Science.gov

Sample records for glucocorticosteroid-sensitive inflammatory eosinophilic

  1. Glucocorticosteroid-sensitive inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder in an adolescent: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder is a rare inflammatory bladder disease. The etiology and pathophysiology of this condition are still unclear. Few case reports have described inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder in adults or children. Although benign, this disease is occasionally clinically aggressive and locally invasive, thus open surgical removal or complete transurethral resection is recommended. Case presentation We present the case of a biopsy-proven inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder in a previously healthy 16-year-old male adolescent with 2-month history of frequent micturition and dysuria with no significant apparent causative factors. The tumor regressed after a 6-week course of glucocorticosteroids. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, our case is a rare case of inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder treated with complete conservative management. Due to its glucocorticosteroid-sensitive nature, we postulate that this disease belongs to a subgroup of eosinophilic disorders. PMID:20062774

  2. Eosinophils in hereditary and inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Thomas; Fuchss, Johann; Schneider, Ilka; Stoltenburg-Didinger, Gisela; Hanisch, Frank

    2013-12-01

    It is not known whether eosinophilic myositis is a specific histopathological feature of limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A (LGMD2A). Number and location of eosinophils in skeletal muscle biopsies (n=100) was analysed by Giemsa and modified hematoxylin/eosin staining in patients with genetically confirmed myopathies (LGMD2A, LGMD2B, LGMD2L, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, dystrophinopathy), histologically confirmed idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), dermatomyositis (DM), polymyositis), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (neurogenic control), and normal controls. The number of eosinophils/mm² was significantly higher in LGMD2A, PM, DM, and sIBM compared to controls but not significantly higher than other myopathies. A large overlap in the number of eosinophils/mm2 between all groups was seen. In all disease groups eosinophils were mainly found endomysially (46- 88%) and intra- and perivascularly (4-37%). There was no correlation between the numbers of eosinophils/mm² and (i) age at biopsy and (ii) the duration of the disease. The extent of myopathic, fibrotic, and inflammatory changes did not differ in samples with high and low eosinophil count. Eosinophils seem to represent an unspecific histological finding in hereditary and inflammatory myopathies, but also amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:24803842

  3. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2–eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2–eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  4. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2-eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2-eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  5. Eosinophil-mediated signalling attenuates inflammatory responses in experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Masterson, Joanne C; McNamee, Eóin N; Fillon, Sophie A; Hosford, Lindsay; Harris, Rachel; Fernando, Shahan D; Jedlicka, Paul; Iwamoto, Ryo; Jacobsen, Elizabeth; Protheroe, Cheryl; Eltzschig, Holger K; Colgan, Sean P; Arita, Makoto; Lee, James J; Furuta, Glenn T

    2015-01-01

    Objective Eosinophils reside in the colonic mucosa and increase significantly during disease. Although a number of studies have suggested that eosinophils contribute to the pathogenesis of GI inflammation, the expanding scope of eosinophil-mediated activities indicate that they also regulate local immune responses and modulate tissue inflammation. We sought to define the impact of eosinophils that respond to acute phases of colitis in mice. Design Acute colitis was induced in mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid or oxazolone to C57BL/6J (control) or eosinophil deficient (PHIL) mice. Eosinophils were also depleted from mice using antibodies against interleukin (IL)-5 or by grafting bone marrow from PHIL mice into control mice. Colon tissues were collected and analysed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry and reverse transcription PCR; lipids were analysed by mass spectroscopy. Results Eosinophil-deficient mice developed significantly more severe colitis, and their colon tissues contained a greater number of neutrophils, than controls. This compensatory increase in neutrophils was accompanied by increased levels of the chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, which attract neutrophils. Lipidomic analyses of colonic tissue from eosinophil-deficient mice identified a deficiency in the docosahexaenoic acid-derived anti-inflammatory mediator 10, 17- dihydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (diHDoHE), namely protectin D1 (PD1). Administration of an exogenous PD1-isomer (10S, 17S-DiHDoHE) reduced the severity of colitis in eosinophil-deficient mice. The PD1-isomer also attenuated neutrophil infiltration and reduced levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and inducible NO-synthase in colons of mice. Finally, in vitro assays identified a direct inhibitory effect of PD1-isomer on neutrophil transepithelial migration. Conclusions Eosinophils exert a protective effect in acute mouse colitis, via production of anti-inflammatory lipid

  6. Eosinophils in Gastrointestinal disorders- eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases, celiac disease, inflammatory bowel diseases and parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Pooja; Furuta, Glenn T.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The gastrointestinal tract provides an intriguing organ for considering the eosinophil’s role in health and disease. The normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract, except for the esophagus, is populated by eosinophils that are present throughout the mucosa in varying numbers. This latter fact raises the possibility that eosinophils participate in innate mechanisms of defense. In contrast, a number of clinical studies provide a wealth of data that associates increased numbers of eosinophils with inflammatory GI diseases; these findings prompt concerns that eosinophils may have a deleterious effect on the gut. In this article we present clinical features of 4 disease processes that have been associated with eosinophilia and suggest areas requiring investigation as to their clinical significance and scientific relevance. PMID:26209893

  7. Human eosinophils can express the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, J J; Matossian, K; Resnick, M B; Beil, W J; Wong, D T; Gordon, J R; Dvorak, A M; Weller, P F; Galli, S J

    1993-01-01

    By in situ hybridization, 44-100% of the blood eosinophils from five patients with hypereosinophilia and four normal subjects exhibited intense hybridization signals for TNF-alpha mRNA. TNF-alpha protein was detectable by immunohistochemistry in blood eosinophils of hypereosinophilic subjects, and purified blood eosinophils from three atopic donors exhibited cycloheximide-inhibitable spontaneous release of TNF-alpha in vitro. Many blood eosinophils (39-91%) from hypereosinophilic donors exhibited intense labeling for macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) mRNA, whereas eosinophils of normal donors demonstrated only weak or undetectable hybridization signals for MIP-1 alpha mRNA. Most tissue eosinophils infiltrating nasal polyps were strongly positive for both TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha mRNA. By Northern blot analysis, highly enriched blood eosinophils from a patient with the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome exhibited differential expression of TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha mRNA. These findings indicate that human eosinophils represent a potential source of TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha, that levels of expression of mRNA for both cytokines are high in the blood eosinophils of hypereosinophilic donors and in eosinophils infiltrating nasal polyps, that the eosinophils of normal subjects express higher levels of TNF-alpha than MIP-1 alpha mRNA, and that eosinophils purified from the blood of atopic donors can release TNF-alpha in vitro. Images PMID:8514874

  8. Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children: is it a disease continuum?

    PubMed

    Mutalib, Mohamed; Blackstock, Sarah; Evans, Victoria; Huggett, Bonita; Chadokufa, Sibongile; Kiparissi, Fevronia; Elawad, Mamoun

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease (EGID) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are two distinct disorders that share some clinical manifestations but have different diagnostic criteria. In this article, we reviewed the clinical data of three children with EGID who later developed IBD. This study is a retrospective case note review that was conducted between 2007 and 2012. EGID seems to precede IBD in some subsets of children in whom the diagnosis of IBD may take a few years to fully develop. PMID:25358014

  9. Contribution of endothelial selectins and alpha 4 integrins to eosinophil trafficking in allergic and nonallergic inflammatory reactions in skin.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, M M; Hellewell, P G

    1998-09-01

    The role of endothelial selectins in mediating eosinophil recruitment was assessed using the trafficking of 111In-labeled blood eosinophils in mouse skin. An intradermal injection of chemoattractants (leukotriene B4, macrophage inflammatory protein-l alpha, and eotaxin) resulted in a rapid accumulation of 111In eosinophils that was reduced 49 to 91% by anti-P-selectin mAb. An anti-E-selectin mAb was ineffective, although a combined E- and P-selectin blockade resulted in >95% inhibition of all responses. The accumulation of a pulse of 111In eosinophils at sites of active cutaneous anaphylaxis (ACA) at 4 to 8 h and at 20 to 24 h after Ag challenge was completely dependent upon E- and P-selectin in combination, but not in isolation. In contrast, at 20 to 24 h after Ag challenge in a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in skin, 111In eosinophil accumulation was largely independent of endothelial selectins, even when L-selectin was also blocked. An anti-alpha 4 integrin mAb significantly reduced 111In eosinophil trafficking in both allergic reactions but was slightly more effective in the DTH reaction compared with the ACA reaction. These results show that P-selectin and to a lesser extent E-selectin mediate eosinophil recruitment in skin in acute inflammatory reactions. In allergic, late-onset inflammatory reactions, neither P- nor E-selectin alone are sufficient to mediate eosinophil accumulation; when combined, they are essential for trafficking in ACA but are less important in the DTH reaction. Whether alpha 4 integrin-based strategies will be more effective than selectin-based strategies at inhibiting eosinophil recruitment in human disease remains to be determined. PMID:9725251

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of limonene from yuzu (Citrus junos Tanaka) essential oil on eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Ryoji; Roger, Ngatu Nlandu; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Song, Hee-Sun; Sawamura, Masayoshi; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2010-04-01

    Yuzu (Citrus junos Tanaka) has been used as a traditional medicine in Japan. We investigated in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of limonene from yuzu peel on human eosinophilic leukemia HL-60 clone 15 cells. To examine anti-inflammatory effects of limonene on the cells, we measured the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), nuclear factor (NF) kappa B, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We found that low concentration of limonene (7.34 mmol/L) inhibited the production of ROS for eotaxin-stimulated HL-60 clone 15 cells. 14.68 mmol/L concentration of limonene diminished MCP-1 production via NF-kappa B activation comparable to the addition of the proteasomal inhibitor MG132. In addition, it inhibited cell chemotaxis in a p38 MAPK dependent manner similar to the adding of SB203580. These results suggest that limonene may have potential anti-inflammatory efficacy for the treatment of bronchial asthma by inhibiting cytokines, ROS production, and inactivating eosinophil migration. PMID:20492298

  11. Early Comparison of Inflammatory vs. Fibrostenotic Phenotype in Eosinophilic Esophagitis in a Multicenter Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Manish B; Chehade, Mirna; Brizuela, Diana; Maydonovitch, Corinne L; Chen, Yen-Ju; Riffle, Mary Ellen; Achem, Sami R; Moawad, Fouad J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition that causes esophageal remodeling and stricture formation. We compared the clinical course of symptoms, endoscopic findings, histology, and changes in phenotype over time in EoE patients with inflammatory and fibrostenotic phenotypes. METHODS: Data were obtained from EoE patients from three medical centers and followed prospectively. Endoscopic features and histology from index and follow-up endoscopies were recorded. Behavior was classified as inflammatory if endoscopic findings demonstrated furrows or white plaques and as fibrostenotic if endoscopic findings included fixed rings or strictures. RESULTS: Two hundred and fifty-six EoE patients were included in the analysis. The mean age was 32±18 years, 25% of patients were <18 years, 89% of patients were Caucasians, and 74% of patients were male. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 6.8±7.2 years with a follow-up of 1.7±1.9 years (maximum follow-up of 12 years). Fifty-four percent of patients presented with fibrostenotic EoE, whereas 46% presented with inflammatory EoE. Patients with inflammatory disease were younger than those with fibrostenotic disease (24±19 vs. 39±15 years, P<0.001). Patients with fibrostenotic disease had a longer duration of symptoms than those with inflammatory disease (8.1±7.7 vs. 5.3±6.3 years, P=0.002). Over the study period, 47 (18%) had remission of inflammatory EoE, 68 (27%) continued to have inflammatory disease, 74 (29%) continued to have fibrostenotic disease, 65 (25%) fibrostenotic patients had regression of fibrosis, and 2 patients (1%) progressed from inflammatory disease to fibrostenotic disease. Patients who had regression from their fibrostenosis were more likely than patients who continued to demonstrate fibrostenosis to have a decrease in proximal (54% vs. 32%, P<0.001) and distal (70% vs. 38%, P<0.001) eosinophilia. CONCLUSIONS: Most EoE patients maintained their phenotype or

