurring element and environmental pollutant, is an established human carcinogen. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that As-mediated epigenetic mechanisms may be involved in its toxicity and carcinogenicity, but how this occurs is still unclear. Here we present evidence that suggests As-induced global histone H4K16 acetylation (H4K16ac) partly due to the direct physical interaction between As and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) hMOF (human male absent on first) protein, leading to the loss of hMOF HAT activity. Our data show that decreased global H4K16ac and increased deacetyltransferase HDAC4 expression occurred in arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-exposed HeLa or HEK293T cells. However, depletion of HDAC4 did not affect global H4K16ac, and it could not raise H4K16ac in cells exposed to As2O3, suggesting that HDAC4 might not directly be involved in histone H4K16 de-acetylation. Using As-immobilized agarose, we confirmed that As binds directly to hMOF, and that this interaction was competitively inhibited by free As2O3. Also, the direct interaction of As and C2CH zinc finger peptide was verified by MAIDI-TOF mass and UV absorption. In an in vitro HAT assay, As2O3 directly inhibited hMOF activity. hMOF over-expression not only increased resistance to As and caused less toxicity, but also effectively reversed reduced H4K16ac caused by As exposure. These data suggest a theoretical basis for elucidating the mechanism of As toxicity. PMID:26473953

  11. The Fasted/Fed Mouse Metabolic Acetylome: N6-Acetylation Differences Suggest Acetylation Coordinates Organ-Specific Fuel Switching

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Hartil, Kirsten; Robinson, Alan J.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Kurland, Irwin J.; Bruce, James E.

    2011-01-01

    The elucidation of extra-nuclear lysine acetylation has been of growing interest, as the co-substrate for acetylation, acetyl CoA, is at a key metabolic intersection. Our hypothesis was that mitochondrial and cytoplasmic protein acetylation may be part of a fasted/re-fed feedback control system for the regulation of the metabolic network in fuel switching, where acetyl CoA would be provided by fatty acid oxidation, or glycolysis, respectively. To test this we characterized the mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetylome in various organs that have a high metabolic rate relative to their mass, and/or switch fuels, under fasted and re-fed conditions (brain, kidney, liver, skeletal muscle, heart muscle, white and brown adipose tissues). Using immunoprecipitation, coupled with LC-MSMS label free quantification, we show there is a dramatic variation in global quantitative profiles of acetylated proteins from different organs. In total, 733 acetylated peptides from 337 proteins were identified and quantified, out of which 31 acetylated peptides from the metabolic proteins that may play organ-specific roles were analyzed in detail. Results suggest that fasted/re-fed acetylation changes coordinated by organ-specific (de-)acetylases in insulin-sensitive versus insensitive organs may underlie fuel use and switching. Characterization of the tissue-specific acetylome should increase understanding of metabolic conditions wherein normal fuel switching is disrupted, such as in Type II diabetes. PMID:21728379

  12. Maximal oxidative capacity during exercise is associated with skeletal muscle fuel selection and dynamic changes in mitochondrial protein acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Overmyer, Katherine A.; Evans, Charles R.; Qi, Nathan R.; Minogue, Catherine E.; Carson, Joshua J.; Chermside-Scabbo, Christopher J.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Pagliarini, David J.; Coon, Joshua J.; Burant, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Maximal exercise-associated oxidative capacity is strongly correlated with health and longevity in humans. Rats selectively bred for high running capacity (HCR) have improved metabolic health and are longer-lived than their low capacity counterparts (LCR). Using metabolomic and proteomic profiling, we show that HCR efficiently oxidize fatty acids (FA) and branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), sparing glycogen and reducing accumulation of short- and medium-chain acylcarnitines. HCR mitochondria have reduced acetylation of mitochondrial proteins within oxidative pathways at rest, and there is rapid protein deacetylation with exercise, which is greater in HCR than LCR. Fluxomic analysis of valine degradation with exercise demonstrates a functional role of differential protein acetylation in HCR and LCR. Our data suggest efficient FA and BCAA utilization contribute to high intrinsic exercise capacity and the health and longevity benefits associated with enhanced fitness. PMID:25738461

  13. Nϵ-lysine acetylation in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum: A way to regulate autophagy and maintain protein homeostasis in the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yajing; Puglielli, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    The Nϵ-lysine acetylation of cargo proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) requires a membrane transporter (SLC33A1) and 2 acetyltransferases (NAT8B and NAT8). The ER acetylation machinery regulates the homeostatic balance between quality control/efficiency of the secretory pathway and autophagy-mediated disposal of toxic protein aggregates. We recently reported that the autophagy pathway that acts downstream of the ER acetylation machinery specifically targets protein aggregates that form within the secretory pathway. Genetic and biochemical manipulation of ER acetylation in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease is able to restore normal proteostasis and rescue the disease phenotype. Here we summarize these findings and offer an overview of the ER-acetylation machinery. PMID:27124586

  14. Wnt Protein Signaling Reduces Nuclear Acetyl-CoA Levels to Suppress Gene Expression during Osteoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Karner, Courtney M; Esen, Emel; Chen, Jiakun; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Turk, John; Long, Fanxin

    2016-06-17

    Developmental signals in metazoans play critical roles in inducing cell differentiation from multipotent progenitors. The existing paradigm posits that the signals operate directly through their downstream transcription factors to activate expression of cell type-specific genes, which are the hallmark of cell identity. We have investigated the mechanism through which Wnt signaling induces osteoblast differentiation in an osteoblast-adipocyte bipotent progenitor cell line. Unexpectedly, Wnt3a acutely suppresses the expression of a large number of genes while inducing osteoblast differentiation. The suppressed genes include Pparg and Cebpa, which encode adipocyte-specifying transcription factors and suppression of which is sufficient to induce osteoblast differentiation. The large scale gene suppression induced by Wnt3a corresponds to a global decrease in histone acetylation, an epigenetic modification that is associated with gene activation. Mechanistically, Wnt3a does not alter histone acetyltransferase or deacetylase activities but, rather, decreases the level of acetyl-CoA in the nucleus. The Wnt-induced decrease in histone acetylation is independent of β-catenin signaling but, rather, correlates with suppression of glucose metabolism in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Functionally, preventing histone deacetylation by increasing nucleocytoplasmic acetyl-CoA levels impairs Wnt3a-induced osteoblast differentiation. Thus, Wnt signaling induces osteoblast differentiation in part through histone deacetylation and epigenetic suppression of an alternative cell fate. PMID:27129247

  15. P. aeruginosa SGNH Hydrolase-Like Proteins AlgJ and AlgX Have Similar Topology but Separate and Distinct Roles in Alginate Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Moynihan, Patrick J.; Kitova, Elena N.; Walvoort, Marthe T. C.; Little, Dustin J.; Whitney, John C.; Dawson, Karen; Weadge, Joel T.; Robinson, Howard; Ohman, Dennis E.; Codée, Jeroen D. C.; Klassen, John S.; Clarke, Anthony J.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2014-01-01

    The O-acetylation of polysaccharides is a common modification used by pathogenic organisms to protect against external forces. Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the anionic, O-acetylated exopolysaccharide alginate during chronic infection in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients to form the major constituent of a protective biofilm matrix. Four proteins have been implicated in the O-acetylation of alginate, AlgIJF and AlgX. To probe the biological function of AlgJ, we determined its structure to 1.83 Å resolution. AlgJ is a SGNH hydrolase-like protein, which while structurally similar to the N-terminal domain of AlgX exhibits a distinctly different electrostatic surface potential. Consistent with other SGNH hydrolases, we identified a conserved catalytic triad composed of D190, H192 and S288 and demonstrated that AlgJ exhibits acetylesterase activity in vitro. Residues in the AlgJ signature motifs were found to form an extensive network of interactions that are critical for O-acetylation of alginate in vivo. Using two different electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) assays we compared the abilities of AlgJ and AlgX to bind and acetylate alginate. Binding studies using defined length polymannuronic acid revealed that AlgJ exhibits either weak or no detectable polymer binding while AlgX binds polymannuronic acid specifically in a length-dependent manner. Additionally, AlgX was capable of utilizing the surrogate acetyl-donor 4-nitrophenyl acetate to catalyze the O-acetylation of polymannuronic acid. Our results, combined with previously published in vivo data, suggest that the annotated O-acetyltransferases AlgJ and AlgX have separate and distinct roles in O-acetylation. Our refined model for alginate acetylation places AlgX as the terminal acetlytransferase and provides a rationale for the variability in the number of proteins required for polysaccharide O-acetylation. PMID:25165982

  16. Inhibition of the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins interferes with adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goupille, Olivier; Penglong, Tipparat; Kadri, Zahra; Granger-Locatelli, Marine; Fucharoen, Suthat; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Prost, Stéphane; Leboulch, Philippe; Chrétien, Stany

    2016-04-15

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family proteins are epigenetic modulators involved in the reading of acetylated lysine residues. The first BET protein inhibitor to be identified, (+)-JQ1, a thienotriazolo-1, 4-diazapine, binds selectively to the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of BET proteins. We evaluated the impact on adipogenesis of this druggable targeting of chromatin epigenetic readers, by investigating the physiological consequences of epigenetic modifications through targeting proteins binding to chromatin. JQ1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white and brown adipocytes by down-regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, particularly those encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ), the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα) and, STAT5A and B. The expression of a constitutively activated STAT5B mutant did not prevent inhibition by JQ1. Thus, the association of BET/STAT5 is required for adipogenesis but STAT5 transcription activity is not the only target of JQ1. Treatment with JQ1 did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BET protein inhibition thus interferes with generation of adipose tissue from progenitors, confirming the importance of the connections between epigenetic mechanisms and specific adipogenic transcription factors. PMID:26972250

  17. Acetylation of Human TCF4 (TCF7L2) Proteins Attenuates Inhibition by the HBP1 Repressor and Induces a Conformational Change in the TCF4::DNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Elfert, Susanne; Weise, Andreas; Bruser, Katja; Biniossek, Martin L.; Jägle, Sabine; Senghaas, Niklas; Hecht, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The members of the TCF/LEF family of DNA-binding proteins are components of diverse gene regulatory networks. As nuclear effectors of Wnt/β-catenin signaling they act as assembly platforms for multimeric transcription complexes that either repress or activate gene expression. Previously, it was shown that several aspects of TCF/LEF protein function are regulated by post-translational modification. The association of TCF/LEF family members with acetyltransferases and deacetylases prompted us to investigate whether vertebrate TCF/LEF proteins are subject to acetylation. Through co-expression with p300 and CBP and subsequent analyses using mass spectrometry and immunodetection with anti-acetyl-lysine antibodies we show that TCF4 can be acetylated at lysine K150 by CBP. K150 acetylation is restricted to TCF4E splice variants and requires the simultaneous presence of β-catenin and the unique TCF4E C-terminus. To examine the functional consequences of K150 acetylation we substituted K150 with amino acids representing the non-acetylated and acetylated states. Reporter gene assays based on Wnt/β-catenin-responsive promoter regions did not indicate a general role of K150 acetylation in transactivation by TCF4E. However, in the presence of CBP, non-acetylatable TCF4E with a K150R substitution was more susceptible to inhibition by the HBP-1 repressor protein compared to wild-type TCF4E. Acetylation of K150 using a bacterial expression system or amino acid substitutions at K150 alter the electrophoretic properties of TCF4E::DNA complexes. This result suggests that K150 acetylation leads to a conformational change that may also represent the mechanism whereby acetylated TCF4E acquires resistance against HBP1. In summary, TCF4 not only recruits acetyltransferases but is also a substrate for these enzymes. The fact that acetylation affects only a subset of TCF4 splice variants and is mediated preferentially by CBP suggests that the conditional acetylation of TCF4E is a novel

  18. AvrBsT Acetylates Arabidopsis ACIP1, a Protein that Associates with Microtubules and Is Required for Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Mi Sun; Kirik, Angela; Kim, Jung-Gun; Frame, Kenneth; Kirik, Viktor; Mudgett, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens of plant and animals share a homologous group of virulence factors, referred to as the YopJ effector family, which are translocated by the type III secretion (T3S) system into host cells during infection. Recent work indicates that some of these effectors encode acetyltransferases that suppress host immunity. The YopJ-like protein AvrBsT is known to activate effector-triggered immunity (ETI) in Arabidopsis thaliana Pi-0 plants; however, the nature of its enzymatic activity and host target(s) has remained elusive. Here we report that AvrBsT possesses acetyltransferase activity and acetylates ACIP1 (for ACETYLATED INTERACTING PROTEIN1), an unknown protein from Arabidopsis. Genetic studies revealed that Arabidopsis ACIP family members are required for both pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity and AvrBsT-triggered ETI during Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) infection. Microscopy studies revealed that ACIP1 is associated with punctae on the cell cortex and some of these punctae co-localize with microtubules. These structures were dramatically altered during infection. Pst DC3000 or Pst DC3000 AvrRpt2 infection triggered the formation of numerous, small ACIP1 punctae and rods. By contrast, Pst DC3000 AvrBsT infection primarily triggered the formation of large GFP-ACIP1 aggregates, in an acetyltransferase-dependent manner. Our data reveal that members of the ACIP family are new components of the defense machinery required for anti-bacterial immunity. They also suggest that AvrBsT-dependent acetylation in planta alters ACIP1's defense function, which is linked to the activation of ETI. PMID:24586161

  19. Global satellite retrievals of Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate (PAN) in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, V.; Alvarado, M.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Worden, J.; Kulawik, S. S.; Fischer, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    Peroxyacetyl Nitrate (PAN) is a thermally unstable reservoir for NOx that allows NOx to be transported over large distances, enabling ozone formation far downwind from the original source. Satellite retrievals of PAN could potentially provide substantial information on the fate of NOx emissions from a range of sources including biomass burning and anthropogenic combustion. PAN has previously been retrieved in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere on a global scale from limb-sounding satellite instruments. PAN signatures have also been detected in nadir-viewing satellite observations of smoke plumes from fires. However, to our knowledge, PAN has not yet been retrieved in the nadir view on a global scale. Here we present global observations of tropospheric PAN from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), a thermal infrared spectrometer flying on the Aura satellite since 2004. PAN can be detected in TES spectra for cases where the PAN signal is above the instrument noise. The detection limit for a single TES measurement is dependent on the atmospheric and surface conditions. For observations where the cloud optical depth is less than 0.5, we find that the TES detection limit for PAN is in the region of 200 to 300 pptv. We present example distributions of elevated PAN concentrations associated with (1) trans-Pacific transport of Asian pollution, (2) boreal biomass burning and (3) the Tropical South Atlantic in austral spring.

  20. Assigning in vivo carbamylation and acetylation in human lens proteins using tandem mass spectrometry and database searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Zee-Yong; Sadygov, Rovshan; Clark, Judy M.; Clark, John I.; Yates, John R., III

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we show that ion trap mass spectrometers can differentiate acetylation and carbamylation modifications based on database search results for a lens protein sample. These types of modifications are difficult to distinguish on ion trap instruments because of their lower resolution and mass accuracy. The results were corroborated by using accurate mass information derived from MALDI TOF MS analysis of eluted peptides from a duplicate capillary RPLC separation. Tandem mass spectra of lysine carbamylated peptides were further verified by manual assignments of fragment ions and by the presence of characteristic fragment ions of carbamylated peptides. It was also observed that carbamylated peptides show a strong neutral loss of the carbamyl group in collision induced dissociation (CID), a feature that can be prognostic for carbamylation. In a lens tissue sample of a 67-year-old patient, 12 in vivo carbamylation sites were detected on 7 different lens proteins and 4 lysine acetylation sites were detected on 3 different lens proteins. Among the 12 in vivo carbamylation sites, 9 are novel in vivo carbamylation modification sites. Notably, in vivo carbamylation of [gamma]S crystallin, [beta]A4 crystallin, [beta]B1 crystallin, and [beta]B2 crystallin observed in this study have never been reported before.

  1. Modulation of the cytoplasmic functions of mammalian post-transcriptional regulatory proteins by methylation and acetylation: a key layer of regulation waiting to be uncovered?

    PubMed

    Blee, Tajekesa K P; Gray, Nicola K; Brook, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Post-transcriptional control of gene expression is critical for normal cellular function and viability and many of the proteins that mediate post-transcriptional control are themselves subject to regulation by post-translational modification (PTM), e.g. phosphorylation. However, proteome-wide studies are revealing new complexities in the PTM status of mammalian proteins, in particular large numbers of novel methylated and acetylated residues are being identified. Here we review studied examples of methylation/acetylation-dependent regulation of post-transcriptional regulatory protein (PTRP) function and present collated PTM data that points to the huge potential for regulation of mRNA fate by these PTMs. PMID:26614674

  2. Trichostatin A and 5-azacytidine both cause an increase in global histone H4 acetylation and a decrease in global DNA and H3K9 methylation during mitosis in maize

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modifications of DNA and histones in various combinations are correlated with many cellular processes. In this study, we investigated the possible relationship between histone H4 tetraacetylation, DNA methylation and histone H3 dimethylation at lysine 9 during mitosis in maize root meristems. Results Treatment with trichostatin A, which inhibits histone deacetylases, resulted in increased histone H4 acetylation accompanied by the decondensation of interphase chromatin and a decrease in both global H3K9 dimethylation and DNA methylation during mitosis in maize root tip cells. These observations suggest that histone acetylation may affect DNA and histone methylation during mitosis. Treatment with 5-azacytidine, a cytosine analog that reduces DNA methylation, caused chromatin decondensation and mediated an increase in H4 acetylation, in addition to reduced DNA methylation and H3K9 dimethylation during interphase and mitosis. These results suggest that decreased DNA methylation causes a reduction in H3K9 dimethylation and an increase in H4 acetylation. Conclusions The interchangeable effects of 5-azacytidine and trichostatin A on H4 acetylation, DNA methylation and H3K9 dimethylation indicate a mutually reinforcing action between histone acetylation, DNA methylation and histone methylation with respect to chromatin modification. Treatment with trichostatin A and 5-azacytidine treatment caused a decrease in the mitotic index, suggesting that H4 deacetylation and DNA and H3K9 methylation may contain the necessary information for triggering mitosis in maize root tips. PMID:20718950

  3. The Arabidopsis acetylated histone-binding protein BRAT1 forms a complex with BRP1 and prevents transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cui-Jun; Hou, Xiao-Mei; Tan, Lian-Mei; Shao, Chang-Rong; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Yong-Qiang; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She; He, Xin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements and other repetitive DNA sequences are usually subject to DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing. However, anti-silencing mechanisms that promote transcription in these regions are not well understood. Here, we describe an anti-silencing factor, Bromodomain and ATPase domain-containing protein 1 (BRAT1), which we identified by a genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana. BRAT1 interacts with an ATPase domain-containing protein, BRP1 (BRAT1 Partner 1), and both prevent transcriptional silencing at methylated genomic regions. Although BRAT1 mediates DNA demethylation at a small set of loci targeted by the 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase ROS1, the involvement of BRAT1 in anti-silencing is largely independent of DNA demethylation. We also demonstrate that the bromodomain of BRAT1 binds to acetylated histone, which may facilitate the prevention of transcriptional silencing. Thus, BRAT1 represents a potential link between histone acetylation and transcriptional anti-silencing at methylated genomic regions, which may be conserved in eukaryotes. PMID:27273316

  4. Thanatos-associated protein 7 associates with template activating factor-Ibeta and inhibits histone acetylation to repress transcription.

    PubMed

    Macfarlan, Todd; Parker, J Brandon; Nagata, Kyosuke; Chakravarti, Debabrata

    2006-02-01

    The posttranslational modifications of histones on chromatin or a lack thereof is critical in transcriptional regulation. Emerging studies indicate a role for histone-binding proteins in transcriptional activation and repression. We have previously identified template-activating factor-Ibeta (TAF-Ibeta, also called PHAPII, SET, and I(2)(pp2A)) as a component of a cellular complex called inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) that masks histone acetylation in vitro and blocks histone acetyltransferase (HAT)-dependent transcription in living cells. TAF-Ibeta has also been shown to associate with transcription factors, including nuclear receptors, to regulate their activities. To identify novel interactors of TAF-Ibeta, we employed a yeast two-hybrid screen and identified a previously uncharacterized human protein called thanatos-associated protein-7 (THAP7), a member of a large family of THAP domain-containing putative DNA-binding proteins. In this study we demonstrate that THAP7 associates with TAF-Ibeta in vitro and map their association domains to a C-terminal predicted coiled-coil motif on THAP7 and the central region of TAF-Ibeta. Similarly, stably transfected THAP7 associates with endogenous TAF-Ibeta in intact cells. Like TAF-Ibeta, THAP7 associates with histone H3 and histone H4 and inhibits histone acetylation. The histone-interacting domain of THAP7 is sufficient for this activity in vitro. Promoter-targeted THAP7 can also recruit TAF-Ibeta and silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid receptors/nuclear hormone receptor corepressor (NCoR) proteins to promoters, and knockdown of TAF-Ibeta by small interfering RNA relieves THAP7-mediated repression, indicating that, like nuclear hormone receptors, THAP7 may represent a novel class of transcription factor that uses TAF-Ibeta as a corepressor to maintain histones in a hypoacetylated, repressed state. PMID:16195249

  5. Acetyl-Phosphate Is Not a Global Regulatory Bridge between Virulence and Central Metabolism in Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Richards, Crystal L; Lawrence, Kevin A; Su, Hua; Yang, Youyun; Yang, X Frank; Dulebohn, Daniel P; Gherardini, Frank C

    2015-01-01

    In B. burgdorferi, the Rrp2-RpoN-RpoS signaling cascade is a distinctive system that coordinates the expression of virulence factors required for successful transition between its arthropod vector and mammalian hosts. Rrp2 (BB0763), an RpoN specific response regulator, is essential to activate this regulatory pathway. Previous investigations have attempted to identify the phosphate donor of Rrp2, including the cognate histidine kinase, Hk2 (BB0764), non-cognate histidine kinases such as Hk1, CheA1, and CheA2, and small molecular weight P-donors such as carbamoyl-phosphate and acetyl-phosphate (AcP). In a report by Xu et al., exogenous sodium acetate led to increased expression of RpoS and OspC and it was hypothesized this effect was due to increased levels of AcP via the enzyme AckA (BB0622). Genome analyses identified only one pathway that could generate AcP in B. burgdorferi: the acetate/mevalonate pathway that synthesizes the lipid, undecaprenyl phosphate (C55-P, lipid I), which is essential for cell wall biogenesis. To assess the role of AcP in Rrp2-dependent regulation of RpoS and OspC, we used a unique selection strategy to generate mutants that lacked ackA (bb0622: acetate to AcP) or pta (bb0589: AcP to acetyl-CoA). These mutants have an absolute requirement for mevalonate and demonstrate that ackA and pta are required for cell viability. When the ΔackA or Δpta mutant was exposed to conditions (i.e., increased temperature or cell density) that up-regulate the expression of RpoS and OspC, normal induction of those proteins was observed. In addition, adding 20mM acetate or 20mM benzoate to the growth media of B. burgdorferi strain B31 ΔackA induced the expression of RpoS and OspC. These data suggest that AcP (generated by AckA) is not directly involved in modulating the Rrp2-RpoN-RpoS regulatory pathway and that exogenous acetate or benzoate are triggering an acid stress response in B. burgdorferi. PMID:26681317

  6. Acetyl-Phosphate Is Not a Global Regulatory Bridge between Virulence and Central Metabolism in Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Crystal L.; Lawrence, Kevin A.; Su, Hua; Yang, Youyun; Yang, X. Frank; Dulebohn, Daniel P.; Gherardini, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    In B. burgdorferi, the Rrp2-RpoN-RpoS signaling cascade is a distinctive system that coordinates the expression of virulence factors required for successful transition between its arthropod vector and mammalian hosts. Rrp2 (BB0763), an RpoN specific response regulator, is essential to activate this regulatory pathway. Previous investigations have attempted to identify the phosphate donor of Rrp2, including the cognate histidine kinase, Hk2 (BB0764), non-cognate histidine kinases such as Hk1, CheA1, and CheA2, and small molecular weight P-donors such as carbamoyl-phosphate and acetyl-phosphate (AcP). In a report by Xu et al., exogenous sodium acetate led to increased expression of RpoS and OspC and it was hypothesized this effect was due to increased levels of AcP via the enzyme AckA (BB0622). Genome analyses identified only one pathway that could generate AcP in B. burgdorferi: the acetate/mevalonate pathway that synthesizes the lipid, undecaprenyl phosphate (C55-P, lipid I), which is essential for cell wall biogenesis. To assess the role of AcP in Rrp2–dependent regulation of RpoS and OspC, we used a unique selection strategy to generate mutants that lacked ackA (bb0622: acetate to AcP) or pta (bb0589: AcP to acetyl-CoA). These mutants have an absolute requirement for mevalonate and demonstrate that ackA and pta are required for cell viability. When the ΔackA or Δpta mutant was exposed to conditions (i.e., increased temperature or cell density) that up-regulate the expression of RpoS and OspC, normal induction of those proteins was observed. In addition, adding 20mM acetate or 20mM benzoate to the growth media of B. burgdorferi strain B31 ΔackA induced the expression of RpoS and OspC. These data suggest that AcP (generated by AckA) is not directly involved in modulating the Rrp2-RpoN-RpoS regulatory pathway and that exogenous acetate or benzoate are triggering an acid stress response in B. burgdorferi. PMID:26681317

  7. Differential Effect of Endurance Training on Mitochondrial Protein Damage, Degradation, and Acetylation in the Context of Aging.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew L; Irving, Brian A; Lanza, Ian R; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Konopka, Adam R; Robinson, Matthew M; Henderson, Gregory C; Klaus, Katherine A; Morse, Dawn M; Heppelmann, Carrie; Bergen, H Robert; Dasari, Surendra; Schimke, Jill M; Jakaitis, Daniel R; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2015-11-01

