Sample records for global silicate weathering

  1. New estimates of silicate weathering rates and their uncertainties in global rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Seulgi; Chamberlain, C. P.; Hilley, G. E.

    2014-06-01

    This study estimated the catchment- and global-scale weathering rates of silicate rocks from global rivers using global compilation datasets from the GEMS/Water and HYBAM. These datasets include both time-series of chemical concentrations of major elements and synchronous discharge. Using these datasets, we first examined the sources of uncertainties in catchment and global silicate weathering rates. Then, we proposed future sampling strategies and geochemical analyses to estimate accurate silicate weathering rates in global rivers and to reduce uncertainties in their estimates. For catchment silicate weathering rates, we considered uncertainties due to sampling frequency and variability in river discharge, concentration, and attribution of weathering to different chemical sources. Our results showed that uncertainties in catchment-scale silicate weathering rates were due mostly to the variations in discharge and cation fractions from silicate substrates. To calculate unbiased silicate weathering rates accounting for the variations from discharge and concentrations, we suggest that at least 10 and preferably ?40 temporal chemical data points with synchronous discharge from each river are necessary. For the global silicate weathering rate, we examined uncertainties from infrequent sampling within an individual river, the extrapolation from limited rivers to a global flux, and the inverse model selections for source differentiation. For this weathering rate, we found that the main uncertainty came from the extrapolation to the global flux and the model configurations of source differentiation methods. This suggests that to reduce the uncertainties in the global silicate weathering rates, coverage of synchronous datasets of river chemistry and discharge to rivers from tectonically active regions and volcanic provinces must be extended, and catchment-specific silicate end-members for those rivers must be characterized. With current available synchronous datasets, we suggest that the global silicate weathering rate (Ca + Mg silicate weathering flux) was ?2.17 (2 ? range of 1.59-2.75) × 1012 mol/yr, and the global CO2 consumption rates from silicate weathering was ?7.85 (5.78-9.93) × 1012 mol/yr. Since current synchronous datasets are not available for some rivers in tectonically active regions and highly active volcanic rocks, our estimate should be considered as lower limit of estimates. Including the estimates from volcanic provinces from Dessert et al. (2003), the global CO2 consumption rates from silicates can be estimated as 11.93 (9.86-14.01) × 1012 mol/yr, which is similar to the previous estimates of Gaillardet et al. (1999).

  2. A framework for predicting global silicate weathering and CO2 drawdown rates over geologic time-scales

    PubMed Central

    Hilley, George E.; Porder, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Global silicate weathering drives long-time-scale fluctuations in atmospheric CO2. While tectonics, climate, and rock-type influence silicate weathering, it is unclear how these factors combine to drive global rates. Here, we explore whether local erosion rates, GCM-derived dust fluxes, temperature, and water balance can capture global variation in silicate weathering. Our spatially explicit approach predicts 1.9–4.6 × 1013 mols of Si weathered globally per year, within a factor of 4–10 of estimates of global silicate fluxes derived from riverine measurements. Similarly, our watershed-based estimates are within a factor of 4–18 (mean of 5.3) of the silica fluxes measured in the world's ten largest rivers. Eighty percent of total global silicate weathering product traveling as dissolved load occurs within a narrow range (0.01–0.5 mm/year) of erosion rates. Assuming each mol of Mg or Ca reacts with 1 mol of CO2, 1.5–3.3 × 108 tons/year of CO2 is consumed by silicate weathering, consistent with previously published estimates. Approximately 50% of this drawdown occurs in the world's active mountain belts, emphasizing the importance of tectonic regulation of global climate over geologic timescales. PMID:18952842

  3. Global silicate weathering and CO 2 consumption rates deduced from the chemistry of large rivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Gaillardet; B. Dupré; P. Louvat; C. J. Allègre

    1999-01-01

    The main problem associated with the study of silicate weathering using river dissolved load is that the main control of solute chemistry is lithology and that all rivers are influenced by carbonate and evaporite weathering. In this paper, newly compiled data on the 60 largest rivers of the world are used to calculate the contribution of main lithologies, rain and

  4. Natural Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. White

    2003-01-01

    Silicates constitute more than 90% of the rocks exposed at Earth's land surface (Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971). Most primary minerals comprising these rocks are thermodynamically unstable at surface pressure\\/temperature conditions and are therefore susceptible to chemical weathering. Such weathering has long been of interest in the natural sciences. Hartt (1853) correctly attributed chemical weathering to \\

  5. Temperature dependence of silicate weathering in nature: How strong a negative feedback on long-term accumulation of atmospheric CO2 and global greenhouse warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velbel, Michael Anthony

    1993-12-01

    Estimation of the temperature dependence of natural feldspar weathering in two catchments at different elevations yields an apparent Arrhenius activation energy of 18.4 kcal/mol (77.0 kJ/mol), much higher than most laboratory values. This finding supports recent suggestions that hydrolytic weathering of silicate minerals may consume carbonic acid and thereby remove atmospheric carbon dioxide more rapidly with increasing temperature than previously thought. This result provides a stronger negative feedback on long-term greenhouse warming than has been assumed in most models of global carbon cycling. The present estimate was determined from the ratio of feldspar weathering rates (determined by geochemical mass balance) in the southern Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, United States. Temperature (a function of elevation) is the only factor that differs between the two catchments; parent rock type, aspect, hillslope hydrology, and vegetation type and successional stage are the same in both.

  6. The geoengineering potential of artificially enhanced silicate weathering of olivine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Köhler; Jens Hartmann; Dieter A. Wolf-Gladrow

    2010-01-01

    Geoengineering is a proposed action to manipulate Earth's climate in order to counteract global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We investigate in more detail the potential of a specific geoengineering technique, the carbon sequestration by artificially enhanced silicate weathering via the dissolution of olivine. This approach would not only operate against rising temperatures but would also oppose ocean acidification,

  7. Controlling The Global Weather.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Ross N.

    2002-02-01

    the weather controller is extremely complex, the existence of the required technology is plausible in the time range of several decades.While the concept of controlling the weather has often appeared in science fiction literature, this statement of the problem provides a scientific basis and a system architecture to actually implement global weather control. Large-scale weather control raises important legal and ethical questions. The nation that controls its own weather will perforce control the weather of other nations. Weather "wars" are conceivable. An international treaty may be required, limiting the use of weather control technology.

  8. Effects of temperature on silicate weathering: Solute fluxes and chemical weathering in a temperate rain forest watershed, Jamieson Creek, British Columbia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin F. Turner; Art F. White; Susan L. Brantley

    2010-01-01

    Chemical weathering of silicate minerals has long been known as a sink for atmospheric CO2, and feedbacks between weathering and climate are believed to affect global climate. While warmer temperatures are believed to increase rates of weathering, weathering in cool climates can be accelerated by increased mineral exposure due to mechanical weathering by ice. In this study, chemical weathering of

  9. Impact of atmospheric CO2 levels on continental silicate weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, E.; GoddéRis, Y.; Labat, D.; Roelandt, C.; Oliva, P.; Guerrero, B.

    2010-07-01

    Anthropogenic sources are widely accepted as the dominant cause for the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Here we use the B-WITCH model to quantify the impact of increased CO2 concentrations on CO2 consumption by weathering of continental surfaces. B-WITCH couples a dynamic biogeochemistry model (LPJ) and a process-based numerical model of continental weathering (WITCH). It allows simultaneous calculations of the different components of continental weathering fluxes, terrestrial vegetation dynamics, and carbon and water fluxes. The CO2 consumption rates are estimated at four different atmospheric CO2 concentrations, from 280 up to 1120 ppmv, for 22 sites characterized by silicate lithologies (basalt, granite, or sandstones). The sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 variations is explored, while temperature and rainfall are held constant. First, we show that under 355 ppmv of atmospheric CO2, B-WITCH is able to reproduce the global pattern of weathering rates as a function of annual runoff, mean annual temperature, or latitude for silicate lithologies. When atmospheric CO2 increases, evapotranspiration generally decreases due to progressive stomatal closure, and the soil CO2 pressure increases due to enhanced biospheric productivity. As a result, vertical drainage and soil acidity increase, promoting CO2 consumption by mineral weathering. We calculate an increase of about 3% of the CO2 consumption through silicate weathering (mol ha-1 yr-1) for 100 ppmv rise in CO2. Importantly, the sensitivity of the weathering system to the CO2 rise is not uniform and heavily depends on the climatic, lithologic, pedologic, and biospheric settings.

  10. Geochemistry of large river suspended sediments: Silicate chemical weathering or recycling tracer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillardeta, J.; Dupré, B.; Allègre, C. J.

    1999-12-01

    This study focuses on the major and trace element composition of suspended sediments transported by the world's largest rivers. Its main purpose is to answer the following question: is the degree of weathering of modern river-borne particles consistent with the estimated river dissolved loads derived from silicate weathering? In agreement with the well known mobility of elements during weathering of continental rocks, we confirm that river sediments are systematically depleted in Na, K, Ba with respect to the Upper Continental Crust. For each of these mobile elements, a systematics of weathering indexes of river-borne solids is attempted. A global consistency is found between all these indexes. Important variations in weathering intensities exist. A clear dependence of weathering intensities with climate is observed for the rivers draining mostly lowlands. However, no global correlation exists between weathering intensities and climatic or relief parameters because the trend observed for lowlands is obscured by rivers draining orogenic zones. An inverse correlation between weathering intensities and suspended sediment concentrations is observed showing that the regions having the highest rates of physical denudation produce the least weathered sediments. Finally, chemical and physical weathering are compared through the use of a simple steady state model. We show that the weathering intensities of large river suspended sediments can only be reconciled with the (silicate-derived) dissolved load of rivers, by admitting that most of the continental rocks submitted to weathering in large river basins have already suffered previous weathering cycles. A simple graphical method is proposed for calculating the proportion of sedimentary recycling in large river basins. Finally, even if orogenic zones produce weakly weathered sediments, we emphasize the fact that silicate chemical weathering rates (and hence CO 2 consumption rates by silicate weathering) are greatly enhanced in mountains simply because the sediment yields in orogenic drainage basins are higher. Hence, the parameters that control chemical weathering rates would be those that control physical denudation rates.

  11. Silicate weathering and CO2 consumption within agricultural landscapes, the Ohio-Tennessee River Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myriad studies have shown the extent of human alteration to global biogeochemical cycles. Yet, there is only a limited understanding of the influence that humans have over silicate weathering fluxes; fluxes that have regulated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and global climate over geologi...

  12. Geoengineering potential of artificially enhanced silicate weathering of olivine

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Peter; Hartmann, Jens; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.

    2010-01-01

    Geoengineering is a proposed action to manipulate Earth’s climate in order to counteract global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We investigate the potential of a specific geoengineering technique, carbon sequestration by artificially enhanced silicate weathering via the dissolution of olivine. This approach would not only operate against rising temperatures but would also oppose ocean acidification, because it influences the global climate via the carbon cycle. If important details of the marine chemistry are taken into consideration, a new mass ratio of CO2 sequestration per olivine dissolution of about 1 is achieved, 20% smaller than previously assumed. We calculate that this approach has the potential to sequestrate up to 1 Pg of C per year directly, if olivine is distributed as fine powder over land areas of the humid tropics, but this rate is limited by the saturation concentration of silicic acid. In our calculations for the Amazon and Congo river catchments, a maximum annual dissolution of 1.8 and 0.4 Pg of olivine seems possible, corresponding to the sequestration of 0.5 and 0.1 Pg of C per year, but these upper limit sequestration rates come at the environmental cost of pH values in the rivers rising to 8.2. Open water dissolution of fine-grained olivine and an enhancement of the biological pump by the rising riverine input of silicic acid might increase our estimate of the carbon sequestration, but additional research is needed here. We finally calculate with a carbon cycle model the consequences of sequestration rates of 1–5 Pg of C per year for the 21st century by this technique. PMID:21059941

  13. Geoengineering potential of artificially enhanced silicate weathering of olivine.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Peter; Hartmann, Jens; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A

    2010-11-23

    Geoengineering is a proposed action to manipulate Earth's climate in order to counteract global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We investigate the potential of a specific geoengineering technique, carbon sequestration by artificially enhanced silicate weathering via the dissolution of olivine. This approach would not only operate against rising temperatures but would also oppose ocean acidification, because it influences the global climate via the carbon cycle. If important details of the marine chemistry are taken into consideration, a new mass ratio of CO(2) sequestration per olivine dissolution of about 1 is achieved, 20% smaller than previously assumed. We calculate that this approach has the potential to sequestrate up to 1 Pg of C per year directly, if olivine is distributed as fine powder over land areas of the humid tropics, but this rate is limited by the saturation concentration of silicic acid. In our calculations for the Amazon and Congo river catchments, a maximum annual dissolution of 1.8 and 0.4 Pg of olivine seems possible, corresponding to the sequestration of 0.5 and 0.1 Pg of C per year, but these upper limit sequestration rates come at the environmental cost of pH values in the rivers rising to 8.2. Open water dissolution of fine-grained olivine and an enhancement of the biological pump by the rising riverine input of silicic acid might increase our estimate of the carbon sequestration, but additional research is needed here. We finally calculate with a carbon cycle model the consequences of sequestration rates of 1-5 Pg of C per year for the 21st century by this technique. PMID:21059941

  14. Global Weather Patterns

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This tutorial introduces students to global weather patterns and how they affect the kinds of trees and plants that grow in different latitudes of the Earth. The discussion covers the tropics and the lush rainforests that live there, temperate forests in the mid-latitudes, and boreal forests in the far north. There is also a description of how treeless areas occur in various climate zones (desert, tundra, savannah), and how plants adapt to low-water conditions in the desert. A quiz and glossary are included.

  15. Evolution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi intensifies silicate mineral weathering.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Joe; Beerling, David J; Banwart, Steve A; Kakonyi, Gabriella; Romero-Gonzalez, Maria E; Leake, Jonathan R

    2012-12-23

    Forested ecosystems diversified more than 350 Ma to become major engines of continental silicate weathering, regulating the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by driving calcium export into ocean carbonates. Our field experiments with mature trees demonstrate intensification of this weathering engine as tree lineages diversified in concert with their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Preferential hyphal colonization of the calcium silicate-bearing rock, basalt, progressively increased with advancement from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) to later, independently evolved ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi, and from gymnosperm to angiosperm hosts with both fungal groups. This led to 'trenching' of silicate mineral surfaces by AM and EM fungi, with EM gymnosperms and angiosperms releasing calcium from basalt at twice the rate of AM gymnosperms. Our findings indicate mycorrhiza-driven weathering may have originated hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously recognized and subsequently intensified with the evolution of trees and mycorrhizas to affect the Earth's long-term CO(2) and climate history. PMID:22859556

  16. Evolution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi intensifies silicate mineral weathering

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, Joe; Beerling, David J.; Banwart, Steve A.; Kakonyi, Gabriella; Romero-Gonzalez, Maria E.; Leake, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Forested ecosystems diversified more than 350 Ma to become major engines of continental silicate weathering, regulating the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by driving calcium export into ocean carbonates. Our field experiments with mature trees demonstrate intensification of this weathering engine as tree lineages diversified in concert with their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Preferential hyphal colonization of the calcium silicate-bearing rock, basalt, progressively increased with advancement from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) to later, independently evolved ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi, and from gymnosperm to angiosperm hosts with both fungal groups. This led to ‘trenching’ of silicate mineral surfaces by AM and EM fungi, with EM gymnosperms and angiosperms releasing calcium from basalt at twice the rate of AM gymnosperms. Our findings indicate mycorrhiza-driven weathering may have originated hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously recognized and subsequently intensified with the evolution of trees and mycorrhizas to affect the Earth's long-term CO2 and climate history. PMID:22859556

  17. Space Weather and Global Warming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George Carruthers

    2009-01-01

    This presentation will give discussions of the broad topic of Space Weather, and of Global Warming (these have some associations, as well as differences). Both have the Sun as the major energy source; short-term differences in solar activity are the sources of space weather (which affects the entire solar system, not just our Earth), whereas global warming is a longer-term

  18. Direct measurement of the combined effects of lichen, rainfall, and temperature on silicate weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, P.V.; Dorn, R.I.; Brazel, A.J.; Clark, J.; Moore, R.B.; Glidewell, T.

    1999-10-01

    A key uncertainty in models of the global carbonate-silicate cycle and long-term climate is the way that silicates weather under different climatologic conditions, and in the presence or absence of organic activity. Digital imaging of basalts in Hawaii resolves the coupling between temperature, rainfall, and weathering in the presence and absence of lichens. Activation energies for abiotic dissolution of plagioclase (23.1 {+-} 2.5 kcal/mol) and olivine (21.3 {+-} 2.7 kcal/mol) are similar to those measured in the laboratory, and are roughly double those measured from samples taken underneath lichen. Abiotic weathering rates appear to be proportional to rainfall. Dissolution of plagioclase and olivine underneath lichen is far more sensitive to rainfall.

  19. Weather: Global Awareness Tour

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    In this problem-based learning scenario, students are challenged to plan concert locations for their favorite musical artists, using TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) satellite data and other resources to locate regions at risk for extreme weather. A math extension activity is included, along with a glossary, teacher notes, student worksheets, assessment rubrics, and an appendix about problem-based learning.

  20. An Evaluation of Ethyl Silicate-Based Grouts for Weathered Silicate Stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolph, Brittany Helen

    Culturally significant monuments made of weathered siliceous stone often display sub-surface condition issues such as cracks and voids. These issues require grouts that are ideally compatible with the composition and properties of the substrate. Based on the successful application of ethyl silicates as consolidants in recent literature, this study examines possible formulation pathways for the development of a grout incorporating ethyl silicate. Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTL) as a catalyst, silicone oil (PDMS), various grades of ground quartz, sepiolite, and hollow glass spheres were used in differing concentrations to create samples. These were visually and physically assessed on workability, separation, shrinkage, cracking, strength, and flexibility. Quantitative analysis was performed on selected formulations using UV-Vis-NIR reflectance spectroscopy in coordination with a weight loss experiment to investigate kinetics, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Successful formulations tended to include oligomeric TEOS, crushed quartz of mixed grades, sepiolite powder, and PDMS, and show promise for future investigations.

  1. Global CO2-consumption by chemical weathering: What is the contribution of highly active weathering regions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Jens; Jansen, Nils; Dürr, Hans H.; Kempe, Stephan; Köhler, Peter

    2010-05-01

    CO2-consumption by chemical weathering of silicates and resulting silicate/carbonate weathering ratios influences the terrestrial lateral inorganic carbon flux to the ocean and long-term climate changes. However, little is known of the spatial extension of highly active weathering regions and their proportion of global CO2-consumption. As those regions may be of significant importance for global climate change, global CO2-consumption is calculated here at high resolution, to adequately represent them. In previous studies global CO2-consumption is estimated using two different approaches: i) a reverse approach based on hydrochemical fluxes from large rivers and ii) a forward approach applying spatially explicit a function for CO2-consumption. The first approach results in an estimate without providing a spatial resolution for highly active regions and the second approach applied six lithological classes while including three sediment classes (shale, sandstone and carbonate rock) based at a 1° or 2° grid resolution. It remained uncertain, if the applied lithological classification schemes represent adequately CO2-consumption from sediments on a global scale (as well as liberation of other elements like phosphorus or silicon by chemical weatheirng). This is due to the large variability of sediment properties, their diagenetic history and the contribution from carbonates apparent in silicate dominated lithological classes. To address these issues, a CO2-consumption model, trained at high-resolution data, is applied here to a global vector based lithological map with 15 lithological classes. The calibration data were obtained from areas representing a wide range of weathering rates. Resulting global CO2-consumption by chemical weathering is similar to earlier estimates (237 Mt C a-1) but the proportion of silicate weathering is 63%, and thus larger than previous estimates (49 to 60%). The application of the enhanced lithological classification scheme reveals that it is important to distinguish among the various types of sedimentary rocks and their diagenetic history to evaluate the spatial distribution of rock weathering and thus lateral inorganic carbon fluxes. Results highlight the role of hotspots (>10 times global average weathering rates) and hyperactive areas (5 to 10 times global average rates). Only 9% of the global exorheic area is responsible for about 50% of CO2- consumption by chemical weathering (or if hotspots and hyperactive areas are considered: 3.4% of exorheic surface area corresponds to 28% of global CO2-consumption). The contribution of endorheic areas to the global CO2-consumption is with 3.7 Mt C a-1 only minor. A significant impact on the global CO2-consumption rate can be expected if identified highly active areas are affected by changes in the overall spatial patterns of the hydrological cycle due to ongoing global climate change. Specifically if comparing the Last Glacial Maximum with present conditions it is probable that also the global carbon cycle has been affected by those changes. It is expected that results will contribute to improve global carbon and global circulation models. In addition, recognizing chemical weathering rates and geochemical composition of certain lithological classes may be of value for studies focusing on biological aspects of the carbon cycles (e.g. studies needing information on the abundance of phosphorus or silica in the soil or aquatic system). Reference: Hartmann, J., Kempe, S, Dürr, H.H., Jansen, N. (2009) Global CO2-consumption by chemical weathering: What is the contribution of highly active weathering regions?. Global and Planetary Change, 69, 185-194. doi:10.1016/j.gloplacha.2009.07.007

  2. Global warming, bad weather, insurance losses and the global economy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. C. Low; S. Shen

    1996-01-01

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. The impact on the insurance industry is described. Why global warming in the near term causes very bad weather is explained. The continuing trend of very bad weather and the future impact on the insurance industry is explored. How very bad weather can affect the global financial market is explained.

  3. A new CO 2 disposal process via artificial weathering of calcium silicate accelerated by acetic acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Kakizawa; A. Yamasaki; Y. Yanagisawa

    2001-01-01

    A new disposal process for anthropogenic CO2 via an artificially accelerated weathering reaction is proposed to counteract global warming. The process is essentially composed of the following two steps:(1)CaSiO3+2CH3COOH?Ca2++2CH3COO?+H2O+SiO2(2)Ca2++2CH3COO?+CO2+H2O?CaCO3?+2CH3COOHStep (1) is the extraction of calcium ions by acetic acid from calcium silicate, for example, wollastonite rocks. Step (2) is the deposition of calcium carbonate from the solution of calcium ions

  4. The effect of land plants on weathering rates of silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Drever, J.I. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Land plants and their associated microbiota directly affect silicate mineral weathering in several ways: by generation of chelating ligands, by modifying pH through production of CO[sub 2] or organic acids, and by altering the physical properties of a soil, particularly the exposed surface areas of minerals and the residence time of water. In laboratory experiments far from equilibrium, 1 mM oxalate (a strong chelator of Al) has a negligible effect on the dissolution rate of alkali feldspars, but some effect on calcic feldspars and olivine. By analogy to oxalate, the overall effect of organic ligands on the weathering rate of silicate minerals in nature is likely to be small, except perhaps in microenvironments adjacent to roots and fungal hyphae. The effect of pH on silicate mineral dissolution rate depends on pH: below pH 4-5, the rate increases with decreasing pH, in the circumneutral region the rate is pH-independent, and at pH values above around 8 the rate increases with increasing pH. Vegetation should thus cause an increase in weathering rate through the pH effect only where the pH is below 4-5. As an overall generalization, the effect of plants on weathering rate through changes in soil-solution chemistry is probably small for granitic rocks; it may be greater for more mafic rocks. It is the release of Ca and Mg from mafic rocks that has the greatest influence on the global CO[sub 2] budget.

  5. Silicate Weathering of Marine Terraces North of Santa Cruz, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, M. S.; White, A. F.; Harden, J.; Stonestrom, D.; Anderson, S.; Vivit, D.

    2002-12-01

    Flights of marine terraces provide a natural laboratory to study silicate weathering, soil development and hydrologic evolution of the vadose zone. Terraces north of Santa Cruz, California were cut successively into the slowly rising coastline by high stands of sea level during the Pleistocene. Subsequently, they were covered with 1 to 5 meters of sediment derived locally from Miocene sedimentary formations and Cretaceous Ben Lomond granodiorite. Terrace surfaces have been dated using cosmogenic radionuclides (CRN) Be10 and 26Al by Lesley Perg and others as 65 ka, 92 ka, 137 ka 139 ka and 226 ka. Soils from five terraces have been sampled and instrumented with suction water samplers, tensiometers, and soil gas samplers. Physical characterization of the sediments includes bulk chemistry, grain size, and specific surface area. Chemical analyses of the sediments were done by XRF. Mass transfer coefficients indicating how much of a component has been lost due to weathering, were calculated using SiO2 as the initial proxy for a conservative component based on a high content of detrital quartz. Iron and Aluminum were lost from the topsoils (<0.5 m) and gained in the subsoils (0.5m to 2m) relative to Si. Evidence for the transfer of Fe and Al from upper to lower horizons is consistent with pedogenic formation of aluminosilicate clays and iron oxy/hydroxides in the subsoil. The argillic B horizons contain significant amounts of kaolinite and extractable iron oxides at roughly the same depths where net gains of Al and Fe occur. The progressive development of these argillic horizons with time has a strong influence on pore water hydrology and solute fluxes In contrast to Al and Fe, base cations become progressively depleted in the terrace soils with age. The strong correlation between Na and Ca loss indicates rapid plagioclase weathering. Mg and K exhibit less consistency in weathering trends corresponding to partial retention of mica in the weathering profiles. The high intensity of weathering in the Santa Cruz chronosequence compared to other chronosequences in California is attributed to wet climatic conditions.

  6. Geochemistry of dissolved and suspended loads of the Seine River, France: anthropogenic impact, carbonate and silicate weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Gaillardet, J.; Allègre, C. J.

    1999-05-01

    This study focuses on the chemistry of the Seine river system, one of the major rivers in Europe, and constitutes the first geochemical investigation of both suspended and dissolved loads of this river. The Seine river drains a typical Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary basin: the Paris basin, constituted of limestones mixed or interbedded with terrigenous sediments derived from the paleoreliefs bordering the Mesozoic and Cenozoic seas. In the context of quantifying the global influence of carbonate and silicate weathering on atmospheric CO 2 consumption, the Seine river offers the possibility of examining weathering rates in a flat sedimentary environment, under temperate climatic conditions. One of the major problems associated with the Seine river, as with many temperate rivers, is pollution. We propose, in this paper, 2 approaches in order to correct the dissolved load of the Seine river for anthropogenic inputs and to calculate weathering rates of carbonates and silicates. The first uses the dissolved load of rivers and tries to allocate the different solutes to different sources. A mixing model, based on elemental ratios, is established and solved by an inversion technique. The second approach consists in using the suspended load geochemistry. Under steady state conditions, we show that the geochemistry of suspended sediments makes it possible to estimate the amount of solutes released during the chemical weathering of silicates, and thus to calculate weathering rates of silicates. The total dissolved load of the Seine river at Paris can be decomposed into 2% of solutes derived from natural atmospheric sources, 7% derived from anthropogenic atmospheric sources, 6% derived from agriculture, 3% derived from communal inputs, and 82% of solutes derived from rock weathering. During high floods, the contribution of atmospheric and agriculture inputs predominates. The weathering rate of carbonates is estimated to be 48 t/km 2/yr (25 mm/1000 yr). Only 10% of carbonates are transported in a solid form, the rest being transported in solution. CO 2 consumption by carbonate weathering approaches 400 × 10 3 mol/km 2/yr. In the Seine river at Paris, about 2-3 mg/l of dissolved cations are found to originate from the chemical weathering of silicates. By taking dissolved silica into accounts, the total dissolved load derived from silicate weathering is about 6-7 mg/l. This value is minimal because biological uptake of silica probably occur in the Seine river. The chemical weathering rate of aluminosilicates is estimated to be 2 t/km 2/yr . The ratio of physical over chemical weathering of silicates range between 1 and 3 and the total (chemical and physical) erosion rates of sedimentary silicates are about 2-3 mm/kyr. The CO 2 consumption by silicate weathering 15-24 × 10 3 mol/km 2/yr and is independent of dissolved silica concentration. Silicate consumption is thus 20 times less than carbonate consumption in the Paris basin. Compared to the neighboring granitic areas, the sedimentary region drained by the Seine river has 2 to 3 times lower CO 2 consumption rates. We attribute this difference to the cation-depleted nature of the Seine basin aluminosilicates, which are of sedimentary origin. At a world scale, the chemical denudation rates found for the Seine basin are very low and comparable to those given for tropical lowland rivers draining silicates, such as the rivers of the Congo and Amazon basins, in spite of huge climatic differences. We attribute this similarity to the low mechanical denudation that characterizes these two types of regions.

  7. Global warming, bad weather, insurance losses and the global economy

    SciTech Connect

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Ltd., Singapore (Singapore); Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. The impact on the insurance industry is described. Why global warming in the near term causes very bad weather is explained. The continuing trend of very bad weather and the future impact on the insurance industry is explored. How very bad weather can affect the global financial market is explained. Taking a historical view of the development of the modern economy, the authors describe in the near term the impact of global warming on the global economy. The long term impact of global warming on the global economy and the human race is explored. Opportunities presented by global warming are described.

  8. Variation in silicate weathering across the Oligocene-Miocene boundary: evidence from lithium and neodymium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; James, R. H.; Wilson, P. A.; Anand, P.; Edgar, K. M.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in global silicate weathering have a profound effect on the global carbon cycle and Earth's climate on multi-million year timescales. They may also be associated with short-term (<105 yrs) climatic aberrations: for example, temperature anomalies observed across the Oligocene-Miocene (O/M) boundary (~23 Ma) have been linked to changes in silicate rock exposure on Antarctica. To explore this idea further, we present trace element data along with lithium and neodymium isotope data measured in the carbonate tests of O/M-aged planktic foraminifera. These temporal records of the Li and Nd isotopic composition (?7Li and ?Nd) of seawater generated from deep-sea sediment core material (ODP Site 926, Ceara Rise) require large samples of mono-specific foraminifera (~20 mg). Therefore we first assess the geochemical utility of the large, abundant taxa, Dentoglobigerina venezuelana, for the purposes of ?7Li and ?Nd analysis. Three morphotypes of D. venezuelana are defined based on the morphology of the final chamber and aperture architecture. We find that the palaeoecology of these morphotypes based on their Mg/Ca, ?18O, and ?13C compositions is suitably similar to allow them to be grouped for the purpose of generating "sample-hungry" continental weathering records. Because the ?7Li and ?Nd of seawater are influenced by changes in continent-derived fluvial input to the oceans, records of seawater ?7Li and ?Nd have the potential to help constrain past changes in continental weathering. Li isotopes fractionate strongly during weathering processes, with ?7Li values becoming lower as weathering reactions tend towards completion. Nd sourced from ancient continental material typically possesses distinctively unradiogenic compositions (low ?Nd) relative to younger, mantle-derived sources. Finally, local vs. global signals of weathering input can be evaluated through utilisation of the differing oceanic residence times of Li (~1 Myrs) and Nd (~1 kyrs). To this end, we present a 4 Myr isotopic and trace element record for the O/M boundary, and we use these new data to better constrain the links between weathering and climate during this interval of significant climate change.

  9. Value of global weather sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1998-12-23

    Long-range weather predictions have great scientific and economic potential, but require precise global observations. Small balloon transponders could serve as lagrangian trace particles to measure the vector wind, which is the primary input to long-range numerical forecasts. The wind field is difficult to measure; it is at present poorly sampled globally. Distance measuring equipment (DME) triangulation of signals from roughly a million transponders could sample it with sufficient accuracy to support {approximately} two week forecasts. Such forecasts would have great scientific and economic potential which is estimated below. DME uses small, low-power transmitters on each transponder to broadcast short, low-power messages that are detected by several small receivers and forwarded to the ground station for processing of position, velocity, and state information. Thus, the transponder is little more than a balloon with a small radio, which should only weigh a few grams and cost a few dollars.

  10. Lithium isotope history of Cenozoic seawater: changes in silicate weathering and reverse weathering.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sambuddha; Froelich, Philip N

    2012-02-17

    Weathering of uplifted continental rocks consumes carbon dioxide and transports cations to the oceans, thereby playing a critical role in controlling both seawater chemistry and climate. However, there are few archives of seawater chemical change that reveal shifts in global tectonic forces connecting Earth ocean-climate processes. We present a 68-million-year record of lithium isotopes in seawater (?(7)Li(SW)) reconstructed from planktonic foraminifera. From the Paleocene (60 million years ago) to the present, ?(7)Li(SW) rose by 9 per mil (‰), requiring large changes in continental weathering and seafloor reverse weathering that are consistent with increased tectonic uplift, more rapid continental denudation, increasingly incongruent continental weathering (lower chemical weathering intensity), and more rapid CO(2) drawdown. A 5‰ drop in ?(7)Li(SW) across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary cannot be produced by an impactor or by Deccan trap volcanism, suggesting large-scale continental denudation. PMID:22282473

  11. The effect of time on the weathering of silicate minerals: why do weathering rates differ in the laboratory and field?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Art F. White; Susan L. Brantley

    2003-01-01

    The correlation between decreasing reaction rates of silicate minerals and increasing duration of chemical weathering was investigated for both experimental and field conditions. Column studies, using freshly prepared Panola Granite, produced ambient plagioclase weathering rates that decreased parabolically over 6 years to a final rate of 7.0×10?14 mol m?2 s?1. In contrast, the corresponding plagioclase reaction rate for partially kaolinized

  12. Process-based modeling of silicate mineral weathering responses to increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banwart, Steven A.; Berg, Astrid; Beerling, David J.

    2009-12-01

    A mathematical model describes silicate mineral weathering processes in modern soils located in the boreal coniferous region of northern Europe. The process model results demonstrate a stabilizing biological feedback mechanism between atmospheric CO2 levels and silicate weathering rates as is generally postulated for atmospheric evolution. The process model feedback response agrees within a factor of 2 of that calculated by a weathering feedback function of the type generally employed in global geochemical carbon cycle models of the Earth's Phanerozoic CO2 history. Sensitivity analysis of parameter values in the process model provides insight into the key mechanisms that influence the strength of the biological feedback to weathering. First, the process model accounts for the alkalinity released by weathering, whereby its acceleration stabilizes pH at values that are higher than expected. Although the process model yields faster weathering with increasing temperature, because of activation energy effects on mineral dissolution kinetics at warmer temperature, the mineral dissolution rate laws utilized in the process model also result in lower dissolution rates at higher pH values. Hence, as dissolution rates increase under warmer conditions, more alkalinity is released by the weathering reaction, helping maintain higher pH values thus stabilizing the weathering rate. Second, the process model yields a relatively low sensitivity of soil pH to increasing plant productivity. This is due to more rapid decomposition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) under warmer conditions. Because DOC fluxes strongly influence the soil water proton balance and pH, this increased decomposition rate dampens the feedback between productivity and weathering. The process model is most sensitive to parameters reflecting soil structure; depth, porosity, and water content. This suggests that the role of biota to influence these characteristics of the weathering profile is as important, if not more important, than the role of biota to influence mineral dissolution rates through changes in soil water chemistry. This process-modeling approach to quantify the biological weathering feedback to atmospheric CO2 demonstrates the potential for a far more mechanistic description of weathering feedback in simulations of the global geochemical carbon cycle.

  13. Global ocean data for global weather and climate monitoring

    E-print Network

    Stoffelen, Ad

    of oceans ­ could only make use of relatively isolated data to project the global patterns of wavesJason-2 Global ocean data for global weather and climate monitoring #12;Global ocean data to meet worldwide challenges 16/01/08 - "'Big climate impact' on UK coasts" (BBC Online) March 2008 - "Le

  14. Control of Regional and Global Weather

    E-print Network

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-09

    Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary idea for regional and global weather control. He offers to cover cities, bad regions of country, full country or a continent by a thin closed film with control clarity located at a top limit of the Earth troposphere (4 - 6 km). The film is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric pressure and connected to ground by thin cables. It is known, the troposphere defines the Earth weather. Authors show this closed dome allows to do a full control of the weather in a given region (the day is always fine, the rain is only in night, no strong wind). The average Earth (white cloudy) reflectance equal 0.3 - 0.5. That means the Earth losses about 0.3 - 0.5 of a solar energy. The dome controls the clarity of film and converts the cold regions to subtropics and creates the hot deserts, desolate wildernesses to the prosperous regions with temperate climate. That is a realistic and the cheapest method of the weather control in the Earth at the current time. Key words: Global weather control, gigantic film dome, converting a cold region to subtropics, converting desolate wilderness to a prosperous region.

  15. Global economic impacts of severe Space Weather.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte In Den Baeumen, Hagen; Cairns, Iver

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) strong enough to create electromagnetic effects at latitudes below the auroral oval are frequent events, and could have substantial impacts on electric power transmission and telecommunication grids. Modern society’s heavy reliance on these domestic and international networks increases our susceptibility to such a severe Space Weather event. Using a new high-resolution model of the global economy we simulate the economic impact of large CMEs for 3 different planetary orientations. We account for the economic impacts within the countries directly affected as well as the post-disaster economic shock in partner economies through international trade. For the CMEs modeled the total global economic impacts would range from US 380 billion to US 1 trillion. Of this total economic shock 50 % would be felt in countries outside the zone of direct impact, leading to a loss in global GDP of 0.1 - 1 %. A severe Space Weather event could lead to global economic damages of the same order as other weather disasters, climate change, and extreme financial crisis.

  16. Silicate weathering mechanisms determined using soil solutions held at high matric potential

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Gérard; J. Ranger; C. Ménétrier; P. Bonnaud

    2003-01-01

    We present evidence of surface-controlled and proton-promoted chemical weathering of primary silicates in a brown acidic soil (Vauxrenard, Rhône, France). We used aqueous silica (Si) in soil solutions held at high matric potential (180–1600 kPa), which are representative of solutions reacting with soil solids. Si concentration was well correlated with H+ concentration and to a lesser extent with dissolved organic

  17. Li isotope composition in coral skeleton as a potential proxy for the silicate weathering intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; You, C.; Lin, P.; Wang, R.; Chung, C.

    2009-12-01

    Lithium (Li) is particularly useful for tracing silicate weathering intensity because of its high concentrations in silicate rocks, and the large isotopic fractionations between the two Li isotopes due to relatively large mass difference. Studies on inorganically precipitated aragonites and natural corals have shown little temperature effect on Li isotope fractionation in aragonitic carbonates. This suggests that the Li isotope in carbonates can provide valuable information on Li isotope composition in ambient waters and hence for silicate weathering intensity in the coastal ocean. In this study, the massive corals, Porities lobata, collected from Lamay Island, ~15 km offshore the Kao-Ping River, southwestern Taiwan, were selected to systematically examine the potential influence of riverine Li inputs. Additionally, coral samples from Lanyu Island, offshore southeastern Taiwan, were chosen as a reference site for comparison. Preliminary result showed that the coralline Li isotope composition in the Lamay Island ranged from 20.9‰ to 19.9‰ (±0.2‰, 2?), and can faithfully record the seasonal variation of riverine inputs (varying from 17.2‰ at wet season to 16.1‰ at dry season). In contrast, only less than 0.4‰ variation (from 21.6‰ to 21.2‰) was observed in the Lanyu coral. This study provides the first direct evidence on the use of coralline Li isotope for tracing the history of weathering intensity. However, further investigation on other controlling factors, such as coral growth rate and biological activity, for the Li isotope fractionation and the Li isotope behavior in the river catchment are necessary to better understand the reliability of this novel proxy for weathering conditions in the past.

  18. Temporal and spatial variation of surface reaction rates in porous media: Applications to silicate weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Hunt, A. G.; Skinner, T. E.; Ewing, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Percolation theory provides a promising framework for modeling transport in heterogeneous porous media, including hydraulic and electrical conductivity, air permeability, gas diffusivity, and solute transport. Using percolation concepts (e.g., critical path analysis, fractal scaling of percolation clusters, and cluster statistics), we developed a physically-based model for predicting solute transport. Our model predicted spatial solute distributions as a function of time, and arrival time distributions as a function of system size. Our solute transport predictions gave good matches to a wide range of experiments. We now apply our solute transport model to silicate weathering. We assume that surface chemical reactions are at equilibrium at the scale of a single pore, but that at larger length scales, reactions are limited by transport of reactants or products. Using results from published field experiments, we find that the temporal and spatial dependence derived from solute velocity successfully predicts the measured time- and length-dependence of reaction rates and weathering of silicate minerals over a wide range of time and length scale. A similar analysis of lab experiments (uranium breakthrough curves measured in two short and long columns from the Hanford site) indicates that normalized reaction rate versus normalized time follow 2D invasion and 3D random percolation.

  19. Global chemical weathering and associated P-release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Jens; Moosdorf, Nils; Lauerwald, Ronny; Hinderer, Matthias; West, A. Joshua

    2014-05-01

    Chemical weathering releases phosphorus to soils and ecosystems. To improve understanding of the spatial distribution of the global P-release characteristics, a model framework for estimating global chemical weathering rates was coupled with geochemical information. Results suggest that the global soil shielding reduces chemical weathering fluxes by about 44%, compared to an Earth surface with no deeply weathered soils but relatively young rock surfaces (e.g. as in volcanic arc and other tectonically active areas). About 70% of the weathering fluxes globally derive from 10% of the land area, with Southeast Asia being a primary "hot spot" of chemical weathering and for P-release. In contrast, only 50% of runoff is attributed to 10% of the land area; thus the global chemical weathering rating curve is to some extent disconnected from the global runoff curve due to the spatially heterogeneous climate as well as differences in rock and soil properties. In addition to total chemical weathering fluxes, the release of P, a nutrient that controls biological productivity at large spatial scales, is affected by the spatial correlation between runoff, lithology, temperature and soil properties. The areal abundance of deeply weathered soils in Earth's past may have influenced weathering fluxes and P-fuelled biological productivity significantly, specifically in the case of larger climate shifts when high runoff fields shift to areas with thinner soils or areas with more weatherable rocks and relatively increased P-content. This observation may be particularly important for spatially resolved Earth system models targeting geological time scales. The full research text can be found in: Hartmann, J., N. Moosdorf, R. Lauerwald, M. Hinderer, A.J. West (2014) Global chemical weathering and associated P-release - the role of lithology, temperature and soil properties. Chemical Geology 363, 145-163. doi: 10.1016/j.chemgeo.2013.10.025 (open access)

  20. BET surface area distributions in polar stream sediments: Implications for silicate weathering in a cold-arid environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marra, Kristen R.; Elwood Madden, Megan E; Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Hall, Brenda L

    2014-01-01

    BET surface area values are critical for quantifying the amount of potentially reactive sediments available for chemical weathering and ultimately, prediction of silicate weathering fluxes. BET surface area values of fine-grained (<62.5 ?m) sediment from the hyporheic zone of polar glacial streams in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica (Wright and Taylor Valleys) exhibit a wide range (2.5–70.6 m2/g) of surface area values. Samples from one (Delta Stream, Taylor Valley) of the four sampled stream transects exhibit high values (up to 70.6 m2/g), which greatly exceed surface area values from three temperate proglacial streams (0.3–12.1 m2/g). Only Clark stream in Wright Valley exhibits a robust trend with distance, wherein surface area systematically decreases (and particle size increases) in the mud fraction downstream, interpreted to reflect rapid dissolution processes in the weathering environment. The remaining transects exhibit a range in variability in surface area distributions along the length of the channel, likely related to variations in eolian input to exposed channel beds, adjacent snow drifts, and to glacier surfaces, where dust is trapped and subsequently liberated during summer melting. Additionally, variations in stream discharge rate, which mobilizes sediment in pulses and influences water:rock ratios, the origin and nature of the underlying drift material, and the contribution of organic acids may play significant roles in the production and mobilization of high-surface area sediment. This study highlights the presence of sediments with high surface area in cold-based glacier systems, which influences models of chemical denudation rates and the impact of glacial systems on the global carbon cycle.

  1. Controls on seasonal variations of silicate weathering and CO2 consumption in two river catchments on the NE Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fei; Jin, Zhangdong; Li, Fuchun; Yu, Jinmin; Xiao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Water samples from the Buha and Shaliu Rivers, located on the semi-arid northeastern Tibetan Plateau, were collected weekly over a one year period. The major ionic compositions of water samples were measured and the daily contents of suspended particulate material (SPM) were monitored in both rivers in order to investigate the influence of lithology, climate and physical erosion on seasonal silicate weathering. In the Shaliu River, weathering of trace amounts of calcite contributes more than 50% of the Ca2+ and HCO3- to the river water. Through high-resolution variations of Ca2+ concentrations and elemental ratios, the signal of carbonate precipitation is captured at the end of monsoon in this river. The measured physical erosion rate is only 8.7-16.0 mm/kyr in this semi-arid region, which is 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than that in the Himalaya and nearby regions. In contrast with several orders of magnitude in seasonal variations of silicate weathering rates in both catchments, the distinct lithology between the catchments only leads to a 15 times difference of annual net CO2 consumption. The correlation analysis shows that seasonal silicate weathering is strongly dependent on water discharge in the semi-arid area. The most important observation is that, unrecognized by the previous studies, both physical erosion rate and air temperature exhibit two distinct trends with silicate weathering rates (and net CO2 consumption) during the years. The two trends might suggest that temperature plays a more important role on the CO2 consumption rate before the mid-monsoon under a condition of low water discharge than that after the monsoon with a high water discharge. During the period before the mid-monsoon, the relationship between temperature and silicate weathering rate exhibits higher activation energy than after the mid-monsoon, suggesting a greater dissolution of uneasily weatherable minerals from groundwater, frozen soil, and/or dust input. The relationship between erosion and weathering during the period before the mid-monsoon indicates a faster increase of silicate weathering rate, because freezing erosion produces large amount of high surface area minerals.

  2. Silicate versus carbonate weathering in Iceland: New insights from Ca isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Andrew D.; Grace Andrews, M.; Lehn, Gregory O.; Holmden, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have measured riverine fluxes of Ca and carbonate alkalinity in Iceland with the aim of quantifying the role of basalt weathering in the long-term carbon cycle. A major assumption is that all of the Ca and alkalinity originates from the dissolution of Ca-bearing silicate minerals, such as plagioclase and clinopyroxene. However, hydrothermal calcite occurs throughout Iceland, and even trace levels are expected to impact river geochemistry owing to the mineral's high solubility and fast dissolution rate. To test this hypothesis, we used a new, high-precision Ca isotope MC-TIMS method (?44/40Ca; 2?SD = ± 0.04 ‰) to trace sources of Ca in Icelandic rivers. We report elemental and Ca isotope data for rivers, high- and low-temperature groundwater, basalt, hydrothermal calcite (including Iceland Spar), and stilbite and heulandite, which are two types of zeolites commonly formed during low-grade metamorphism of basalt. In agreement with previous research, we find that rivers have higher ?44/40Ca values than basalt, with a maximum difference of ?0.40‰. This difference may reflect isotope fractionation in the weathering zone, i.e., preferential uptake of 40Ca during clay mineral formation, adsorption, and other geochemical processes that cycle Ca. However, calcite ?44/40Ca values are also up to ?0.40‰?higher than bedrock values, and on a diagram of ?44/40Ca versus Sr/Ca, nearly all waters plot within a plausible mixing domain bounded by the measured compositions of basalt and calcite, with glacial rivers plotting closer to calcite than non-glacial rivers. Calcite and heulandite form during hydrothermal alteration of basalt in the deep lava pile and often occur together in metabasalts now exposed at the surface. Because heulandite ?44/40Ca values are ?1-2‰?lower than basalt, we suggest that 40Ca uptake by heudlandite explains the relatively high ?44/40Ca values of calcite and that calcite weathering in turn elevates riverine ?44/40Ca values. High mechanical erosion rates are known to facilitate the exposure and weathering of calcite, which explains the isotopic contrast between glacial and non-glacial watersheds. Using a mixing model, we find that calcite weathering provides ?0-65% of the Ca in non-glacial rivers and ?25-90% of the Ca in glacial rivers, with silicate weathering providing the remainder. Icelandic hydrothermal calcite contains mantle carbon. Noting that zeolite facies metamorphism and hydrothermal fluid circulation are ubiquitous characteristics of basaltic eruptions and assuming that hydrothermal calcite in other basaltic settings also contains mantle carbon, we suggest that the contribution of basalt weathering to long-term CO2 drawdown and climate regulation may be less significant than previously realized.

  3. Electrochemical Acceleration of Carbonate and Silicate Weathering for CO2 Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, G. H.; Carroll, S.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonate and many silicate minerals dissolve in strong acids, and such acids are commonly generated at the anode of a conventional saline water electrolysis cell. It was therefore reasoned that encasing such an anode with base minerals would lead to enhanced mineral dissolution and hence increased hydroxide (base) generation at the cathode, formed in course of splitting water, generating H2 and OH-. Subsequent exposue of the alkalized solution to CO2 (e.g., as in air) would lead to absorption of the CO2 and formation of stable dissolved or solid (bi)carbonates for carbon sequestration. Previously, it has been demonstrated that mineral carbonate encasement of a seawater electrolysis cell anode indeed generated basic solutions in excess of pH 9 that were subsequently neutralized via contact with air CO2, increasing the carbon content of the initial seawater by 30% (Rau, G.H. 2008. Environ Sci. Techol. 42, 8935-). To test such a weathering/CO2 capture scheme using silicate minerals, either powdered wollastonite or ultramafic rock standard (UM-4) was encased around the anode of an electrolysis cell composed of graphite electrodes and a 0.25M Na2SO4 electrolyte solution. After 0.5 to 1.5 hrs of electricity application (3.5Vdc, 5-10mA), the electrolyte pH rose to as much as 11.1 (initial and blank solution pH's <6.6). Subequent bubbling of these basic solutions with air lowered pH by at least 2 units and increased dissolve carbon content (primarily bicarbonate) by as much as 50X that of the blanks. While Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations were elevated, these were insufficient to balance the majority of the bicarbonate anions formed in solution. This suggests that in these experiments the silicate minerals acted as a neutralizer of the anolyte acid, H2SO4, forming mostly insoluble CaSO4 and MgSO4 at the anode. This then allowed NaOH normally produced at the cathode to accumulate in solution, in turn reacting with air CO2 to form NaHCO3. Longer electrolysis times and/or alternative electrolyte solutions might allow formation and precipitation of Ca or Mg carbonates. Such electrochemistry might ultimately provide a safe, efficient way to harness the planet's: i) large, off-peak or off-grid renewable electricity potential, ii) abundant basic minerals, and iii) vast natural brine electrolytes for large-scale air CO2 mitigation and carbon-negative H2 production.