  12. Human mast cell chymase induces the accumulation of neutrophils, eosinophils and other inflammatory cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Shaoheng; Walls, Andrew F

    1998-01-01

    The roles of chymase in acute allergic responses are not clear, despite the relative abundance of this serine proteinase in the secretory granules of human mast cells. We have isolated chymase to high purity from human skin tissue by heparin-agarose affinity chromatography and Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration procedures, and have investigated the ability of human mast cell chymase to stimulate cell accumulation following injection into laboratory animals.Injection of chymase provoked marked neutrophilia and eosinophilia in the skin of Dunkin Hartley guinea-pigs. Compared with saline injected control animals, there were some 60 fold more neutrophils and 12 fold more eosinophils present at the injection site.Following injection of chymase into the peritoneum of BALB/c mice, there were up to 700 fold more neutrophils, 21 fold more eosinophils, 19 fold more lymphocytes and 7 fold more macrophages recovered than from saline injected controls at 16 h. Doses of chymase as low as 5 ng (1.7×10−13 mole) stimulated an inflammatory infiltrate, and significant neutrophilia was elicited within 3 h.The chymase induced cell accumulation in both the guinea-pig and mouse models was dependent on an intact catalytic site, being reduced by co-injection of proteinase inhibitors or heat inactivation of the enzyme.Co-injection of histamine or heparin significantly reduced the chymase induced neutrophil accumulation, whereas neither histamine nor heparin by themselves had any effect on the accumulation of nucleated cells. No synergistic or antagonist interactions between chymase and tryptase were observed when these two major mast cell proteinases were co-injected into the mouse peritoneum.Our findings suggest that chymase may provide an potent stimulus for inflammatory cell recruitment following mast cell activation. PMID:9884078

  13. Eosinophils Contribute to IL-4 Production and Shape the T-Helper Cytokine Profile and Inflammatory Response in Pulmonary Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Piehler, Daniel; Stenzel, Werner; Grahnert, Andreas; Held, Josephin; Richter, Lydia; Köhler, Gabriele; Richter, Tina; Eschke, Maria; Alber, Gottfried; Müller, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility to infection with Cryptococcus neoformans is tightly determined by production of IL-4. In this study, we investigated the time course of IL-4 production and its innate cellular source in mice infected intranasally with C. neoformans. We show that pulmonary IL-4 production starts surprisingly late after 6 weeks of infection. Interestingly, in the lungs of infected mice, pulmonary T helper (Th) cells and eosinophils produce significant amounts of IL-4. In eosinophil-deficient ΔdblGATA mice, IL-33 receptor–expressing Th2s are significantly reduced, albeit not absent, whereas protective Th1 and Th17 responses are enhanced. In addition, recruitment of pulmonary inflammatory cells during infection with C. neoformans is reduced in the absence of eosinophils. These data expand previous findings emphasizing an exclusively destructive effector function by eosinophilic granulocytes. Moreover, in ΔdblGATA mice, fungal control is slightly enhanced in the lung; however, dissemination of Cryptococcus is not prevented. Therefore, eosinophils play an immunoregulatory role that contributes to Th2-dependent susceptibility in allergic inflammation during bronchopulmonary mycosis. PMID:21699881

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anand R; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized in adults. The diagnosis is based on the presence of both typical symptoms and pathologic findings on esophageal biopsy. Patients usually present with dysphagia, food impaction and/or reflux-like symptoms, and biopsy of the esophagus shows more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field. In addition, it is essential to exclude the presence of known causes of tissue eosinophilia such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, infections, malignancy, collagen vascular diseases, hypersensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease. There are no standardized protocols for the therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis. A variety of therapeutic approaches including acid suppression, dietary modifications, topical corticosteroids and endoscopic dilation can be used alone or in combination. PMID:19115464

  15. Characterizing the inflammatory response in esophageal mucosal biopsies in children with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Sayej, Wael N; Ménoret, Antoine; Maharjan, Anu S; Fernandez, Marina; Wang, Zhu; Balarezo, Fabiola; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Sylvester, Francisco A; Vella, Anthony T

    2016-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging allergic, IgE- and non-IgE (Th2 cell)-mediated disease. There are major gaps in the understanding of the basic mechanisms that drive the persistence of EoE. We investigated whether esophageal biopsies from children with EoE demonstrate an inflammatory response that is distinct from normal controls. We prospectively enrolled 84 patients, of whom 77 were included in our analysis, aged 4-17 years (12.8±3.8 years; 81% males). Five esophageal biopsies were collected from each patient at the time of endoscopy. Intramucosal lymphocytes were isolated, phenotyped and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin to measure their potential to produce cytokines via flow cytometry. We also performed cytokine arrays on 72-h biopsy culture supernatants. CD8(+) T cells, compared with CD4(+) T cells, synthesized more TNF-α and interferon (IFN)-γ after mitogen stimulation in the EoE-New/Active vs EoE-Remission group (P=0.0098; P=0.02) and controls (P=0.0008; P=0.03). Culture supernatants taken from explant esophageal tissue contained 13 analytes that distinguished EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and Controls. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis based on these analytes distinctly separated EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and Controls. In summary, we have identified a previously unappreciated role for CD8(+) T lymphocytes with potential to produce TNF-α and IFN-γ in EoE. Our results suggest that CD8(+) T cells have a role in the persistence or progression of EoE. We have also identified a panel of analytes produced by intact esophageal biopsies that differentiates EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and controls. Our results suggest that esophageal epithelial cells may have specific immune effector functions in EoE that control the type and amplitude of inflammation. PMID:27525061

  16. Characterizing the inflammatory response in esophageal mucosal biopsies in children with eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Sayej, Wael N; Ménoret, Antoine; Maharjan, Anu S; Fernandez, Marina; Wang, Zhu; Balarezo, Fabiola; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Sylvester, Francisco A; Vella, Anthony T

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging allergic, IgE- and non-IgE (Th2 cell)-mediated disease. There are major gaps in the understanding of the basic mechanisms that drive the persistence of EoE. We investigated whether esophageal biopsies from children with EoE demonstrate an inflammatory response that is distinct from normal controls. We prospectively enrolled 84 patients, of whom 77 were included in our analysis, aged 4–17 years (12.8±3.8 years; 81% males). Five esophageal biopsies were collected from each patient at the time of endoscopy. Intramucosal lymphocytes were isolated, phenotyped and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin to measure their potential to produce cytokines via flow cytometry. We also performed cytokine arrays on 72-h biopsy culture supernatants. CD8+ T cells, compared with CD4+ T cells, synthesized more TNF-α and interferon (IFN)-γ after mitogen stimulation in the EoE-New/Active vs EoE-Remission group (P=0.0098; P=0.02) and controls (P=0.0008; P=0.03). Culture supernatants taken from explant esophageal tissue contained 13 analytes that distinguished EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and Controls. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis based on these analytes distinctly separated EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and Controls. In summary, we have identified a previously unappreciated role for CD8+ T lymphocytes with potential to produce TNF-α and IFN-γ in EoE. Our results suggest that CD8+ T cells have a role in the persistence or progression of EoE. We have also identified a panel of analytes produced by intact esophageal biopsies that differentiates EoE-New/Active from EoE-Remission and controls. Our results suggest that esophageal epithelial cells may have specific immune effector functions in EoE that control the type and amplitude of inflammation. PMID:27525061

  17. Differential eosinophil and mast cell regulation: mast cell viability and accumulation in inflammatory tissue are independent of proton-sensing receptor GPR65.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiang; Mose, Eucabeth; Hogan, Simon P; Zimmermann, Nives

    2014-06-01

    Extracellular acidification has been observed in allergic inflammatory diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that the proton-sensing receptor G protein-coupled receptor 65 (GPR65) regulates eosinophil survival in an acidic environment in vitro and eosinophil accumulation in an allergic lung inflammation model. For mast cells, another inflammatory cell type critical for allergic responses, it remains unknown whether GPR65 is expressed and/or regulates mast cell viability. Thus, in the present study, we employed in vitro experiments and an intestinal anaphylaxis model in which both mastocytosis and eosinophilia can be observed, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract, to enable us to directly compare the effect of GPR65 expression on these two cell types. We identified GPR65 expression on mast cells; however, unlike eosinophil viability, mast cell viability in vitro is not affected by acidification or GPR65 expression. Mechanistically, we determined that mast cells do not respond to extracellular acidification with increased cAMP levels. Furthermore, in the intestinal anaphylaxis model, we observed a significant reduction of eosinophils (59.1 ± 9.2% decrease) in the jejunum of allergen-challenged GPR65-deficient mice compared with allergen-challenged wild-type mice, despite the degree of antigen sensitization and the expression levels of Th2 cytokines (Il4, Il13) and eosinophil chemokines (Ccl11, Ccl24) in the jejunum being comparable. In contrast, the accumulation of mast cells in allergen-challenged mice was not affected by GPR65 deficiency. In conclusion, our study demonstrates differential regulation of eosinophils and mast cells in inflammatory tissue, with mast cell viability and accumulation being independent of GPR65. PMID:24742990

  18. Differential eosinophil and mast cell regulation: Mast cell viability and accumulation in inflammatory tissue are independent of proton-sensing receptor GPR65

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiang; Mose, Eucabeth; Hogan, Simon P.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular acidification has been observed in allergic inflammatory diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that the proton-sensing receptor G protein-coupled receptor 65 (GPR65) regulates eosinophil survival in an acidic environment in vitro and eosinophil accumulation in an allergic lung inflammation model. For mast cells, another inflammatory cell type critical for allergic responses, it remains unknown whether GPR65 is expressed and/or regulates mast cell viability. Thus, in the present study, we employed in vitro experiments and an intestinal anaphylaxis model in which both mastocytosis and eosinophilia can be observed, particularly in the gastrointestinal tract, to enable us to directly compare the effect of GPR65 expression on these two cell types. We identified GPR65 expression on mast cells; however, unlike eosinophil viability, mast cell viability in vitro is not affected by acidification or GPR65 expression. Mechanistically, we determined that mast cells do not respond to extracellular acidification with increased cAMP levels. Furthermore, in the intestinal anaphylaxis model, we observed a significant reduction of eosinophils (59.1 ± 9.2% decrease) in the jejunum of allergen-challenged GPR65-deficient mice compared with allergen-challenged wild-type mice, despite the degree of antigen sensitization and the expression levels of Th2 cytokines (Il4, Il13) and eosinophil chemokines (Ccl11, Ccl24) in the jejunum being comparable. In contrast, the accumulation of mast cells in allergen-challenged mice was not affected by GPR65 deficiency. In conclusion, our study demonstrates differential regulation of eosinophils and mast cells in inflammatory tissue, with mast cell viability and accumulation being independent of GPR65. PMID:24742990