    Acute aerobic exercise increases reactive oxygen species and could potentially damage proteins, but exercise training (ET) enhances mitochondrial respiration irrespective of age. Here, we report a differential impact of ET on protein quality in young and older participants. Using mass spectrometry we measured oxidative damage to skeletal muscle proteins before and after 8 weeks of ET and find that young but not older participants reduced oxidative damage to both total skeletal muscle and mitochondrial proteins. Young participants showed higher total and mitochondrial derived semitryptic peptides and 26S proteasome activity indicating increased protein degradation. ET however, increased the activity of the endogenous antioxidants in older participants. ET also increased skeletal muscle content of the mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 in both groups. A reduction in the acetylation of isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 was observed following ET that may counteract the effect of acute oxidative stress. In conclusion aging is associated with an inability to improve skeletal muscle and mitochondrial protein quality in response to ET by increasing degradation of damaged proteins. ET does however increase muscle and mitochondrial antioxidant capacity in older individuals, which provides increased buffering from the acute oxidative effects of exercise. PMID:25504576

  8. De novo nonsense mutations in KAT6A, a lysine acetyl-transferase gene, cause a syndrome including microcephaly and global developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Arboleda, Valerie A; Lee, Hane; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Zadeh, Neda; Willis, Mary; Macmurdo, Colleen Forsyth; Manning, Melanie A; Kwan, Andrea; Hudgins, Louanne; Barthelemy, Florian; Miceli, M Carrie; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Kantarci, Sibel; Strom, Samuel P; Deignan, Joshua L; Grody, Wayne W; Vilain, Eric; Nelson, Stanley F

    2015-03-01

    Chromatin remodeling through histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deactylase (HDAC) enzymes affects fundamental cellular processes including the cell-cycle, cell differentiation, metabolism, and apoptosis. Nonsense mutations in genes that are involved in histone acetylation and deacetylation result in multiple congenital anomalies with most individuals displaying significant developmental delay, microcephaly and dysmorphism. Here, we report a syndrome caused by de novo heterozygous nonsense mutations in KAT6A (a.k.a., MOZ, MYST3) identified by clinical exome sequencing (CES) in four independent families. The same de novo nonsense mutation (c.3385C>T [p.Arg1129∗]) was observed in three individuals, and the fourth individual had a nearby de novo nonsense mutation (c.3070C>T [p.Arg1024∗]). Neither of these variants was present in 1,815 in-house exomes or in public databases. Common features among all four probands include primary microcephaly, global developmental delay including profound speech delay, and craniofacial dysmorphism, as well as more varied features such as feeding difficulties, cardiac defects, and ocular anomalies. We further demonstrate that KAT6A mutations result in dysregulation of H3K9 and H3K18 acetylation and altered P53 signaling. Through histone and non-histone acetylation, KAT6A affects multiple cellular processes and illustrates the complex role of acetylation in regulating development and disease. PMID:25728775

  9. De Novo Nonsense Mutations in KAT6A, a Lysine Acetyl-Transferase Gene, Cause a Syndrome Including Microcephaly and Global Developmental Delay

    PubMed Central

    Arboleda, Valerie A.; Lee, Hane; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Zadeh, Neda; Willis, Mary; Macmurdo, Colleen Forsyth; Manning, Melanie A.; Kwan, Andrea; Hudgins, Louanne; Barthelemy, Florian; Miceli, M. Carrie; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Kantarci, Sibel; Strom, Samuel P.; Deignan, Joshua L.; Grody, Wayne W.; Vilain, Eric; Nelson, Stanley F.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling through histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deactylase (HDAC) enzymes affects fundamental cellular processes including the cell-cycle, cell differentiation, metabolism, and apoptosis. Nonsense mutations in genes that are involved in histone acetylation and deacetylation result in multiple congenital anomalies with most individuals displaying significant developmental delay, microcephaly and dysmorphism. Here, we report a syndrome caused by de novo heterozygous nonsense mutations in KAT6A (a.k.a., MOZ, MYST3) identified by clinical exome sequencing (CES) in four independent families. The same de novo nonsense mutation (c.3385C>T [p.Arg1129∗]) was observed in three individuals, and the fourth individual had a nearby de novo nonsense mutation (c.3070C>T [p.Arg1024∗]). Neither of these variants was present in 1,815 in-house exomes or in public databases. Common features among all four probands include primary microcephaly, global developmental delay including profound speech delay, and craniofacial dysmorphism, as well as more varied features such as feeding difficulties, cardiac defects, and ocular anomalies. We further demonstrate that KAT6A mutations result in dysregulation of H3K9 and H3K18 acetylation and altered P53 signaling. Through histone and non-histone acetylation, KAT6A affects multiple cellular processes and illustrates the complex role of acetylation in regulating development and disease. PMID:25728775

  10. [Activity of protective proteins in wheat plants treated with chitooligosaccharides with different degrees of acetylation and infection with Bipolaris sorokiniana].

    PubMed

    Iarullina, L G; Kasimova, R I; Akhatova, A R

    2014-01-01

    The influence of chitooligosaccharides (COS) with different degrees of acetylation (DA) on the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and changes in the level of gene expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins (oxalate oxidase AJ556991.1, peroxidase TC 151917, chitinase AV029935L, proteinase inhibitor EU293132.1) in the roots of the wheat Triticum aestivum L. inoculated with root rot pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana (Sacc.) Shoenaker was investigated. Differences were detected in plant responses to infection. These differences were due to the pretreatment of COS seeds with differing DA. Our results demonstrated that COS with a DA over 65% more effectively induced accumulation of H2O2 and increased the transcriptional activity of genes of PR-proteins as compared to COS with a DA of 30%. These data suggest an important role for DA in the manifestation of eliciting properties of COS, also in the presence of H2O2. PMID:25707110

  11. SIRT1 phosphorylation by AMP-activated protein kinase regulates p53 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Alan W; Liu, Pengda; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Gao, Daming

    2014-01-01

    The deacetylase SIRT1 regulates multiple biological processes including cellular metabolism and aging. Importantly, SIRT1 can also inactivate the p53 tumor suppressor via deacetylation, suggesting a role in oncogenesis. Recently, SIRT1 was shown to be released from its endogenous inhibitor DBC1 by a process requiring AMPK and the phosphorylation of SIRT1 by yet undefined kinase(s). Here we provide further evidence that AMPK directly phosphorylates SIRT1 on T344, releasing it from DBC1. Furthermore, a phospho-mimetic SIRT1 (T334E) showed decreased binding to DBC1, supporting the importance of this phosphorylation in AMPK-mediated regulation of SIRT1 activity. In addition, inhibition of AMPK by Compound C led to increased p53 acetylation, suggesting a role for the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway in regulating p53 signaling. Together, our results support a hypothesis that AMPK negatively regulates p53 acetylation via phosphorylation of SIRT1 on T344. Furthermore, our findings also define the AMPK/SIRT1 axis as a possible targetable pathway to regulate p53 function. PMID:24959379

  12. DUX4 recruits p300/CBP through its C-terminus and induces global H3K27 acetylation changes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Si Ho; Gearhart, Micah D.; Cui, Ziyou; Bosnakovski, Darko; Kim, Minjee; Schennum, Natalie; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic expression of the double homeodomain transcription factor DUX4 causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Mechanisms of action of DUX4 are currently unknown. Using immortalized human myoblasts with a titratable DUX4 transgene, we identify by mass spectrometry an interaction between the DUX4 C-terminus and the histone acetyltransferases p300/CBP. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that DUX4 recruits p300 to its target gene, ZSCAN4, displaces histone H3 from the center of its binding site, and induces H3K27Ac in its vicinity, but C-terminal deleted DUX4 does not. We show that a DUX4 minigene, bearing only the homeodomains and C-terminus, is transcriptionally functional and cytotoxic, and that overexpression of a nuclear targeted C-terminus impairs the ability of WT DUX4 to interact with p300 and to regulate target genes. Genomic profiling of DUX4, histone H3, and H3 modifications reveals that DUX4 binds two classes of loci: DNase accessible H3K27Ac-rich chromatin and inaccessible H3K27Ac-depleted MaLR-enriched chromatin. At this latter class, it acts as a pioneer factor, recruiting H3K27 acetyltransferase activity and opening the locus for transcription. In concert with local increased H3K27Ac, the strong H3K27Ac peaks at distant sites are significantly depleted of H3K27Ac, thus DUX4 uses its C-terminus to induce a global reorganization of H3K27 acetylation. PMID:26951377

  13. DUX4 recruits p300/CBP through its C-terminus and induces global H3K27 acetylation changes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Si Ho; Gearhart, Micah D; Cui, Ziyou; Bosnakovski, Darko; Kim, Minjee; Schennum, Natalie; Kyba, Michael

    2016-06-20

    Ectopic expression of the double homeodomain transcription factor DUX4 causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Mechanisms of action of DUX4 are currently unknown. Using immortalized human myoblasts with a titratable DUX4 transgene, we identify by mass spectrometry an interaction between the DUX4 C-terminus and the histone acetyltransferases p300/CBP. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that DUX4 recruits p300 to its target gene, ZSCAN4, displaces histone H3 from the center of its binding site, and induces H3K27Ac in its vicinity, but C-terminal deleted DUX4 does not. We show that a DUX4 minigene, bearing only the homeodomains and C-terminus, is transcriptionally functional and cytotoxic, and that overexpression of a nuclear targeted C-terminus impairs the ability of WT DUX4 to interact with p300 and to regulate target genes. Genomic profiling of DUX4, histone H3, and H3 modifications reveals that DUX4 binds two classes of loci: DNase accessible H3K27Ac-rich chromatin and inaccessible H3K27Ac-depleted MaLR-enriched chromatin. At this latter class, it acts as a pioneer factor, recruiting H3K27 acetyltransferase activity and opening the locus for transcription. In concert with local increased H3K27Ac, the strong H3K27Ac peaks at distant sites are significantly depleted of H3K27Ac, thus DUX4 uses its C-terminus to induce a global reorganization of H3K27 acetylation. PMID:26951377

  14. Global Analysis of Posttranslational Protein Arginylation

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Bailey, Aaron O; Yates, John R; Wolf, Yuri I; Zebroski, Henry; Kashina, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Posttranslational arginylation is critical for embryogenesis, cardiovascular development, and angiogenesis, but its molecular effects and the identity of proteins arginylated in vivo are largely unknown. Here we report a global analysis of this modification on the protein level and identification of 43 proteins arginylated in vivo on highly specific sites. Our data demonstrate that unlike previously believed, arginylation can occur on any N-terminally exposed residue likely defined by a structural recognition motif on the protein surface, and that it preferentially affects a number of physiological systems, including cytoskeleton and primary metabolic pathways. The results of our study suggest that protein arginylation is a general mechanism for regulation of protein structure and function and outline the potential role of protein arginylation in cell metabolism and embryonic development. PMID:17896865

  15. NatF Contributes to an Evolutionary Shift in Protein N-Terminal Acetylation and Is Important for Normal Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Helsens, Kenny; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Martinho, Rui G.; Gevaert, Kris; Arnesen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation (N-Ac) is a highly abundant eukaryotic protein modification. Proteomics revealed a significant increase in the occurrence of N-Ac from lower to higher eukaryotes, but evidence explaining the underlying molecular mechanism(s) is currently lacking. We first analysed protein N-termini and their acetylation degrees, suggesting that evolution of substrates is not a major cause for the evolutionary shift in N-Ac. Further, we investigated the presence of putative N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs) in higher eukaryotes. The purified recombinant human and Drosophila homologues of a novel NAT candidate was subjected to in vitro peptide library acetylation assays. This provided evidence for its NAT activity targeting Met-Lys- and other Met-starting protein N-termini, and the enzyme was termed Naa60p and its activity NatF. Its in vivo activity was investigated by ectopically expressing human Naa60p in yeast followed by N-terminal COFRADIC analyses. hNaa60p acetylated distinct Met-starting yeast protein N-termini and increased general acetylation levels, thereby altering yeast in vivo acetylation patterns towards those of higher eukaryotes. Further, its activity in human cells was verified by overexpression and knockdown of hNAA60 followed by N-terminal COFRADIC. NatF's cellular impact was demonstrated in Drosophila cells where NAA60 knockdown induced chromosomal segregation defects. In summary, our study revealed a novel major protein modifier contributing to the evolution of N-Ac, redundancy among NATs, and an essential regulator of normal chromosome segregation. With the characterization of NatF, the co-translational N-Ac machinery appears complete since all the major substrate groups in eukaryotes are accounted for. PMID:21750686

  16. Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Down-Regulates Acetylation of Histone H4 at Lysine 16 through Induction of Stressor Protein Nupr1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Danqi; Kluz, Thomas; Fang, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoru; Sun, Hong; Jin, Chunyuan; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    The environmental and occupational carcinogen Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) has been shown to cause lung cancer in humans when inhaled. In spite of a considerable research effort, the mechanisms of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Nupr1 (nuclear protein 1) is a small, highly basic, and unfolded protein with molecular weight of 8,800 daltons and is induced by a variety of stressors. Studies in animal models have suggested that Nupr1 is a key factor in the development of lung and pancreatic cancers, with little known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we report that the level of Nupr1 is significantly increased in human bronchial epithelial BEAS2B cells following exposure to Cr(VI) through epigenetic mechanisms. Interestingly, Cr(VI) exposure also results in the loss of acetylation at histone H4K16, which is considered a 'hallmark' of human cancer. Cr(VI)-induced reduction of H4K16 acetylation appears to be caused by the induction of Nupr1, since (a) overexpression of Nupr1 decreased the levels of both H4K16 acetylation and the histone acetyltransferase MOF (male absent on the first; also known as Kat8, Myst 1), which specifically acetylates H4K16; (b) the loss of acetylation of H4K16 upon Cr(VI) exposure is greatly compromised by knockdown of Nupr1. Moreover, Nupr1-induced reduction of H4K16 acetylation correlates with the transcriptional down-regulation at several genomic loci. Notably, overexpression of Nupr1 induces anchorage-independent cell growth and knockdown of Nupr1 expression prevents Cr(VI)-induced cell transformation. We propose that Cr(VI) induces Nupr1 and rapidly perturbs gene expression by downregulating H4K16 acetylation, thereby contributing to Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:27285315

  17. Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Down-Regulates Acetylation of Histone H4 at Lysine 16 through Induction of Stressor Protein Nupr1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Danqi; Kluz, Thomas; Fang, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoru; Sun, Hong; Jin, Chunyuan; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    The environmental and occupational carcinogen Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) has been shown to cause lung cancer in humans when inhaled. In spite of a considerable research effort, the mechanisms of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Nupr1 (nuclear protein 1) is a small, highly basic, and unfolded protein with molecular weight of 8,800 daltons and is induced by a variety of stressors. Studies in animal models have suggested that Nupr1 is a key factor in the development of lung and pancreatic cancers, with little known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we report that the level of Nupr1 is significantly increased in human bronchial epithelial BEAS2B cells following exposure to Cr(VI) through epigenetic mechanisms. Interestingly, Cr(VI) exposure also results in the loss of acetylation at histone H4K16, which is considered a ‘hallmark’ of human cancer. Cr(VI)-induced reduction of H4K16 acetylation appears to be caused by the induction of Nupr1, since (a) overexpression of Nupr1 decreased the levels of both H4K16 acetylation and the histone acetyltransferase MOF (male absent on the first; also known as Kat8, Myst 1), which specifically acetylates H4K16; (b) the loss of acetylation of H4K16 upon Cr(VI) exposure is greatly compromised by knockdown of Nupr1. Moreover, Nupr1-induced reduction of H4K16 acetylation correlates with the transcriptional down-regulation at several genomic loci. Notably, overexpression of Nupr1 induces anchorage-independent cell growth and knockdown of Nupr1 expression prevents Cr(VI)-induced cell transformation. We propose that Cr(VI) induces Nupr1 and rapidly perturbs gene expression by downregulating H4K16 acetylation, thereby contributing to Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:27285315

  18. Amino-terminal processing of proteins: hemoglobin South Florida, a variant with retention of initiator methionine and N alpha-acetylation.

    PubMed Central

    Boissel, J P; Kasper, T J; Shah, S C; Malone, J I; Bunn, H F

    1985-01-01

    The hemoglobin variant South Florida has been shown by protein sequencing and fast-atom-bombardment mass spectroscopy to have a substitution of methionine for the NH2-terminal valine of the beta-globin chain. In addition, there was complete retention of the initiator methionine on the mutant polypeptide. Approximately 20% of the protein was acetylated at the NH2 terminus of the beta chain. A search of a comprehensive data bank of protein and gene sequences revealed 84 unrelated vertebrate proteins that have not undergone cleavage of leader sequences. A highly nonrandom distribution of residues at the NH2 termini of these proteins predicts removal of the initiator methionine as well as NH2-terminal acetylation. Proteins that undergo removal commonly have serine, alanine, glycine, or valine, as the NH2-terminal residues. The first three residues favor N alpha-acetylation. Proteins that retain the initiator methionine commonly have a charged residue or methionine at the second position. Information on Hb South Florida and other hemoglobins coupled with this survey of primary sequence provides insights into the NH2-terminal processing of proteins. PMID:3866233

  19. The Structural Basis of Protein Acetylation by the p300/CBP Transcriptional Coactivator

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,X.; Wang, L.; Zhao, K.; Thompson, P.; Hwang, Y.; Marmorstein, R.; Cole, P.

    2008-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator p300/CBP (CREBBP) is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) that regulates gene expression by acetylating histones and other transcription factors. Dysregulation of p300/CBP HAT activity contributes to various diseases including cancer. Sequence alignments, enzymology experiments and inhibitor studies on p300/CBP have led to contradictory results about its catalytic mechanism and its structural relation to the Gcn5/PCAF and MYST HATs. Here we describe a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a semi-synthetic heterodimeric p300 HAT domain in complex with a bi-substrate inhibitor, Lys-CoA. This structure shows that p300/CBP is a distant cousin of other structurally characterized HATs, but reveals several novel features that explain the broad substrate specificity and preference for nearby basic residues. Based on this structure and accompanying biochemical data, we propose that p300/CBP uses an unusual 'hit-and-run' (Theorell-Chance) catalytic mechanism that is distinct from other characterized HATs. Several disease-associated mutations can also be readily accounted for by the p300 HAT structure. These studies pave the way for new epigenetic therapies involving modulation of p300/CBP HAT activity.

  20. Optimization of proteins and minerals removal from shrimp shells to produce highly acetylated chitin.

    PubMed

    Younes, Islem; Hajji, Sawssen; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Chaabouni, Moncef; Jellouli, Kemel; Nasri, Moncef

    2016-03-01

    Chitin and derivatives used for biomedical or pharmaceutical applications require a high level of purity and quality that are difficult to achieve. In this study, we propose to optimize the extraction of chitin in order to obtain pure product keeping a structure as close as possible to the native form. Thus, demineralization step was firstly optimized using response surface methodology. In the optimized conditions predicted by the model, the obtained chitin has an acetylation degree (DA) and a demineralization degree (DM) equal to 99% and 100%, respectively. Then, different microbial and fish crude alkaline proteases were tested for their efficiency in deproteinization. Crude alkaline proteases giving the highest deproteinization degrees (DP), Bacillus mojavensis A21 and Scorpaena scrofa, were selected for chitin extraction. The obtained DP was 88±2% and 83±1%, respectively. At the end, effect of the use of mixed enzymatic treatment with the two selected crude enzymes and the order of demineralization/deproteinization steps were tested. The results demonstrated that two separated steps in enzymatic treatments realized on demineralized sample give the best DP (96%) preserving the DA (99%). PMID:26299708

  1. Interactions between the nitrogen signal transduction protein PII and N-acetyl glutamate kinase in organisms that perform oxygenic photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Burillo, Sergio; Luque, Ignacio; Fuentes, Inmaculada; Contreras, Asunción

    2004-06-01

    PII, one of the most conserved signal transduction proteins, is believed to be a key player in the coordination of nitrogen assimilation and carbon metabolism in bacteria, archaea, and plants. However, the identity of PII receptors remains elusive, particularly in photosynthetic organisms. Here we used yeast two-hybrid approaches to identify new PII receptors and to explore the extent of conservation of PII signaling mechanisms between eubacteria and photosynthetic eukaryotes. Screening of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 libraries with PII as bait resulted in identification of N-acetyl glutamate kinase (NAGK), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of arginine. The integrity of Ser49, a residue conserved in PII proteins from organisms that perform oxygenic photosynthesis, appears to be essential for NAGK binding. The effect of glnB mutations on NAGK activity is consistent with positive regulation of NAGK by PII. Phylogenetic and yeast two-hybrid analyses strongly suggest that there was conservation of the NAGK-PII regulatory interaction in the evolution of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts, providing insight into the function of eukaryotic PII-like proteins. PMID:15150219

  2. Nε−Lysine Acetylation of a Bacterial Transcription Factor Inhibits Its DNA-Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Thao, Sandy; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Zhu, Heng; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggesting that eukaryotes and archaea use reversible Nε-lysine (Nε-Lys) acetylation to modulate gene expression has been reported, but evidence for bacterial use of Nε-Lys acetylation for this purpose is lacking. Here, we report data in support of the notion that bacteria can control gene expression by modulating the acetylation state of transcription factors (TFs). We screened the E. coli proteome for substrates of the bacterial Gcn5-like protein acetyltransferase (Pat). Pat acetylated four TFs, including the RcsB global regulatory protein, which controls cell division, and capsule and flagellum biosynthesis in many bacteria. Pat acetylated residue Lys180 of RcsB, and the NAD+-dependent Sir2 (sirtuin)-like protein deacetylase (CobB) deacetylated acetylated RcsB (RcsBAc), demonstrating that Nε-Lys acetylation of RcsB is reversible. Analysis of RcsBAc and variant RcsB proteins carrying substitutions at Lys180 provided biochemical and physiological evidence implicating Lys180 as a critical residue for RcsB DNA-binding activity. These findings further the likelihood that reversible Nε-Lys acetylation of transcription factors is a mode of regulation of gene expression used by all cells. PMID:21217812

  3. Comparative covalent protein binding of 2,5-hexanedione and 3-acetyl-2,5-hexanedione in the rat.

    PubMed

    DeCaprio, Anthony P; Kinney, Elizabeth A; LoPachin, Richard M

    2009-01-01

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD) is the metabolite implicated in n-hexane neurotoxicity. This gamma-diketone reacts with protein lysine amines to form 2,5-dimethylpyrrole adducts. Pyrrole adduction of neurofilaments (NF) and/or other axonal proteins was proposed as a critical step in the neuropathy. While pyrrole adduction is widely accepted as necessary, subsequent pyrrole oxidation, which may result in protein cross-linking, was alternatively postulated as the critical mechanistic step. Previous studies have indicated that 3-acetyl-2,5-HD (AcHD), an analogue that forms pyrroles that do not oxidize, was not neurotoxic in rats. However, relative levels of pyrrole adduction of NF or other axonal proteins were not reported. In the present study, groups of 6 male Wistar rats were given saline, [1,6-(14)C]-HD (3 mmol/kg/d), or [5-(14)C]-AcHD (0.1 mmol/kg/d), i.p. for 21 d. HD- and AcHD-treated rats lost 10% and gained 14% body weight, respectively, compared to a 22% gain for control rats. At termination, HD- and AcHD-treated rats exhibited mean scores of 3.5 and 1.4, respectively, for hindlimb weakness (0-5 scale). Incorporation of radiolabel from HD was 27.8 +/- 3.9, 13.9 +/- 2.6, and 7.8 +/- 0.6 nmol/mg in plasma protein, purified globin, and axonal cytoskeletal proteins, respectively, compared to 0.6 +/- 0.1, 1.6 +/- 0.5, and 1.0 +/- 0.1 for AcHD. Binding of HD to the NF-L, -M, and -H subunit proteins from treated animals was 4-, 24-, and 13-fold higher, respectively, that that of AcHD, indicating differing stoichiometry and patterns of NF adduction for the two diketones. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of globin and NF proteins did not demonstrate protein cross-linking for either diketone at the dose levels and time period examined. These results indicate that that the lack of neurotoxicity previously reported for AcHD may reflect differences in adduct levels at critical axonal target sites rather than an inability to form cross

  4. GENERAL CONTROL NONREPRESSED PROTEIN5-Mediated Histone Acetylation of FERRIC REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE3 Contributes to Iron Homeostasis in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jiewen; Wang, Tianya; Liu, Zhenshan; Xu, Jianqin; Yao, Yingyin; Hu, Zhaorong; Peng, Huiru; Xin, Mingming; Yu, Futong; Zhou, Daoxiu; Ni, Zhongfu

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is essential for plant growth and development. Here, we report that a mutation in GENERAL CONTROL NONREPRESSED PROTEIN5 (GCN5) impaired iron translocation from the root to the shoot in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Illumina high-throughput sequencing revealed 879 GCN5-regulated candidate genes potentially involved in iron homeostasis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that five genes (At3G08040, At2G01530, At2G39380, At2G47160, and At4G05200) are direct targets of GCN5 in iron homeostasis regulation. Notably, GCN5-mediated acetylation of histone 3 lysine 9 and histone 3 lysine 14 of FERRIC REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE3 (FRD3) determined the dynamic expression of FRD3. Consistent with the function of FRD3 as a citrate efflux protein, the iron retention defect in gcn5 was rescued and fertility was partly restored by overexpressing FRD3. Moreover, iron retention in gcn5 roots was significantly reduced by the exogenous application of citrate. Collectively, these data suggest that GCN5 plays a critical role in FRD3-mediated iron homeostasis. Our results provide novel insight into the chromatin-based regulation of iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis. PMID:26002909

  5. Quaternion maps of global protein structure.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew J; Thakur, Sidharth

    2012-09-01

    The geometric structures of proteins are vital to the understanding of biochemical interactions. However, there is much yet to be understood about the spatial arrangements of the chains of amino acids making up any given protein. In particular, while conventional analysis tools like the Ramachandran plot supply some insight into the local relative orientation of pairs of amino acid residues, they provide little information about the global relative orientations of large groups of residues. We apply quaternion maps to families of coordinate frames defined naturally by amino acid residue structures as a way to expose global spatial relationships among residues within proteins. The resulting visualizations enable comparisons of absolute orientations as well as relative orientations, and thus generalize the framework of the Ramachandran plot. There are a variety of possible quaternion frames and visual representation strategies that can be chosen, and very complex quaternion maps can result. Just as Ramachandran plots are useful for addressing particular questions and not others, quaternion tools have characteristic domains of relevance. In particular, quaternion maps show great potential for answering specific questions about global residue alignment in crystallographic data and statistical orientation properties in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data that are very difficult to treat by other methods. PMID:23099777

  6. Development of the intein-mediated method for production of recombinant thymosin β4 from the acetylated in vivo fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Esipov, Roman S; Makarov, Dmitry A; Stepanenko, Vasily N; Miroshnikov, Anatoly I

    2016-06-20

    Thymosin β4 is a 43 amino acid long peptide with an acetylated N-terminal serin that has a high potential as a remedy for healing ulcers, wounds and burns. Although protein biosynthesis offers attractive opportunities in terms of a large-scale production, currently thymosin β4 is mainly produced by chemical synthesis. The problems that hinder the successful commercialization of the biotechnological approach are associated with the small peptides expression and N-terminal acetylation. This work presents an innovative biotechnological method for thymosin β4 production that employs the peptide acetylation in vivo. A genetically engineered construct was created, where the Tβ4 coding sequence fused with the intein Mxe GyrA sequence and chitin-binding domain was combined with the acetyltransferase coding sequence to form a polycistronic construct under a stringent control of T7 promoter. This plasmid construct provided for the expression of the Tβ4-intein fusion protein. In the process of the post-translational modification in vivo formyl methionine was completely removed from the target peptide N-terminus and followed by the Tβ4 precursor N-terminal acetylation. The use of the intein-mediated expression system made it possible to extract thymosin β4 in only 2 chromatographic runs. The method is straightforward to implement and scale up. PMID:27015974

  7. Silent information regulator 2 family of NAD- dependent histone/protein deacetylases generates a unique product, 1-O-acetyl-ADP-ribose.