  4. What is the maximum potential for CO2 sequestration by ``stimulated'' weathering on the global scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Jens; Kempe, Stephan

    2008-12-01

    Natural chemical weathering of silicate rocks is a significant sink for soil and atmospheric CO2. Previous work suggested that natural chemical weathering may be stimulated by applying finely ground silicate rocks to agricultural areas or forests [stimulated weathering (SW)]. However, it remained unknown if this technique is practical to sequester globally significant amounts of CO2 under realistic conditions. Applying first estimates of “normal treatment” amounts from a literature review, we report here a theoretical global maximum potential of 65 106 t sequestered C a-1 if SW would be applied homogenously on all agricultural and forested areas of the world. This is equivalent to 0.9% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions (reference period 2000 2005). First, however, the assumed application of SW on most of the considered areas is not economically feasible because of logistic issues, and second the net-CO2 sequestration is expected to amount to only a fraction of consumed CO2 due to the energy demand of the application itself (currently ~11%). Unless progress in application procedures is provided, the recent realistic maximum net-CO2-consumption potential is expected to be much smaller than 0.1% of anthropogenic emissions, and the SW would thus not be one of the key techniques to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, literature suggests that for some agricultural areas (croplands) and specifically for rice production areas in humid climates, this SW may be a feasible tool to support international efforts to sequester CO2. SW may be cost effective for those areas if linked to the CO2-emission certificate trade in the future, and increases in crop production are taken into account.

  5. Economic value of global weather measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.; Butterworth, J.

    1999-02-19

    Global sensor networks could support increased activity in a number of economic sectors. Potential benefits and the predicted time scales required to realize them are estimated. Benefits are particular compelling for fundamental reasons for aviation, hotels and restaurants, natural disasters, construction, agriculture, and apparel. These benefits can be captured by simple logistic approximations.

  6. Global Weather Prediction and High-End Computing at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shian-Jiann; Atlas, Robert; Yeh, Kao-San

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate current capabilities of the NASA finite-volume General Circulation Model an high-resolution global weather prediction, and discuss its development path in the foreseeable future. This model can be regarded as a prototype of a future NASA Earth modeling system intended to unify development activities cutting across various disciplines within the NASA Earth Science Enterprise.

  7. Boron and Lithium isotopic signatures in rivers as proxies of silicate weathering regimes : the example of the Mackenzie river system, Canada (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillardet, J.; Millot, R.; Lemarchand, D.; Vigier, N.

    2009-12-01

    Large river systems integrate the diversity of weathering and transport conditions as well as the bedrock composition. They provide a unique opportunity to unravel the parameters operating within the critical zone of the Earth globally. Here, we present B and Li isotopes data measured in both the complementary soluble and suspended phases in the Mackenzie river (Northeastern Canada), one of the world largest river the Mackenzie river basin. An interesting parallel can be made between these two isotopic systems: - Both elements are predominantly derived from the weathering of silicate minerals and are thus relatively less affected by lithology. - Both elements are considerably fractionated during water/rock interactions during which they partition between the solid and liquid phases. Their respective geochemical signature is then strongly dependent upon geomorphic features of the Basin (mountains, plains, shield area). - Both isotopic systems are greatly fractionated by a preferential release in solution of the heavy isotope, which considerably help investigating the nature and magnitude of the weathering and transport processes in action. - And finally, strong evidences indicate that local groundwaters may control their transfer through the basin and imprint their isotopic signature as well. Because, boron and lithium have very different chemical behaviors, in particular distinct surface properties, their respective isotopes behave distinctly under same reactive transport conditions. This feature results in the absence of correlation between this two isotopic systems despite their apparent similarities. Then the coupled investigation of the Li and B isotopes during chemical weathering adds strong constraints on the weathering regimes operating at large scale and clearly encourages the multi-isotopic tracing of the critical zone processes.

  8. The contribution of weathering of the main Alpine rivers on the global carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnini, Marco; Probst, Jean-Luc; Probst, Anne; Frondini, Francesco; Marchesini, Ivan; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2013-04-01

    On geological time-scales the carbon fluxes from the solid Earth to the atmosphere mainly result from volcanism and metamorphic-decarbonation processes, whereas the carbon fluxes from atmosphere to solid Earth mainly depend on weathering of silicates and carbonates, biogenic precipitation and removal of CaCO3 in the oceans and volcanic gases - seawater interactions. Quantifying each contribution is critical. In this work, we estimate the atmospheric CO2 uptake by weathering in the Alps, using results of the study of the dissolved loads transported by 33 main Alpine rivers. The chemical composition of river water in unpolluted areas is a good indicator of surface weathering processes (Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971; Drever, 1982; Meybeck, 1984; Tardy, 1986; Berner and Berner, 1987; Probst et al., 1994). The dissolved load of streams originates from atmospheric input, pollution, evaporite dissolution, and weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks, and the application of mass balance calculations allows quantification of the different contributions. In this work, we applied the MEGA (Major Element Geochemical Approach) geochemical code (Amiotte Suchet, 1995; Amiotte Suchet and Probst, 1996) to the chemical compositions of the selected rivers in order to quantify the atmospheric CO2 consumed by weathering in Alpine region. The drainage basins of the main Alpine rivers were sampled near the basin outlets during dry and flood seasons. The application of the MEGA geochemical consisted in several steps. First, we subtracted the rain contribution in river waters knowing the X/Cl (X = Na, K, Mg, Ca) ratios of the rain. Next, we considered that all (Na+K) came from silicate weathering. The average molar ratio Rsil = (Na+K)/(Ca+Mg) for rivers draining silicate terrains was estimated from unpolluted French stream waters draining small monolithological basins (Meybeck, 1986; 1987). For the purpose, we prepared a simplified geo-lithological map of Alps according to the lithological classification of Meybeck (1986, 1987). Then for each basin we computed Rsil weighted average considering the surface and the mean precipitation for the surface area of each lithology. Lastly, we estimated the (Ca+Mg) originating from carbonate weathering as the remaining cations after silicate correction. Depending on time-scales of the phenomena (shorter than about 1 million year i.e., correlated to the short term carbon cycle, or longer than about 1 million years i.e., correlated to the long-term carbon cycle), we considered different equations for the quantification of the atmospheric CO2 consumed by weathering (Huh, 2010). The results show the net predominance of carbonate weathering on fixing atmospheric CO2 and that, considering the long-term carbon cycle, the amount of atmospheric CO2 uptake by weathering is about one order of magnitude lower than considering the short-term carbon cycle. Moreover, considering the short-term carbon cycle, the mean CO2 consumed by Alpine basins is of the same order of magnitude of the mean CO2 consumed by weathering by the 60 largest rivers of the world estimated by Gaillardet et al. (1999). References Amiotte-Suchet, P. "Cycle Du Carbone, Érosion Chimique Des Continents Et Transfert Vers Les Océans." Sci. Géol. Mém. Strasbourg 97 (1995): 156. Amiotte-Suchet, P., and J.-L. Probst. "Origins of dissolved inorganic carbon in the Garonne river waters: seasonal and interannual variations." Sci. Géologiques Bull. Strasbourg 49, no. 1-4 (1996): 101-126. Berner, E.K., and R.A. Berner. The Global Water Cycle. Geochemistry and Environment. Prentice Halle. Engelwood Cliffs, NJ, 1987. Drever, J.L. The Geochemistry of Natural Waters. Prentice Hall, 1982. Gaillardet, J., B. Dupré, P. Louvat, and C.J. Allègre. "Global Silicate Weathering and CO2 Consumption Rates Deduced from the Chemistry of Large Rivers." Chemical Geology 159 (1999): 3-30. Garrels, R.M., and F.T. Mackenzie. Evolution of Sedimentary Rocks. New York: W.W. Nortonand, 1971. Huh, Y. "Estimation of Atmospheric CO2 Uptake by Silicat

  9. Evaluating the effects of terrestrial ecosystems, climate and carbon dioxide on weathering over geological time: a global-scale process-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lyla L.; Banwart, Steve A.; Valdes, Paul J.; Leake, Jonathan R.; Beerling, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Global weathering of calcium and magnesium silicate rocks provides the long-term sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on a timescale of millions of years by causing precipitation of calcium carbonates on the seafloor. Catchment-scale field studies consistently indicate that vegetation increases silicate rock weathering, but incorporating the effects of trees and fungal symbionts into geochemical carbon cycle models has relied upon simple empirical scaling functions. Here, we describe the development and application of a process-based approach to deriving quantitative estimates of weathering by plant roots, associated symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi and climate. Our approach accounts for the influence of terrestrial primary productivity via nutrient uptake on soil chemistry and mineral weathering, driven by simulations using a dynamic global vegetation model coupled to an ocean–atmosphere general circulation model of the Earth's climate. The strategy is successfully validated against observations of weathering in watersheds around the world, indicating that it may have some utility when extrapolated into the past. When applied to a suite of six global simulations from 215 to 50 Ma, we find significantly larger effects over the past 220 Myr relative to the present day. Vegetation and mycorrhizal fungi enhanced climate-driven weathering by a factor of up to 2. Overall, we demonstrate a more realistic process-based treatment of plant fungal–geosphere interactions at the global scale, which constitutes a first step towards developing ‘next-generation’ geochemical models. PMID:22232768

  10. Evaluating the effects of terrestrial ecosystems, climate and carbon dioxide on weathering over geological time: a global-scale process-based approach.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lyla L; Banwart, Steve A; Valdes, Paul J; Leake, Jonathan R; Beerling, David J

    2012-02-19

    Global weathering of calcium and magnesium silicate rocks provides the long-term sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) on a timescale of millions of years by causing precipitation of calcium carbonates on the seafloor. Catchment-scale field studies consistently indicate that vegetation increases silicate rock weathering, but incorporating the effects of trees and fungal symbionts into geochemical carbon cycle models has relied upon simple empirical scaling functions. Here, we describe the development and application of a process-based approach to deriving quantitative estimates of weathering by plant roots, associated symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi and climate. Our approach accounts for the influence of terrestrial primary productivity via nutrient uptake on soil chemistry and mineral weathering, driven by simulations using a dynamic global vegetation model coupled to an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model of the Earth's climate. The strategy is successfully validated against observations of weathering in watersheds around the world, indicating that it may have some utility when extrapolated into the past. When applied to a suite of six global simulations from 215 to 50 Ma, we find significantly larger effects over the past 220 Myr relative to the present day. Vegetation and mycorrhizal fungi enhanced climate-driven weathering by a factor of up to 2. Overall, we demonstrate a more realistic process-based treatment of plant fungal-geosphere interactions at the global scale, which constitutes a first step towards developing 'next-generation' geochemical models. PMID:22232768

  11. Impact of derived global weather data on simulated crop yields

    PubMed Central

    van Wart, Justin; Grassini, Patricio; Cassman, Kenneth G

    2013-01-01

    Crop simulation models can be used to estimate impact of current and future climates on crop yields and food security, but require long-term historical daily weather data to obtain robust simulations. In many regions where crops are grown, daily weather data are not available. Alternatively, gridded weather databases (GWD) with complete terrestrial coverage are available, typically derived from: (i) global circulation computer models; (ii) interpolated weather station data; or (iii) remotely sensed surface data from satellites. The present study's objective is to evaluate capacity of GWDs to simulate crop yield potential (Yp) or water-limited yield potential (Yw), which can serve as benchmarks to assess impact of climate change scenarios on crop productivity and land use change. Three GWDs (CRU, NCEP/DOE, and NASA POWER data) were evaluated for their ability to simulate Yp and Yw of rice in China, USA maize, and wheat in Germany. Simulations of Yp and Yw based on recorded daily data from well-maintained weather stations were taken as the control weather data (CWD). Agreement between simulations of Yp or Yw based on CWD and those based on GWD was poor with the latter having strong bias and large root mean square errors (RMSEs) that were 26–72% of absolute mean yield across locations and years. In contrast, simulated Yp or Yw using observed daily weather data from stations in the NOAA database combined with solar radiation from the NASA-POWER database were in much better agreement with Yp and Yw simulated with CWD (i.e. little bias and an RMSE of 12–19% of the absolute mean). We conclude that results from studies that rely on GWD to simulate agricultural productivity in current and future climates are highly uncertain. An alternative approach would impose a climate scenario on location-specific observed daily weather databases combined with an appropriate upscaling method. PMID:23801639

  12. Entropy Shows that Global Warming Should Cause Increased Variability in the Weather

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Michael Williams

    2000-01-01

    Elementary physical reasoning seems to leave it inevitable that global warming would increase the variability of the weather. The first two terms in an approximation to the global entropy are used to show that global warming has increased the free energy available to drive the weather, and that the variance of the weather should increase correspondingly.

  13. Oceans Effect on Weather and Climate: Global Climate Patterns

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2007-03-28

    This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Ocean's Effect on Weather and Climate SciPack. It explores ocean circulation patterns and the effect oceans have on climate. Water in the oceans hold a lot of thermal energy (more than an equal amount of land). Throughout the ocean there is a global, interconnected circulation system that transfers this thermal energy across Earth. The shape of ocean basins and adjacent land masses influence the path of circulation. As ocean currents transfer thermal energy to various locations, the temperature of the atmosphere above the ocean is affected. For example, the condensation of water that has been evaporated from warm seas provides the energy for hurricanes and cyclones. When the pattern of thermal energy released into the atmosphere changes, global weather patterns are affected. An example of a large-scale change like this is the El Ni?o Southern Oscillation, which changes the pattern of thermal energy released into the atmosphere in the Pacific. Learning Outcomes:? Explain how the oceans might influence and affect local weather and climate, given a specific location (on the planet near the ocean) and the local ocean currents.? Describe the cause of hurricanes and explain why they usually occur within specific regions during certain times of the year.? Explain how changes in ocean temperatures (over a period of months) affect factors that influence weather patterns.? List the major variables that affect the transfer of energy through the ocean.

  14. Oceans Effect on Weather and Climate: Global Precipitation and Energy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2007-03-28

    This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Ocean's Effect on Weather and Climate SciPack. It explores ocean circulation patterns and the effect oceans have on climate. Water in the oceans hold a lot of thermal energy (more than an equal amount of land). Throughout the ocean there is a global, interconnected circulation system that transfers this thermal energy across Earth. The shape of ocean basins and adjacent land masses influence the path of circulation. As ocean currents transfer thermal energy to various locations, the temperature of the atmosphere above the ocean is affected. For example, the condensation of water that has been evaporated from warm seas provides the energy for hurricanes and cyclones. When the pattern of thermal energy released into the atmosphere changes, global weather patterns are affected. An example of a large-scale change like this is the El Ni?o Southern Oscillation, which changes the pattern of thermal energy released into the atmosphere in the Pacific. Learning Outcomes:? Explain how the oceans might influence and affect local weather and climate, given a specific location (on the planet near the ocean) and the local ocean currents.? Describe the cause of hurricanes and explain why they usually occur within specific regions during certain times of the year.? Explain how changes in ocean temperatures (over a period of months) affect factors that influence weather patterns.? List the major variables that affect the transfer of energy through the ocean.

  15. Oceans Effect on Climate and Weather: Global Circulation Patterns

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2007-03-28

    This Science Object explores ocean circulation patterns and the effect oceans have on climate. Water in the oceans hold a lot of thermal energy (more than an equal amount of land). Throughout the ocean there is a global, interconnected circulation system that transfers this thermal energy across Earth. The shape of ocean basins and adjacent land masses influence the path of circulation. As ocean currents transfer thermal energy to various locations, the temperature of the atmosphere above the ocean is affected. For example, the condensation of water that has been evaporated from warm seas provides the energy for hurricanes and cyclones. When the pattern of thermal energy released into the atmosphere changes, global weather patterns are affected. An example of a large-scale change like this is the El Ni?o Southern Oscillation, which changes the pattern of thermal energy released into the atmosphere in the Pacific. This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Ocean's Effect on Weather and Climate SciPack. Learning Outcomes: ? Explain how the oceans might influence and affect local weather and climate, given a specific location (on the planet near the ocean) and the local ocean currents. ? Describe the cause of hurricanes and explain why they usually occur within specific regions during certain times of the year. ? Explain how changes in ocean temperatures (over a period of months) affect factors that influence weather patterns. ? List the major variables that affect the transfer of energy through the ocea

  16. Effect of carbonic anhydrase on silicate weathering and carbonate formation at present day CO? concentrations compared to primordial values.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Leilei; Lian, Bin; Hao, Jianchao; Liu, Congqiang; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that carbonic anhydrase (CA) participates in silicate weathering and carbonate formation. Nevertheless, it is still not known if the magnitude of the effect produced by CA on surface rock evolution changes or not. In this work, CA gene expression from Bacillus mucilaginosus and the effects of recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation under different conditions are explored. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to explore the correlation between CA gene expression and sufficiency or deficiency in calcium and CO? concentration. The results show that the expression of CA genes is negatively correlated with both CO? concentration and ease of obtaining soluble calcium. A pure form of the protein of interest (CA) is obtained by cloning, heterologous expression, and purification. The results from tests of the recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation at different levels of CO? concentration show that the magnitudes of the effects of CA and CO? concentration are negatively correlated. These results suggest that the effects of microbial CA in relation to silicate weathering and carbonate formation may have increased importance at the modern atmospheric CO? concentration compared to 3 billion years ago. PMID:25583135

  17. Effect of carbonic anhydrase on silicate weathering and carbonate formation at present day CO2 concentrations compared to primordial values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Leilei; Lian, Bin; Hao, Jianchao; Liu, Congqiang; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that carbonic anhydrase (CA) participates in silicate weathering and carbonate formation. Nevertheless, it is still not known if the magnitude of the effect produced by CA on surface rock evolution changes or not. In this work, CA gene expression from Bacillus mucilaginosus and the effects of recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation under different conditions are explored. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to explore the correlation between CA gene expression and sufficiency or deficiency in calcium and CO2 concentration. The results show that the expression of CA genes is negatively correlated with both CO2 concentration and ease of obtaining soluble calcium. A pure form of the protein of interest (CA) is obtained by cloning, heterologous expression, and purification. The results from tests of the recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation at different levels of CO2 concentration show that the magnitudes of the effects of CA and CO2 concentration are negatively correlated. These results suggest that the effects of microbial CA in relation to silicate weathering and carbonate formation may have increased importance at the modern atmospheric CO2 concentration compared to 3 billion years ago.

  18. Effect of carbonic anhydrase on silicate weathering and carbonate formation at present day CO2 concentrations compared to primordial values

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Leilei; Lian, Bin; Hao, Jianchao; Liu, Congqiang; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that carbonic anhydrase (CA) participates in silicate weathering and carbonate formation. Nevertheless, it is still not known if the magnitude of the effect produced by CA on surface rock evolution changes or not. In this work, CA gene expression from Bacillus mucilaginosus and the effects of recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation under different conditions are explored. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to explore the correlation between CA gene expression and sufficiency or deficiency in calcium and CO2 concentration. The results show that the expression of CA genes is negatively correlated with both CO2 concentration and ease of obtaining soluble calcium. A pure form of the protein of interest (CA) is obtained by cloning, heterologous expression, and purification. The results from tests of the recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation at different levels of CO2 concentration show that the magnitudes of the effects of CA and CO2 concentration are negatively correlated. These results suggest that the effects of microbial CA in relation to silicate weathering and carbonate formation may have increased importance at the modern atmospheric CO2 concentration compared to 3 billion years ago. PMID:25583135

  19. The Global Distribution of Weathered Glass on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, B.; Chojnacki, M.; Lai, J.; Clarke, D.; Joseph, J.; Bell, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Weathered iron-bearing glass has been identified as the primary phase in over ten million square kilometers of low-albedo deposits in the northern lowlands of Mars, based on visible to near-infrared (0.36-2.5 ?m) spectra from the OMEGA imaging spectrometer onboard Mars Express (Horgan and Bell, 2012). The glass exhibits a concave blue slope in the near-infrared that is consistent with a leached glass rind. This rind is formed during exposure of glass to at least slightly acidic fluids under water-limited conditions, and is commonly observed in dry volcanic environments on Earth. The proposed origin for these materials is explosive volcanism, potentially triggered due to ice-magma interactions in the late Hesperian or Amazonian, followed by post-depositional acidic weathering at the surface. A possible analog for these glass-rich sedimentary terrains are the extensive sand plains, dune fields, and flood plains of Iceland, which are composed of glass-rich (50-90%) volcaniclastic sediments formed during sub-glacial eruptions. The large scale of the martian deposits suggests widespread (and potentially ice-related) explosive volcanism either in the northern lowlands or near the dichotomy boundary. This possibility raises the question: How widespread are glass-rich deposits on Mars globally? To address this question, we have developed a global set of visible/near-infrared OMEGA mosaics at 1 km/pixel resolution. Preliminary analysis of this data set indicates that the concave spectral slope that we associate with weathered glass is present in large portions of the Syrtis Major region, within Mawrth Vallis, and in several dozen dune fields in the regions of Syrtis Major, Arabia Terra, Valles Marineris, and the Argyre Basin. Higher resolution CRISM observations of several Valles Marineris dune fields appear to confirm these preliminary results, as spectra within the dune fields are consistent with iron-bearing glass (Chojnacki et al., 2012). We are currently working to extend this analysis globally, and to search for correlations with deposit types, sediment sources, and predicted distributions of pyroclastic deposits from the major volcanic edifices. However, even these preliminary results strongly suggest that weathered glass is a major component of global martian sediments. An additional source of information regarding the nature and distribution of these deposits is their inferred composition from thermal infrared spectra. The dark, glassy deposits of the northern lowlands are the type locality for the globally distributed TES Surface Type 2 (ST2) composition, which differs from the olivine-basaltic Surface Type 1 by requiring an additional high-silica component. Based on the correlation between the glass and ST2 in the northern lowlands, we hypothesize that the weathered glassy rinds may be the high-silica component of ST2 in this region. In order to determine whether there is a global correlation between ST2 and weathered glass, we have compared global maps of TES ST2 spectral indices with OMEGA weathered glass spectral indices. We have initially focused on dune fields as mapped by the Mars Global Digital Dunes Database, which reveal at least a qualitative correlation between ST2 and weathered glass. Further analysis will produce a quantitative comparison of the two data sets in the dune fields as well as in other low albedo terrains.

  20. Atlas of the global distribution of atmospheric heating during the global weather experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaack, Todd K.; Johnson, Donald R.

    1991-01-01

    Global distributions of atmospheric heating for the annual cycle of the Global Weather Experiment are estimated from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Level 3b data set. Distributions of monthly, seasonally, and annually averaged heating are presented for isentropic and isobaric layers within the troposphere and for the troposphere as a whole. The distributions depict a large-scale structure of atmospheric heating that appears spatially and temporally consistent with known features of the global circulation and the seasonal evolution.

  1. Influence of weather and global warming in chloride ingress into concrete: a stochastic approach

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Influence of weather and global warming in chloride ingress into concrete: a stochastic approach E the influence of weather conditions and global warming on chloride ingress into concrete. The assessment including seasonal variations and global warming is also proposed in this work. Three scenarios of global

  2. Tectonic and climatic controls on long-term silicate weathering in Asia since 5 Ma

    E-print Network

    Clift, Peter

    of the Mekong River basin that sup- plied the sediment. Coherent variation of weathering proxies from the South China Sea, Bay of Bengal, Loess Plateau, as well as the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers, indicates weakening

  3. Building resilience of the Global Positioning System to space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Genene; Kunches, Joseph

    2011-12-01

    Almost every aspect of the global economy now depends on GPS. Worldwide, nations are working to create a robust Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), which will provide global positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) services for applications such as aviation, electric power distribution, financial exchange, maritime navigation, and emergency management. The U.S. government is examining the vulnerabilities of GPS, and it is well known that space weather events, such as geomagnetic storms, contribute to errors in single-frequency GPS and are a significant factor for differential GPS. The GPS industry has lately begun to recognize that total electron content (TEC) signal delays, ionospheric scintillation, and solar radio bursts can also interfere with daily operations and that these threats grow with the approach of the next solar maximum, expected to occur in 2013. The key challenges raised by these circumstances are, first, to better understand the vulnerability of GPS technologies and services to space weather and, second, to develop policies that will build resilience and mitigate risk.

  4. The separate and combined effects of temperature, soilpCO2, and organic acidity on silicate weathering in the soil environment: Formulation of a model and results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto H. Gwiazda; Wallace S. Broecker

    1994-01-01

    A model is used to evaluate the relative importance of temperature, soil pCO2, and organic acidity on silicate weathering rates in an average soil of warm temperate climate. The model has a structure similar to the Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments, (Cosby et al., 1985a, b) used to predict catchment responses to acid deposition, but it is modified

  5. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Bullough

    2010-06-24

    This lesson is written for fourth grade students. Students will explore weather and the effects it has on their lives. What is weather? video of what is weather Let's take a walk through the weather. Put on your hats and coats! Clouds Cloud Types Clouds - Dan's Wild Weather Page What to Wear? What to Wear? What to Drink? Weather Patterns and Climatic Regions ...

  6. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Stearns

    2008-10-25

    This is a first grade weather unit. SEASONS Fall Winter Build a Snowman Spring Summer What things determine and effect the weather? Cloud Precipitation Sunshine Temperature Visibility Wind Direction Wind Force WEATHER VIDEOS Tornado Hurricane Hail Lightning FUN AND GAMES Dress the Bear for the Weather The Great Weather Race Game Weather coloring books for kids ...

  7. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Hyde

    2007-02-08

    Learn all about the aspects of weather that effect us every day. Click here to see a weather forecast for anywhere in the world World Wide Weather Watch See what happens to weather when you change conditions at your house Weather Maker Weather Games ...

  8. Entropy Shows that Global Warming Should Cause Increased Variability in the Weather

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Michael Williams

    2000-01-01

    Elementary physical reasoning seems to leave it inevitable that global\\u000awarming would increase the variability of the weather. The first two terms in\\u000aan approximation to the global entropy are used to show that global warming has\\u000aincreased the free energy available to drive the weather, and that the variance\\u000aof the weather should increase correspondingly.

  9. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Williams

    2005-10-25

    Have you ever wondered how the weather man, or meteorolgist, on TV knows what to say about tomorrow\\'s weather? It\\'s because they have certain tools that they use that help them predict what the weather will be. Throughout this school year you are going to be making tools and predicting weather just like a meterorologist! Task You are going to be weather forcasters! You are going to record and track weather patterns throughout the year. You will also use weather tools to make predictions about the weather like real weather forecasters! The Process 1. First we need to learn a little bit about weather so ...

  10. How severe Space Weather can disrupt global supply chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte in den Bäumen, H.; Moran, D.; Lenzen, M.; Cairns, I.; Steenge, A.

    2014-06-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) strong enough to create electromagnetic effects at latitudes below the auroral oval are frequent events that could soon have substantial impacts on electrical grids. Modern society's heavy reliance on these domestic and international networks increases our susceptibility to such a severe space weather event. Using a new high-resolution model of the global economy we simulate the economic impact of strong CMEs for 3 different planetary orientations. We account for the economic impacts within the countries directly affected as well as the post-disaster economic shock in partner economies linked by international trade. For a 1989 Quebec-like event the global economic impacts would range from USD 2.4 to 3.4 trillion over a year. Of this total economic shock about 50% would be felt in countries outside the zone of direct impact, leading to a loss in global GDP of 3.9 to 5.6%. The global economic damages are of the same order as wars, extreme financial crisis and estimated for future climate change.

  11. How severe space weather can disrupt global supply chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte in den Bäumen, H.; Moran, D.; Lenzen, M.; Cairns, I.; Steenge, A.

    2014-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) strong enough to create electromagnetic effects at latitudes below the auroral oval are frequent events that could soon have substantial impacts on electrical grids. Modern society's heavy reliance on these domestic and international networks increases our susceptibility to such a severe space-weather event. Using a new high-resolution model of the global economy, we simulate the economic impact of strong CMEs for three different planetary orientations. We account for the economic impacts within the countries directly affected, as well as the post-disaster economic shock in partner economies linked by international trade. For a 1989 Quebec-like event, the global economic impacts would range from USD 2.4 to 3.4 trillion over a year. Of this total economic shock, about 50% would be felt in countries outside the zone of direct impact, leading to a loss in global Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of 3.9 to 5.6%. The global economic damage is of the same order as wars, extreme financial crisis and estimated for future climate change.

  12. Effects of silicate weathering on water chemistry in forested, upland, felsic terrane of the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, R.E.; Wittchen, B.D. (Univ. of Maine, Orono (United States))

    1991-11-01

    The authors use data from the US EPA National Surface Water Survey (NSWS), the USGS Bench-Mark Station monitoring program, and the National Acid Deposition Program (NADP) to evaluate the role of weathering in supplying base cations to surface waters in forested, upland, felsic terrane of the northeastern, northcentral, and northwestern (Idaho batholith) US. Multivariate regression reveals differential effects of discharge on individual base cations and silica, but no secular trend in the Ca/Na denudation rate over 24 yr (1965-1988) for the Wild River catchment in the White Mountains. Because the turn-over time for Na in the soil-exchange complex is only ca. 1.5 yr, the long-term behavior of the ratios Ca/Na and Si/Na in waters leaving this catchment indicates that weathering is compensating for base cation export. In every subregion, Ca and Mg concentrations in lakes are statistically linked to nonmarine Na, but the median Ca/Na ratio is greater than the ratio in local plagioclase. The authors attribute this inequality to nonstoichiometric weathering of calcium in juvenile (formerly glaciated) terrane, not to leaching of exchangeable cations by So{sub 4} because intraregional and cross-regional statistical analysis reveals no effect of atmospherically derived sulfate ion. The median base cation denudation rates (meq m{sup {minus}2}yr{sup {minus}1}) for these American lake regions are: Maine granites (108); western Adirondack felsic gneiss (85); Vermilion batholith (42); Idaho batholith (52). The regional rates are high enough to compensate for present wet deposition of acidifying anions except in some vulnerable lake watersheds in the western Adirondacks.

  13. Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Pamela Gore

    1995-08-29

    This course handout covers the processes and effects of weathering. The purpose of this handout is to contrast weathering and erosion, contrast and discuss chemical and mechanical weathering, list the products resulting from the chemical weathering of igneous rocks, and list and discuss the factors that influence the type and rate of rock weathering. Many photographs accompany this summary which depict weathered landscapes. Links are provided to the online Physical Geology resources at Georgia Perimeter College.

  14. The separate and combined effects of temperature, soil pCO2, and organic acidity on silicate weathering in the soil environment: Formulation of a model and results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto H. Gwiazda; Wallace S. Broecker

    1994-01-01

    A model is used to evaluate the relative importance of temperature, soil pCO2, and organic acidity on silicate weathering rates in an average soil of warm temperate climate. The model has a structure similar to the Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments (Cosby et al., 1985a,b) used to predict catchment responses to acid deposition, but it is modified to

  15. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miss Jennie

    2009-10-22

    What are the different types of weather? In this project you will compare different types of weather by drawing pictures and making it into a flip book. First you will begin by learning about the different types of weather. Read about each topic. Then get together with your partner and draw a picture of each type of weather. 1. Thunder storm Thunder storm Thunder storm Kids 2. Lightning Lightning Lightning picture 3. Tornado Tornadoes Tornado Kids 4. ...

  16. The separate and combined effects of temperature, soil pCO[sub 2], and organic acidity on silicate weathering in the soil environment: Formulation of a model and results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. H. Gwiazda; W. S. Broecker

    1994-01-01

    Research of the long-term carbon cycle generally uses simple functions to couple temperature or atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration with silicate weathering. It has been postulated that since carbon dioxide in aqueous solution is a weak acid, carbon dioxide in soils controlles the weathering rate. Some investigators believe that organic secretions from plant roots and fungi are important. Others emphasize the

  17. Global Cooperation in the Science of Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    The international space science community had recognized the importance of space weather more than a decade ago, which resulted in a number of international collaborative activities such as the Climate and Weather of the Sun Earth System (CAWSES) by SCOSTEP and the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI). The ISWI program is a continuation of the successful International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program. These programs have brought scientists together to tackle the scientific issues behind space weather. In addition to the vast array of space instruments, ground based instruments have been deployed, which not only filled voids in data coverage, but also inducted young scientists from developing countries into the scientific community. This paper presents a summary of CAWSES and ISWI activities that promote space weather science via complementary approaches in international scientific collaborations. capacity building. and public outreach.

  18. Do fair weather regions contribute to the global circuit support?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareev, Evgeny

    2014-05-01

    The role of different generators (thunderstorm clouds, mesoscale convective systems, electrified shower clouds etc.) in the maintaining the ionospheric potential (IP) of the global electric circuit (GEC) and its variation is still insufficiently understood. This paper considers possible approaches to the modeling of GEC generators with particular focus on the planetary boundary layer (PBL), or Austausch, generator, operating in the fair weather regions. It is well known that turbulent convection leads to intensive mixing of charged particles in the PBL and, consequently, to the generation of the vertical electric current. As a rule, this current is directed upward if the positive charge is accumulated near the Earth's surface particularly due to the electrode effect. There is still a great uncertainty concerning the contribution of the PBL generator into the global circuit. This is not only for a lack of data, but also due to the difficulties of theory: the intensity of the generator depends upon the IP, so the search for its contribution into the GEC requires solving a self-consistent problem. We suggest an analytical approach for the calculation of the IP induced by the given electric currents in the atmosphere. The obtained expressions and numerical calculations show that convection amplifies the contributions of thunderstorm/shower-cloud sources, while the value of this amplification varies likely from 10 to 20% depending mainly on the square occupied by intensive convection and the mean thickness of the PBL. It is important that the diurnal motion of the convection area on the Earth's surface may cause regular variations into the IP diurnal variation (reflected in the Carnegie curve), superimposed with the thunderstorm/shower-cloud contributions. It is suggested that the contribution of PBL generator into the GEC potential maximizes when the Pacific ocean surface is sunlit because at this time both conditions of its operation are satisfied: the PBL is unstable; the electrode effect forms over the maximum square because over the land surface this effect is often not developed due to radioactive emanations.

  19. Recovery of global surface weather observations for historical reanalyses and international users

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rob Allan; Gil Compo; Jim Carton

    2011-01-01

    Third International Atmospheric Circulation Reconstructions Over the Earth Initiative Workshop: Reanalysis and Applications; Baltimore, Maryland, 3-5 November 2010; The third Atmospheric Circulation Reconstructions over the Earth (ACRE) workshop advanced the goals of the international ACRE initiative (http:\\/\\/www.met-acre.org\\/) to undertake and facilitate the recovery of instrumental terrestrial and marine global surface weather observations underpinning global weather reconstructions and reanalyses spanning the

  20. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Lauren

    2010-11-17

    You will learn how to describe and observe changes in weather patterns by completing the following activities. The students will record and report changes in weather on their data sheet. The Process: Read the information on How Air Pressure Affects You. In this article you will see the term barometer. Write its definition. Now look over Weather Facts. Now go to Investigate Climate Conditions and use the weather maker to observe the effects of certain changes. Answer the questions: How much of a change in temperature is needed to make it ...

  1. Atmospheric and oceanographic research review, 1978. [global weather, ocean/air interactions, and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Research activities related to global weather, ocean/air interactions, and climate are reported. The global weather research is aimed at improving the assimilation of satellite-derived data in weather forecast models, developing analysis/forecast models that can more fully utilize satellite data, and developing new measures of forecast skill to properly assess the impact of satellite data on weather forecasting. The oceanographic research goal is to understand and model the processes that determine the general circulation of the oceans, focusing on those processes that affect sea surface temperature and oceanic heat storage, which are the oceanographic variables with the greatest influence on climate. The climate research objective is to support the development and effective utilization of space-acquired data systems in climate forecast models and to conduct sensitivity studies to determine the affect of lower boundary conditions on climate and predictability studies to determine which global climate features can be modeled either deterministically or statistically.

  2. Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Smoothstone

    This interactive Flash resource provides information regarding physical and chemical weathering at an introductory physical geology or Earth science level. It includes animations, diagrams, and supplementary information and is suitable for high school or undergraduate students.

  3. Stormy Weather: 101 Solutions to Global Climate Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dauncey, Guy

    This document presents 101 solutions to global climate change. These solutions are actions that are well suited to every level of society. This book creates awareness about global climate change. The history of Earth and the greenhouse effect are discussed, and explanations and solutions to global climate change are provided including traveling…

  4. Global Particle Simulation as A Space Weather Model

    E-print Network

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    ;Outline · Introduction A brief history of global simulations Comparisons among the different methods difficult to transfer physical values at boundaries #12;A brief history of global simulations · 1978: First at the present time, but it will become a vital model · MHD simulations with localized particle simulations very

  5. Global markets and the differential effects of climate and weather on conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, K. C.; Hsiang, S. M.; Cane, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Both climate and weather have been attributed historically as possible drivers for violence. Previous empirical studies have either focused on isolating local idiosyncratic weather variation or have conflated weather with spatially coherent climatic changes. This paper provides the first study of the differential impacts of climate and weather variation by employing methods developed in earlier work linking the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) with the onset of civil conflicts. By separating the effects of climate from local weather, we are able to test possible mechanisms by which atmospheric changes can cause violence. It is generally difficult to separate the effect of year-to-year climate variations from other global events that might drive conflict. We avoid this problem by examining the set of tropical countries that are strongly teleconnected to ENSO. For this region, the ENSO cycle parallels the common year-to-year pattern of violence. Using ENSO, we isolate the influence of climatic changes from other global determinants of violence and compare it with the effect of local weather variations. We find that while climate affects the onset of civil conflicts in teleconnected countries, local weather has no significant effect. Productivity overall as well as across major sectors is more affected by local weather than by climatic variation. This is particularly evident in the agricultural sector where total value and cereal yield decline much greater from a 1°C increase in local temperature than a 1°C increase in ENSO. However, when examining the effect on food prices, we find that ENSO is associated with a large and statistically significant increase in cereal prices but no effect from hotter local temperatures. Altogether, this evidence points toward the ability of global and regional commodity markets to insure against the effects of local weather variation and their limitations in containing losses from aggregate shocks such as El Nino events. We posit that conflict reacts to climate and not weather because climatic events trigger not only local agricultural losses but also increased food prices as a result of an aggregate decline in output. This is because in an open economy, idiosyncratic weather variation alone would not lead to higher prices. These results are informative in understanding the impacts of anthropogenic global change, which would yield variation exhibiting spatial coherence beyond the extent of existing markets.

  6. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Caitlin

    2009-10-21

    In the project you will learn about thunderstorms and tornadoes and play a weather matching game. What exactly are thunderstorms and tornadoes? Use your T- chart to explain some facts about a thunderstorm and a tornado as we review each. T-Chart Begin by reviewing what a thunderstorm is and how they form. Thunderstorm information What is a thunderstorm? What are thunderstorms most likely to occur? What causes thunder? Next review what a tornado ...

  7. Global Weather Maps of Exoplanets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossfield, Ian; Biller, Beth; Schlieder, Joshua; Deacon, Niall; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Homeier, Derek; Allard, France; Buenzli, Esther; Henning, Thomas; Brandner, Wolfgang; Goldman, Bertrand; Kopytova, Taisiya

    2014-11-01

    Clouds and atmospheric circulation play a critical role in shaping the composition, structure, and thermal emission of giant planets and their more massive brown dwarf cousins. Characterization of these objects' dynamic atmospheres has so far been largely limited to measurements of globally averaged thermal emission. We present the first two-dimensional, global map of any substellar object beyond the Solar System. Our map, obtained via Doppler Imaging, allows unambiguous identification of large-scale surface features. Geographic localization of such features provides the best constraints yet on brown dwarf global atmospheric circulation and represents a major step toward understanding the complex processes governing the atmospheres of cool substellar objects. Future giant telescopes now under construction will allow us to make maps like this of dozens of objects beyond the Solar System, including some extrasolar planets.

  8. Modeling extreme "Carrington-type" space weather events using three-dimensional global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Glocer, Alex

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing concern over possible severe societal consequences related to adverse space weather impacts on man-made technological infrastructure. In the last two decades, significant progress has been made toward the first-principles modeling of space weather events, and three-dimensional (3-D) global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models have been at the forefront of this transition, thereby playing a critical role in advancing our understanding of space weather. However, the modeling of extreme space weather events is still a major challenge even for the modern global MHD models. In this study, we introduce a specially adapted University of Michigan 3-D global MHD model for simulating extreme space weather events with a Dst footprint comparable to the Carrington superstorm of September 1859 based on the estimate by Tsurutani et. al. (2003). Results are presented for a simulation run with "very extreme" constructed/idealized solar wind boundary conditions driving the magnetosphere. In particular, we describe the reaction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system and the associated induced geoelectric field on the ground to such extreme driving conditions. The model setup is further tested using input data for an observed space weather event of Halloween storm October 2003 to verify the MHD model consistence and to draw additional guidance for future work. This extreme space weather MHD model setup is designed specifically for practical application to the modeling of extreme geomagnetically induced electric fields, which can drive large currents in ground-based conductor systems such as power transmission grids. Therefore, our ultimate goal is to explore the level of geoelectric fields that can be induced from an assumed storm of the reported magnitude, i.e., Dst˜=-1600 nT.

  9. Influence of weather and global warming in chloride ingress into concrete: A stochastic approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Bastidas-Arteaga; A. Chateauneuf; M. Sánchez-Silva; Ph. Bressolette; F. Schoefs

    2010-01-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) structures are subjected to environmental actions affecting their performance, serviceability and safety. Among these actions, chloride ingress leads to corrosion and has been recognized as a critical factor reducing service life of RC structures. This paper presents a stochastic approach to study the influence of weather conditions and global warming on chloride ingress into concrete. The assessment

  10. IS CHEMICAL INDEX OF ALTERATION (CIA) A RELIABLE PROXY FOR CHEMICAL WEATHERING IN GLOBAL DRAINAGE BASINS?

    E-print Network

    Yang, Shouye

    IS CHEMICAL INDEX OF ALTERATION (CIA) A RELIABLE PROXY FOR CHEMICAL WEATHERING IN GLOBAL DRAINAGE as the most important carrier of terrigenous materials into the sea. The chemical index of alteration (CIA, the CIA values of suspended particulate matters from 44 rivers worldwide are recalculated. The CIA values

  11. Development of a global fire weather database for 1980-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. D.; Spessa, A. C.; Aziz, N. A.; Camia, A.; Cantin, A.; Carr, R.; de Groot, W. J.; Dowdy, A. J.; Flannigan, M. D.; Manomaiphiboon, K.; Pappenberger, F.; Tanpipat, V.; Wang, X.

    2014-10-01

    The Canadian Fire Weather Index (FWI) System is the mostly widely used fire danger rating system in the world. We have developed a global database of daily, gridded FWI System calculations from 1980-2012. Input weather data were obtained from the NASA Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research, and two different estimates of daily precipitation from rain gauges over land. FWI System Drought Code (DC) calculations from the gridded datasets were compared to calculations from individual weather station data for a representative set of stations in North, Central and South America, Europe, Russia, Southeast Asia and Australia. Agreement between gridded calculations and the station-based calculations tended to be most different over the tropics for strictly MERRA-based calculations. This dataset can be used for analyzing historical relationships between fire weather and fire activity at continental and global scales, in identifying large-scale atmosphere-ocean controls on fire weather, and calibration of FWI-based fire prediction models.

  12. The role of climate and vegetation in weathering and clay mineral formation in late Quaternary soils of the Swiss and Italian Alps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markus Egli; Aldo Mirabella; Giacomo Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between climate and soil remain ambiguous, particularly when silicate weathering and clay mineral formation and transformation rates are considered in relation to global climate changes. Recent studies suggest that climate affects weathering rates much less than previously thought. Here we show that the climate in the central European Alps has a significant, but indirect, influence on the weathering of

  13. Global Muon Detector Network Used for Space Weather Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Schuch, N. J.; Munakata, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Oliveira, A. G.; Echer, E.; Braga, C. R.; Mendonça, R. R. S.; Kato, C.; Kozai, M.; Tokumaru, M.; Bieber, J. W.; Evenson, P.; Duldig, M. L.; Humble, J. E.; Al Jassar, H. K.; Sharma, M. M.; Sabbah, I.

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we summarize the development and current status of the Global Muon Detector Network (GMDN). The GMDN started in 1992 with only two muon detectors. It has consisted of four detectors since the Kuwait-city muon hodoscope detector was installed in March 2006. The present network has a total of 60 directional channels with an improved coverage of the sunward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) orientation, making it possible to continuously monitor cosmic ray precursors of geomagnetic storms. The data analysis methods developed also permit precise calculation of the three dimensional cosmic ray anisotropy on an hourly basis free from the atmospheric temperature effect and analysis of the cosmic ray precursors free from the diurnal anisotropy of the cosmic ray intensity.

  14. High Impact Weather Events in the Transition Seasons: Linked to Global Change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    For over a decade the author has been involved in a call-in radio show concerning climate and weather issues. From among several common themes visited frequently in the context of the show is the question of whether or not a recent high impact weather event is (or is not) directly related to global warming/climate change. A plausible physical connection between global change and high impact, mid-latitude weather events in the transition seasons is suggested. The mechanism centers on an elevation of the subtropical tropopause that occurs either as a result of direct in-situ latent heating or as a result of outflow from upstream, organized tropical convection. When the subtropical tropopause is raised in proximity to the polar jet, an anomalously deep tropopause fold is steepened rapidly leading to an intensification of the juxtaposed subtropical and polar jet streams. The resulting "superjet" is shown to underlie a number of high impact, continental cyclones over a 50 year census. Several notable convective outbreaks also appear to originate from similar "superjets" including the deadly Tuscaloosa tornado outbreak of April 2011. It is suggested that the transition seasons are preferred times of year for such jet interactions and that the length of the transition seasons, so defined, may be extended in a warmer climate thus leading to a larger number of high impact, transition season weather events in the future.

  15. Pathways of calcrete development on weathered silicate rocks in Tamil Nadu, India: Mineralogy, chemistry and paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, N.; Gunnell, Y.; Curmi, P.; Ahmad, S. M.

    2006-11-01

    Poorly documented yet spectacularly thick and extensive outcrops of calcrete hardpan occur on gneiss in the semiarid region of Coimbatore, South India. The hardpan caps a series of residual plateaux forming the present-day continental divide and grades into large expanses of Vertisols. Characteristic calcrete and Vertisol profiles were logged along toposequences and sampled for macro- and micromorphological study, and for chemical and mineralogical composition. Strontium isotopic analyses revealed that the calcrete is derived from in situ weathering of Ca-bearing primary minerals of the saprolite, which is rich in ankerite, Ca-amphiboles and Ca-plagioclase. The macroscale analysis revealed a range of facies developed within the gneiss saprolite, but in terms of relative chronology the nodular hardpan has the longest history. Two evolutionary pathways leading to nodular hardpan formation have been established. The first occurs entirely within a vadose environment, whereas the second begins within a phreatic environment before continuing to develop in vadose conditions. The ability to identify and map these generic categories of calcrete constitutes a potential tool for reconstructing paleotopography and paleogroundwater levels. The bedrock-weathering-derived nodular hardpan is blanketed by a laminar facies that correlates with an eolian event with marine Sr signatures. This suggests influx of Ca dust from the Arabian Sea continental shelf during a Pleistocene sea-level low-stand. It defines an important benchmark in the chronology of the area and highlights the potential antiquity of the thick calcrete profiles.

  16. Transport of Aerosols: Regional and Global Implications for Climate, Weather, and Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Yu, Hongbin; Bian, Huisheng; Remer, Lorraine; Kahn, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Long-range transport of atmospheric aerosols can have a significant impact on global climate, regional weather, and local air quality. In this study, we use a global model GOCART together with satellite data and ground-based measurements to assess the emission and transport of pollution, dust, biomass burning, and volcanic aerosols and their implications. In particular, we will show the impact of emissions and long-range transport of aerosols from major pollution and dust source regions to (1) the surface air quality, (2) the atmospheric heating rates, and (3) surface radiation change near the source and downwind regions.

  17. Applying ultra-high resolution Global weather-climate models for hurricane predictions: past progresses and future directions (Invited)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Lin

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in parallel computing, numerical solvers for partial differential equations on the sphere, and physical parameterizations for atmospheric models have increasingly made the usual classification between weather\\/climate models and regional\\/global models seem artificial. Researchers have been using regional weather models with a domain encompassing a significant portion of the globe for regional \\

  18. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #12: U.S.-- CANADA SYMPOSIUM ON NORTH AMERICAN CLIMATE CHANGE AND WEATHER EXTREMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This edition reports on a U.S.-Canada Symposium on North American Climate Change and Weather Extremes that was held in Atlanta in October. This symposium was conducted by EPA's Global Change Research Program in partnership with Environment Canada and the U.S. National Weather Se...