  19. Reslizumab for pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Garry M

    2010-07-01

    Pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis is an inflammatory condition associated with marked eosinophil accumulation in the mucosal tissues of the esophagus. Eosinophils are major proinflammatory cells thought to make a major contribution to allergic diseases that affect the upper and lower airways, skin and GI tract. IL-5 is central to eosinophil maturation and release from the bone marrow, and their subsequent accumulation, activation and persistence in the tissues. Reslizumab (Cinquil, Ception Therapeutics Inc., PA, USA) is a humanized monoclonal antibody with potent IL-5 neutralizing effects that represents a potential treatment for eosinophilic diseases. This article considers the current status of the clinical development of reslizumab for pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:20636000

  20. Human eosinophil transmigration.

    PubMed

    Bazan-Socha, Stanislawa; Zuk, Joanna; Jakiela, Bogdan; Musial, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we describe an optimized eosinophil transmigration assay. Transmigration of purified human peripheral blood eosinophils can be studied using special insert with membrane coated with extracellular matrix components or membrane covered with cells growing as a confluent monolayer, such as vascular endothelial cells of any origin or airway epithelial cells. In our opinion, eosinophil transmigration assay performed through monolayer of human microvascular endothelial cells of lung origin is a suitable tool to estimate the full migratory potential of eosinophils in studies on the pathology of asthma or other respiratory diseases, where eosinophils play important effector functions. This experimental system is easy to perform, simple for optimization, and comparable to in vivo processes occurring during eosinophil migration to the inflammatory sites in lungs. PMID:24986615

  1. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis : Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Shih, H-M; Bair, M-J; Chen, H-L; Lin, I-T

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) is a rare disease which belongs to primary eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (primary EGIDs), characterized by an accumulation of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and is strongly associated with atopy and allergy. The clinical presentations vary depending on the site and depth of eosinophilic intestinal infiltration. Radiology pictures may show irregular thickening of the folds, but these findings can also be present in other conditions like inflammatory bowel disease and lymphoma. The endoscopic appearance is also nonspecific. The definite diagnosis requires biopsy for histological evidence of GI eosinophilic infiltration and clinicians make the diagnosis in correlation with and by exclusion of other possible causes of eosinophilic infiltration. Because EGE is a rare disease, the treatment is based on limited case reports and clinicians' experience. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy. The prognosis of EGE is relatively good when patients receive timely and proper treatment. PMID:27382945

  2. Eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Saurabh; Baruah, Bhaskar Jyoti; Makharia, Govind; Ahuja, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinico-pathological entity characterised by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilia on esophageal mucosal biopsies in the absence of other causes of esophageal eosinophilia. It is a chronic inflammatory condition of esophagus often characterized by refractory reflux symptoms in children and dysphagia in adults. It occurs as a result of Th2 inflammatory response to environmental triggers (food antigens) in genetically predisposed individuals. The diagnostic criteria include symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, esophageal eosinophilia (> 15/hpf), and a PPI trial (persistent eosinophilia after 8 weeks of PPI). Mainstay of treatment at present is topical steroids and dietary therapy. Maintenance treatment should be considered to prevent long term complications. PMID:27522734

  3. Eosinophil Granule Proteins ECP and EPX as Markers for a Potential Early-Stage Inflammatory Lesion in Female Genital Schistosomiasis (FGS)

    PubMed Central

    Randrianasolo, Bodo Sahondra; Ravoniarimbinina, Pascaline; Ravaoalimalala, Vololomboahangy Elisabeth; Leutscher, Peter; Kjetland, Eyrun Floerecke; Vennervald, Birgitte Jyding

    2014-01-01

    Background Genital granulomas induced by Schistosoma haematobium eggs can manifest as different lesion types visible by colposcopy; rubbery papules (RP), homogenous sandy patches (HSP) and grainy sandy patches (GSP). Pronounced tissue eosinophilia is a candidate marker for active S. haematobium pathology, as viable schistosome egg granulomas often are eosinophil rich. Here it was investigated whether eosinophil granule proteins ECP (eosinophil cationic protein) and EPX (eosinophil protein-X) in urine and genital lavage can be used as markers for active FGS lesions. Methods Uro-genital samples from 118 Malagasy women were analysed for ECP and EPX by standard sandwich avidin/biotin amplified ELISA. Principal findings The women with RP lesions had significantly higher levels of ECP and EPX in both lavage and urine. Furthermore, women with RP lesions were significantly younger than those with GSP. This could indicate that RP lesions might be more recently established and thus represent an earlier inflammatory lesion stage. Conclusion ECP in genital lavage might be a future tool aiding the identification of FGS pathology at a stage where reversibility remains a possibility following praziquantel treatment. PMID:25033206

  4. Pseudotumoral Eosinophilic Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Ahmed; Bouzouita, Abderrazak; Ayed, Haroun; Kerkeni, Walid; Cherif, Mohamed; Ben Slama, Riadh M.; Derouiche, Amine; Chebil, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the bladder which origin and pathogenesis are unknown. Since the first description in 1960, hundreds of cases have been reported, 20 Pseudotumor forms. We report a case of cystitis eosinophils in tumor-form, a patient of 72 years without urological or allergic history. The patient was treated with endoscopic resection alone. The outcome was favorable with disappearance symptoms and no recurrence at 1, 3 and 6 months controls. We carry a literature review of cystitis eosinophils on the different clinical manifestations, the means diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. PMID:26793503

  5. [Eosinophilic esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Rodrigues, Susana; Piedade, Susana; Gaspar, Ângela; Morais-Almeida, Mário; Macedo, Guilherme

    2011-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by significant and isolated infiltration of the esophageal mucosa by eosinophils, associated with clinical symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, affecting children and adults. It is an increasingly frequent cause of symptoms similar to gastroesophageal reflux disease but refractory to anti-acid therapeutic. It is commonly associated with food allergies or other atopic diseases. Since there are no symptoms, signs, serological biomarkers or endoscopic findings pathognomonic of EE, the diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion; moreover, due to its chronic relapsing nature the potential to cause major esophageal structural changes, its early recognition and close cooperation between gastroenterologists and immunoallergologists is essential for the timely institution of appropriate therapy. The treatment is based on two main strategies: diet and / or pharmacotherapy, depending on the co-existence of sensitization to food allergens. It is our aim to review this issue, considering recent guidelines, as well as propose a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm. PMID:22863504

  6. Identification of Fetal Inflammatory Cells in Eosinophilic/T-cell Chorionic Vasculitis Using Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Philip J; Li, LiQiong; Wang, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic/T-cell chorionic vasculitis (ETCV) is an inflammatory lesion of placental fetal vessels. In contrast to acute chorionic vasculitis, inflammation in ETCV is seen in chorionic vessel walls opposite the amnionic surface. It is not known whether inflammation in ETCV consists of maternal cells from the intervillous space or fetal cells migrating from the vessel. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to differentiate fetal versus maternal cells in ETCV. Placentas with ETCV, previously identified for a published study, were used. Infant sex in each case was identified using the electronic medical record. For male infants, 3-μm sections were cut from archived tissue blocks from placentas involving ETCV and stained with fluorescent X- and Y-chromosome centromeric probes. A consecutive hematoxylin/eosin-stained section was used for correlation. FISH analysis was performed on 400 interphase nuclei at the site of ETCV to determine the proportion of XX, XY, X, and Y cells. Of 31 ETCV cases, 20 were female and 10 were male (1 sex not recorded). Six of 10 cases with male infants had recuts with visible ETCV. In these 6 cases the average percentages (ranges) of XY cells, X-only cells, and Y-only cells in the region of inflammation were 81 (70-90), 11 (6-17), and 8 (2-14), respectively. There was a 2:1 female:male infant ratio in ETCV. Similar to acute chorionic vasculitis, the inflammation in ETCV is of fetal origin. It is still unknown, however, whether the stimulus for ETCV is of fetal or maternal origin. PMID:25756311

  7. Leukemia -- Eosinophilic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia - Eosinophilic: Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Leukemia - Eosinophilic: Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... Platelets that help the blood to clot About leukemia Types of leukemia are named after the specific ...

  8. Eosinophilic bioactivities in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Carr, Tara F; Berdnikovs, Sergejs; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Bochner, Bruce S; Rosenwasser, Lanny J

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is clearly related to airway or blood eosinophilia, and asthmatics with significant eosinophilia are at higher risk for more severe disease. Eosinophils actively contribute to innate and adaptive immune responses and inflammatory cascades through the production and release of diverse chemokines, cytokines, lipid mediators and other growth factors. Eosinophils may persist in the blood and airways despite guidelines-based treatment. This review details eosinophil effector mechanisms, surface markers, and clinical outcomes associated with eosinophilia and asthma severity. There is interest in the potential of eosinophils or their products to predict treatment response with biotherapeutics and their usefulness as biomarkers. This is important as monoclonal antibodies are targeting cytokines and eosinophils in different lung environments for treating severe asthma. Identifying disease state-specific eosinophil biomarkers would help to refine these strategies and choose likely responders to biotherapeutics. PMID:27386041

  9. Eosinophilic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... parasites , particularly ones that invade tissue, cause eosinophilia. Cancers that cause eosinophilia include Hodgkin lymphoma , leukemia , and myeloproliferative disorders . If the number of eosinophils is only ...

  10. EoE (Eosinophilic Esophagitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... EGIDs Eosinophilic Fasciitis Eosinophilic Pneumonia Eosinophilic Cystitis Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Hypereosinophilic Syndrome Eosinophilia-Myalgia Syndrome Resources For Patients ...

  11. An improved method to visualize eosinophils in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Rubio, C A; Glaessgen, A

    2006-01-01

    We previously found in Giemsa-stained colorectal sections from IBD patients that eosinophilic granulocytes turned fluorescent when excited with indirect fluorescent light, while other inflammatory cells were non-fluorescent. We now studied with that method, the frequency of eosinophilic granulocytes in sections from patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EE). Cell counting was done in consecutive sections stained with Giemsa stain using indirect fluorescence light (G-IFL setting) and with hematoxylin-eosin using transmitted light (HE-TL setting) in 5 cases of EE and in 10 consecutive cases of reflux esophagitis (RE) grade 2. In EE 45.0 eosinophils/case (range 39-51) were recorded with the G-IFL setting but only 33.4 eosinophils/case (range 28-39) with the HE-TL setting (p < 0.05). In RE cases, 3 eosinophils/case (range 2-4) were found with the G-IFL setting and 2 eosinophil/case (range 1-3) with the HE-TL setting. The G-IFL method is not only more sensitive in detecting eosinophils than the conventional HE-TL method but also quicker, since a differential cell counting is not necessary. PMID:17091778

  12. [Eosinophilic esophagitis: an "emerging disease"].