    PubMed

    Tanner, K G; Landry, J; Sternglanz, R; Denu, J M

    2000-12-19

    Conflicting reports have suggested that the silent information regulator 2 (SIR2) protein family employs NAD(+) to ADP-ribosylate histones [Tanny, J. C., Dowd, G. J., Huang, J., Hilz, H. & Moazed, D. (1999) Cell 99, 735-745; Frye, R. A. (1999) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 260, 273-279], deacetylate histones [Landry, J., Sutton, A., Tafrov, S. T., Heller, R. C., Stebbins, J., Pillus, L. & Sternglanz, R. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 5807-5811; Smith, J. S., Brachmann, C. B., Celic, I., Kenna, M. A., Muhammad, S., Starai, V. J., Avalos, J. L., Escalante-Semerena, J. C., Grubmeyer, C., Wolberger, C. & Boeke, J. D. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 6658-6663], or both [Imai, S., Armstrong, C. M., Kaeberlein, M. & Guarente, L. (2000) Nature (London) 403, 795-800]. Uncovering the true enzymatic function of SIR2 is critical to the basic understanding of its cellular function. Therefore, we set out to authenticate the reaction products and to determine the intrinsic catalytic mechanism. We provide direct evidence that the efficient histone/protein deacetylase reaction is tightly coupled to the formation of a previously unidentified acetyl-ADP-ribose product (1-O-acetyl-ADP ribose). One molecule of NAD(+) and one molecule of acetyl-lysine are readily catalyzed to one molecule of deacetylated lysine, nicotinamide, and 1-O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. A unique reaction mechanism involving the attack of enzyme-bound acetate or the direct attack of acetyl-lysine on an oxocarbenium ADP-ribose intermediate is proposed. We suggest that the reported histone/protein ADP-ribosyltransferase activity is a low-efficiency side reaction that can be explained through the partial uncoupling of the intrinsic deacetylation and acetate transfer to ADP-ribose. PMID:11106374

  8. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  9. Genetic Incorporation of the Unnatural Amino Acid p-Acetyl Phenylalanine into Proteins for Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Eric G.B.; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is a powerful tool for the characterization of protein structure and dynamics; however, its application in many systems is hampered by the reliance on unique and benign cysteine substitutions for the site-specific attachment of the spin label. An elegant solution to this problem involves the use of genetically encoded unnatural amino acids (UAAs) containing reactive functional groups that are chemically orthogonal to those of the 20 amino acids found naturally in proteins. These unique functional groups can then be selectively reacted with an appropriately functionalized spin probe. In this chapter, we detail the genetic incorporation of the ketone-bearing amino acid p-acetyl phenylalanine (pAcPhe) into recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli. Incorporation of pAcPhe is followed by chemoselective reaction of the ketone side chain with a hydroxylamine-functionalized nitroxide to afford the spin-labeled side chain “K1,” and we present two protocols for successful K1 labeling of proteins bearing site-specific pAcPhe. We outline the basic requirements for pAcPhe incorporation and labeling, with an emphasis on practical aspects that must be considered by the researcher if high yields of UAA incorporation and efficient labeling reactions are to be achieved. To this end, we highlight recent advances that have led to increased yields of pAcPhe incorporation, and discuss the use of aniline-based catalysts allowing for facile conjugation of the hydroxylamine spin label under mild reaction conditions. To illustrate the utility of K1 labeling in proteins where traditional cysteine-based SDSL methods are problematic, we site-specifically K1 label the cellular prion protein at two positions in the C-terminal domain and determine the interspin distance using double electron–electron resonance EPR. Recent advances in UAA incorporation and ketone-based bioconjugation, in combination with the commercial availability of all requisite

  10. The two paralogue phoN (phosphinothricin acetyl transferase) genes of Pseudomonas putida encode functionally different proteins.

    PubMed

    Páez-Espino, A David; Chavarría, Max; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2015-09-01

    Phosphinothricin (PPT) is a non-specific inhibitor of glutamine synthetase that has been employed as herbicide for selection of transgenic plants expressing cognate resistance genes. While the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has been generally considered PPT-sensitive, inspection of its genome sequence reveals the presence of two highly similar open reading frames (PP_1924 and PP_4846) encoding acetylases with a potential to cause tolerance to the herbicide. To explore this possibility, each of these genes (named phoN1 and phoN2) was separately cloned and their activities examined in vivo and in vitro. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicated that phoN1 encodes a bona fide PPT-acetyl transferase, the expression of which suffices to make P. putida tolerant to high concentrations of the herbicide. In contrast, PhoN2 does not act on PPT but displays instead activity against methionine sulfoximine (MetSox), another glutamine synthetase inhibitor. When the geometry of the substrate-binding site of PhoN1 was grafted with the equivalent residues of the predicted PhoN2 structure, the resulting protein increased significantly MetSox resistance of the expression host concomitantly with the loss of activity on PPT. These observations uncover intricate biochemical and genetic interactions among soil microorganisms and how they can be perturbed by exposure to generic herbicides in soil. PMID:25684119

  11. Accurate in silico identification of species-specific acetylation sites by integrating protein sequence-derived and functional features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Wang, Mingjun; Wang, Huilin; Tan, Hao; Zhang, Ziding; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Song, Jiangning

    2014-07-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible post-translational modification, playing an important role in cytokine signaling, transcriptional regulation, and apoptosis. To fully understand acetylation mechanisms, identification of substrates and specific acetylation sites is crucial. Experimental identification is often time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics methods are cost-effective and can be used in a high-throughput manner to generate relatively precise predictions. Here we develop a method termed as SSPKA for species-specific lysine acetylation prediction, using random forest classifiers that combine sequence-derived and functional features with two-step feature selection. Feature importance analysis indicates functional features, applied for lysine acetylation site prediction for the first time, significantly improve the predictive performance. We apply the SSPKA model to screen the entire human proteome and identify many high-confidence putative substrates that are not previously identified. The results along with the implemented Java tool, serve as useful resources to elucidate the mechanism of lysine acetylation and facilitate hypothesis-driven experimental design and validation.

  12. Post-translational Serine/Threonine Phosphorylation and Lysine Acetylation: A Novel Regulatory Aspect of the Global Nitrogen Response Regulator GlnR in S. coelicolor M145

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Rafat; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Tiffert, Yvonne; Heberer, Martin; Meky, Mohamed; Ahmed, Yousra; Matthews, Arne; Krysenko, Sergii; Jakobi, Marco; Hinder, Markus; Moore, Jane; Okoniewski, Nicole; Maček, Boris; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Bera, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Soil-dwelling Streptomyces bacteria such as S.coelicolor have to constantly adapt to the nitrogen (N) availability in their habitat. Thus, strict transcriptional and post-translational control of the N-assimilation is fundamental for survival of this species. GlnR is a global response regulator that controls transcription of the genes related to the N-assimilation in S. coelicolor and other members of the Actinomycetales. GlnR represents an atypical orphan response regulator that is not activated by the phosphorylation of the conserved aspartate residue (Asp 50). We have applied transcriptional analysis, LC-MS/MS analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to understand the regulation of GlnR in S. coelicolor M145. The expression of glnR and GlnR-target genes was revisited under four different N-defined conditions and a complex N-rich condition. Although, the expression of selected GlnR-target genes was strongly responsive to changing N-concentrations, the glnR expression itself was independent of the N-availability. Using LC-MS/MSanalysis we demonstrated that GlnR was post-translationally modified. The post-translational modifications of GlnR comprise phosphorylation of the serine/threonine residues and acetylation of lysine residues. In the complex N-rich medium GlnR was phosphorylated on six serine/threonine residues and acetylated on one lysine residue. Under defined N-excess conditions only two phosphorylated residues were detected whereas under defined N-limiting conditions no phosphorylation was observed. GlnR phosphorylation is thus clearly correlated with N-rich conditions. Furthermore, GlnR was acetylated on four lysine residues independently of the N-concentration in the defined media and on only one lysine residue in the complex N-rich medium. Using EMSAs we demonstrated that phosphorylation inhibited the binding of GlnR to its targets genes, whereas acetylation had little influence on the formation of GlnR-DNA complex. This study clearly

  13. Post-translational Serine/Threonine Phosphorylation and Lysine Acetylation: A Novel Regulatory Aspect of the Global Nitrogen Response Regulator GlnR in S. coelicolor M145.

    PubMed

    Amin, Rafat; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Tiffert, Yvonne; Heberer, Martin; Meky, Mohamed; Ahmed, Yousra; Matthews, Arne; Krysenko, Sergii; Jakobi, Marco; Hinder, Markus; Moore, Jane; Okoniewski, Nicole; Maček, Boris; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Bera, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Soil-dwelling Streptomyces bacteria such as S.coelicolor have to constantly adapt to the nitrogen (N) availability in their habitat. Thus, strict transcriptional and post-translational control of the N-assimilation is fundamental for survival of this species. GlnR is a global response regulator that controls transcription of the genes related to the N-assimilation in S. coelicolor and other members of the Actinomycetales. GlnR represents an atypical orphan response regulator that is not activated by the phosphorylation of the conserved aspartate residue (Asp 50). We have applied transcriptional analysis, LC-MS/MS analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to understand the regulation of GlnR in S. coelicolor M145. The expression of glnR and GlnR-target genes was revisited under four different N-defined conditions and a complex N-rich condition. Although, the expression of selected GlnR-target genes was strongly responsive to changing N-concentrations, the glnR expression itself was independent of the N-availability. Using LC-MS/MSanalysis we demonstrated that GlnR was post-translationally modified. The post-translational modifications of GlnR comprise phosphorylation of the serine/threonine residues and acetylation of lysine residues. In the complex N-rich medium GlnR was phosphorylated on six serine/threonine residues and acetylated on one lysine residue. Under defined N-excess conditions only two phosphorylated residues were detected whereas under defined N-limiting conditions no phosphorylation was observed. GlnR phosphorylation is thus clearly correlated with N-rich conditions. Furthermore, GlnR was acetylated on four lysine residues independently of the N-concentration in the defined media and on only one lysine residue in the complex N-rich medium. Using EMSAs we demonstrated that phosphorylation inhibited the binding of GlnR to its targets genes, whereas acetylation had little influence on the formation of GlnR-DNA complex. This study clearly

  14. Global view of the protein universe

    PubMed Central

    Nepomnyachiy, Sergey; Ben-Tal, Nir; Kolodny, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    To explore protein space from a global perspective, we consider 9,710 SCOP (Structural Classification of Proteins) domains with up to 70% sequence identity and present all similarities among them as networks: In the “domain network,” nodes represent domains, and edges connect domains that share “motifs,” i.e., significantly sized segments of similar sequence and structure. We explore the dependence of the network on the thresholds that define the evolutionary relatedness of the domains. At excessively strict thresholds the network falls apart completely; for very lax thresholds, there are network paths between virtually all domains. Interestingly, at intermediate thresholds the network constitutes two regions that can be described as “continuous” versus “discrete.” The continuous region comprises a large connected component, dominated by domains with alternating alpha and beta elements, and the discrete region includes the rest of the domains in isolated islands, each generally corresponding to a fold. We also construct the “motif network,” in which nodes represent recurring motifs, and edges connect motifs that appear in the same domain. This network also features a large and highly connected component of motifs that originate from domains with alternating alpha/beta elements (and some all-alpha domains), and smaller isolated islands. Indeed, the motif network suggests that nature reuses such motifs extensively. The networks suggest evolutionary paths between domains and give hints about protein evolution and the underlying biophysics. They provide natural means of organizing protein space, and could be useful for the development of strategies for protein search and design. PMID:25071170

  15. Proteomic analysis of acetylation in thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Dooil; Lee, Yong-Jik; Kim, Jung-Ae; Choi, Ji Young; Kang, Sunghyun; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2013-08-01

    Recent analysis of prokaryotic N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteins highlights the posttranslational regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular proteins. However, the exact role of acetylation remains unclear due to a lack of acetylated proteome data in prokaryotes. Here, we present the N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteome of gram-positive thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus. Affinity enrichment using acetyl-lysine-specific antibodies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis revealed 253 acetylated peptides representing 114 proteins. These acetylated proteins include not only common orthologs from mesophilic Bacillus counterparts, but also unique G. kaustophilus proteins, indicating that lysine acetylation is pronounced in thermophilic bacteria. These data complement current knowledge of the bacterial acetylproteome and provide an expanded platform for better understanding of the function of acetylation in cellular metabolism. PMID:23696451

  16. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylproteome analysis reveals diverse functions of lysine acetylation in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Song, Limin; Liang, Wenxing; Mu, Ping; Wang, Shu; Lin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation of proteins, a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification, plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several researches have been carried out on acetylproteome in plants. However, until now, there have been no data on common wheat, the major cereal crop in the world. In this study, we performed a global acetylproteome analysis of common wheat variety (Triticum aestivum L.), Chinese Spring. In total, 416 lysine modification sites were identified on 277 proteins, which are involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Consistent with previous studies, a large proportion of the acetylated proteins are involved in metabolic process. Interestingly, according to the functional enrichment analysis, 26 acetylated proteins are involved in photosynthesis and Calvin cycle, suggesting an important role of lysine acetylation in these processes. Moreover, protein interaction network analysis reveals that diverse interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. These data represent the first report of acetylome in common wheat and serve as an important resource for exploring the physiological role of lysine acetylation in this organism and likely in all plants. PMID:26875666

  17. Comprehensive profiling of lysine acetylproteome analysis reveals diverse functions of lysine acetylation in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumei; Song, Limin; Liang, Wenxing; Mu, Ping; Wang, Shu; Lin, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation of proteins, a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification, plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Several researches have been carried out on acetylproteome in plants. However, until now, there have been no data on common wheat, the major cereal crop in the world. In this study, we performed a global acetylproteome analysis of common wheat variety (Triticum aestivum L.), Chinese Spring. In total, 416 lysine modification sites were identified on 277 proteins, which are involved in a wide variety of biological processes. Consistent with previous studies, a large proportion of the acetylated proteins are involved in metabolic process. Interestingly, according to the functional enrichment analysis, 26 acetylated proteins are involved in photosynthesis and Calvin cycle, suggesting an important role of lysine acetylation in these processes. Moreover, protein interaction network analysis reveals that diverse interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. These data represent the first report of acetylome in common wheat and serve as an important resource for exploring the physiological role of lysine acetylation in this organism and likely in all plants. PMID:26875666

  18. The reductive acetyl coenzyme A pathway: sequence and heterologous expression of active methyltetrahydrofolate:corrinoid/iron-sulfur protein methyltransferase from Clostridium thermoaceticum.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D L; Zhao, S; Doukov, T; Ragsdale, S W

    1994-01-01

    The methyltransferase (MeTr) from Clostridium thermoaceticum transfers the N5-methyl group of (6S)-methyltetrahydrofolate to the cobalt center of a corrinoid/iron-sulfur protein in the acetyl coenzyme A pathway. MeTr was purified to homogeneity and shown to lack metals. The acsE gene encoding MeTr was sequenced and actively expressed in Escherichia coli at a level of 9% of cell protein. Regions in the sequence of MeTr and the E. coli cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase were found to share significant homology, suggesting that they may represent tetrahydrofolate-binding domains. PMID:7928975

  19. Time-resolved luminescence biosensor for continuous activity detection of protein acetylation-related enzymes based on DNA-sensitized terbium(III) probes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yitao; Li, Hao; Hu, Yufang; Li, Pei; Wang, Huixia; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-09-15

    Protein acetylation of histone is an essential post-translational modification (PTM) mechanism in epigenetic gene regulation, and its status is reversibly controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Herein, we have developed a sensitive and label-free time-resolved luminescence (TRL) biosensor for continuous detection of enzymatic activity of HATs and HDACs, respectively, based on acetylation-mediated peptide/DNA interaction and Tb(3+)/DNA luminescent probes. Using guanine (G)-rich DNA-sensitized Tb(3+) luminescence as the output signal, the polycationic substrate peptides interact with DNA with high affinity and subsequently replace Tb(3+), eliminating the luminescent signal. HAT-catalyzed acetylation remarkably reduces the positive charge of the peptides and diminishes the peptide/DNA interaction, resulting in the signal on detection via recovery of DNA-sensitized Tb(3+) luminescence. With this TRL sensor, HAT (p300) can be sensitively detected with a wide linear range from 0.2 to 100 nM and a low detection limit of 0.05 nM. The proposed sensor was further used to continuously monitor the HAT activity in real time. Additionally, the TRL biosensor was successfully applied to evaluating HAT inhibition by two specific inhibitors, anacardic acid and C464, and satisfactory Z'-factors above 0.73 were obtained. Moreover, this sensor is feasible to continuously monitor the HDAC (Sirt1)-catalyzed deacetylation with a linear range from 0.5 to 500 nM and a detection limit of 0.5 nM. The proposed sensor is a convenient, sensitive, and mix-and-read assay, presenting a promising platform for protein acetylation-targeted epigenetic research and drug discovery. PMID:26307596

  20. The Escherichia coli G-fimbrial lectin protein participates both in fimbrial biogenesis and in recognition of the receptor N-acetyl-D-glucosamine.

    PubMed Central

    Saarela, S; Taira, S; Nurmiaho-Lassila, E L; Makkonen, A; Rhen, M

    1995-01-01

    The gafD gene encoding the N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-specific fimbrial lectin (adhesin) protein GafD of uropathogenic Escherichia coli was cloned and subjected to genetic analysis. The corresponding gene product was isolated as a MalE fusion protein. The lectin gene was identified with the aid of deletion mutagenesis; mutations in gafD impaired either receptor binding or both receptor binding and fimbria production, depending on the mutation created. All mutants converted to wild-type expressors when complemented in trans with the cloned intact gafD gene. The predicted 354-amino-acid sequence of GafD, deduced from the nucleotide sequence, is closely related to those of the fimbria-associated F17-G and F17b-G proteins coded for by enterotoxigenic and invasive E. coli strains. Isolated GafD was shown to recognize N-acetyl-D-glucosamine by virtue of specific binding to an immobilized receptor, thus proving directly that GafD is a sugar-binding protein. Our results indicate that GafD as such is sufficient for receptor recognition and that the protein also participates in fimbrial biogenesis. PMID:7883703

  1. NatB Domain-Containing CRA-1 Antagonizes Hydrolase ACER-1 Linking Acetyl-CoA Metabolism to the Initiation of Recombination during C. elegans Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinmin; Kim, Hyun-Min; Elia, Andrew E.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Colaiácovo, Monica P.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) must take place during meiosis to ensure the formation of crossovers, which are required for accurate chromosome segregation, therefore avoiding aneuploidy. However, DSB formation must be tightly regulated to maintain genomic integrity. How this regulation operates in the context of different chromatin architectures and accessibility, and how it is linked to metabolic pathways, is not understood. We show here that global histone acetylation levels undergo changes throughout meiotic progression. Moreover, perturbations to global histone acetylation levels are accompanied by changes in the frequency of DSB formation in C. elegans. We provide evidence that the regulation of histone acetylation requires CRA-1, a NatB domain-containing protein homologous to human NAA25, which controls the levels of acetyl-Coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) by antagonizing ACER-1, a previously unknown and conserved acetyl-CoA hydrolase. CRA-1 is in turn negatively regulated by XND-1, an AT-hook containing protein. We propose that this newly defined protein network links acetyl-CoA metabolism to meiotic DSB formation via modulation of global histone acetylation. PMID:25768301

  2. Myofibril growth during cardiac hypertrophy is regulated through dual phosphorylation and acetylation of the actin capping protein CapZ.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Hsi; Warren, Chad M; Li, Jieli; McKinsey, Timothy A; Russell, Brenda

    2016-08-01

    The mechanotransduction signaling pathways initiated in heart muscle by increased mechanical loading are known to lead to long-term transcriptional changes and hypertrophy, but the rapid events for adaptation at the sarcomeric level are not fully understood. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that actin filament assembly during cardiomyocyte growth is regulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs) of CapZβ1. In rapidly hypertrophying neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) stimulated by phenylephrine (PE), two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) of CapZβ1 revealed a shift toward more negative charge. Consistent with this, mass spectrometry identified CapZβ1 phosphorylation on serine-204 and acetylation on lysine-199, two residues which are near the actin binding surface of CapZβ1. Ectopic expression of dominant negative PKCɛ (dnPKCɛ) in NRVMs blunted the PE-induced increase in CapZ dynamics, as evidenced by the kinetic constant (Kfrap) of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and concomitantly reduced phosphorylation and acetylation of CapZβ1. Furthermore, inhibition of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) increased lysine-199 acetylation on CapZβ1, which increased Kfrap of CapZ and stimulated actin dynamics. Finally, we show that PE treatment of NRVMs results in decreased binding of HDAC3 to myofibrils, suggesting a signal-dependent mechanism for the regulation of sarcomere-associated CapZβ1 acetylation. Taken together, this dual regulation through phosphorylation and acetylation of CapZβ1 provides a novel model for the regulation of myofibril growth during cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27185186

  3. N-Acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine 6-phosphate is a specific inhibitor of glycogen-bound protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Board, M

    1997-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the C-1-substituted glucose-analogue N-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosylamine (1-GlcNAc) is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and stimulates the inactivation of this enzyme by GP phosphatase. In addition to its effects on GP, 1-GlcNAc also prevents the glucose-led activation of glycogen synthase (GS) in whole hepatocytes. Such an effect on GS was thought to be due to the formation of 1-GlcNAc-6-P by the action of glucokinase within the hepatocyte [Board, Bollen, Stalmans, Kim, Fleet and Johnson (1995) Biochem. J. 311, 845-852]. To investigate this possibility further, a pure preparation of 1-GlcNAc-6-P was synthesized. The effects of the phosphorylated glucose analogue on the activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), the enzyme responsible for dephosphorylation and activation of GS, are reported. During the present study, 1-GlcNAc-6-P inhibited the activity of the glycogen-bound form of PP1, affecting both the GSb phosphatase and GPa phosphatase activities. A level of 50% inhibition of GSb phosphatase activity was achieved with 85 microM 1-GlcNAc-6-P in the absence of Glc-6-P and with 135 microM in the presence of 10 mM Glc-6-P. At either Glc-6-P concentration, 500 microM 1-GlcNAc-6-P completely inhibited activity. The Glc-6-P stimulation of the GPa phosphatase activity of PP1 was negated by 1-GlcNAc-6-P but there was no inhibition of the basal rate in the absence of Glc-6-P. 1-GlcNAc-6-P inhibition was specific for the glycogen-bound form of PP1 and did not inhibit the GSb phosphatase activity of the cytosolic form of the enzyme. The present work explains our previous observations on the inactivating effects on GS of incubating whole hepatocytes with 1-GlcNAc. These observations have their basis in the inhibition of glycogen-bound PP1 by 1-GlcNAc-6-P. A novel inhibitor of PP1, specific for the glycogen-bound form of the enzyme, is presented. PMID:9371733

  4. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated. PMID:27423860

  5. A Method to Determine Lysine Acetylation Stoichiometries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Wu, Si; Sydor, Michael A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Weitz, Karl K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kim, Jong-Seo; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a common protein posttranslational modification that regulates a variety of biological processes. A major bottleneck to fully understanding the functional aspects of lysine acetylation is the difficulty in measuring the proportion of lysine residues that are acetylated. Here we describe a mass spectrometry method using a combination of isotope labeling and detection of a diagnostic fragment ion to determine the stoichiometry of protein lysine acetylation. Using this technique, we determined the modification occupancy for ~750 acetylated peptides from mammalian cell lysates. Furthermore, the acetylation on N-terminal tail of histone H4 was cross-validated by treating cells with sodiummore » butyrate, a potent deacetylase inhibitor, and comparing changes in stoichiometry levels measured by our method with immunoblotting measurements. Of note we observe that acetylation stoichiometry is high in nuclear proteins, but very low in mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. In summary, our method opens new opportunities to study in detail the relationship of lysine acetylation levels of proteins with their biological functions.« less

  6. Transcription and protein synthesis inhibitors influence long-term effects of acetyl-l-carnitine on non-associative learning in the leech.