  19. First report on Cretaceous paleoweathering rates in western Panthalassa: Evidence of global enhancement of continental weathering during OAE 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, T.

    2013-12-01

    Mid-Cretaceous is characterized by intensified oceanic anoxia (Oceanic Anoxic Events: OAEs) that raised global deposition of organic black shales. Several models have been proposed to explain the cause of the OAEs in conjunction with Cretaceous global warmth, active volcanism, sea-level changes and others. For example, Weissert et al. (1998) proposed a mechanism called 'weathering hypothesis'. In this model, the cause of the OAEs is explained in a following chain reaction, (1) global warmth and increase in atmospheric CO2 enhanced weathering of continental crust, (2) enhanced land weathering led excessive influx of nutrients from continents to oceans, (3) eutrophication enhanced primary productivity, (4) the excessive primary producers consumed dissolved oceanic oxygen that finally led to the OAEs. Several studies, in fact, revealed a causal relation between enhanced weathering and OAEs in northern Tethys region. However, it is necessary to collect worldwide information to unravel the global response of weathering hypothesis as a cause of OAEs. For such reason, the present contribution conducted measurements of the degree of hinterland paleoweathering during OAEs in northern Japan, for the purpose to provide a first report on the relation between continental weathering and OAEs in open ocean, the western Panthalassa Ocean. Aptian to Campanian forearc basin mudstones (Yezo Group) were analyzed by XRF and the degree of hinterland weathering was evaluated by geochemical weathering index (W index; Ohta and Arai, 2007). The W values obtained for the Yezo Group are 30~50, which is equivalent to the W values of recent soils developed in temperate mid-latitude climate. The W values show a fluctuation pattern that is concordant with the Cretaceous paleotemperature changes. This match indicates that the change in paleotemperature governed the weathering rates of East Asian continental crust. In addition, hinterland weathering rates show instantaneous increase during the OAE intervals. Specifically, a clear positive excursion of W value is recorded in the OAE 2 horizon. High-resolution analysis revealed that increase in weathering rate slightly predates the OAE 2, c.a. 100 to 500 ka before the onset of anoxia. Therefore, our results are consistent with the weathering hypothesis in two aspects. As assumed in weathering hypothesis, enhanced hinterland weathering is linked with the OAEs and hinterland weathering precedes the onset of OAEs. Furthermore, our data suggests that, as well as in Tethys Ocean, enhanced hinterland paleoweathering during OAEs also occurred in the open Panathalassa Ocean. This indicates that enhanced hinterland weathering was a global and pervasive event causing OAEs.

  20. Chemical weathering rates of a soil chronosequence on granitic alluvium: I. Quantification of mineralogical and surface area changes and calculation of primary silicate reaction rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Blum, A.E.; Schulz, M.S.; Bullen, T.D.; Harden, J.W.; Peterson, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Mineral weathering rates are determined for a series of soils ranging in age from 0.2-3000 Ky developed on alluvial terraces near Merced in the Central Valley of California. Mineralogical and elemental abundances exhibit time-dependent trends documenting the chemical evolution of granitic sand to residual kaolinite and quartz. Mineral losses with time occur in the order: hornblende > plagioclase > K-feldspar. Maximum volume decreases of >50% occur in the older soils. BET surface areas of the bulk soils increase with age, as do specific surface areas of aluminosilicate mineral fractions such as plagioclase, which increases from 0.4-1.5 m2 g-1 over 600 Ky. Quartz surface areas are lower and change less with time (0.11-0.23 m2 g-1). BET surface areas correspond to increasing external surface roughness (?? = 10-600) and relatively constant internal surface area (??? 1.3 m2 g-1). SEM observations confirm both surface pitting and development of internal porosity. A numerical model describes aluminosilicate dissolution rates as a function of changes in residual mineral abundance, grain size distributions, and mineral surface areas with time. A simple geometric treatment, assuming spherical grains and no surface roughness, predicts average dissolution rates (plagioclase, 10-17.4; K-feldspar, 10-17.8; and hornblende, 10-17.5 mol cm-1 s-1) that are constant with time and comparable to previous estimates of soil weathering. Average rates, based on BET surface area measurements and variable surface roughnesses, are much slower (plagioclase, 10-19.9; K-feldspar, 10-20.5; and hornblende 10-20.1 mol cm-2 s-1). Rates for individual soil horizons decrease by a factor of 101.5 over 3000 Ky indicating that the surface reactivities of minerals decrease as the physical surface areas increase. Rate constants based on BET estimates for the Merced soils are factors of 103-104 slower than reported experimental dissolution rates determined from freshly prepared silicates with low surface roughness (?? <10). This study demonstrates that the utility of experimental rate constants to predict weathering in soils is limited without consideration of variable surface areas and processes that control the evolution of surface reactivity with time.

  1. Chemical weathering rates of a soil chronosequence on granitic alluvium: I. Quantification of mineralogical and surface area changes and calculation of primary silicate reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Art F.; Blum, Alex E.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Bullen, Tom D.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Peterson, Maria L.

    1996-07-01

    Mineral weathering rates are determined for a series of soils ranging in age from 0.2-3000 Ky developed on alluvial terraces near Merced in the Central Valley of California. Mineralogical and elemental abundances exhibit time-dependent trends documenting the chemical evolution of granitic sand to residual kaolinite and quartz. Mineral losses with time occur in the order: hornblende > plagioclase > K-feldspar. Maximum volume decreases of >50% occur in the older soils. BET surface areas of the bulk soils increase with age, as do specific surface areas of aluminosilicate mineral fractions such as plagioclase, which increases from 0.4-1.5 m 2 g -1 over 600 Ky. Quartz surface areas are lower and change less with time (0.11-0.23 m 2 g -1). BET surface areas correspond to increasing external surface roughness (? = 10-600) and relatively constant internal surface area (? 1.3 m 2 g -1). SEM observations confirm both surface pitting and development of internal porosity. A numerical model describes aluminosilicate dissolution rates as a function of changes in residual mineral abundance, grain size distributions, and mineral surface areas with time. A simple geometric treatment, assuming spherical grains and no surface roughness, predicts average dissolution rates (plagioclase, 10 -17.4; K-feldspar, 10 -17.8; and hornblende, 10 -17.5 mol cm -1 s -1) that are constant with time and comparable to previous estimates of soil weathering. Average rates, based on BET surface area measurements and variable surface roughnesses, are much slower (plagioclase, 10 -19.9; K-feldspar, 10 -20.5; and hornblende 10 -20.1 mol cm -2 s -1). Rates for individual soil horizons decrease by a factor of 10 1.5 over 3000 Ky indicating that the surface reactivities of minerals decrease as the physical surface areas increase. Rate constants based on BET estimates for the Merced soils are factors of 10 3-104 slower than reported experimental dissolution rates determined from freshly prepared silicates with low surface roughness (? < 10). This study demonstrates that the utility of experimental rate constants to predict weathering in soils is limited without consideration of variable surface areas and processes that control the evolution of surface reactivity with time.

  2. Association of global weather changes with acute coronary syndromes: gaining insights from clinical trials data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Westerhout, Cynthia M.; Boersma, Eric; Armstrong, Paul W.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for the identification of global weather parameters and patient characteristics associated with a type of heart attack in which there is a sudden partial blockage of a coronary artery. This type of heart attack does not demonstrate an elevation of the ST segment on an electrocardiogram and is defined as a non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). Data from the Global Summary of the Day database was linked with the enrollment and baseline data for a phase III international clinical trial in NSTE-ACS in four 48-h time periods covering the week prior to the clinical event that prompted enrollment in the study. Meteorological events were determined by standardizing the weather data from enrollment dates against an empirical distribution from the month prior. These meteorological events were then linked to the patients' geographic region, demographics and comorbidities to identify potential susceptible populations. After standardization, changes in temperature and humidity demonstrated an association with the enrollment event. Additionally there appeared to be an association with gender, region and a history of stroke. This methodology may provide a useful global insight into assessing the biometeorologic component of diseases from international data.

  3. Space weathering of silicate regoliths with various FeO contents: New insights from laser irradiation experiments and theoretical spectral simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Lyuba V.; Starukhina, Larissa V.; Rout, Surya Snata; Sasaki, Sho; Helbert, Jörn; Baither, Dietmar; Bischoff, Addi; Hiesinger, Harald

    2014-06-01

    To investigate effects of micrometeorite bombardment on optical spectra and composition of planetary and asteroid regoliths with low Fe contents, we irradiated samples of a Fe-poor plagioclase feldspar (andesine-labradorite) using a nanosecond pulsed laser. We measured reflectance spectra of irradiated and non-irradiated areas of the samples (pressed pellets) between 0.5 and 18 ?m and performed SEM/EDS and TEM studies of the samples. Bulk FeO content of 0.72 wt.% in the samples is comparable, for example, to FeO content in silicates on the surface of Mercury, that was recently mapped by NASA's MESSENGER mission and will be spectrally mapped by remote sensing instruments MERTIS and SYMBIO-SYS on board the ESA BepiColombo spacecraft. We also employed theoretical spectral modeling to characterize optical alteration caused by formation of nano- and submicrometer Fe0 inclusions within space-weathered surface layers and grain rims of a Fe-poor regolith. The laser-irradiated surface layer of plagioclase reveals significant melting, while reflectance spectra show mild darkening and reddening in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR). Our spectral modeling indicates that the optical changes observed in the visible require reduction of bulk FeO (including Fe from mineral impurities found in the sample) and formation of nanophase (np) Fe0 within the glassy surface layer. A vapor deposit, if present, is optically too thin to contribute to optical modification of the investigated samples or to cause space weathering-induced optical alteration of Fe-poor regoliths in general. Due to low thickness of vapor deposits, npFe0 formation in the latter can cause darkening and reddening only for a regolith with rather high bulk Fe content. Our calculations show that only a fraction of bulk Fe is likely to be converted to npFe0 in nanosecond laser irradiation experiments and probably in natural regolith layers modified by space weathering. The previously reported differences in response of different minerals to laser irradiation, and probably to space weathering-induced heating are likely controlled by their differences in electrical conductivities and melting points. For a given mineral grain, its susceptibility to melting/vaporization is also affected by electric conductivities of adjacent grains of other minerals in the regolith. Published nanosecond laser irradiation experiments simulate optical alteration of immature regoliths, since only the uppermost surface layer of an irradiated pellet is subject to heating. According to our calculations, if regolith particles due to impact-induced turnover are mantled with npFe0-bearing rims of the same thickness, then even low contents of Fe similar to our sample or Mercury' surface can cause significant darkening and reddening, provided a melt layer, rather than a thin vapor deposit is involved into npFe0 formation. All spectral effects observed in the thermal infrared (TIR) after irradiation of our feldspar sample are likely to be associated with textural changes. We expect that mineralogical interpretation of the BepiColombo MERTIS infrared spectra of Mercury between 7 and 17 ?m will be influenced mostly by textural effects (porosity, comminution) and impact glass formation rather than formation of npFe0 inclusions.

  4. The data systems tests - The final phase. [for Global Weather Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greaves, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The U.S.A. has conducted a series of data systems tests (DSTs) as a precursor to its participation in FGGE, the Global Weather Experiment. The paper briefly describes the impact those tests have had on the FGGE observing system and on the data management plans. In particular, the final phase of the DST programs is described, wherein a number of investigators have been selected to work with the DST data sets in research studies directed toward the GARP objectives. Thus, an important first step has been taken in providing feedback to the potential FGGE research community.

  5. Bias corrections of global models for regional climate simulations of high-impact weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyère, Cindy L.; Done, James M.; Holland, Greg J.; Fredrick, Sherrie

    2014-10-01

    All global circulation models (GCMs) suffer from some form of bias, which when used as boundary conditions for regional climate models may impact the simulations, perhaps severely. Here we present a bias correction method that corrects the mean error in the GCM, but retains the six-hourly weather, longer-period climate-variability and climate change from the GCM. We utilize six different bias correction experiments; each correcting different bias components. The impact of the full bias correction and the individual components are examined in relation to tropical cyclones, precipitation and temperature. We show that correcting of all boundary data provides the greatest improvement.

  6. Long Range Weather Prediction III: Miniaturized Distributed Sensors for Global Atmospheric Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E; Leith, C; Canavan, G; Wood, L

    2001-11-13

    We continue consideration of ways-and-means for creating, in an evolutionary, ever-more-powerful manner, a continually-updated data-base of salient atmospheric properties sufficient for finite differenced integration-based, high-fidelity weather prediction over intervals of 2-3 weeks, leveraging the 10{sup 14} FLOPS digital computing systems now coming into existence. A constellation comprised of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 9} small atmospheric sampling systems--high-tech superpressure balloons carrying early 21st century semiconductor devices, drifting with the local winds over the meteorological spectrum of pressure-altitudes--that assays all portions of the troposphere and lower stratosphere remains the central feature of the proposed system. We suggest that these devices should be active-signaling, rather than passive-transponding, as we had previously proposed only for the ground- and aquatic-situated sensors of this system. Instead of periodic interrogation of the intra-atmospheric transponder population by a constellation of sophisticated small satellites in low Earth orbit, we now propose to retrieve information from the instrumented balloon constellation by existing satellite telephony systems, acting as cellular tower-nodes in a global cellular telephony system whose ''user-set'' is the atmospheric-sampling and surface-level monitoring constellations. We thereby leverage the huge investment in cellular (satellite) telephony and GPS technologies, with large technical and economic gains. This proposal minimizes sponsor forward commitment along its entire programmatic trajectory, and moreover may return data of weather-predictive value soon after field activities commence. We emphasize its high near-term value for making better mesoscale, relatively short-term weather predictions with computing-intensive means, and its great long-term utility in enhancing the meteorological basis for global change predictive studies. We again note that adverse impacts of weather involve continuing costs of the order of 1% of GDP, a large fraction of which could be retrieved if high-fidelity predictions of two weeks forward applicability were available. These {approx}$10{sup 2} B annual savings dwarf the <$1 B costs of operating a rational, long-range weather prediction system of the type proposed.

  7. Antarctic Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Visitors to this site can read a discussion about the weather in Anarctica, including why it is so cold, how weather observations are conducted there, and what role the continent plays in the global weather system. Links to related topics, a wind chill calculator, and a Fahrenheit-Celsius-Kelvin temperature converter are also provided.

  8. Antarctic Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    Visitors to this site can read a discussion about the weather in Antarctica, including why it is so cold, how weather observations are conducted there, and what role the continent plays in the global weather system. Links to related topics, a wind chill calculator, and a Fahrenheit-Celsius-Kelvin temperature converter are also provided.

  9. On the role of clouds in the fair weather part of the global electric circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertner, A. J. G.; Lucas, G. M.; Thayer, J. P.; Mallios, S. A.

    2014-08-01

    Clouds in the fair weather return path of the global electric circuit (GEC) reduce conductivity because of the limited mobility of charge due to attachment to cloud water droplets, effectively leading to a loss of ions. A high-resolution GEC model, which numerically solves the current continuity equation in combination with Ohm's law, is used to show that return currents partially flow around clouds, with current divergence above the cloud and convergence below the cloud. An analysis of this effect is presented for various types of clouds, i.e., for different altitude extents and for different horizontal dimensions, finding that the effect is most pronounced for high clouds with a diameter below 100 km. Based on these results, a method to calculate column and global resistance is developed that can account for all cloud sizes and altitudes. The CESM1(WACCM) (Community Earth System Model - Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model) as well as ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) cloud data are used to calculate the effect of this phenomenon on global resistance. From CESM1(WACCM), it is found that when including clouds in the estimate of resistance the global resistance increases by up to 73%, depending on the parameters used. Using ISCCP cloud cover leads to an even larger increase, which is likely to be overestimated because of time averaging of cloud cover. Neglecting current divergence/convergence around small clouds overestimates global resistance by up to 20% whereas the method introduced by previous studies underestimates global resistance by up to 40%. For global GEC models, a~conductivity parameterization is developed to account for the current divergence/convergence phenomenon around clouds. Conductivity simulations from CESM1(WACCM) using this parameterization are presented.

  10. Impacts of increasing the aerosol complexity in the Met Office global numerical weather prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, J. P.; Walters, D. N.; Bellouin, N.; Milton, S. F.

    2014-05-01

    The inclusion of the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosols in high-resolution global numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is being increasingly recognised as important for the improved accuracy of short-range weather forecasts. In this study the impacts of increasing the aerosol complexity in the global NWP configuration of the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) are investigated. A hierarchy of aerosol representations are evaluated including three-dimensional monthly mean speciated aerosol climatologies, fully prognostic aerosols modelled using the CLASSIC aerosol scheme and finally, initialised aerosols using assimilated aerosol fields from the GEMS project. The prognostic aerosol schemes are better able to predict the temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric aerosol optical depth, which is particularly important in cases of large sporadic aerosol events such as large dust storms or forest fires. Including the direct effect of aerosols improves model biases in outgoing long-wave radiation over West Africa due to a better representation of dust. However, uncertainties in dust optical properties propagate to its direct effect and the subsequent model response. Inclusion of the indirect aerosol effects improves surface radiation biases at the North Slope of Alaska ARM site due to lower cloud amounts in high-latitude clean-air regions. This leads to improved temperature and height forecasts in this region. Impacts on the global mean model precipitation and large-scale circulation fields were found to be generally small in the short-range forecasts. However, the indirect aerosol effect leads to a strengthening of the low-level monsoon flow over the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal and an increase in precipitation over Southeast Asia. Regional impacts on the African Easterly Jet (AEJ) are also presented with the large dust loading in the aerosol climatology enhancing of the heat low over West Africa and weakening the AEJ. This study highlights the importance of including a more realistic treatment of aerosol-cloud interactions in global NWP models and the potential for improved global environmental prediction systems through the incorporation of more complex aerosol schemes.

  11. HESFIRE: a global fire model to explore the role of anthropogenic and weather drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Page, Y.; Morton, D.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Pereira, J. M. C.; Hurtt, G.

    2015-02-01

    Vegetation fires are a major driver of ecosystem dynamics and greenhouse gas emissions. Anticipating potential changes in fire activity and their impacts relies first on a realistic model of fire activity (e.g., fire incidence and interannual variability) and second on a model accounting for fire impacts (e.g., mortality and emissions). In this paper, we focus on our understanding of fire activity and describe a new fire model, HESFIRE (Human-Earth System FIRE), which integrates the influence of weather, vegetation characteristics, and human activities on fires in a stand-alone framework. It was developed with a particular emphasis on allowing fires to spread over consecutive days given their major contribution to burned areas in many ecosystems. A subset of the model parameters was calibrated through an optimization procedure using observation data to enhance our knowledge of regional drivers of fire activity and improve the performance of the model on a global scale. Modeled fire activity showed reasonable agreement with observations of burned area, fire seasonality, and interannual variability in many regions, including for spatial and temporal domains not included in the optimization procedure. Significant discrepancies are investigated, most notably regarding fires in boreal regions and in xeric ecosystems and also fire size distribution. The sensitivity of fire activity to model parameters is analyzed to explore the dominance of specific drivers across regions and ecosystems. The characteristics of HESFIRE and the outcome of its evaluation provide insights into the influence of anthropogenic activities and weather, and their interactions, on fire activity.

  12. FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 GNSS radio occultation constellation mission for global weather monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K.; Fong, Chen-Joe; Wenkel, M. J.; Wilczynski, P.; Yen, N.; Chang, G. S.

    The United States and Taiwan, through an Agreement signed in May 2010, have begun to jointly develop a satellite program to deliver next-generation global navigation satellite system (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) data to users around the world. This Program, known as FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2, is the follow-on to the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC mission, which was a joint US-Taiwan 6-satellite constellation demonstration mission launched in April 2006. The COSMIC mission was the world's first operational GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) mission for global weather forecast; climate monitoring; atmospheric, ionospheric, and geodetic research. The GPS-RO data from COSMIC has been extremely valuable to the climate, meteorology, and space weather communities, including real-time forecasting users as well as U.S. and international research communities. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC reached the end of its design life in 2011. The constellation satellites have exhibited some unrecoverable anomalies and consequently the critical real-time satellite observing capability is degrading and may go offline with uncertainty in the coming few years. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Taiwan's National Space Organization (NSPO) have recognized the potential GPS-RO data gap due to the degrading COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 constellation and agreed to implement the follow-on COSMIC-2/FORMOSAT-7 mission in 2010. Both experienced programmatic difficulties in the past two years in the course of implementing the COSMIC-2/FORMOSAT-7 Program; however, significant progress over the past six months has occurred. This paper will provide an overview of the COSMIC2/FORMOSAT-7 Program including the Program goals and objectives. It will also discuss the status of the Program including current satellite and constellation configuration, activities to determine the optimal and minimal ground system architecture to meet data latency requirements, and other discussions on the mission and scientific payload technol- gy that will be used to meet the Program objectives.

  13. Carbon dioxide efficiency of terrestrial enhanced weathering.

    PubMed

    Moosdorf, Nils; Renforth, Phil; Hartmann, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Terrestrial enhanced weathering, the spreading of ultramafic silicate rock flour to enhance natural weathering rates, has been suggested as part of a strategy to reduce global atmospheric CO2 levels. We budget potential CO2 sequestration against associated CO2 emissions to assess the net CO2 removal of terrestrial enhanced weathering. We combine global spatial data sets of potential source rocks, transport networks, and application areas with associated CO2 emissions in optimistic and pessimistic scenarios. The results show that the choice of source rocks and material comminution technique dominate the CO2 efficiency of enhanced weathering. CO2 emissions from transport amount to on average 0.5-3% of potentially sequestered CO2. The emissions of material mining and application are negligible. After accounting for all emissions, 0.5-1.0 t CO2 can be sequestered on average per tonne of rock, translating into a unit cost from 1.6 to 9.9 GJ per tonne CO2 sequestered by enhanced weathering. However, to control or reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations substantially with enhanced weathering would require very large amounts of rock. Before enhanced weathering could be applied on large scales, more research is needed to assess weathering rates, potential side effects, social acceptability, and mechanisms of governance. PMID:24597739

  14. Proceedings of the First National Workshop on the Global Weather Experiment: Current Achievements and Future Directions, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A summary of the proceedings in which the most important findings stemming from the Global Weather Experiment (GWE) are highlighted, additional key results and recommendations are comered, and the presentations and discussion are summarized. Detailed achievements, unresolved problems, and recommendations are included.

  15. Shifting Economic Impacts from Weather Extremes in the United States: A Result of Societal Changes, Not Global Warming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2003-01-01

    Loss values from extremes in the U.S. and elsewhere have been more qualitativethan quantitative, but recent pressures for better information have led to newassessments and better estimates of financial losses from extremes. These pressureshave included concerns over potential impacts of more extremes due to global warmingfostered by ever increasing costs to the insurance industry and government from weather extremes; plus

  16. Global silicate mineralogy of the Moon from the Diviner lunar radiometer.

    PubMed

    Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Lucey, Paul G; Wyatt, Michael B; Glotch, Timothy D; Allen, Carlton C; Arnold, Jessica A; Bandfield, Joshua L; Bowles, Neil E; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri L; Hayne, Paul O; Song, Eugenie; Thomas, Ian R; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    We obtained direct global measurements of the lunar surface using multispectral thermal emission mapping with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment. Most lunar terrains have spectral signatures that are consistent with known lunar anorthosite and basalt compositions. However, the data have also revealed the presence of highly evolved, silica-rich lunar soils in kilometer-scale and larger exposures, expanded the compositional range of the anorthosites that dominate the lunar crust, and shown that pristine lunar mantle is not exposed at the lunar surface at the kilometer scale. Together, these observations provide compelling evidence that the Moon is a complex body that has experienced a diverse set of igneous processes. PMID:20847266

  17. Rivers, chemical weathering and Earth's climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Bernard; Dessert, Céline; Oliva, Priscia; Goddéris, Yves; Viers, Jérôme; François, Louis; Millot, Romain; Gaillardet, Jérôme

    2003-12-01

    We detail the results of recent studies describing and quantifying the large-scale chemical weathering of the main types of continental silicate rocks: granites and basalts. These studies aim at establishing chemical weathering laws for these two lithologies, describing the dependence of chemical weathering on environmental parameters, such as climate and mechanical erosion. As shown within this contribution, such mathematical laws are of primary importance for numerical models calculating the evolution of the partial pressure of atmospheric CO 2 and the Earth climate at geological timescales. The major results can be summarized as follow: (1) weathering of continental basaltic lithologies accounts for about 30% of the total consumption of atmospheric CO 2 through weathering of continental silicate rocks. This is related to their high weatherability (about eight times greater than the granite weatherability); (2) a simple weathering law has been established for basaltic lithologies, giving the consumption of atmospheric CO 2 as a function of regional continental runoff, and mean annual regional temperature; (3) no such simple weathering law can be proposed for granitic lithologies, since the effect of temperature can only be identified for regions displaying high continental runoff; (4) a general law relating mechanical erosion and chemical weathering has been validated on small and large catchments. The consequences of these major advances on the climatic evolution of the Earth are discussed. Particularly, the impacts of the onset of the Deccan trapps and the Himalayan orogeny on the global carbon cycle are reinvestigated. To cite this article: B. Dupré et al., C. R. Geoscience 335 (2003).

  18. Global magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere simulations - from science to space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeder, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    Earth's magnetosphere arises from the interaction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field with the internal magnetic field of the Earth. Because the solar wind is highly variable the magnetosphere is very dynamic and host to numerous plasma processes. Since the magnetosphere is fairly accessible for in situ measurements it also serves as a laboratory for the collisionless plasma that makes up most of the cosmos. Attempts to model the global solar wind - magnetosphere interaction go back to the 1980's and are usually based on the MHD equations. Contemporary models are much more complex and are coupled to other sub-models, such as ionosphere-thermosphere and ring current models. Furthermore, ever increasing computer power now allows us to produce many details and processes of the interaction. Space weather forecasting critically depends on global models of the magnetosphere -ionosphere -thermosphere system. However, science-grade models are generally not well suited for operational tasks. In this talk I will address the most important issues that distinguish a science model from an operational model, such as relevance, robustness, efficiency, documentation, and verification. In particular, I will suggest programs that are needed to overcome the "valley of death," i.e., the rocky path from science to forecasting.

  19. Evaluating a system of systems approach for integrated global weather, climate, and hazard monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, Ronald; Baldauf, Brian; Ohlemacher, Rick; Andreoli, Leo

    2008-08-01

    Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) provides systems and technologies to ensure national security based on technologies - from undersea to outer space, and in cyberspace. With a heritage of developing and integrating science instruments on space platforms and airborne systems, NGC is conducting analysis of alternatives for a global observing system that integrates data collected from geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites with Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) platforms. This enhanced acquisition of environmental data will feed decision support systems such as the TouchTable ® to deliver improved decision making capabilities. Rapidly fusing and displaying multiple types of weather and ocean observations, imagery, and environmental data with geospatial data to create an integrated source of information for end users such as emergency managers and planners will deliver innovative solutions to improve disaster warning, mitigate disaster impacts, and reduce the loss of life and property. We present analysis of alternatives of combinations of sensor platforms that integrate space and airborne systems with ground and ocean observing sensors and form the basis for vertically integrated global observing systems with the capacity to improve measurements associated with hazard and climate-related uncertainties. The analyses include candidate sensors deployed on various configurations of satellites that include NPOESS, GOES R, and future configurations, augmented by UAS vehicles including Global Hawk, configured to deliver innovative environmental data collection capabilities over a range of environmental conditions, including severe hazards, such as hurricanes and extreme wildland fires. Resulting approaches are evaluated based on metrics that include their technical feasibility, capacity to be integrated with evolving Earth science models and relevant decision support tools, and life cycle costs.

  20. Weather One

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Duane Friend

    This website contains summaries and lessons about various aspects of weather. This includes the seasons, types of clouds, air, winds, global warming, hurricanes, tornadoes and lightning. Worksheets are provided to accompany the lesson themes.

  1. Weather Avoidance Guidelines for NASA Global Hawk High-Altitude UAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Zipser, Edward J.; Velden, Chris; Monette, Sarah; Heymsfield, Gerry; Braun, Scott; Newman, Paul; Black, Pete; Black, Michael; Dunion, Jason

    2014-01-01

    NASA operates two Global Hawk unmanned aircraft systems for Earth Science research projects. In particular, they are used in the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) project during 2012, 2013, and 2014 to take measurements from the environment around tropical cyclones, and from directly above tropical cyclones. There is concern that strict adherence to the weather avoidance rules used in 2012 may sacrifice the ability to observe important science targets. We have proposed modifications to these weather avoidance rules that we believe will improve the ability to observe science targets without compromising aircraft safety. The previous guidelines, used in 2012, specified: Do not approach thunderstorms within 25 nm during flight at FL500 or below. When flying above FL500: Do not approach reported lightning within 25NM in areas where cloud tops are reported at FL500 or higher. Aircraft should maintain at least 10000 ft vertical separation from reported lightning if cloud tops are below FL500. No over-flight of cumulus tops higher than FL500. No flight into forecast or reported icing conditions. No flight into forecast or reported moderate or severe turbulence Based on past experience with high-altitude flights over tropical cyclones, we have recommended changing this guidance to: Do not approach thunderstorms within 25 nm during flight at FL500 or below. Aircraft should maintain at least 5000 ft vertical separation from significant convective cloud tops except: a) When cloud tops above FL500: In the event of reported significant lightning activity or indicators of significant overshooting tops, do not approach within 10-25 nm, depending on pilot discretion and advice from Mission Scientist. b) When cloud tops are below FL500, maintain 10000 ft separation from reported significant lightning or indicators of significant overshooting tops. No flight into forecasted or reported icing conditions. No flight into forecasted or reported moderate or severe turbulence The key changes have to do with overflight of high convective cloud tops and those producing lightning. Experience shows that most tropical oceanic convection (including that in tropical cyclones) is relatively gentle even if the cloud tops are quite high, and can be safely overflown. Exceptions are convective elements producing elevated lightning flash rates (more than just the occasional flash, which would trigger avoidance under the previous rules) and significant overshooting cloud tops.

  2. Modeling the weather impact on aviation in a global air traffic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmelsbach, S.; Hauf, T.; Rokitansky, C. H.

    2009-09-01

    Weather has a strong impact on aviation safety and efficiency. For a better understanding of that impact, especially of thunderstorms and similar other severe hazards, we pursued a modeling approach. We used the detailed simulation software (NAVSIM) of worldwide air traffic, developed by Rokitansky [Eurocontrol, 2005] and implemented a specific weather module. NAVSIM models each aircraft with its specific performance characteristics separately along preplanned and prescribed routes. The specific weather module in its current version simulates a thunderstorm as an impenetrable 3D object, which forces an aircraft to circumvent the latter. We refer to that object in general terms as a weather object. The Cb-weather object, as a specific weather object, is a heuristic model of a real thunderstorm, with its characteristics based on actually observed satellite and precipitation radar data. It is comprised of an upper volume, mostly the anvil, and a bottom volume, the up- and downdrafts and the lower outflow area [Tafferner and Forster, 2009; Kober and Tafferner 2009; Zinner et al, 2008]. The Cb-weather object is already implemented in NAVSIM, other weather objects like icing and turbulence will follow. This combination of NAVSIM with a weather object allows a detailed investigation of situations where conflicts exist between planned flight routes and adverse weather. The first objective is to simulate the observed circum-navigation in NAVSIM. Real occurring routes will be compared with simulated ones. Once this has successfully completed, NAVSIM offers a platform to assess existing rules and develop more efficient strategies to cope with adverse weather. An overview will be given over the implementation status of weather objects within NAVSIM and first results will be presented. Cb-object data provision by A. Tafferner, C. Forster, T. Zinner, K. Kober, M. Hagen (DLR Oberpfaffenhofen) is greatly acknowledged. References: Eurocontrol, VDL Mode 2 Capacity Analysis through Simulations: WP3.B - NAVSIM Overview and Validation Results, Edition 1.2, 2005 Kober K. and A. Tafferner. Tracking and nowcasting of convective cells using remote sensing data from radar and satellite, Meteorologische Zeitschrift, 1 (No. 18), 75-84, 2009 Tafferner A. and C. Forster, Improvement of thunderstorm hazard information for pilots through a ground based weather information and management system, Eighth USA/Europe Air Traffic Management Research and Development Seminar (submitted), 2009 Zinner, T., H. Mannstein, A. Tafferner. Cb-TRAM: Tracking and monitoring severe convection from onset over rapid development to mature phase using multi-channel Meteosat-8 SEVIRI data, Meteorol. Atmos. Phys., 101, 191-210, 2008

  3. Passive millimeter-wave retrieval of global precipitation utilizing satellites and a numerical weather prediction model

    E-print Network

    Surussavadee, Chinnawat

    2007-01-01

    This thesis develops and validates the MM5/TBSCAT/F([lambda]) model, composed of a mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model (MM5), a two-stream radiative transfer model (TBSCAT), and electromagnetic models for ...

  4. Estimation of confidence intervals of global horizontal irradiance obtained from a weather prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtake, Hideaki; Gari da Silva Fonseca, Joao, Jr.; Takashima, Takumi; Oozeki, Takashi; Yamada, Yoshinori

    2014-05-01

    Many photovoltaic (PV) systems have been installed in Japan after the introduction of the Feed-in-Tariff. For an energy management of electric power systems included many PV systems, the forecast of the PV power production are useful technology. Recently numerical weather predictions have been applied to forecast the PV power production while the forecasted values invariably have forecast errors for each modeling system. So, we must use the forecast data considering its error. In this study, we attempted to estimate confidence intervals for hourly forecasts of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) values obtained from a mesoscale model (MSM) de-veloped by the Japan Meteorological Agency. In the recent study, we found that the forecasted values of the GHI of the MSM have two systematical forecast errors; the first is that forecast values of the GHI are depended on the clearness indices, which are defined as the GHI values divided by the extraterrestrial solar irradiance. The second is that forecast errors have the seasonal variations; the overestimation of the GHI forecasts is found in winter while the underestimation of those is found in summer. The information of the errors of the hourly GHI forecasts, that is, confidence intervals of the forecasts, is of great significance for planning the energy management included a lot of PV systems by an electric company. On the PV systems, confidence intervals of the GHI forecasts are required for a pinpoint area or for a relatively large area control-ling the power system. For the relatively large area, a spatial-smoothing method of the GHI values is performed for both the observations and forecasts. The spatial-smoothing method caused the decline of confidence intervals of the hourly GHI forecasts on an extreme event of the GHI forecast (a case of large forecast error) over the relatively large area of the Tokyo electric company (approximately 68 % than for a pinpoint forecast). For more credible estimation of the confidence intervals, it is required to consider the location of the installed PV systems or its capacity over the region.

  5. Chemical weathering rates of a soil chronosequence on granitic alluvium: I. Quantification of mineralogical and surface area changes and calculation of primary silicate reaction rates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Art F. White; Alex E. Blum; Marjorie S. Schulz; Tom D. Bullen; Jennifer W. Harden; Maria L. Peterson

    1996-01-01

    Mineral weathering rates are determined for a series of soils ranging in age from 0.2–3000 Ky developed on alluvial terraces near Merced in the Central Valley of California. Mineralogical and elemental abundances exhibit time-dependent trends documenting the chemical evolution of granitic sand to residual kaolinite and quartz. Mineral losses with time occur in the order: hornblende > plagioclase > K-feldspar.

  6. Chemical weathering and CO? consumption in the Lower Mekong River.

    PubMed

    Li, Siyue; Lu, X X; Bush, Richard T

    2014-02-15

    Data on river water quality from 42 monitoring stations in the Lower Mekong Basin obtained during the period 1972-1996 was used to relate solute fluxes with controlling factors such as chemical weathering processes. The total dissolved solid (TDS) concentration of the Lower Mekong varied from 53 mg/L to 198 mg/L, and the median (114 mg/L) was compared to the world spatial median value (127 mg/L). Total cationic exchange capacity (Tz(+)) ranged from 729 to 2,607 ?molc/L, and the mean (1,572 ?molc/L) was 1.4 times higher than the world discharge-weighted average. Calcium and bicarbonate dominated the annual ionic composition, accounting for ~70% of the solute load that equalled 41.2×10(9)kg/y. TDS and major elements varied seasonally and in a predictable way with river runoff. The chemical weathering rate of 37.7t/(km(2)y), with respective carbonate and silicate weathering rates of 27.5t/(km(2) y) (13.8mm/ky) and 10.2t/(km(2) y) (3.8mm/ky), was 1.5 times higher than the global average. The CO2 consumption rate was estimated at 191×10(3)molCO2/(km(2)y) for silicate weathering, and 286×10(3)molCO2/(km(2)y) by carbonate weathering. In total, the Mekong basin consumed 228×10(9)molCO2/y and 152×10(9)molCO2/y by the combined weathering of carbonate and silicate, constituting 1.85% of the global CO2 consumption by carbonate weathering and 1.75% by silicates. This is marginally higher than its contribution to global water discharge ~1.3% and much higher than (more than three-fold) its contribution to world land surface area. Remarkable CO2 consumed by chemical weathering (380×10(9)mol/y) was similar in magnitude to dissolved inorganic carbon as HCO3(-) (370×10(9)mol/y) exported by the Mekong to the South China Sea. In this landscape, atmospheric CO2 consumption by rock chemical weathering represents an important carbon sink with runoff and physical erosion controlling chemical erosion. PMID:24291559

  7. World weather program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A brief description of the Global Weather Experiment is presented. The world weather watch program plan is described and includes a global observing system, a global data processing system, a global telecommunication system, and a voluntary cooperation program. A summary of Federal Agency plans and programs to meet the challenges of international meteorology for the two year period, FY 1980-1981, is presented.

  8. Estimation of weathering rates and CO2 drawdown based on solute load: Significance of granulites and gneisses dominated weathering in the Kaveri River basin, Southern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaik, J. K.; Balakrishnan, S.; Bhutani, R.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    The solute load of the Kaveri River (South India) and its tributaries draining diverse Precambrian terrains during pre-monsoon and monsoon periods was determined. Using average annual flow, total drainage area and atmospheric input corrected major ion concentrations of these rivers chemical weathering rates, annual fluxes of different ionic species to the ocean and CO2 consumption rates were estimated. Bicarbonate is the most dominant ion (27-79% of anion budget) in all the river samples collected during monsoon period followed by Ca2+, whereas, in case of pre-monsoon water samples Na+ is the most dominant ion (in meq/l). Two approaches were adopted to estimate silicate and carbonate weathering rates in the drainage basin. At Musuri silicate weathering rate (SWR) is 9.44 ± 0.29 tons/km2/a and carbonate weathering rate (CWR) is 1.46 ± 0.16 tons/km2/a. More than 90% of the total ionic budget is derived from weathering of silicates in the Kaveri basin. CO2 consumption rate in the basin for silicate weathering FCO2sil is 3.83 ± 0.12 × 105 mol/km2/a (upper limit), which is comparable with the Himalayan rivers at upper reaches. For carbonate weathering (FCO2carb) CO2 consumption rate is 0.15 ± 0.03 × 105 mol/km2/a in the Kaveri basin. The lower limit of CO2 consumption rate corrected for H2SO4 during silicate and carbonate weathering is FCO2sil is 3.24 × 1005 mol/km2/a and FCO2carb 0.13 × 105 mol/km2/a respectively. CO2 sequestered due to silicate weathering in the Kaveri basin is 25.41 (±0.82) × 109 mol/a which represents 0.21 (±0.01)% of global CO2 drawdown. This may be due to tropical climatic condition, high rainfall during both SW and NE monsoon and predominance of silicate rocks in the Kaveri basin.

  9. Development of an integrated chemical weather prediction system for environmental applications at meso to global scales: NMMB/BSC-CHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorba, O.; Pérez, C.; Karsten, K.; Janjic, Z.; Dabdub, D.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-09-01

    This contribution presents the ongoing developments of a new fully on-line chemical weather prediction system for meso to global scale applications. The modeling system consists of a mineral dust module and a gas-phase chemistry module coupled on-line to a unified global-regional atmospheric driver. This approach allows solving small scale processes and their interactions at local to global scales. Its unified environment maintains the consistency of all the physico-chemical processes involved. The atmospheric driver is the NCEP/NMMB numerical weather prediction model (Janjic and Black, 2007) developed at National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). It represents an evolution of the operational WRF-NMME model extending from meso to global scales. Its unified non-hydrostatic dynamical core supports regional and global simulations. The Barcelona Supercomputing Center is currently designing and implementing a chemistry transport model coupled online with the new global/regional NMMB. The new modeling system is intended to be a powerful tool for research and to provide efficient global and regional chemical weather forecasts at sub-synoptic and mesoscale resolutions. The online coupling of the chemistry follows the approach similar to that of the mineral dust module already coupled to the atmospheric driver, NMMB/BSC-DUST (Pérez et al., 2008). Chemical species are advected and mixed at the corresponding time steps of the meteorological tracers using the same numerical scheme. Advection is eulerian, positive definite and monotone. The chemical mechanism and chemistry solver is based on the Kinetic PreProcessor KPP (Damian et al., 2002) package with the main purpose of maintaining a wide flexibility when configuring the model. Such approach will allow using a simplified chemical mechanism for global applications or a more complete mechanism for high-resolution local or regional studies. Moreover, it will permit the implementation of a specific configuration for forecasting applications in regional or global domains. An emission process allows the coupling of different emission inventories sources such as RETRO, EDGAR and GEIA for the global domain, EMEP for Europe and HERMES for Spain. The photolysis scheme is based on the Fast-J scheme, coupled with physics of each model layer (e.g., aerosols, clouds, absorbers as ozone) and it considers grid-scale clouds from the atmospheric driver. The dry deposition scheme follows the deposition velocity analogy for gases, enabling the calculation of deposition fluxes from airborne concentrations. No cloud-chemistry processes are included in the system yet (no wet deposition, scavenging and aqueous chemistry). The modeling system developments will be presented and first results of the gas-phase chemistry at global scale will be discussed. REFERENCES Janjic, Z.I., and Black, T.L., 2007. An ESMF unified model for a broad range of spatial and temporal scales, Geophysical Research Abstracts, 9, 05025. Pérez, C., Haustein, K., Janjic, Z.I., Jorba, O., Baldasano, J.M., Black, T.L., and Nickovic, S., 2008. An online dust model within the meso to global NMMB: current progress and plans. AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, A41K-03, 2008. Damian, V., Sandu, A., Damian, M., Potra, F., and Carmichael, G.R., 2002. The kinetic preprocessor KPP - A software environment for solving chemical kinetics. Comp. Chem. Eng., 26, 1567-1579. Sandu, A., and Sander, R., 2006. Technical note:Simulating chemical systems in Fortran90 and Matlab with the Kinetic PreProcessor KPP-2.1. Atmos. Chem. and Phys., 6, 187-195.

  10. The ocean is critical to the Earth's global systems, regulating weather and climate, the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, the re-cycling

    E-print Network

    Johannesson, Henrik

    Abstract The ocean is critical to the Earth's global systems, regulating weather and climate resources. Through evaporation to cloud formation to rain, the ocean rejuvenates the Earth's drinking water. There is a growing need and demand for more systematic ocean information at local, national, regional, and global

  11. Research Review: Walter Orr Roberts on the Atmosphere, Global Pollution and Weather Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Sally

    1973-01-01

    Global Atmospheric Research Program is envisaged to study various aspects of the environment for the whole globe. Describes programs undertaken and the international problems involved in implementing results of such research on a global level. (PS)

  12. Thermal Expansion Calculation of Silicate Glasses at 210°C, Based on the Systematic Analysis of Global Databases

    SciTech Connect

    Fluegel, Alex

    2010-10-01

    Thermal expansion data for more than 5500 compositions of silicate glasses were analyzed statistically. These data were gathered from the scientific literature, summarized in SciGlass© 6.5, a new version of the well known glass property database and information system. The analysis resulted in a data reduction from 5500 glasses to a core of 900, where the majority of the published values is located within commercial glass composition ranges and obtained over the temperature range 20 to 500°C. A multiple regression model for the linear thermal expansivity at 210°C, including error formula and detailed application limits, was developed based on those 900 core data from over 100 publications. The accuracy of the model predictions is improved about twice compared to previous work because systematic errors from certain laboratories were investigated and corrected. The standard model error (precision) was 0.37 ppm/K, with R² = 0.985. The 95% confidence interval for individual predictions largely depends on the glass composition of interest and the composition uncertainty. The model is valid for commercial silicate glasses containing Na2O, CaO, Al2O3, K2O, MgO, B2O3, Li2O, BaO, ZrO2, TiO2, ZnO, PbO, SrO, Fe2O3, CeO2, fining agents, and coloring and de-coloring components. In addition, a special model for ultra-low expansion glasses in the system SiO2-TiO2 is presented. The calculations allow optimizing the time-temperature cooling schedule of glassware, the development of glass sealing materials, and the design of specialty glass products that are exposed to varying temperatures.

  13. Effects of climate on chemical weathering in watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Blum, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    Climatic effects on chemical weathering are evaluated by correlating variations in solute concentrations and fluxes with temperature, precipitation, runoff, and evapotranspiration (ET) for a worldwide distribution of sixty-eight watersheds underlain by granitoid rock types. Stream solute concentrations are strongly correlated with proportional ET loss, and evaporative concentration makes stream solute concentrations an inapprorpiate surrogate for chemical weathering. Chemical fluxes are unaffected by ET, and SiO2 and Na weathering fluxes exhibit systematic increases with precipitation, runoff, and temperature. However, warm and wet watersheds produce anomalously rapid weathering rates. A proposed model that provides an improved prediction of weathering rates over climatic extremes is the product of linear precipitation and Arrhenius temperature functions. The resulting apparent activation energies based on SiO2 and Na fluxes are 59.4 and 62.5 kJ.mol-1, respectively. The coupling between temperature and precipitation emphasizes the importance of tropical regions in global silicate weathering fluxes, and suggests it is not representative to use continental averages for temperature and precipitation in the weathering rate functions of global carbon cycling and climatic change models. Fluxes of K, Ca, and Mg exhibit no climatic correlation, implying that other processes, such as ion exchange, nutrient cycling, and variations in lithology, obscure any climatic signal. -from Authors

  14. Global particle simulations as a future model for Space Weather Program

    E-print Network

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    ;Outline · Introduction A brief history of global simulations Comparisons among the different methods difficult to transfer physical values at boundaries #12;A brief history of global simulations · 1978: First at the present time, but it will become a vital model · MHD simulations with localized particle simulations very

  15. Proterozoic oxygen rise linked to shifting balance between seafloor and terrestrial weathering

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Benjamin; Lenton, Timothy M.; Watson, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    A shift toward higher atmospheric oxygen concentration during the late Proterozoic has been inferred from multiple indirect proxies and is seen by many as a prerequisite for the emergence of complex animal life. However, the mechanisms controlling the level of oxygen throughout the Proterozoic and its eventual rise remain uncertain. Here we use a simple biogeochemical model to show that the balance between long-term carbon removal fluxes via terrestrial silicate weathering and ocean crust alteration plays a key role in determining atmospheric oxygen concentration. This balance may be shifted by changes in terrestrial weatherability or in the generation rate of oceanic crust. As a result, the terrestrial chemical weathering flux may be permanently altered—contrasting with the conventional view that the global silicate weathering flux must adjust to equal the volcanic CO2 degassing flux. Changes in chemical weathering flux in turn alter the long-term supply of phosphorus to the ocean, and therefore the flux of organic carbon burial, which is the long-term source of atmospheric oxygen. Hence we propose that increasing solar luminosity and a decrease in seafloor spreading rate over 1,500–500 Ma drove a gradual shift from seafloor weathering to terrestrial weathering, and a corresponding steady rise in atmospheric oxygen. Furthermore, increased terrestrial weatherability during the late Neoproterozoic may explain low temperature, increases in ocean phosphate, ocean sulfate, and atmospheric oxygen concentration at this time. PMID:24927553

  16. Space Weather Monitors -- A Global Education and Small Instruments Program for the IHY 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, D. K.; Mitchell, R.; Cohen, M.; Clark, W.; Styner, R.; Roche, A.; Scherrer, P.; Inan, U.; Lee, S.; Winegarden, S.; Tan, J.; Khanal, S.

    2005-12-01

    Earth's ionosphere reacts strongly to the intense x-ray and ultraviolet radiation released by the Sun during solar events and by lightning during thunderstorms. Students around the world can directly monitor and track these sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) by using a receiver to monitor the signal strength from distant VLF transmitters, and noting unusual changes as the waves bounce off the ionosphere. Stanford's Solar Center, in conjunction with the Space, Telecommunications and Radioscience Laboratory and local educators, have developed inexpensive ionospheric disturbance monitors that students can install and use at their local schools. Students "buy in" to the project by building their own antenna, a simple structure costing little and taking a couple hours to assemble. Data collection and analysis is handled by a local PC. Stanford is providing a centralized data repository where students can exchange and discuss data. Two versions of the monitors exist -- a low-cost version (nicknamed "SID") designed to detect solar flares, and a more sensitive version ("AWESOME") that provides both solar and nighttime research-quality data. Both monitors are currently being placed in high schools and community colleges around the US. Students will have the opportunity to work with a researcher "mentor" to collect and interpret data. Our space weather monitors have been chosen as educational and small intruments projects for deployment to 191 countries around the world for the International Heliophysical Year, 2007. Our presentation will focus on the educational aspects of the Space Weather Monitor program.