    PubMed

    Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Hervieu, Valérie; Scoazec, Jean-Yves

    2007-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a recently identified disease. The histological examination of esophageal biopsies is essential for its diagnosis, which is made with steadily increasing frequency. Eosinophilic esophagitis is an anatomoclinical entity, involving both children and adults, characterized by a dense and isolated infiltration of the esophageal mucosa by eosinophils, revealed by clinical symptoms of upper digestive tract origin and resistant to anti-acid treatment with IPP at high doses. Eosinophilic esophagitis is currently interpreted as an allergic disease, even though its pathogenesis remains unclear. The disease has a chronic course with persistent or relapsing symptoms, present with symptoms similar to those of gastro-esophageal reflux or with dysphagia. Endoscopic examination shows the presence of characteristic, but not pathognomonic, lesions (stenoses, strictures, circular rings, reduction of calibre, white specks, granularity of the mucosa). The histological diagnosis requires multiple biopsies taken all along the esophagus. The main sign is the presence of a dense eosinophilic infiltrate of the mucosa: a peak density of more than 15 eosinophils in at least one x400 field is the minimal criteria required for diagnosis. Associated lesions correspond to tissue damage and repair secondary to eosinophil activation (basal hyperplasia, microabscesses, fibrosis of the lamina propria). The treatment is based on dietary measures (allergen exclusion) and on the use of anti-inflammatory drugs, mainly corticoids. In conclusion, eosinophilic esophagitis is an emerging disease, important to identify, since it requires a specific treatment, different from that of reflux esophagitis. PMID:18554551

  13. Eosinophilic colitis.

    PubMed

    Dionísio de Sousa, Isabel José; Bonito, Nuno; Pais, Ana; Gervásio, Helena

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old man, diagnosed with colon cancer stage III in July/2010, underwent surgery and received adjuvant chemotherapy with FOLFOX 4 (5-fluorouracil; calcium folinate and oxaliplatin), which ended in March/2011 after 12-cycles. It was then decided to maintain periodical surveillance. About 1 year later, the patient developed several episodes of diarrhoea, mainly during the night, and presented persistent peripheral eosinophilia in the blood count (range 585-1300 eosinophils/µL). Colonoscopy was performed, with the histological result showing eosinophilic infiltration of the colon, compatible with eosinophilic colitis. The patient was treated with a short course of budesonide, achieving resolution of symptoms, and has remained asymptomatic. PMID:26957036

  14. Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Glenn T.; Katzka, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Once considered a rare condition, eosinophilic esophagitis is now one of the most common conditions diagnosed during the assessment of feeding problems in children and during the evaluation of dysphagia and food impaction in adults.1 The entity exists worldwide but has been most extensively studied in Western countries, where its prevalence has been estimated to be 0.4% among all children and adults.2 Whether eosinophilic esophagitis is truly a new disease or simply a recently recognized one is uncertain.3 In this review, we consider the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiological and clinical features, and treatment of this increasingly prevalent disease. PMID:26488694

  15. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Biology to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, a recently recognized and growing clinical disorder over the past decade, is characterized by antigen-driven eosinophil accumulation in the esophagus. Symptoms frequently mimic those of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) but the two diseases are quite distinct in terms of their histopathology, genetic signature, response to therapy, hereditary risk and association with allergy. Disease pathogenesis involves the interplay of external and genetic factors, particularly food antigens and the eosinophil chemoattractant eotaxin-3, respectively. Transcript signatures and animal models have uncovered the importance of adaptive T cell immunity involving IL-5 and IL-13 elicited esophageal epithelial cell responses. Notably, symptoms, dysregulated esophageal gene expression and pathology are largely reversible following reduction of specific food antigen exposure, as well as anti-inflammatory therapy, but chronic treatment is necessary to prevent relapse. As such, eosinophilic esophagitis is a disease with the unique features of chronic esophagitis, atopy, immune sensitization to oral antigens, reversibility and familial association. PMID:19596009

  16. Gallium-67 pulmonary uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Morais, J.; Carrier, L.; Gariepy, G.; Le Bel, L.; Chartrand, R.; Picard, D.

    1988-01-01

    Eosinophilic pneumonia is usually diagnosed based on the findings on chest x-ray, white blood count, and transbronchial biopsy. After reporting a case of Ga-67 lung uptake in eosinophilic pneumonia, its histopathology is discussed and the mechanisms of Ga-67 uptake by inflammatory lesions are reviewed.

  17. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Merves, Jamie; Muir, Amanda; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna Modayur; Cianferoni, Antonella; Wang, Mei-Lun; Spergel, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review the understanding of the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and the role of the immune system in the disease process. Data Sources Peer-reviewed articles on EoE from PubMed searching for “Eosinophilic Esophagitis and fibrosis” in the period of 1995 to 2013. Study Selection Studies on the clinical and immunologic features, pathogenesis, and management of EoE. Results Recent work has revealed that thymic stromal lymphopoietin and basophil have an increased role in the pathogenesis of disease. Additional understanding on the role of fibrosis in EoE is emerging. Conclusion The incidence of EoE is increasing like most atopic disease. Similar to other allergic diseases, EoE is treated with topical steroids and/or allergen avoidance. PMID:24566295

  18. Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease (EGID) can be classified as eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) when the eosinophilia is limited to the esophagus or as eosinophilic gastritis (EG) if it is limited to the gastric tract, eosinophilic colitis (EC) if it is limited to the colon, and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) if the eosinophilia involves one or more parts of the gastrointestinal tract. EoE is by far the most common EGID. It is a well-defined chronic atopic disease due to a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammation triggered often by food allergens. EoE diagnosis is done if an esophageal biopsy shows at least 15 eosinophils per high power field (eos/hpf). Globally accepted long-term therapies for EoE are the use of swallowed inhaled steroids or food antigen avoidance. The treatment of EoE is done not only to control symptoms but also to prevent complications such as esophageal stricture and food impaction. EGE cause non-specific gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and are diagnosed if esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD)/colonoscopy show eosinophilia in one or more parts of the GI tract. They are rare diseases with an unclear pathogenesis, and they are poorly defined in terms of diagnostic criteria and treatment. Before initiating treatment of any EGE, it is imperative to conduct a differential diagnosis to exclude other causes of hypereosinophilia with GI localization. EGE are often poorly responsive to therapy and there is no commonly accepted long-term treatment. EG has many characteristics similar to EoE, including the fact that it is often due to a food allergen-driven Th2 inflammation; transcriptome analysis however shows that it is more a systemic disease and has a different gene signature than EoE. EC is a benign form of delayed food allergy in infant and is instead a difficult-to-treat severe inflammatory condition in older children and adults. EC in the latter groups can be a manifestation of drug allergy or autoimmune disease. Overall EGE, EC, and EG are rare and

  19. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  20. Eosinophils: important players in humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Berek, C

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils perform numerous tasks. They are involved in inflammatory reactions associated with innate immune defence against parasitic infections and are also involved in pathological processes in response to allergens. Recently, however, it has become clear that eosinophils also play crucial non-inflammatory roles in the generation and maintenance of adaptive immune responses. Eosinophils, being a major source of the plasma cell survival factor APRIL (activation and proliferation-induced ligand), are essential not only for the long-term survival of plasma cells in the bone marrow, but also for the maintenance of these cells in the lamina propria which underlies the gut epithelium. At steady state under non-inflammatory conditions eosinophils are resident cells of the gastrointestinal tract, although only few are present in the major organized lymphoid tissue of the gut - the Peyer's patches (PP). Surprisingly, however, lack of eosinophils abolishes efficient class-switching of B cells to immunoglobulin (Ig)A in the germinal centres of PP. Thus, eosinophils are required to generate and to maintain mucosal IgA plasma cells, and as a consequence their absence leads to a marked reduction of IgA both in serum and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). Eosinophils thus have an essential part in long-term humoral immune protection, as they are crucial for the longevity of antibody-producing plasma cells in the bone marrow and, in addition, for gut immune homeostasis. PMID:26291602

  1. Roles and Regulation of Gastrointestinal Eosinophils in Immunity and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, YunJae; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils have been considered to be destructive end-stage effector cells that have a role in parasitic infections and allergy reactions by the release of their granule-derived cytotoxic proteins. However, an increasing number of experimental observations indicate that eosinophils also are multifunctional leukocytes involved in diverse inflammatory and physiologic immune responses. Under homeostatic conditions, eosinophils are particularly abundant in the lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract where their involvement in various biological processes within the gastrointestinal tract has been posited. In this review, we summarize the molecular steps involved in eosinophil development and describe eosinophil trafficking to the gastrointestinal tract. We synthesize the current findings on the phenotypic and functional properties of gastrointestinal eosinophils and the accumulating evidence that they have a contributory role in gastrointestinal disorders, with a focus on primary eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. Finally, we discuss the potential role of eosinophils as modulators of the intestinal immune system. PMID:25049430

  2. SOCS3 Silencing Attenuates Eosinophil Functions in Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zafra, Mª Paz; Cañas, Jose A.; Mazzeo, Carla; Gámez, Cristina; Sanz, Veronica; Fernández-Nieto, Mar; Quirce, Santiago; Barranco, Pilar; Ruiz-Hornillos, Javier; Sastre, Joaquín; del Pozo, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are one of the key inflammatory cells in asthma. Eosinophils can exert a wide variety of actions through expression and secretion of multiple molecules. Previously, we have demonstrated that eosinophils purified from peripheral blood from asthma patients express high levels of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3). In this article, SOCS3 gene silencing in eosinophils from asthmatics has been carried out to achieve a better understanding of the suppressor function in eosinophils. SOCS3 siRNA treatment drastically reduced SOCS3 expression in eosinophils, leading to an inhibition of the regulatory transcription factors GATA-3 and FoxP3, also interleukin (IL)-10; in turn, an increased STAT3 phosphorilation was observed. Moreover, SOCS3 abrogation in eosinophils produced impaired migration, adhesion and degranulation. Therefore, SOCS3 might be regarded as an important regulator implicated in eosinophil mobilization from the bone marrow to the lungs during the asthmatic process. PMID:25764157

  3. SOCS3 silencing attenuates eosinophil functions in asthma patients.

    PubMed

    Zafra, Ma Paz; Cañas, Jose A; Mazzeo, Carla; Gámez, Cristina; Sanz, Veronica; Fernández-Nieto, Mar; Quirce, Santiago; Barranco, Pilar; Ruiz-Hornillos, Javier; Sastre, Joaquín; del Pozo, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are one of the key inflammatory cells in asthma. Eosinophils can exert a wide variety of actions through expression and secretion of multiple molecules. Previously, we have demonstrated that eosinophils purified from peripheral blood from asthma patients express high levels of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3). In this article, SOCS3 gene silencing in eosinophils from asthmatics has been carried out to achieve a better understanding of the suppressor function in eosinophils. SOCS3 siRNA treatment drastically reduced SOCS3 expression in eosinophils, leading to an inhibition of the regulatory transcription factors GATA-3 and FoxP3, also interleukin (IL)-10; in turn, an increased STAT3 phosphorilation was observed. Moreover, SOCS3 abrogation in eosinophils produced impaired migration, adhesion and degranulation. Therefore, SOCS3 might be regarded as an important regulator implicated in eosinophil mobilization from the bone marrow to the lungs during the asthmatic process. PMID:25764157

  4. Platelet-activating factor induces eosinophil peroxidase release from purified human eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Kroegel, C; Yukawa, T; Dent, G; Chanez, P; Chung, K F; Barnes, P J