    PubMed

    Traina, Giovanna; Scuri, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC) is the principal acetyl ester of L-carnitine and it plays an essential role in intermediary metabolism. ALC affects several targets in the nervous system. Along this line of investigation, we analyzed the long-term effects of ALC on elementary nonassociative learning in the swimming induction model of the leech Hirudo medicinalis, in which nociceptive stimulation of the dorsal skin produces a more rapid swim response to a test stimulus (sensitization). In this simplified model a single ALC administration blocked the sensitizing effects of nociceptive stimulation in swim induction showing increasingly long lasting effects. Herein, we have analyzed the long-term effects of ALC on sensitization and dishabituation. Leeches were treated with inhibitors of either transcription or protein synthesis 30 min after the administration of ALC and, subsequently, subjected to noxious stimuli: the animals exhibited a sensitized swimming response 6 days after ALC treatment but not after 2 hours indicating that the long-term suppressive effects of ALC on sensitization/dishabituation needed mRNA and protein synthesis. PMID:25463319

  7. Detection of methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring (13)C chemical-shift changes: A quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Garay, Pablo G; Martin, Osvaldo A; Scheraga, Harold A; Vila, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins expand the diversity of the proteome by several orders of magnitude and have a profound effect on several biological processes. Their detection by experimental methods is not free of limitations such as the amount of sample needed or the use of destructive procedures to obtain the sample. Certainly, new approaches are needed and, therefore, we explore here the feasibility of using (13)C chemical shifts of different nuclei to detect methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring the deviation of the (13)C chemical shifts from the expected (mean) experimental value of the non-modified residue. As a proof-of-concept, we used (13)C chemical shifts, computed at the DFT-level of theory, to test this hypothesis. Moreover, as a validation test of this approach, we compare our theoretical computations of the (13)Cε chemical-shift values against existing experimental data, obtained from NMR spectroscopy, for methylated and acetylated lysine residues with good agreement within ∼1 ppm. Then, further use of this approach to select the most suitable (13)C-nucleus, with which to determine other modifications commonly seen, such as methylation of arginine and glycosylation of serine, asparagine and threonine, shows encouraging results. PMID:27547559

  8. Detection of methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring 13C chemical-shift changes: A quantum-chemical study

    PubMed Central

    Garay, Pablo G.; Martin, Osvaldo A.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins expand the diversity of the proteome by several orders of magnitude and have a profound effect on several biological processes. Their detection by experimental methods is not free of limitations such as the amount of sample needed or the use of destructive procedures to obtain the sample. Certainly, new approaches are needed and, therefore, we explore here the feasibility of using 13C chemical shifts of different nuclei to detect methylation, acetylation and glycosylation of protein residues by monitoring the deviation of the 13C chemical shifts from the expected (mean) experimental value of the non-modified residue. As a proof-of-concept, we used 13C chemical shifts, computed at the DFT-level of theory, to test this hypothesis. Moreover, as a validation test of this approach, we compare our theoretical computations of the 13Cε chemical-shift values against existing experimental data, obtained from NMR spectroscopy, for methylated and acetylated lysine residues with good agreement within ∼1 ppm. Then, further use of this approach to select the most suitable 13C-nucleus, with which to determine other modifications commonly seen, such as methylation of arginine and glycosylation of serine, asparagine and threonine, shows encouraging results. PMID:27547559

  9. Cancer-preventive peptide lunasin from Solanum nigrum L. inhibits acetylation of core histones H3 and H4 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb).

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Jeong, Hyung Jin; Park, Jae Ho; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Jeong Rak; Lee, Hee Kyeong; Chung, Gyu Young; Choi, Jeong Doo; de Lumen, Ben O

    2007-12-26

    Lunasin, a unique 43 amino acid, 4.8 kDa cancer-chemopreventive peptide initially reported in soybean and now found in barley and wheat, has been shown to be cancer-chemopreventive in mammalian cells and in a skin cancer mouse model against oncogenes and chemical carcinogens. To identify bioactive components in traditional herbal medicines and in search for new sources of lunasin, we report here the properties of lunasin from Solanum nigrum L. (SNL), a plant indigenous to northeast Asia. Lunasin was screened in the crude extracts of five varieties of the medicinal plants of Solanaceae origin and seven other major herbal plants. An in vitro digestion stability assay for measuring bioavailability was carried out on SNL crude protein and autoclaved SNL using pepsin and pancreatin. A nonradioactive histone acetyltransferase (HAT) assay and HAT activity colorimetric assay were used to measure the inhibition of core histone acetylation. The inhibitory effect of lunasin on the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) was determined by immunoblotting against phospho-Rb. Lunasin isolated from autoclaved SNL inhibited core histone H3 and H4 acetylation, the activities of the HATs, and the phosphorylation of the Rb protein. Lunasin in the crude protein and in the autoclaved crude protein was very stable to pepsin and pancreatin in vitro digestion, while the synthetic pure lunasin was digested at 2 min after the reaction. We conclude that lunasin is a bioactive and bioavailable component in SNL and that consumption of SNL may play an important role in cancer prevention. PMID:18038993

  10. A strategy to quantitate global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-04-15

    Current studies of protein phosphorylation focus primarily on the importance of specific phosphoproteins and their landscapes of phosphorylation in the regulation of different cellular functions. However, global changes in phosphorylation of extracellular matrix phosphoproteins measured "in bulk" are equally important. For example, correct global phosphorylation of different bone matrix proteins is critical to healthy tissue biomineralization. To study changes of bone matrix global phosphorylation, we developed a strategy that combines a procedure for in vitro phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of fully mineralized bone in addition to quantitation of the global phosphorylation levels of bone matrix proteins. For the first time, we show that it is possible to enzymatically phosphorylate/dephosphorylate fully mineralized bone originating from either cadaveric human donors or laboratory animals (mice). Using our strategy, we detected the difference in the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from wild-type and osteopontin knockout mice. We also observed that the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from human cortical bone were lower than those isolated from trabecular bone. The developed strategy has the potential to open new avenues for studies on the global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins and their role in biomineralization as well for other tissues/cells and protein-based materials. PMID:26851341

  11. Mitochondrial Acetylation and Diseases of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gregory R.; Payne, R. Mark

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, protein lysine acetylation has emerged as a prominent and conserved regulatory posttranslational modification that is abundant on numerous enzymes involved in the processes of intermediary metabolism. Well-characterized mitochondrial processes of carbon utilization are enriched in acetyl-lysine modifications. Although seminal discoveries have been made in the basic biology of mitochondrial acetylation, an understanding of how acetylation states influence enzyme function and metabolic reprogramming during pathological states remains largely unknown. This paper will examine our current understanding of eukaryotic acetate metabolism and present recent findings in the field of mitochondrial acetylation biology. The implications of mitochondrial acetylation for the aging process will be discussed, as well as its potential implications for the unique and localized metabolic states that occur during the aging-associated conditions of heart failure and cancer growth. PMID:21437190

  12. Major cancer protein amplifies global gene expression

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists may have discovered why a protein called MYC can provoke a variety of cancers. Like many proteins associated with cancer, MYC helps regulate cell growth. A new study carried out by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and colleagues

  13. Alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a wave of global protein hyperacetylation: Implications in cancer cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Myoung-Ae; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Joo-In; Kwak, Jong-Young; Chung, Jay H.; Yun, Jeanho . E-mail: yunj@dau.ac.kr

    2007-08-24

    Protein acetylation modification has been implicated in many cellular processes but the direct evidence for the involvement of protein acetylation in signal transduction is very limited. In the present study, we found that an alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a robust and reversible hyperacetylation of both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins during the early phase of the cellular response to MMS. Notably, the acetylation level upon MMS treatment was strongly correlated with the susceptibility of cancer cells, and the enhancement of MMS-induced acetylation by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors was shown to increase the cellular susceptibility. These results suggest protein acetylation is important for the cell death signal transduction pathway and indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of cancer is relevant.

  14. Quantitative Measurement of Histone Tail Acetylation Reveals Stage-Specific Regulation and Response to Environmental Changes during Drosophila Development.

    PubMed

    Henry, Ryan A; Singh, Tanu; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Biester, Alison; O'Keefe, Abigail; Lee, Sandy; Andrews, Andrew J; O'Reilly, Alana M

    2016-03-22

    Histone modification plays a major role in regulating gene transcription and ensuring the healthy development of an organism. Numerous studies have suggested that histones are dynamically modified during developmental events to control gene expression levels in a temporal and spatial manner. However, the study of histone acetylation dynamics using currently available techniques is hindered by the difficulty of simultaneously measuring acetylation of the numerous potential sites of modification present in histones. Here, we present a methodology that allows us to combine mass spectrometry-based histone analysis with Drosophila developmental genetics. Using this system, we characterized histone acetylation patterns during multiple developmental stages of the fly. Additionally, we utilized this analysis to characterize how treatments with pharmacological agents or environmental changes such as γ-irradiation altered histone acetylation patterns. Strikingly, γ-irradiation dramatically increased the level of acetylation at H3K18, a site linked to DNA repair via nonhomologous end joining. In mutant fly strains deficient in DNA repair proteins, however, this increase in the level of H3K18 acetylation was lost. These results demonstrate the efficacy of our combined mass spectrometry system with a Drosophila model system and provide interesting insight into the changes in histone acetylation during development, as well as the effects of both pharmacological and environmental agents on global histone acetylation. PMID:26836402

  15. Myc-dependent mitochondrial generation of acetyl-CoA contributes to fatty acid biosynthesis and histone acetylation during cell cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Noonan, Jhoanna; Perez-Olsen, Carissa; Gafken, Philip R; Fitzgibbon, Matthew; Kelleher, Joanne; VanGilst, Marc; Hockenbery, David

    2010-11-19

    Cell reprogramming from a quiescent to proliferative state requires coordinate activation of multiple -omic networks. These networks activate histones, increase cellular bioenergetics and the synthesis of macromolecules required for cell proliferation. However, mechanisms that coordinate the regulation of these interconnected networks are not fully understood. The oncogene c-Myc (Myc) activates cellular metabolism and global chromatin remodeling. Here we tested for an interconnection between Myc regulation of metabolism and acetylation of histones. Using [(13)C(6)]glucose and a combination of GC/MS and LC/ESI tandem mass spectrometry, we determined the fractional incorporation of (13)C-labeled 2-carbon fragments into the fatty acid palmitate, and acetyl-lysines at the N-terminal tail of histone H4 in myc(-/-) and myc(+/+) Rat1A fibroblasts. Our data demonstrate that Myc increases mitochondrial synthesis of acetyl-CoA, as the de novo synthesis of (13)C-labeled palmitate was increased 2-fold in Myc-expressing cells. Additionally, Myc induced a forty percent increase in (13)C-labeled acetyl-CoA on H4-K16. This is linked to the capacity of Myc to increase mitochondrial production of acetyl-CoA, as we show that mitochondria provide 50% of the acetyl groups on H4-K16. These data point to a key role for Myc in directing the interconnection of -omic networks, and in particular, epigenetic modification of proteins in response to proliferative signals. PMID:20813845

  16. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2015-01-01

    Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  17. The DAF-16 FOXO Transcription Factor Regulates natc-1 to Modulate Stress Resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans, Linking Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling to Protein N-Terminal Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Warnhoff, Kurt; Murphy, John T.; Kumar, Sandeep; Schneider, Daniel L.; Peterson, Michelle; Hsu, Simon; Guthrie, James; Robertson, J. David; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway plays a critical role in stress resistance and longevity, but the mechanisms are not fully characterized. To identify genes that mediate stress resistance, we screened for C. elegans mutants that can tolerate high levels of dietary zinc. We identified natc-1, which encodes an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the N-terminal acetyltransferase C (NAT) complex. N-terminal acetylation is a widespread modification of eukaryotic proteins; however, relatively little is known about the biological functions of NATs. We demonstrated that loss-of-function mutations in natc-1 cause resistance to a broad-spectrum of physiologic stressors, including multiple metals, heat, and oxidation. The C. elegans FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is a critical target of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway that mediates stress resistance, and DAF-16 is predicted to directly bind the natc-1 promoter. To characterize the regulation of natc-1 by DAF-16 and the function of natc-1 in insulin/IGF-1 signaling, we analyzed molecular and genetic interactions with key components of the insulin/IGF-1 pathway. natc-1 mRNA levels were repressed by DAF-16 activity, indicating natc-1 is a physiological target of DAF-16. Genetic studies suggested that natc-1 functions downstream of daf-16 to mediate stress resistance and dauer formation. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that natc-1 is directly regulated by the DAF-16 transcription factor, and natc-1 is a physiologically significant effector of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway that mediates stress resistance and dauer formation. These studies identify a novel biological function for natc-1 as a modulator of stress resistance and dauer formation and define a functionally significant downstream effector of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. Protein N-terminal acetylation mediated by the NatC complex may play an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating stress resistance. PMID:25330323

  18. Poly(ADP-Ribosyl)ation Affects Histone Acetylation and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Verdone, Loredana; La Fortezza, Marco; Ciccarone, Fabio; Caiafa, Paola; Zampieri, Michele; Caserta, Micaela

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is a posttranslational protein modification catalyzed by members of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme family. PARylation regulates a wide variety of biological processes in most eukaryotic cells including energy metabolism and cell death, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and transcription. Inside the nucleus, cross-talk between PARylation and other epigenetic modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, was already described. In the present work, using PJ34 or ABT888 to inhibit PARP activity or over-expressing poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), we show decrease of global histone H3 and H4 acetylation. This effect is accompanied by a reduction of the steady state mRNA level of p300, Pcaf, and Tnfα, but not of Dnmt1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses, performed at the level of the Transcription Start Site (TSS) of these four genes, reveal that changes in histone acetylation are specific for each promoter. Finally, we demonstrate an increase of global deacetylase activity in nuclear extracts from cells treated with PJ34, whereas global acetyltransferase activity is not affected, suggesting a role for PARP in the inhibition of histone deacetylases. Taken together, these results show an important link between PARylation and histone acetylation regulated transcription. PMID:26636673

  19. Synthesis and immunological properties of Vi and di-O-acetyl pectin protein conjugates with adipic acid dihydrazide as the linker.

    PubMed Central

    Kossaczka, Z; Bystricky, S; Bryla, D A; Shiloach, J; Robbins, J B; Szu, S C

    1997-01-01

    The Vi capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella typhi, a licensed vaccine for typhoid fever in individuals > or = 5 years old, induces low and short-lived antibodies in children, and reinjection does not elicit booster responses at any age. Its immunogenicity was improved by binding Vi to proteins by using N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP) as a linker. Similar findings were observed with the structurally related, di-O-acetyl derivative of pectin [poly-alpha(1-->4)-D-GalpA] designated OAcP. Protein conjugates of Vi and OAcP were synthesized by carbodiimide-mediated synthesis with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as the linker. Hydrazide groups were introduced into proteins (bovine serum albumin or recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotein A) by treatment with ADH and 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC). The resultant adipic acid hydrazide derivatives (AH-proteins), containing 2.3 to 3.4% AH, had antigenic and physicochemical properties similar to those of the native proteins. The AH-proteins were bound to Vi and OAcP by treatment with EDC. The immunogenicity of Vi or OAcP, alone or as protein conjugates, was evaluated in young outbred mice and guinea pigs by subcutaneous injection of 2.5 and 5.0 microg, respectively, of polysaccharide, and antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All conjugates were significantly more immunogenic than Vi or OAcP alone and induced booster responses with 5- to 25-fold increases of antibodies. Vi conjugates were significantly more immunogenic than their OAcP analogs. A carboxymethyl derivative of yeast beta-glucan enhanced the anti-Vi response elicited by an OAcP conjugate but had no effect on the immunogenicity of Vi or of OAcP alone. Vi and OAcP conjugates synthesized by this scheme will be evaluated clinically. PMID:9169736

  20. Identification of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-specific lectins from rat liver cytosolic and nuclear compartments as heat-shock proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, T; Cieniewski, C; Lemoine, J; Guerardel, Y; Leroy, Y; Zanetta, J P; Michalski, J C

    2001-01-01

    Cytosolic and nuclear O-linked N-acetylglucosaminylation has been proposed to be involved in the nuclear transport of cytosolic proteins. We have isolated nuclear and cytosolic N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc)-specific lectins from adult rat liver by affinity chromatography on immobilized GlcNAc and identified these lectins, by a proteomic approach, as belonging to the heat-shock protein (HSP)-70 family (one of them being heat-shock cognate 70 stress protein). Two-dimensional electrophoresis indicated that the HSP-70 fraction contained three equally abundant proteins with molecular masses of 70, 65 and 55 kDa. The p70 and p65 proteins are phosphorylated and are themselves O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc)-modified. The HSP-70 associated into high molecular mass complexes that dissociated in the presence of reductive and chaotropic agents. The lectin(s) present in this complex was (were) able to recognize cytosolic and nuclear ligands, which have been isolated using wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography. These ligands are O-GlcNAc glycosylated as demonstrated by [(3)H]galactose incorporation and analysis of the products released by reductive beta-elimination. The isolated lectins specifically recognized ligands present in both the cytosol and the nucleus of human resting lymphocytes. These results demonstrated the existence of endogenous GlcNAc-specific lectins, identified as HSP-70 proteins, which could act as a shuttle for the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of O-GlcNAc glycoproteins between the cytosol and the nucleus. PMID:11696006

  1. Impact of acetylation on tumor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Li, Fu-Long; Cheng, Zhou-Li; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of protein lysine residues is a reversible and dynamic process that is controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs and SIRTs). Recent studies have revealed that acetylation modulates not only nuclear proteins but also cytoplasmic or mitochondrial proteins, including many metabolic enzymes. In tumors, cellular metabolism is reprogrammed to provide intermediates for biosynthesis such as nucleotides, fatty acids, and amino acids, and thereby favor the rapid proliferation of cancer cells and tumor development. An increasing number of investigations have indicated that acetylation plays an important role in tumor metabolism. Here, we summarize the substrates that are modified by acetylation, especially oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and enzymes that are implicated in tumor metabolism. PMID:27308346

  2. Purification and characterization of a cytoplasmic enzyme component of the Na+-activated malonate decarboxylase system of Malonomonas rubra: acetyl-S-acyl carrier protein: malonate acyl carrier protein-SH transferase.

    PubMed

    Hilbi, H; Dimroth, P

    1994-01-01

    Malonate decarboxylation by crude extracts of Malonomonas rubra was specifically activated by Na+ and less efficiently by Li+ ions. The extracts contained an enzyme catalyzing CoA transfer from malonyl-CoA to acetate, yielding acetyl-CoA and malonate. After about a 26-fold purification of the malonyl-CoA:acetate CoA transferase, an almost pure enzyme was obtained, indicating that about 4% of the cellular protein consisted of the CoA transferase. This abundance of the transferase is in accord with its proposed role as an enzyme component of the malonate decarboxylase system, the key enzyme of energy metabolism in this organism. The apparent molecular weight of the polypeptide was 67,000 as revealed from SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A similar molecular weight was estimated for the native transferase by gel chromatography, indicating that the enzyme exists as a monomer. Kinetic analyses of the CoA transferase yielded the following: pH-optimum at pH 5.5, an apparent Km for malonyl-CoA of 1.9mM, for acetate of 54mM, for acetyl-CoA of 6.9mM, and for malonate of 0.5mM. Malonate or citrate inhibited the enzyme with an apparent Ki of 0.4mM and 3.0mM, respectively. The isolated CoA transferase increased the activity of malonate decarboxylase of a crude enzyme system, in which part of the endogenous CoA transferase was inactivated by borohydride, about three-fold. These results indicate that the CoA transferase functions physiologically as a component of the malonate decarboxylase system, in which it catalyzes the transfer of acyl carrier protein from acetyl acyl carrier protein and malonate to yield malonyl acyl carrier protein and acetate. Malonate is thus activated on the enzyme by exchange for the catalytically important enzymebound acetyl thioester residues noted previously. This type of substrate activation resembles the catalytic mechanism of citrate lyase and citramalate lyase. PMID:18251085

  3. Acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein is required for cooperation with the HTLV-1 p30{sup II} accessory protein and the induction of oncogenic cellular transformation by p30{sup II}/c-MYC

    SciTech Connect

    Romeo, Megan M.; Ko, Bookyung; Kim, Janice; Brady, Rebecca; Heatley, Hayley C.; He, Jeffrey; Harrod, Carolyn K.; Barnett, Braden; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.; Martinez, Ernest; Lüscher, Bernhard; Robson, Craig N.; Henriksson, Marie; Harrod, Robert

    2015-02-15

    The human T-cell leukemia retrovirus type-1 (HTLV-1) p30{sup II} protein is a multifunctional latency-maintenance factor that negatively regulates viral gene expression and deregulates host signaling pathways involved in aberrant T-cell growth and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that p30{sup II} interacts with the c-MYC oncoprotein and enhances c-MYC-dependent transcriptional and oncogenic functions. However, the molecular and biochemical events that mediate the cooperation between p30{sup II} and c-MYC remain to be completely understood. Herein we demonstrate that p30{sup II} induces lysine-acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein. Acetylation-defective c-MYC Lys→Arg substitution mutants are impaired for oncogenic transformation with p30{sup II} in c-myc{sup −/−} HO15.19 fibroblasts. Using dual-chromatin-immunoprecipitations (dual-ChIPs), we further demonstrate that p30{sup II} is present in c-MYC-containing nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed HuT-102 T-lymphocytes. Moreover, p30{sup II} inhibits apoptosis in proliferating cells expressing c-MYC under conditions of genotoxic stress. These findings suggest that c-MYC-acetylation is required for the cooperation between p30{sup II}/c-MYC which could promote proviral replication and contribute to HTLV-1-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Acetylation of c-MYC is required for oncogenic transformation by HTLV-1 p30{sup II}/c-MYC. • Acetylation-defective c-MYC mutants are impaired for foci-formation by p30{sup II}/c-MYC. • The HTLV-1 p30{sup II} protein induces lysine-acetylation of c-MYC. • p30{sup II} is present in c-MYC nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. • HTLV-1 p30{sup II} inhibits apoptosis in c-MYC-expressing proliferating cells.

  4. From local to global changes in proteins: a network view.

    PubMed

    Vuillon, Laurent; Lesieur, Claire

    2015-04-01

    To fulfill the biological activities in living organisms, proteins are endowed with dynamics, robustness and adaptability. The three properties co-exist because they allow global changes in structure to arise from local perturbations (dynamics). Robustness refers to the ability of the protein to incur such changes without suffering loss of function; adaptability is the emergence of a new biological activity. Since loss of function may jeopardize the survival of the organism and lead to disease, adaptability may occur through the combination of two local perturbations that together rescue the initial function. The review highlights the relevancy of computational network analysis to understand how a local change produces global changes. PMID:25791607

  5. Complex formation and catalytic activation by the PII signaling protein of N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase from Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942.

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, Mani; Urbanke, Claus; Forchhammer, Karl

    2004-12-31

    The signal transduction protein P(II) from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 forms a complex with the key enzyme of arginine biosynthesis, N-acetyl-l-glutamate kinase (NAGK). Here we report the effect of complex formation on the catalytic properties of NAGK. Although pH and ion dependence are not affected, the catalytic efficiency of NAGK is strongly enhanced by binding of P(II), with K(m) decreasing by a factor of 10 and V(max) increasing 4-fold. In addition, arginine feedback inhibition of NAGK is strongly decreased in the presence of P(II), resulting in a tight control of NAGK activity under physiological conditions by P(II). Analysis of the NAGK-P(II) complex suggests that one P(II) trimer binds to one NAGK hexamer with a K(d) of approximately 3 nm. Complex formation is strongly affected by ATP and ADP. ADP is a strong inhibitor of complex formation, whereas ATP inhibits complex formation only in the absence of divalent cations or in the presence of Mg(2+) ions, together with increased 2-oxoglutarate concentrations. Ca(2+) is able to antagonize the negative effect of ATP and 2-oxoglutarate. ADP and ATP exert their adverse effect on NAGK-P(II) complex formation through binding to the P(II) protein. PMID:15502156

  6. Histone Acetylation Regulates Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    McBrian, Matthew A.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ferrari, Roberto; Su, Trent; Huang, Ta-Wei; Li, Kunwu; Hong, Candice S.; Christofk, Heather R.; Vogelauer, Maria; Seligson, David B.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Differences in global levels of histone acetylation occur in normal and cancer cells, although the reason why cells regulate these levels has been unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for histone acetylation in regulating intracellular pH (pHi). As pHi decreases, histones are globally deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and the released acetate anions are coexported with protons out of the cell by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), preventing further reductions in pHi. Conversely, global histone acetylation increases as pHi rises, such as when resting cells are induced to proliferate. Inhibition of HDACs or MCTs decreases acetate export and lowers pHi, particularly compromising pHi maintenance in acidic environments. Global deacetylation at low pH is reflected at a genomic level by decreased abundance and extensive redistribution of acetylation throughout the genome. Thus, acetylation of chromatin functions as a rheostat to regulate pHi with important implications for mechanism of action and therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23201122

  7. Global organization of protein complexome in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Proteins in organisms, rather than act alone, usually form protein complexes to perform cellular functions. We analyze the topological network structure of protein complexes and their component proteins in the budding yeast in terms of the bipartite network and its projections, where the complexes and proteins are its two distinct components. Compared to conventional protein-protein interaction networks, the networks from the protein complexes show more homogeneous structures than those of the binary protein interactions, implying the formation of complexes that cause a relatively more uniform number of interaction partners. In addition, we suggest a new optimization method to determine the abundance and function of protein complexes, based on the information of their global organization. Estimating abundance and biological functions is of great importance for many researches, by providing a quantitative description of cell behaviors, instead of just a "catalogues" of the lists of protein interactions. Results With our new optimization method, we present genome-wide assignments of abundance and biological functions for complexes, as well as previously unknown abundance and functions of proteins, which can provide significant information for further investigations in proteomics. It is strongly supported by a number of biologically relevant examples, such as the relationship between the cytoskeleton proteins and signal transduction and the metabolic enzyme Eno2's involvement in the cell division process. Conclusions We believe that our methods and findings are applicable not only to the specific area of proteomics, but also to much broader areas of systems biology with the concept of optimization principle. PMID:21843333

  8. Transport of N-acetyl-S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine, a metabolite of trichloroethylene, by mouse multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (Mrp2)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Koag, Myong-Chul; Newman, Debra; Bondar, Galyna; Zhu Quansheng; Dekant, Wolfgang; Faull, Kym; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-04-15

    N-acetyl-S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (Ac-DCVC) and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) are the glutathione conjugation pathway metabolites of a common industrial contaminant and potent nephrotoxicant trichloroethylene (TCE). Ac-DCVC and DCVC are accumulated in the renal proximal tubule where they may be secreted into the urine by an unknown apical transporter(s). In this study, we explored the hypothesis that the apical transport of Ac-DCVC and/or DCVC may be mediated by the multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (Mrp2, ABCC2), which is known to mediate proximal tubular apical ATP-dependent transport of glutathione and numerous xenobiotics and endogenous substances conjugated with glutathione. Transport experiments using membrane vesicles prepared from mouse proximal tubule derived cells expressing mouse Mrp2 utilizing ATPase assay and direct measurements of Ac-DCVC/DCVC using liquid chromatography/tandem mass-spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) demonstrated that mouse Mrp2 mediates ATP-dependent transport of Ac-DCVC. Expression of mouse Mrp2 antisense mRNA significantly inhibited the vectorial basolateral to apical transport of Ac-DCVC but not DCVC in mouse proximal tubule derived cells endogenously expressing mouse Mrp2. The results suggest that Mrp2 may be involved in the renal secretion of Ac-DCVC.