  17. Global precipitation retrieval algorithm trained for SSMIS using a numerical weather prediction model: Design and evaluation

    E-print Network

    Surussavadee, Chinnawat

    This paper presents and evaluates a global precipitation retrieval algorithm for the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS). It is based on those developed earlier for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) ...

  18. Direct measurement of the combined effects of lichen, rainfall, and temperature onsilicate weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, P.V.; Dorn, R.I.; Brazel, A.J.; Clark, J.; Moore, R.B.; Glidewell, T.

    1999-01-01

    A key uncertainty in models of the global carbonate-silicate cycle and long-term climate is the way that silicates weather under different climatologic conditions, and in the presence or absence of organic activity. Digital imaging of basalts in Hawaii resolves the coupling between temperature, rainfall, and weathering in the presence and absence of lichens. Activation energies for abiotic dissolution of plagioclase (23.1 ?? 2.5 kcal/mol) and olivine (21.3 ?? 2.7 kcal/mol) are similar to those measured in the laboratory, and are roughly double those measured from samples taken underneath lichen. Abiotic weathering rates appear to be proportional to rainfall. Dissolution of plagioclase and olivine underneath lichen is far more sensitive to rainfall.

  19. Were global numerical weather prediction systems capable of forecasting the extreme Colorado rainfall of 9-16 September 2013?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, David A.; Villarini, Gabriele

    2013-12-01

    9-16 September 2013 significant portions of Colorado experienced extreme precipitation and flooding resulting in large socioeconomic damages and fatalities. Here we investigate the ability of eight global state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction systems to forecast rainfall during the event. Forecasts were analyzed from initializations at 12 UTC 5 September to 12 UTC 12 September to determine when, and how well, the event was captured. Ensemble mean rainfall patterns initialized on 5 September (roughly 4+ day lead time) did not forecast the event's persistent nature; conversely, forecasts initialized on 9 September captured the rainfall patterns reasonably well, although with incorrect rainfall values. Accumulated rainfall forecasts improved when the region considered increased from a 0.5° area centered over Boulder to the entire state of Colorado. We conclude that the models provided guidance indicating a significant period of rainfall in Colorado from 9 September 2013, although not necessarily in the correct locations.

  20. Predicting Seasonal Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cheryl Dybas

    2008-12-07

    This module is about a new method of predicting seasonal weather. The site describes the effects of El Nino on global weather and the accuracy of the new model. It includes links to classroom resources for a variety of weather-based units.

  1. Weather Girl Goes Rogue

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Deep Rogue Ram

    This humorous video suggests what might happen if a weather forecaster reported the weather in the context of climate change. There is a sharp contrast between the anchor focusing on short-term local concerns and the weather forecaster describing what is happening on a long-term global basis.

  2. Rivers, chemical weathering and Earth's climate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard Dupré; Céline Dessert; Priscia Oliva; Yves Goddéris; Jérôme Viers; Louis François; Romain Millot; Jérôme Gaillardet

    2003-01-01

    We detail the results of recent studies describing and quantifying the large-scale chemical weathering of the main types of continental silicate rocks: granites and basalts. These studies aim at establishing chemical weathering laws for these two lithologies, describing the dependence of chemical weathering on environmental parameters, such as climate and mechanical erosion. As shown within this contribution, such mathematical laws

  3. Evaluating a system of systems approach for integrated global weather, climate, and hazard monitoring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald Birk; Brian Baldauf; Rick Ohlemacher; Leo Andreoli

    2008-01-01

    Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) provides systems and technologies to ensure national security based on technologies - from undersea to outer space, and in cyberspace. With a heritage of developing and integrating science instruments on space platforms and airborne systems, NGC is conducting analysis of alternatives for a global observing system that integrates data collected from geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites with

  4. Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and hybrid ARMA/ANN model to predict global radiation

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    it to an ARMA model from a rule based on the analysis of hourly data series. This model has been used to forecast the hourly global radiation for five places in Mediterranean area. Our technique outperforms- Marquard algorithm E[X(t)] Expected value of X(t); the first moment of X(t) is the average, and the second

  5. Investigating the Climate System: WEATHER. Global Awareness Tour. Problem-Based Classroom Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passow, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    With support from National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Goddard Space Flight Center, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) has developed educational materials that incorporate information and data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), a joint satellite mission between the United States and Japan.…

  6. Weather Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    WxLink is an aviation weather system based on advanced airborne sensors, precise positioning available from the satellite-based Global Positioning System, cockpit graphics and a low-cost datalink. It is a two-way system that uplinks weather information to the aircraft and downlinks automatic pilot reports of weather conditions aloft. Manufactured by ARNAV Systems, Inc., the original technology came from Langley Research Center's cockpit weather information system, CWIN (Cockpit Weather INformation). The system creates radar maps of storms, lightning and reports of surface observations, offering improved safety, better weather monitoring and substantial fuel savings.

  7. Detection and Attribution of Climate Change : From global mean temperature change to climate extremes and high impact weather.

    E-print Network

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    This talk will describe how evidence has grown in recent years for a human influence on climate and explain how the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded that it is extremely likely (>95% probability) that human influence on climate has been the dominant cause of the observed global-mean warming since the mid-20th century. The fingerprint of human activities has also been detected in warming of the ocean, in changes in the global water cycle, in reductions in snow and ice, and in changes in some climate extremes. The strengthening of evidence for the effects of human influence on climate extremes is in line with long-held basic understanding of the consequences of mean warming for temperature extremes and for atmospheric moisture. Despite such compelling evidence this does not mean that every instance of high impact weather can be attributed to anthropogenic climate change, because climate variability is often a major factor in many locations, especially for rain...

  8. Frequencies and Characteristics of Global Oceanic Precipitation from Shipboard Present-Weather Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petty, Grant W.

    1995-01-01

    Ship reports of present weather obtained from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set are analyzed for the period 1958-91 in order to elucidate regional and seasonal variations in the climatological frequency, phase, intensity, and character of oceanic precipitation. Specific findings of note include the following: 1) The frequency of thunderstorm reports, relative to all precipitation reports, is a strong function of location, with thunderstorm activity being favored within 1000-3000 km of major tropical and subtropical land masses, while being quite rare at other locations, even within the intertropical convergence zone. 2) The latitudinal frequency of precipitation over the southern oceans increases steadily toward the Antarctic continent and shows relatively little seasonal variation. The frequency of convective activity, however, shows considerable seasonal variability, with sharp winter maxima occurring near 38 deg. latitude in both hemispheres. 3) Drizzle is the preferred form of precipitation in a number of regions, most of which coincide with known regions of persistent marine stratus and stratocumulus in the subtropical highs. Less well documented is the high relative frequency of drizzle in the vicinity of the equatorial sea surface temperature front in the eastern Pacific. 4) Regional differences in the temporal scale of precipitation events (e.g., transient showers versus steady precipitation) are clearly depicted by way of the ratio of the frequency of precipitation at the observation time to the frequency of all precipitation reports, including precipitation during the previous hour. The results of this study suggest that many current satellite rainfall estimation techniques may substantially underestimate the fractional coverage or frequency of precipitation poleward of 50 deg. latitude and in the subtropical dry zones. They also draw attention to the need to carefully account for regional differences in the physical and spatial properties of rainfall when developing calibration relationships for satellite algorithms.

  9. Extreme Weather: Understanding the Science of Hurricanes, Tornadoes, Floods, Heat Waves, Snow Storms, Global Warming and Other Atmospheric Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Harold

    2008-07-01

    Extreme weather is of importance because of the threats it makes to life and property. At the same time, extreme weather is a great fascination for meteorologists as well as for the general public. The conditions and processes that lead to extreme weather-although governed by the same physical principles as ``ordinary'' weather-frequently are far from the average state of the atmosphere. Thus, explaining them in simple terms can be difficult. This book represents an effort to explain the development of extreme weather to the public.

  10. Weather Avoidance Guidelines for NASA Global Hawk High-Altitude Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Zipser, Edward J.; Velden, Chris S.; Monette, Sarah A.; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Braun, Scott A.; Newman, Paul A.; Black, Peter G.; Black, Michael L.; Dunion, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    The current Global Hawk flight rules would probably not have been effective in the single event of greatest concern (the Emily encounter). The cloud top had not reached 50,000 ft until minutes before the encounter. The TOT and lightning data would not have been available until near the overflight time since this was a rapidly growing cell. This case would have required a last-minute diversion when lightning became frequent. Avoiding such a cell probably requires continual monitoring of the forward camera and storm scope, whether or not cloud tops have been exceeding specific limits. However, the current overflight rules as strictly interpreted would have prohibited significant fractions of the successful Global Hawk overpasses of Karl and Matthew that proved not to be hazardous. Many other high altitude aircraft (ER-2 and Global Hawk) flights in NASA tropical cyclone field programs have successfully overflown deep convective clouds without incident.The convective cell that caused serious concern about the safety of the ER-2 in Emily was especially strong for a tropical cyclone environment, probably as strong or stronger than any that was overflown by the ER-2 in 20 previous flights over tropical cyclones. Specifically, what made that cell a safety concern was the magnitude of the vertical velocity of the updraft, at least 20 m/s (4000 ft/minute) at the time the ER-2 overflew it. Such a strong updraft can generate strong gravity waves at and above the tropopause, posing a potential danger to aircraft far above the maximum altitude of the updraft itself or its associated cloud top. Indeed, the ER-2 was probably at least 9000 ft above that cloud top. Cloud-top height, by itself, is not an especially good indicator of the intensity of convection and the likelihood of turbulence. Nor is overflying high cloud tops (i.e. > 50,000 ft) of particular concern unless there is other evidence of very strong convective updrafts beneath those tops in the path of the aircraft. center dot Lightning, especially lightning with a high flash rate, is well correlated with convective intensity. Lightning with a minimal flash rate (say 1-3 flashes per minute) is indicative of updraft speeds of about 10 m/s in the mixed phase region where charge is being separated, generally at altitudes about 20-25 kft in a hurricane. That is still stronger than typical updrafts (more like 5 m/s). An unresolved issue is whether there is a high and instantaneous correlation between vertical velocity in the middle troposphere (necessary for lightning generation) and near cloud top (more direct concern for overflights).

  11. The role of a silicate pump in driving new production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard C. Dugdale; Frances P. Wilkerson; Hans J. Minas

    1995-01-01

    In the past, the importance of silicate as a limiting nutrient for new production in the ocean, and in determining global productivity and carbon budgets, has been relegated to the lower ranks compared to the role of nitrogen and, more recently, iron. This paper describes a “silicate pump” that acts in diatom-dominated communities to enhance the loss of silicate from

  12. Developing approaches to hindcast and earthcast climate controls on solute fluxes during shale weathering in the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, P. L.; Godderis, Y.; Shi, Y.; Schott, J.; Duffy, C.; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    To quantify the anthropogenic and climatic controls on regolith formation and global weathering fluxes, it is critical to understand the evolution of weathering profiles and the consumption of CO2 associated with weathering. Using a cascade of global circulation, biota, and weathering models, Goddéris et al. (2010) hindcasted the evolution of weathering profiles over the last 10k years along a loess transect in the Mississippi Valley. After using the weathering code, WITCH, in this way to investigate the dissolution and precipitation of silicate and carbonate minerals in loess along the climosequence, Godderis et al. (2013) then used a similar cascade of models to project the response of weathering of the transect through 2100 - we call this forward projection an 'earthcast'. The effect of projected climate change on the weathering profile was largely dictated by increasing temperature (which slows the rate of advance of the dolomite reaction front but increases silicate weathering) and changes in drainage (variable along the transect). To a lesser extent, changes in soil CO2 affected weathering. The response of the dolomite reaction front acts like a terrestrial lysocline as it responds to changing CO2 and climate. Here, we embark on a similar study of shale weathering. Like the loess formations, shale has high surface area of silicates per unit volume, and can contain carbonate minerals. Shale also comprises 25% of the continental landmass. Specifically, to explore how climate evolution controls shale weathering we are beginning to compare soils along a shale climosequence transect that spans from Wales to Puerto Rico (Dere et al. in press)--i.e., like the loess north-south transect, a climosequence of pedons. For the shales, we will also explore the effects of climate variables by comparing soils on the north- and south-facing hillslopes of the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHCZO). The eventual goal is to utilize our understanding of the climatic controls on shale weathering profiles and solute chemistry from these explorations to 'earthcast' the next hundred years. We report our initial efforts to link the meteorological forcing from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2), the fully-coupled land-surface Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (Flux-PIHM), and the geochemical box model WITCH. Our preliminary efforts show that WITCH can elucidate the controls on water and Mg weathering fluxes derived from clay weathering.

  13. Observational and theoretical studies of the evolving structure of baroclinic waves: Attractor dynamics of global weather systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltzman, B.; Hansen, A. R.; Nagle, R. N.; Tang, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    Significant progress was made in developing a six-component dry model of mid-latitude baroclinic wave evolution, and a ten-component moist model. These models include representations of airflow over mountians and non-adiabatic processes. As a first step, the properties of a reduced, three component, baroclinic system are studied. The classical baroclinic stability criteria emerge as the properties of one of the three equilibria admitted, with the remaining two equilibria forming the attractor region for the observed weather activity. Passive tracer evolution in a baroclinic wave was studied. A model in which only constituents trapped within low atmospheric levels are considered, has been extended to include the possibility for fluxes into the upper levels of the atmosphere. The reported results for the lower levels achieved previously are shown to be qualitatively similar to those obtained by these new calculations in which the vertical flux constraint is removed. An extensive study of an 8-year record of global outgoing longwave radiation for the Northern Hemisphere reveals that blocking events exhibit only a weak signature of blocking highs, as measured by relatively low values of the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean value of the observed long wave outgoing radiation. Though present in many cases, the signature is not a strongly distinctive feature of the blocking episodes.

  14. Chemical Weathering in the Eastern Himalaya: Geochemistry of Bhutanese Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M.; Petersen, C.

    2011-12-01

    Chemical weathering of Ca-Mg silicate minerals and subsequent marine carbonate precipitation is the fundamental sink for atmospheric CO2 in the long-term carbon cycle. Considerable effort has been made to examine Himalayan rivers and their relationship with weathering processes, in particular using mass balance estimates to quantify the weathering consumption of CO2 and the potential impact on global climate conditions. Weathering reactions produce alkalinity in rivers and thus dissolved load chemistry can be an effective means for assessing the total weathering budget of a watershed as well as for apportioning weathering fluxes between silicate and carbonate mineral sources. While weathering studies are abundant for the drainage basins of the Nepal and Indian Himalaya, they are lacking for Bhutan. Here we present new major element data for 35 rivers and streams across the Himalayan region of Bhutan. The rivers of Bhutan generally flow north to south through deeply incised gorges and are major tributaries to the Brahmaphutra. Within Bhutan, watersheds are largely underlain by the gneisses and metasediments of the High Himalayan Crystalline Series (HHC), with only the high reaches of the major streams flowing over the Tethyan Sedimentary Sequence (TSS) carbonates. Water samples were taken from all the major and most minor rivers at the end of the 2010 monsoon season (late August-September). Because of the strong seasonality of precipitation in Bhutan, these late-monsoon samples are taken to be reasonable first-order proxies for calculating annual dissolved load fluxes. The rivers are characterized by high calcium, with bicarbonate as the dominant anion, typical of carbonate weathering regimes. We note that in some cases, there is the strong influence of hot spring fluids in our stream samples, with 100-fold increases in downstream TDS. Initial analyses of our samples show that despite significant HHC dominated drainages, silicate alkalinity makes up on average 35% of the total alkalinity budget for the rivers of Bhutan, with a minimum of 5% and a maximum of 85%. This is comparable to other Himalayan streams with larger TSS influence to the west in Nepal, where carbonate weathering typically dominates stream dissolved loads.

  15. Continental weathering following a Cryogenian glaciation: Evidence from calcium and magnesium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasemann, Simone A.; Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A. E.; Prave, Anthony R.; Fallick, Anthony E.; Elliott, Tim; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz

    2014-06-01

    A marked ocean acidification event and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations following the extreme environmental conditions of the younger Cryogenian glaciation have been inferred from boron isotope measurements. Calcium and magnesium isotope analyses offer additional insights into the processes occurring during this time. Data from Neoproterozoic sections in Namibia indicate that following the end of glaciation the continental weathering flux transitioned from being of mixed carbonate and silicate character to a silicate-dominated one. Combined with the effects of primary dolomite formation in the cap dolostones, this caused the ocean to depart from a state of acidification and return to higher pH after climatic amelioration. Differences in the magnitude of stratigraphic isotopic changes across the continental margin of the southern Congo craton shelf point to local influences modifying and amplifying the global signal, which need to be considered in order to avoid overestimation of the worldwide chemical weathering flux.

  16. Yellowstone Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Yellowstone National Park

    Yellowstone National Park's high altitude and mountainous terrain makes weather prediction very difficult. This website provides seasonal weather information, average temperature and precipitation data, links to weather forecasts, and other weather links.

  17. Reconstructing CMEs with Coordinated Imaging and In Situ Observations: Global Structure, Kinematics, and Implications for Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Thernisien, A. F.; Luhmann, J. G.; Vourlidas, A.; Davies, J. A.; Lin, R. P.; Bale, S.

    2010-12-01

    We reconstruct the global structure and kinematics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using coordinated imaging and in situ observations from multiple vantage points. A forward modeling technique, which assumes a rope-like morphology for CMEs, is used to determine the global structure (including orientation and propagation direction) from coronagraph observations. We reconstruct the corresponding structure from in situ measurements at 1 AU with the Grad-Shafranov (GS) method, which gives the flux-rope orientation, cross section and a rough knowledge of the propagation direction. CME kinematics (propagation direction and radial distance) during the transit from the Sun to 1 AU are studied with a geometric triangulation technique, which provides an unambiguous association between solar observations and in situ signatures; a track fitting approach is invoked when data are available from only one spacecraft. We show how the results obtained from imaging and in situ data can be compared by applying these methods to some events, especially Earth-directed ones. This merged imaging and in situ study shows important consequences and implications for CME research as well as space weather forecasting: (1) CME propagation directions can be determined to a relatively good precision as shown by the consistency between different methods; (2) the geometric triangulation technique shows a promising capability to link solar observations with corresponding in situ signatures at 1 AU and to predict CME arrival at the Earth; (3) the flux rope within CMEs, which has the most hazardous southward magnetic field, cannot be imaged at large distances due to expansion; (4) the flux-rope orientation derived from in situ measurements at 1 AU may have a large deviation from that determined by coronagraph image modeling; (5) we find, for the first time, that CMEs undergo a westward migration with respect to the Sun-Earth line at their acceleration phase, which we suggest as a universal feature produced by the magnetic field connecting the Sun and ejecta. Importance of having dedicated spacecraft at L4 and L5, which are well situated for the triangulation concept, is also discussed based on the results.

  18. Understanding space weather to shield society: A global road map for 2015-2025 commissioned by COSPAR and ILWS

    E-print Network

    Schrijver, Carolus J; Aylward, Alan D; Denardini, Clezio M; Gibson, Sarah E; Glover, Alexi; Gopalswamy, Nat; Grande, Manuel; Hapgood, Mike; Heynderickx, Daniel; Jakowski, Norbert; Kalegaev, Vladimir V; Lapenta, Giovanni; Linker, Jon A; Liu, Siqing; Mandrini, Cristina H; Mann, Ian R; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Nandi, Dibyendu; Obara, Takahiro; O'Brien, T Paul; Onsager, Terrance; Opgenoorth, Hermann J; Terkildsen, Michael; Valladares, Cesar E; Vilmer, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation that the environmental conditions that we call space weather impact the technological infrastructure that powers the coupled economies around the world. With that comes the need to better shield society against space weather by improving forecasts, environmental specifications, and infrastructure design. [...] advanced understanding of space weather requires a coordinated international approach to effectively provide awareness of the processes within the Sun-Earth system through observation-driven models. This roadmap prioritizes the scientific focus areas and research infrastructure that are needed to significantly advance our understanding of space weather of all intensities and of its implications for society. Advancement of the existing system observatory through the addition of small to moderate state-of-the-art capabilities designed to fill observational gaps will enable significant advances. Such a strategy requires urgent action: key instrumentation needs to be sustaine...

  19. The role of forest trees and their mycorrhizal fungi in carbonate rock weathering and its significance for global carbon cycling.

    PubMed

    Thorley, Rachel M S; Taylor, Lyla L; Banwart, Steve A; Leake, Jonathan R; Beerling, David J

    2014-09-11

    On million-year timescales, carbonate rock weathering exerts no net effect on atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, on timescales of decades-to-centuries, it can contribute to sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and increase land-ocean alkalinity flux, counteracting ocean acidification. Historical evidence indicates this flux is sensitive to land use change, and recent experimental evidence suggests that trees and their associated soil microbial communities are major drivers of continental mineral weathering. Here, we review key physical and chemical mechanisms by which the symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi of forest tree roots potentially enhance carbonate rock weathering. Evidence from our ongoing field study at the UK's national pinetum confirms increased weathering of carbonate rocks by a wide range of gymnosperm and angiosperm tree species that form arbuscular (AM) or ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal partnerships. We demonstrate that calcite-containing rock grains under EM tree species weather significantly faster than those under AM trees, an effect linked to greater soil acidification by EM trees. Weathering and corresponding alkalinity export are likely to increase with rising atmospheric CO2 and associated climate change. Our analyses suggest that strategic planting of fast-growing EM angiosperm taxa on calcite- and dolomite-rich terrain might accelerate the transient sink for atmospheric CO2 and slow rates of ocean acidification. PMID:25211602

  20. Lithium isotope evidence for enhanced weathering during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A. E.; Jenkyns, Hugh C.; Woodfine, Richard G.

    2013-08-01

    The Ocean Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2) about 93.5 million years ago was marked by high atmospheric CO2 concentration, rapid global warming and marine anoxia and euxinia. The event lasted for about 440,000 years and led to habitat loss and mass extinction. The marine anoxia is thought to be linked to enhanced biological productivity, but it is unclear what triggered the increased production and what allowed the subsequent rapid climate recovery. Here we use lithium isotope measurements from carbonates spanning the interval including OAE2 to assess the role of silicate weathering. We find the lightest values of the Li isotope ratio (?7Li) during OAE2, indicating high levels of weathering--and therefore atmospheric CO2 removal--which we attribute to an enhanced hydrological cycle. We use a geochemical model to simulate the evolution of ?7Li and the Ca, Sr and Os isotope tracers. Our simulations suggest a scenario in which the eruption of a large igneous province led to high atmospheric CO2 concentrations and rapid global warming, which initiated OAE2. The simulated warming was accompanied by a roughly 200,000 year pulse of accelerated weathering of mafic silicate rocks, which removed CO2 from the atmosphere. The weathering also delivered nutrients to the oceans that stimulated primary productivity. We suggest that this process, together with the burial of organic carbon, allowed the rapid recovery and stabilization from the greenhouse state.

  1. Space Weather: Welcome, SEC

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2005-01-11

    This video presentation welcomes the Space Weather Prediction Center, formerly known as the Space Environment Center or SEC to the National Weather Service (NWS) as an operational entity of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) family. Describing the ways in which space weather affects global communications and power resources, it demonstrates the importance of space weather forecasting as a part of the NWS family of services. With the inclusion of SWPC, the NWS now provides environmental understanding from the sun to the sea.

  2. Weather: What Forces Affect Our Weather?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-06-11

    This website provides an easy-to-understand look at our weather system. Topics covered include the atmosphere, the water cycle, storms, ice and snow, weather forecasting and Earth's changing climate. There are features on ozone depletion, global warming, El Nino and La Nina. An activity allows users to identify cloud formations associated with tornadoes, complete with photographs. There is also a wind chill calculator.

  3. Differences Between Climate and Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Center for Atmospheric Research

    In this activity, students collect weather data over several days or weeks, graph temperature data, and compare the temperature data collected with long-term climate averages from where they live. Understanding the difference between weather and climate and interpreting local weather data are important first steps to understanding larger-scale global climate changes.

  4. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction from combustion of fossil fuels has become an urgent concern for the society due to marked increase in weather related natural disasters and other negative consequences of global warming. CO2 is a highly stable molecule which does not readily interact with other neutral molecules. However it is more responsive to ions due to charge versus quadrupole interaction [1-2]. Ions can be created by dissolving a salt in water and then aerosolizing the solution. This approach gives CO2 molecules a chance to interact with the hydrated salt ions over the large surface area of the aerosol. Ion containing aerosols exist in nature, an example being sea spray particles generated by breaking waves. Such particles contain singly and doubly charged salt ions including Na+, Cl-, Mg++ and SO4--. Depending on the proximity of CO2 to the ion, interaction energy can be significantly higher than the thermal energy of the aerosol. For example, an interaction energy of 0.6 eV is obtained with the sulfate (SO4--) ion when CO2 is the nearest neighbor [2]. In this research interaction between CO2 and ions which carry higher charges are investigated. The molecules selected for the study are triply charged phosphate (PO4---) ions and quadruply charged silicate (SiO4----) ions. Examples of salts which contain such molecules are potassium phosphate (K3PO4) and sodium orthosilicate (Na4SiO4). The research has been carried out with first principle quantum mechanical calculations using the Density Functional Theory method with B3LYP functional and Pople type basis sets augmented with polarization and diffuse functions. Atomic models consist of the selected ions surrounded by water and CO2 molecules. Similar to the results obtained with singly and doubly charged ions [1-2], phosphate and silicate ions attract CO2 molecules. Energy of interaction between the ion and CO2 is 1.6 eV for the phosphate ion and 3.3 eV for the silicate ion. Hence one can expect that the selected ions would enhance the absorption of CO2 into the aerosol even more than the singly or doubly charged ions. Ion containing aerosols also help to catalyze reactions between water and CO2. Hydrated phosphate and silicate ions tend to attract hydrogen atoms from neighboring water molecules to reduce the charged state. When there is CO2 in the vicinity of the ion, the remainder of the water molecule which loses the hydrogen(s) reacts with CO2 to form carbonates. (PO4---) + H2O + CO2 -> (HPO3--) + (HCO3-) (SiO4----) + H2O + CO2 -> (HSiO4---) + (HCO3-) (SiO4----) + H2O + CO2 -> (H2SiO4--) + (CO3--) In conclusion, highly charged phosphate and silicate ions dissolved in water and aerosolized into small droplets can facilitate both the capture and the mineralization of CO2. This method would be especially effective in a CO2 rich environment such as the exhaust gas of a combustion process. [1] H. Gokturk, "Geoengineering with Charged Droplets," AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco 2011 [2] H. Gokturk, "Atomistic Simulation of Sea Spray Particles," AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco 2012

  5. Fair weather atmospheric electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. G.

    2011-06-01

    Not long after Franklin's iconic studies, an atmospheric electric field was discovered in "fair weather" regions, well away from thunderstorms. The origin of the fair weather field was sought by Lord Kelvin, through development of electrostatic instrumentation and early data logging techniques, but was ultimately explained through the global circuit model of C.T.R. Wilson. In Wilson's model, charge exchanged by disturbed weather electrifies the ionosphere, and returns via a small vertical current density in fair weather regions. New insights into the relevance of fair weather atmospheric electricity to terrestrial and planetary atmospheres are now emerging. For example, there is a possible role of the global circuit current density in atmospheric processes, such as cloud formation. Beyond natural atmospheric processes, a novel practical application is the use of early atmospheric electrostatic investigations to provide quantitative information on past urban air pollution.

  6. Insolation data manual: long-term monthly averages of solar radiation, temperature, degree-days and global anti K/sub T/ for 248 national weather service stations

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, C L; Stoffel, T L; Whitaker, S D

    1980-10-01

    Monthly averaged data is presented which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service stations. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24 to 25 years of data. Average daily maximum, minimum, and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3/sup 0/C (65/sup 0/F). For each station, global anti K/sub T/ (cloudiness index) were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. (MHR)

  7. Winter Weather

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Matters What's New A - Z Index Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes Wildfires Winter Weather Winter Weather Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  8. Weather Watch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, Herschell Marvin

    1973-01-01

    Suggests a number of ways in which Federal Aviation Agency weather report printouts can be used in teaching the weather section of meteorology. These weather sequence reports can be obtained free of charge at most major airports. (JR)

  9. COST Action ES1206 : Advanced Global Navigation Satellite Systems Tropospheric Products for Monitoring Severe Weather Events and Climate (GNSS4SWEC) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.

    2013-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have revolutionised positioning, navigation, and timing, becoming a common part of our everyday life. Aside from these well-known civilian and commercial applications, GNSS is now an established atmospheric observing system which can accurately sense water vapour, the most abundant greenhouse gas, accounting for 60-70% of atmospheric warming. Severe weather forecasting is challenging, in part due to the high temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric water vapour. Water vapour is under-sampled in the current meteorological and climate observing systems, obtaining and exploiting more high-quality humidity observations is essential to weather forecasting and climate monitoring. The new COST Action, ES1206, will address new and improved capabilities from con-current developments in both the GNSS and meteorological communities. For the first time, the synergy of the three GNSS systems (GPS, GLONASS and Galileo) will be used to develop new, advanced tropospheric products, exploiting the full potential of multi-GNSS water vapour estimates on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, from real-time monitoring and forecasting of severe weather, to climate research. In addition the Action will promote the use of meteorological data in GNSS positioning, navigation, and timing services. The Action will stimulate knowledge transfer and data sharing throughout Europe.

  10. COST Action ES1206 : Advanced Global Navigation Satellite Systems Tropospheric Products for Monitoring Severe Weather Events and Climate (GNSS4SWEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jonathan; Guerova, Guergana; Dousa, Jan; de Haan, Siebren; Bock, Olivier; Dick, Galina; Pottiaux, Eric; Pacione, Rosa

    2014-05-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have revolutionised positioning, navigation, and timing, becoming a common part of our everyday life. Aside from these well-known civilian and commercial applications, GNSS is now an established atmospheric observing system which can accurately sense water vapour, the most abundant greenhouse gas, accounting for 60-70% of atmospheric warming. Severe weather forecasting is challenging, in part due to the high temporal and spatial variation of atmospheric water vapour. Water vapour is under-sampled in the current meteorological and climate observing systems, obtaining and exploiting more high-quality humidity observations is essential to weather forecasting and climate monitoring. The new COST Action, ES1206, will address new and improved capabilities from con-current developments in both the GNSS and meteorological communities. For the first time, the synergy of the three GNSS systems (GPS, GLONASS and Galileo) will be used to develop new, advanced tropospheric products, exploiting the full potential of multi-GNSS water vapour estimates on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, from real-time monitoring and forecasting of severe weather, to climate research. In addition the Action will promote the use of meteorological data in GNSS positioning, navigation, and timing services. The Action will stimulate knowledge transfer and data sharing throughout Europe.

  11. Final Report on the Safety Assessment of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Magnesium Aluminum

    E-print Network

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Final Report on the Safety Assessment of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Magnesium Aluminum dose of Zeolite A without any adverse reaction in the eye. Calcium Silicate had no discernible effect Silicate, Magnesium Silicate, Magnesium Trisilicate, Sodium Magnesium Silicate, Zirconium Silicate

  12. Severe Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Evan B.

    2004-01-01

    Educating the public about safety issues related to severe weather is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) mission. This article deals with a poster entitled, "Severe Weather," that has been created by NOAA to help educate the public about hazardous weather conditions. The four types of severe weather highlighted in…

  13. Severe Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Evan B.

    2004-01-01

    Educating the public about safety issues related to severe weather is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) mission. This month's insert, Severe Weather, has been created by NOAA to help educate the public about hazardous weather conditions. The four types of severe weather highlighted in this poster are hurricanes,…

  14. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students consider how weather forecasting plays an important part in their daily lives. They learn about the history of weather forecasting — from old weather proverbs to modern forecasting equipment — and how improvements in weather technology have saved lives by providing advance warning of natural hazards.

  15. UM Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sponsored by The Weather Underground at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, UM Weather bills itself as the "Internet's premier source of weather information." The site offers several general audience tools such as the Fast Forecast for any city in the US, ski weather, and weather cams. But, it also provides access to over two dozen weather software packages, a new computer model forecasts page, and most impressively a list of close to 400 other weather related Web sites. Professionals and researchers will appreciate the non-technical feel of the site and the valuable information they can procure from it.

  16. Living in the Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2006-12-13

    What is weather? Is climate different from weather? It doesn't matter where you live or where you travel, weather patterns influence your daily life. In this guide, students will engage in exploring and predicting the conditions in the atmosphere that are responsible for weather patterns and climatic conditions, and investigate how extreme weather impacts humans and the environment. While many of the keywords embedded into the "Living in the Weather" themes will be familiar, do your students really understand them? This guide provides teacher-tested, reliable links that allow you and your students to "surf" the internet in a quest to better understand how atmospheric conditions directly relate to weather on Earth. Understanding weather and climate can be a great opportunity for you to engage students in topics and themes that connect Earth and space science, life science, and physical science in a real way. The National Science Education Standards (NSES) focus on the study of weather and climate and their impact on human life. This guide uses the ongoing work and technology of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (known to the public simply as NOAA). NOAA scientists study our planet Earth in a global way. Working together with scientists worldwide, NOAA scientists study the diversity of living organisms (including humans) and their impact on our environment--not only in our country but in every country and continent around the world.

  17. BBC Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At this website, the BBC offers an array of materials dealing with weather. Meteorologists can discover employment opportunities. Individuals with spectacular photographs of weather phenomenon can submit their images to the photo gallery. Students and educators can find introductory materials on basic weather concepts, forecasting, extreme events, and broadcasting the weather. The website offers fun weather-related games and projects, a meteorology glossary, and links to other educational websites.

  18. Winter Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Bellows

    2009-09-28

    This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. Weather affects our everyday lives. Some days it's sunny and some days its not. The years weather is split up into seasons. 1. What are the four seasons? 2. What kind of weather do you see in the summer? 3. What kind of weather is unique to winter? 4. ...

  19. Spatial variations in chemical weathering and CO 2 consumption in Nepalese High Himalayan catchments during the monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Gabet, Emmanuel J.; Burbank, Douglas W.; Langner, Heiko; Putkonen, Jaakko

    2009-06-01

    The major ion chemistry of the Marsyandi basin and six of its tributaries in the Nepalese Himalaya have been investigated during the monsoon months of 2002. Weekly water samples taken at 10 river monitoring stations in the Annapurna watershed over the course of 4 months provide chemical weathering data for the region at an unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution. The river chemistry of all but one basin is heavily dominated by carbonate weathering which, compared to silicate weathering, contributes 80 to 97% of the total solute load. This prevalence is due to a combination of (a) intrinsically faster dissolution kinetics of carbonates, (b) relatively high runoff and (c) glacial meltwater and low temperatures at high altitudes resulting in enhanced carbonate solubilities. Monitoring stations with headwaters in the Tethyan Sedimentary Series (TSS) are particularly carbonate-rich and slightly supersaturated with respect to calcite through half of the monsoon season. Silicate weathering in the TSS is driven largely by sulfuric acid and therefore does not contribute significantly to the drawdown of atmospheric CO 2. With respect to the tributaries in the Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS), carbonate weathering is practically as predominant as for the TSS, in spite of the largely felsic lithology of the GHS. Relative to the TSS, the primary proton source in the GHS has shifted, with at least 80% of the protons derived from carbonic acid. Averaged over the whole field area, the CO 2 fluxes, based on silicate-derived Ca and Mg, are considerably lower than the global average. Assuming that this study area is representative of the entire range, we conclude that in situ weathering of the High Himalayas does not represent a significant sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide, despite the presence of a watershed south of the GHS that is characterized by a four times higher CO 2 consumption rate than the global average. Silicate weathering rates of all basins appear to be climate controlled, displaying a tight correlation with runoff and temperature. Given the extremely low chemical weathering under transport-limited conditions in high-altitude crystalline terrains outside of the monsoon season, this would result in virtually no chemical exhumation for 2/3 of the year in such a cold and arid climate, north of the rain shadow cast by the High Himalayas.

  20. Approach to Integrate Global-Sun Models of Magnetic Flux Emergence and Transport for Space Weather Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan A.; Mehrotra, Piyush; Henney, Carl; Arge, Nick; Godinez, H.; Manchester, Ward; Koller, J.; Kosovichev, A.; Scherrer, P.; Zhao, J.; Stein, R.; Duvall, T.; Fan, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The Sun lies at the center of space weather and is the source of its variability. The primary input to coronal and solar wind models is the activity of the magnetic field in the solar photosphere. Recent advancements in solar observations and numerical simulations provide a basis for developing physics-based models for the dynamics of the magnetic field from the deep convection zone of the Sun to the corona with the goal of providing robust near real-time boundary conditions at the base of space weather forecast models. The goal is to develop new strategic capabilities that enable characterization and prediction of the magnetic field structure and flow dynamics of the Sun by assimilating data from helioseismology and magnetic field observations into physics-based realistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations. The integration of first-principle modeling of solar magnetism and flow dynamics with real-time observational data via advanced data assimilation methods is a new, transformative step in space weather research and prediction. This approach will substantially enhance an existing model of magnetic flux distribution and transport developed by the Air Force Research Lab. The development plan is to use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to develop Coupled Models for Emerging flux Simulations (CMES) that couples three existing models: (1) an MHD formulation with the anelastic approximation to simulate the deep convection zone (FSAM code), (2) an MHD formulation with full compressible Navier-Stokes equations and a detailed description of radiative transfer and thermodynamics to simulate near-surface convection and the photosphere (Stagger code), and (3) an MHD formulation with full, compressible Navier-Stokes equations and an approximate description of radiative transfer and heating to simulate the corona (Module in BATS-R-US). CMES will enable simulations of the emergence of magnetic structures from the deep convection zone to the corona. Finally, a plan will be summarized on the development of a Flux Emergence Prediction Tool (FEPT) in which helioseismology-derived data and vector magnetic maps are assimilated into CMES that couples the dynamics of magnetic flux from the deep interior to the corona.

  1. Approach to Integrate Global-Sun Models of Magnetic Flux Emergence and Transport for Space Weather Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.; Mehrotra, P.; Arge, C. N.; Henney, C.; Manchester, W.; Godinez, H. C.; Koller, J.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Scherrer, P. H.; Zhao, J.; Stein, B.; Duvall, T.; Fan, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Sun lies at the center of space weather and is the source of its variability. The primary input to coronal and solar wind models is the activity of the magnetic field in the solar photosphere. Recent advancements in solar observations and numerical simulations provide a basis for developing physics-based models for the dynamics of the magnetic field from the deep convection zone of the Sun to the corona with the goal of providing robust near real-time boundary conditions at the base of space weather forecast models. The goal is to develop new strategic capabilities that enable characterization and prediction of the magnetic field structure and flow dynamics of the Sun by assimilating data from helioseismology and magnetic field observations into physics-based realistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations. The integration of first-principle modeling of solar magnetism and flow dynamics with real-time observational data via advanced data assimilation methods is a new, transformative step in space weather research and prediction. This approach will substantially enhance an existing model of magnetic flux distribution and transport developed by the Air Force Research Lab. The development plan is to use the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) to develop Coupled Models for Emerging flux Simulations (CMES) that couples three existing models: (1) an MHD formulation with the anelastic approximation to simulate the deep convection zone (FSAM code), (2) an MHD formulation with full compressible Navier-Stokes equations and a detailed description of radiative transfer and thermodynamics to simulate near-surface convection and the photosphere (Stagger code), and (3) an MHD formulation with full, compressible Navier-Stokes equations and an approximate description of radiative transfer and heating to simulate the corona (Module in BATS-R-US). CMES will enable simulations of the emergence of magnetic structures from the deep convection zone to the corona. Finally, a plan will be summarized on the development of a Flux Emergence Prediction Tool (FEPT) in which helioseismology-derived data and vector magnetic maps are assimilated into CMES that couples the dynamics of magnetic flux from the deep interior to the corona.

  2. Controls on chemical weathering kinetics: Implications from modelling of stable isotope fractionations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickle, M. J.; Tipper, E.; De La Rocha, C. L.; Galy, A.; Li, S.

    2013-12-01

    The kinetic controls on silicate chemical weathering rates are thought central to the feedback process that regulates global climate on geological time scales. However the nature and magnitude of these kinetic controls are controversial. In particular the importance of physical erosion rates is uncertain with some arguing that there is an upper limit on chemical weathering fluxes irrespective of physical erosion rates (e.g. Dixon and von Blackenburg, 2012). Others argue that it is the hydrology of catchments which determines flow path lengths and fluid residence times which are critical to chemical weathering fluxes (e.g. Maher, 2011). Understanding these physical controls is essential to predicting how chemical weathering fluxes will respond the key climatic controls. Chemical weathering fluxes are best estimated by the integrated riverine outputs from catchments as soil profiles may not integrate all the flow paths. However the interpretation of chemical weathering processes based solely on flux data is difficult, because of both the multiple processes acting and multiple phases dissolving that contribute to these fluxes. Fractionations of stable isotopes of the soluble elements including Li, Mg, Si and Ca should place additional constraints on chemical weathering processes. Here we use a simple reactive-transport model to interpret stable isotope fractionations. Although still a simplification of the natural system, this offers a much closer representation than simple batch and Rayleigh models. The isotopic fractionations are shown to be a function of the ratio of the amount of the element supplied by mineral dissolution to that lost to secondary mineral formation and the extent of reaction down the flow path. The modelling is used to interpret the evolution of dissolved Li, Mg and Si-isotope ratios in Ganges river system. The evolution of Si isotopic ratios in the rapidly eroding Himalayan catchments is distinct from that in the flood planes. Critically the extent of the isotopic fractionations is a measure of the approach of the system to chemical equilibrium, a key indicator of the temperature sensitivity of the chemical weathering rate and hence important to understanding the climate-weathering feedback. Dixon JL, & von Blanckenburg, F, (2012) Soils as pacemakers and limiters of global silicate weathering. Comptes Rendus Geoscience, 344:597-609. Maher, K (2011) The role of fluid residence time and topographic scales in determining chemical fluxes from landscapes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 312:48-58.

  3. Rolling stones; fast weathering of olivine in shallow seas for cost-effective CO2 capture and mitigation of global warming and ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuiling, R. D.; de Boer, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    Human CO2 emissions may drive the Earth into a next greenhouse state. They can be mitigated by accelerating weathering of natural rock under the uptake of CO2. We disprove the paradigm that olivine weathering in nature would be a slow process, and show that it is not needed to mill olivine to very fine, 10 ?m-size grains in order to arrive at a complete dissolution within 1-2 year. In high-energy shallow marine environments olivine grains and reaction products on the grain surfaces, that otherwise would greatly retard the reaction, are abraded so that the chemical reaction is much accelerated. When kept in motion even large olivine grains rubbing and bumping against each other quickly produce fine clay- and silt-sized olivine particles that show a fast chemical reaction. Spreading of olivine in the world's 2% most energetic shelf seas can compensate a year's global CO2 emissions and counteract ocean acidification against a price well below that of carbon credits.

  4. Global three-dimensional MHD simulation of a space weather event: CME formation, interplanetary propagation, and interaction with the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, Clinton P. T.; De Zeeuw, Darren L.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    2000-11-01

    A parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) finite-volume scheme for predicting ideal MHD flows is used to simulate the initiation, structure, and evolution of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and its interaction with the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. The simulated CME is driven by a local plasma density enhancement on the solar surface with the background initial state of the corona and solar wind represented by a newly devised ``steady state'' solution. The initial solution has been constructed to provide a reasonable description of the time-averaged solar wind for conditions near solar minimum: (1) the computed magnetic field near the Sun possesses high-latitude polar coronal holes, closed magnetic field flux tubes at low latitudes, and a helmet streamer structure with a neutral line and current sheet; (2) the Archimedean spiral topology of the interplanetary magnetic field is reproduced; (3) the observed two-state nature of the solar wind is also reproduced with the simulation yielding fast and slow solar wind streams at high and low latitudes, respectively; and (4) the predicted solar wind plasma properties at 1 AU are consistent with observations. Starting with the generation of a CME at the Sun, the simulation follows the evolution of the solar wind disturbance as it evolves into a magnetic cloud and travels through interplanetary space and subsequently interacts with the terrestrial magnetosphere-ionosphere system. The density-driven CME exhibits a two-step release process, with the front of the CME rapidly accelerating following the disruption of the near-Sun closed magnetic field line structure and then moving at a nearly constant speed of ~560 km/s through interplanetary space. The CME also produces a large magnetic cloud (>100RS across) characterized by a magnetic field that smoothly rotates northward and then back again over a period of ~2 days at 1 AU. The cloud does not contain a sustained period with a strong southward component of the magnetic field, and, as a consequence, the simulated CME is somewhat ineffective in generating strong geo-magnetic activity at Earth. Nevertheless, the simulation results illustrate the potential, as well as current limitations, of the MHD-based space weather model for enhancing the understanding of coronal physics, solar wind plasma processes, magnetospheric physics, and space weather phenomena. Such models will provide the foundation for future, more comprehensive space weather prediction tools.

  5. Weather Report

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This printable weather report is designed to help students easily note a field site's important meteorological details. The one-page PDF form asks for the following information: date, temperature, precipitation, weather type, and wind speed (based on environmental clues).

  6. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website, supplied by Annenberg / CPB, discusses weather satellites, Doppler radar, and additional tools forecasters use to predict the weather. Students can find a wind chill calculator along with a brief discussion of the history of forecasting and weather lore. Once you have a firm grasp on the science of weather forecasting, be sure to check out the other sections of this site, which include: "ice and snow," "our changing climate," "the water cycle," and "powerful storms."

  7. World Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Elias, Jaume Sanchez

    2014-02-20

    What's going on in the world of weather? Are there storms around Sri Lanka? What about the snows of Kilimanjaro? These can be pressing questions, indeed, and the World Weather app is a great way to stay in touch with weather patterns around the globe. Users will find that they can just type in a city name to see the current weather and also zoom around the globe as they see fit. It's a remarkable addition to the world of existing weather tracking apps and is compatible with all operating systems.

  8. Cockpit weather information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jeffrey Chen-Yu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Weather information, periodically collected from throughout a global region, is periodically assimilated and compiled at a central source and sent via a high speed data link to a satellite communication service, such as COMSAT. That communication service converts the compiled weather information to GSDB format, and transmits the GSDB encoded information to an orbiting broadcast satellite, INMARSAT, transmitting the information at a data rate of no less than 10.5 kilobits per second. The INMARSAT satellite receives that data over its P-channel and rebroadcasts the GDSB encoded weather information, in the microwave L-band, throughout the global region at a rate of no less than 10.5 KB/S. The transmission is received aboard an aircraft by means of an onboard SATCOM receiver and the output is furnished to a weather information processor. A touch sensitive liquid crystal panel display allows the pilot to select the weather function by touching a predefined icon overlain on the display's surface and in response a color graphic display of the weather is displayed for the pilot.

  9. Severe Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Evan B. Forde

    2004-04-01

    Educating the public about safety issues related to severe weather is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) mission. The National Weather Service (NWS)--which is part of NOAA and its parent agency, the Department of Commerce--is charged with the critical responsibility of observing and reporting the weather and with issuing forecasts and warnings of weather and floods in the interest of national safety and economy. Through a massive network of weather-monitoring and reporting stations around the globe, including land, sea, air, and space-borne instruments, NWS scientists constantly assimilate all of the reliable weather data available. Much of this data are then used in numerical computer models of the atmosphere that help to accurately describe and interpret current conditions and produce the best possible forecasts of future weather.

  10. The role of nitrification in silicate hydrolysis in soils near Santa Cruz, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyker-Snowman, E.; White, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Schulz, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    In some ecosystems, nitrification (microbial conversion of ammonium to nitrate) may supplant carbonic acid as a source of acidity and drive silicate weathering. Recent studies have explored the impact that ammonium fertilizer addition to soils has on weathering of various mineral types (Pacheco et al. 2013) and demonstrated directly that ammonium addition to soils can increase carbonate weathering (Gandois et al. 2011). Some evidence points to a role for nitrification in silicate weathering at a series of coastal grassland terraces near Santa Cruz, CA. Weathering rates in these soils have been estimated using the byproducts of silicate hydrolysis (Cl--adjusted Na+ and other cations). If carbonic acid from dissolved CO2 is the source of acidity in silicate hydrolysis, bicarbonate should balance the cations produced during weathering. However, in the Santa Cruz soils nitrate is the dominant anion balancing cation concentrations. High concentrations of CO2 (>1%) at depths greater than 1m may provide additional support for nitrification-based silicate hydrolysis at Santa Cruz. We evaluate the role of nitrification in silicate weathering for soils from the Santa Cruz Marine Terrace Chronosequence using a column ammonium-addition experiment and a basic weathering model. The column experiment uses ammonium inputs in excess of natural inputs and measures weathering products in eluted fluids over time. The model incorporates more realistic estimates of ammonium input and explores whether the observed concentrations of cations, nitrate and CO2 seen at Santa Cruz can be explained by nitrification-driven acidity or if other inputs need to be considered. Gandois, L, Perrin, A-S, and Probst, A. 2011. Impact of nitrogenous fertiliser-induced proton release on cultivated soils with contrasting carbonate contents: A column experiment. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 75 pp. 1185-1198. Pacheco, F, Landim, P, and Szocs, T. 2013. Anthropogenic impacts on mineral weathering: A statistical perspective. Applied Geochemistry 36 pp. 34-48.