    1988-01-01

    The degranulation response of purified human eosinophils to platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been studied. PAF induced release of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and beta-glucuronidase from highly purified human eosinophils with an EC50 of 0.9 nM. The order of release was comparable with that induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The new specific PAF antagonist 3-[4-(2-chlorophenyl)-9-methyl-H-thieno[3,2-f] [1,2,4]triazolo-[4,3a][1,4]-diazepin-2-yl](4-morpholinyl)- 1-propane-one (WEB 2086) inhibited the PAF-induced enzyme release by human eosinophils in a dose-dependent manner. The viability of eosinophils were unaffected both by PAF and WEB 2086. The results suggest that PAF may amplify allergic and inflammatory reactions by release of preformed proteins from eosinophil granules. PMID:3410498

  5. Eosinophil ETosis and DNA Traps: a New Look at Eosinophilic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Shigeharu; Tokunaga, Takahiro; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Honda, Kohei; Hirokawa, Makoto; Spencer, Lisa A; Weller, Peter F

    2016-07-01

    The traditional paradigm of eosinophils as end-stage damaging cells has mainly relied on their release of cytotoxic proteins. Cytokine-induced cell survival and secretion of granular contents from tissue-dwelling eosinophil are thought to be important mechanisms for eosinophilic inflammatory disorders, although the occurrence of cytolysis and its products (i.e., free extracellular granules) has been observed in affected lesions. Recent evidence indicates that activated eosinophils can exhibit a non-apoptotic cell death pathway, namely extracellular trap cell death (ETosis) that mediates the eosinophil cytolytic degranulation. Here, we discuss the current concept of eosinophil ETosis which provides a new look at eosinophilic inflammation. Lessons from eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis revealed that ETosis-derived DNA traps, composed of stable web-like chromatin, contribute to the properties of highly viscous eosinophilic mucin and impairments in its clearance. Intact granules entrapped in DNA traps are causing long-lasting inflammation but also might have immunoregulatory roles. Eosinophils possess a way to have post-postmortem impacts on innate immunity, local immune response, sterile inflammation, and tissue damage. PMID:27393701

  6. Indomethacin inhibits eosinophil migration to prostaglandin D2: therapeutic potential of CRTH2 desensitization for eosinophilic pustular folliculitis

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Naoko; Satoh, Takahiro; Hirai, Aiko; Saeki, Kazumi; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Indomethacin is a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, and shows therapeutic potential for various eosinophilic skin diseases, particularly eosinophilic pustular folliculitis. One of the unique characteristics of indomethacin is that, unlike other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, it is a potent agonist of chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper type 2 cells (CRTH2), a receptor for prostaglandin D2 (PGD2). This study investigated the pharmacological actions of indomethacin on eosinophil migration to clarify the actual mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of indomethacin on eosinophilic pustular folliculitis. Eosinophils exhibited chemokinetic and chemotactic responses to both PGD2 and indomethacin through CRTH2 receptors. Pre-treatment of eosinophils with indomethacin greatly inhibited eosinophil migration to PGD2 and, to a much lesser extent, to eotaxin (CCL11); these effects could be mediated by homologous and heterologous desensitization of eosinophil CRTH2 and CCR3, respectively, by agonistic effects of indomethacin on CRTH2. Indomethacin also cancelled a priming effect of Δ12-PGJ2, a plasma metabolite of PGD2, on eosinophil chemotaxis to eotaxin. Indomethacin down-modulated cell surface expression of both CRTH2 and CCR3. Hair follicle epithelium and epidermal keratinocytes around eosinophilic pustules together with the eccrine apparatus of palmoplantar lesions of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis were immunohistochemically positive for lipocalin-type PGD synthase. Indomethacin may exert therapeutic effects against eosinophilic skin diseases in which PGD2-CRTH2 signals play major roles by reducing eosinophil responses to PGD2. PMID:23582181

  7. Eosinophilic esophagitis: an autoimmune esophageal disorder.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neha; Levine, Jeremiah

    2014-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) represents a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal inflammatory disease associated with esophageal dysfunction resulting from severe inflammation. The incidence and prevalence of EoE have been increasing in the past decade; however, the reason for this increase is unclear. There is a chronic inflammatory infiltrate that is present in EoE which promotes inflammation, symptoms, and dysfunction. In addition to eosinophils, interleukin (IL)-5 expressing T cells, B cells, eotaxin-3, IL-13, and IgE-bearing mast cells are present in EoE and are thought to contribute to the disease process. Eosinophils are pro-inflammatory and modulate multiple aspects of the immune response. Eosinophils produce a wide range of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factors, and tumor necrosis factors. Once activated, eosinophils release granule components, which are toxic to a variety of tissues. Transforming growth factor β1 is a pro-fibrotic molecule produced by epithelial and inflammatory cells, is overexpressed in EoE, and plays a role in esophageal remodeling. Fibrous remodeling in EoE could be associated with symptoms of dysphagia and may explain and predict future esophageal strictures and dysmotility. EoE is a complex disease involving multiple activation pathways, a large number of cells, and various inflammatory molecules. It, along with other atopic disease, is becoming increasingly prevalent and has an important genetic load and may represent as an immunological tolerance disorder of the GI tract. PMID:25499460

  8. Natural killer cells regulate eosinophilic inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Heui; Choi, Go Eun; Lee, Bong-Jae; Kwon, Seog Woon; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Kim, Hun Sik; Jang, Yong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils play a major pathologic role in the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Dysregulated production of prostaglandin (PG), particularly PGD2, is considered to be an important contributing factor to eosinophilic inflammation in CRS primarily through proinflammatory and chemotactic effects on eosinophils. Here, we provide evidence that PGD2 can promote eosinophilic inflammation through a suppression of Natural killer (NK) cell effector function and NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation. Eosinophil apoptosis mediated by NK cells was significantly decreased in CRS patients compared with healthy controls. This decrease was associated with NK cell dysfunction and eosinophilic inflammation. Tissue eosinophils were positively correlated with blood eosinophils in CRS patients. In a murine model of CRS, NK cell depletion caused an exacerbation of blood eosinophilia and eosinophilic inflammation in the sinonasal tissue. PGD2 and its metabolite, but not PGE2 and a panel of cytokines including TGF-β, were increased in CRS patients compared with controls. Effector functions of NK cells were potently suppressed by PGD2-dependent, rather than PGE2-dependent, pathway in controls and CRS patients. Thus, our results suggest decreased NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation, possibly through an increased level of PGD2, as a previously unrecognized link between PG dysregulation and eosinophilic inflammation in CRS. PMID:27271931

  9. Natural killer cells regulate eosinophilic inflammation in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Heui; Choi, Go Eun; Lee, Bong-Jae; Kwon, Seog Woon; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Kim, Hun Sik; Jang, Yong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils play a major pathologic role in the pathogenesis of diverse inflammatory diseases including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Dysregulated production of prostaglandin (PG), particularly PGD2, is considered to be an important contributing factor to eosinophilic inflammation in CRS primarily through proinflammatory and chemotactic effects on eosinophils. Here, we provide evidence that PGD2 can promote eosinophilic inflammation through a suppression of Natural killer (NK) cell effector function and NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation. Eosinophil apoptosis mediated by NK cells was significantly decreased in CRS patients compared with healthy controls. This decrease was associated with NK cell dysfunction and eosinophilic inflammation. Tissue eosinophils were positively correlated with blood eosinophils in CRS patients. In a murine model of CRS, NK cell depletion caused an exacerbation of blood eosinophilia and eosinophilic inflammation in the sinonasal tissue. PGD2 and its metabolite, but not PGE2 and a panel of cytokines including TGF-β, were increased in CRS patients compared with controls. Effector functions of NK cells were potently suppressed by PGD2-dependent, rather than PGE2-dependent, pathway in controls and CRS patients. Thus, our results suggest decreased NK cell-mediated eosinophil regulation, possibly through an increased level of PGD2, as a previously unrecognized link between PG dysregulation and eosinophilic inflammation in CRS. PMID:27271931

  10. Eosinophilic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Eosinophilic lung diseases especially comprise eosinophilic pneumonia or as the more transient Löffler syndrome, which is most often due to parasitic infections. The diagnosis of eosinophilic pneumonia is based on characteristic clinical-imaging features and the demonstration of alveolar eosinophilia, defined as at least 25% eosinophils at BAL. Peripheral blood eosinophilia is common but may be absent at presentation in idiopathic acute eosinophilic pneumonia, which may be misdiagnosed as severe infectious pneumonia. All possible causes of eosinophilia, including drug, toxin, fungus related etiologies, must be thoroughly investigated. Extrathoracic manifestations should raise the suspicion of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:27514599

  11. Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACG on Facebook About ACG ACG Store ACG Patient Education & Resource Center Home GI Health and Disease Recursos en Español What is a Gastroenterologist? Podcasts and Videos GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome Obesity © ...

  12. Origin, regulation and physiological function of intestinal eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Fulkerson, Patricia C.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophils are pleiotropic multi-functional leukocytes that are typically associated with the initiation and propagation of inflammatory responses, particularly helminth infection and allergic disease. However, expanding evidence supports a broader role for eosinophils in homeostatic function and organ development and modulation of local immune responses via interaction with other effector cells. In this review, the biology of eosinophils in the healthy gut is summarized. In particular, the molecular steps involved in eosinophil development and trafficking are described, with special attention to the important role of the transcription factor GATA-1, the eosinophil selective cytokine IL-5 and the eotaxin subfamily of chemokines. In addition, the regulation of eosinophil survival by inhibitory and death receptors and the expanding role for eosinophils in health and disease are reviewed. PMID:18492563

  13. Cystatin F Ensures Eosinophil Survival by Regulating Granule Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Stephen P.; McMillan, Sarah J.; Colbert, Jeff D.; Lawrence, Rachel A.; Watts, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eosinophils are now recognized as multifunctional leukocytes that provide critical homeostatic signals to maintain other immune cells and aid tissue repair. Paradoxically, eosinophils also express an armory of granule-localized toxins and hydrolases believed to contribute to pathology in inflammatory disease. How eosinophils deliver their supporting functions while avoiding self-inflicted injury is poorly understood. We have demonstrated that cystatin F (CF) is a critical survival factor for eosinophils. Eosinophils from CF null mice had reduced lifespan, reduced granularity, and disturbed granule morphology. In vitro, cysteine protease inhibitors restored granularity, demonstrating that control of cysteine protease activity by CF is critical for normal eosinophil development. CF null mice showed reduced pulmonary pathology in a model of allergic lung inflammation but also reduced ability to combat infection by the nematode Brugia malayi. These data identify CF as a “cytoprotectant” that promotes eosinophil survival and function by ensuring granule integrity. Video Abstract PMID:27067058

  14. Angiostrongylus cantonensis eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pien, F D; Pien, B C

    1999-01-01

    In the past 50 years, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis, has spread from Southeast Asia to the South Pacific, Africa, India, the Caribbean, and recently, to Australia and North America, mainly carried by cargo ship rats. Humans are accidental, "dead-end" hosts infected by eating larvae from snails, slugs, or contaminated, uncooked vegetables. These larvae migrate to the brain, spinal cord, and nerve roots, causing eosinophilia in both spinal fluid and peripheral blood. Infected patients present with severe headache, vomiting, paresthesias, weakness, and occasionally visual disturbances and extraocular muscular paralysis. Most patients have a full recovery; however, heavy infections can lead to chronic, disabling disease and even death. There is no proven treatment for this disease. In the authors' experience, corticosteroids have been helpful in severe cases to relieve intracranial pressure as well as neurologic symptoms due to inflammatory responses to migrating and eventually dying worms. PMID:10460929