  9. Expression and methylation of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and acetyl-CoA carboxylase are associated with fatty liver syndrome in chicken.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Qinghe; Liu, Ranran; Zhao, Guiping; Zhang, Yonghong; Zheng, Maiqing; Cui, Huanxian; Li, Peng; Cui, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jie; Wen, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The typical characteristic of fatty liver syndrome (FLS) is an increased hepatic triacylglycerol content, and a sudden decline in egg production often occurs. FLS may develop into fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome (FLHS), characterized by sudden death from hepatic rupture and hemorrhage. DNA methylation is associated with transcriptional silencing, leading to the etiology and pathogenesis of some animal diseases. The roles of DNA methylation in the genesis of FLS, however, are largely unknown. The lipogenic methyl-deficient diet (MDD) caused FLS similar to human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). After 16 Jingxing-Huang (JXH) hens were fed MDD for 10 wk, eight exhibited FLS (designated as FLS-susceptible birds); the remainder, without FLS, served as controls (NFLS). Physiological and biochemical variables, gene expression levels, and DNA methylation were determined in the liver. The development of FLS in JXH hens was accompanied by abnormal lipid accumulation. Relative expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) were significantly up-regulated in the FLS group in comparison with the NFLS group. The transcript abundance of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1c), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) did not differ between the two groups. Interestingly, MTTP and ACC mRNA abundance were negatively correlated with the level of promoter methylation. The extent of DNA methylation of the cytosine-guanine (CpG) sites in the SREBP-1c, FAS, PPARα, and LXRα promoter regions was also analyzed by direct sequencing but none differed between FLS and NFLS birds. Taken together, these results specify link DNA methylation to the pathogenesis of FLS in chickens. PMID:27083546

  10. Determination of Acetylation of the Gli Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Coni, Sonia; Di Magno, Laura; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The Gli transcription factors (Gli1, Gli2, and Gli3) are the final effectors of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling and play a key role in development and cancer. The activity of the Gli proteins is finely regulated by covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and acetylation. Both Gli1 and Gli2 are acetylated at a conserved lysine, and this modification causes the inhibition of their transcriptional activity. Thus, the acetylation status of these proteins represents a useful marker to monitor Hh activation in pathophysiological conditions. Herein we describe the techniques utilized to detect in vitro and intracellular acetylation of the Gli transcription factors. PMID:26179046

  11. Protein Surface Matching by Combining Local and Global Geometric Information

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Leif; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Comparison of the binding sites of proteins is an effective means for predicting protein functions based on their structure information. Despite the importance of this problem and much research in the past, it is still very challenging to predict the binding ligands from the atomic structures of protein binding sites. Here, we designed a new algorithm, TIPSA (Triangulation-based Iterative-closest-point for Protein Surface Alignment), based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. TIPSA aims to find the maximum number of atoms that can be superposed between two protein binding sites, where any pair of superposed atoms has a distance smaller than a given threshold. The search starts from similar tetrahedra between two binding sites obtained from 3D Delaunay triangulation and uses the Hungarian algorithm to find additional matched atoms. We found that, due to the plasticity of protein binding sites, matching the rigid body of point clouds of protein binding sites is not adequate for satisfactory binding ligand prediction. We further incorporated global geometric information, the radius of gyration of binding site atoms, and used nearest neighbor classification for binding site prediction. Tested on benchmark data, our method achieved a performance comparable to the best methods in the literature, while simultaneously providing the common atom set and atom correspondences. PMID:22815760

  12. Protein surface matching by combining local and global geometric information.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Leif; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Comparison of the binding sites of proteins is an effective means for predicting protein functions based on their structure information. Despite the importance of this problem and much research in the past, it is still very challenging to predict the binding ligands from the atomic structures of protein binding sites. Here, we designed a new algorithm, TIPSA (Triangulation-based Iterative-closest-point for Protein Surface Alignment), based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. TIPSA aims to find the maximum number of atoms that can be superposed between two protein binding sites, where any pair of superposed atoms has a distance smaller than a given threshold. The search starts from similar tetrahedra between two binding sites obtained from 3D Delaunay triangulation and uses the Hungarian algorithm to find additional matched atoms. We found that, due to the plasticity of protein binding sites, matching the rigid body of point clouds of protein binding sites is not adequate for satisfactory binding ligand prediction. We further incorporated global geometric information, the radius of gyration of binding site atoms, and used nearest neighbor classification for binding site prediction. Tested on benchmark data, our method achieved a performance comparable to the best methods in the literature, while simultaneously providing the common atom set and atom correspondences. PMID:22815760

  13. Structural analysis of a type 1 ribosome inactivating protein reveals multiple L-asparagine-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine monosaccharide modifications: Implications for cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    HOGG, TANIS; MENDEL, JAMESON T.; LAVEZO, JONATHAN L.

    2015-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) belongs to the family of type I ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs): Ribotoxins, which function by depurinating the sarcin-ricin loop of ribosomal RNA. In addition to its antibacterial and antifungal properties, PAP has shown promise in antiviral and targeted tumor therapy owing to its ability to depurinate viral RNA and eukaryotic rRNA. Several PAP genes are differentially expressed across pokeweed tissues, with natively isolated seed forms of PAP exhibiting the greatest cytotoxicity. To help elucidate the molecular basis of increased cytotoxicity of PAP isoenzymes from seeds, the present study used protein sequencing, mass spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography to determine the complete covalent structure and 1.7 Å X-ray crystal structure of PAP-S1aci isolated from seeds of Asian pokeweed (Phytolacca acinosa). PAP-S1aci shares ~95% sequence identity with PAP-S1 from P. americana and contains the signature catalytic residues of the RIP superfamily, corresponding to Tyr72, Tyr122, Glu175 and Arg178 in PAP-S1aci. A rare proline substitution (Pro174) was identified in the active site of PAP-S1aci, which has no effect on catalytic Glu175 positioning or overall active-site topology, yet appears to come at the expense of strained main-chain geometry at the pre-proline residue Val173. Notably, a rare type of N-glycosylation was detected consisting of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine monosaccharide residues linked to Asn10, Asn44 and Asn255 of PAP-S1aci. Of note, our modeling studies suggested that the ribosome depurination activity of seed PAPs would be adversely affected by the N-glycosylation of Asn44 and Asn255 with larger and more typical oligosaccharide chains, as they would shield the rRNA-binding sites on the protein. These results, coupled with evidence gathered from the literature, suggest that this type of minimal N-glycosylation in seed PAPs and other type I seed RIPs may serve to enhance cytotoxicity by exploiting receptor

  14. Global discovery of protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins, such as protein kinases, ATPases and GTP-binding proteins, are among the most important families of proteins that are involved in a number of pivotal cellular processes. However, global study of the structure, function, and expression level of nucleotide-binding proteins as well as protein-nucleotide interactions can hardly be achieved with the use of conventional approaches owing to enormous diversity of the nucleotide-binding protein family. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation, coupled with a variety of nucleotide-binding protein enrichment methods, rendered MS-based proteomics a powerful tool for the comprehensive characterizations of the nucleotide-binding proteome, especially the kinome. Here, we review the recent developments in the use of mass spectrometry, together with general and widely used affinity enrichment approaches, for the proteome-wide capture, identification and quantification of nucleotide-binding proteins, including protein kinases, ATPases, GTPases, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. The working principles, advantages, and limitations of each enrichment platform in identifying nucleotide-binding proteins as well as profiling protein-nucleotide interactions are summarized. The perspectives in developing novel MS-based nucleotide-binding protein detection platform are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:601-619, 2016. PMID:25376990

  15. Probing the acetylation code of histone H4.

    PubMed

    Lang, Diana; Schümann, Michael; Gelato, Kathy; Fischle, Wolfgang; Schwarzer, Dirk; Krause, Eberhard

    2013-10-01

    Histone modifications play crucial roles in genome regulation with lysine acetylation being implicated in transcriptional control. Here we report a proteome-wide investigation of the acetylation-dependent protein-protein interactions of the N-terminal tail of histone H4. Quantitative peptide-based affinity MS experiments using the SILAC approach determined the interactomes of H4 tails monoacetylated at the four known acetylation sites K5, K8, K12, and K16, bis-acetylated at K5/K12, triple-acetylated at K8/12/16 and fully tetra-acetylated. A set of 29 proteins was found enriched on the fully acetylated H4 tail while specific binders of the mono and bis-acetylated tails were barely detectable. These observations are in good agreement with earlier reports indicating that the H4 acetylation state establishes its regulatory effects in a cumulative manner rather than via site-specific recruitment of regulatory proteins. PMID:23970329

  16. Optimizing a global alignment of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Ma, Cheng-Yu; Liao, Chung-Shou; Berger, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The global alignment of protein interaction networks is a widely studied problem. It is an important first step in understanding the relationship between the proteins in different species and identifying functional orthologs. Furthermore, it can provide useful insights into the species’ evolution. Results: We propose a novel algorithm, PISwap, for optimizing global pairwise alignments of protein interaction networks, based on a local optimization heuristic that has previously demonstrated its effectiveness for a variety of other intractable problems. PISwap can begin with different types of network alignment approaches and then iteratively adjust the initial alignments by incorporating network topology information, trading it off for sequence information. In practice, our algorithm efficiently refines other well-studied alignment techniques with almost no additional time cost. We also show the robustness of the algorithm to noise in protein interaction data. In addition, the flexible nature of this algorithm makes it suitable for different applications of network alignment. This algorithm can yield interesting insights into the evolutionary dynamics of related species. Availability: Our software is freely available for non-commercial purposes from our Web site, http://piswap.csail.mit.edu/. Contact: bab@csail.mit.edu or csliao@ie.nthu.edu.tw Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24048352

  17. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Biau, Julian; Chautard, Emmanuel; Court, Frank; Pereira, Bruno; Verrelle, Pierre; Devun, Flavien; De Koning, Leanne; Dutreix, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery. PMID:27567954

  18. Global, quantitative and dynamic mapping of protein subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Itzhak, Daniel N; Tyanova, Stefka; Cox, Jürgen; Borner, Georg HH

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular localization critically influences protein function, and cells control protein localization to regulate biological processes. We have developed and applied Dynamic Organellar Maps, a proteomic method that allows global mapping of protein translocation events. We initially used maps statically to generate a database with localization and absolute copy number information for over 8700 proteins from HeLa cells, approaching comprehensive coverage. All major organelles were resolved, with exceptional prediction accuracy (estimated at >92%). Combining spatial and abundance information yielded an unprecedented quantitative view of HeLa cell anatomy and organellar composition, at the protein level. We subsequently demonstrated the dynamic capabilities of the approach by capturing translocation events following EGF stimulation, which we integrated into a quantitative model. Dynamic Organellar Maps enable the proteome-wide analysis of physiological protein movements, without requiring any reagents specific to the investigated process, and will thus be widely applicable in cell biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16950.001 PMID:27278775

  19. Interaction and localization diversities of global and local hubs in human protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Kiran, M; Nagarajaram, H A

    2016-08-16

    Hubs, the highly connected nodes in protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs), are associated with several characteristic properties and are known to perform vital roles in cells. We defined two classes of hubs, global (housekeeping) and local (tissue-specific) hubs. These two categories of hubs are distinct from each other with respect to their abundance, structure and function. However, how distinct are the spatial expression pattern and other characteristics of their interacting partners is still not known. Our investigations revealed that the partners of the local hubs compared with those of global hubs are conserved across the tissues in which they are expressed. Partners of local hubs show diverse subcellular localizations as compared with the partners of global hubs. We examined the nature of interacting domains in both categories of hubs and found that they are promiscuous in global hubs but not so in local hubs. Deletion of some of the local and global hubs has an impact on the characteristic path length of the network indicating that those hubs are inter-modular in nature. Our present study has, therefore, shed further light on the characteristic features of the local and global hubs in human PPIN. This knowledge of different topological aspects of hubs with regard to their types and subtypes is essential as it helps in better understanding of roles of hub proteins in various cellular processes under various conditions including those caused by host-pathogen interactions and therefore useful in prioritizing targets for drug design and repositioning. PMID:27400769

  20. Mechanism of action of clostridial glycine reductase: Isolation and characterization of a covalent acetyl enzyme intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Arkowitz, R.A.; Abeles, R.H. )

    1991-04-23

    Clostridial glycine reductase consists of proteins A, B, and C and catalyzes the reaction glycine + P{sub i} + 2e{sup {minus}} {yields} acetyl phosphate + NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Evidence was previously obtained that is consistent with the involvement of an acyl enzyme intermediate in this reaction. The authors now demonstrate that protein C catalyzes exchange of ({sup 32}P)P{sub i} into acetyl phosphate, providing additional support for an acetyl enzyme intermediate on protein C. Furthermore, they have isolated acetyl protein C and shown that it is qualitatively, catalytically competent. Acetyl protein C can be obtained through the forward reaction from protein C and Se-(carboxymethyl)selenocysteine-protein A, which is generated by the reaction of glycine with proteins A and B. Acetyl protein C can also be generated through the reverse reaction by the addition of acetyl phosphate to protein C. Both procedures lead to the same acetyl enzyme. The acetyl enzyme reacts with P{sub i} to give acetyl phosphate. When ({sup 14}C)acetyl protein C is denaturated with TCA and redissolved with urea, radioactivity remained associated with the protein. Treatment with KBH{sub 4} removes all the radioactivity associated with protein C, resulting in the formation of ({sup 14}C)ethanol. They conclude that a thiol group on protein C is acetylated. Proteins A and C together catalyze the exchange of tritium atoms from ({sup 3}H)H{sub 2}O into acetyl phosphate. This exchange reaction supports the proposal that an enol of the acetyl enzyme is an intermediate in the reaction sequence.

  1. Proteomics technologies for the global identification and quantification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Brewis, Ian A; Brennan, P

    2010-01-01

    This review provides an introduction for the nonspecialist to proteomics and in particular the major approaches available for global protein identification and quantification. Proteomics technologies offer considerable opportunities for improved biological understanding and biomarker discovery. The central platform for proteomics is tandem mass spectrometry (MS) but a number of other technologies, resources, and expertise are absolutely required to perform meaningful experiments. These include protein separation science (and protein biochemistry in general), genomics, and bioinformatics. There are a range of workflows available for protein (or peptide) separation prior to tandem MS and subsequent bioinformatics analysis to achieve protein identifications. The predominant approaches are 2D electrophoresis (2DE) and subsequent MS, liquid chromatography-MS (LC-MS), and GeLC-MS. Beyond protein identification, there are a number of well-established options available for protein quantification. Difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) following 2DE is one option but MS-based methods (most commonly iTRAQ-Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification or SILAC-Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids) are now the preferred options. Sample preparation is critical to performing good experiments and subcellular fractionation can additionally provide protein localization information compared with whole cell lysates. Differential detergent solubilization is another valid option. With biological fluids, it is possible to remove the most abundant proteins by immunodepletion. Sample enrichment is also used extensively in certain analyses and most commonly in phosphoproteomics with the initial purification of phosphopeptides. Proteomics produces considerable datasets and resources to facilitate the necessary extended analysis of this data are improving all the time. Beyond the opportunities afforded by proteomics there are definite challenges to achieving full proteomic coverage

  2. Influence of Crystal Packing on Global Protein Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlstrom, Logan; Miyashita, Osamu

    2011-10-01

    X-ray crystallography is the most robust method for solving protein structure. However, packing forces in the crystal lattice select just a snapshot of a protein's conformational ensemble, whereas proteins are flexible and can adopt different conformations. Here we compare molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in solution and the crystal lattice to add dynamical insight to the static X-ray images of proteins. As a model system, we consider the λ Cro dimer, whose solved X-ray structures range from a ``closed'' to an ``open'' global conformation. Free energy profiles depicting the conformational space sampled by the dimer in solution show some reported structures correspond to stable states. Yet other conformations, while accessible, lie higher in energy, indicating the effect of crystal packing. Subsequent crystal MD simulations estimated the strength of packing interfaces in the lattice, showing the influence of crystal form and mutation in stabilizing different dimer conformations. Our quantitative results will aid analysis of X-ray data in establishing protein structure-function relationships.

  3. Acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein is required for cooperation with the HTLV-1 p30II accessory protein and the induction of oncogenic cellular transformation by p30II/c-MYC

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Megan M.; Ko, Bookyung; Kim, Janice; Brady, Rebecca; Heatley, Hayley C.; He, Jeffrey; Harrod, Carolyn K.; Barnett, Braden; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.; Martinez, Ernest; Lüscher, Bernhard; Robson, Craig N.; Henriksson, Marie; Harrod, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia retrovirus type-1 (HTLV-1) p30II protein is a multifunctional latency-maintenance factor that negatively regulates viral gene expression and deregulates host signaling pathways involved in aberrant T-cell growth and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that p30II interacts with the c-MYC oncoprotein and enhances c-MYC-dependent transcriptional and oncogenic functions. However, the molecular and biochemical events that mediate the cooperation between p30II and c-MYC remain to be completely understood. Herein we demonstrate that p30II induces lysine-acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein. Acetylation-defective c-MYC Lys→Arg substitution mutants are impaired for oncogenic transformation with p30II in c-myc−/− HO15.19 fibroblasts. Using dual-chromatin-immunoprecipitations (dual-ChIPs), we further demonstrate that p30II is present in c-MYC-containing nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed HuT-102 T-lymphocytes. Moreover, p30II inhibits apoptosis in proliferating cells expressing c-MYC under conditions of genotoxic stress. These findings suggest that c-MYC-acetylation is required for the cooperation between p30II/c-MYC which could promote proviral replication and contribute to HTLV-1-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25569455

  4. The bacterial signal transduction protein GlnB regulates the committed step in fatty acid biosynthesis by acting as a dissociable regulatory subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Edileusa C M; Rodrigues, Thiago E; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Pedrosa, Fabio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Forchhammer, Karl; Huergo, Luciano F

    2015-03-01

    Biosynthesis of fatty acids is one of the most fundamental biochemical pathways in nature. In bacteria and plant chloroplasts, the committed and rate-limiting step in fatty acid biosynthesis is catalyzed by a multi-subunit form of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase enzyme (ACC). This enzyme carboxylates acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA, which in turn acts as the building block for fatty acid elongation. In Escherichia coli, ACC is comprised of three functional modules: the biotin carboxylase (BC), the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) and the carboxyl transferase (CT). Previous data showed that both bacterial and plant BCCP interact with signal transduction proteins belonging to the PII family. Here we show that the GlnB paralogues of the PII proteins from E. coli and Azospirillum brasiliense, but not the GlnK paralogues, can specifically form a ternary complex with the BC-BCCP components of ACC. This interaction results in ACC inhibition by decreasing the enzyme turnover number. Both the BC-BCCP-GlnB interaction and ACC inhibition were relieved by 2-oxoglutarate and by GlnB uridylylation. We propose that the GlnB protein acts as a 2-oxoglutarate-sensitive dissociable regulatory subunit of ACC in Bacteria. PMID:25557370

  5. Roles of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein in transporting para-aminosalicylic acid and its N-acetylated metabolite in mice brain

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lan; Xu, Cong; O'Neal, Stefanie; Bi, Hui-chang; Huang, Min; Zheng, Wei; Zeng, Su

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) is effective in the treatment of manganism-induced neurotoxicity (manganism). In this study we investigated the roles of P-glycoprotein (MDR1a) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in transporting PAS and its N-acetylated metabolite AcPAS through blood-brain barrier. Methods: MDR1a-null or wild-type mice were intravenously injected with PAS (200 mg/kg). Thirty minutes after the injection, blood samples and brains were collected, and the concentrations of PAS and AcPAS in brain capillaries and parenchyma were measured using HPLC. Both MDCK-MDR1 and MDCK-MRP1 cells that overexpressed P-gp and MRP1, respectively, were used in two-chamber Transwell transport studies in vitro. Results: After injection of PAS, the brain concentration of PAS was substantially higher in MDR1a-null mice than in wild-type mice, but the brain concentration of AcPAS had no significant difference between MDR1a-null mice and wild-type mice. Concomitant injection of PAS with the MRP-specific inhibitor MK-571 (50 mg/kg) further increased the brain concentration of PAS in MDR1a-null mice, and increased the brain concentration of AcPAS in both MDR1a-null mice and wild-type mice. Two-chamber Transwell studies with MDCK-MDR1 cells demonstrated that PAS was not only a substrate but also a competitive inhibitor of P-gp, while AcPAS was not a substrate of P-gp. Two-chamber Transwell studies with the MDCK-MRP1 cells showed that MRP1 had the ability to transport both PAS and AcPAS across the BBB. Conclusion: P-gp plays a major role in the efflux of PAS from brain parenchyma into blood in mice, while MRP1 is involved in both PAS and AcPAS transport in the brain. PMID:25418377

  6. N-acetylaspartate catabolism determines cytosolic acetyl-CoA levels and histone acetylation in brown adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Prokesch, A.; Pelzmann, H. J.; Pessentheiner, A. R.; Huber, K.; Madreiter-Sokolowski, C. T.; Drougard, A.; Schittmayer, M.; Kolb, D.; Magnes, C.; Trausinger, G.; Graier, W. F.; Birner-Gruenberger, R.; Pospisilik, J. A.; Bogner-Strauss, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation depends on the abundance of nucleo-cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA. Here, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. N-acetylaspartate (NAA) is a highly abundant brain metabolite catabolized by aspartoacylase yielding aspartate and acetate. The latter can be further used for acetyl-CoA production. Prior to this work, the presence of NAA has not been described in adipocytes. Here, we show that accumulation of NAA decreases the brown adipocyte phenotype. We increased intracellular NAA concentrations in brown adipocytes via media supplementation or knock-down of aspartoacylase and measured reduced lipolysis, thermogenic gene expression, and oxygen consumption. Combinations of approaches to increase intracellular NAA levels showed additive effects on lipolysis and gene repression, nearly abolishing the expression of Ucp1, Cidea, Prdm16, and Ppara. Transcriptome analyses of aspartoacylase knock-down cells indicate deficiencies in acetyl-CoA and lipid metabolism. Concordantly, cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA levels and global histone H3 acetylation were decreased. Further, activating histone marks (H3K27ac and H3K9ac) in promoters/enhancers of brown marker genes showed reduced acetylation status. Taken together, we present a novel route for cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA production in brown adipocytes. Thereby, we mechanistically connect the NAA pathway to the epigenomic regulation of gene expression, modulating the phenotype of brown adipocytes. PMID:27045997

  7. Generation of acetyllysine antibodies and affinity enrichment of acetylated peptides

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Kun-Liang; Yu, Wei; Lin, Yan; Xiong, Yue; Zhao, Shimin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation has emerged as one of the major post-translational modifications, as indicated by its roles in chromatin remodeling, activation of transcription factors and, most recently, regulation of metabolic enzymes. Identification of acetylation sites in a protein is the first essential step for functional characterization of acetylation in physiological regulation. However, the study of the acetylome is hindered by the lack of suitable physical and biochemical properties of the acetyl group and existence of high-abundance acetylated histones in the cell, and needs a robust method to overcome these problems. Here we present protocols for (i) using chemically acetylated ovalbumin and synthetic acetylated peptide to generate a pan-acetyllysine antibody and a site-specific antibody to Lys288-acetylated argininosuccinate lyase, respectively; (ii) using subcellular fractionation to reduce highly abundant acetylated histones; and (iii) using acetyllysine antibody affinity purification and mass spectrometry to characterize acetylome of human liver tissue. The entire characterization procedure takes ~2–3 d to complete. PMID:21085124

  8. Mitochondrial SIRT4-type proteins in C. elegans and mammals interact with pyruvate carboxylase and other acetylated biotin-dependent carboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Martina; Karaca, Samir; Wenzel, Dirk; Ho, Linh; Tishkoff, Daniel; Lombard, David B.; Verdin, Eric; Urlaub, Henning; Jedrusik-Bode, Monika; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The biological and enzymatic function of SIRT4 is largely uncharacterized. We show that the C. elegans SIR-2.2 and SIR-2.3 orthologs of SIRT4 are ubiquitously expressed, also localize to mitochondria and function during oxidative stress. Further, we identified conserved interaction with mitochondrial biotin-dependent carboxylases (PC, PCC, MCCC), key enzymes in anaplerosis and ketone body formation. The carboxylases were found acetylated on multiple lysine residues and detailed analysis of mPC suggested that one of these residues, K748ac, might regulate enzymatic activity. Nevertheless, no changes in mPC acetylation levels and enzymatic activity could be detected upon overexpression or loss of functional SIRT4. PMID:23438705

  9. An Alternative Strategy for Pan-acetyl-lysine Antibody Generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Yee; Sim, Choon Kiat; Zhang, Qiongyi; Tang, Hui; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Pan, Hong; Karnani, Neerja; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Kangling; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification in cell signaling. In acetylome studies, a high-quality pan-acetyl-lysine antibody is key to successful enrichment of acetylated peptides for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we show an alternative method to generate polyclonal pan-acetyl-lysine antibodies using a synthesized random library of acetylated peptides as the antigen. Our antibodies are tested to be specific for acetyl-lysine peptides/proteins via ELISA and dot blot. When pooled, five of our antibodies show broad reactivity to acetyl-lysine peptides, complementing a commercial antibody in terms of peptide coverage. The consensus sequence of peptides bound by our antibody cocktail differs slightly from that of the commercial antibody. Lastly, our antibodies are tested in a proof-of-concept to analyze the acetylome of HEK293 cells. In total we identified 1557 acetylated peptides from 416 proteins. We thus demonstrated that our antibodies are well-qualified for acetylome studies and can complement existing commercial antibodies. PMID:27606599

  10. Data detailing the platelet acetyl-lysine proteome

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Joseph E.; David, Larry L.; McCarty, Owen J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Here we detail proteomics data that describe the acetyl-lysine proteome of blood platelets (Aslan et al., 2015 [1]). An affinity purification – mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach was used to identify proteins modified by Nε-lysine acetylation in quiescent, washed human platelets. The data provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms of platelet function mediated by protein lysine acetylation. Additionally, as platelets are anucleate and lack histone proteins, they offer a unique and valuable system to study the regulation of cytosolic proteins by lysine acetylation. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [2]) via with PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002332. PMID:26904711

  11. Data detailing the platelet acetyl-lysine proteome.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Joseph E; David, Larry L; McCarty, Owen J T

    2015-12-01

    Here we detail proteomics data that describe the acetyl-lysine proteome of blood platelets (Aslan et al., 2015 [1]). An affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) approach was used to identify proteins modified by Nε-lysine acetylation in quiescent, washed human platelets. The data provide insights into potential regulatory mechanisms of platelet function mediated by protein lysine acetylation. Additionally, as platelets are anucleate and lack histone proteins, they offer a unique and valuable system to study the regulation of cytosolic proteins by lysine acetylation. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [2]) via with PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002332. PMID:26904711

  12. Insulin accelerates global and mitochondrial protein synthesis rates in neonatal muscle during sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In neonatal pigs, sepsis decreases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle by decreasing translation initiation. However, insulin stimulates muscle protein synthesis despite persistent repression of translation initiation signaling. To determine whether the insulin-induced increase in global rates of m...