  11. Jerks as Guiding Influences on the Global Environment: Effects on the Solid Earth, Its Angular Momentum and Lithospheric Plate Motions, the Atmosphere, Weather, and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, J. M.; Leybourne, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Jerks are thought to be the result of torques applied at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) caused by either of two possible processes, working together or separately: 1) Electromagnetic Induction and 2) Mechanical Slippage. In the first case, it is thought that electromagnetic energy slowly builds-up at the CMB, reaches some critical level, and is then suddenly released, causing a geomagneticly induced torque at the CMB due to the differential electrical conductivity between the lower mantle and the surface of the outer core. The second case is driven by stress and strain increases that buildup mechanical potential energy, which is released when a critical level is reached, thereby generating a torque at the CMB. Generally, a trigger is required to start the Jerk process in motion. In the electromagnetic case, it is suggested that energy from the Sun may supply the requisite energy buildup that is subsequently released by a magnetic storm trigger, for instance. In the case of mechanical slippage, bari-center motion among the Earth, Moon, and Sun, as well as tidal forces and mass redistributions through Earth's wobbles combine to provide the accumulated stress/strain buildup and subsequent trigger. The resulting fluid flow changes at the CMB result in geomagnetic field changes and Joule heating throughout the solid Earth, its oceans, and atmosphere. It is shown that the Global Temperature Anomaly (GTA), which is measured at Earth's surface, correlates with changes in the geomagnetic non-dipole moment, and thus with core fluid motions. This links Global Warming and weather with core processes, important examples being the 1930's Dust Bowl Era and the 1947 Impulse. The CMB torque also affects Earth's angular momentum. But it appears that magnetic storms can as well. As a consequence, the Jet Stream, atmospheric circulation patterns, and the Global Oscillation System (i.e., El-Nino/Southern-Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation, the Pacific Decade Oscillation, etc.) are modulated. These parameters in turn affect the weather and climate (e.g., the Dust Bowl Era, El Ninos, La Ninas, and hurricanes). The stress/strain within the Earth leads to Earth torsion, vibration, and mass redistribution, which leads to tectonic plate motion, seismicity, volcanism, and gravity waves, which drive atmospheric circulation and the teleconnection processes (i.e., a redistribution of magma beneath the plates) via surge tectonics. Various other connections among these processes and parameters will be discussed.

  12. Global satellite millimeter-wave precipitation retrievals trained with a cloud-resolving numerical weather prediction model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chinnawat Surussavadee; David H. Staelin

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops global retrieval algorithms for surface precipitation rate (mm\\/h), peak vertical wind (m\\/s), and water-paths (mm) for rainwater, snow, graupel, cloud water, cloud ice, and the sum of rainwater, snow, and graupel, for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) aboard the NOAA-15, -16, and -17 satellites. These retrieved products are expected to be available to researchers and operational

  13. Chemical weathering in a tropical watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: I. Long-term versus short-term weathering fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Blum, A.E.; Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.V.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Larsen, M.; Murphy, S.F.; Eberl, D.

    1998-01-01

    The pristine Rio Icacos watershed in the Luquillo Mountains in eastern Puerto Rico has the fastest documented weathering rate of silicate rocks on the Earth's surface. A regolith propagation rate of 58 m Ma-1 calculated from iso-volumetric saprolite formation from quartz diorite, is comparable to the estimated denudation rate (25-50 Ma-1) but is an order of magnitude faster than the global average weathering rate (6 Ma-1). Weathering occurs in two distinct environments; plagioclase and hornblende react at the saprock interface and biotite and quartz weather in the overlying thick saprolitic regolith. These environments produce distinctly different water chemistries, with K, Mg, and Si increasing linearly with depth in saprolite porewaters and with stream waters dominated by Ca, Na, and Si. Such differences are atypical of less intense weathering in temperate watersheds. Porewater chemistry in the shallow regolith is controlled by closed-system recycling of inorganic nutrients such as K. Long-term elemental fluxes through the regolith (e.g., Si = 1.7 ?? 10-8 moles m-2 s-1) are calculated from mass losses based on changes in porosity and chemistry between the regolith and bedrock and from the age of the regolith surface (200 Ma). Mass losses attributed to solute fluxes are determined using a step-wise infiltration model which calculates mineral inputs to the shallow and deep saprolite porewaters and to stream water. Pressure heads decrease with depth in the shallow regolith (-2.03 m H2O m-1), indicating that both increasing capillary tension and graviometric potential control porewater infiltration. Interpolation of experimental hydraulic conductivities produces an infiltration rate of 1 m yr-1 at average field moisture saturation which is comparable with LiBr tracer tests and with base discharge from the watershed. Short term weathering fluxes calculated from solute chemistries and infiltration rates (e.g., Si = 1.4 ?? 10-8 moles m-2 s-1) are compared to watershed flux rates (e.g., Si = 2.7 ?? 10-8 moles m-2 s-1). Consistency between three independently determined sets of weathering fluxes imply that possible changes in precipitation, temperature, and vegetation over the last several hundred thousand years have not significantly impacted weathering rates in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. This has important ramifications for tropical environments and global climate change. Copyright ?? 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  14. Response of the Middle Atmosphere to a Total Solar Eclipse Using a Prototype High-Altitude Global Numerical Weather Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckermann, S. D.; Stollberg, M. T.; Hogan, T. F.; Coy, L.; McCormack, J. P.

    2006-05-01

    Solar eclipses provide a natural reproducible perturbation experiment for studying the atmosphere's reponse to changes in solar forcing. Theory suggests a large-scale gravity wave response in the middle and upper atmosphere, yet nearly 4 decades of observations aimed at testing these predictions have been largely inconclusive. To investigate in more detail the atmosphere's response to the total solar eclipse that occurred in the Southern Hemisphere on 4~December 2002, we use an advanced-level physics and high-altitude (ALPHA) prototype version of the spectral forecast model of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS), the Department of Defense's global weather prediction model. The NOGAPS-ALPHA runs reported here extend from the surface to ~100~km. Our control simulations are standard "cold-start" hindcasts initialized at 0000~UTC on 4~December 2002 which have no eclipse effects included. In these runs we update the radiative heating and cooling rates at every model time step, rather than the more typical 1--2~hours. Our eclipse simulations rerun these same hindcasts, but insert a moving eclipse shadow at the appropriate times based on 60~s time series of the leading and lagging limbs of the lunar shadow on the Earth's surface, issued by the U.S. Naval Observatory. For implementation in NOGAPS-ALPHA, we convert eclipse magnitudes within these shadow regions into local reductions in solar UV intensity using geometry and consenus estimates of limb darkening across the solar disk at 200-300~nm. We study evolving atmospheric responses to this moving UV eclipse shadow using global atmospheric difference fields between the two simulations. In particular, we compare the observed response to the theoretical predictions of Chimonas and Fritts--Luo. Finally, we present preliminary results from similar runs for the most recent total solar eclipse that occurred on 29 March 2006. www.nrl.navy.mil/dynamics/html/nogaps.html

  15. The calcium silicate hydrates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. G. Richardson

    2008-01-01

    This article is concerned with the calcium silicate hydrates, including crystalline minerals and the extremely variable and poorly ordered phase (C-S-H) that is the main binding phase in most concrete. Up-to-date composition and crystal-structure information is tabulated for the most important crystalline calcium (alumino) silicate hydrates and related phases. A number of models for the nanostructure of C-S-H are summarized

  16. Chemical Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kira Lawrence

    This tombstone weathering lab is designed to provide students with tangible understanding of chemical weathering and weathering rates. To prepare for this lab, students will have learned in previous labs to identify common minerals and rocks and will have attended lectures about the process of chemical weathering. During the first part of the lab we travel to the city cemetery to collect data on the age and extent of chemical weathering of tombstones that are made of limestone and igneous rocks. After collecting data for ~1 hour, we return to the computer lab where students use Microsoft Excel to analyze and interpret their data. Their task is to calculate a chemical weathering rate for limestone for our region and compare that rate to those from other regions. This activity gives students experience in the process of scientific inquiry: data collection, data analysis and data interpretation. Students develop Microsoft Excel skills: writing formulas, producing charts, understanding trendlines and R2 values.

  17. Weather Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Harris

    2011-01-24

    The listed websites are recommended safe kid friendly sites that may be used when gathering data for the at home data project. Use the websites listed to learn more about daily weather patterns in different cities around the world. After you have collected and organized your data, create a graph representing the different weather patterns in that city. Use this site to record the daily high temperature for your assigned city. The Weather Channel Use this ...

  18. Weather Instruments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Topic in Depth discusses the variety of instruments used to collect climate and weather data. The first two websites provide simple introductions to the many weather instruments. Bethune Academy's Weather Center (1) discusses the functions of psychrometers, anemometers, weather balloons, thermometers, and barometers. The Illinois State Water Survey (2) furnishes many images of various instruments that collect data daily for legal issues, farmers, educators, students, and researchers. The third website (3), created by the Center for Improving Engineering and Science Education (CIESE), provides a classroom activity to educate users on how to build and use weather instruments. By the end of the group project, students should know all about wind vanes, rain gauges, anemometers, and thermometers. Next, the Miami Museum of Science provides a variety of activities to help students learn about the many weather instruments including wind scales and wind chimes (4). Students can learn about the wind, air pressure, moisture, and temperature. At the fifth website, the Tyson Research Center at Washington University describes the devices it uses in its research (5). At the various links, users can find out the center's many projects that utilize meteorological data such as acid rain monitoring. The sixth website, a pdf document created by Dr. John Guyton at the Mississippi State University Extension Service, provides guidance to teachers about the education of weather patterns and instruments (6). Users can find helpful information on pressure systems, humidity, cloud patterns, and much more. Next, the University of Richmond discusses the tools meteorologists use to learn about the weather (7). While providing materials about the basic tools discussed in the other websites, this site also offers information about weather satellites, radar, and computer models. After discovering the many weather instruments, users can learn about weather data output and analysis at the Next Generation Weather Lab website (8). This expansive website provides an abundance of surface data and upper air data as well as satellite and radar images for the United States.

  19. Predicting Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    By performing the activities presented in this website, fourth grade students can learn about weather instruments and data collection. This website, produced by the Government of Saskatchewan, also explores how the weather can impact local communities. Each activity presented here includes both objectives and assessment techniques for the lesson. Sixteen different activity suggestions provide students and teachers with ample opportunities to explore weather in the classroom.

  20. Weather Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    R. Hopson

    The weather watch activity is designed to provide instruction on how to collect weather data from on-line databases. Following completion of this activity the user will be able to look up weather conditions for any city in North America, know what radar maps are used for and how to access them, and know how to access satellite images and make estimated guesses on cloud conditions for their area from them.

  1. Weather Experiments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    Looking for fun ways to learn about weather? Weather Wiz Kids has 39 fun weather related experiments for you to try. These experiments can be done in the classroom with your friends or even at home! Some of the experiments on the site include: tornado in a bottle, make lightning, make it rain, cloud in a bottle, what's in the wind, the Doppler Effect, and baking soda volcano.

  2. MSATT Workshop on Chemical Weathering on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger (editor); Banin, Amos (editor)

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered with respect to chemical weathering on Mars include the following: Mars soil, mineralogy, spectroscopic analysis, clays, silicates, oxidation, iron oxides, water, chemical reactions, geochemistry, minerals, Mars atmosphere, atmospheric chemistry, salts, planetary evolution, volcanology, Mars volcanoes, regolith, surface reactions, Mars soil analogs, carbonates, meteorites, and reactivity.

  3. An AEM-TEM study of weathering and diagenesis, Abert Lake, Oregon. (1) Weathering reactions in the volcanics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Banfield; D. R. Veblen; B. F. Jones

    1991-01-01

    Abert Lake in south-central Oregon provides a site suitable for the study of sequential weathering and diagenetic events. In this first of two papers, transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize the igneous mineralogy, subsolidus alteration assemblage, and the structural and chemical aspects of silicate weathering reactions that occur in the volcanic rocks that outcrop around the lake. Olivine and

  4. An aem-tem study of weathering and diagenesis, Abert Lake, Oregon: I. Weathering reactions in the volcanics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jillian F. Banfield; Blair F. Jones; David R. Veblen

    1991-01-01

    Abert Lake in south-central Oregon provides a site suitable for the study of sequential weathering and diagenetic events. In this first of two papers, transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize the igneous mineralogy, subsolidus alteration assemblage, and the structural and chemical aspects of silicate weathering reactions that occur in the volcanic rocks (basalts, basaltic andesites, and dacitic\\/ rhyolitic extrusive

  5. Global climate change and reindeer: effects of winter weather on the autumn weight and growth of calves.

    PubMed

    Weladji, Robert B; Holand, Øystein

    2003-07-01

    Reindeer/caribou (Rangifer tarandus), which constitute a biological resource of vital importance for the physical and cultural survival of Arctic residents, and inhabit extremely seasonal environments, have received little attention in the global change debate. We investigated how body weight and growth rate of reindeer calves were affected by large-scale climatic variability [measured by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) winter index] and density in one population in central Norway. Body weights of calves in summer and early winter, as well as their growth rate (summer to early winter), were significantly influenced by density and the NAO index when cohorts were in utero. Males were heavier and had higher absolute growth than females, but there was no evidence that preweaning condition of male and female calves were influenced differently by the NAO winter index. Increasing NAO index had a negative effect on calves' body weight and growth rate. Increasing density significantly reduced body weight and growth rate of calves, and accentuated the effect of the NAO winter index. Winters with a higher NAO index are thus severe for reindeer calves in this area and their effects are associated with nutritional stress experienced by the dams during pregnancy or immediately after calving. Moreover, increased density may enhance intra-specific competition and limits food available at the individual level within cohorts. We conclude that if the current pattern of global warming continues, with greater change occurring in northern latitudes and during winter as is predicted, reduced body weight of reindeer calves may be a consequence in areas where winters with a high NAO index are severe. This will likely have an effect on the livelihood of many northern indigenous peoples, both economically and culturally. PMID:12707839

  6. Has Anthropogenic Global Warming in the Arctic Contributed to Colder Winter Weather in the Northern Hemisphere Mid-latitudes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, J. L.; Furtado, J. C.; Barlow, M. A.; Cherry, J. E.; Alexeev, V. A.

    2012-12-01

    The global climate models predict that temperatures will warm the greatest in winter due to a positive feedback of increased greenhouse gases and a diminished and darker cryosphere. Furthermore, current consensus on global climate change predicts warming trends over the NH continents during boreal winter. However, recent trends in Northern Hemisphere (NH) seasonal surface temperatures diverge from these projections. For the last two decades or so, NH landmasses have experienced significant warming trends for all seasons except winter, when large-scale cooling trends exist instead. We propose a mechanism linking Arctic warming and winter continental cooling. Evidence suggests that summer and autumn Arctic warming trends are concurrent with increases in high-latitude moisture and an increase in autumnal Eurasian snow cover, which dynamically induces large-scale wintertime cooling. Understanding this counterintuitive response to radiative warming of the climate system has the potential to improve climate predictions at seasonal and longer timescales.a) JAS area-averaged (poleward of 60°N) surface temperature anomalies (°C) from NASA MERRA. b) September area-averaged (poleward of 65°N) Arctic Ocean sea ice coverage (fractional area). c) September - October vertically integrated (700-1000 hPa) and area-averaged (poleward of 60°N) specific humidity (kg m-2). d) October mean snow cover areal extent (106 km2) over the Eurasian continent from observations (black) and ensemble-mean from the historical runs of the CMIP5 model output (brown line). e) The DJF average AO index (standardized). Same-coloured dashed lines in a) - e) represent the linear trend in each index. Trends with double asterisk (**) indicate trends are significant at the p < 0.01 level.

  7. Oceans, Climate, and Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kimberly Lightle

    This resource guide from the Middle School Portal 2 project, written specifically for teachers, provides links to exemplary resources including background information, lessons, career information, and related national science education standards. What is the difference between weather and climate? What do the oceans have to do with them? Weather is the day-to-day state of the atmosphere and its short-term (minutes to weeks) variation. Climate is typically described by the regional patterns of seasonal temperature and precipitation over 30 years. The averages of annual temperature, rainfall, cloud cover, and depth of frost penetration are all typical climate-related statistics. The oceans influence the worlds climate by storing solar energy and distributing it around the planet through currents and atmospheric winds.This publication is all about developing your students understandings of earths oceans and the major effect they have on climate. Understanding and interpreting local weather data and understanding the relationship between weather and climate are important first steps to understanding larger-scale global climate changes. Activities that ask students to collect and analyze local weather data as well as analyze global data can be found in the Lessons and Activities section. Analyzing and interpreting data is a major focus of this publication. Numerous data sets can be found in the Sources for Real Data section. The Background Information section and the article Tomorrows Forecast will help reinforce your own content knowledge.

  8. Oceans, Climate and Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kimberly Lightle

    2006-01-01

    What is the difference between weather and climate? What do the oceans have to do with them? Weather is the day-to-day state of the atmosphere and its short-term (minutes to weeks) variation. Climate is typically described by the regional patterns of seasonal temperature and precipitation over 30 years. The averages of annual temperature, rainfall, cloud cover, and depth of frost penetration are all typical climate-related statistics. The oceans influence the worlds climate by storing solar energy and distributing it around the planet through currents and atmospheric winds.This publication is all about developing your students understandings of earths oceans and the major effect they have on climate. Understanding and interpreting local weather data and understanding the relationship between weather and climate are important first steps to understanding larger-scale global climate changes. Activities that ask students to collect and analyze local weather data as well as analyze global data can be found in the Lessons and Activities section. Analyzing and interpreting data is a major focus of this publication. Numerous data sets can be found in the Sources for Real Data section. The Background Information section and the article Tomorrows Forecast will help reinforce your own content knowledge.

  9. Using C and S isotopes to elucidate carbonic versus sulfuric acid reaction pathways during shale weathering in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Ogrinc, N.; Yesavage, T.; Hasenmueller, E. A.; Ma, L.; Kaye, J. P.; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical weathering of silicate minerals via the carbonic acid reaction pathway regulates global climate on geological timescales. However, strong acids are also key dissolution agents that drive silicate and carbonate weathering. In order to assess the potentials of silicate weathering on CO2 consumption, it is crucial to separate carbonic acid versus sulfuric acid reaction pathways, and also to separate the contribution of stream-dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from silicate versus carbonate dissoution. Here we address these two questions using C and S isotopes at the well-studied Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SSHO). In shallow soils of SSHO, clay dissolution dominates. Here soil waters are charaterized by low [DIC], which is controlled by equilibrium with soil pCO2. Carbonate minerals, in this Rose Hill Shale formation, are depleted in soils and have only been observed in few bedrock boreholes, i.e. at > 23m depth at ridges and > 2m depth under the valley. Indeed, some groundwaters have much higher [DIC], [Mg] and [Ca], presumably due to ankerite dissolution. Accompanied by the transition from silicate weathering in shallow soils to carbonate weathering below the water table, the source of sulfate shifts with depth from atmospheric deposition to pyrite dissolution. Apparently, the weathering fronts of ankerite and pyrite are at almost the same depth. The ?13CDIC values of these groundwaters indicate C mixing equally from ankerite and soil CO2, with only slight modification by the sulfuric acid pathway. Groundwater chemistry evolves to different extents with respect to ankerite saturation because the depths to ankerite weathering fronts vary due to heterogeneity of the Rose Hill shales and landscape position. Interestingly, groundwaters along the valley floor at the outlet of the first-order catchment are influenced by carbonate dissolution but also show S isotope signatures indicative of anthropogenic sulfate in wet precipitation. This provides another line of evidence that at least some of the carbonate we observe at shallow depths in the valley floor may be secondary. Indeed, C isotopes of some of the shallow carbonates differ from those in Rose Hill bedrock. Comparison between groundwater and soil water chemistry shows that at SSHO most DIC derives from the dissolution of carbonate minerals, i.e., primary ankerite or secondary carbonate. Sulfate derives almost entirely from atmospheric deposition in soil waters and some groundwater near the outlet; however, its source shifts to pyrite dissolution in groundwaters from ridges and headwater areas. Overall, in this catchment underlain by grey shale, the sulfuric acid pathway is insignicant due to the low pyrite content in comparison to ankerite or secondary carbonate.

  10. Wacky Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabarre, Amy; Gulino, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    What do a leaf blower, water hose, fan, and ice cubes have in common? Ask the students who participated in an integrative science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (I-STEM) education unit, "Wacky Weather," and they will tell say "fun and severe weather"--words one might not have expected! The purpose of the unit…

  11. Weather Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantley, L. Reed, Sr.; Demanche, Edna L.; Klemm, E. Barbara; Kyselka, Will; Phillips, Edwin A.; Pottenger, Francis M.; Yamamoto, Karen N.; Young, Donald B.

    This booklet presents some activities to measure various weather phenomena. Directions for constructing a weather station are included. Instruments including rain gauges, thermometers, wind vanes, wind speed devices, humidity devices, barometers, atmospheric observations, a dustfall jar, sticky-tape can, detection of gases in the air, and pH of…

  12. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

    2005-01-01

    This activity (on page 2 of the PDF) is a full inquiry investigation into meteorology and forecasting. Learners will research weather folklore, specifically looking for old-fashioned ways of predicting the weather. Then, they'll record observations of these predictors along with readings from their own homemade barometer, graphing the correct predictions for analysis. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV: Forecasting.

  13. Do disease cycles follow changes in weather? Researchers ponder global warming`s effect on the carriers of human illness

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.S.

    1996-07-01

    Two years ago, Mother Nature one-upped an Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee big time. In 1991, the committee had wracked its collective brains to come up with a plausible epidemic scenario for a report on disease emergence. The team finally settled on a potential southern US outbreak of yellow fever, a well-known African viral disease carried by mosquitoes. The idea was realistic, if not particularly imaginative. Yellow fever is an old problem. Shortly after the report on microbe-induced epidemics was released, Mother Nature displayed tremendous creativity. In the spring of 1993, a mysterious virus began killing young people in the Southwest. The culprit turned out to be a previously unrecognized strain of hantavirus, which causes a deadly respiratory disease. Emerging from its natural host, the common deer mouse, the hantavirus strain affected at least 131 people. Half died. Today, emerging viruses have shocked the public and sent scientists searching for causes of epidemics and factors that determine how serious disease outbreaks might be be. One factor gaining attention climate. To learn how global warming might affect mosquitoes, mice and other microbe carriers, biologists are studying diseases within an environmental context. This article discusses the work in this area and some of the results, speculations, and future areas of interest.

  14. Precipitable water and surface humidity over global oceans from special sensor microwave imager and European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, Wenqing; Wentz, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    Global fields of precipitable water W from the special sensor microwave imager were compared with those from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. They agree over most ocean areas; both data sets capture the two annual cycles examined and the interannual anomalies during an ENSO episode. They show significant differences in the dry air masses over the eastern tropical-subtropical oceans, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. In these regions, comparisons with radiosonde data indicate that overestimation by the ECMWF model accounts for a large part of the differences. As a check on the W differences, surface-level specific humidity Q derived from W, using a statistical relation, was compared with Q from the ECMWF model. The differences in Q were found to be consistent with the differences in W, indirectly validating the Q-W relation. In both W and Q, SSMI was able to discern clearly the equatorial extension of the tongues of dry air in the eastern tropical ocean, while both ECMWF and climatological fields have reduced spatial gradients and weaker intensity.

  15. Chemical weathering and associated carbon-dioxide consumption in a tropical river basin (Swarna River), Southwestern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muguli, T.; Gurumurthy, G. P.; Balakrishna, K.; Audry, S.; Riotte, J.; Braun, J.; Chadaga, M.; Shankar HN, U.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical weathering in river basins forms the key process to study the global climate change on a long term scale due to its association with the carbon sequestration. Water samples from a west flowing tropical river (Swarna River) of Southern India were collected for a period of two years to study the chemical weathering process and to quantify the weathering and associated carbon-dioxide consumption rates in the river basin. In addition, the major ion chemistry of Swarna River is studied for the first time on a spatial and temporal (monthly) scale to decipher the factors (lithology, precipitation/ discharge, temperature, slope and physical weathering) controlling the chemical weathering process. Swarna River originates in Western Ghats at an altitude of 1100 m above mean sea level and flows westwards draining Peninsular Gneiss and Dharwar Schist to join the Arabian Sea near Udupi. The river basin receives annual rainfall of 4500 mm and experiences warm climate with average temperature of 30°C. Major ion composition and radiogenic strontium isotopic composition measured in the Swarna river water reflects the influence of silicate rocks in the basin. The river water chemistry is found to be least affected by anthropogenic impact; however, the effect of evaporation is observed on few samples during the peak dry season. The atmospheric inputs and carbonate contributions to the river water are corrected to estimate the silicate weathering rate (SWR) and the associated carbon-dioxide consumption rate (CCR) using local rainwater and bed rock composition respectively. The SWR and CCR in the Swarna river basin are estimated to be 46 tons/km2/yr and 4.4 x 10^5 mol/km2/yr respectively. This estimation is observed to be relatively higher than the recently reported SWR and CCR in the adjacent larger Nethravati river basin (Gurumurthy et al., 2012). The increased rate could be attributed to the relatively higher precipitation in the Swarna river basin than the lithological variation between the two basins. The weathering process is largely controlled by the higher run-off accompanied by warm temperature in the Swarna river basin. The intense silicate weathering is also supported by the highly radiogenic strontium isotope composition (87Sr/86Sr) ranging between 0.7195 and 0.7304 in the Swarna river water. The average 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7249 in the river water is found to be higher than the global river average. Keywords: Major ion, Radiogenic strontium isotope, Silicate weathering rate, Carbon-dioxide consumption rate, Tropical river, Southwestern India. Reference: Gurumurthy GP, Balakrishna K, Riotte J, Braun J-J, Audry S, Udayashankar HN, Manjunatha BR (2012), Controls on intense silicate weathering in a tropical river, southwestern India. Chemical Geology, 300-301, 61-69.

  16. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Nielsen-Gammon

    1996-09-01

    Weather Forecasting is a set of computer-based learning modules that teach students about meteorology from the point of view of learning how to forecast the weather. The modules were designed as the primary teaching resource for a seminar course on weather forecasting at the introductory college level (originally METR 151, later ATMO 151) and can also be used in the laboratory component of an introductory atmospheric science course. The modules assume no prior meteorological knowledge. In addition to text and graphics, the modules include interactive questions and answers designed to reinforce student learning. The module topics are: 1. How to Access Weather Data, 2. How to Read Hourly Weather Observations, 3. The National Collegiate Weather Forecasting Contest, 4. Radiation and the Diurnal Heating Cycle, 5. Factors Affecting Temperature: Clouds and Moisture, 6. Factors Affecting Temperature: Wind and Mixing, 7. Air Masses and Fronts, 8. Forces in the Atmosphere, 9. Air Pressure, Temperature, and Height, 10. Winds and Pressure, 11. The Forecasting Process, 12. Sounding Diagrams, 13. Upper Air Maps, 14. Satellite Imagery, 15. Radar Imagery, 16. Numerical Weather Prediction, 17. NWS Forecast Models, 18. Sources of Model Error, 19. Sea Breezes, Land Breezes, and Coastal Fronts, 20. Soundings, Clouds, and Convection, 21. Snow Forecasting.

  17. Observing Weather: Making the Invisible Visible

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Passow

    This presentation will help students understand that weather occurs at local, regional and global scales and that modern weather observation and forecasting makes use of both simple instruments and the most advanced technologies to measure, record and forecast the weather. They will learn the instruments and methods used to measure temperature, pressure, wind direction and speed, humidity, dew point, cloud types, and precipitation. They will also learn about the use of remotely sensed data from satellites to make weather maps and predictions.

  18. Planetary Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. It focuses on the weather conditions on other planets. After learning more about weather patterns, students research the weather on a given planet and create a visual display of the conditions there. It includes objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

  19. The effect of rock composition on cyanobacterial weathering of crystalline basalt and rhyolite.

    PubMed

    Olsson-Francis, K; Simpson, A E; Wolff-Boenisch, D; Cockell, C S

    2012-09-01

    The weathering of volcanic rocks contributes significantly to the global silicate weathering budget, effecting carbon dioxide drawdown and long-term climate control. The rate of chemical weathering is influenced by the composition of the rock. Rock-dwelling micro-organisms are known to play a role in changing the rate of weathering reactions; however, the influence of rock composition on bio-weathering is unknown. Cyanobacteria are known to be a ubiquitous surface taxon in volcanic rocks. In this study, we used a selection of fast and slow growing cyanobacterial species to compare microbial-mediated weathering of bulk crystalline rocks of basaltic and rhyolitic composition, under batch conditions. Cyanobacterial growth caused an increase in the pH of the medium and an acceleration of rock dissolution compared to the abiotic controls. For example, Anabaena cylindrica increased the linear release rate (R(i)(l)) of Ca, Mg, Si and K from the basalt by more than fivefold (5.21-12.48) and increased the pH of the medium by 1.9 units. Although A. cylindrica enhanced rhyolite weathering, the increase in R(i)(l) was less than threefold (2.04-2.97) and the pH increase was only 0.83 units. The R(i)(l) values obtained with A. cylindrica were at least ninefold greater with the basalt than the rhyolite, whereas in the abiotic controls, the difference was less than fivefold. Factors accounting for the slower rate of rhyolite weathering and lower biomass achieved are likely to include the higher content of quartz, which has a low rate of weathering and lower concentrations of bio-essential elements, such as, Ca, Fe and Mg, which are known to be important in controlling cyanobacterial growth. We show that at conditions where weathering is favoured, biota can enhance the difference between low and high Si-rock weathering. Our data show that cyanobacteria can play a significant role in enhancing rock weathering and likely have done since they evolved on the early Earth. PMID:22694082

  20. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and...ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate,...

  1. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and...ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate,...

  2. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and...ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate,...

  3. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and...CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate,...

  4. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and...CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate,...

  5. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and...ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate,...

  6. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and...CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate,...

  7. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and...CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate,...

  8. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and...ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate,...

  9. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and...CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate,...

  10. Winter Weather

    MedlinePLUS

    ... weather presents hazards including slippery roads/surfaces, strong winds and environmental cold. Employers must prevent illnesses, injuries, ... from surfaces) Use extreme caution when working near power lines Prevent harmful exposure to cold temperatures and ...

  11. Weatherizing America

    ScienceCinema

    Stewart, Zachary; Bergeron, T.J.; Barth, Dale; Qualis, Xavier; Sewall, Travis; Fransen, Richard; Gill, Tony;

    2013-05-29

    As Recovery Act money arrives to expand home weatherization programs across the country, Zachary Stewart of Phoenix, Ariz., and others have found an exciting opportunity not only to start working again, but also to find a calling.

  12. Weatherizing America

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Zachary; Bergeron, T.J.; Barth, Dale; Qualis, Xavier; Sewall, Travis; Fransen, Richard; Gill, Tony

    2009-01-01

    As Recovery Act money arrives to expand home weatherization programs across the country, Zachary Stewart of Phoenix, Ariz., and others have found an exciting opportunity not only to start working again, but also to find a calling.

  13. Weather Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades K-5. It focuses on basic information about the weather and how different weather maps depict conditions. Included are objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

  14. Weather Creator

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    KShumway

    2009-09-28

    This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. Form groups of three. Explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper. 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you get them to stop? 3. What can you do to make it rain or even snow? 4. Does it always snow when ...

  15. Exploring Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miss Emily

    2010-01-29

    Second Grade Standard 3: Students will develop an understanding of their environment. Objective 2: Observe and describe weather. Indicator a: Observe and describe patterns of change in weather. Monday, February 1st: Look at the five-day forecast for Salt Lake City, Utah at Five day forecasts. The high temperature for the day will be in red and the low temperature will be in blue. Make sure you look at the temperature listed in degrees Farenheit (F) not degrees Celcius (C). Make ...

  16. Weathering Experiment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Pete Stelling

    After discussing weathering and erosion in class, students are asked to do a small amount of research on different types of chemical weathering, physical weathering, and erosion processes (mostly out of their textbook). Outside of class students then dirty at least four similar dishes with the same type, thickness and aerial extent of food, preferably baked on to ensure maximum stick. One dish is set aside as a control (no weathering or erosion will occur for that dish). For each of the remaining three dishes, students devise an experiment that mimics some sort of chemical weathering, physical weathering, or erosion process (freeze/thaw, sand abrasion, oxidation, etc.). Prior to the experiments, the thickness of food is measured. Experiments are timed, and at the end of the experiment each plate is turned over to determine how much which method removed the greatest aerial extent of food. Experimental results are compared to the control plate to determine the actual effectiveness. Erosion/weathering rates are determined by dividing the thickness of food removed by the experimental time. Students then calculate how long it would take to remove a pile of food the size of the Geology building (assume a 50 m radius sphere), and to remove an amount of food equivalent to the depth of the Grand Canyon. Students then compare these results to rock erosion and weathering rates, performing similar calculations using these "real" rates (see the full project description for details). Photos of each step and the scientists are encouraged in their 2-3 page writeup.

  17. Gravestone Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this activity (located on pages 9-14 of PDF), learners visit a cemetery to examine the distinguishing characteristics of rock weathering. After researching stone weathering and acid rain, learners apply their knowledge to collect data related to chemical decomposition and physical disintegration at a cemetery site. This detailed lesson guide includes tips for educators, pre/post activity suggestions, hands-outs, and background information.

  18. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  19. Weathering History During Extreme Climate Conditions in Neoproterozoic Time: a Clay Mineral Study on the Nanhuan-Sinian Succession (South China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzinski, N.; Bahlburg, H.; Strauss, H.; Kasbohm, J.; Zhang, Q.

    2004-05-01

    The Nanhuan-Sinian sedimentary rocks on the Yangtze Platform in South China represent a glacial succession of Neoproterozoic age. The succession of paleolow-latitude is assumed to be correlative to the global glacial "snowball Earth" event. This estimation is on the one hand based on sparse age determinations and on the other hand on in the simalarities of its consecutive occurence of tillites and warm-water carbonates similar to successions on other continents. One of the postulates of the snowball Earth hypothesis is that during glaciation chemical weathering on the continents was shut down and was followed by intense silicate weathering in the aftermath of the glaciation. Furthermore, as a result of the nearly complete ice-cover oceanic bottom waters allegedly became anoxic. Clay minerals are being produced among other things by weathering of silicate minerals. We evaluated the degree of chemical weathering by combining major and trace element analyses (incl. REE), XRD and TEM to recontruct the weathering history during the Nanhuan-Sinian time. Lithological records together with the application of geochemical weathering proxies indicate an inter- or at least intraglacial stage for the Nanhuan-Sinian succession. The values of paleoredox indices do not show anoxic bottom water conditions during the Nanhuan glaciation. Our results allow two possible implications: (i) The snowball Earth scenario did not occur exactly as postulated and needs to consider climate variability and long-term ocean-atmosphere interaction, or (ii) the Nanhuan glaciation evolved independently from the global glaciations considered by the snowball Earth hypothesis.

  20. Causes and consequences of extreme Permo-Triassic warming to globally equable climate and relation to the Permo-Triassic extinction and recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David L. Kidder; Thomas R. Worsley

    2004-01-01

    Permian waning of the low-latitude Alleghenian\\/Variscan\\/Hercynian orogenesis led to a long collisional orogeny gap that cut down the availability of chemically weatherable fresh silicate rock resulting in a high-CO2 atmosphere and global warming. The correspondingly reduced delivery of nutrients to the biosphere caused further increases in CO2 and warming. Melting of polar ice curtailed sinking of O2- and nutrient-rich cold

  1. Impact of nitrogenous fertilizers on carbonate dissolution in small agricultural catchments: Implications for weathering CO 2 uptake at regional and global scales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne-Sophie Perrin; Anne Probst; Jean-Luc Probst

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to highlight the occurrence of an additional proton-promoted weathering pathway of carbonate rocks in agricultural areas where N-fertilizers are extensively spread, and to estimate its consequences on riverine alkalinity and uptake of CO2 by weathering. We surveyed 25 small streams in the calcareous molassic Gascogne area located in the Garonne river basin (south-western France)

  2. The Weather Radar Toolkit, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climatic Data Center's support of interoperability and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S.; Del Greco, S.

    2006-12-01

    In February 2005, 61 countries around the World agreed on a 10 year plan to work towards building open systems for sharing geospatial data and services across different platforms worldwide. This system is known as the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The objective of GEOSS focuses on easy access to environmental data and interoperability across different systems allowing participating countries to measure the "pulse" of the planet in an effort to advance society. In support of GEOSS goals, NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) has developed radar visualization and data exporter tools in an open systems environment. The NCDC Weather Radar Toolkit (WRT) loads Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) volume scan (S-band) data, known as Level-II, and derived products, known as Level-III, into an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant environment. The application is written entirely in Java and will run on any Java- supported platform including Windows, Macintosh and Linux/Unix. The application is launched via Java Web Start and runs on the client machine while accessing these data locally or remotely from the NCDC archive, NOAA FTP server or any URL or THREDDS Data Server. The WRT allows the data to be manipulated to create custom mosaics, composites and precipitation estimates. The WRT Viewer provides tools for custom data overlays, Web Map Service backgrounds, animations and basic filtering. The export of images and movies is provided in multiple formats. The WRT Data Exporter allows for data export in both vector polygon (Shapefile, Well-Known Text) and raster (GeoTIFF, ESRI Grid, VTK, NetCDF, GrADS) formats. By decoding the various Radar formats into the NetCDF Common Data Model, the exported NetCDF data becomes interoperable with existing software packages including THREDDS Data Server and the Integrated Data Viewer (IDV). The NCDC recently partnered with NOAA's National Severe Storms Lab (NSSL) to decode Sigmet C-band Doppler radar data providing the NCDC Viewer/Data Exporter the functionality to read C-Band. This also supports a bilateral agreement between the United States and Canada for data sharing and to support interoperability with the US WSR-88D and Environment Canada radar networks. In addition, the NCDC partnered with the University of Oklahoma to develop decoders to read a test bed of distributed X- band radars that are funded through the Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) project. The NCDC is also archiving the National Mosaic and Next Generation QPE (Q2) products from NSSL, which provide products such as three-dimensional reflectivity, composite reflectivity and precipitation estimates at a 1 km resolution. These three sources of Radar data are also supported in the WRT.

  3. The Weather Doctor

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Heidorn, Keith.

    Published by Spectrum Educational Enterprises, The Weather Doctor Web site is maintained by meteorologist Keith Heidorn. Visitors to the site will find everything from the joys of weather watching, to making rain, to weather history, to much more. Coming from someone who clearly enjoys what they do, this site explores unique aspects of weather including weather people, weather history, and weather and arts.

  4. Space Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2004-02-06

    With three levels to choose from on each page - beginner, intermediate or advanced - this site provides information on Space Weather and the terms scientists use to describe the everchanging conditions in space. Explosions on the Sun create storms of radiation, fluctuating magnetic fields, and swarms of energetic particles. These phenomena travel outward through the Solar System with the solar wind. Upon arrival at Earth, they interact in complex ways with Earth's magnetic field, creating Earth's radiation belts and the Aurora. Some space weather storms can damage satellites, disable electric power grids, and disrupt cell phone communications systems. This site provides images, activities, and interesting facts about all of these events.

  5. Wonderful Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Broadhead

    2007-11-06

    Second Grade Standard 3: Students will develop an understanding of their environment. Objective 2: Observe and describe weather. Indicator a: Observe and describe patterns of change in weather. Monday November 6th: Look at the five-day forecast for Logan Utah at Five Day Forecast in Utah. The high temperature for the day will be in red and the low temperature will be in blue. Look at the temperature listed in degrees Farenheit (F) not degrees Celcius (C). Make a bar graph for the ...

  6. Wild Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this online, interactive module, students learn about severe weather (thunderstorms, hurricanes, tornadoes, and blizzards) and the key features for each type of "wild weather" using satellite images. The module is part of an online course for grades 7-12 in satellite meteorology, which includes 10 interactive modules. The site also includes lesson plans developed by teachers and links to related resources. Each module is designed to serve as a stand-alone lesson, however, a sequential approach is recommended. Designed to challenge students through the end of 12th grade, middle school teachers and students may choose to skim or skip a few sections.

  7. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this online, interactive module, students will learn how to interpret weather patterns from satellite images, predict storm paths and forecast the weather for their area. The module is part of an online course for grades 7-12 in satellite meteorology, which includes 10 interactive modules. The site also includes lesson plans developed by teachers and links to related resources. Each module is designed to serve as a stand-alone lesson, however, a sequential approach is recommended. Designed to challenge students through the end of 12th grade, middle school teachers and students may choose to skim or skip a few sections.

  8. Weather Activity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    missy.jones@gmail.com

    2009-09-28

    This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. Form groups of three. Explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper. 1. Why does the wind blow? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you get them to stop? 3. What happens when the temperature is the same? 4. What happens when there is high relative humidity? 5. What ...

  9. Silicates in Alien Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This plot of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescopes shows that asteroid dust around a dead 'white dwarf' star contains silicates a common mineral on Earth. The data were taken primarily by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that breaks light apart into its basic constituents. The yellow dots show averaged data from the spectrograph, while the orange triangles show older data from Spitzer's infrared array camera. The white dwarf is called GD 40.

  10. Weathering: the decay of rocks and the source of sediments inand the source of sediments in

    E-print Network

    Kammer, Thomas

    SiO4 (silicic acid) #12;Hydration · A mineral reacts with either the H+ or the OH- (hydroxide) from water to produce a( y ) p new mineral. Aluminum silicates do not dissolve in water. Feldspars weather: quartz clay aluminum oxides· Most stable: quartz, clay, aluminum oxides (bauxite), iron oxides. #12

  11. Does mineral surface area affect chemical weathering rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salome Eiriksdottir, Eydis; Reynir Gislason, Sigurdur; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2010-05-01

    Iceland is a basaltic volcanic island representative of the high relief, volcanic and tectonic active islands that contribute over 45% of river suspended material to the oceans worldwide (Milliman and Syvitski, 1992). These islands have enormous mechanical and chemical weathering rates due to the combined effects of high relief, high runoff, the presence of glaciers and easily weathered volcanic rocks, and a lack of sedimentary traps. In total, Iceland delivers 0.7% of the worldwide river suspended matter flux to the ocean, which is approximately one fourth that of Africa (Tómasson, 1990). River suspended matter from volcanic islands is highly reactive in seawater and might play an important role in the global carbon cycle (Gislason et al., 2006). Thus it is important to define and understand the mechanical and chemical weathering rates of these islands. Experimental dissolution experiments performed in the laboratory suggest that chemical weathering rates should be proportional to rock-water interfacial surface area. This hypothesis is tested in the present study through a study of the chemical composition of suspended material collected from rivers located in Northeast Iceland. These rivers were selected for this study because their catchments essentially monolithic, consisting of uniform compositioned and aged basalts. Gaillardet (1999) described weathering intensities of the worlds river systems to be from 1 (low weathering intensity) to 25 (high weathering intensity). These indexes were calculated to be from 1.8 to 3.2 in rivers in NE-Iceland (Eiriksdottir et al., 2008). The surface area of sediments is inversely proportional to particle size; smaller particles have larger specific surface areas. As a result, smaller particles should weather faster. This trend is confirmed by the measured compositions of analyzed suspended material. The concentration of insoluble elements (Zr, Fe, Cu, Ni, Y) is found to increase in the suspended material, whereas the concentration of soluble elements (Na, Ca, Ba, V) decrease with decreasing particle size in samples collected from various catchments. References. Eiriksdottir E.S., Louvat P., Gislason S.R., Óskarsson N., Hardardóttir J., 2008. Temporal variation of chemical and mechanical weathering in NE Iceland: Evaluation of a steady-state model of erosion. EPSL 272, 78-88 Gaillardet, J., Dupré, B., Allegre, C.J., Négrel, P., 1999b. Geochemistry of large river suspended sediments: silicate weathering or recycling tracer? Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 63, 4037-4051. Gislason, S.R., Oelkers, E.H., Snorrason, Á., 2006. Role of river-suspended material in the global carbon cycle. Geology 34, 49-52. Milliman, J.D., Syvitski, J.P.M., 1992. Geomorphic/tectonic control of sediment discharge to the ocean: the importance of small mountainous rivers. J. Geol. 100, 525-544. Tómasson, H., 1990. Suspended material in Icelandic rivers. In: Guttormur, S. (Ed.), Vatnid og Landid. Orkustofnun, Reykjavik, pp. 169-174.

  12. Space Weather

    E-print Network

    Shepherd, Simon

    Space Weather :: Printer Friendly Version of Article 2005SW000176 http://www.agu.org/journals/sw/swa/feature/article/print.php?id=2005S... 1 of 5 07/07/2006 12:22 PM Shielding Space Explorers From Cosmic Rays Expert opinions-inducing radiation in space. Eugene N. Parker 18 August 2005 Any space traveler far removed from the protective

  13. Weathering Experiments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This experiment is designed to allow students to observe and understand chemical and physical weathering of simulated "rocks". They will place the materials in plastic bags, one wet and one dry, and store them for 3-4 days. At the end of the storage period, they will observe the contents of both bags and answer some questions about what they see.

  14. Weather Stations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-12-19

    This is a series of seven brief activities about Jupiter's atmosphere and weather. Learners will look at Jupiter's distinct banded appearance, violent storms, and clouds of many different colors. The activities are part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.

  15. Wacky Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barbara Chichetti

    2002-01-01

    This 5-lesson unit gives students practice in using calculating, graphing and modeling skills to analyze varoius aspects of weather. Students calculate fractions of a set of rainfall data, graph damage costs of selected hurricanes, and make Venn diagrams to compare droughts and hurricanes. Visuals and student handouts are provided.

  16. Weather Alert

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students discuss the characteristics of storms, including the relationship of weather fronts and storms. Using everyday materials, they develop models of basic lightning detection systems (similar to a Benjamin Franklin design) and analyze their models to determine their effectiveness as community storm warning systems.

  17. Wonderful Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mission Science Workshop

    2013-01-01

    In this activity, learners conduct three experiments to examine temperature, the different stages of the water cycle, and how convection creates wind. These activities can be used individually or as a group for a lesson on weather. Note: boiling water is required for this activity; adult supervision required.

  18. Today's Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is part of Planet Diary and contains an online exploration of weather maps. Students use current maps to learn about and locate different features such as low-pressure areas and fronts. They then explore how these are related to severe storms.

  19. Seafloor weathering buffering climate: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.; Abbot, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Continental silicate weathering is widely held to consume atmospheric CO2 at a rate controlled in part by temperature, resulting in a climate-weathering feedback [Walker et al., 1981]. It has been suggested that weathering of oceanic crust of warm mid-ocean ridge flanks also has a CO2 uptake rate that is controlled by climate [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001; Brady and Gislason, 1997]. Although this effect might not be significant on present-day Earth [Caldeira, 1995], seafloor weathering may be more pronounced during snowball states [Le Hir et al., 2008], during the Archean when seafloor spreading rates were faster [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001], and on waterworld planets [Abbot et al., 2012]. Previous studies of seafloor weathering have made significant contributions using qualitative, generally one-box, models, and the logical next step is to extend this work using a spatially resolved model. For example, experiments demonstrate that seafloor weathering reactions are temperature dependent, but it is not clear whether the deep ocean temperature affects the temperature at which the reactions occur, or if instead this temperature is set only by geothermal processes. Our goal is to develop a 2-D numerical model that can simulate hydrothermal circulation and resulting alteration of oceanic basalts, and can therefore address such questions. A model of diffusive and convective heat transfer in fluid-saturated porous media simulates hydrothermal circulation through porous oceanic basalt. Unsteady natural convection is solved for using a Darcy model of porous media flow that has been extensively benchmarked. Background hydrothermal circulation is coupled to mineral reaction kinetics of basaltic alteration and hydrothermal mineral precipitation. In order to quantify seafloor weathering as a climate-weathering feedback process, this model focuses on hydrothermal reactions that influence carbon uptake as well as ocean alkalinity: silicate rock dissolution, calcium and magnesium leaching reactions, carbonate precipitation, and clay formation.

  20. Can enhanced weathering remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to prevent climate change? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renforth, P.; Pogge von Strandmann, P.; Henderson, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    On long timescales, silicate weathering provides the ultimate sink for CO2 released by volcanic degassing and, because the rate of such weathering is temperature dependant, this sink is thought to respond to climate change to provide a strong negative feedback stabilising Earth's climate. An increase of global weathering rates is expected in response to anthropogenic warming and this increased weathering will ultimately (on the timescale of hundreds of thousands of years) serve to remove additional CO2 and return the climate system to lower temperatures. Some have proposed that accelerating this natural process by adding ground minerals to the land surface may help to prevent climate change. However, a major challenge in assessing such a proposal is the lack of experimental kinetic data for minerals added to the environment. Here we will present results from an experiment in which a forsterite rich olivine (Mg2SiO4) was added to the top of a soil column extracted from an agricultural field. A solution was passed through the columns over a period of 5 months and the drainage waters were collected and analysed. The greater flux of Mg measured eluting from the treated soil can be used to constrain the weathering rate of the olivine. A weathering rate can be determined by normalising the rate of magnesium flux to the surface area of olivine in the soil. By combining this information with a simple shrinking core model, we can estimate that an average particle size less than 1 ?m would be required in order for the olivine to completely dissolve in a year. Therefore, the energy requirements for enhanced weathering are large >2 GJ(electrical) per net tonne of CO2 sequestered, but it is at least comparable to direct air capture technologies. These preliminary results suggest limited carbon capture potential for enhanced weathering in temperate agricultural soils. However, some environments may be better suited (e.g. humid tropical agricultural soils) and additional experimental work is required to test these. This initial assessment does not include the plethora of other impacts that may be caused by enhanced weathering (ocean fertilisation, dust generation, soil carbon changes, K-feldspar fertilisation). More generally, terrestrial enhanced weathering is only one of a number of technologies that propose to add alkalinity to the surface ocean. The findings from this study will be presented in the context of this broader research field of ocean alkalinity modification.