  15. Eosinophilic myositis in a slaughtered Korean native cattle

    PubMed Central

    Do, Sun Hee; Jeong, Da-Hee; Chung, Jae-Yong; Park, Jin-Kyu; Yang, Hai-Jie; Yuan, Dong-Wei

    2008-01-01

    Histopathological findings of eosinophilic myositis in the carcass of a slaughtered Korean native cow are presented. Lesions contained massive fibrous septae with vacuolar changes in some lesions, and the hypercontraction and rupturing of muscle bundles, with replacement by eosinophils. Necrosis and severe eosinophil infiltration were observed. Sarcoplasmic fragmentation and atrophy developed. Typical of granuloma, calcified myofibers were focally surrounded by macrophages and numerous inflammatory cells, and multinucleated giant cell formation was evident. PMID:19043319

  16. Eosinophilic fasciitis after parasite infection

    PubMed Central

    Patinha, Fabia; Marinho, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by symmetrical swelling and skin induration of the distal portions of the arms and/or legs, evolving into a scleroderma-like appearance, accompanied by peripheral blood eosinophilia. It is a rare disease with a poorly understood etiology. Corticosteroid treatment remains the standard therapy, either taken alone or in association with an immunosuppressive drug. This paper presents a case of a male patient with palpebral edema and marked eosinophilia, diagnosed with intestinal parasitic infection in October 2006. He was treated with an antiparasitic drug, but both the swelling and the analytical changes remained. This was followed by a skin and muscle biopsy, which turned out to be compatible with eosinophilic fasciitis. There was progressive worsening of the clinical state, with stiffness of the abdominal wall and elevated inflammatory parameters, and the patient was referred to the Immunology Department, medicated with corticosteroids and methotrexate. Over the years there were therapeutic adjustments and other causes were excluded. Currently the patient continues to be monitored, and there is no evidence of active disease. The case described in this article is interesting because of the diagnosis of eosinophilic fasciitis probably associated/coexisting with a parasite infection. This case report differs from others in that there is an uncommon cause associated with the onset of the disease, instead of the common causes such as trauma, medication, non-parasitic infections or cancer. PMID:27407276

  17. Eosinophilic fasciitis after parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta; Patinha, Fabia; Marinho, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by symmetrical swelling and skin induration of the distal portions of the arms and/or legs, evolving into a scleroderma-like appearance, accompanied by peripheral blood eosinophilia. It is a rare disease with a poorly understood etiology. Corticosteroid treatment remains the standard therapy, either taken alone or in association with an immunosuppressive drug. This paper presents a case of a male patient with palpebral edema and marked eosinophilia, diagnosed with intestinal parasitic infection in October 2006. He was treated with an antiparasitic drug, but both the swelling and the analytical changes remained. This was followed by a skin and muscle biopsy, which turned out to be compatible with eosinophilic fasciitis. There was progressive worsening of the clinical state, with stiffness of the abdominal wall and elevated inflammatory parameters, and the patient was referred to the Immunology Department, medicated with corticosteroids and methotrexate. Over the years there were therapeutic adjustments and other causes were excluded. Currently the patient continues to be monitored, and there is no evidence of active disease. The case described in this article is interesting because of the diagnosis of eosinophilic fasciitis probably associated/coexisting with a parasite infection. This case report differs from others in that there is an uncommon cause associated with the onset of the disease, instead of the common causes such as trauma, medication, non-parasitic infections or cancer. PMID:27407276

  18. Eosinophilic Endotype of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Fernando; Lim, Hui Fang; Nair, Parameswaran

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into different clinical endotypes, depending on the type of airway inflammation, clinical severity, and response to treatment. This article focuses on the eosinophilic endotype of asthma, which is defined by the central role that eosinophils play in the pathophysiology of the condition. It is characterized by elevated sputum and/or blood eosinophils on at least 2 occasions and by a significant response to treatments that suppress eosinophilia. Histopathologic demonstration of eosinophils in the airways provides the most direct diagnosis of eosinophilic asthma; but it is invasive, thus, impractical in clinical practice. PMID:27401626

  19. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis and related eosinophilic disorders.

    PubMed

    Prussin, Calman

    2014-06-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) represents one member within the spectrum of diseases collectively referred to as eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders, which includes eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), gastritis, enteritis, and colitis. EGE is less common than EoE and involves a different site of disease but otherwise shares many common features with EoE. The clinical manifestations of EGE are protean and can vary from nausea and vomiting to protein-losing enteropathy or even bowel obstruction requiring surgery. Although systemic corticosteroids are an effective treatment for EGE, their use results in substantial corticosteroid toxicity. Accordingly, there is a great need for improved therapies for these patients. PMID:24813518

  20. Monitoring nasal allergic inflammation by measuring the concentration of eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophils in nasal secretions.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Clement, P; Smitz, J; de Waele, M; Derde, M P

    1995-02-01

    Quantitative measurement of the eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) concentration and the percentage of eosinophils in nasal secretions has greatly improved our understanding of the inflammatory process after natural allergen exposure. ECP and eosinophils were measured in the nasal secretions of 40 symptomatic patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis during the pollen season. Results showed a significant relationship between a high concentration of ECP (median: 410 ng/g, range: 6-2380 ng/g) and a high percentage of eosinophils (median: 13.5%, range: 1-85%). This quantitative study again demonstrated that infiltration by eosinophils and release of ECP play a key role in allergic rhinitis. It also suggests that the combined measurement of the percentage of eosinophils together with the ECP concentration in nasal secretions seems to be a very useful model in monitoring and assessing the condition of chronic nasal inflammation in patients with allergic rhinitis. PMID:7604937

  1. [Eosinophilic oesophagitis in bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Mikhaleva, L M; Barkhina, T G; Golovanova, V E; Shchegoleva, N N; Gracheva, N A

    2012-01-01

    Combination of bronchial asthma and gastrointestinal pathology is frequently encountered in clinical practice. Clinical symptoms of this condition are highly diversified and gastrointestinal diseases play an important role in exacerbation of bronchial asthma. The prevalence of allergic diseases has recently become rampant. Eosinophilic oesophagitis is worth of special attention because its histological criteria, unlike clinical ones, are well defined. They include chronic immune antigen-mediated inflammatory oesophageal disease with pronounced intraepithelial eosinophilic infiltration and clinical symptoms resulting from oesophageal dysfunction that resemble manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease but fail to respond to antireflux and antacid therapy. Many specific and practical aspects of the problem remain to be elucidated. The poor awareness of clinicians of this disease hampers its adequate diagnostics and treatment. In order to revise and optimize the former diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm., an interdisciplinary expert group was set up in 2010 constituted by specialists of the American College of Gastroenterology, American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology, and Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition. Results of the work of this group together with the literature data on eosinophilic esopahgitis are discussed in the present review. PMID:23516863

  2. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis and related eosinophilic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Prussin, Calman

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) represents one member within the spectrum of diseases collectively referred to as eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGIDs), which includes eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), gastritis, enteritis, and colitis. EGE is less common than EoE and involves a different site of disease, but otherwise shares many common features with EoE. The clinical manifestations of EGE are protean and can vary from nausea and vomiting to protein losing enteropathy or even bowel obstruction requiring surgery. Although systemic corticosteroids are an effective treatment for EGE, their use over the chronic course of the disease results in substantial corticosteroid toxicity. Accordingly, there is a great need for improved therapies for these patients. PMID:24813518

  3. [Angiostrongylosis or eosinophilic meningitis].

    PubMed

    Bourée, Patrice; Dumazedier, Déborah; Dahane, Naïma

    2010-04-20

    Eosinophilic meningitis, or angiostrongyliasis, is a common disease in Asia, in the Caribbean and in the Pacific islands. It is caused by a rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Infection occurs by consumption of raw or undercooked snails. Diagnosis is based on epidemiological criteria, clinical manifestations, elevated count of eosinophils in the cerebrospinal fluid and serological tests. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. PMID:20465114

  4. The pathophysiology of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

  5. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

  6. Bone Marrow Derived Eosinophil Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas X.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional effector cells implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases including asthma, eosinophil gastrointestinal disorders and helminth infection. Mouse bone marrow derived progenitor cells can be differentiated into eosinophils following IL-5 exposure. These bone marrow derived eosinophils are fully differentiated at the end of a 14 day culture based on morphology and expression of molecular markers.

  7. [Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Cerri, D; Carabelli, A; Bertani, E; Portaluppi, F; Novi, C; Gianotti, R; Gelmetti, C

    1990-09-01

    The Authors report a case of eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome). The patient was a 61 year old woman, diabetic, with a cardio-respiratory insufficiency and a maniaco-depressive psycosis. She presented, on the upper arms and trunk, a cutaneous eruption of erythematous-urticarial plaques, that histopathologically were characterized by a dermic leukocyte population, with a prevalence of eosinophils, distributed in the perivascular site. Laboratory tests revealed eosinophilia and circulating immune complexes. The etiopathogenesis of the disease is discussed as is the possible role of immune complexes in eosinophilic cellulitis. PMID:2079351

  8. Eosinophilic cellulitis and dermographism.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nathalie Q; Ma, Linglei

    2005-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with a history of intermittent erythematous plaques on his hands and legs. A peripheral blood eosinophilia was noted. Histopathologic examination showed numerous eosinophils and characteristic flame figures. The clinical presentation and histopathologic alterations are consistent with the diagnosis of Wells' syndrome, which is also known as eosinophilic cellulitis. Wells' syndrome is a rare condition of unclear etiology. We discuss its diagnosis and possible association with other conditions that manifest peripheral eosinophilia. PMID:16403379

  9. The Eosinophil in Infection.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Karen A; Loy, Michael

    2016-04-01

    First described by Paul Ehrlich in 1879, who noted its characteristic staining by acidophilic dyes, for many years, the eosinophil was considered to be an end-effector cell associated with helminth infections and a cause of tissue damage. Over the past 30 years, research has helped to elucidate the complexity of the eosinophil's function and establish its role in host defense and immunity. Eosinophils express an array of ligand receptors which play a role in cell growth, adhesion, chemotaxis, degranulation, and cell-to-cell interactions. They play a role in activation of complement via both classical and alternative pathways. Eosinophils synthesize, store and secrete cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. They can process antigen, stimulate T cells, and promote humoral responses by interacting with B cells. Eosinophils can function as antigen presenting cells and can regulate processes associated with both T1 and T2 immunity. Although long known to play a role in defense against helminth organisms, the interactions of eosinophils with these parasites are now recognized to be much more complex. In addition, their interaction with other pathogens continues to be investigated. In this paper, we review the eosinophil's unique biology and structure, including its characteristic granules and the effects of its proteins, our developing understanding of its role in innate and adaptive immunity and importance in immunomodulation, and the part it plays in defense against parasitic, viral, fungal and bacterial infections. Rather than our worst enemy, the eosinophil may, in fact, be one of the most essential components in host defense and immunity. PMID:26690368