  13. Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Affects Global Protein Synthesis in Dividing Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J.; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement—a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis. PMID:25283437

  14. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) affects global protein synthesis in dividing human cells.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Liang, Shuang; Rambo, Brittany; Skucha, Sylvia; Weber, Megan J; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Hypoxic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is dependent on Notch-1 signaling for survival. Targeting Notch-1 by means of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSI) proved effective in killing hypoxic NSCLC. Post-mortem analysis of GSI-treated, NSCLC-burdened mice suggested enhanced phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at threonines 37/46 in hypoxic tumor tissues. In vitro dissection of this phenomenon revealed that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) inhibition was responsible for a non-canonical 4E-BP1 phosphorylation pattern rearrangement-a process, in part, mediated by APP regulation of the pseudophosphatase Styx. Upon APP depletion we observed modifications of eIF-4F composition indicating increased recruitment of eIF-4A to the mRNA cap. This phenomenon was supported by the observation that cells with depleted APP were partially resistant to silvestrol, an antibiotic that interferes with eIF-4A assembly into eIF-4F complexes. APP downregulation in dividing human cells increased the rate of global protein synthesis, both cap- and IRES-dependent. Such an increase seemed independent of mTOR inhibition. After administration of Torin-1, APP downregulation and Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC-1) inhibition affected 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and global protein synthesis in opposite fashions. Additional investigations indicated that APP operates independently of mTORC-1. Key phenomena described in this study were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain. The presented data suggest that APP may be a novel regulator of protein synthesis in dividing human cells, both cancerous and primary. Furthermore, APP appears to affect translation initiation using mechanisms seemingly dissimilar to mTORC-1 regulation of cap-dependent protein synthesis. PMID:25283437

  15. First Comprehensive Proteome Analyses of Lysine Acetylation and Succinylation in Seedling Leaves of Brachypodium distachyon L.

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Shoumin; Deng, Xiong; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Gengrui; Cao, Hui; Yuan, Linlin; Yan, Yueming

    2016-01-01

    Protein acetylation and succinylation are the most crucial protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) involved in the regulation of plant growth and development. In this study, we present the first lysine-acetylation and lysine-succinylation proteome analysis of seedling leaves in Brachypodium distachyon L (Bd). Using high accuracy nano LC-MS/MS combined with affinity purification, we identified a total of 636 lysine-acetylated sites in 353 proteins and 605 lysine-succinylated sites in 262 proteins. These proteins participated in many biology processes, with various molecular functions. In particular, 119 proteins and 115 sites were found to be both acetylated and succinylated, simultaneously. Among the 353 acetylated proteins, 148 had acetylation orthologs in Oryza sativa L., Arabidopsis thaliana, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and Glycine max L. Among the 262 succinylated proteins, 170 of them were found to have homologous proteins in Oryza sativa L., Escherichia coli, Sacchayromyces cerevisiae, or Homo sapiens. Motif-X analysis of the acetylated and succinylated sites identified two new acetylated motifs (K---K and K-I-K) and twelve significantly enriched succinylated motifs for the first time, which could serve as possible binding loci for future studies in plants. Our comprehensive dataset provides a promising starting point for further functional analysis of acetylation and succinylation in Bd and other plant species. PMID:27515067

  16. Acetylated Rhamnogalacturonans from Immature Fruits of Abelmoschus esculentus Inhibit the Adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to Human Gastric Cells by Interaction with Outer Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Thöle, Christian; Brandt, Simone; Ahmed, Niyaz; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Polysaccharide containing extracts from immature fruits of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) are known to exhibit antiadhesive effects against bacterial adhesion of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to stomach tissue. The present study investigates structural and functional features of polymers responsible for this inhibition of bacterial attachment to host cells. Ammonium sulfate precipitation of an aqueous extract yielded two fractions at 60% and 90% saturation with significant antiadhesive effects against H. pylori, strain J99, (FE60% 68% ± 15%; FE90% 75% ± 11% inhibition rates) after preincubation of the bacteria at 1 mg/mL. Sequential extraction of okra fruits yielded hot buffer soluble solids (HBSS) with dose dependent antiadhesive effects against strain J99 and three clinical isolates. Preincubation of H. pylori with HBSS (1 mg/mL) led to reduced binding to 3'-sialyl lactose, sialylated Le(a) and Le(x). A reduction of bacterial binding to ligands complementary to BabA and SabA was observed when bacteria were pretreated with FE90%. Structural analysis of the antiadhesive polysaccharides (molecular weight, monomer composition, linkage analysis, stereochemistry, and acetylation) indicated the presence of acetylated rhamnogalacturonan-I polymers, decorated with short galactose side chains. Deacetylation of HBSS and FE90% resulted in loss of the antiadhesive activity, indicating esterification being a prerequisite for antiadhesive activity. PMID:26389872

  17. N-Myc-interacting protein (NMI) negatively regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition by inhibiting the acetylation of NF-κB/p65.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingjing; Wang, Tao; Xie, Qingqing; Deng, Weixian; Yang, James Y; Zhang, Si Qing; Cai, Jian-Chun

    2016-06-28

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an essential role in embryonic development, wound healing, tissue regeneration, organ fibrosis, and tumor progression. However, the mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. Many signaling pathways, including the NF-κB signaling pathway, trigger EMT during development and differentiation. In the present study, we report that N-Myc interactor (NMI) inhibits EMT progression by suppressing transcriptional activities of NF-κB in human gastric cancer cells. We show that the expression of NMI is significantly reduced in invasive gastric cancer cells and gastric cancer tissues. Overexpression of NMI inhibited cell migration and invasion, and this inhibition was enhanced after TNF-α stimulation. Tumorigenicity assay in nude mice support the notion that NMI inhibits EMT in cancer cells. Mechanistically, NMI promotes the interaction between NF-κB/p65 and histone deacetylases (HDACs) and inhibits the acetylation and transcriptional activity of p65. The expression of p65 rescues NMI-mediated inhibition of EMT and the inhibition of the acetylation of p65 mediated by NMI is HDACs-dependent. Taken together, these findings suggest that NMI can suppress tumor invasion and metastasis by inhibiting NF-κB pathways, providing an alternative mechanism for EMT inhibition in stomach neoplasm. PMID:27012186

  18. Identification of the Acetylation and Ubiquitin-Modified Proteome during the Progression of Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Daniel J.; Judge, Sarah M.; Beharry, Adam W.; Farnsworth, Charles L.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Judge, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a consequence of several physiological and pathophysiological conditions including muscle disuse, aging and diseases such as cancer and heart failure. In each of these conditions, the predominant mechanism contributing to the loss of skeletal muscle mass is increased protein turnover. Two important mechanisms which regulate protein stability and degradation are lysine acetylation and ubiquitination, respectively. However our understanding of the skeletal muscle proteins regulated through acetylation and ubiquitination during muscle atrophy is limited. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to conduct an unbiased assessment of the acetylation and ubiquitin-modified proteome in skeletal muscle during a physiological condition of muscle atrophy. To induce progressive, physiologically relevant, muscle atrophy, rats were cast immobilized for 0, 2, 4 or 6 days and muscles harvested. Acetylated and ubiquitinated peptides were identified via a peptide IP proteomic approach using an anti-acetyl lysine antibody or a ubiquitin remnant motif antibody followed by mass spectrometry. In control skeletal muscle we identified and mapped the acetylation of 1,326 lysine residues to 425 different proteins and the ubiquitination of 4,948 lysine residues to 1,131 different proteins. Of these proteins 43, 47 and 50 proteins were differentially acetylated and 183, 227 and 172 were differentially ubiquitinated following 2, 4 and 6 days of disuse, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis identified contractile proteins as being enriched among proteins decreased in acetylation and increased in ubiquitination, whereas histone proteins were enriched among proteins increased in acetylation and decreased in ubiquitination. These findings provide the first proteome-wide identification of skeletal muscle proteins exhibiting changes in lysine acetylation and ubiquitination during any atrophy condition, and provide a basis for future mechanistic studies into how the

  19. Altered acetylation and succinylation profiles in Corynebacterium glutamicum in response to conditions inducing glutamate overproduction.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuta; Nagano-Shoji, Megumi; Kubo, Shosei; Kawamura, Yumi; Yoshida, Ayako; Kawasaki, Hisashi; Nishiyama, Makoto; Yoshida, Minoru; Kosono, Saori

    2016-02-01

    The bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum is utilized during industrial fermentation to produce amino acids such as L-glutamate. During L-glutamate fermentation, C. glutamicum changes the flux of central carbon metabolism to favor L-glutamate production, but the molecular mechanisms that explain these flux changes remain largely unknown. Here, we found that the profiles of two major lysine acyl modifications were significantly altered upon glutamate overproduction in C. glutamicum; acetylation decreased, whereas succinylation increased. A label-free semi-quantitative proteomic analysis identified 604 acetylated proteins with 1328 unique acetylation sites and 288 succinylated proteins with 651 unique succinylation sites. Acetylation and succinylation targeted enzymes in central carbon metabolic pathways that are directly related to glutamate production, including the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC), a key enzyme regulating glutamate overproduction. Structural mapping revealed that several critical lysine residues in the ODHC components were susceptible to acetylation and succinylation. Furthermore, induction of glutamate production was associated with changes in the extent of acetylation and succinylation of lysine, suggesting that these modifications may affect the activity of enzymes involved in glutamate production. Deletion of phosphotransacetylase decreased the extent of protein acetylation in nonproducing condition, suggesting that acetyl phosphate-dependent acetylation is active in C. glutamicum. However, no effect was observed on the profiles of acetylation and succinylation in glutamate-producing condition upon disruption of acetyl phosphate metabolism or deacetylase homologs. It was considered likely that the reduced acetylation in glutamate-producing condition may reflect metabolic states where the flux through acid-producing pathways is very low, and substrates for acetylation do not accumulate in the cell. Succinylation would occur more

  20. Extensive lysine acetylation occurs in evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways and parasite-specific functions during Plasmodium falciparum intraerythrocytic development

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jun; Lawrence, Matthew; Jeffers, Victoria; Zhao, Fangqing; Parker, Daniel; Ge, Ying; Sullivan, William J.; Cui, Liwang

    2013-01-01

    Summary Lysine acetylation has emerged as a major posttranslational modification involved in diverse cellular functions. Using a combination of immunoisolation and liquid chromatography coupled to accurate mass spectrometry, we determined the first acetylome of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum during its active proliferation in erythrocytes with 421 acetylation sites identified in 230 proteins. Lysine-acetylated proteins are distributed in the nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondrion, and apicoplast. Whereas occurrence of lysine acetylation in a similarly wide range of cellular functions suggests conservation of lysine acetylation through evolution, the Plasmodium acetylome also revealed significant divergence from those of other eukaryotes and even the closely-related parasite Toxoplasma. This divergence is reflected in the acetylation of a large number of Plasmodium-specific proteins and different acetylation sites in evolutionarily conserved acetylated proteins. A prominent example is the abundant acetylation of proteins in the glycolysis pathway but relatively deficient acetylation of enzymes in the citrate cycle. Using specific transgenic lines and inhibitors, we determined that the acetyltransferase PfMYST and lysine deacetylases play important roles in regulating the dynamics of cytoplasmic protein acetylation. The Plasmodium acetylome provides an exciting start point for further exploration of functions of acetylation in the biology of malaria parasites. PMID:23796209

  1. Application of reverse-phase HPLC to quantify oligopeptide acetylation eliminates interference from unspecific acetyl CoA hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Evjenth, Rune; Hole, Kristine; Ziegler, Mathias; Lillehaug, Johan R

    2009-01-01

    Protein acetylation is a common modification that plays a central role in several cellular processes. The most widely used methods to study these modifications are either based on the detection of radioactively acetylated oligopetide products or an enzyme-coupled reaction measuring conversion of the acetyl donor acetyl CoA to the product CoASH. Due to several disadvantages of these methods, we designed a new method to study oligopeptide acetylation. Based on reverse phase HPLC we detect both reaction products in a highly robust and reproducible way. The method reported here is also fully compatible with subsequent product analysis, e.g. by mass spectroscopy. The catalytic subunit, hNaa30p, of the human NatC protein N-acetyltransferase complex was used for N-terminal oligopeptide acetylation. We show that unacetylated and acetylated oligopeptides can be efficiently separated and quantified by the HPLC-based analysis. The method is highly reproducible and enables reliable quantification of both substrates and products. It is therefore well-suited to determine kinetic parameters of acetyltransferases. PMID:19660098

  2. Role of Histone Acetylation in Cell Cycle Regulation.

    PubMed

    Koprinarova, Miglena; Schnekenburger, Michael; Diederich, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Core histone acetylation is a key prerequisite for chromatin decondensation and plays a pivotal role in regulation of chromatin structure, function and dynamics. The addition of acetyl groups disturbs histone/DNA interactions in the nucleosome and alters histone/histone interactions in the same or adjacent nucleosomes. Acetyl groups can also provide binding sites for recruitment of bromodomain (BRD)-containing non-histone readers and regulatory complexes to chromatin allowing them to perform distinct downstream functions. The presence of a particular acetylation pattern influences appearance of other histone modifications in the immediate vicinity forming the "histone code". Although the roles of the acetylation of particular lysine residues for the ongoing chromatin functions is largely studied, the epigenetic inheritance of histone acetylation is a debated issue. The dynamics of local or global histone acetylation is associated with fundamental cellular processes such as gene transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair or chromatin condensation. Therefore, it is an essential part of the epigenetic cell response to processes related to internal and external signals. PMID:26303420

  3. Global Analysis of Protein Activities Using Proteome Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Heng; Bilgin, Metin; Bangham, Rhonda; Hall, David; Casamayor, Antonio; Bertone, Paul; Lan, Ning; Jansen, Ronald; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Houfek, Thomas; Mitchell, Tom; Miller, Perry; Dean, Ralph A.; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2001-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the yeast proteome, we cloned 5800 open reading frames and overexpressed and purified their corresponding proteins. The proteins were printed onto slides at high spatial density to form a yeast proteome microarray and screened for their ability to interact with proteins and phospholipids. We identified many new calmodulin- and phospholipid-interacting proteins; a common potential binding motif was identified for many of the calmodulin-binding proteins. Thus, microarrays of an entire eukaryotic proteome can be prepared and screened for diverse biochemical activities. The microarrays can also be used to screen protein-drug interactions and to detect posttranslational modifications.

  4. Global landscape of protein complexes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krogan, Nevan J; Cagney, Gerard; Yu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Gouqing; Guo, Xinghua; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Li, Joyce; Pu, Shuye; Datta, Nira; Tikuisis, Aaron P; Punna, Thanuja; Peregrín-Alvarez, José M; Shales, Michael; Zhang, Xin; Davey, Michael; Robinson, Mark D; Paccanaro, Alberto; Bray, James E; Sheung, Anthony; Beattie, Bryan; Richards, Dawn P; Canadien, Veronica; Lalev, Atanas; Mena, Frank; Wong, Peter; Starostine, Andrei; Canete, Myra M; Vlasblom, James; Wu, Samuel; Orsi, Chris; Collins, Sean R; Chandran, Shamanta; Haw, Robin; Rilstone, Jennifer J; Gandi, Kiran; Thompson, Natalie J; Musso, Gabe; St Onge, Peter; Ghanny, Shaun; Lam, Mandy H Y; Butland, Gareth; Altaf-Ul, Amin M; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Shilatifard, Ali; O'Shea, Erin; Weissman, Jonathan S; Ingles, C James; Hughes, Timothy R; Parkinson, John; Gerstein, Mark; Wodak, Shoshana J; Emili, Andrew; Greenblatt, Jack F

    2006-03-30

    Identification of protein-protein interactions often provides insight into protein function, and many cellular processes are performed by stable protein complexes. We used tandem affinity purification to process 4,562 different tagged proteins of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each preparation was analysed by both matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to increase coverage and accuracy. Machine learning was used to integrate the mass spectrometry scores and assign probabilities to the protein-protein interactions. Among 4,087 different proteins identified with high confidence by mass spectrometry from 2,357 successful purifications, our core data set (median precision of 0.69) comprises 7,123 protein-protein interactions involving 2,708 proteins. A Markov clustering algorithm organized these interactions into 547 protein complexes averaging 4.9 subunits per complex, about half of them absent from the MIPS database, as well as 429 additional interactions between pairs of complexes. The data (all of which are available online) will help future studies on individual proteins as well as functional genomics and systems biology. PMID:16554755

  5. Global De Novo Protein-Protein Interactome Elucidates Interactions of Drought-Responsive Proteins in Horse Gram (Macrotyloma uniflorum).

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Gangwar, Indu; Panzade, Ganesh; Shankar, Ravi; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the availability of de novo transcriptome of horse gram (Macrotyloma uniflorum) and recent developments in systems biology studies, the first ever global protein-protein interactome (PPI) map was constructed for this highly drought-tolerant legume. Large-scale studies of PPIs and the constructed database would provide rationale behind the interplay at cascading translational levels for drought stress-adaptive mechanisms in horse gram. Using a bidirectional approach (interolog and domain-based), a high-confidence interactome map and database for horse gram was constructed. Available transcriptomic information for shoot and root tissues of a sensitive (M-191; genotype 1) and a drought-tolerant (M-249; genotype 2) genotype of horse gram was utilized to draw comparative PPI subnetworks under drought stress. High-confidence 6804 interactions were predicted among 1812 proteins covering about one-fourth of the horse gram proteome. The highest number of interactions (33.86%) in horse gram interactome matched with Arabidopsis PPI data. The top five hub nodes mostly included ubiquitin and heat-shock-related proteins. Higher numbers of PPIs were found to be responsive in shoot tissue (416) and root tissue (2228) of genotype 2 compared with shoot tissue (136) and root tissue (579) of genotype 1. Characterization of PPIs using gene ontology analysis revealed that kinase and transferase activities involved in signal transduction, cellular processes, nucleocytoplasmic transport, protein ubiquitination, and localization of molecules were most responsive to drought stress. Hence, these could be framed in stress adaptive mechanisms of horse gram. Being the first legume global PPI map, it would provide new insights into gene and protein regulatory networks for drought stress tolerance mechanisms in horse gram. Information compiled in the form of database (MauPIR) will provide the much needed high-confidence systems biology information for horse gram genes, proteins, and

  6. Selective recognition of acetylated histones by bromodomains in transcriptional co-activators

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed H.; Awad, Salma; Al-Natour, Zeina; Othman, Samah; Mustafa, Farah; Rizvi, Tahir A.

    2006-01-01

    Bromodomains are present in many chromatin-associated proteins such as the SWI/SNF and RSC chromatin remodelling and the SAGA HAT (histone acetyltransferase) complexes, and can bind to acetylated lysine residues in the N-terminal tails of the histones. Lysine acetylation is a histone modification that forms a stable epigenetic mark on chromatin for bromodomain-containing proteins to dock and in turn regulate gene expression. In order to better understand how bromodomains read the ‘histone code’ and interact with acetylated histones, we have tested the interactions of several bromodomains within transcriptional co-activators with differentially acetylated histone tail peptides and HAT-acetylated histones. Using GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down assays, we show specificity of binding of some bromodomains to differentially acetylated H3 and H4 peptides as well as HAT-acetylated histones. Our results reveal that the Swi2/Snf2 bromodomain interacts with various acetylated H3 and H4 peptides, whereas the Gcn5 bromodomain interacts only with acetylated H3 peptides and tetra-acetylated H4 peptides. Additionally we show that the Spt7 bromodomain interacts with acetylated H3 peptides weakly, but not with acetylated H4 peptides. Some bromodomains such as the Bdf1-2 do not interact with most of the acetylated peptides tested. Results of the peptide experiments are confirmed with tests of interactions between these bromodomains and HAT-acetylated histones. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Swi2/Snf2 bromodomain is important for the binding and the remodelling activity of the SWI/SNF complex on hyperacetylated nucleosomes. The selective recognition of the bromodomains observed in the present study accounts for the broad effects of bromodomain-containing proteins observed on binding to histones. PMID:17049045

  7. Deep, Quantitative Coverage of the Lysine Acetylome Using Novel Anti-acetyl-lysine Antibodies and an Optimized Proteomic Workflow.