  1. The Daily Martian Weather Report

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science Team

    This site from the Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science Team features the results of a detailed study of the Martian atmosphere in the form of a daily weather report and precise atmospheric measurements for the planet Mars. Atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles which have been archived with NASA's Planetary Data System are also available on this site. These profiles illustrate the vertical structure of the atmosphere of Mars. The site also includes links to many images of Martian atmospheric and weather phenomena (with captions) from the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MGS MOC), the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) and the Hubble Space Telescope.

  2. Weathering of sulfides on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produce degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy and terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni, and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato-and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossan above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite), and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates, and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  3. Weathering of sulfides on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produce degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy and terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni, and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato-and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossan above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite), and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates, and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  4. National Weather Service

    MedlinePLUS

    HOME FORECAST Local Graphical Aviation Marine Rivers and Lakes Hurricanes Severe Weather Fire Weather Sun/Moon Long Range Forecasts Climate Prediction PAST WEATHER Past Weather Heating/Cooling Days Monthly ...

  5. Activities in Teaching Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonn, Martin

    1977-01-01

    Presented is a unit composed of activities for teaching weather. Topics include cloud types and formation, simple weather instruments, and the weather station. Illustrations include a weather chart and instruments. A bibliography is given. (MA)

  6. Weather Cycles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Mitchell

    2010-09-23

    We are professionals in the teaching profession. We designed this project for children ranging from 4th grade to 6th grade. This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. YOU WILL NEED: Paper with copied questions, Overhead projector and Students broken up into groups of 3. Form groups of three. Have each group explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Have students use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper. They should be discussing the questions in their groups. 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you get them to stop? 3. What ...

  7. Weather Watchers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students are introduced to some essential meteorology concepts so they more fully understand the impact of meteorological activity on air pollution control and prevention. First, they develop an understanding of the magnitude and importance of air pressure. Next, they build a simple aneroid barometer to understand how air pressure information is related to weather prediction. Then, students explore the concept of relative humidity and its connection to weather prediction. Finally, students learn about air convection currents and temperature inversions. In an associated literacy activity, students learn how scientific terms are formed using Latin and Greek roots, prefixes and suffixes, and are introduced to the role played by metaphor in language development. Note: Some of these activities can be conducted simultaneously with the air quality activity (What Color Is Your Air Today?) of Air Pollution unit, Lesson 1.

  8. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #33: PUBLICATION OF RESEARCH AGENDA FROM UNITED STATES - CANADA SYMPOSIUM ON NORTH AMERICAN CLIMATE CHANGE AND WEATHER EXTREMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-day workshop on climate variability and change and extreme weather events in North America was held in October 1999 in Atlanta, Georgia. The workshop was a bi-national effort conducted under the auspices of a United States - Canada agreement fostering cooperation on activ...

  9. Arctic Sea Ice Hits Record Low--Extreme Weather to Come? Global warming to blame for highest observed decline, scientists say.

    E-print Network

    South Bohemia, University of

    intense extreme-weather events such as heat waves, cold spells, and droughts. On Monday, researchers." Climate models used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) also predict that Arctic years," instead of 50 years or more that some models predict, said Francis, who was not involved

  10. Commercializing Space Weather using GAIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Schunk, Robert; Sojka, Jan J.

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the en-ergy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the ionosphere is the key region that affects com-munication and navigation systems. The Utah State University (USU) Space Weather Center (SWC) was organized in 2009 to develop commercial space weather applications. It uses the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) system as the basis for providing improvements to communication and navigation systems. For example, in August 2009 SWC released, in conjunction with Space Environment Technologies, the world's first real-time space weather via an iPhone app, Space WX. It displays the real-time, current global ionosphere to-tal electron content along with its space weather drivers, is available through the Apple iTunes store, and is used around the world. The GAIM system is run operationally at SWC for global and regional (continental U.S.) conditions. Each run stream continuously ingests up to 10,000 slant TEC measurements every 15-minutes from approximately 500 stations in a Kalman filter to adjust the background output from the physics-based Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM). Additionally, 80 real-time digisonde data streams from around the world provide ionosphere characterization up to the F-region peak. The combination of these data dramatically improves the current epoch ionosphere specification beyond the physics-based solution. The altitudinal range is 90-1500 km for output TEC, electron densities, and other data products with a few degrees resolution in latitude and longitude at 15-minute time granularity. We describe the existing SWC products that are used as commercial space weather information. SWC funding is provided by the State of Utah's Utah Science Technology and Research (USTAR) initiative. The SWC is physically located on the USU campus in Logan, Utah.

  11. Ch.8 Weather Learning Objective One

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    the characteristics of its source region. ! The interactions of air masses produce weather patterns. #12) #12;Air Masses Affecting North America in Summer #12;Global July Barometric Pressure #12;Continental developed in winter and cold-weather conditions. ! The cold, dense cP air displaces moist and warm air

  12. Globalization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Beyer

    Looking at religion from a global perspective requires that we first of all be clear about what that implies. What, sociologically,\\u000a can we mean by “global”? A simple answer would be to say that we would be looking at the entire globe as our unit of analysis\\u000a and not only some part of it, but that elaboration does not go

  13. Identification of rock weathering and environmental control in arid catchments (northern Xinjiang) of Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bingqi; Yu, Jingjie; Qin, Xiaoguang; Rioual, Patrick; Zhang, Yichi; Liu, Ziting; Mu, Yan; Li, Hongwei; Ren, Xiaozong; Xiong, Heigang

    2013-04-01

    Chemical weathering is an integral part of the earth surface processes, whose spatial patterns and controlling factors on continental scale are still not fully understood. Highlands of the Asian continent have been shown having some of the highest observed rates of chemical weathering yet reported. However, the paucity of river gauge data in many of these terrains has limited determination of chemical weathering budget in a continental scale. A dataset of three large watersheds throughout northern Xinjiang in Central Asia is used to empirically identify chemical weathering regimes and interpret the underlying controlling factors. Detailed analysis of major ion ratios and a forward model of mass budget procedure are presented to distinguish the relative significances and contributions of silicate, carbonate weathering and evaporite dissolution. The analytical results show that carbonic acid is the most important weathering agent to the studied watersheds. Silicate weathering contributes, on average, ˜17.8% (molar basis) of total cations on a basin wide scale with an order of Zhungarer > Erlqis > Yili, indicating that silicate weathering, however, does not seem to be intense in the study basins. Evaporite dissolution, carbonate weathering and precipitation input contribute 43.6%, 29.7% and 8.9% of the total dissolved cations on average for the whole catchment, respectively. The three main morphological and hydrological units are reflected in water chemistry. Rivers from the montane areas (recharge area) of the three watersheds are very dilute, dominated by carbonate and silicate weathering, whereas the rivers of piedmont areas as well as the rivers of the sedimentary platform (runoff area) are dominated by carbonate weathering, and rivers of desert plain in the central Zhungarer basin (discharge area) are dominated by evaporite dissolution and are SO4 rich. This spatial pattern indicates that, beside lithology, runoff conditions have significant role on the regional chemical weathering regimes. Chemical weathering processes in the areas appear to be significantly climate controlled, displaying a tight correlation with runoff and aridity. Carbonate weathering are mostly influenced by runoff, which is higher in the mountainous part of the studied basins. The identification of chemical weathering regimes from our study confirmed the weathering potential and complexity of temperate watersheds in arid environment and that additional studies of these terrains are warranted. However, because the dominant weathering reactions in the sedimentary platform of northern Xinjiang are of carbonates and evaporites rather than silicate minerals, and the climatic factors have important role on the rock weathering regimes, we think that weathering at the arid temperate drainage system (Central Asia) is maybe not an important long-term sink for atmospheric CO2, if the future climate has no great change.

  14. The composition of the continental river weathering flux deduced from seawater Mg isotopes

    E-print Network

    Paytan, Adina

    weathering flux, particularly carbonate versus silicate weathering. Preliminary results suggest of major seawater constituents such as calcium (Zhu and Macdougall, 1998) and magnesium (Galy et al., 2001 of the cycling of magnesium and calcium is particularly relevant to understanding the role of calcium

  15. Pedogenesis and weathering rates of a Histic Andosol in Iceland: Field and experimental soil solution study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bergur Sigfusson; Sigurdur R. Gislason; Graeme I. Paton

    2008-01-01

    It is important to study the rate determining processes of chemical weathering and soil formation in volcanic islands since a significant part of the carbon fixed by chemical weathering of silicates on Earth is fixed at the surface of volcanic islands. These soils are fertile and much of the river suspended matter delivered to the ocean stems from these islands.

  16. Reconnaissance of Field Sites for the Study of Chemical Weathering on the Guayana Shield, South America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steefell

    2003-01-01

    Despite the fact that chemical weathering of silicate rocks plays an important role in the draw-down of COâ over geologic time scales (Berner and Berner, 1996), the overall controls on the rate of chemical weathering are still not completely understood. Lacking a mechanistic understanding of these controls, it remains difficult to evaluate a hypothesis such as that presented by Raymo

  17. Destructive Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    alizabethirwin

    2010-11-03

    What are the effects of different types of destructive weather? Learn All About Hurricanes Record on your chart 3 things that you learned. Watch a Hurricane Video These are the devastating Effects of Hurricanes Learn All About Tornadoes Record on your chart 3 things that you learned. Watch a Tornado Video These are the devastating Effects of tornadoes Learn All About Thunderstorms Record on your chart 3 things that you learned. These are the devastating Effects of thunderstorms Follow these important tips To keep safe. ...

  18. Weather Photography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ph.D. student Harald Edens describes himself as a "photographer of lightning, clouds, atmospheric optical phenomena and astronomy". His Web site entitled Weather Photography proves this by providing a stunning collection of photographs and movies of atmospheric optics, lightning, clouds, and astronomy. The author describes how the photographs were taken, what equipment was used, and even discusses many of the phenomenon being observed such as mirages and halos. An added bonus of this very interesting site is that the author generously allows free personal use of the photographs.

  19. Weather Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This entertaining, interactive website is the perfect tool to educate users about the basics of weather forecasting and reporting. The two educational modules, created by EdHeads, each contain three levels and are designed for grades four through nine. While discovering how to predict a three-day forecast, students learn about warm and cold fronts, wind direction and speed, high and low pressure systems, isobars, and humidity. Teachers can find a helpful guide discussing how best to use the site as well as providing an overview of science standards, lesson plans, and pre- and post-tests for students.

  20. Mountain Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mountains can be awe-inspiring both for the vistas they provide and for the weather events and long-term climate systems they support. This interactive feature illustrates how a moisture-laden air mass interacts with a mountain slope to produce characteristic patterns of precipitation over the mountain and surrounding areas. Viewers can see how clouds and precipitation form as the air mass ascends the windward side of the peak, and observe the rain shadow created on the leeward side by the descending, warmed, and moisture-depleted air. A background essay and list of discussion questions supplement the interactive feature.

  1. Investigating Weather and Climate with Google Earth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Environmental Literacy and Inquiry Working Group at Lehigh University

    In this activity, students use Google Earth to explore global temperature changes during a recent 50 - 58 year period. They also explore, analyze, and interpret climate patterns of 13 different cities, and analyze differences between weather and climate patterns.

  2. Geochemistry of the suspended sediments of circum-himalayan rivers and weathering budgets over the last 50 Myrs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillardet, J.; Métivier, F.; Lemarchand, D.; Dupré, B.; Allègre, C. J.; Li, W.; Zhao, J.

    2003-04-01

    The geochemistry of the Ganges and Brahmaputra system has received a particular attention over the last decade for addressing the role of Himalayan uplift on the global carbon cycle and more generally on the geochemical cycles at the surface of the Earth. However, our knowledge of the large river systems draining the Himalaya and Tibet Plateau is still very poor. In this study, we will present data for the largest rivers of East Asia, including the Huanghe, Changjiang, Zhujiang, Honghe, Mekong, Salween, Irrawady, Ganges and Brahmaputra. We will focus here on the geochemistry of the suspended load analyzed for both major, trace elements and Sr isotopic ratios. Except the Irrawady, all rivers show slight chemical variations and all contains significant calcite. Leaching experiments allowed us to remove the carbonate fraction and to characterize the silicate fraction, derived from the chemical weathering of rocks. The radiogenic character of the Gange and Brahmaputra rivers is not found in the sediments of the other Himalayan rivers, rather close to the mean upper continental value. Using an estimate of the bedrock composition, river sediment chemistry is used to calculate the amount of cations and Sr liberated by silicate chemical weathering. We propose to use this method to reconstruct the history of chemical weathering fluxes over the Cenozoic. For that purpose, the total volume of marine sediments accumulated in 18 offshore sedimentary basins since the beginning of the Cenozoic is used as an history of the mechanical erosion fluxes. This, and the geochemistry of modern rivers enable us to deduce the history of cations and Sr fluxes to the sea derived from the chemical weathering of rocks during that period of time. The impact of these fluxes on the composition of the ocean, and on the evolution of the atmosphere will be presented.

  3. Building a Weather-Ready Nation Winter Weather Safety

    E-print Network

    Building a Weather-Ready Nation Winter Weather Safety NOAA/NWS Winter Weather Safety Seasonal Campaign www.weather.gov #12;Building a Weather-Ready Nation Winter Weather Hazards Winter Weather Safety www.weather.gov · Snow/Ice · Blizzards · Flooding · Cold Temperatures #12;Building a Weather

  4. Final report on the safety assessment of aluminum silicate, calcium silicate, magnesium aluminum silicate, magnesium silicate, magnesium trisilicate, sodium magnesium silicate, zirconium silicate, attapulgite, bentonite, Fuller's earth, hectorite, kaolin, lithium magnesium silicate, lithium magnesium sodium silicate, montmorillonite, pyrophyllite, and zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Amy R

    2003-01-01

    This report reviews the safety of Aluminum, Calcium, Lithium Magnesium, Lithium Magnesium Sodium, Magnesium Aluminum, Magnesium, Sodium Magnesium, and Zirconium Silicates, Magnesium Trisilicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite as used in cosmetic formulations. The common aspect of all these claylike ingredients is that they contain silicon, oxygen, and one or more metals. Many silicates occur naturally and are mined; yet others are produced synthetically. Typical cosmetic uses of silicates include abrasive, opacifying agent, viscosity-increasing agent, anticaking agent, emulsion stabilizer, binder, and suspending agent. Clay silicates (silicates containing water in their structure) primarily function as adsorbents, opacifiers, and viscosity-increasing agents. Pyrophyllite is also used as a colorant. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled Attapulgite fibers >5 microm as possibly carcinogenic to humans, but fibers <5 microm were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. Likewise, Clinoptilolite, Phillipsite, Mordenite, Nonfibrous Japanese Zeolite, and synthetic Zeolites were not classified as to their carcinogenicity to humans. These ingredients are not significantly toxic in oral acute or short-term oral or parenteral toxicity studies in animals. Inhalation toxicity, however, is readily demonstrated in animals. Particle size, fibrogenicity, concentration, and mineral composition had the greatest effect on toxicity. Larger particle size and longer and wider fibers cause more adverse effects. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate was a weak primary skin irritant in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. No gross effects were reported in any of these studies. Sodium Magnesium Silicate had no primary skin irritation in rabbits and had no cumulative skin irritation in guinea pigs. Hectorite was nonirritating to the skin of rabbits in a Draize primary skin irritation study. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate and Sodium Magnesium Silicate caused minimal eye irritation in a Draize eye irritation test. Bentonite caused severe iritis after injection into the anterior chamber of the eyes of rabbits and when injected intralamellarly, widespread corneal infiltrates and retrocorneal membranes were recorded. In a primary eye irritation study in rabbits, Hectorite was moderately irritating without washing and practically nonirritating to the eye with a washout. Rats tolerated a single dose of Zeolite A without any adverse reaction in the eye. Calcium Silicate had no discernible effect on nidation or on maternal or fetal survival in rabbits. Magnesium Aluminum Silicate had neither a teratogenic nor adverse effects on the mouse fetus. Female rats receiving a 20% Kaolin diet exhibited maternal anemia but no significant reduction in birth weight of the pups was recorded. Type A Zeolite produced no adverse effects on the dam, embryo, or fetus in either rats or rabbits at any dose level. Clinoptilolite had no effect on female rat reproductive performance. These ingredients were not genotoxic in the Ames bacterial test system. In primary hepatocyte cultures, the addition of Attapulgite had no significant unscheduled DNA synthesis. Attapulgite did cause significant increases in unscheduled DNA synthesis in rat pleural mesothelial cells, but no significant increase in sister chromosome exchanges were seen. Zeolite particles (<10 microm) produced statistically significant increase in the percentage of aberrant metaphases in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and cells collected by peritoneal lavage from exposed mice. Topical application of Magnesium Aluminum Silicate to human skin daily for 1 week produced no adverse effects. Occupational exposure to mineral dusts has been studied extensively. Fibrosis and pneumoconiosis have been documented in workers involved in the mining and processing of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Zirconium Silicate, Fuller's Earth, Kaolin, Montmorillonite, Pyrophyllite, and Zeolite. The Cosmetic Ingre

  5. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  6. Analysis of a Sheet Silicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, J. M.; Evans, S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a student project in analytical chemistry using sheet silicates. Provides specific information regarding the use of phlogopite in an experiment to analyze samples for silicon, aluminum, magnesium, iron, potassium, and fluoride. (CS)

  7. The Silicate Structures: Chalkboard Demonstration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Liane Stevens

    Three-dimensional, magnetic representations of SiO tetrahedra and cations are manipulated on a chalkboard to create five basic silicate structures. Students are expected to complete a worksheet accompanying the exercise, which addresses silicate structures, bond types and strengths, physical properties (e.g. fracture, cleavage), Si:O ratio and introduction to vocabulary such as "felsic" and "mafic," and mineral formulae. The worksheet and chalkboard demonstration are designed to simplify silicate structures from complex ball-and-stick models typically used in textbook figures, and to grant students a visual, three-dimensional, manipulable, perspective on what tends to be a confusing concept. This exercise may be simplified or expanded to suit timeframe and the needs of the audience. Benefits of this approach include reinforcement of lecture concepts, broad appeal for a student group with multiple learning styles and degrees of knowledge, and strengthened understanding of the silicate structures.

  8. Industry and Government Officials Meet for Space Weather Summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    2008-10-01

    Commercial airlines, electric power grids, cell phones, handheld Global Positioning Systems: Although the Sun is less active due to solar minimum, the number and types of situations and technologies that can benefit from up-to-date space weather information are growing. To address this, the second annual summit of the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group (CSWIG) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) was held on 1 May 2008 during Space Weather Workshop (SWW), in Boulder, Colo.

  9. A new ice core proxy of continental weathering and its feedback with atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J.; Seth, B.; Köhler, P.; Willenbring, J. K.; Fischer, H.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of CO2 and its stable carbon isotopes from ice cores revealed large changes of atmospheric CO2 which are closely related to a reorganisation of the global ocean circulation, marine processes and minor contributions in the terrestrial carbon storage. These components dominate the large CO2 amplitudes during glacial/interglacial terminations. Yet, on longer orbital time scales, CO2 is also modulated by the alkalinity of the ocean system. The net alkalinity influx to the ocean is driven by silicate weathering, which draws down atmospheric CO2 and provides alkalinity in the form of bicarbonate ions. Conversely, alkalinity is lost during coral reef growth and when CaCO3 is buried in marine sediments. On orbital time scales, these fluxes are assumed to be almost balanced as atmospheric CO2 and its climatic effects feed back on the weathering rates providing a negative feedback loop. Besides these basic concepts, little is known about the magnitude of weathering rate fluctuations on orbital time scales. To date, proxies from marine sediments and Fe-Mn crusts that faithfully record the ocean composition over glacial interglacial cycles do not quantify the total weathering fluxes to the ocean but only indicate that the style of weathering or the source area of sediment has changed. Due to large spatial heterogeneity, individual field site measurements do not elucidate global fluxes of weathering products to the ocean and how those might affect atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here, we use a novel approach using the pptv-level trace gas CF4, which can be analysed in air trapped in ice cores. CF4 is a trace impurity in granites and other plutonic rocks, and during weathering this gas escapes into the atmosphere. In preindustrial times, weathering of granitic rocks was the only natural source of CF4. Because CF4 is inert to destruction processes in the tropo- and stratospheres, its only sink is destruction by UV radiation in the mesosphere. This chemical inertness is responsible for an exceptionally long atmospheric lifetime which is expected to range between 50 kyr and 400 kyr. We developed a vacuum melt-extraction system for ice core samples coupled to a mass spectrometry detector to precisely measure the trace amounts of CF4 found in past atmosphere. During the last 800 kyr, the atmospheric CF4 concentrations varied in a narrow band between 31 ppt and 35 ppt, i.e. only 10-15 % variability, providing a first estimate of the long-term weathering rate fluctuations. On closer inspection, our CF4 record, however, shows a pronounced shift toward higher CF4 levels after 430 kyr (the Mid-Brunhes Event). With the beginning of Marine Isotope stage 11, we find a steep rise in CF4 that probably relates to intense weathering during the first interglacial, where CO2 reached 280 ppm and sea level may have been even higher than today. Further, our record shows that CF4 concentrations, and thus weathering, increases during interglacials and falls during the coldest, glacial phases. This dataset lends support to a strong positive coupling of continental weathering rates during warmer climate conditions at high CO2 levels.

  10. World weather program: Plan for fiscal year 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The World Weather Program which is composed of the World Weather Watch, the Global Atmospheric Research Program, and the Systems Design and Technological Development Program is presented. The U.S. effort for improving the national weather services through advances in science, technology and expanded international cooperation during FY 72 are described. The activities of the global Atmospheric Research Program for last year are highlighted and fiscal summary of U.S. programs is included.

  11. Yaquina Bay Weather & Tides

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Yaquina Bay Weather & Tides Clay Creech Phil Barbour #12;HMSC Weather Station #12;Temp-Humidity Sensor at Library #12;http://weather.hmsc.oregonstate.edu #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Archived Data is Available every 15 mins. #12;#12;A pyranometer measures solar radiation #12;#12;National Weather Service

  12. Weather in Your Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kannegieter, Sandy; Wirkler, Linda

    Facts and activities related to weather and meteorology are presented in this unit. Separate sections cover the following topics: (1) the water cycle; (2) clouds; (3) the Beaufort Scale for rating the speed and force of wind; (4) the barometer; (5) weather prediction; (6) fall weather in Iowa (sleet, frost, and fog); (7) winter weather in Iowa…

  13. Comparative pathology of silicate pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, C.; Abraham, J.; Brambilla, E.; Benirschke, K.; Bloor, C.

    1979-01-01

    A simple pneumoconiosis with lamellar birefringent crystals was observed in animals dying in the San Diego Zoo. We studied 100 autopsies from 11 mammalian and eight avian species. In mammals, mild pulmonary lesions comprised crystal-laden macrophages in alveoli and lymphatics. Interstitial fibrosis was present in 20% of cases. There were no nodules. In birds, dust retention produced large granulomas around tertiary bronchi without fibrosis. Mineralogic analysis using scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed most of the crystals to be silicates. Ninety percent were complex silicates, with aluminum-potassium silicates comprising 70% of the analyzed particles. Electron and x-ray diffraction showed the silicates to be muscovite mica and its hydrothermal degradation product, ie, illite clay. This mica was also present on filtration membranes of atmospheric air samples obtained from the San Diego Zoo. The amount of dust retention was related to the animal's age, anatomic or ecologic variances, and length of stay in the San Diego Zoo. Its semidesert atmosphere is rich in silicates, which are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. Similar mica-induced lesions are found in humans living in this region or the Southwest of the USA. This simple pneumoconiosis is likely to be widespread in human populations living in desert or semidesert climates. Images Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:223447

  14. What's the Weather?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    In this lesson, students use daily observations, videos, and activities to learn about meteorology and the changing nature of weather. They will also identify weather events that are commonly reported in the news and discuss how weather affects lives. They should understand that weather can change daily and weather patterns change over the seasons, and that it has characteristics that can be measured and predicted. Suggestions for an optional field trip are also provided.

  15. Australian Severe Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Australian Severe Weather Web site is maintained by self proclaimed severe weather enthusiasts Michael Bath and Jimmy Deguara. Other weatherphobes will fully appreciate what the authors have assembled. Everything from weather images, storm news, tropical cyclone data, bush fire and wild fire information, weather observation techniques, and even video clips and Web cam links. Although these other items make the site well rounded, the extensive amount of categorized weather pictures (which are quite extraordinary) are reason enough to visit.

  16. GPS as a Weather Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2013-12-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) stations are not just useful for studying how tectonic plates and glaciers surge or creep or how land deforms as magma runs below it. They also are rapidly becoming important sensors for monitoring the terrestrial water cycle (see "Using GPS to study the terrestrial water cycle," pages 505-506). What is more, they can help study and forecast weather, according to scientists who presented their work at AGU's 2013 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

  17. Faint young Sun and the carbon cycle: implication for the Proterozoic global glaciations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajika, Eiichi

    2003-09-01

    The Earth may have been globally ice-covered several times during the Proterozoic. While the Neoproterozoic and the Paleoproterozoic glaciations may have been 'snowball' Earth events, there is no evidence for such glaciation during the Phanerozoic. It might be hypothesized that a dimmer Sun earlier in Earth's history may have made the Earth more susceptible to global glaciation. In this paper, the roles of solar flux and soil biological activity in the carbon cycle and the climate during the Proterozoic are investigated using a simple carbon geochemical cycle model with a one-dimensional energy balance climate model. The results indicate, perhaps counterintuitively, that the Proterozoic Earth, with its dimmer Sun, was not more susceptible to 'snowball glaciation'. Metamorphic and volcanic CO 2 fluxes accumulate in the atmosphere and ocean until such time that those inputs are balanced by silicate weathering followed by carbonate precipitation and net organic carbon burial. Because of the dependence of weathering rates on climatic conditions, changes in geologic CO 2 inputs have a large influence on climatic conditions. In contrast, slow variation in solar flux has relatively little long-term impact on climate, because of large compensating changes in atmospheric CO 2 level. A reduction in CO 2 inputs lowers atmospheric CO 2 level, which finally initiates global glaciation. The atmospheric CO 2 level at the critical condition for a globally ice-covered state would have been high during the Proterozoic. However, roughly the same amount of CO 2 flux reduction is required for both the Proterozoic and the Phanerozoic. This is essentially because the temperatures at the critical condition are very low, hence the silicate weathering rate (which should balance with a net CO 2 input rate in a steady state) is also very low, regardless of the variation in solar flux. Furthermore, the effect of the lower solar flux on the CO 2 input rate at the critical condition would have been largely canceled by a lower efficiency of the silicate weathering rate due to lower soil biological activity during the Proterozoic. As a result, CO 2 flux conditions for initiating the global glaciation may be similar during both the Proterozoic and the Phanerozoic. Therefore, the explanation for the susceptibility of the Proterozoic Earth to 'snowball' conditions cannot hinge simply on the dimmer Sun; we must look to other differences in behaviors of the carbon cycle and the climate between these two ages.

  18. Progress in Space Weather Predictions and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstedt, H.

    The methods of today's predictions of space weather and effects are so much more advanced and yesterday's statistical methods are now being replaced by integrated knowledge-based neurocomputing and MHD methods. Within in the ESA Space Weather Programme Study a real-time forecast service has been developed of space weather and effects. This prototype is now being implemented for specific users. Today's applications are not only so many more but also so much more advanced and user-oriented. A scientist asks for a real-time predictions of a global index as input for a MHD model calculating the radiation dose for EVAs. A power system operator asks for a prediction of the local value of a geomagnetically induced current. A science tourist wants to know whether or not aurora will occur. Soon we might even be able to predict the tropospheric weather and climate changes from the variation of the space weather.

  19. Progress in space weather predictions and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstedt, H.

    The methods of today's predictions of space weather and effects are so much more advanced and yesterday's statistical methods are now replaced by integrated knowledge-based neuro-computing models and MHD methods. Within the ESA Space Weather Programme Study a real-time forecast service has been developed for space weather and effects. This prototype is now being implemented for specific users. Today's applications are not only so many more but also so much more advanced and user-oriented. A scientist needs real-time predictions of a global index as input for an MHD model calculating the radiation dose for EVAs. A power company system operator needs a prediction of the local value of a geomagnetically induced current. A science tourist needs to know whether or not aurora will occur. Soon we might even be able to predict the tropospheric climate changes and weather caused by the space weather.

  20. Weather Camp 2012 "Weather and Climate All Around Us"

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Weather Camp 2012 "Weather and Climate All Around Us" Are you interested in the weather? Come to Weather Camp at UNL What is Weather Camp? For more information Weather camp is a week long day camp for students who will be 11-14 years old at the time of the camp Most of the activities at Weather Camp 2012

  1. Nanoporus Silicate Frameworks Nanoporous Copper Silicates with One-Dimen-

    E-print Network

    Wang, Xiqu

    layers and chains. We have reported examples that contain VO2+ ,[6­8] NbFO2+ ,[9] UO2 2+ ,[10,11] and [VO, and their potential use as components in advanced nanocomposites.[1­4] Nanoporous transition-metal silicates and catalytic properties introduced by the transition-metal centers.[4,5] We have recently developed a strategy

  2. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    DOEpatents

    Delnick, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); Reinhardt, Frederick W. (Albuquerque, NM); Odinek, Judy G. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  3. Chemical Weathering, Atmospheric Carbon Fluxes and River Geochemistry of Sandstone of Nanjing Purple Mountain River System, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon is the essential element of life on Earth. Weathering of silicate rocks acts as a net carbon sink of the integrated global carbon cycle in the geological time scale. The chemical composition of river can provide us sources of major ions, chemical weathering rates of watershed and the consuming rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Accordingly, we choose Nanjing Purple Mountain River System to analyze chemical characteristics of the river water, the consuming rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide and some representative characteristics of rocks and soils. We have got Sodium normalized value for major elements of sandstone weathering, which can provide basis for calculating different endmenbers for large river systems in the world. We found the variation between river water samples, rock samples and soil samples by using several measurement methods and analysis methods. We conclude that: (1) The weathering of sandstone is weak. The contributes of sandstone for river are that Ca/Na:1.5-3, Mg/Na:0.5-1.5, K/Na:0.02-0.1(after sodium normalized). (2) We suggest that there is interference from atmospheric dust input by analyzing those rock samples and soil samples. (3)The rates of chemical weathering are controlled by both temperature and humidity. (4) The consuming rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide is 1.40×105mol/yr. (5) Strontium isotope provides that n(87Sr)/n(86Sr) is between 0.710557×7 and 0.710955×2. Moreover, the concentration of strontium is over 1?mol/L, and the average value is 2.29?mol/L, which suggests that relatively high concentration and isotope ratio.

  4. Inorganic Plant Nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Silicate Introduction

    E-print Network

    Jochem, Frank J.

    Lab 3: Inorganic Plant Nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Silicate Introduction Compounds of nitrogen base cations (calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium) are generally in sufficient supply in seawater. Silicate can play a regulating role in the growth of such organisms that carry shells of silicate. Most

  5. Pilot weather advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, W. A.; Seth, S.; Crabill, N. L.; Shipley, S. T.; Graffman, I.; Oneill, J.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the work performed by ViGYAN, Inc., to demonstrate the Pilot Weather Advisor cockpit weather data system using a broadcast satellite communication system are presented. The Pilot Weather Advisor demonstrated that the technical problems involved with transmitting significant amount of weather data to an aircraft in-flight or on-the-ground via satellite are solvable with today's technology. The Pilot Weather Advisor appears to be a viable solution for providing accurate and timely weather information for general aviation aircraft.

  6. Space Weather FX

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Space Weather FX is a vodcast (video podcast) series that explores the science of space weather and how it can impact our every day lives. Episodes include Space Weather and its Effects, Connecting the Sun and Earth, When Space Weather Attacks, Stratospheric Sudden Warming, A Tour of Haystack's Radars, GPS and Space Weather, It Came from the Sun, and The Big Picture. The site also contain links to space weather information and educational materials. The episodes will run on one of four free video players.

  7. The Weather Man

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Emma Grasser

    2012-09-27

    This project is designed to let you be "The Weather Man" and control the weather through simulation, and hands on experience, followed by guided questioning and resource exploration. Form groups of three. Explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper. 1. How does humility play a role in weather? How does more or less change weather? 2. What is water vapor? Where does it come from? 3. What happens when the weather drops below zero degrees? ...

  8. Edheads: Weather Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    This great interactive resource allows you multiple opportunities to explore weather related concepts. After clicking start, you will learn how to report and predict the weather at the underground W.H.E.D weather caves! Each activity has three different levels, and each level is harder than the one before it. This resource also includes a teacher's guide (with pre- and post- tests) and links to additional weather related resources. These include a weather glossary, a Fahrenheit to Celsius & Celsius to Fahrenheit converter, and a link that provides information about interesting people in the weather field.

  9. Science Sampler: Weather RATS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mary Taft

    2006-02-01

    Weather RATS, or Weather Research and Tracking Systems, is a collaborative effort among a national network of K-12 students, their teachers, wireless weather stations, internet data sharing, and professional engineers and meteorologists. Weather Rats is a new way to teach K-12 science and technology by tracking and comparing weather data from schools in Massachusetts, Arizona, Oklahoma, and Puerto Rico. In addition, it is hoped through this enriching project that Weather RATS will inspire many more students, especially girls and minorities, to pursue careers in science and engineering as a result of this project.

  10. Amended Silicated for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

    2006-12-31

    Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly ash is sold as a by-product.

  11. Hydrochemical and Isotopic Constraints on the Temporal and Spatial Variability of Chemical Weathering and CO2 Fluxes: An Example From the Australian Victorian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, B.; Cartwright, I.

    2007-12-01

    Water from a network of 11 pristine rivers draining the Australian Victorian Alps was collected at different locations during (i) high discharge (June 2006) and (ii) low discharge (February 2007) conditions and was analyzed for dissolved major ions, ?2H and ?18O, and ?34S of dissolved sulphate. River water chemistry implies that solutes are largely derived from precipitation and chemical weathering of silicate lithologies. Cl/Br ratios as low as 30 molar suggest that rivers have not dissolved halite, however, higher salinity (?100 mmol/L) winter samples have intermediate Cl/Br ratios (600 to 2000 molar) that are attributed to minor halite dissolution at the onset of the rainy season. Subsequent mixing of river water homogenizes ratios and evaporation is the dominant process that increases downstream salinities. Oxygen and Hydrogen isotopes also indicate that mixing and evaporation have occurred. Despite the lack of carbonate outcrops in the study area and uniform negative calcite saturation indices, the dissolution of hydrothermal calcite may account for up to 67% of the total dissolved cations, generating up to 92% of all dissolved Ca and Mg. The sulphur isotope data (16 to 20°CDT) indicates that the dissolved SO4 is derived predominantly from atmospheric deposition and minor gypsum weathering and not from bacterial reduction of FeS. This militates against sulphuric acid weathering in Victorian rivers. Si/(Na* + K*) ratios suggest that silicate weathering is dominated by the transformation of plagioclase (An40) to smectite and, to a lesser extend, the production of kaolinite. In total, chemical weathering consumes 17.6 x 106 (summer) to 71.59 x 106(winter) mol/km2/yr CO2, with the highest values in rivers draining the basement outcrops rather than sedimentary rocks. This range is at the upper end of the global scale and shows that the predominance of fresh silicate lithologies exerts the main control on higher CO2 fluxes; temperature and runoff, in turn, are crucial variables for the inter- seasonal variability in this region. Data on discharge and major ion chemistry, measured in regular intervals between 1977 and 1990, support this; however, the timing of absolute maxima of Si/(Na* + K*) and CO2 flux peaks do not coincide. We suggest that the combination of dissolution of diatoms that precipitated under low flow- and high temperature conditions in the tributaries and Na-adsorption by suspended clay particles, that were probably redistributed locally after bushfires and/or duststorms during drought periods in the early 1980's, as mechanisms to spontaneously elevate Si/(Na* + K*) ratios and, when coupled with irregular discharge fluctuations, explain deviations from seasonal CO2 fluxes.

  12. Weather Camp 2012: Weather and Climate All Around Us Are you interested in the weather?

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Weather Camp 2012: Weather and Climate All Around Us Are you interested in the weather? Come to Weather Camp at UNL! What is Weather Camp? For more information Weather camp is a week-long day camp for students who will be 11-14 years old at the time of the camp. Most of the activities at Weather Camp 2012

  13. Recent work on the evolution of the global climate during the Cenozoic era has focused almost exclusively on the possible per-

    E-print Network

    Warrick, Douglas R.

    Himalayan ero- sion and weathering has had a significantly larger effect on the carbon cycle than silicate back mechanism for the long-term stabilization of Earth's surface temperature. J. Geophys. Res. 86 exclusively on the possible per- turbation of atmospheric CO2 levels resulting from weathering of silicates

  14. Winter Weather: Frostbite

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Matters What's New A - Z Index Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... related health problems. More Information: Hypothermia Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ...

  15. Winter Weather Emergencies

    MedlinePLUS

    Severe winter weather can lead to health and safety challenges. You may have to cope with Cold related health problems, including ... there are no guarantees of safety during winter weather emergencies, you can take actions to protect yourself. ...

  16. Favorite Demonstration: Differential Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mark Francek

    2002-10-01

    In this inquiry-based demonstration, the consumption of a Baby Ruth candy bar is used to nurture students' interest in chemical and physical weathering. In addition, two other concepts can be illustrated: the difference between weathering and erosion and

  17. Owlie Skywarn's Weather Book

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cris Garcia

    2001-06-22

    This is an online activity book from the National Weather Service that teaches about hazardous weather. The site also includes links to kids sites for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency (NOAA).

  18. On Observing the Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Peter Crane

    2004-05-01

    In this article, Mount Washington Observatory meteorologist Tim Markle shares the ins and outs of his daily weather-observing routine and offers insights on making weather observations at home or at school.

  19. High-latitude filtering in a global grid-point model using model normal modes. [Fourier filters for synoptic weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takacs, L. L.; Kalnay, E.; Navon, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    A normal modes expansion technique is applied to perform high latitude filtering in the GLAS fourth order global shallow water model with orography. The maximum permissible time step in the solution code is controlled by the frequency of the fastest propagating mode, which can be a gravity wave. Numerical methods are defined for filtering the data to identify the number of gravity modes to be included in the computations in order to obtain the appropriate zonal wavenumbers. The performances of the model with and without the filter, and with a time tendency and a prognostic field filter are tested with simulations of the Northern Hemisphere winter. The normal modes expansion technique is shown to leave the Rossby modes intact and permit 3-5 day predictions, a range not possible with the other high-latitude filters.

  20. A Milestone in Commercial Space Weather: USTAR Center for Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.; Thompson, D. C.; Scherliess, L.; Zhu, L.; Gardner, L. C.

    2009-12-01

    As of 2009, Utah State University (USU) hosts a new organization to develop commercial space weather applications using funding that has been provided by the State of Utah’s Utah Science Technology and Research (USTAR) initiative. The USTAR Center for Space Weather (UCSW) is located on the USU campus in Logan, Utah and is developing innovative applications for mitigating adverse space weather effects in technological systems. Space weather’s effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the Sun’s photons, particles, and fields. Of the space environment domains that are affected by space weather, the ionosphere is the key region that affects communication and navigation systems. The UCSW has developed products for users of systems that are affected by space weather-driven ionospheric changes. For example, on September 1, 2009 USCW released, in conjunction with Space Environment Technologies, the world’s first real-time space weather via an iPhone app. Space WX displays the real-time, current global ionosphere total electron content along with its space weather drivers; it is available through the Apple iTunes store and is used around the planet. The Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) system is now being run operationally in real-time at UCSW with the continuous ingestion of hundreds of global data streams to dramatically improve the ionosphere’s characterization. We discuss not only funding and technical advances that have led to current products but also describe the direction for UCSW that includes partnering opportunities for moving commercial space weather into fully automated specification and forecasting over the next half decade.

  1. Space Weathering on Icy Satellites in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Roger N.; Perlman, Zachary; Pearson, Neil; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2014-11-01

    Space weathering produces well-known optical effects in silicate minerals in the inner Solar System, for example, on the Moon. Space weathering from solar wind and UV is expected to be weaker in the outer Solar System simply because intensities are lower. However, cosmic rays from inner to outer solar system would be similar to first order. Similarly with micrometeoroid bombardment. That, combined with the much higher volatility of icy surfaces means there is the potential for space weathering on icy outer Solar System surfaces to show optical effects. The Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn is providing evidence for space weathering on icy bodies. The Cassini VIMS instrument has spatially mapped satellite surfaces and the rings from .35-5 microns and the UVIS instrument from 0.1 to 0.2 microns. These data have sampled a complex mixing space between H2O ice and non-ice components and they show some common spectral properties. Similarly, spectra of the icy Galilean satellites and satellites in the Uranian system have some commonality in spectral properties with those in the Saturn system. The UV absorber is spectrally similar on many surfaces. VIMS has identified CO2, H2 and trace organics in varying abundances on Saturn's satellites. We postulate that through the spatial relationships of some of these compounds that they are created and destroyed through space weathering effects. For example, the trapped H2 and CO2 observed by VIMS in regions with high concentrations of dark material may in part be space weathering products from the destruction of H2O and organic molecules. The dark material, particularly on Iapetus which has the highest concentration in the Saturn system, is well matched by space-weathered silicates in the .4-2.6 micron range, and the spectral shapes closely match those of the most mature lunar soils, another indicator of space weathered material.

  2. Space Weathering: A Lesson from Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, S.; Hiroi, T.; Nimura, T.

    Reflectance spectra of S-type asteroids are different from those of ordinary chondrites There are also spectral differences between lunar rocks and soils of the similar composition These spectral mismatches are explained by the so-called space weathering S-type asteroids exhibit more overall depletion and reddening of spectra and more weakening of absorption bands relative to ordinary chondrites Formation of nanophase metallic iron particles due to high velocity dust impacts as well as sputtering by solar wind would be responsible for the spectral change We succeeded in reproducing the spectral change expected in space weathering using nano-second pulse laser irradiation on silicates simulating high-velocity dust impacts We confirmed the formation of nanophase iron particles using TEM Sasaki S et al 2001 Nature 410 555-557 We considered regolith-like surface condition is essential for space weathering since evaporated materials may condense with nano-iron particles on the surfaces of other particles The size-dependent transition from Q-type ordinary chondrite-like objects to S-type objects also suggested that regolith is scarce abundant on objects smaller larger than the transition size Binzel R P et al 2004 Icarus 170 259-294 In 2005 Hayabusa spacecraft rendezvoused an S-type asteroid 25143 Itokawa with size of 550m and performed a color imaging by onboard camera AMICA Approximately 80 of Itokawa s surface is rough and boulder-rich but it has a somewhat weathered

  3. Fire Weather Climatology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2008-04-28

    The “Fire Weather Climatology” module provides a comprehensive look at fire regions across the United States and characteristics of typical fire seasons in each region. In addition, critical fire weather patterns are described in terms of their development, duration and impact on fire weather. Numerous case studies provide examples and opportunities to practice recognizing these critical patterns and how they can affect fire ignition and spread. This module is part of the Advanced Fire Weather Forecasters Course.

  4. Enviropedia: Introduction to Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-12-12

    This resource provides an overview of weather, the day-to-day changes in temperature, air pressure, moisture, wind, cloudiness, rainfall and sunshine. Links embedded in the text provide access to descriptions of cloud types and to information on weather hazards such as fog, hurricanes, thunderstorms, and tornadoes. Other topics include meteorology, weather measurements, and weather mapping. Materials are also provided on the water cycle and its elements, such as evaporation, uplift and cooling of air, dew point, condensation, and precipitation.

  5. Weather and Road Management

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    Anticipating and dealing with weather and the hazards it creates is a real challenge for those in departments of transportation. This module gives road and highway managers a basic understanding of meteorology and weather hazards so that they can better interpret weather forecast information used to make road management decisions. The module also highlights web-based forecast products available from the National Weather Service that can help in the decision-making process.

  6. Stormfax Weather Services

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-06-10

    This site offers links to a variety of weather information, including national, international and local weather maps and forecasts, satellite and radar imagery, and severe weather warnings. There are also links to diverse resources such as fire maps, glacier inventories, snow depths, storm surges and tropical storms. There are reports and advisories about El Nino and La Nina. The site also has a glossary of weather terms and conversion charts for temperature, wind speed and atmospheric pressure.

  7. Weathering and Erosion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Medina, Philip

    This unit provides an introduction for younger students to the concepts of weathering and erosion. Topics include types of weathering (physical versus chemical), rates of weathering, and weathering products (soil). The section on erosion explains the importance of water and gravity in the process, and discusses some of the more important erosional agents such as wind, water and ice, streams and glaciers. A vocabulary list and downloadable, printable student worksheets are provided.

  8. Isotopic variations in the recent sediment of the Caspian Sea: a record of Quaternary continental weathering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret-Neboit, M.; Chabaux, F. J.; Leroy, S.

    2010-12-01

    The region of the Caspian Sea was subject to important climatic and sea-level changes during the Late Quaternary, which remain so far still poorly understood. This study presents combined mineralogical, chemical, isotopic (87Sr/86Sr and U-Th disequilibria series) and palynological analyses on bulk sediments and on distinct mineral phases (carbonates and clays) from a 10-m-long core drilled in the southern Caspian Sea and containing Late Pleistocene and Holocene records. The data allowed us to identify 1) the main variations in sedimentations, 2) the processes causing these variations, and possibly 3) the influence of climatic and/or Caspian Sea level changes in the region since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The chemical and mineralogical results allowed the division of the sedimentary sequence into three main units and a transition zone. The lower unit (U1) consists primarily of silicate and carbonate-rich detritus. Sedimentation was relatively constant during U1: the detritus are in secular equilibrium resulting from mechanical erosion in cold climate. U1 corresponds probably to the Khvalynian Transgression, the main transgression in the Caspian Sea during the Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene period. Vegetation cover was sparse and winds were strong. The global increase of temperatures and the decrease of the Caspian water level have modified the sedimentation in the Caspian Sea. Biogenic sedimentation is higher in U2 and U3, and detritus differs from U1. Variations in detrital input are likely caused by decreasing aeolian contribution and by the shrinking of the catchment area of the Caspian Sea. The U-Th disequilibrium of bulk sediments, carbonates and clays has shown an increase of chemical weathering since about 10 ka BP, corresponding to a global warming and to installation of forests in the S and SW of the Caspian Sea watershed. During the same time, the biogenic sedimentation increase strongly, the nature and origin of detrital particles have changed (reflecting for instance decrease of aeolian inputs, change in the catchment area of the main rivers), as well as the physical/chemical weathering ratio. The study of geochemical and isotopic variations in the sediment of the Caspian Sea have allowed to understand the processes having induced these variations: 1) the relation with the Caspian Sea level changes and especially with the Khvalynian transgression, and 2) the influence of the main climatic changes. Our results suggest an evolution of the continental weathering conditions in the drainage basin of the Caspian Sea from mechanical/physical erosion during the cold LMG period to a continuous increase of weathering since about 10,000 yr ago, as climate improved, which illustrates the strong relation between climate, vegetation cover and weathering processes.

  9. Effects of ionization on silicate glasses. [Silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Primak, W.

    1982-02-01

    This evaluation of radiation effects in silicate glasses caused by ionization is based on our own investigations, on material collected in our files (reports, articles, and notes), and on a computer literature search through recent issues of Physics Abstracts and Chemical Abstracts (and the apparently pertinent references which appeared). Some of our recent results, available heretofore only in internal correspondence, are presented in some detail. It is concluded that research into the behavior of silicate glasses generally will be required before the specific effects in the radioactive waste storage glasses can be properly understood and evaluated. Two particular neglected areas of investigation are targeted for immediate concern: a kinetic analysis of annealing data and the acquisition of data on effects of irradiation at controlled elevated temperatures.

  10. Extreme Weather on Earth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Anna Mika

    In this activity, students utilize a set of photographs and a 30 minute video on weather to investigate extreme weather events. They are posed with a series of questions that ask them to identify conditions predictive of these events, and record them on a worksheet. Climate and weather concepts defined.

  11. METEOROLOGICAL Weather and Forecasting

    E-print Network

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Weather and Forecasting EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary and interpretation of information from National Weather Service watches and warnings by10 decision makers such an outlier to the regional severe weather climatology. An analysis of the synoptic and13 mesoscale

  12. Weather Fundamentals: Meteorology. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) looks at how meteorologists gather and interpret current weather data collected from sources…

  13. Severe Weather Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Karol

    Severe weather is an element of nature that cannot be controlled. Therefore, it is important that the general public be aware of severe weather and know how to react quickly and appropriately in a weather emergency. This study, done in the community surrounding the Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, was conducted to compile and analyze…

  14. Hot Weather Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Form - A A + A You are here Home HOT Weather Tips Printer-friendly version We all suffer in hot weather. However, for elderly and disabled people and ... stress and following these tips for dealing with hot weather. Wear cool clothing: See that the person ...

  15. Weather Maps in Motion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Charles Burrows

    In this activity, students learn to interpret current weather maps. They will observe weather map loop animations on the internet, learn the concept of Zulu time (Universal Time Coordinated, UTC) and visualize the movement of fronts and air masses. They will then analyze a specific weather station model, generate a meteogram from their observations, and answer a set of questions about their observations.