  10. Cellular mechanisms underlying eosinophilic and neutrophilic airway inflammation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Pelaia, Girolamo; Vatrella, Alessandro; Busceti, Maria Teresa; Gallelli, Luca; Calabrese, Cecilia; Terracciano, Rosa; Maselli, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous chronic disease of the airways, characterized by either predominant eosinophilic or neutrophilic, or even mixed eosinophilic/neutrophilic inflammatory patterns. Eosinophilic inflammation can be associated with the whole spectrum of asthma severity, ranging from mild-to-moderate to severe uncontrolled disease, whereas neutrophilic inflammation occurs mostly in more severe asthma. Eosinophilic asthma includes either allergic or nonallergic phenotypes underlying immune responses mediated by T helper (Th)2 cell-derived cytokines, whilst neutrophilic asthma is mostly dependent on Th17 cell-induced mechanisms. These immune-inflammatory profiles develop as a consequence of a functional impairment of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes, which promotes the activation of dendritic cells directing the differentiation of distinct Th cell subsets. The recent advances in the knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying asthmatic inflammation are contributing to the identification of novel therapeutic targets, potentially suitable for the implementation of future improvements in antiasthma pharmacologic treatments. PMID:25878402

  11. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Eosinophilic and Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Vatrella, Alessandro; Busceti, Maria Teresa; Gallelli, Luca; Calabrese, Cecilia; Terracciano, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous chronic disease of the airways, characterized by either predominant eosinophilic or neutrophilic, or even mixed eosinophilic/neutrophilic inflammatory patterns. Eosinophilic inflammation can be associated with the whole spectrum of asthma severity, ranging from mild-to-moderate to severe uncontrolled disease, whereas neutrophilic inflammation occurs mostly in more severe asthma. Eosinophilic asthma includes either allergic or nonallergic phenotypes underlying immune responses mediated by T helper (Th)2 cell-derived cytokines, whilst neutrophilic asthma is mostly dependent on Th17 cell-induced mechanisms. These immune-inflammatory profiles develop as a consequence of a functional impairment of T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes, which promotes the activation of dendritic cells directing the differentiation of distinct Th cell subsets. The recent advances in the knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying asthmatic inflammation are contributing to the identification of novel therapeutic targets, potentially suitable for the implementation of future improvements in antiasthma pharmacologic treatments. PMID:25878402

  12. Medical therapy in eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Straumann, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is a chronic-inflammatory disease of the oesophagus. If left untreated, eosinophilic inflammation induces fibrosis, angiogenesis and stricture formation, resulting finally in a so called remodelling with structural and functional damage of the organ. In addition, patients with untreated EoE are permanently at risk of experiencing food impactions. It is therefore widely accepted that active EoE should be treated. Any treatment applied in EoE should ideally achieve two therapeutic goals: first, resolution of symptoms, and, second, control of inflammation. Avoidance of food allergens by elimination diets as well as anti-inflammatory drugs have both the ability to achieve these goals. Among the pharmacological options, only corticosteroids have documented efficacy, whereas alternatives have shown rather disappointing results or are still under evaluation. Of note, swallowed topical corticosteroids are at least as efficient as systemically administered corticosteroids but have fewer side effects. As such topical corticosteroids are widely used as first-line drug in the treatment of EoE, even though this compound is currently not approved for this indication by regulatory authorities. Unfortunately, complete resolution of symptoms can be achieved with swallowed topical corticosteroids only in approximately 70% of patients despite appropriate dosing and despite correct administration of these compounds. Control of inflammation is even harder to achieve, as only in approximately 50% of patients tissue eosinophilia disappears completely under this anti-inflammatory medication. For this group of "difficult to treat" patients, therapeutic alternatives are urgently needed. Fortunately several anti-allergic drugs and several biologicals are currently under investigation. PMID:26552779

  13. An Overview of the Diagnosis and Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Manish B; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. The diagnosis requires esophageal biopsies demonstrating at least 15 eosinophils per high-powered field following a course of high-dose proton pump inhibitors. Management of EoE consists of the three Ds: drugs, dietary therapy, and esophageal dilation. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of EoE to include the role of emerging therapies. PMID:26986655

  14. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis as a Rare Cause of Recurrent Epigastric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Mohammad Taghi; Shahrokh, Shabnam; Miri, Mohammad Bagher; Ehsani Ardakani, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) is a rare inflammatory disorder of gastrointestinal tract characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the bowel wall. It can mimic many gastrointestinal disorders due to its wide spectrum of presentations. Diagnose is mostly based on excluding other disorders and a high suspicion. Here we report a case of 26 year old man with a history of sever epigastric pain followed by nausea, vomiting since a few days before admission with final diagnosis of EGE.

  15. Mechanisms of Disease of Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Benjamin P; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2016-05-23

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a recently recognized inflammatory disease of the esophagus with clinical symptoms derived from esophageal dysfunction. The etiology of EoE is now being elucidated, and food hypersensitivity is emerging as the central cornerstone of disease pathogenesis. Herein, we present a thorough picture of the current clinical, pathologic, and molecular understanding of the disease with a focus on disease mechanisms. PMID:26925500

  16. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: clinical presentation and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bystrom, Jonas; O'Shea, Nuala R

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory disorder of the oesophagus which has become increasingly recognised over recent years, although it remains underdiagnosed in many centres. It is characterised histologically by a significant eosinophilic infiltration of the oesophageal mucosa (>15 eosinophils per high powered field), and clinically with features of oesophageal dysfunction such a dysphagia, food impaction, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) resistant dyspepsia. Fibrosis and oesophageal remodelling may occur and lead to oesophageal strictures. An allergic predisposition is common in the EoE population, which appears to be primarily food antigen driven in children and aeroallergen driven in adults. Evidence suggests that the pathogenesis of EoE is due to a dysregulated immunological response to an environmental allergen, resulting in a T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammatory disease and remodelling of the oesophagus in genetically susceptible individuals. Allergen elimination and anti-inflammatory therapy with corticosteroids are currently the mainstay of treatment; however, an increasing number of studies are now focused on targeting different stages in the disease pathogenesis. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms resulting in EoE will allow us to improve the therapeutic options available. PMID:24647582

  17. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Seed, W A

    1980-01-01

    We described three cases of eosinophilic pneumonia of unknown aetiology investigated clinically and by lung biopsy. The illnesses lasted between six and 20 weeks and consisted of cough, dyspnoea, malaise, and in two cases prolonged pyrexia. All had blood eosinophilia and chest radiographs showing widespread bilateral shadowing; in two cases this had a characteristic peripheral distribution. One patient recovered spontaneously and the other two responded to steroids, with disappearance of pyrexia within 12 hours and radiological clearing within 14 days. Lung function tests during the acute illness showed volume restriction or gas transfer defects or both in two cases. After remission all three showed abnormalities if small airways function. Lung biopsies performed during the acute illness were examined histologically and by transmission electron microscopy, and in two cases by immunofluorescence. There was both intra-alveolar and interstitial eosinophilic pneumonia with bronchiolitis obliterans, microgranulomata, and a vasculitis. Electron microscopy showed numerous eosinophils, many degranulated, and macrophages with phagocytosed eosinophilic granules and intracytoplasmic inclusions. In one case IgM, IgG, and IgA were demonstrated in the bronchial walls and interstitium. No IgE or complement was present. We believe that eosinophil granules are responsible for the tissue damage and fever and suggest mechanisms for this and for the response to steroid therapy. Images PMID:7003796

  18. Eosinophilic granuloma of the ileum

    PubMed Central

    Myers, A.; Humphreys, Daphne M.; Williamson, R. C. N.

    1975-01-01

    A case of eosinophilic granuloma of the ileum is described in association with a high (50%) eosinophil count. A review of published suggested classifications, aetiology and therapy is made. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:1114154

  19. Organ-specific eosinophilic disorders of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Dagmar; Wardlaw, Andrew; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that increase in various tissues in a variety of disorders. Locally, they can be involved in the initiation and propagation of diverse inflammatory responses. In this review, the clinical association of eosinophils with diseases of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract is summarized. An approach to determining the causal role of eosinophils in these diseases is presented. Recent findings concerning molecular diagnosis, etiology and treatment are discussed. PMID:20392477

  20. Eosinophilic Liver Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa Rivera, Ivonne; Toro, Doris H.; Gutierrez, Jose; Acosta, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic liver infiltration is a commonly encountered focal eosinophil-related inflammation with or without necrosis, which can be seen on computed tomography (CT) in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Although this entity has a relatively benign course, it is related to numerable conditions for which diagnosis may be challenging and requires substantial diagnostic work-up for proper management and care of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain with multiple ill-defined liver hypodensities associated with significant eosinophilia. PMID:26504883

  1. A specific elevation of RANTES in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of patients with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kurashima, K; Mukaida, N; Fujimura, M; Yasui, M; Shinagawa, T; Matsuda, T; Ohmoto, Y; Matsushima, K

    1997-01-01

    Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is a rare, idiopathic lung disorder characterized pathologically by massive eosinophil infiltration into lung. In the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients with CEP, eosinophil numbers were markedly increased but returned to normal-levels upon the resolution of clinical symptoms, which suggests the crucial role of eosinophils in the pathogenesis of CEP. To clarify the mechanism of eosinophil accumulation in CEP, we determined the BALF levels of RANTES and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha, two chemokines that predominantly exhibit in vitro eosinophil chemotactic activities. RANTES (106.7 +/- 27.2 pg/mg albumin; n = 16) concentrations in BALF from patients with CEP were significantly elevated in comparison with those of normal control subjects (1.4 pg/mg albumin; n = 13), whereas BALF macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha levels were not. In addition, eosinophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in BALF were positively stained with a specific anti-RANTES antibody, which suggests that RANTES was produced locally in the lungs of CEP patients. Moreover, BALF-RANTES levels correlated significantly with the proportion of eosinophils in BALF. Furthermore, nearly half of the eosinophil chemotactic activities in BALF were abrogated by the anti-RANTES antibody in vitro. Collectively, these data suggest that locally produced RANTES is involved in eosinophil accumulation in the pulmonary alveolus and interstitium of patients with CEP. PMID:9010450

  2. Immunohistochemical detection of deposits of eosinophil-derived neurotoxin and eosinophil peroxidase in the myocardium of patients with Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Molina, H A; Kierszenbaum, F

    1988-01-01

    An immunohistochemical study of eosinophil distribution in the inflammatory cell infiltrates of four different types of myocardial lesions associated with Chagas' disease--caused by Trypanosoma cruzi--showed larger numbers of these cells in areas presenting tissue necrosis and degeneration, most notably in patients with the most severe myocarditis from a histopathological stand-point. Using antisera specific for human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin or eosinophil peroxidase, we detected deposits of these secretion products on myofibres and in the interstitium of chagasic myocardium displaying necrosis and degeneration but rarely in other types of lesions. These deposits were not detectable in the myocardium of non-chagasic patients who had died from myocardial infarction (acute or in the scarring stage) or myocarditis secondary to bacterial endocarditis. When human eosinophil-derived neurotoxin was incubated with myoblast monolayers there was a significant cell injury, detachment and lysis. These effects were abrogated by yeast RNA, added as a competitive ribonuclease substrate, and inhibited by the ribonuclease inhibitor RNasin, suggesting that the ribonuclease activity of the eosinophil-derived neurotoxin was involved in the effect. These results suggest a link between eosinophil infiltration and necrosis in chagasic myocardial lesions and point to EDN, and perhaps other toxic eosinophil secretion products, as possible mediators of tissue damage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3049321