    PubMed

    Svinkina, Tanya; Gu, Hongbo; Silva, Jeffrey C; Mertins, Philipp; Qiao, Jana; Fereshetian, Shaunt; Jaffe, Jacob D; Kuhn, Eric; Udeshi, Namrata D; Carr, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    Introduction of antibodies specific for acetylated lysine has significantly improved the detection of endogenous acetylation sites by mass spectrometry. Here, we describe a new, commercially available mixture of anti-lysine acetylation (Kac) antibodies and show its utility for in-depth profiling of the acetylome. Specifically, seven complementary monoclones with high specificity for Kac were combined into a final anti-Kac reagent which results in at least a twofold increase in identification of Kac peptides over a commonly used Kac antibody. We outline optimal antibody usage conditions, effective offline basic reversed phase separation, and use of state-of-the-art LC-MS technology for achieving unprecedented coverage of the acetylome. The methods were applied to quantify acetylation sites in suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid-treated Jurkat cells. Over 10,000 Kac peptides from over 3000 Kac proteins were quantified from a single stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture labeled sample using 7.5 mg of peptide input per state. This constitutes the deepest coverage of acetylation sites in quantitative experiments obtained to-date. The approach was also applied to breast tumor xenograft samples using isobaric mass tag labeling of peptides (iTRAQ4, TMT6 and TMT10-plex reagents) for quantification. Greater than 6700 Kac peptides from over 2300 Kac proteins were quantified using 1 mg of tumor protein per iTRAQ 4-plex channel. The novel reagents and methods we describe here enable quantitative, global acetylome analyses with depth and sensitivity approaching that obtained for other well-studied post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitylation, and should have widespread application in biological and clinical studies employing mass spectrometry-based proteomics. PMID:25953088

  8. Annotating N Termini for the Human Proteome Project: N Termini and Nα-Acetylation Status Differentiate Stable Cleaved Protein Species from Degradation Remnants in the Human Erythrocyte Proteome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A goal of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project is to identify all human protein species. With 3844 proteins annotated as “missing”, this is challenging. Moreover, proteolytic processing generates new protein species with characteristic neo-N termini that are frequently accompanied by altered half-lives, function, interactions, and location. Enucleated and largely void of internal membranes and organelles, erythrocytes are simple yet proteomically challenging cells due to the high hemoglobin content and wide dynamic range of protein concentrations that impedes protein identification. Using the N-terminomics procedure TAILS, we identified 1369 human erythrocyte natural and neo-N-termini and 1234 proteins. Multiple semitryptic N-terminal peptides exhibited improved mass spectrometric identification properties versus the intact tryptic peptide enabling identification of 281 novel erythrocyte proteins and six missing proteins identified for the first time in the human proteome. With an improved bioinformatics workflow, we developed a new classification system and the Terminus Cluster Score. Thereby we described a new stabilizing N-end rule for processed protein termini, which discriminates novel protein species from degradation remnants, and identified protein domain hot spots susceptible to cleavage. Strikingly, 68% of the N-termini were within genome-encoded protein sequences, revealing alternative translation initiation sites, pervasive endoproteolytic processing, and stabilization of protein fragments in vivo. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with the data set identifier . PMID:24555563

  9. Olig1 Acetylation and Nuclear Export Mediate Oligodendrocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jinxiang; Bercury, Kathryn K.; Jin, Weilin

    2015-01-01

    The oligodendrocyte transcription factor Olig1 is critical for both oligodendrocyte development and remyelination in mice. Nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of Olig1 protein occurs during brain development and in multiple sclerosis, but the detailed molecular mechanism of this translocation remains elusive. Here, we report that Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation drive its active translocation between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in both mouse and rat oligodendrocytes. We identified three functional nuclear export sequences (NES) localized in the basic helix-loop-helix domain and one specific acetylation site at Lys 150 (human Olig1) in NES1. Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation are regulated by the acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein and the histone deacetylases HDAC1, HDAC3, and HDAC10. Acetylation of Olig1 decreased its chromatin association, increased its interaction with inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and facilitated its retention in the cytoplasm of mature oligodendrocytes. These studies establish that acetylation of Olig1 regulates its chromatin dissociation and subsequent translocation to the cytoplasm and is required for its function in oligodendrocyte maturation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of Olig1 protein has been observed during mouse and human brain development and in multiple sclerosis in several studies, but the detailed molecular mechanism of this translocation remains elusive. Here, we provide insight into the mechanism by which acetylation of Olig1 regulates its unique nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling during oligodendrocyte development and how the acetylation status of Olig1 modulates its distinct function in the nucleus versus the cytoplasm. The current study provides a unique example of a lineage-specific transcription factor that is actively translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm as the cell differentiates. Importantly, we demonstrate that this process is tightly controlled by acetylation at a single

  10. Proteome-wide analysis of lysine acetylation in the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Binna; Yang, Qianqian; Li, Delong; Liang, Wenxing; Song, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification that plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. Botrytis cinerea is the most thoroughly studied necrotrophic species due to its broad host range and huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. In this study, we determined the lysine acetylome of B. cinerea through the combination of affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis. Overall, 1582 lysine acetylation sites in 954 proteins were identified. Bioinformatics analysis shows that the acetylated proteins are involved in diverse biological functions and show multiple cellular localizations. Several particular amino acids preferred near acetylation sites, including KacY, KacH, Kac***R, KacF, FKac and Kac***K, were identified in this organism. Protein interaction network analysis demonstrates that a variety of interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. Interestingly, 6 proteins involved in virulence of B. cinerea, including 3 key components of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, were found to be acetylated, suggesting that lysine acetylation plays regulatory roles in pathogenesis. These data provides the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of B. cinerea and serves as a rich resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. PMID:27381557

  11. Proteome-wide analysis of lysine acetylation in the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Lv, Binna; Yang, Qianqian; Li, Delong; Liang, Wenxing; Song, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and reversible post-translational modification that plays an important role in diverse cellular processes. Botrytis cinerea is the most thoroughly studied necrotrophic species due to its broad host range and huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. In this study, we determined the lysine acetylome of B. cinerea through the combination of affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis. Overall, 1582 lysine acetylation sites in 954 proteins were identified. Bioinformatics analysis shows that the acetylated proteins are involved in diverse biological functions and show multiple cellular localizations. Several particular amino acids preferred near acetylation sites, including K(ac)Y, K(ac)H, K(ac)***R, K(ac)F, FK(ac) and K(ac)***K, were identified in this organism. Protein interaction network analysis demonstrates that a variety of interactions are modulated by protein acetylation. Interestingly, 6 proteins involved in virulence of B. cinerea, including 3 key components of the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, were found to be acetylated, suggesting that lysine acetylation plays regulatory roles in pathogenesis. These data provides the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of B. cinerea and serves as a rich resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in this plant pathogen. PMID:27381557

  12. Identification of cellular factors binding to acetylated HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed

    Allouch, Awatef; Cereseto, Anna

    2011-11-01

    The viral protein integrase (IN) catalyzes the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into the host cellular genome. We have recently demonstrated that IN is acetylated by a cellular histone acetyltransferase, p300, which modifies three lysines located in the C-terminus of the viral factor (Cereseto et al. in EMBO J 24:3070-3081, 2005). This modification enhances IN catalytic activity, as demonstrated by in vitro assays. Consistently, mutations introduced in the targeted lysines greatly decrease the efficiency of HIV-1 integration. Acetylation was proven to regulate protein functions by modulating protein-protein interactions. HIV-1 to efficiently complete its replication steps, including the integration reaction, requires interacting with numerous cellular factors. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether acetylation might modulate the interaction between IN and the cellular factors. To this aim we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening that differs from the screenings so far performed (Rain et al. in Methods 47:291-297, 2009; Studamire and Goff in Retrovirology 5:48, 2008) for using as bait IN constitutively acetylated. From this analysis we have identified thirteen cellular factors involved in transcription, chromatin remodeling, nuclear transport, RNA binding, protein synthesis regulation and microtubule organization. To validate these interactions, binding assays were performed showing that acetylation increases the affinity of IN with specific factors. Nevertheless, few two-hybrid hits bind with the same affinity the acetylated and the unmodified IN. These results further underlie the relevance of IN post-translational modification by acetylation in HIV-1 replication cycle. PMID:20016921

  13. Role of Carnitine Acetyltransferases in Acetyl Coenzyme A Metabolism in Aspergillus nidulans ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Michael J.; Murray, Sandra L.; Andrianopoulos, Alex; Davis, Meryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The flow of carbon metabolites between cellular compartments is an essential feature of fungal metabolism. During growth on ethanol, acetate, or fatty acids, acetyl units must enter the mitochondrion for metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) in the cytoplasm is essential for the biosynthetic reactions and for protein acetylation. Acetyl-CoA is produced in the cytoplasm by acetyl-CoA synthetase during growth on acetate and ethanol while β-oxidation of fatty acids generates acetyl-CoA in peroxisomes. The acetyl-carnitine shuttle in which acetyl-CoA is reversibly converted to acetyl-carnitine by carnitine acetyltransferase (CAT) enzymes is important for intracellular transport of acetyl units. In the filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans, a cytoplasmic CAT, encoded by facC, is essential for growth on sources of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA while a second CAT, encoded by the acuJ gene, is essential for growth on fatty acids as well as acetate. We have shown that AcuJ contains an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence and a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting sequence (PTS) and is localized to both peroxisomes and mitochondria, independent of the carbon source. Mislocalization of AcuJ to the cytoplasm does not result in loss of growth on acetate but prevents growth on fatty acids. Therefore, while mitochondrial AcuJ is essential for the transfer of acetyl units to mitochondria, peroxisomal localization is required only for transfer from peroxisomes to mitochondria. Peroxisomal AcuJ was not required for the import of acetyl-CoA into peroxisomes for conversion to malate by malate synthase (MLS), and export of acetyl-CoA from peroxisomes to the cytoplasm was found to be independent of FacC when MLS was mislocalized to the cytoplasm. PMID:21296915

  14. Global Subcellular Characterization of Protein Degradation Using Quantitative Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Kirkwood, Kathryn J.; Ly, Tony; Lamond, Angus I.

    2013-01-01

    Protein degradation provides an important regulatory mechanism used to control cell cycle progression and many other cellular pathways. To comprehensively analyze the spatial control of protein degradation in U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we have combined drug treatment and SILAC-based quantitative mass spectrometry with subcellular and protein fractionation. The resulting data set analyzed more than 74,000 peptides, corresponding to ∼5000 proteins, from nuclear, cytosolic, membrane, and cytoskeletal compartments. These data identified rapidly degraded proteasome targets, such as PRR11 and highlighted a feedback mechanism resulting in translation inhibition, induced by blocking the proteasome. We show this is mediated by activation of the unfolded protein response. We observed compartment-specific differences in protein degradation, including proteins that would not have been characterized as rapidly degraded through analysis of whole cell lysates. Bioinformatic analysis of the entire data set is presented in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics, a web-based resource, with proteins annotated for stability and subcellular distribution. PMID:23242552

  15. Acetylation of C/EBPα inhibits its granulopoietic function.

    PubMed

    Bararia, Deepak; Kwok, Hui Si; Welner, Robert S; Numata, Akihiko; Sárosi, Menyhárt B; Yang, Henry; Wee, Sheena; Tschuri, Sebastian; Ray, Debleena; Weigert, Oliver; Levantini, Elena; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Tenen, Daniel G

    2016-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) is an essential transcription factor for myeloid lineage commitment. Here we demonstrate that acetylation of C/EBPα at lysine residues K298 and K302, mediated at least in part by general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5), impairs C/EBPα DNA-binding ability and modulates C/EBPα transcriptional activity. Acetylated C/EBPα is enriched in human myeloid leukaemia cell lines and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) samples, and downregulated upon granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)- mediated granulocytic differentiation of 32Dcl3 cells. C/EBPα mutants that mimic acetylation failed to induce granulocytic differentiation in C/EBPα-dependent assays, in both cell lines and in primary hematopoietic cells. Our data uncover GCN5 as a negative regulator of C/EBPα and demonstrate the importance of C/EBPα acetylation in myeloid differentiation. PMID:27005833

  16. Acetylation of C/EBPα inhibits its granulopoietic function

    PubMed Central

    Bararia, Deepak; Kwok, Hui Si; Welner, Robert S.; Numata, Akihiko; Sárosi, Menyhárt B.; Yang, Henry; Wee, Sheena; Tschuri, Sebastian; Ray, Debleena; Weigert, Oliver; Levantini, Elena; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) is an essential transcription factor for myeloid lineage commitment. Here we demonstrate that acetylation of C/EBPα at lysine residues K298 and K302, mediated at least in part by general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5), impairs C/EBPα DNA-binding ability and modulates C/EBPα transcriptional activity. Acetylated C/EBPα is enriched in human myeloid leukaemia cell lines and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) samples, and downregulated upon granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)- mediated granulocytic differentiation of 32Dcl3 cells. C/EBPα mutants that mimic acetylation failed to induce granulocytic differentiation in C/EBPα-dependent assays, in both cell lines and in primary hematopoietic cells. Our data uncover GCN5 as a negative regulator of C/EBPα and demonstrate the importance of C/EBPα acetylation in myeloid differentiation. PMID:27005833

  17. Effects of peptide acetylation and dimethylation on electrospray ionization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Cho; Kang, Jeong Won; Choi, Yuri; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2016-02-01

    Peptide acetylation and dimethylation have been widely used to derivatize primary amino groups (peptide N-termini and the ε-amino group of lysines) for chemical isotope labeling of quantitative proteomics or for affinity tag labeling for selection and enrichment of labeled peptides. However, peptide acetylation results in signal suppression during electrospray ionization (ESI) due to charge neutralization. In contrast, dimethylated peptides show increased ionization efficiency after derivatization, since dimethylation increases hydrophobicity and maintains a positive charge on the peptide under common LC conditions. In this study, we quantitatively compared the ESI efficiencies of acetylated and dimethylated model peptides and tryptic peptides of BSA. Dimethylated peptides showed higher ionization efficiency than acetylated peptides for both model peptides and tryptic BSA peptides. At the proteome level, peptide dimethylation led to better protein identification than peptide acetylation when tryptic peptides of mouse brain lysate were analyzed with LC-ESI-MS/MS. These results demonstrate that dimethylation of tryptic peptides enhanced ESI efficiency and provided up to two-fold improved protein identification sensitivity in comparison with acetylation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26889926

  18. Methods to detect NF-κB Acetylation and Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, JinJing; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Summary Post-translational modifications of NF-κB, including acetylation and methylation, have emerged as an important regulatory mechanism for determining the duration and strength of NF-κB nuclear activity as well as its transcriptional output. Within the seven NF-κB family proteins, the RelA subunit of NF-κB is the most studied for its regulation by lysine acetylation and methylation. Acetylation or methylation at different lysine residues modulates distinct functions of NF-κB, including DNA binding and transcription activity, protein stability, and its interaction with NF-κB modulators. Here, we describe the experimental methods to monitor the in vitro and in vivo acetylated or methylated forms of NF-κB. These methods include radiolabeling the acetyl- or methyl- groups and immunoblotting with pan or site-specific acetyl- or methyl-lysine antibodies. Radiolabeling is useful in the initial validation of the modifications. Immunoblotting with antibodies provides a rapid and powerful approach to detect and analyze the functions of these modifications in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25736763

  19. Runt-related Transcription Factor 1 (RUNX1) Stimulates Tumor Suppressor p53 Protein in Response to DNA Damage through Complex Formation and Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Ozaki, Toshinori; Yoshihara, Yukari; Kubo, Natsumi; Nakagawara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Representative tumor suppressor p53 plays a critical role in the regulation of proper DNA damage response. In this study, we have found for the first time that Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) contributes to p53-dependent DNA damage response. Upon adriamycin (ADR) exposure, p53 as well as RUNX1 were strongly induced in p53-proficient HCT116 and U2OS cells, which were closely associated with significant transactivation of p53 target genes, such as p21WAF1, BAX, NOXA, and PUMA. RUNX1 was exclusively expressed in the cell nucleus and formed a complex with p53 in response to ADR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that p53 together with RUNX1 are efficiently recruited onto p53 target gene promoters following ADR exposure, indicating that RUNX1 is involved in p53-mediated transcriptional regulation. Indeed, forced expression of RUNX1 stimulated the transcriptional activity of p53 in response to ADR. Consistent with these observations, knockdown of RUNX1 attenuated ADR-mediated induction of p53 target genes and suppressed ADR-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, RUNX1 was associated with p300 histone acetyltransferase, and ADR-dependent acetylation of p53 at Lys-373/382 was markedly inhibited in RUNX1 knockdown cells. In addition, knockdown of RUNX1 resulted in a significant decrease in the amount of p53-p300 complex following ADR exposure. Taken together, our present results strongly suggest that RUNX1 is required for the stimulation of p53 in response to DNA damage and also provide novel insight into understanding the molecular mechanisms behind p53-dependent DNA damage response. PMID:23148227

  20. Bayesian Proteoform Modeling Improves Protein Quantification of Global Proteomic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Datta, Susmita; Payne, Samuel H.; Kang, Jiyun; Bramer, Lisa M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Tardiff, Mark F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2014-12-01

    As the capability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has matured, tens of thousands of peptides can be measured simultaneously, which has the benefit of offering a systems view of protein expression. However, a major challenge is that with an increase in throughput, protein quantification estimation from the native measured peptides has become a computational task. A limitation to existing computationally-driven protein quantification methods is that most ignore protein variation, such as alternate splicing of the RNA transcript and post-translational modifications or other possible proteoforms, which will affect a significant fraction of the proteome. The consequence of this assumption is that statistical inference at the protein level, and consequently downstream analyses, such as network and pathway modeling, have only limited power for biomarker discovery. Here, we describe a Bayesian model (BP-Quant) that uses statistically derived peptides signatures to identify peptides that are outside the dominant pattern, or the existence of multiple over-expressed patterns to improve relative protein abundance estimates. It is a research-driven approach that utilizes the objectives of the experiment, defined in the context of a standard statistical hypothesis, to identify a set of peptides exhibiting similar statistical behavior relating to a protein. This approach infers that changes in relative protein abundance can be used as a surrogate for changes in function, without necessarily taking into account the effect of differential post-translational modifications, processing, or splicing in altering protein function. We verify the approach using a dilution study from mouse plasma samples and demonstrate that BP-Quant achieves similar accuracy as the current state-of-the-art methods at proteoform identification with significantly better specificity. BP-Quant is available as a MatLab ® and R packages at https://github.com/PNNL-Comp-Mass-Spec/BP-Quant.

  1. Quantitative Proteomic Atlas of Ubiquitination and Acetylation in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Elia, Andrew E.H.; Boardman, Alexander P.; Wang, David C.; Huttlin, Edward L.; Everley, Robert A.; Dephoure, Noah; Zhou, Chunshui; Koren, Itay; Gygi, Steven P.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Execution of the DNA damage response (DDR) relies upon a dynamic array of protein modifications. Using quantitative proteomics, we have globally profiled ubiquitination, acetylation, and phosphorylation in response to ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. To improve acetylation site profiling, we developed the strategy FACET-IP. Our datasets of 33,500 ubiquitination and 16,740 acetylation sites provide valuable insight into DDR remodeling of the proteome. We find that K6- and K33-linked polyubiquitination undergo bulk increases in response to DNA damage, raising the possibility that these linkages are largely dedicated to DDR function. We also show that Cullin Ring Ligases mediate 10% of DNA damage induced ubiquitination events and that EXO1 is an SCF-Cyclin F substrate in the response to UV radiation. Our extensive datasets uncover additional regulated sites on known DDR players such as PCNA and identify previously unknown DDR targets such as CENPs, underscoring the broad impact of the DDR on cellular physiology. PMID:26051181

  2. Global Membrane Protein Interactome Analysis using In vivo Crosslinking and Mass Spectrometry-based Protein Correlation Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Kirkwood, Kathryn J.; Tinti, Michele; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Ferguson, Michael A. J.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2016-01-01

    We present a methodology using in vivo crosslinking combined with HPLC-MS for the global analysis of endogenous protein complexes by protein correlation profiling. Formaldehyde crosslinked protein complexes were extracted with high yield using denaturing buffers that maintained complex solubility during chromatographic separation. We show this efficiently detects both integral membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes,in addition to soluble complexes, allowing identification and analysis of complexes not accessible in native extracts. We compare the protein complexes detected by HPLC-MS protein correlation profiling in both native and formaldehyde crosslinked U2OS cell extracts. These proteome-wide data sets of both in vivo crosslinked and native protein complexes from U2OS cells are freely available via a searchable online database (www.peptracker.com/epd). Raw data are also available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD003754). PMID:27114452

  3. Global Membrane Protein Interactome Analysis using In vivo Crosslinking and Mass Spectrometry-based Protein Correlation Profiling.

    PubMed

    Larance, Mark; Kirkwood, Kathryn J; Tinti, Michele; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Ferguson, Michael A J; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-07-01

    We present a methodology using in vivo crosslinking combined with HPLC-MS for the global analysis of endogenous protein complexes by protein correlation profiling. Formaldehyde crosslinked protein complexes were extracted with high yield using denaturing buffers that maintained complex solubility during chromatographic separation. We show this efficiently detects both integral membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes,in addition to soluble complexes, allowing identification and analysis of complexes not accessible in native extracts. We compare the protein complexes detected by HPLC-MS protein correlation profiling in both native and formaldehyde crosslinked U2OS cell extracts. These proteome-wide data sets of both in vivo crosslinked and native protein complexes from U2OS cells are freely available via a searchable online database (www.peptracker.com/epd). Raw data are also available via ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD003754). PMID:27114452

  4. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in biosynthesis of antibiotics in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Wang, Guangyuan; Song, Limin; Lv, Binna; Liang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a major post-translational modification that plays an important regulatory role in almost every aspects in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, a Gram-positive bacterium, is very effective for the control of plant pathogens. However, very little is known about the function of lysine acetylation in this organism. Here, we conducted the first lysine acetylome in B. amyloliquefaciens through a combination of highly sensitive immune-affinity purification and high-resolution LC−MS/MS. Overall, we identified 3268 lysine acetylation sites in 1254 proteins, which account for 32.9% of the total proteins in this bacterium. Till date, this is the highest ratio of acetylated proteins that have been identified in bacteria. Acetylated proteins are associated with a variety of biological processes and a large fraction of these proteins are involved in metabolism. Interestingly, for the first time, we found that about 71.1% (27/38) and 78.6% (22/28) of all the proteins tightly related to the synthesis of three types of pepketides and five families of lipopeptides were acetylated, respectively. These findings suggest that lysine acetylation plays a critical role in the regulation of antibiotics biosynthesis. These data serves as an important resource for further elucidation of the physiological role of lysine acetylation in B. amyloliquefaciens. PMID:26822828

  5. The Effect of Acetyl Salicylic Acid Induced Nitric Oxide Synthesis in the Normalization of Hypertension through the Stimulation of Renal Cortexin Synthesis and by the Inhibition of Dermcidin Isoform 2, A Hypertensive Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Bank, Sarbashri; Maji, Uttam K; Bhattacharya, Rabindra; Guha, Santanu; Khan, Nighat N; Sinha, A Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Currently, there is no specific medication for essential hypertension (EH), a major form of the condition, in man. As acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) is reported to stimulate the synthesis of renal (r)-cortexin, an anti-essential hypertensive protein, and, as aspirin is reported to inhibit dermcidin isoform 2 (dermcidin), a causative protein for EH, the role of aspirin in the control of EH in man was studied. Oral administration of 150 mg aspirin/70 kg body weight in subjects with EH was found to reduce both the elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressures to normal levels within 3 h due to the normalization of dermcidin level in these subjects. The plasma cortexin level at day 0, 1, 30 and 90 were 0.5 pmol/ml, 155.5 pmol/ml, 160.2 pmol/ml, 190.5 pmol/ml respectively with increased NO synthesis (r=+0.994). In vitro studies demonstrated that the incubation of the goat kidney cortex cells with aspirin stimulated (r)-cortexin synthesis due to NO synthesis. It could be suggested that the use of aspirin might control EH in man. PMID:25324696

  6. In the absence of cellular poly (A) binding protein, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Thangima Zannat, Mst.; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B.; Bag, Jnanankur

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} PABP knock down and cell apoptosis. {yields} Nuclear translocation of GAPDH in PABP depleted cells. {yields} Role of p53 in apoptosis of PABP depleted cells. {yields} Bax translocation and cytochrome C release and caspase 3 activation following PABP depletion. {yields} Association of p53 with Bcl2 and Bax. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) interacts with 3' poly (A) tract of eukaryotic mRNA and is important for both translation and stability of mRNA. Previously, we have shown that depletion of PABP by siRNA prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. In the present investigation, we studied the mechanism of cell apoptosis. We show that in the absence of PABP, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53. As a result, p53 translocated to the mitochondria to initiate Bax mediated apoptosis.

  7. The Effect of Acetyl Salicylic Acid Induced Nitric Oxide Synthesis in the Normalization of Hypertension through the Stimulation of Renal Cortexin Synthesis and by the Inhibition of Dermcidin Isoform 2, A Hypertensive Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Bank, Sarbashri; Maji, Uttam K.; Bhattacharya, Rabindra; Guha, Santanu; Khan, Nighat N.; Sinha, A. Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no specific medication for essential hypertension (EH), a major form of the condition, in man. As acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) is reported to stimulate the synthesis of renal (r)-cortexin, an anti-essential hypertensive protein, and, as aspirin is reported to inhibit dermcidin isoform 2 (dermcidin), a causative protein for EH, the role of aspirin in the control of EH in man was studied. Oral administration of 150 mg aspirin/70 kg body weight in subjects with EH was found to reduce both the elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressures to normal levels within 3 h due to the normalization of dermcidin level in these subjects. The plasma cortexin level at day 0, 1, 30 and 90 were 0.5 pmol/ml, 155.5 pmol/ml, 160.2 pmol/ml, 190.5 pmol/ml respectively with increased NO synthesis (r=+0.994). In vitro studies demonstrated that the incubation of the goat kidney cortex cells with aspirin stimulated (r)-cortexin synthesis due to NO synthesis. It could be suggested that the use of aspirin might control EH in man. PMID:25324696

  8. Enhancement of lysine acetylation accelerates wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Spallotta, Francesco; Cencioni, Chiara; Straino, Stefania; Sbardella, Gianluca; Castellano, Sabrina; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio; Gaetano, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    In physiopathological conditions, such as diabetes, wound healing is significantly compromised and chronic complications, including ulcers, may occur. In a mouse model of skin repair, we recently reported that wound treatment with Sirtuin activators and class I HDAC inhibitors induced keratinocyte proliferation and enhanced healing via a nitric oxide (NO) dependent mechanism. We observed an increase in total protein acetylation in the wound area, as determined by acetylation of α-tubulin and histone H3 Lysine 9. We reasoned that this process activated cell function as well as regulated gene expression to foster tissue repair. We report here that the direct activation of P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) by the histone acetylase activator pentadecylidenemalonate 1b (SPV-106) induced Lysine acetylation in the wound area. This intervention was sufficient to enhance repair process by a NO-independent mechanism. Hence, an impairment of PCAF and/or other GCN5 family acetylases may delay skin repair in physiopathological conditions. PMID:24265859

  9. Acetylation of Gly1 and Lys2 Promotes Aggregation of Human γD-Crystallin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The human lens contains three major protein families: α-, β-, and γ-crystallin. Among the several variants of γ-crystallin in the human lens, γD-crystallin is a major form. γD-Crystallin is primarily present in the nuclear region of the lens and contains a single lysine residue at the second position (K2). In this study, we investigated the acetylation of K2 in γD-crystallin in aging and cataractous human lenses. Our results indicated that K2 is acetylated at an early age and that the amount of K2-acetylated γD-crystallin increased with age. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that in addition to K2, glycine 1 (G1) was acetylated in γD-crystallin from human lenses and in γD-crystallin acetylated in vitro. The chaperone ability of α-crystallin for acetylated γD-crystallin was lower than that for the nonacetylated protein. The tertiary structure and the microenvironment of the cysteine residues were significantly altered by acetylation. The acetylated protein exhibited higher surface hydrophobicity, was unstable against thermal and chemical denaturation, and exhibited a higher propensity to aggregate at 80 °C in comparison to the nonacetylated protein. Acetylation enhanced the GdnHCl-induced unfolding and slowed the subsequent refolding of γD-crystallin. Theoretical analysis indicated that the acetylation of K2 and G1 reduced the structural stability of the protein and brought the distal cysteine residues (C18 and C78) into close proximity. Collectively, these results indicate that the acetylation of G1 and K2 residues in γD-crystallin likely induced a molten globule-like structure, predisposing it to aggregation, which may account for the high content of aggregated proteins in the nucleus of aged and cataractous human lenses. PMID:25393041