  16. American Weather Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Patrick

    Weather has shaped United States' culture, national character and folklore; at times it has changed the course of history. The seven accounts compiled in this publication highlight some of the nation's weather experiences from the hurricanes that threatened Christopher Columbus to the peculiar run of bad weather that has plagued American…

  17. Space Weather Now

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Space Environment Center

    The Space Weather Now page is intended to give the non-technical user a "plain language" look at space weather. It includes information about relevant events and announcements, data from and about different instruments and satellites watching various aspects of space weather, alerts and advisories, daily themes of products and services, and links appropriate for the various groups of users.

  18. Climate and Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Geographic

    This video discusses the differences between climate and weather by defining and presenting examples of each. When presenting examples of weather, the video focuses on severe events and how meteorologists predict and study the weather using measurement, satellites, and radar. The climate focus is primarily on an overview of climate zones.

  19. Aviation weather services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    The primary responsibilities of the National Weather Service (NWS) are to: provide warnings of severe weather and flooding for the protection of life and property; provide public forecasts for land and adjacent ocean areas for planning and operation; and provide weather support for: production of food and fiber; management of water resources; production, distribution and use of energy; and efficient and safe air operations.

  20. Characterization of Fungal Community Structure on a Weathered Pegmatitic Granite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deirdre B. Gleeson; Nicholas Clipson; Karrie Melville; Geoffrey M. Gadd; Frank P. McDermott

    2005-01-01

    This study exploited the contrasting major element chemistry of adjacent, physically separable crystals of framework and sheet\\u000a silicates in a pegmatitic granite to investigate the mineralogical influences of fungal community structure on mineral surfaces.\\u000a Large intact crystals of variably weathered muscovite, plagioclase, K-feldspar, and quartz were individually extracted, together\\u000a with whole-rock granite. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) revealed a diversity

  1. Convective Weather Avoidance with Uncertain Weather Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karahan, Sinan; Windhorst, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Convective weather events have a disruptive impact on air traffic both in terminal area and in en-route airspaces. In order to make sure that the national air transportation system is safe and efficient, it is essential to respond to convective weather events effectively. Traffic flow control initiatives in response to convective weather include ground delay, airborne delay, miles-in-trail restrictions as well as tactical and strategic rerouting. The rerouting initiatives can potentially increase traffic density and complexity in regions neighboring the convective weather activity. There is a need to perform rerouting in an intelligent and efficient way such that the disruptive effects of rerouting are minimized. An important area of research is to study the interaction of in-flight rerouting with traffic congestion or complexity and developing methods that quantitatively measure this interaction. Furthermore, it is necessary to find rerouting solutions that account for uncertainties in weather forecasts. These are important steps toward managing complexity during rerouting operations, and the paper is motivated by these research questions. An automated system is developed for rerouting air traffic in order to avoid convective weather regions during the 20- minute - 2-hour time horizon. Such a system is envisioned to work in concert with separation assurance (0 - 20-minute time horizon), and longer term air traffic management (2-hours and beyond) to provide a more comprehensive solution to complexity and safety management. In this study, weather is dynamic and uncertain; it is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. Algorithms are implemented in an air traffic simulation environment to support the research study. The algorithms used are deterministic but periodically revise reroutes to account for weather forecast updates. In contrast to previous studies, in this study convective weather is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. The automated system periodically updates forecasts and reassesses rerouting decisions in order to account for changing weather predictions. The main objectives are to reroute flights to avoid convective weather regions and determine the resulting complexity due to rerouting. The eventual goal is to control and reduce complexity while rerouting flights during the 20 minute - 2 hour planning period. A three-hour simulation is conducted using 4800 flights in the national airspace. The study compares several metrics against a baseline scenario using the same traffic and weather but with rerouting disabled. The results show that rerouting can have a negative impact on congestion in some sectors, as expected. The rerouting system provides accurate measurements of the resulting complexity in the congested sectors. Furthermore, although rerouting is performed only in the 20-minute - 2-hour range, it results in a 30% reduction in encounters with nowcast weather polygons (100% being the ideal for perfectly predictable and accurate weather). In the simulations, rerouting was performed for the 20-minute - 2-hour flight time horizon, and for the en-route segment of air traffic. The implementation uses CWAM, a set of polygons that represent probabilities of pilot deviation around weather. The algorithms were implemented in a software-based air traffic simulation system. Initial results of the system's performance and effectiveness were encouraging. Simulation results showed that when flights were rerouted in the 20-minute - 2-hour flight time horizon of air traffic, there were fewer weather encounters in the first 20 minutes than for flights that were not rerouted. Some preliminary results were also obtained that showed that rerouting will also increase complexity. More simulations will be conducted in order to report conclusive results on the effects of rerouting on complexity. Thus, the use of the 20-minute - 2-hour flight time horizon weather avoidance teniques performed in the simulation is expected to provide benefits for short-term weather avoidan

  2. External Resource: Weathering and Erosion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1900-01-01

    This activity includes background information about weathering, as well as simple demonstrations/activities to model how weather conditions contribute to weathering and erosion. Topics include: chemical weathering, dunes, erosion, floods, glaciers, physi

  3. Modifying Silicates for Better Dispersion in Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi

    2005-01-01

    An improved chemical modification has been developed to enhance the dispersion of layered silicate particles in the formulation of a polymer/silicate nanocomposite material. The modification involves, among other things, the co-exchange of an alkyl ammonium ion and a monoprotonated diamine with interlayer cations of the silicate. The net overall effects of the improved chemical modification are to improve processability of the nanocomposite and maximize the benefits of dispersing the silicate particles into the polymer. Some background discussion is necessary to give meaning to a description of this development. Polymer/silicate nanocomposites are also denoted polymer/clay composites because the silicate particles in them are typically derived from clay particles. Particles of clay comprise layers of silicate platelets separated by gaps called "galleries." The platelet thickness is 1 nm. The length varies from 30 nm to 1 m, depending on the silicate. In order to fully realize the benefits of polymer/silicate nanocomposites, it is necessary to ensure that the platelets become dispersed in the polymer matrices. Proper dispersion can impart physical and chemical properties that make nanocomposites attractive for a variety of applications. In order to achieve nanometer-level dispersion of a layered silicate into a polymer matrix, it is typically necessary to modify the interlayer silicate surfaces by attaching organic functional groups. This modification can be achieved easily by ion exchange between the interlayer metal cations found naturally in the silicate and protonated organic cations - typically protonated amines. Long-chain alkyl ammonium ions are commonly chosen as the ion-exchange materials because they effectively lower the surface energies of the silicates and ease the incorporation of organic monomers or polymers into the silicate galleries. This completes the background discussion. In the present improved modification of the interlayer silicate surfaces, the co-ion exchange strengthens the polymer/silicate interface and ensures irreversible separation of the silicate layers. One way in which it does this is to essentially tether one amine of each diamine molecule to a silicate surface, leaving the second amine free for reaction with monomers during the synthesis of a polymer. In addition, the incorporation of alkyl ammonium ions into the galleries at low concentration helps to keep low the melt viscosity of the oligomer formed during synthesis of the polymer and associated processing - a consideration that is particularly important in the case of a highly cross-linked, thermosetting polymer. Because of the chemical bonding between the surface-modifying amines and the monomers, even when the alkyl ammonium ions become degraded at high processing temperature, the silicate layers do not aggregate and, hence, nanometer-level dispersion is maintained.

  4. Investigating impacts of forest fires in Alaska and western Canada on regional weather over the northeastern United States using CAM5 global simulations to constrain transport to a WRF-Chem regional domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhan; Kooperman, Gabriel J.; Pritchard, Michael S.; Russell, Lynn M.; Somerville, Richard C. J.

    2014-06-01

    An aerosol-enabled globally driven regional modeling system has been developed by coupling the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem). In this modeling system, aerosol-enabled CAM5, a state-of-the-art global climate model is downscaled to provide coherent meteorological and chemical boundary conditions for regional WRF-Chem simulations. Aerosol particle emissions originating outside the WRF-Chem domain can be a potentially important nonlocal aerosol source. As a test case, the potential impacts of nonlocal forest fire aerosols on regional precipitation and radiation were investigated over the northeastern United States during the summer of 2004. During this period, forest fires in Alaska and western Canada lofted aerosol particles into the midtroposphere, which were advected across the United States. WRF-Chem simulations that included nonlocal biomass burning aerosols had domain-mean aerosol optical depths that were nearly three times higher than those without, which reduced peak downwelling domain-mean shortwave radiation at the surface by ~25 W m-2. In this classic twin experiment design, adding nonlocal fire plume led to near-surface cooling and changes in cloud vertical distribution, while variations in domain-mean cloud liquid water path were negligible. The higher aerosol concentrations in the simulation with the fire plume resulted in a ~10% reduction in domain-mean precipitation coincident with an ~8% decrease in domain-mean CAPE. A suite of simulations was also conducted to explore sensitivities of meteorological feedbacks to the ratio of black carbon to total plume aerosols, as well as to overall plume concentrations. Results from this ensemble revealed that plume-induced near-surface cooling and CAPE reduction occur in a wide range of conditions. The response of moist convection was very complex because of strong thermodynamic internal variability.

  5. WeatherHawk Weather Station Protocol

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The GLOBE Program, UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)

    2003-08-01

    This resource provides instructions on how to log atmosphere data using a WeatherHawk weather station. A weather station is setup to measure and record atmospheric measurements at 15-minute intervals and can be transferred to the GLOBE program via email. Students can view data for their school that are continuous and show variations within a day. The data collected includes wind speed and direction and pressure thereby supporting a more complete study of meteorology using GLOBE. Students pursue a more extensive set of research investigations.

  6. Chemical Weathering in a Tropical Watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico: I. Long-Term Versus Short-Term Weathering Fluxes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Art F. White; Alex E. Blum; Marjorie S. Schulz; Davison V. Vivit; David A. Stonestrom; Matthew Larsen; Sheila F. Murphy; D. Eberl

    1998-01-01

    The pristine Rio Icacos watershed in the Luquillo Mountains in eastern Puerto Rico has the fastest documented weathering rate of silicate rocks on the Earth’s surface. A regolith propagation rate of 58 m Ma?1, calculated from iso-volumetric saprolite formation from quartz diorite, is comparable to the estimated denudation rate (25–50 Ma?1) but is an order of magnitude faster than the

  7. Fabulous Weather Day

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Candice Marshall

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. After studying weather for three months, we celebrate what we have learned and stretch our thinking further into the weather world around us! Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in their understanding of how the weather works and how it can affect their lives. Our unit focused on guiding students to formulate explanations about animals based on scientific evidence.

  8. Siliceous Protozoan Plates and Scales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marianne S. V. Douglas; John P. Smol

    Siliceous protozoan plates and scales are commonly observed on diatom and chrysophyte microscopic slide preparations, however\\u000a they are rarely included in paleolimnological interpretations. A major deterrent to their full exploitation is that plates\\u000a can rarely be identified to the species level, and at times even generic-level identifications are tentative. This relatively\\u000a coarse taxonomic resolution discourages detailed paleoeoenvironmental interpretations. Hopefully, further

  9. Iron Isotope Fractionation in Artic Weathering Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxel, O. J.; Escoube, R.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Wisch, M.; Miller, C.

    2008-12-01

    While our current knowledge of Fe isotope systematics in rivers is still limited, Fe isotopes provide a new approach to important questions concerning Fe sources, Fe speciation and its bioavailability in the hydrological cycles. Here, we investigated several Arctic rivers for elemental and Fe-isotopic composition with specific emphasis on silicate weathering and organic C content in order to provide new insights into the delivery of trace nutrients, such as Fe, that are important for the biological productivity of the Arctic Ocean. Without such characterization of the present state of the system, future changes in the response of these river systems to global change cannot be properly evaluated. Our Fe isotope systematics results in Siberian rivers, include (1) a time-series of water samples from large rivers (Ob and Lena) focusing on the peak flow that has not yet been investigated despite its critical importance for annual budgets; (2) the colloidal fractions (1 kDa to 0.45 ?m) of rivers and their estuaries in the White Sea, including the Severnaya Dvina River to assess the influence of Fe-rich colloids flocculation on the Fe isotopic composition of the estuarine waters. Dissolved iron fractions (<0.22 ?m) in large rivers have restricted ?56Fe values, with the Ob River varying from -0.29 to 0.01‰, averaging -0.11‰ (n= 20) and the Lena River varying from -0.24 to -0.01‰, averaging -0.11‰ (n=15). These values are slightly lower than bulk silicate earth values (defined at 0.09‰ relative to IRMM-14) and do not display any relationships with ice break-up on the rivers. In contrast, dissolved iron fractions in the Severnaya Dvina River and its tributaries yield more positive ?56Fe values, with values ranging from -0.09 to up to 0.64‰, averaging 0.2‰ (n=19). Small swamp rivers from the South White Sea coast reveal an even higher spread of dissolved ?56Fe values, from -1.1 to +0.8‰ with some clear variations among the various colloidal fractions (1 kDa-10 kDa - 100 kDa). These results, together with the high Fe and DOC concentrations in the water samples, suggest that Fe-redox cycling in soil aquifer, as well as the formation of organic-rich colloids, may impart specific Fe-isotope signatures in dissolved Fe reaching the Artic Ocean. Recent studies (e.g. Fantle and De Paolo, 2004 and Bergquist and Boyle, 2006) have demonstrated that rivers present an isotopically light Fe source to the oceans. Our study further suggests that ?56Fe composition of Artic rivers is not unique and depending on Fe speciation in organo- mineral colloids and their origin, may be characterized by more positive and negative ?56Fe values relative to the crust than previously reported.

  10. Avalanche Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2010-09-30

    Avalanches form through the interaction of snowpack, terrain, and weather, the latter being the focus of this module. The module begins with basic information about avalanches, highlighting weather's role in their development. The rest of the module teaches weather forecasters how to make an avalanche weather forecast, that is, one in which key weather parameters are evaluated for their impact on avalanche potential. The forecasts are used primarily by avalanche forecasters, who integrate them with other information to determine when to issue avalanche hazard warnings. The module contains five cases that let users apply the avalanche weather forecast process to different combinations of snowpack, terrain, and weather conditions. It is a companion to the COMET module "Snowpack and Its Assessment," which describes snowpack development and various assessment techniques.

  11. Plymouth State Weather Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Plymouth State Weather Center provides a variety of weather information, including a tropical weather menu with current and archived data on tropical depressions, storms, or hurricanes in the Atlantic or Eastern Pacific Oceans. An interactive Weather Product Generator allows students to make their own surface data maps and meteograms (24-hour summaries of weather at a specific location), and view satellite imagery. There are also interactive weather maps for the U.S., Canada, and Alaska that display the latest observations, and text servers which provide current written observations for New England and North America. A set of past and current weather data products provides information on minimum and maximum temperatures, wind chill, and heat index. In addition, there are collections of satellite loops/movies, radar/lightning images, loops, and movies, and a set of tutorials on clouds, the sun and its effects on the environment, and balanced atmospheric flows.

  12. Glaciers show direct linkage between erosion rate and chemical weathering fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Suzanne Prestrud

    2005-04-01

    Field studies suggest a linkage between high physical erosion rates and rates of chemical denudation. Mechanical erosion by temperate glaciers is commonly an order of magnitude higher than in mountainous fluvial catchments, leading to an expectation that chemical weathering fluxes should also be high from glacierized basins. Yet solute fluxes from glaciers are not found to be higher than non-glacierized catchments. Application of a model of silicate weathering from glaciers based on mineral surface area production and mineralogy shows that solute fluxes are consistent with the low temperatures, dilute water chemistry, and high mineral surface area production in these environments. Low temperatures reduce silicate-weathering rates; this effect explains the difference between silica fluxes from glaciers and from non-glacierized basins. As in laboratory flow-through reactors, glacial solute flux should depend on surface area production and mineral weathering rate constants. The surface area production is significant: a typical glacial erosion rate and grain-size distribution produces on the order of 10 4 km 2 of mineral surface area per square kilometer per year. This new surface area is highly reactive because mineral weathering rates decline with surface age. Application of the "reactor" model yields results largely consistent with measured solute fluxes for the example of Bench Glacier, Alaska. The model underpredicts potassium fluxes, probably due to accelerated initial dissolution of biotite strained by abrasion. The success of the model in predicting other silicate weathering fluxes reflects the far-from-equilibrium conditions in glacial runoff, such that mineral weathering rate constants are not limited by saturation state. In a small data set from glacial catchments, both annual silica fluxes and mean concentrations increase with water discharge. This suggests that mineral surface area increases with water discharge from glaciers, an effect plausibly linked to erosion rates. Those glaciers for which both erosion rate and silica flux data are available support the idea that production of new reactive mineral surface area by glacial erosion drives silicate weathering fluxes.

  13. Weathering: methods and techniques to measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Arce, P.; Zornoza-Indart, A.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    Surface recession takes place when weathered material is removed from the rocks. In order to know how fast does weathering and erosion occur, a review of several methods, analyses and destructive and non-destructive techniques to measure weathering of rocks caused by physico-chemical changes that occur in bedrocks due to salt crystallization, freezing-thaw, thermal shock, influence of water, wind, temperature or any type of environmental agent leading to weathering processes and development of soils, in-situ in the field or through experimental works in the laboratory are addressed. From micro-scale to macro-scale, from the surface down to more in depth, several case studies on in-situ monitoring of quantification of decay on soils and rocks from natural landscapes (mountains, cliffs, caves, etc) or from urban environment (foundations or facades of buildings, retaining walls, etc) or laboratory experimental works, such as artificial accelerated ageing tests (a.a.e.e.) or durability tests -in which one or more than one weathering agents are selected to assess the material behaviour in time and in a cyclic way- performed on specimens of these materials are summarised. Discoloration, structural alteration, precipitation of weathering products (mass transfer), and surface recession (mass loss) are all products of weathering processes. Destructive (SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, drilling resistance measurement, flexural and compression strength) and Non-destructive (spectrophotocolorimetry, 3D optical surface roughness, Schmidt hammer rebound tester, ultrasound velocity propagation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NMR, X ray computed micro-tomography or CT-scan, geo-radar differential global positioning systems) techniques and characterization analyses (e.g. water absorption, permeability, open porosity or porosity accessible to water) to assess their morphological, physico-chemical, mechanical and hydric weathering; consolidation products or methods to stop or to slow down their weathering or durability and stability of soils and rocks are also topics where the methods and techniques deal with the quantification of weathering. Cultural stone weathering studies contribute substantially to the knowledge of weathering rates revealing the importance of specific weathering agents and weathering factors.

  14. Beyond the Weather Chart: Weathering New Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Amy Bruno

    1996-01-01

    Describes an early childhood educator's approach to teaching children about rain, rainbows, clouds, precipitation, the sun, air, and wind. Recommends ways to organize study topics and describes experiments that can help children better understand the different elements of weather. (MOK)

  15. National Weather Service- Severe Weather Awareness

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website provides access to information designed to protect and prepare individuals from severe weather. Materials presented here include forecasts for aviation and marine interests and the general public, maps, statistical data, educational materials, publications, and links to related sites.

  16. Global Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students learn how the greenhouse effect is related to global warming and how global warming impacts our planet, including global climate change. Extreme weather events, rising sea levels, and how we react to these changes are the main points of focus of this lesson.

  17. Global warming elucidated

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shen

    1995-01-01

    The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. Global warming causes extreme events and bad weather in the near term. In the long term it may cause the earth to transition to another equilibrium state through many

  18. Weather and Atmosphere

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    In this unit, students learn the basics about weather and the atmosphere. They investigate materials engineering as it applies to weather and the choices available to us for clothing to counteract the effects of weather. Students have the opportunity to design and analyze combinations of materials for use in specific weather conditions. In the next lesson, students also are introduced to air masses and weather forecasting instrumentation and how engineers work to improve these instruments for atmospheric measurements on Earth and in space. Then, students learn the distinguishing features of the four main types of weather fronts that accompany high and low pressure air masses and how those fronts are depicted on a weather map. During this specific lesson, students learn different ways that engineers help with storm prediction, analysis and protection. In the final lesson, students consider how weather forecasting plays an important part in their daily lives by learning about the history of weather forecasting and how improvements in weather technology have saved lives by providing advance warning of natural disasters.

  19. Space Weathering of Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  20. Silicate absorption in heavily obscured galaxy nuclei

    E-print Network

    P. F. Roche; C. Packham; D. K. Aitken; R. E. Mason

    2006-10-19

    Spectroscopy at 8-13 microns with T-ReCS on Gemini-S is presented for 3 galaxies with substantial silicate absorption features, NGC 3094, NGC 7172 and NGC 5506. In the galaxies with the deepest absorption bands, the silicate profile towards the nuclei is well represented by the emissivity function derived from the circumstellar emission from the red supergiant, mu Cephei which is also representative of the mid-infrared absorption in the diffuse interstellar medium in the Galaxy. There is spectral structure near 11.2 microns in NGC 3094 which may be due to a component of crystalline silicates. In NGC 5506, the depth of the silicate absorption increases from north to south across the nucleus, suggestive of a dusty structure on scales of 10s of parsecs. We discuss the profile of the silicate absorption band towards galaxy nuclei and the relationship between the 9.7 micron silicate and 3.4 micron hydrocarbon absorption bands.

  1. Silicon Kedge XANES spectra of silicate minerals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dien Li; G. M. Bancroft; M. E. Fleet; X. H. Feng

    1995-01-01

    Silicon K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of a selection of silicate and aluminosilicate minerals have been measured using synchrotron radiation (SR). The spectra are qualitatively interpreted based on MO calculation of the tetrahedral SiO44-cluster. The Si K-edge generally shifts to higher energy with increased polymerization of silicates by about 1.3 eV, but with considerable overlap for silicates of

  2. International Collaboration in Space Weather Situational Awareness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Boteler; Larisa Trichtchenko; Donald Danskin

    2010-01-01

    Space weather is a global phenomena so interntional collaboration is necessary to maintain awareness of potentially dangerous conditions. The Regional Warning Centres (RWCs) of the International Space Environment Service were set up during the International Geophysical Year to alert the scientific community to conditions requiring special measurements. The information sharing continues to this day with URSIGRAM messages exchanged between RWCs

  3. Weather Changing Waves Chartered from Space

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This article explains how the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite has been used to track large-scale ocean waves called Rossby waves. This new data indicates that the waves may move faster than previously thought, which may have implications for global weather forecasting. Links to related sites are provided.

  4. Tales of future weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeleger, W.; van den Hurk, B. J. J. M.; Min, E.; van Oldenborgh, G. J.; Petersen, A. C.; Stainforth, D. A.; Vasileiadou, E.; Smith, L. A.

    2015-02-01

    Society is vulnerable to extreme weather events and, by extension, to human impacts on future events. As climate changes weather patterns will change. The search is on for more effective methodologies to aid decision-makers both in mitigation to avoid climate change and in adaptation to changes. The traditional approach uses ensembles of climate model simulations, statistical bias correction, downscaling to the spatial and temporal scales relevant to decision-makers, and then translation into quantities of interest. The veracity of this approach cannot be tested, and it faces in-principle challenges. Alternatively, numerical weather prediction models in a hypothetical climate setting can provide tailored narratives for high-resolution simulations of high-impact weather in a future climate. This 'tales of future weather' approach will aid in the interpretation of lower-resolution simulations. Arguably, it potentially provides complementary, more realistic and more physically consistent pictures of what future weather might look like.

  5. Effect of silicate ions on electrode overvoltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gras, J. M.; Seite, C.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of the addition of a silicate to a caustic solution (KOH) is studied in order to determine the degree to which silicates inhibit the corrosion of chrysotile under conditions of electrolysis at working temperatures of 100 C and above. In an alkaline solution containing various silicate concentrations, current density was increased and electrode overvoltage was measured. Results show that silicate ion concentrations in the electrolyte increase with temperature without effecting electrochemical performance up to 115 C at 700 MA/sqcm. At this point the concentration is about 0.5 g Si/100 g KOH. Beyond this limit, electrolytic performance rapidly degenerates due to severe oxidation of the electrodes.

  6. Weather Radar Fundamentals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    This 2-hour module presents the fundamental principles of Doppler weather radar operation and how to interpret common weather phenomena using radar imagery. This is accomplished via conceptual animations and many interactive radar examples in which the user can practice interpreting both radar reflectivity and radar velocity imagery. Although intended as an accelerated introduction to understanding and using basic Doppler weather radar products, the module can also serve as an excellent refresher for more experienced users.

  7. Weather and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Recommendations for using space observations of weather and climate to aid in solving earth based problems are given. Special attention was given to: (1) extending useful forecasting capability of space systems, (2) reducing social, economic, and human losses caused by weather, (3) development of space system capability to manage and control air pollutant concentrations, and (4) establish mechanisms for the national examination of deliberate and inadvertent means for modifying weather and climate.

  8. WWW - Wonderful Web Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jason Parrish

    2007-12-12

    This is a web quest for students to research weather forecasting using the Internet. Students work in groups to study how accurate weather forecasts are by tracking the weather for 3 days in several locations. Using graphs students then compare how each location scored in accuracy and present their findings to the class. This site contains links for students to use for more background information, a process for the students to follow, and evaluation rubrics for the student-produced graphs and presentation.

  9. Winter weather activity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Whitney Frankovic

    2009-09-28

    This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. Weather Maker Simulator Use the weather simulation above to answer the following questions in complete sentences on paper. 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you get them to stop? 3. What usually happens when there is a large difference between the temperatures? 4. What happens when there is high ...

  10. Cosmic weather and cybernetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdiushin, Sergei Ivanovich; Danilov, Aleksei Dmitrievich; Dlikman, Fishel'l'vovich

    1987-09-01

    The use of computer techniques to study cosmic weather (i.e., manifestations of solar activity in near-earth space, the ionosphere, and the lower atmosphere) is examined. A scheme of observational facilities for the acquisition of data on cosmic weather is described; the basic types of observations that yield information on the state of the ionosphere at different altitudes are considered; and the role of computers in the prediction of cosmic weather is assessed.

  11. Everything Weather- Archived Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    Users can obtain current weather forecasts for their own areas by entering a ZIP code, or they can access a large archive of historic data on severe weather (tornadoes, hail, high winds, hurricanes). Materials presented in the archive include dates, times, and intensities of storms, a photo gallery, maps, radar and other satellite data, storm chaser reports, and links to other weather sites. Raw data can be found in several forms for teachers wishing to have unprocessed data to work with.

  12. National Weather Service

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sick and tired of the heat? Feel like it will never end? Then check out the National Weather Service's (NWS) Heat Wave, a site devoted to the extreme weather that is crippling the south. The NWS provides information on the heat index, heat's affect on the body, and how to beat the heat. For those who want an up-to-the-minute look at the weather, the site links to current conditions, forecasts, and watches and warnings.

  13. Microcosm studies of the role of land plants in elevating soil carbon dioxide and chemical weathering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Baars; T. Hefin Jones; Dianne Edwards

    2008-01-01

    A decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration during the mid-Palaeozoic is postulated to have been partially the consequence of the evolution of rooted land plants. Root development increased the amount of carbonic acid generated by root respiration within soils. This led to increased chemical weathering of silicates and subsequent formation of carbonates, resulting in lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations. To

  14. MINERAL WEATHERING RATES FROM SMALL-PLOT EXPERIMENTS, WMP SITE, BEAR BROOKS, MAINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pH-dependence of silicate mineral weathering rates was measured in small-plot experiments at the Bear Brooks Watershed Manipulation Project site in Maine, U.S.A. ix 2 m2 plots were acidified with solutions of HCL in deionized water at pH values of 2, 2.5, and 3. Acid applicat...

  15. The Weather and Climate Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S.; Del Greco, S.; Hankins, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Weather and Climate Toolkit (WCT) is free, platform independent software distributed from NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). The WCT allows the visualization and data export of weather and climate data, including Radar, Satellite and Model data. By leveraging the NetCDF for Java library and Common Data Model, the WCT is extremely scalable and capable of supporting many new datasets in the future. Gridded NetCDF files (regular and irregularly spaced, using Climate-Forecast (CF) conventions) are supported, along with many other formats including GRIB. The WCT provides tools for custom data overlays, Web Map Service (WMS) background maps, animations and basic filtering. The export of images and movies is provided in multiple formats. The WCT Data Export Wizard allows for data export in both vector polygon/point (Shapefile, Well-Known Text) and raster (GeoTIFF, ESRI Grid, VTK, Gridded NetCDF) formats. These data export features promote the interoperability of weather and climate information with various scientific communities and common software packages such as ArcGIS, Google Earth, MatLAB, GrADS and R. The WCT also supports an embedded, integrated Google Earth instance. The Google Earth Browser Plugin allows seamless visualization of data on a native 3-D Google Earth instance linked to the standard 2-D map. Level-II NEXRAD data for Hurricane Katrina GPCP (Global Precipitation Product), visualized in 2-D and internal Google Earth view.

  16. Meteorology:Meteorology: Weather and ClimateWeather and Climate

    E-print Network

    1 Meteorology:Meteorology: Weather and ClimateWeather and Climate Large Scale Weather SystemsLarge--scale Weather Systemsscale Weather Systems Tropical cyclones (1-2) Location, Structure, Life-cycle Formation and modification, airmasses that effect the British Isles Airmasses affecting the British Isles

  17. Winter Storm (weather)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Aubree Miller

    2009-09-28

    This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. First think about these questions: 1. What is your favorite aspect of winter weather? 2. How does the weather effect your everyday life? Form groups of THREE. Explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper... 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you ...

  18. Cockpit weather information needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective is to develop an advanced pilot weather interface for the flight deck and to measure its utilization and effectiveness in pilot reroute decision processes, weather situation awareness, and weather monitoring. Identical graphical weather displays for the dispatcher, air traffic control (ATC), and pilot crew should also enhance the dialogue capabilities for reroute decisions. By utilizing a broadcast data link for surface observations, forecasts, radar summaries, lightning strikes, and weather alerts, onboard weather computing facilities construct graphical displays, historical weather displays, color textual displays, and other tools to assist the pilot crew. Since the weather data is continually being received and stored by the airborne system, the pilot crew has instantaneous access to the latest information. This information is color coded to distinguish degrees of category for surface observations, ceiling and visibilities, and ground radar summaries. Automatic weather monitoring and pilot crew alerting is accomplished by the airborne computing facilities. When a new weather information is received, the displays are instantaneously changed to reflect the new information. Also, when a new surface or special observation for the intended destination is received, the pilot crew is informed so that information can be studied at the pilot's discretion. The pilot crew is also immediately alerted when a severe weather notice, AIRMET or SIGMET, is received. The cockpit weather display shares a multicolor eight inch cathode ray tube and overlaid touch panel with a pilot crew data link interface. Touch sensitive buttons and areas are used for pilot selection of graphical and data link displays. Time critical ATC messages are presented in a small window that overlays other displays so that immediate pilot alerting and action can be taken. Predeparture and reroute clearances are displayed on the graphical weather system so pilot review of weather along the route can be accomplished prior to pilot acceptance of the clearance. An ongoing multiphase test series is planned for testing and modifying the graphical weather system. Preliminary data shows that the nine test subjects considered the graphical presentation to be much better than their current weather information source for situation awareness, flight safety, and reroute decision making.

  19. Pilot Weather Advisor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindamood, Glenn; Martzaklis, Konstantinos Gus; Hoffler, Keith; Hill, Damon; Mehrotra, Sudhir C.; White, E. Richard; Fisher, Bruce D.; Crabill, Norman L.; Tucholski, Allen D.

    2006-01-01

    The Pilot Weather Advisor (PWA) system is an automated satellite radio-broadcasting system that provides nearly real-time weather data to pilots of aircraft in flight anywhere in the continental United States. The system was designed to enhance safety in two distinct ways: First, the automated receipt of information would relieve the pilot of the time-consuming and distracting task of obtaining weather information via voice communication with ground stations. Second, the presentation of the information would be centered around a map format, thereby making the spatial and temporal relationships in the surrounding weather situation much easier to understand

  20. Washington Post Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Washington Post makes a bid for the already crowded Internet weather market with WeatherPost. Coverage includes current conditions and four-day forecasts for 3,600 cities worldwide, as well as snapshot and time-lapse satellite maps (provided by Accu Weather). For US cities, users may also access UV and air quality maps and data, as well as seasonal maps (snow cover, tanning index, heat index, and BeachCast) and other radar images such as precipitation. Users may enter a city name into the homepage search box, or may browse by country or state/province. The historical weather database offers compiled monthly average weather data for nearly 1,000 cities worldwide; the database is searchable. An aspect of the site that sets it apart from many other weather pages is the weather reference desk, which includes a weather glossary, weather calculators (JavaScript converters for temperature, wind chill, heat index, etc.) and a page devoted to storm chasers.

  1. Decreased water flowing from a forest amended with calcium silicate

    PubMed Central

    Green, Mark B.; Bailey, Amey S.; Bailey, Scott W.; Battles, John J.; Campbell, John L.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Fahey, Timothy J.; Lepine, Lucie C.; Likens, Gene E.; Ollinger, Scott V.; Schaberg, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition during the 20th century caused widespread depletion of available soil calcium (Ca) throughout much of the industrialized world. To better understand how forest ecosystems respond to changes in a component of acidification stress, an 11.8-ha watershed was amended with wollastonite, a calcium silicate mineral, to restore available soil Ca to preindustrial levels through natural weathering. An unexpected outcome of the Ca amendment was a change in watershed hydrology; annual evapotranspiration increased by 25%, 18%, and 19%, respectively, for the 3 y following treatment before returning to pretreatment levels. During this period, the watershed retained Ca from the wollastonite, indicating a watershed-scale fertilization effect on transpiration. That response is unique in being a measured manipulation of watershed runoff attributable to fertilization, a response of similar magnitude to effects of deforestation. Our results suggest that past and future changes in available soil Ca concentrations have important and previously unrecognized implications for the water cycle. PMID:23530239

  2. NASA's Sentinels Monitoring Weather and Climate: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Herring, David; Gutro, Rob; Huffman, George; Halverson, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Weatherwise is probably the most popular newstand magazine focusing on the subject of weather. It is published six times per year and includes features on weather, climate, and technology. This article (to appear in the January/February Issue) provides a comprehensive review of NASA s past, present, and future contributions in satellite remote sensing for weather and climate processes. The article spans the historical strides of the TIROS program through the scientific and technological innovation of Earth Observer-3 and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM). It is one of the most thorough reviews of NASA s weather and climate satellite efforts to appear in the popular literature.

  3. A Weathering Index for CK and R Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Huber, Heinz

    2006-01-01

    We present a new weathering index (wi) for the metallic-Fe-Ni-poor chondrite groups (CK and R) based mainly on transmitted light observations of the modal abundance of crystalline material that is stained brown in thin sections: wi-0, <5 vol%; wi-1, 5-25 vol%; wi-2,25-50 vol%; wi-3,50- 75 vol%; wi-4, 75-95 vol%; wi-5, >95 vol%, wi-6, significant replacement of mafic silicates by phyllosilicates. Brown staining reflects mobilization of oxidized iron derived mainly from terrestrial weathering of Ni-bearing sulfide. With increasing degrees of terrestrial weathering of CK and R chondrites, the sulfide modal abundance decreases, and S, Se, and Ni become increasingly depleted. In addition, bulk Cl increases in Antarctic CK chondrites, probably due to contamination from airborne sea mist.

  4. Weather and emotional state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasova, Z.

    2010-09-01

    Introduction Given the proven effects of weather on the human organism, an attempt to examine its effects on a psychic and emotional level has been made. Emotions affect the bio-tonus, working ability and concentration, hence their significance in various domains of economic life, such as health care, education, transportation, tourism, etc. Data and methods The research has been made in Sofia City within a period of 8 months, using 5 psychological methods (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Test for Self-assessment of the emotional state (developed by Wessman and Ricks), Test for evaluation of moods and Test "Self-confidence - Activity - Mood" (developed by the specialists from the Military Academy in Saint Petersburg). The Fiodorov-Chubukov's complex-climatic method was used to characterize meteorological conditions because of the purpose to include in the analysis a maximal number of meteorological elements. 16 weather types are defined in dependence of the meteorological elements values according to this method. Abrupt weather changes from one day to another, defined by the same method, were considered as well. Results and discussions The results obtained by t-test show that the different categories of weather lead to changes in the emotional status, which indicates a character either positive or negative for the organism. The abrupt weather changes, according to expectations, have negative effect on human emotions but only when a transition to the cloudy weather or weather type, classified as "unfavourable" has been realized. The relationship between weather and human emotions is rather complicated since it depends on individual characteristics of people. One of these individual psychological characteristics, marked by the dimension "neuroticism", has a strong effect on emotional reactions in different weather conditions. Emotionally stable individuals are more "protected" to the weather influence on their emotions, while those who are emotionally unstable have a stronger dependence to the impacts of the weather.

  5. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122...Anticaking Agents § 582.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2...

  6. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122...Anticaking Agents § 582.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2...

  7. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122...Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2...

  8. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122...Anticaking Agents § 582.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2...

  9. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122...Anticaking Agents § 582.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2...

  10. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122...Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2...

  11. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122...Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2...

  12. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122...Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2...

  13. 21 CFR 582.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 582.2122 Section 582.2122...Anticaking Agents § 582.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2...

  14. 21 CFR 182.2122 - Aluminum calcium silicate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aluminum calcium silicate. 182.2122 Section 182.2122...Anticaking Agents § 182.2122 Aluminum calcium silicate. (a) Product. Aluminum calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). 721...Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). ...substance identified generically as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). 721...Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). ...substance identified generically as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). 721...Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). ...substance identified generically as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). 721...Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). ...substance identified generically as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). 721...Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). ...substance identified generically as modified magnesium silicate polymer (PMN...

  20. Global Warming

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Schultz

    2007-12-03

    Use the links below to complete your research. The Heat Over Global Warming God and Global Warming Robert Redford: Business Warming Up to Environment Emission Impossible? Senator Stepping Up on Climate Control Interview: Bill McKibben Climate Change and the Media Senate Hearings Five Questions with Environmental Writer Tom Philpott Home Grown Oil, Politics Bribes E2: Energy The Greens Online NewsHour: The Global Warming Debate NewsHour Extra: Global Warming Linked to Humans NewsHour Extra: Global Warming Fears Lead to Ratification of the Kyoto Protocol Frontline: Doubters of Global Warming Journey to Planet Earth: The State of the Planet: Global Warming What s Up With the Weather? Some of the below resources were found in the book Global Warming : Opposing Viewpoints (available in the MRC) The Heritage Foundation - Global Warming Rainforest Alliance Doing a global warming search in this website will result in a list of various articles Sierra Club - homepage eLibrary (Proquest) is now available through the

  1. Identifying the crystal graveyards remaining after large silicic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, Sarah E.; Deering, Chad D.; Bachmann, Olivier; Huber, Christian; Gutiérrez, Francisco J.

    2014-10-01

    The formation of crystal-poor high-silica rhyolite via extraction of interstitial melt from an upper crustal mush predicts the complementary formation of large amounts of (typically unerupted) silicic cumulates. However, identification of these cumulates remains controversial. One hindrance to our ability to identify them is a lack of clear predictions for complementary chemical signatures between extracted melts and their residues. To address this discrepancy, we present a generalized geochemical model tracking the evolution of trace elements in a magma reservoir concurrently experiencing crystallization and extraction of interstitial melt. Our method uses a numerical solution rather than analytical, thereby allowing for various dependencies between crystallinity, partition coefficients for variably compatible and/or incompatible elements, and melt extraction efficiency. Results reveal unambiguous fractionation signatures for the extracted melts, while those signatures are muted for their cumulate counterparts. Our model is first applied to a well-constrained example (Searchlight pluton, USA), and provides a good fit to geochemical data. We then extrapolate our results to understanding the relationship between volcanic and plutonic silicic suites on a global scale. Utilizing the NAVDAT database to identify crystal accumulation or depletion signatures for each suite, we suggest that many large granitoids are indeed silicic cumulates, although their crystal accumulation signature is expected to be subtle.

  2. Introdution of China Weather TV and its work on climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Li

    2007-01-01

    A. Introduction of China Weather TV China Weather TV is the exclusive meteorological channel in China which broadcasting 24 hours each day. Nowadays, climate change becomes the global hot issue. As the professional meteorological channel, China Weather TV focuses on the education and public awareness on climate change. It not only makes news reports to let the public know the

  3. Weathering Database Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Collecting weather data is a traditional part of a meteorology unit at the middle level. However, making connections between the data and weather conditions can be a challenge. One way to make these connections clearer is to enter the data into a database. This allows students to quickly compare different fields of data and recognize which…

  4. Exercising in Cold Weather

    MedlinePLUS

    ... www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercising in Cold Weather Exercise has benefits all year, even during winter. ... activities when it’s cold outside: l Check the weather forecast. If it’s very windy or cold, exercise ...

  5. On Observing the Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Rain, sun, snow, sleet, wind... the weather affects everyone in some way every day, and observing weather is a terrific activity to attune children to the natural world. It is also a great way for children to practice skills in gathering and recording information and to learn how to use simple tools in a standardized fashion. What better way to…

  6. Fabulous Weather Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in…

  7. Northwest Weather Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sue Palewicz

    This educational module is designed to teach students about predicting weather. This includes a series of activites about clouds, moisture, air and rain for students to complete. There are curriculum connections to art, writing and math as well as links for more resources and live weather data.

  8. The Home Weather Station.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinke, Steven D.

    1991-01-01

    Described is how an amateur weather observer measures and records temperature and precipitation at a well-equipped, backyard weather station. Directions for building an instrument shelter and a description of the instruments needed for measuring temperature and precipitation are included. (KR)

  9. Designing a Weather Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The collection and analysis of weather data is crucial to the location of alternate energy systems like solar and wind. This article presents a design challenge that gives students a chance to design a weather station to collect data in advance of a large wind turbine installation. Data analysis is a crucial part of any science or engineering…

  10. Winter Storms Weather Quizzes

    E-print Network

    Quizzes pg 3 pg 22 pg 7 pg 29 pg 13 pg 17 #12;Weather can be calm and peaceful. It also can be violent and the news media. We will tell you what is happening. Stay tuned! Hurricane Warning When the National Weather

  11. Sedimentary Rocks and Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Timothy Heaton

    This site contains 42 questions on the topic of sedimentary rocks and weathering including clast sizes, depositional environments, and products of weathering. This is part of the Principles of Earth Science course at the University of South Dakota. Users select an answer and are provided immediate feedback.

  12. Home Weatherization Visit

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  13. Next Generation Weather Lab

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Users can learn about weather data output and analysis at the Next Generation Weather Lab website. This expansive website provides an abundance of surface data and upper air data as well as satellite and radar images for the United States. Types of data include plotting maps, contoured images, soundings, and cross sections.

  14. Weather Data Gamification

    E-print Network

    Gargate, Rohit

    2013-07-25

    of the weather patterns and climate change trends for those cities. We do a user-study to evaluate our application and prove its feasibility. An evaluation of the fantasy weather game indicates that the game had the desired effect of causing players to explore...

  15. Weather and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contemporary Learning Center, Houston, TX.

    This document is a minicourse on the interaction of weather, environment, and culture. It is designed for the high school student to read and self-administer. Performance objectives, enabling activities, and postassessment questions are given for each of eight modules. The modules are: (1) Basic Facts About Your Weather Known As Rain, (2) The…

  16. Weather Theory Introduction

    E-print Network

    protects life on Earth from high energy radiation and the frigid vacuum of space. Composition a Flight Service Station (FSS) weather specialist and other aviation weather services. Be it a local flight, and waves that travel for great distances. Life on Earth is supported by the atmosphere, solar energy

  17. Weather Fundamentals: Clouds. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) discusses how clouds form, the different types of clouds, and the important role they play in…

  18. Mild and Wild Weather.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents background information and six activities that focus on clouds, precipitation, and stormy weather. Each activity includes an objective, recommended age level(s), subject area(s), and instructional strategies. Also provided are two ready-to-copy pages (a coloring page on lightning and a list of weather riddles to solve). (JN)

  19. Weather Vane and Anemometer

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Watsonville Environmental Science Workshop

    2011-01-01

    In this meteorology activity, learners construct simple devices to measure the direction and speed of wind. Learners will explore wind and air resistance as well as how weather vanes and generators work to analyze weather patterns. Note: a drill and other specialty tools are required for this activity, but are not included in the cost of materials.

  20. Teacher's Weather Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konvicka, Tom

    This book is a teaching resource for the study of weather-related phenomena. A "weather unit" is often incorporated into school study because of its importance to our daily lives and because of its potential to cut across disciplinary content. This book consists of two parts. Part I covers the major topics of atmospheric science such as the modern…

  1. Tracking Weather Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Helen E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of weather satellites in providing an exciting, cohesive framework for students learning Earth and space science and in providing a hands-on approach to technology in the classroom. Discusses the history of weather satellites and classroom satellite tracking. (JRH)

  2. EMERGENCY, DISASTER, & WEATHER INFORMATION

    E-print Network

    Weber, David J.

    EMERGENCY, DISASTER, & WEATHER INFORMATION University · Campus Emergency and Inclement Weather.umaryland.edu/health · Dental Care: 6-7102 or 6-7063 www.dental.umaryland.edu/ patientinfo · Student Counseling Center: 8.parking.umaryland.edu Police and Public Safety 6-6882, 711 (emergency) www.umaryland.edu/police Recreation and Fitness 6-PLAY

  3. What Is Space Weather?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource provides a brief overview of the phenomenon known as space weather, which happens when energetic particles emitted by the Sun impact the Earth's magnetosphere. Users can view images, video clips, and animations of auroras and other types of space weather. A set of links to related websites is also provided.

  4. Weather Fundamentals: Wind. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) describes the roles of the sun, temperature, and air pressure in creating the incredible power…

  5. Relationships Between Calcium Silicates and Clay Minerals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. F. W. Taylor; J. W. HowlsoN

    1956-01-01

    The crystal-chemical basis of the relationship between hydrated calcium silicate and clay minerals is discussed, and a review is given of recent work on the tobermorite minerals, the group of hydrated calcium silicates which most nearly resembles the clay minerals. New data are presented for the specific gravities, refractive indices, basal spacings, and dehydration isobars of synthetic tobermorite minerals, and

  6. Scholastic: Weather Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Weather Watch series of online projects investigates seasonal weather phenomena. Students discover the scientific explanations for these events, and use tools and resources for enhanced research. The Hurricanes project allows students to monitor patterns and plot the progression of hurricanes. The Winter Storms project contains an interactive weather maker allowing students to create different weather patterns by changing factors. A winter storm timeline provides stories of the harshest blizzards that have occurred in the U.S. The Weather Reporters project includes a selection of hands-on science experiments for classroom participation, leading up to sharing results online with students worldwide. Each project provides assessment tools and lesson plan suggestions for educators. Links are provided for additional resources.

  7. Global Predictions

    E-print Network

    Swyden, Courtney

    2006-01-01

    above 500 will institute a burn ban. The index uses weather station estimates of temperature and Doppler radar-based precipitation estimates to produce geographic information systems (GIS) maps. The KBDI maps are one of more than 15 map products... created every day by the lab and used by the forest service, county commissioners and others. Using computer technology and satellites, the lab currently focuses on three core spatial technologies? GIS, global positioning systems (GPS) and remote...

  8. What are the true astronomical silicates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, J. M.; Li, A.

    1996-05-01

    We redefine the term "astronomical silicate" by interpreting the 9.7?m and 18?m interstellar features not in terms of absorption by a pure silicate but rather in terms of silicate core-organic refractory mantle particles. The silicate core optical properties used are those of a glassy (amorphous) olivine produced in the laboratory. The optical constants of the organic refractory mantle material are derived from a combination of astronomical and laboratory spectra of residues of ultraviolet photoprocessed ices, which we define as ``astronomical organic refractory". The silicate core-organic refractory mantle elongated dust model provides an excellent match to the observation of the Becklin-Neugebauer object polarization features in shape, width, and in relative strength. An additional ice mantle is included on a fraction of the dust in the line of sight to the BN object which is consistent with the 3.1 ?m absorption strength. This further improves the match to observations.

  9. Northern latitude chemical weathering rates: clues from the Mackenzie River Basin, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, Romain; Gaillardet, J. érôme; Dupré, Bernard; Allègre, Claude Jean

    2003-04-01

    The main scope of this study is to investigate parameters controlling chemical weathering rates for a large river system submitted to subarctic climate. More than 110 river water samples from the Mackenzie River system (northern Canada) have been sampled and analyzed for major and trace elements and Sr isotopic ratios in the dissolved phase. The three main morphological units are reflected in water chemistry. Rivers from the Canadian Shield are very dilute, dominated by silicate weathering (Millot et al., 2002), whereas the rivers of the Rocky and Mackenzie Mountains as well as the rivers of the sedimentary Interior Platform are dominated by carbonate weathering and are SO 4 rich. Compared to the rivers of the Mackenzie and Rocky Mountains, the rivers of the interior plains are organic, silica, and Na rich and constitute the dominant input term to the Mackenzie River mainstream. Rivers of the Canadian Shield area do not significantly contribute to the Mackenzie River system. Using elemental ratios and Sr isotopic ratios, a mathematical inversion procedure is presented that distinguishes between solutes derived from silicate weathering and solutes derived from carbonate weathering. Carbonate weathering rates are mostly controlled by runoff, which is higher in the mountainous part of the Mackenzie basin. These rates are comparable to the carbonate weathering rates of warmer areas of the world. It is possible that part of the carbonate weathering is controlled by sulfide oxidative weathering, but its extent remains difficult to assess. Conversely to what was stated by Edmond and Huh (1997), overall silicate weathering rates in the Mackenzie basin are low, ranging from 0.13 to 4.3 tons/km 2/yr (Na + K + Ca + Mg), and confirm the negative action of temperature on silicate weathering rates for river basins in cold climates. In contrast to what has been observed in other large river systems such as the Amazon and Ganges Rivers, silicate weathering rates appear 3 to 4 times more elevated in the plains than in the mountainous headwaters. This contradicts the "Raymo hypothesis" (Raymo and Ruddiman, 1992). Isotopic characterization of suspended material clearly shows that the higher weathering rates reported for the plains are not due to the weathering of fine sediments produced in the mountains (e.g., by glaciers) and deposited in the plains. Rather, the relatively high chemical denudation rates in the plains are attributed to lithology (uncompacted shales), high mechanical denudation, and the abundance of soil organic matter derived from incomplete degradation and promoting crystal lattice degradation by element complexation. The three- to fourfold factor of chemical weathering enhancement between the plains and mountains is similar to the fourfold factor of enhancement found by Moulton et al. (2000) between unvegetated and vegetated watershed. This study confirms the negative action of temperature on silicate weathering for cold climate but shows that additional factors, such as organic matter, associated with northern watersheds are able to counteract the effect of temperature. This acceleration by a factor of 4 in the plains is equivalent to a 6°C increase in temperature.