  10. Global multiple protein-protein interaction network alignment by combining pairwise network alignments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background A wealth of protein interaction data has become available in recent years, creating an urgent need for powerful analysis techniques. In this context, the problem of finding biologically meaningful correspondences between different protein-protein interaction networks (PPIN) is of particular interest. The PPIN of a species can be compared with that of other species through the process of PPIN alignment. Such an alignment can provide insight into basic problems like species evolution and network component function determination, as well as translational problems such as target identification and elucidation of mechanisms of disease spread. Furthermore, multiple PPINs can be aligned simultaneously, expanding the analytical implications of the result. While there are several pairwise network alignment algorithms, few methods are capable of multiple network alignment. Results We propose SMAL, a MNA algorithm based on the philosophy of scaffold-based alignment. SMAL is capable of converting results from any global pairwise alignment algorithms into a MNA in linear time. Using this method, we have built multiple network alignments based on combining pairwise alignments from a number of publicly available (pairwise) network aligners. We tested SMAL using PPINs of eight species derived from the IntAct repository and employed a number of measures to evaluate performance. Additionally, as part of our experimental investigations, we compared the effectiveness of SMAL while aligning up to eight input PPINs, and examined the effect of scaffold network choice on the alignments. Conclusions A key advantage of SMAL lies in its ability to create MNAs through the use of pairwise network aligners for which native MNA implementations do not exist. Experiments indicate that the performance of SMAL was comparable to that of the native MNA implementation of established methods such as IsoRankN and SMETANA. However, in terms of computational time, SMAL was significantly faster

  11. Sirtuin-dependent reversible lysine acetylation of glutamine synthetases reveals an autofeedback loop in nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    You, Di; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Li, Zhi-Hai; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Wen-Bang; Zuo, Peng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-06-14

    In cells of all domains of life, reversible lysine acetylation modulates the function of proteins involved in central cellular processes such as metabolism. In this study, we demonstrate that the nitrogen regulator GlnR of the actinomycete Saccharopolyspora erythraea directly regulates transcription of the acuA gene (SACE_5148), which encodes a Gcn5-type lysine acetyltransferase. We found that AcuA acetylates two glutamine synthetases (GlnA1 and GlnA4) and that this lysine acetylation inactivated GlnA4 (GSII) but had no significant effect on GlnA1 (GSI-β) activity under the conditions tested. Instead, acetylation of GlnA1 led to a gain-of-function that modulated its interaction with the GlnR regulator and enhanced GlnR-DNA binding. It was observed that this regulatory function of acetylated GSI-β enzymes is highly conserved across actinomycetes. In turn, GlnR controls the catalytic and regulatory activities (intracellular acetylation levels) of glutamine synthetases at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels, indicating an autofeedback loop that regulates nitrogen metabolism in response to environmental change. Thus, this GlnR-mediated acetylation pathway provides a signaling cascade that acts from nutrient sensing to acetylation of proteins to feedback regulation. This work presents significant new insights at the molecular level into the mechanisms underlying the regulation of protein acetylation and nitrogen metabolism in actinomycetes. PMID:27247389

  12. An acetylation switch controls TDP-43 function and aggregation propensity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Todd J; Hwang, Andrew W; Restrepo, Clark R; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M Y

    2015-01-01

    TDP-43 pathology is a disease hallmark that characterizes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP). Although a critical role for TDP-43 as an RNA-binding protein has emerged, the regulation of TDP-43 function is poorly understood. Here, we identify lysine acetylation as a novel post-translational modification controlling TDP-43 function and aggregation. We provide evidence that TDP-43 acetylation impairs RNA binding and promotes accumulation of insoluble, hyper-phosphorylated TDP-43 species that largely resemble pathological inclusions in ALS and FTLD-TDP. Moreover, biochemical and cell-based assays identify oxidative stress as a signalling cue that promotes acetylated TDP-43 aggregates that are readily engaged by the cellular defense machinery. Importantly, acetylated TDP-43 lesions are found in ALS patient spinal cord, indicating that aberrant TDP-43 acetylation and loss of RNA binding are linked to TDP-43 proteinopathy. Thus, modulating TDP-43 acetylation represents a plausible strategy to fine-tune TDP-43 activity, which could provide new therapeutic avenues for TDP-43 proteinopathies. PMID:25556531

  13. An acetylation switch controls TDP-43 function and aggregation propensity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Todd J.; Hwang, Andrew W.; Restrepo, Clark R.; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.Y.

    2015-01-01

    TDP-43 pathology is a disease hallmark that characterizes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP). Although a critical role for TDP-43 as an RNA-binding protein has emerged, the regulation of TDP-43 function is poorly understood. Here we identify lysine acetylation as a novel post-translational modification controlling TDP-43 function and aggregation. We provide evidence that TDP-43 acetylation impairs RNA-binding and promotes accumulation of insoluble, hyper-phosphorylated TDP-43 species that largely resemble pathological inclusions in ALS and FTLD-TDP. Moreover, biochemical and cell-based assays identify oxidative stress as a signaling cue that promotes acetylated TDP-43 aggregates that are readily engaged by the cellular defense machinery. Importantly, acetylated TDP-43 lesions are found in ALS patient spinal cord, indicating that aberrant TDP-43 acetylation and loss of RNA binding are linked to TDP-43 proteinopathy. Thus, modulating TDP-43 acetylation represents a plausible strategy to fine-tune TDP-43 activity, which could provide new therapeutic avenues for TDP-43 proteinopathies. PMID:25556531

  14. Non-enzymatic protein acylation as a carbon stress regulated by sirtuin deacylases

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gregory R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular proteins are decorated with a wide range of acetyl and other acyl modifications. Many studies have demonstrated regulation of site-specific acetylation by acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Acylation is emerging as a new type of lysine modification, but less is known about its overall regulatory role. Furthermore, the mechanisms of lysine acylation, its overlap with protein acetylation, and how it influences cellular function are major unanswered questions in the field. In this review, we discuss the known roles of acetyltransferases and deacetylases, and the sirtuins as a conserved family of NAD+-dependent protein deacylases that are important for response to cellular stress and homeostasis. We also consider the evidence for an emerging idea of non-enzymatic protein acylation. Finally, we put forward the hypothesis that protein acylation is a form of protein “carbon stress”, that the deacylases evolved to remove as a part of a global protein quality control network. PMID:24725594

  15. Acetylation mimic of lysine 280 exacerbates human Tau neurotoxicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Burnouf, Sylvie; Dols, Jacqueline; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction and accumulation of the microtubule-associated human Tau (hTau) protein into intraneuronal aggregates is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Reversible lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a post-translational modification that may play an important role in the modulation of hTau pathology. Acetylated hTau species have been observed within hTau aggregates in human AD brains and multi-acetylation of hTau in vitro regulates its propensity to aggregate. However, whether lysine acetylation at position 280 (K280) modulates hTau-induced toxicity in vivo is unknown. We generated new Drosophila transgenic models of hTau pathology to evaluate the contribution of K280 acetylation to hTau toxicity, by analysing the respective toxicity of pseudo-acetylated (K280Q) and pseudo-de-acetylated (K280R) mutant forms of hTau. We observed that mis-expression of pseudo-acetylated K280Q-hTau in the adult fly nervous system potently exacerbated fly locomotion defects and photoreceptor neurodegeneration. In addition, modulation of K280 influenced total hTau levels and phosphorylation without changing hTau solubility. Altogether, our results indicate that pseudo-acetylation of the single K280 residue is sufficient to exacerbate hTau neurotoxicity in vivo, suggesting that acetylated K280-hTau species contribute to the pathological events leading to neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:26940749

  16. A SUMO-acetyl switch in PXR biology.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wenqi; Sun, Mengxi; Zhang, Shupei; Shen, Xunan; Galeva, Nadezhda; Williams, Todd D; Staudinger, Jeff L

    2016-09-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM) of nuclear receptor superfamily members regulates various aspects of their biology to include sub-cellular localization, the repertoire of protein-binding partners, as well as their stability and mode of degradation. The nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) is a master-regulator of the drug-inducible gene expression in liver and intestine. The PXR-mediated gene activation program is primarily recognized to increase drug metabolism, drug transport, and drug efflux pathways in these tissues. The activation of PXR also has important implications in significant human diseases including inflammatory bowel disease and cancer. Our recent investigations reveal that PXR is modified by multiple PTMs to include phosphorylation, SUMOylation, and ubiquitination. Using both primary cultures of hepatocytes and cell-based assays, we show here that PXR is modified through acetylation on lysine residues. Further, we show that increased acetylation of PXR stimulates its increased SUMO-modification to support active transcriptional suppression. Pharmacologic inhibition of lysine de-acetylation using trichostatin A (TSA) alters the sub-cellular localization of PXR in cultured hepatocytes, and also has a profound impact upon PXR transactivation capacity. Both the acetylation and SUMOylation status of the PXR protein is affected by its ability to associate with the lysine de-acetylating enzyme histone de-acetylase (HDAC)3 in a complex with silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT). Taken together, our data support a model in which a SUMO-acetyl 'switch' occurs such that acetylation of PXR likely stimulates SUMO-modification of PXR to promote the active repression of PXR-target gene expression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26883953

  17. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in diverse biological processes in Phytophthora sojae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Delong; Lv, Binna; Tan, Lingling; Yang, Qianqian; Liang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and highly conserved post-translational modification that plays an important regulatory role in almost every aspects of cell metabolism in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Phytophthora sojae is one of the most important plant pathogens due to its huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this Phytopthora. Here, we conducted a lysine acetylome in P. sojae. Overall, 2197 lysine acetylation sites in 1150 proteins were identified. The modified proteins are involved in diverse biological processes and are localized to multiple cellular compartments. Importantly, 7 proteins involved in the pathogenicity or the secretion pathway of P. sojae were found to be acetylated. These data provide the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of P. sojae and serve as an important resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in plant pathogens. PMID:27412925

  18. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in diverse biological processes in Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Li, Delong; Lv, Binna; Tan, Lingling; Yang, Qianqian; Liang, Wenxing

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a dynamic and highly conserved post-translational modification that plays an important regulatory role in almost every aspects of cell metabolism in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Phytophthora sojae is one of the most important plant pathogens due to its huge economic impact. However, to date, little is known about the functions of lysine acetylation in this Phytopthora. Here, we conducted a lysine acetylome in P. sojae. Overall, 2197 lysine acetylation sites in 1150 proteins were identified. The modified proteins are involved in diverse biological processes and are localized to multiple cellular compartments. Importantly, 7 proteins involved in the pathogenicity or the secretion pathway of P. sojae were found to be acetylated. These data provide the first comprehensive view of the acetylome of P. sojae and serve as an important resource for functional analysis of lysine acetylation in plant pathogens. PMID:27412925

  19. Global protein synthesis in human trophoblast is resistant to inhibition by hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S.F.; Fik, E.; Zamudio, S.; Illsley, N.P.

    2012-01-01

    Placental growth and function depend on syncytial cell processes which require the continuing synthesis of cellular proteins. The substantial energy demands of protein synthesis are met primarily from oxidative metabolism. Although the responses of individual proteins produced by the syncytiotrophoblast to oxygen deprivation have been investigated previously, there is no information available on global protein synthesis in syncytiotrophoblast under conditions of hypoxia. These studies were designed to test the hypothesis that syncytial protein synthesis is decreased in a dose-dependent manner by hypoxia. Experiments were performed to measure amino acid incorporation into proteins in primary syncytiotrophoblast cells exposed to oxygen concentrations ranging from 0 to 10%. Compared to cells exposed to normoxia (10% O2), no changes were observed following exposure to 5% or 3% O2, but after exposure to 1% O2, protein synthesis after 24 and 48 h decreased by 24% and 23% and with exposure to 0% O2, by 65% and 50%. As a consequence of these results, we hypothesized that global protein synthesis in conditions of severe hypoxia was being supported by glucose metabolism. Additional experiments were performed therefore to examine the role of glucose in supporting protein synthesis. These demonstrated that at each oxygen concentration there was a significant, decreasing linear trend in protein synthesis as glucose concentration was reduced. Under conditions of near-anoxia and in the absence of glucose, protein synthesis was reduced by >85%. Even under normoxic conditions (defined as 10% O2) and in the presence of oxidative substrates, reductions in glucose were accompanied by decreases in protein synthesis. These experiments demonstrate that syncytiotrophoblast cells are resistant to reductions in protein synthesis at O2 concentrations greater than 1%. This could be explained by our finding that a significant fraction of protein synthesis in the syncytiotrophoblast is

  20. Leucine-684: A conserved residue of an AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AceCS) from Leishmania donovani is involved in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Soumya, Neelagiri; Tandan, Hitendra; Damre, Mangesh V; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Singh, Sushma

    2016-04-15

    AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AMP-AceCS) is a key enzyme which catalyzes the activation of acetate to acetyl CoA, an important intermediate at the cross roads of various anabolic and catabolic pathways. Multiple sequence alignment of Leishmania donovani AceCS with other organisms revealed the presence of a highly conserved leucine residue at 684 position which is known to be crucial for acetylation by protein acetyl transferases in other organisms. In an attempt to understand the role of leucine residue at 684 position in L. donovani acetyl CoA synthetase (LdAceCS), it was mutated to proline (P) by site directed mutagenesis. Kinetic analysis of the L684P-LdAceCS mutant revealed approximately two fold increased binding affinity with acetate, whereas fivefold decreased affinity was observed with ATP. There was insignificant change in secondary structure as revealed by CD however, two fold decreased fluorescence intensity was observed at an emission maxima of 340nm. Interestingly, L684P mutation abolished the acetylation of the mutant enzyme indicating the importance of L684 in acetylation of the enzyme. Changes in biochemical parameters of the mutant protein were validated by homology modeling of the wild type and mutant LdAceCS enzyme using Salmonella enterica AceCS crystal structure as template. Our data provides evidence for the role of leucine 684 residue in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation of the AceCS enzyme. PMID:26794803

  1. Protein Structure and Evolution: Are They Constrained Globally by a Principle Derived from Information Theory?

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, Leslie; Warr, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    That the physicochemical properties of amino acids constrain the structure, function and evolution of proteins is not in doubt. However, principles derived from information theory may also set bounds on the structure (and thus also the evolution) of proteins. Here we analyze the global properties of the full set of proteins in release 13-11 of the SwissProt database, showing by experimental test of predictions from information theory that their collective structure exhibits properties that are consistent with their being guided by a conservation principle. This principle (Conservation of Information) defines the global properties of systems composed of discrete components each of which is in turn assembled from discrete smaller pieces. In the system of proteins, each protein is a component, and each protein is assembled from amino acids. Central to this principle is the inter-relationship of the unique amino acid count and total length of a protein and its implications for both average protein length and occurrence of proteins with specific unique amino acid counts. The unique amino acid count is simply the number of distinct amino acids (including those that are post-translationally modified) that occur in a protein, and is independent of the number of times that the particular amino acid occurs in the sequence. Conservation of Information does not operate at the local level (it is independent of the physicochemical properties of the amino acids) where the influences of natural selection are manifest in the variety of protein structure and function that is well understood. Rather, this analysis implies that Conservation of Information would define the global bounds within which the whole system of proteins is constrained; thus it appears to be acting to constrain evolution at a level different from natural selection, a conclusion that appears counter-intuitive but is supported by the studies described herein. PMID:25970335

  2. Temporal Regulation of the Bacillus subtilis Acetylome and Evidence for a Role of MreB Acetylation in Cell Wall Growth

    PubMed Central

    Carabetta, Valerie J.; Greco, Todd M.; Tanner, Andrew W.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Dubnau, David

    2016-01-01

    Nε-Lysine acetylation has been recognized as a ubiquitous regulatory posttranslational modification that influences a variety of important biological processes in eukaryotic cells. Recently, it has been realized that acetylation is also prevalent in bacteria. Bacteria contain hundreds of acetylated proteins, with functions affecting diverse cellular pathways. Still, little is known about the regulation or biological relevance of nearly all of these modifications. Here we characterize the cellular growth-associated regulation of the Bacillus subtilis acetylome. Using acetylation enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry, we investigate the logarithmic and stationary growth phases, identifying over 2,300 unique acetylation sites on proteins that function in essential cellular pathways. We determine an acetylation motif, EK(ac)(D/Y/E), which resembles the eukaryotic mitochondrial acetylation signature, and a distinct stationary-phase-enriched motif. By comparing the changes in acetylation with protein abundances, we discover a subset of critical acetylation events that are temporally regulated during cell growth. We functionally characterize the stationary-phase-enriched acetylation on the essential shape-determining protein MreB. Using bioinformatics, mutational analysis, and fluorescence microscopy, we define a potential role for the temporal acetylation of MreB in restricting cell wall growth and cell diameter. IMPORTANCE The past decade highlighted Nε-lysine acetylation as a prevalent posttranslational modification in bacteria. However, knowledge regarding the physiological importance and temporal regulation of acetylation has remained limited. To uncover potential regulatory roles for acetylation, we analyzed how acetylation patterns and abundances change between growth phases in B. subtilis. To demonstrate that the identification of cell growth-dependent modifications can point to critical regulatory acetylation events, we further characterized MreB, the

  3. p53 targets simian virus 40 large T antigen for acetylation by CBP.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Danielle L; Kung, Andrew L; DeCaprio, James A

    2004-08-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (T Ag) interacts with the tumor suppressor p53 and the transcriptional coactivators CBP and p300. Binding of these cellular proteins in a ternary complex has been implicated in T Ag-mediated transformation. It has been suggested that the ability of CBP/p300 to modulate p53 function underlies p53's regulation of cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we provide further evidence that CBP activity may be mediated through its synergistic action with p53. We demonstrate that SV40 T Ag is acetylated in vivo in a p53-dependent manner and T Ag acetylation is largely mediated by CBP. The acetylation of T Ag is dependent on its interaction with p53 and on p53's interaction with CBP. We have mapped the site of acetylation on T Ag to the C-terminal lysine residue 697. This acetylation site is conserved between the T antigens of the human polyomaviruses JC and BK, which are also known to interact with p53. We show that both JC and BK T antigens are also acetylated at corresponding sites in vivo. While other proteins are known to be acetylated by CBP/p300, none are known to depend on p53 for acetylation. T Ag acetylation may provide a regulatory mechanism for T Ag binding to a cellular factor or play a role in another aspect of T Ag function. PMID:15254196

  4. Olig1 Acetylation and Nuclear Export Mediate Oligodendrocyte Development.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jinxiang; Bercury, Kathryn K; Jin, Weilin; Macklin, Wendy B

    2015-12-01

    The oligodendrocyte transcription factor Olig1 is critical for both oligodendrocyte development and remyelination in mice. Nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of Olig1 protein occurs during brain development and in multiple sclerosis, but the detailed molecular mechanism of this translocation remains elusive. Here, we report that Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation drive its active translocation between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in both mouse and rat oligodendrocytes. We identified three functional nuclear export sequences (NES) localized in the basic helix-loop-helix domain and one specific acetylation site at Lys 150 (human Olig1) in NES1. Olig1 acetylation and deacetylation are regulated by the acetyltransferase CREB-binding protein and the histone deacetylases HDAC1, HDAC3, and HDAC10. Acetylation of Olig1 decreased its chromatin association, increased its interaction with inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and facilitated its retention in the cytoplasm of mature oligodendrocytes. These studies establish that acetylation of Olig1 regulates its chromatin dissociation and subsequent translocation to the cytoplasm and is required for its function in oligodendrocyte maturation. PMID:26631469

  5. Acetyl transfer in arylamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Booth, J.

    1966-01-01

    1. N-Hydroxyacetamidoaryl compounds (hydroxamic acids) are metabolites of arylamides, and an enzyme that transfers the acetyl group from these derivatives to arylamines has been found in rat tissues. The reaction products were identified by thin-layer chromatography and a spectrophotometric method, with 4-amino-azobenzene as acetyl acceptor, was used to measure enzyme activity. 2. The acetyltransferase was in the soluble fraction of rat liver, required a thiol for maximum activity and had a pH optimum between 6·0 and 7·5. 3. The soluble fractions of various rat tissues showed decreasing activity in the following order: liver, adrenal, kidney, lung, spleen, testis, heart; brain was inactive. 4. With the exception of aniline and aniline derivatives all the arylamines tested were effective as acetyl acceptors but aromatic compounds with side-chain amino groups were inactive. 5. The N-hydroxyacetamido derivatives of 2-naphthylamine, 4-amino-biphenyl and 2-aminofluorene were active acetyl donors but N-hydroxyacetanilide showed only slight activity. Acetyl-CoA was not a donor. 6. Some properties of the enzyme are compared with those of other acetyltransferases. PMID:5969287

  6. Fatal Intoxication with Acetyl Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Susan M; Haikal, Nabila A; Kraner, James C

    2016-01-01

    Among the new psychoactive substances encountered in forensic investigations is the opioid, acetyl fentanyl. The death of a 28-year-old man from recreational use of this compound is reported. The decedent was found in the bathroom of his residence with a tourniquet secured around his arm and a syringe nearby. Postmortem examination findings included marked pulmonary and cerebral edema and needle track marks. Toxicological analysis revealed acetyl fentanyl in subclavian blood, liver, vitreous fluid, and urine at concentrations of 235 ng/mL, 2400 ng/g, 131 ng/mL, and 234 ng/mL, respectively. Acetyl fentanyl was also detected in the accompanying syringe. Death was attributed to recreational acetyl fentanyl abuse, likely through intravenous administration. The blood acetyl fentanyl concentration is considerably higher than typically found in fatal fentanyl intoxications. Analysis of this case underscores the need for consideration of a wide range of compounds with potential opioid-agonist activity when investigating apparent recreational drug-related deaths. PMID:26389815

  7. Autoimmune regulator is acetylated by transcription coactivator CBP/p300

    SciTech Connect

    Saare, Mario; Rebane, Ana; Rajashekar, Balaji; Vilo, Jaak; Peterson, Paert

    2012-08-15

    The Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) is a regulator of transcription in the thymic medulla, where it controls the expression of a large set of peripheral-tissue specific genes. AIRE interacts with the transcriptional coactivator and acetyltransferase CBP and synergistically cooperates with it in transcriptional activation. Here, we aimed to study a possible role of AIRE acetylation in the modulation of its activity. We found that AIRE is acetylated in tissue culture cells and this acetylation is enhanced by overexpression of CBP and the CBP paralog p300. The acetylated lysines were located within nuclear localization signal and SAND domain. AIRE with mutations that mimicked acetylated K243 and K253 in the SAND domain had reduced transactivation activity and accumulated into fewer and larger nuclear bodies, whereas mutations that mimicked the unacetylated lysines were functionally similar to wild-type AIRE. Analogously to CBP, p300 localized to AIRE-containing nuclear bodies, however, the overexpression of p300 did not enhance the transcriptional activation of AIRE-regulated genes. Further studies showed that overexpression of p300 stabilized the AIRE protein. Interestingly, gene expression profiling revealed that AIRE, with mutations mimicking K243/K253 acetylation in SAND, was able to activate gene expression, although the affected genes were different and the activation level was lower from those regulated by wild-type AIRE. Our results suggest that the AIRE acetylation can influence the selection of AIRE activated genes. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE is acetylated by the acetyltransferases p300 and CBP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation occurs between CARD and SAND domains and within the SAND domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation increases the size of AIRE nuclear dots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylation increases AIRE protein stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIRE acetylation mimic regulates a different set of AIRE

  8. Local-global alignment for finding 3D similarities in protein structures

    DOEpatents

    Zemla, Adam T.

    2011-09-20

    A method of finding 3D similarities in protein structures of a first molecule and a second molecule. The method comprises providing preselected information regarding the first molecule and the second molecule. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Longest Continuous Segments (LCS) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Global Distance Test (GDT) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Local Global Alignment Scoring function (LGA_S) analysis. Verifying constructed alignment and repeating the steps to find the regions of 3D similarities in protein structures.

  9. Global analysis of cellular protein flux quantifies the selectivity of basal autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Ghaemmaghami, Sina

    2016-08-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the macroautophagy pathway has been implicated in the degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged organelles. Although it has been demonstrated that macroautophagy can selectively degrade specific targets, its contribution to the basal turnover of cellular proteins had previously not been quantified on proteome-wide scales. In a recent study, we utilized dynamic proteomics to provide a global comparison of protein half-lives between wild-type and autophagy-deficient cells. Our results indicated that in quiescent fibroblasts, macroautophagy contributes to the basal turnover of a substantial fraction of the proteome. However, the contribution of macroautophagy to constitutive protein turnover is variable within the proteome. The methodology outlined in the study provides a global strategy for quantifying the selectivity of basal macroautophagy. PMID:27248575

  10. Aspirin inhibits glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in HCT 116 cells through acetylation: Identification of aspirin-acetylated sites

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Kumar, D. Ramesh; Alfonso, Lloyd F.; Marimuthu, Srinivasan; Bhat, G. Jayarama

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose phosphate pathway, and generates ribose sugars, which are required for nucleic acid synthesis, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), which is important for neutralization of oxidative stress. The expression of G6PD is elevated in several types of tumor, including colon, breast and lung cancer, and has been implicated in cancer cell growth. Our previous study demonstrated that exposure of HCT 116 human colorectal cancer cells to aspirin caused acetylation of G6PD, and this was associated with a decrease in its enzyme activity. In the present study, this observation was expanded to HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, in order to compare aspirin-mediated acetylation of G6PD and its activity between HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. In addition, the present study aimed to determine the acetylation targets of aspirin on recombinant G6PD to provide an insight into the mechanisms of inhibition. The results demonstrated that the extent of G6PD acetylation was significantly higher in HCT 116 cells compared with in HT-29 cells; accordingly, a greater reduction in G6PD enzyme activity was observed in the HCT 116 cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of aspirin-acetylated G6PD (isoform a) revealed that aspirin acetylated a total of 14 lysine residues, which were dispersed throughout the length of the G6PD protein. One of the important amino acid targets of aspirin included lysine 235 (K235, in isoform a) and this corresponds to K205 in isoform b, which has previously been identified as being important for catalysis. Acetylation of G6PD at several sites, including K235 (K205 in isoform b), may mediate inhibition of G6PD activity, which may contribute to the ability of aspirin to exert anticancer effects through decreased synthesis of ribose sugars and NADPH. PMID:27356773