  10. Food Safety for Warmer Weather

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fight Off Food Poisoning Food Safety for Warmer Weather In warm-weather months, who doesn’t love to get outside ... to keep foods safe to eat during warmer weather. If you’re eating or preparing foods outside, ...

  11. Environmental Education Tips: Weather Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Audrey H.

    1989-01-01

    Provides weather activities including questions, on weather, heating the earth's surface, air, tools of the meteorologist, clouds, humidity, wind, and evaporation. Shows an example of a weather chart activity. (RT)

  12. Hypothermia: A Cold Weather Hazard

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cold air. But, not everyone knows that cold weather can also lower the temperature inside your body. ... cold it is where you are. Check the weather forecasts for windy and cold weather. Try to ...

  13. Geo-neutrinos and Silicate Earth Enrichment of U and Th

    E-print Network

    Steve Dye

    2010-08-30

    The terrestrial distribution of U, Th, and K abundances governs the thermal evolution, traces the differentiation, and reflects the bulk composition of the earth. Comparing the bulk earth composition to chondritic meteorites estimates the net amounts of these radiogenic heat-producing elements available for partitioning to the crust, mantle, and core. Core formation enriches the abundances of refractory lithophile elements, including U and Th, in the silicate earth by ~1.5. Global removal of volatile elements potentially increases this enrichment to ~2.8. The K content of the silicate earth follows from the ratio of K to U. Variable enrichment produces a range of possible heat-producing element abundances in the silicate earth. A model assesses the essentially fixed amounts of U, Th, and K in the approximately closed crust reservoir. Subtracting these sequestered crustal amounts from the variable amounts in the silicate earth results in a range of possible mantle allocations, leaving global dynamics and thermal evolution poorly constrained. Terrestrial antineutrinos from {\\beta}-emitting daughter nuclei in the U and Th decay series traverse the earth with negligible attenuation. The rate at which large subsurface instruments observe these geo-neutrinos depends on the distribution of U and Th relative to the detector. Geo-neutrino observations with sensitivity to U and Th in the mantle are able to estimate silicate earth enrichment, leading to a more complete understanding of the origin, accretion, differentiation, and thermal history of the planet.

  14. Fire Weather Forecasting: Clear Communications

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    The “Fire Weather Forecasting: Clear Communications” distance learning module offers best practices for Fire Weather Forecasters needing to communicate weather information when deployed in the field. The 30-minute module defines strategies for communicating with Weather Forecast Offices and with customers. Examples include writing a useful fire weather forecast discussion and undertaking proper planning to quickly and accurately disseminate information. This distance learning module is part of the Advanced Fire Weather Forecasters Course.

  15. Barium in the Yamuna River System in the Himalaya: Sources, fluxes, and its behavior during weathering and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalai, Tarun K.; Krishnaswami, S.; Sarin, M. M.

    2002-12-01

    Systematic measurements of Ba in waters and bed sediments of the Yamuna and many of its tributaries in the Himalaya (Yamuna River System) have been carried out. Dissolved Ba in the Yamuna River System (YRS) ranges from 17 to 871 nM. Streams near the source region draining predominantly granites/gneisses have lower abundance of Ba, <100 nM compared with those in the lower reaches. These data, coupled with those available for major ion composition of these rivers and their sediments, have been used to determine the contributions of silicates and carbonates, the two major lithologies in the drainage basin, to dissolved Ba in YRS. In YRS, dissolved Ba shows significant covariations with Na*, Si, Ca, and Mg. Using Na* as an index, it is estimated that silicates are an important source of Ba to many of the rivers; in a few streams in the lower reaches, however, they account for only <20% of measured Ba. Carbonate weathering, which dominates the major ion composition of YRS rivers, contributes on average ˜30% of dissolved Ba. Together, silicates and carbonates roughly balance measured Ba in many of the rivers, whereas in a few streams, Ba contributions from additional sources are needed to balance the budget. Prospective sources include organic matter/phosphorites. Plot of 1/Ba versus 87Sr/86Sr shows a two-component mixing trend, one with low Ba-high 87Sr/86Sr (silicates) and the other with high Ba-low 87Sr/86Sr (carbonates, phosphorites). Ba also shows significant positive correlation with dissolved Re and SO4. A likely explanation for the Ba-Re-SO4 association is that they are supplied from organic matter/phosphorites/carbonates assemblages through H2SO4 weathering. In YRS bed sediments, Ba shows significant correlation with K and Al. Ba/Na and Ba/Sr in these sediments are higher than those in granites of the Higher Himalaya. These observations can be explained in terms of (1) differential release of these elements during weathering, Ba being less mobile because of its association with weathering resistant minerals or (2) "nonconservative" behavior of Ba in rivers resulting in its removal from dissolved to particulate phases. Either way, these results indicate that Ba is less mobile relative to Na and Sr. Dissolved Ba flux from the YRS basin is ˜5 times more than that from the Ganga headwaters, a result consistent with higher physical and chemical erosion in the YRS basin. The Yamuna and the Ganga together transport ˜5.4 × 106 mol yr-1 of Ba out of the Himalaya, which is ˜10% of the dissolved Ba flux from the Ganga at Bangladesh, roughly the same as their contribution to water discharge. The rate of Ba mobilization in the Yamuna and the Ganga basins in the Himalaya is a factor of ˜2 higher than the global average.

  16. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Melde, Brian J.; Johnson, Brandy J.; Charles, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through co-condensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  17. Solar structure and terrestrial weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility that solar activity has discernible effects on terrestrial weather is considered. Research involving correlation of weather conditions with solar and geomagnetic activity is discussed.

  18. Biological and Organic Chemical Decomposition of Silicates. Chapter 7.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    The weathering of silicate rocks and minerals, an important concern of geologists and geochemists for many years, traditionally has been approached from strictly physical and chemical points of view. Biological effects were either unrecognized, ignored, or were mentioned in passing to account for such phenomena as the accumulation of organic matter in sediments or the generation of reducing environments. A major exception occurred in soil science where agricultural scientists, studying the factors important in the development of soils and their ability to nourish and sustain various crops, laid the foundation for much of what is known of the biological breakdown of silicate rocks and minerals. The advent of the space age accelerated the realization that many environmental problems and geochemical processes on Earth can only be understood in terms of ecosystems. This in turn, spurred renewed interest and activity among modem biologists, geologists and soil scientists attempting to unravel the intimate relations between biology and the weathering of silicate rocks and minerals of the earth's surface.

  19. Biological and Organic Chemical Decomposition of Silicates. Chapter 7.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    The weathering of silicate rocks and minerals, an important concern of geologists and geochemists for many years, traditionally has been approached from strictly physical and chemical points of view. Biological effects were either unrecognized, ignored, or were mentioned in passing to account for such phenomena as the accumulation of organic matter in sediments or the generation of reducing environments. A major exception occurred in soil science where agricultural scientists, studying the factors important in the development of soils and their ability to nourish and sustain various crops, laid the foundation for much of what is known of the biological breakdown of silicate rocks and minerals. The advent of the space age accelerated the realization that many environmental problems and geo- chemical processes on Earth can only be understood in terms of ecosystems. This in turn, spurred renewed interest and activity among modem biologists, geologists and soil scientists attempting to unravel the intimate relations between biology and the weathering of silicate rocks and minerals of the earth surface.

  20. Weather Observing Fundamentals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    "Weather Observing Fundamentals" provides guidance for U.S. Navy Aerographer's Mates, Quartermasters, and civilian observers tasked with taking and reporting routine, special, and synoptic observations. Although the focus of this lesson is on shipboard observations, much of the content applies to land-based observing and reporting as well. The lesson details standard procedures for taking accurate weather observations and for encoding those observations on COMNAVMETOCCOM Report 3141/3. Exercises throughout the lesson and four weather identification drills at the end provide learners with opportunities to practice and build their skills. The lesson covers a large amount of content. You may wish to work through the material in multiple sessions.

  1. Wonderful World of Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2006-01-01

    This website uses real time data for many activities for learning about the weather. It can be modified to fit virtually any grade level. The project is broken up into 3 sets of lessons; Introductory Activities, Real Time Data Activities, and Language Arts Activities. Each lesson gives a recommended time for completion, to help keep students and teachers on track. There is a helpful teachers guide section with background information about real time data, curriculum standards, and assessment suggestions. Th students gallery has many examples of real projects other students have already created. There is also a helpful reference guide, with information on real time weather, projects, and weather lesson plans.

  2. Weather and Climate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Medina, Philip

    This unit introduces younger students to the concepts of weather and climate. Topics include the structure of the atmosphere, the definitions of weather and climate, and temperature and how it is measured. There are also discussions of heat transfers (radiation, conduction, convection), air pressure, wind, and the Coriolis effect. Other topics include types of storms, larger-scale weather systems such as pressure systems and fronts, and factors (insolation, land-sea breezes, orographic effect) that influence the climate in a given region. A vocabulary list and downloadable, printable student worksheets are provided.

  3. Space Weather Now

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The NOAA Space Weather Now website provides non-technical information and an assortment of images detailing current space weather. Visitors can find summaries describing auroras, plots of current auroral ovals on the poles, and viewing information for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The Real-Time Solar Wind Pages furnish dynamic plots of data, geomagnetic activity test product information, and resources about the four instruments used to collect data on geomagnetic storms. The website features Space Weather Scales to help the public understand the severity of environmental disturbances due to geomagnetic storms, solar radiation storms, and radio blackouts. Visitors can find the latest news, alerts, advisory bulletins, and much more.

  4. Extreme Weather Sourcebook 2001

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Originally reviewed in the February 26, 1999 Scout Report, the latest version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Extreme Weather Sourcebook offers easy access to updated data on the economic damage from hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes in the United States and its territories. Time spans for each type of extreme weather vary, with hurricane data covering 1900-99, tornadoes 1950-99, floods 1955-1999, and lightning 1959-1994; however, all damage data are reported in constant 1999 dollars to simplify comparisons. The data are offered by weather event and state by rank or alphabetically.

  5. Wonderful World of Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This standards-based Real Time Data Module was created by the Center for Improved Engineering and Science Education (CIESE) for use by students in the elementary grades to allow them to investigate weather phenomena both locally as well as in other places around the world. By using hands-on activities and real-time data investigations, the students will develop a basic understanding of how weather can be described in measurable quantities, such as temperature, wind and precipitation. The site features a Teacher Area containing lesson plans, curriculum standards, guidelines for data collection, and a list of children's books with weather-related themes.

  6. WeatherTracker

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WeatherTracker is the ideal desktop application for anyone who always wants to know what the weather outside is like. The temperature, barometric pressure, humidity, winds, and current conditions can be displayed in three different formats, updated hourly for North American Cities. The local forecasts, climate data and near shore marine forecasts can be displayed in other windows and are available for select North American cities. Other cities are limited to temperature and current conditions. WeatherTracker is shareware with a fee of $20.00.

  7. GEOSS interoperability for Weather, Ocean and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, David; Nyenhuis, Michael; Zsoter, Ervin; Pappenberger, Florian

    2013-04-01

    "Understanding the Earth system — its weather, climate, oceans, atmosphere, water, land, geodynamics, natural resources, ecosystems, and natural and human-induced hazards — is crucial to enhancing human health, safety and welfare, alleviating human suffering including poverty, protecting the global environment, reducing disaster losses, and achieving sustainable development. Observations of the Earth system constitute critical input for advancing this understanding." With this in mind, the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) started implementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). GEOWOW, short for "GEOSS interoperability for Weather, Ocean and Water", is supporting this objective. GEOWOW's main challenge is to improve Earth observation data discovery, accessibility and exploitability, and to evolve GEOSS in terms of interoperability, standardization and functionality. One of the main goals behind the GEOWOW project is to demonstrate the value of the TIGGE archive in interdisciplinary applications, providing a vast amount of useful and easily accessible information to the users through the GEO Common Infrastructure (GCI). GEOWOW aims at developing funcionalities that will allow easy discovery, access and use of TIGGE archive data and of in-situ observations, e.g. from the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC), to support applications such as river discharge forecasting.TIGGE (THORPEX Interactive Grand Global Ensemble) is a key component of THORPEX: a World Weather Research Programme to accelerate the improvements in the accuracy of 1-day to 2 week high-impact weather forecasts for the benefit of humanity. The TIGGE archive consists of ensemble weather forecast data from ten global NWP centres, starting from October 2006, which has been made available for scientific research. The TIGGE archive has been used to analyse hydro-meteorological forecasts of flooding in Europe as well as in China. In general the analysis has been favourable in terms of forecast skill and concluded that the use of a multi-model forecast is beneficial. Long term analysis of individual centres, such as the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), has been conducted in the past. However, no long term and large scale study has been performed so far with inclusion of different global numerical models. Here we present some initial results from such a study.

  8. Alkali Silicate Vehicle Forms Durable, Fireproof Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, John B.; Seindenberg, Benjamin

    1964-01-01

    The problem: To develop a paint for use on satellites or space vehicles that exhibits high resistance to cracking, peeling, or flaking when subjected to a wide range of temperatures. Organic coatings will partially meet the required specifications but have the inherent disadvantage of combustibility. Alkali-silicate binders, used in some industrial coatings and adhesives, show evidence of forming a fireproof paint, but the problem of high surface-tension, a characteristic of alkali silicates, has not been resolved. The solution: Use of a suitable non-ionic wetting agent combined with a paint incorporating alkali silicate as the binder.

  9. Cold-Weather Sports

    MedlinePLUS

    Ahh, winter! Shorter days. Frigid temperatures. Foul weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports can help you burn calories, increase your cardiovascular fitness, and strengthen muscles. Activities that are ...

  10. How does weather change?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Susan Anderson, Taylors Falls Elementary, Taylors Falls, MN based on an activity from Houghton Mifflin Science Grade 2 Weather Patterns, p. D6.

    This activity is a field investigation where students gather temperature and weather data in the a.m and p.m. and develop a new, experimental question to predict temperature over the course of the year.

  11. Waste glass weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

    1993-12-31

    The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass.

  12. The Weather Calculator

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This set of conversion tools helps convert units and values for weather data, including temperature, moisture, atmospheric pressure, wind, and other parameters. Formulas are also provided for the conversions.

  13. Detection of solar wind-produced water in irradiated rims on silicate minerals.

    PubMed

    Bradley, John P; Ishii, Hope A; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J; Ciston, James; Nielsen, Michael H; Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C

    2014-02-01

    The solar wind (SW), composed of predominantly ?1-keV H(+) ions, produces amorphous rims up to ?150 nm thick on the surfaces of minerals exposed in space. Silicates with amorphous rims are observed on interplanetary dust particles and on lunar and asteroid soil regolith grains. Implanted H(+) may react with oxygen in the minerals to form trace amounts of hydroxyl (-OH) and/or water (H2O). Previous studies have detected hydroxyl in lunar soils, but its chemical state, physical location in the soils, and source(s) are debated. If -OH or H2O is generated in rims on silicate grains, there are important implications for the origins of water in the solar system and other astrophysical environments. By exploiting the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we detect water sealed in vesicles within amorphous rims produced by SW irradiation of silicate mineral grains on the exterior surfaces of interplanetary dust particles. Our findings establish that water is a byproduct of SW space weathering. We conclude, on the basis of the pervasiveness of the SW and silicate materials, that the production of radiolytic SW water on airless bodies is a ubiquitous process throughout the solar system. PMID:24449869

  14. Detection of solar wind-produced water in irradiated rims on silicate minerals

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, John P.; Ishii, Hope A.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Ciston, James; Nielsen, Michael H.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The solar wind (SW), composed of predominantly ?1-keV H+ ions, produces amorphous rims up to ?150 nm thick on the surfaces of minerals exposed in space. Silicates with amorphous rims are observed on interplanetary dust particles and on lunar and asteroid soil regolith grains. Implanted H+ may react with oxygen in the minerals to form trace amounts of hydroxyl (?OH) and/or water (H2O). Previous studies have detected hydroxyl in lunar soils, but its chemical state, physical location in the soils, and source(s) are debated. If ?OH or H2O is generated in rims on silicate grains, there are important implications for the origins of water in the solar system and other astrophysical environments. By exploiting the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we detect water sealed in vesicles within amorphous rims produced by SW irradiation of silicate mineral grains on the exterior surfaces of interplanetary dust particles. Our findings establish that water is a byproduct of SW space weathering. We conclude, on the basis of the pervasiveness of the SW and silicate materials, that the production of radiolytic SW water on airless bodies is a ubiquitous process throughout the solar system. PMID:24449869

  15. Space Weather Needs of an Evolving Customer Base (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, B.; Viereck, R. A.; Onsager, T. G.

    2013-12-01

    Great progress has been made in raising the global awareness of space weather and the associated impacts on Earth and our technological systems. However, significant gaps still exist in providing comprehensive and easily understood space weather information, products, and services to the diverse and growing customer base. As technologies, such as Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), have become more ingrained in applications and fields of work that previously did not rely on systems sensitive to space weather, the customer base has grown substantially. Furthermore, the causes and effects of space weather can be difficult to interpret without a detailed understanding of the scientific underpinnings. In response to this change, space weather service providers must address this evolution by both improving services and by representing space weather information and impacts in ways that are meaningful to each facet of this diverse customer base. The NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) must work with users, spanning precision agriculture, emergency management, power grid operators and beyond, to both identify unmet space weather service requirements and to ensure information and decision support services are provided in meaningful and more easily understood forms.

  16. Initial effects of vegetation on Hawaiian basalt weathering rates

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, M.F.; Berner, R.A. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Weathering of Ca and Mg silicates on land and ensuing precipitation and burial of Ca and Mg carbonates in marine sediments is the principal sink for carbon dioxide from the atmosphere/ocean system on geologic time scales. Model calculations of ancient atmospheric CO[sub 2] partial pressure depend strongly on the authors assumptions about the enhancement of silicate weathering rates first by primitive terrestrial biota, then by the appearance and evolution of the vascular plants. Aa and pahoehoe basalts were collected from Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. Flows ranged in age (one year to several thousand years) and in ambient climate. Where possible, each flow was sampled beneath a suite of current plant covers: none, lichens, and higher plants. Rocks were embedded in epoxy to preserve the plant-rock interface, then sectioned and subjected to electron probe microanalysis. During initial weathering, vascular plants appeared to promote congruent dissolution of minerals (particularly olivine and Ca-rich plagioclase) and glass near the surfaces of underlying basalts. In the neighborhood of roots, primary cracks widened with time into networks of open channels. This effect was observed prior to the formation of measurable leached zones in exterior grains and prior to the appearance of secondary minerals. As a result, initial mass loss from young, plant-covered basalts appeared to be up to one or more orders of magnitude greater than from bare-rock controls. Despite earlier reports of substantial enhancement of Hawaiian basalt weathering rates by the lichen Stereocaulon vulcani, weathering observed beneath this lichen was comparable to that of unvegetated rocks.

  17. Predicting Seasonal Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Large-scale weather patterns which occur in various locations around the Earth play a significant part in controlling the weather on a seasonal time scale. A National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded collaborative research effort between Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has led to a new understanding of the relationship between fall snow cover and winter climate variability. This research has led to the development of a new seasonal forecast model.

  18. TypoWeather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-03-13

    The TypoWeather application is a great way to stay on top of the latest weather conditions. This handy device presents users with a five day outlook and an hourly breakdown that is updated based on data from the National Meteorological Service. Visitors can customize their layout to include alerts about certain meteorological conditions, such as wind patterns, humidity, and more. This version is compatible with all operating systems.

  19. Rates of Chemical Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Passow

    In this activity, students will investigate the weathering of rocks by chemical processes. They will use effervescent cleansing tablets as a model for rock, and vary surface area, temperature, and acidity to see how rapidly the "rock" dissolves. This investigation will help them understand three of the factors that affect the rate of chemical weathering and develop better understanding of how to design controlled experiments by exploring only one experimental variable at a time.

  20. Extreme Weather Sourcebook: Tornadoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    University Consortium for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)

    The Extreme Weather Sourcebook is a database maintained by the Societal Impacts Program (SIP) at NCAR of statistics on extreme weather events. The Sourcebook is intended as a resource for researchers, policy makers, the media, and the general public, among other users. This page from the Sourcebook showcases data on tornado damages as total losses for the years 1950-2009 in the United States.

  1. Weathering of Minerals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wendy Van Norden

    Students determine the % change in mass of mineral samples that have been placed in a rock tumbler. They graph the relationship between the hardness of the mineral and the % change in mass. They then consider why some of the mineral samples do not conform the the relationship they graphed. They investigate the physical properties of the outliers and consider how the physical properties contributed to the rate of weathering, and what kind of weathering occured in the rock tumbler.

  2. Weathering and Erosion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lise Whitfield

    2010-01-01

    In this multi-station lab, learners conduct a series of experiments to explore the processes and effects of weathering and erosion. Using the results from these explorations, learners design and conduct an experiment comparing the rate of erosion in different biomes. Use this activity to teach weathering and erosion, and also to illustrate how scientists often use the results of one experiment to inspire another. This activity is intended to be conducted over multiple meetings.

  3. Geo-neutrinos, Mantle Circulation and Silicate Earth

    E-print Network

    Gianni Fiorentini; Marcello Lissia; Fabio Mantovani; Riccardo Vannucci

    2004-01-12

    In preparation to the experimental results which will be available in the future, we consider geo-neutrino production in greater detail than in [F. Mantovani et al., arXiv:hep-ph/0309013], putting the basis for a more refined model. We study geo-neutrino production for different models of matter circulation and composition in the mantle. By using global mass balance for the Bulk Silicate Earth, the predicted flux contribution from distant sources in the crust and in the mantle is fixed within +-15% (full range). A detailed geological and geochemical investigation of the region near the detector has to be performed, for reducing the flux uncertainty from fluctuations of the local abundances to the level of the global geochemical error. A five-kton detector operating over four years at a site relatively far from nuclear power plants can measure the geo-neutrino signal with 5% accuracy (1 sigma). It will provide a crucial test of the Bulk Silicate Earth and a direct estimate of the radiogenic contribution to terrestrial heat.

  4. Utilization of Live Localized Weather Information for Sustainable Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Usher, J.

    2010-09-01

    Authors: Jim Anderson VP, Global Network and Business Development WeatherBug® Professional Jeremy Usher Managing Director, Europe WeatherBug® Professional Localized, real-time weather information is vital for day-to-day agronomic management of all crops. The challenge for agriculture is twofold in that local and timely weather data is not often available for producers and farmers, and it is not integrated into decision-support tools they require. Many of the traditional sources of weather information are not sufficient for agricultural applications because of the long distances between weather stations, meaning the data is not always applicable for on-farm decision making processes. The second constraint with traditional weather information is the timeliness of the data. Most delivery systems are designed on a one-hour time step, whereas many decisions in agriculture are based on minute-by-minute weather conditions. This is especially true for decisions surrounding chemical and fertilizer application and frost events. This presentation will outline how the creation of an agricultural mesonet (weather network) can enable producers and farmers with live, local weather information from weather stations installed in farm/field locations. The live weather information collected from each weather station is integrated into a web-enabled decision support tool, supporting numerous on-farm agronomic activities such as pest management, or dealing with heavy rainfall and frost events. Agronomic models can be used to assess the potential of disease pressure, enhance the farmer's abilities to time pesticide applications, or assess conditions contributing to yield and quality fluctuations. Farmers and industry stakeholders may also view quality-assured historical weather variables at any location. This serves as a record-management tool for viewing previously uncharted agronomic weather events in graph or table form. This set of weather tools is unique and provides a significant enhancement to the agronomic decision-support process. Direct benefits to growers can take the form of increased yield and grade potential, as well as savings in money and time. Pest management strategies become more efficient due to timely and localized disease and pest modelling, and increased efficacy of pest and weed control. Examples from the Canadian Wheat Board (CWB) WeatherFarm weather network will be utilized to illustrate the processes, decision tools and benefits to producers and farmers.

  5. Utility weatherization programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kier, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    Public utility commissions (PUCs) have recently ordered or approved an increasing number of programs that install weatherization measures in residences. These programs tend to install only low-cost weatherization measures (e.g., caulking, weatherstripping, plastic storm windows, door sweeps) or major weatherization measures (e.g., insulation, storm windows, storm doors). When a program does not have income restrictions for eligibility, part of the costs are paid by the participating customer. For programs that install low-cost measures, the participant usually pays at the time of installation for the measures chosen. To require payment for major weatherization measures at the time of installation could deter participation, so these programs usually provide loans with the interest subsidized by the sponsor. Low-income customers, who have little or no disposable income, tend to shun Residential Conservation Service, loan, and other utility conservation programs that have costs to participants. Therefore PUCs have turned to programs that install weatherization measures without charge in order to reach low-income customers. This paper discusses some of the regulatory issues raised by these programs and how they have been justified by PUCs. It also gives information on cost and energy savings for 10 weatherization programs, both utility-sponsored and non-utility-sponsored, and attempts to interpret this information.

  6. Influence of PC superplasticizers on tricalcium silicate Sylvie Pourchet*1

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    to be due to the nucleation-growth of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) resulting from tricalcium silicateInfluence of PC superplasticizers on tricalcium silicate hydration Sylvie Pourchet*1 , Cédric with variations of content of anionic groups was studied on pure tricalcium silicate hydration. The hydration

  7. Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering

    SciTech Connect

    Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-10-01

    The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

  8. S-290 Unit 9: Observing the Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    This webcast covers procedures for taking accurate weather observations using belt weather kits and descriptions of other common weather observing equipment used in fire weather. In addition, maintenance of the primary components of the belt weather kit are demonstrated.

  9. The Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF): Models and Validation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tamas Gombosi; Gabor Toth; Igor Sokolov; Darren de Zeeuw; Bart van der Holst; Aaron Ridley; Ward Manchester IV

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade our group at the Center for Space Environment Modeling (CSEM) has developed the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) that efficiently couples together different models describing the interacting regions of the space environment. Many of these domain models (such as the global solar corona, the inner heliosphere or the global magneto-sphere) are based on MHD and are

  10. 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Florida's 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide F L O R I D A D I of Emergency Management #12;Florida's Severe Weather Awareness Guide 2 Florida is affected by many natural. That is why I am proud to present the 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide. By reading this guide you can learn

  11. Social Aspects of Weather Modification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Eugene Haas

    1973-01-01

    A description of the social context and citizen response to three weather modification projects provides an introduction to the discussion of a variety of social and economic issues related to planned weather modification. Various interest groups have markedly different perspectives on weather modification. Most persons subject to the consequences of weather modification have no opportunity to participate in the associated

  12. Fracture characteristics in weathered granites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judy Ehlen

    1999-01-01

    The variability of weathered materials is an important factor in the geotechnical characterization of rock for engineering purposes. Most engineering rock mass classifications include weathering schemes that separate the weathering profile into zones or grades that depend upon the engineering and geological properties of the rock. Many geotechnical characteristics, including weathering, are controlled by the density and arrangement of fractures

  13. New biodegradable polyhydroxybutyrate/layered silicate nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Pralay; Batt, Carl A; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2007-11-01

    Poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)/layered silicate nanocomposites were prepared via melt extrusion. The nanostructure, as observed from wide-angle X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, indicates intercalated hybrids. The extent of intercalation depends on the amount of silicate and the nature of organic modifier present in the layered silicate. The nanohybrids show significant improvement in thermal and mechanical properties of the matrix as compared to the neat polymer. The silicate particles act as a strong nucleating agent for the crystallization of PHB. The biodegradability of pure PHB and its nanocomposites was studied at two different temperatures under controlled conditions in compost media. The rate of biodegradation of PHB is enhanced dramatically in the nanohybrids. The change in biodegradation is rationalized in terms of the crystallization behavior of the nanohybrids as compared to that of the neat polymer. PMID:17958439

  14. Siliceous microfossil extraction from altered Monterey rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.O.; Casey, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    Samples of altered Monterey rocks of differing lithologies were processed by various methods to develop new techniques for extracting siliceous microfossils. The preliminary use of thin sections made from the same rocks reduced the number of probable samples (samples worth further processing) by about one-third. Most of the siliceous microfossils contained in altered Monterey rocks appear to be highly recrystallized and are extremely fragile; however, some contained silicified and silica-infilled radiolarians and planktonic and benthonic foraminifera, which are very tough. In general the most useful techniques were gently hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, monosodium glutamate, and regular siliceous microfossil extraction techniques. Unsuccessful techniques and a new siliceous microfossil flotation technique are also documented.

  15. Highly silicic compositions on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Glotch, Timothy D; Lucey, Paul G; Bandfield, Joshua L; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Thomas, Ian R; Elphic, Richard C; Bowles, Neil; Wyatt, Michael B; Allen, Carlton C; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    Using data from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment, we show that four regions of the Moon previously described as "red spots" exhibit mid-infrared spectra best explained by quartz, silica-rich glass, or alkali feldspar. These lithologies are consistent with evolved rocks similar to lunar granites in the Apollo samples. The spectral character of these spots is distinct from surrounding mare and highlands material and from regions composed of pure plagioclase feldspar. The variety of landforms associated with the silicic spectral character suggests that both extrusive and intrusive silicic magmatism occurred on the Moon. Basaltic underplating is the preferred mechanism for silicic magma generation, leading to the formation of extrusive landforms. This mechanism or silicate liquid immiscibility could lead to the formation of intrusive bodies. PMID:20847267

  16. Silicate Liquid Immiscibility in Young Impact Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, C.; Hecht, L.; Schultze, D.; Ebert, M.; Reimold, W. U.; Wirth, R.

    2014-09-01

    Emulsion textures have rarely been described from impact melts. Here, we present and compare several examples of silicate emulsions in impact melts and show that liquid immiscibility may play an important role in the formation of impact melts.

  17. 2011 Space Weather Workshop to Be Held in April

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    The annual Space Weather Workshop will be held in Boulder, Colo., 26-29 April 2011. The workshop will bring customers, forecasters, commercial service providers, researchers, and government agencies together in a lively dialogue about space weather. The workshop will include 4 days of plenary sessions on a variety of topics, with poster sessions focusing on the Sun, interplanetary space, the magnetosphere, and the ionosphere. The conference will address the remarkably diverse impacts of space weather on today's technology. Highlights on this year's agenda will include presentations on space weather impacts on the Global Positioning System (GPS), the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory's (STEREO) mission milestone of a 360° view of the Sun, the latest from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and space weather impacts on emergency response by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Additionally, the vulnerabilities of satellites and the power grid to space weather will be addressed. Additional highlights will include the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group's (CSWIG) roundtable session and a presentation from the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology (OFCM). The CSWIG roundtable session on the growth of the space weather enterprise will feature distinguished panelists. As always, lively interaction between the audience and the panel is anticipated. The OFCM will present the National Space Weather Program's new strategic plan.

  18. Modified calcium silicates as active rubber fillers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrzej Krysztafkiewicz

    1987-01-01

    The physicochemical characteristics of calcium silicates obtained from the reaction of sodium metasilicate solution with calcium\\u000a nitrate are given. Further, studies of the modification of the silicate surface with silane and titanate coupling agents are\\u000a presented. By wettability measurements and an analysis of the chemically adsorbed carbon arising from the coupling agents,\\u000a the degree of modification of these surfaces was

  19. Transition metal-silicate analogs of zeolites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Ratnasamy; Rajiv Kumar

    1993-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of three transition metal (Fe3+, Ti4+ and V4+)-silicate molecular sieves are discussed. The key factors for a successful incorporation of these metal ions in the growing silicate network during gel preparation\\/hydrothermal synthesis (e.g. avoidance of insoluble\\/sparingly soluble metal hydroxides\\/oxyhydroxides (Fe3+ and Ti4+) and alkali metal ions (Ti4+and V4+\\/5+)) as well as the effects of post synthesis

  20. Slow advance of the weathering front during deep, supply-limited saprolite formation in the tropical Highlands of Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewawasam, Tilak; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien; Dixon, Jean L.; Schuessler, Jan A.; Maekeler, Ricarda

    2013-10-01

    Silicate weathering - initiated by major mineralogical transformations at the base of ten meters of clay-rich saprolite - generates the exceptionally low weathering flux found in streams draining the crystalline rocks of the mountainous and humid tropical Highlands of Sri Lanka. This conclusion is reached from a thorough investigation of the mineralogical, chemical, and Sr isotope compositions of samples within a regolith profile extending >10 m from surface soil through the weathering front in charnockite bedrock (a high-grade metamorphic rock), corestones formed at the weathering front, as well as from the chemical composition of the dissolved loads in nearby streams. Weatherable minerals and soluble elements are fully depleted at the top of the profile, showing that the system is supply-limited, such that weathering fluxes are controlled directly by the supply of fresh minerals. We determine the weathering rates using two independent means: (1) in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides in surface soil and creek sediments in the close vicinity of the regolith combined with immobile element mass balance across the regolith and (2) river dissolved loads. Silicate weathering rates determined from both approaches range from 16 to 36 t km-2 y-1, corresponding to a weathering front advance rate of 6-14 mm ky-1. These rates agree across the 101 to 104 y time scales over which our rate metrics integrate, suggesting that the weathering system operates at steady state. Within error these rates are furthermore compatible with those obtained by modeling the advance rate of the weathering front from chemical gradients and mineral dissolution rates. The silicate weathering flux out of the weathering profile, measured on small creeks, amounts to 84% of the profile’s export flux; the remaining 16% is contributed by non-silicate, atmospheric-derived input. The silicate weathering flux, as measured by dissolved loads in large catchments, amounts to ca. 50% of the total dissolved flux; the remainder being contributed by dust, rain, and weathering of local marble bands. Spheroidal weathering is the key processes of converting the fresh bedrock into saprolite at the weathering front. The mineralogical composition of weathering rinds shows that the sequence of mineral decomposition is: pyroxene; plagioclase; biotite; K-feldspar. Observable biotite alteration does not appear to initiate spheroidal weathering within corestones; therefore, we infer that other processes than biotite oxidation, like pyroxene oxidation, clay formation from pyroxene and plagioclase decomposition, the development of secondary porosity by plagioclase dissolution, or even microbiologic processes at depth enable the coupling between slow advance of the weathering front and slow erosion at the surface. The comparison to tectonically more active tropical landscapes lets us conclude that the combination of hard rock with tightly interlocked mineral grains and slow erosion in the absence of tectonically-induced landscape rejuvenation lead to these exceptionally low weathering rates.

  1. Weather and The Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Merritt

    2005-10-15

    Students will be able to do activities dealing with weather and water cycles. Learn what makes weather wet and wild, forcast and predict weather. Webweather For Kids Learn about tornadoes and hurricanes. Kidstorm Learn about the water cycles. water Cycles Now click on the following link: Interactive weather maker 1. How much change in temperature is needed to make it snow? On the right side of the page click on Weather Detective Web Quest. Follow the ...

  2. Mycorrhizal weathering of apatite as an important calcium source in base-poor forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Blum, Joel D; Klaue, Andrea; Nezat, Carmen A; Driscoll, Charles T; Johnson, Chris E; Siccama, Thomas G; Eagar, Christopher; Fahey, Timothy J; Likens, Gene E

    2002-06-13

    The depletion of calcium in forest ecosystems of the northeastern USA is thought to be a consequence of acidic deposition and to be at present restricting the recovery of forest and aquatic systems now that acidic deposition itself is declining. This depletion of calcium has been inferred from studies showing that sources of calcium in forest ecosystems namely, atmospheric deposition and mineral weathering of silicate rocks such as plagioclase, a calcium-sodium silicate do not match calcium outputs observed in forest streams. It is therefore thought that calcium is being lost from exchangeable and organically bound calcium in forest soils. Here we investigate the sources of calcium in the Hubbard Brook experimental forest, through analysis of calcium and strontium abundances and strontium isotope ratios within various soil, vegetation and hydrological pools. We show that the dissolution of apatite (calcium phosphate) represents a source of calcium that is comparable in size to known inputs from atmospheric sources and silicate weathering. Moreover, apatite-derived calcium was utilized largely by ectomycorrhizal tree species, suggesting that mycorrhizae may weather apatite and absorb the released ions directly, without the ions entering the exchangeable soil pool. Therefore, it seems that apatite weathering can compensate for some of the calcium lost from base-poor ecosystems, and should be considered when estimating soil acidification impacts and calcium cycling. PMID:12066181

  3. Sunlight and the Earth : Climate and Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David P. Stern

    2004-09-22

    These web pages trace the processes involved in the suns impact on weather. This is an exploration of the importance of radiation and reflection of light, both visible and infra-red, and the greenhouse effect. Convection and the role of water vapor are also considered. Global-scale air flows are described, explaining why wind in the continental US usually blows from the west, while near the equator it comes from the east.

  4. Space Weather Workshop 2010 to Be Held in April

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    The annual Space Weather Workshop will be held in Boulder, Colo., 27-30 April 2010. The workshop will bring customers, forecasters, commercial service providers, researchers, and government agencies together in a lively dialogue about space weather. The workshop will include 4 days of plenary sessions on a variety of topics, with poster sessions focusing on the Sun, interplanetary space, the magnetosphere, and the ionosphere. The conference will address the remarkably diverse impacts of space weather on today's technology. Highlights on this year's agenda include ionospheric storms and their impacts on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), an update on NASA's recently launched Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and new space weather-related activities in the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Also this year, the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group will feature a presentation by former NOAA administrator, Vice Admiral Conrad Lautenbacher, U.S. Navy (Ret.).

  5. Weather from the Stratosphere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Mark P.; Thompson, David W. J.; Shuckburgh, Emily F.; Norton, Warwick A.; Gillett, Nathan P.

    2006-01-01

    Is the stratosphere, the atmospheric layer between about 10 and 50 km, important for predicting changes in weather and climate? The traditional view is that the stratosphere is a passive recipient of energy and waves from weather systems in the underlying troposphere, but recent evidence suggests otherwise. At a workshop in Whistler, British Columbia (1), scientists met to discuss how the stratosphere responds to forcing from below, initiating feedback processes that in turn alter weather patterns in the troposphere. The lowest layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere, is highly dynamic and rich in water vapor, clouds, and weather. The stratosphere above it is less dense and less turbulent (see the figure). Variability in the stratosphere is dominated by hemispheric-scale changes in airflow on time scales of a week to several months. Occasionally, however, stratospheric air flow changes dramatically within just a day or two, with large-scale jumps in temperature of 20 K or more. The troposphere influences the stratosphere mainly through atmospheric waves that propagate upward. Recent evidence shows that the stratosphere organizes this chaotic wave forcing from below to create long-lived changes in the stratospheric circulation. These stratospheric changes can feed back to affect weather and climate in the troposphere.

  6. Diversity history of Cenozoic marine siliceous plankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, David; Renaudie, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms and polycystine radiolarians, both with shells of opaline silica, make up a large part of the deep-sea sediment fossil record. Diatom export of organic material to the deep ocean and sediments strongly affects the global carbon cycle; while both groups compete for, and are regulated by the availability of, dissolved silica derived from global weathering. Diatoms and radiolarians also both have a relatively (compared to foraminifera or coccolithophores) complex biogeography, with diverse, endemic polar and tropical assemblages. Changes in past diatom and radiolarian diversity can be used to understand how the ocean's biologic pump has evolved, how co-evolution between groups occurs, and how nutrient availability controls evolutionary change. Lazarus et al. (2014) recently showed that diatom diversity increased by a factor of ca 3.5X over the Cenozoic, with a temporary peak in the latest Eocene, a late Oligocene-early Miocene low interval, very strong diversification in the late Miocene-early Pliocene, and minor decline in the late Pliocene-Recent. Only Phanerozoic scale radiolarian diversity estimates have been available until now, and these are strongly biased by sample size. We employed similar data (NSB database) and methods (1 my bins, 'sqs' subsampling, outlier removal using Pacman trims) as Lazarus et al. (2014) to calculate, for the first time, a detailed estimate of radiolarian diversity history, and origination and extinction rates over the last 50 my, the period for which sufficient NSB data is available. Radiolarian diversity increases almost monotonically by a factor of 5, with relatively rapid increases in the mid Eocene (high relative origination) and early Miocene (due to low extinction rates), and a moderate decline in the Plio-Pleistocene due to high extinction rates. Combined high rates of both extinction and origination, with little diversity change, are seen at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Most of these events can be related to changing global paleoceanographic conditions. Radiolarians show a major decrease in Cenozoic silica usage, apparently due to the rise of diatoms and consequent reduction of surface water silica concentrations (Lazarus et al. 2009). This inference based on diatom diversity has been confirmed (Renaudie et al., this meeting) with new estimates showing Cenozoic increasing rates of global diatom silica deposition. Our new radiolarian results show this did not negatively impact radiolarian diversity. Presumably increasing diversity from increasing faunal provinciality dominated Cenozoic radiolarian diversity dynamics, similar to the diversity controls on diatoms (Lazarus et al. 2014). Lazarus et al. (2009). PNAS 106:9333-9338. Lazarus et al. (2014). PLOS One (in press).

  7. Weather Scope : An Investigative Study of Weather and Climate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-12-12

    During the course of this project, students will learn how to build instruments to measure weather, access online weather observations, collect weather data for an extended period, analyze weather data to reveal trends, and make predictions. They will develop a basic understanding of how weather can be described in measurable quantities such as temperature, wind and precipitation. The module contains five lessons relating to weather, five relating to climate, and three enrichment activities. Project information, a teacher guide, reference materials, and an ask an expert feature are also provided.

  8. Space weather center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

    2005-01-01

    Five tutorials about space weather topics make up this web site. Plasma, the sun, Earth's magnetic field, magnetic storms, and the research and modeling of space weather are the topics, respectively, of the five tutorials. The tutorials use numerous enlargeable graphics, some animations and games, and additional special features like sound recordings of space weather phenomena to complement their textual content. In addition, the games and activities from all the tutorials are available together on a page accessible from the homepage. Within the tutorials, students learn about topics such as sunspots and the solar wind in the sun tutorial and space-based and Earth-based research tools in the research and modeling tutorial. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

  9. Jet Streams and Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    In this lesson, students learn about jet streams and explore the effects the polar-front jet stream has on weather conditions in North America. They begin by doing an interactive activity that highlights the atmospheric conditions and phenomena that create jet streams. They then look at a model that illustrates the relationships between latitude and variations in air temperature, wind speed, and altitude and begin to make generalizations about these relationships. In the second part of this lesson, they use the knowledge gained in the first part to interpret weather maps, helping them to make direct connections between the behavior of the polar-front jet stream and seasonal weather patterns in North America. As a final exercise, they will use real data to deepen their understanding of the relationships between pressure, altitude, and the wind speed of jet streams.

  10. Delicious Differential Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mary Gorte

    Students are asked to place a Baby Ruth candy bar in their mouths but are asked not to bite it. Once they have sucked off all the chocolate and caramel the students are given permission to bite the peanuts. After lecturing on the differences between chemical and physical weathering students are asked to list the order of ingredients they tasted. Each group is given a sample of granite. Students are asked to list three visible minerals in the granite. Relate the minerals of the granite (hornblende, feldspar, and quartz) to the ingredients of the candy bar. Explain Bowen's reaction series and how different minerals will weather first and how climate will affect weathering rates.

  11. Extreme Weather Sourcebook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This report presents a summary of damage caused by hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, lightning, hail, thunderstorms, and windstorms in the United States and its territories. Information was collected from as far back as 1900 (for hurricanes) and as recently as 1999 (for most categories). For each weather category, there is statistical information on monetary damages (in millions of dollars), sorted by rank and by alphabetic listing. There is also a summary table for composite damage from tornadoes, hurricanes, and floods; tables and graphs for damage and casualties caused by lightning; and summary information for other types of extreme weather (hail, thunderstorms, winter storms). Links are provided to information on data sources and methodology and on the societal impacts of weather.

  12. Web Weather for Kids!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Susan Foster

    Web Weather for Kids offers hands-on classroom activities for students to learn about selected severe weather phenomena. Each activity has step-by-step instructions, materials lists, and guiding questions for students. A Teacher Tips page offers implementation strategies for teachers. Phenomena covered include the formation of thunderstorms, lightning, and tornados. Students explore the concepts of convection currents, precipitation, static electricity, wind shear and supercell updraft. Estimating the distance to a storm using the time delay between a flash of lightning and the sound of thunder is explained, as is what to do if caught near an electrical storm. Short videos of students involved in the activities enhance the site, as do links to more extensive information on the science of severe weather.

  13. Weathering the Storm: Nurses' Stories about Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L

    2014-06-19

    Proposed is a hermeneutic humanbecoming study on the reflections of 16 nurses' stories about Hurricane Sandy. The phenomenon of interest is weathering the storm. The research question is "what are the emerging meanings of the living experience of weathering the storm?" The perspective to be used is the humanbecoming school of thought. The participants were nurses who were living and working in New York City (NYC) during and after Hurricane Sandy. The emergent meanings are to enhance knowledge and understanding of the experience of weathering the storm for global health nursing. PMID:24951527

  14. The NASA SCIence Files: The Case of the Phenomenal Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-04-10

    In this episode, the tree house detectives plan a trip to Florida and encounter problems in trying to predict the weather. Students learn about violent storms, such as hurricanes and tornadoes, weather fronts, global wind patterns, and climates. While solving the case, they will discover that predicting the weather is not predictable at all! The NASA SCIence Files series introduces students in grades 3-5 to NASA and integrates mathematics, science, and technology through the use of Problem-Based Learning (PBL), scientific inquiry, and the scientific method. Length: 60:00.

  15. Wonderful World of Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-01-01

    This standards-based module uses hands-on activities and real-time data investigations to allow students in the elementary grades to investigate weather phenomena both locally as well as in other places around the world. By using hands-on activities and real-time data investigations, the students will develop a basic understanding of how weather can be described in measurable quantities, such as temperature, wind and precipitation. The lesson plans which make up this module have been designed to allow teachers to select the ones which fit into their curriculum to allow for flexibility in implementation

  16. Weather Station Model

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson instructs students on how to read station models, the symbols used on weather maps to show data (temperature, wind speed and direction, barometeric pressure, etc.) for a given reporting station. It includes a diagram of a station model, an explanation of the data conveyed by the numbers and symbols, and a table of definitions for the graphic symbols used with models. There is also a set of interactive station models students can use for practice at interpretation, and an interactive exercise in which students use real-time weather data to interpret models.

  17. Davis Weather Station Protocol

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The GLOBE Program, UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)

    2003-08-01

    This resource provides instructions on how to log atmosphere data using a Davis weather station. A weather station is setup to measure and record atmospheric measurements at 15-minute intervals and can be transferred to the GLOBE program via email. Students can view data for their school that are continuous and show variations within a day. The data collected includes wind speed and direction and pressure thereby supporting a more complete study of meteorology using GLOBE. Students pursue a more extensive set of research investigations.

  18. Weather and Health

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2008-11-25

    This course will help meteorologists and others broaden their understanding of the impacts of weather and climate on public health, including the impacts of heat waves and cold temperatures, winter storms and thunderstorms, flooding, drought, poor air quality, tornadoes, hurricanes, wildfire, UV radiation, and others. This course is directed to broadcast meteorologists, in particular, who play a critical role in the community by helping the public to protect against weather-related health threats and by promoting good health. The course also describes the public health communication system, providing information about reliable public health services, tools, and resources.

  19. Indigenous Weather Knowledge

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Produced by the Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology, this Web site exhibits seasonal weather calendars created by Indigenous people thousands of years ago. The site first discusses the Aboriginal people in Australia and their methods for dealing with past climate changes. Studying the calendars, users will notice that Indigenous people dealt with climate on a local scale and recognized a varying number of seasons. For comparison, the site presents the Bureau of Meteorology's Temperature and Rainfall Graphs and climate group classification maps. Because it is still in the early stages of development, users should revisit this site to learn more about Aboriginal knowledge of weather and climate.

  20. Space Weather Action Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NASA

    2013-07-30

    In this interdisciplinary activity, learners create a Space Weather Action Center (SWAC) to monitor solar storms and develop real SWAC news reports. Learners work in teams to first investigate sunspot regions, storm signals, a magnetosphere, and auroras and share their research with their peers. Then, learners assemble an instructional flip chart, data collection clipboards/notebook, and display board for their SWAC. Learners conclude the activity by writing their own weather reports, which can be filmed or broadcast if equipment is available. Once learners create a SWAC, solar storm research and reporting can become an ongoing activity.