  3. Diagnosis and management of eosinophilic asthma: a US perspective

    PubMed Central

    Walford, Hannah H; Doherty, Taylor A

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic asthma is now recognized as an important subphenotype of asthma based on the pattern of inflammatory cellular infiltrate in the airway. Eosinophilic asthma can be associated with increased asthma severity, atopy, late-onset disease, and steroid refractoriness. Induced sputum cell count is the gold standard for identifying eosinophilic inflammation in asthma although several noninvasive biomarkers, including fractional exhaled nitric oxide and periostin, are emerging as potential surrogates. As novel therapies and biologic agents become increasingly available, there is an increased need for specific phenotype-directed treatment strategies. Greater recognition and understanding of the unique immunopathology of this asthma phenotype has important implications for management of the disease and the potential to improve patient outcomes. The present review provides a summary of the clinical features, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of eosinophilic asthma. PMID:24748808

  4. Eosinophilic Drug Allergy.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Merin; Khan, David A

    2016-04-01

    While peripheral or tissue eosinophilia may certainly characterize drug eruptions, this feature is hardly pathognomonic for a medication-induced etiology. While delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions with prominent eosinophilic recruitment have been typically classified as type IVb reactions, their pathophysiology is now known to be more complex. Eosinophilic drug reactions have a diversity of presentations and may be benign and self-limited to severe and life-threatening. The extent of clinical involvement is also heterogeneous, ranging from isolated peripheral eosinophilia or single organ involvement (most often the skin and lung) to systemic disease affecting multiple organs, classically exemplified by drug-reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). The spectrum of implicated medications in the causation of DRESS is ever expanding, and multiple factors including drug metabolites, specific HLA alleles, herpes viruses, and immune system activation have been implicated in pathogenesis. Due to this complex interplay of various factors, diagnostic workup in terms of skin and laboratory testing has not been validated. Similarly, the lack of controlled trials limits treatment options. This review also describes other localized as well as systemic manifestations of eosinophilic disease induced by various medication classes, including their individual pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management. Given the multitude of clinical patterns associated with eosinophilic drug allergy, the diagnosis can be challenging. Considerable deficits in our knowledge of these presentations remain, but the potential for severe reactions should be borne in mind in order to facilitate diagnosis and institute appropriate management. PMID:26006718

  5. Eosinophils In Health and Disease: The LIAR Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James J.; Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; McGarry, Michael P.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Lee, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    Discussions of eosinophils are often descriptions of end-stage effector cells with destructive capabilities mediated predominantly by released cytotoxic cationic granule proteins. Moreover, eosinophils in the medical literature are invariably associated with the pathologies linked with helminth infections or allergic diseases such as asthma. This has led to an almost fatalist view of eosinophil effector functions and associated therapeutic strategies targeting these cells that would make even William of Ockham proud - eosinophil effector functions have physiological consequences that increase patient morbidity/mortality and “the only good eosinophils are dead eosinophils”. Unfortunately, the strengths of dogmas are also their greatest weaknesses. Namely, while the repetitive proclamation of dogmatic concepts by authoritative sources (i.e., reviews, meeting proceedings, textbooks, etc.) builds consensus within the medical community and lower the entropies surrounding difficult issues, they often ignore not easily explained details and place diminished importance on alternative hypotheses. The goal of this perspective is two fold: (i) We will review recent observations regarding eosinophils and their activities as well as reinterpret earlier data as part of the synthesis of a new paradigm. In this paradigm, we hypothesize that eosinophils accumulate at unique sites in response to cell turnover or in response to local stem cell activity(ies). We further suggest that this accumulation is part of one or more mechanisms regulating tissue homeostasis. Specifically, instead of immune cells exclusively mediating innate host defense, we suggest that accumulating tissue eosinophils are actually regulators of Local Immunity And/or Remodeling/Repair in both health and disease - The LIAR Hypothesis; (ii) We want to be inflammatory (pun intended!) and challenge the currently common perspective of eosinophils as destructive end-stage effector cells. Our hope is to create more

  6. Successful treatment of eosinophilic cellulitis with dapsone.

    PubMed

    Coelho de Sousa, Virgínia; Laureano Oliveira, André; Cardoso, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of recurrent episodes of pruritic cellulitis-like erythematous plaques, mostly located on the limbs. Simultaneously, fever, malaise and peripheral eosinophilia were noted. The clinical diagnosis of eosinophilic cellulitis (also known as Well's syndrome) was supported by the histopathological finding of typical "flame figures". Treatment with dapsone was initiated at a dose of 50 mg per day. After one year of follow-up the patient was relapse-free. Eosinophilic cellulitis is an uncommon, recurrent inflammatory skin disease. The management is often a challenge, due to the frequent need for long-term therapy. Dapsone is an effective and safe treatment option. PMID:27617724

  7. Esophageal Microbiome in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Kirk; Fang, Rui; Wagner, Brandie D.; Choe, Ha Na; Kelly, Caleb J.; Schroeder, Shauna; Moore, Wendy; Stevens, Mark J.; Yeckes, Alyson; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F.; Zalewski, Angelika; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Henry, Lauren N.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Robertson, Charles E.; Leung, Donald Y.; Pace, Norman R.; Ackerman, Steven J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Fillon, Sophie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis. Design In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST). Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease. Results Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects. Conclusions Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD. PMID:26020633

  8. Toward the Proteome of the Human Peripheral Blood Eosinophil

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Christof; Pazdrak, Konrad; Young, Travis W.; Stafford, Susan J.; Wu, Zheng; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Haag, Anthony M.; English, Robert D.; Soman, Kizhake V.; Kurosky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophils are granular leukocytes that have significant roles in many inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses, especially asthma and allergic diseases. We have undertaken a fairly comprehensive proteomic analysis of purified peripheral blood eosinophils from normal human donors primarily employing 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis with protein spot identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Protein subfractionation methods employed included isoelectric focusing (Zoom® Fractionator) and subcellular fractionation using differential protein solubilization. We have identified 3,141 proteins which had Mascot expectation scores of 10−3 or less. Of these 426 were unique and non-redundant of which 231 were novel proteins not previously reported to occur in eosinophils. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that some 70% of the non-redundant proteins could be subdivided into categories that are clearly related to currently known eosinophil biological activities. Cytoskeletal and associated proteins predominated among the proteins identified. Extensive protein posttranslational modifications were evident, many of which have not been previously reported that reflected the dynamic character of the eosinophil. This dataset of eosinophilic proteins will prove valuable in comparative studies of disease versus normal states and for studies of gender differences and polymorphic variation among individuals. PMID:21048890

  9. Clinical usefulness of mepolizumab in severe eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    Menzella, Francesco; Lusuardi, Mirco; Montanari, Gloria; Galeone, Carla; Facciolongo, Nicola; Zucchi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways with variable clinical severity from very mild and occasional symptoms to recurrent critical exacerbations, at risk of fatal or near-fatal outcome, in a small percentage of patients. Within the different inflammatory cascades involved in asthma, eosinophils play a central role in the pathogenesis and largely influence disease severity. Interleukin-5 (IL-5) is the main cytokine controlling eosinophil activity and proliferation at the site of inflammation. Mepolizumab was the first biological humanized anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibody tested in randomized clinical trials on eosinophilic asthma and other eosinophilic diseases. On the basis of several positive clinical efficacy data, it has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of severe eosinophilic asthma. Unfortunately, high costs are at present a critical issue. Future studies will probably help in the correct selection of a potential "responder phenotype", allowing the prescription of this promising therapy to appropriate patients and best define cost-effectiveness issues. PMID:27354806

  10. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Ochkur, Sergei I.; Luo, Janice L.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Lee, James J.; Lee, Nancy A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine–driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense. PMID:24297871

  11. Clinical usefulness of mepolizumab in severe eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Menzella, Francesco; Lusuardi, Mirco; Montanari, Gloria; Galeone, Carla; Facciolongo, Nicola; Zucchi, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways with variable clinical severity from very mild and occasional symptoms to recurrent critical exacerbations, at risk of fatal or near-fatal outcome, in a small percentage of patients. Within the different inflammatory cascades involved in asthma, eosinophils play a central role in the pathogenesis and largely influence disease severity. Interleukin-5 (IL-5) is the main cytokine controlling eosinophil activity and proliferation at the site of inflammation. Mepolizumab was the first biological humanized anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibody tested in randomized clinical trials on eosinophilic asthma and other eosinophilic diseases. On the basis of several positive clinical efficacy data, it has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of severe eosinophilic asthma. Unfortunately, high costs are at present a critical issue. Future studies will probably help in the correct selection of a potential “responder phenotype”, allowing the prescription of this promising therapy to appropriate patients and best define cost-effectiveness issues. PMID:27354806

  12. Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis of the Nasal Septum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunchuan; Liu, Honggang; Zang, Hongrui; Wang, Tong; Hu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis (EAF) is a rare benign condition of unknown aetiology that causes stenosis of the upper respiratory tract. It is most commonly found at the nasal septum and sinus mucosa causing mucosal thickening and nasal obstructive symptoms. The diagnosis is mainly based on characteristic histologic findings. Case Report. A 27-year-old young woman presented with a slow growing mass at her anterior nasal septum for over eight years. She complained of persistent nasal obstruction, epistaxis, sometimes diffused facial pain, and chronic headache. 3 years ago, the tumor was partially resected for ventilation and a nasal septum perforation was left. Imaging findings indicated soft-tissue thickening of the anterior part of septum and adjacent lateral nasal walls. Pathological examination showed numerous inflammatory cells infiltrates containing eosinophils, fibroinflammatory lesion with a whorled appearance fibrosis which typically surrounded vessels. A diagnosis of eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis was made. All laboratory tests were unremarkable. Skin prick test was positive. The tumor-like lesion was totally resected. Conclusions. EAF is a rare benign and progressive disorder causing destruction. Combined with radiological imaging of EAF historical findings contribute to the diagnosis. It is important to prevent tumor from recurrence by total resection of the lesion. PMID:23634315

  13. Differential Activation of Airway Eosinophils Induces IL-13 Mediated Allergic Th2 Pulmonary Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, EA; Doyle, AD; Colbert, DC; Zellner, KR; Protheroe, CA; LeSuer, WE; Lee, NA.; Lee, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophils are hallmark cells of allergic Th2 respiratory inflammation. However, the relative importance of eosinophil activation and the induction of effector functions such as the expression of IL-13 to allergic Th2 pulmonary disease remain to be defined. Methods Wild type or cytokine deficient (IL-13−/− or IL-4−/−) eosinophils treated with cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-4, IL-33) were adoptively transferred into eosinophil-deficient recipient mice subjected to allergen provocation using established models of respiratory inflammation. Allergen-induced pulmonary changes were assessed. Results In contrast to the transfer of untreated blood eosinophils to the lungs of recipient eosinophildeficient mice, which induced no immune/inflammatory changes either in the lung or lung draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), pretreatment of blood eosinophils with GM-CSF prior to transfer elicited trafficking of these eosinophils to LDLNs. In turn, these LDLN eosinophils elicited the accumulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells to these same LDLNs without inducing pulmonary inflammation. However, exposure of eosinophils to GM-CSF, IL-4 and IL-33 prior to transfer induced not only immune events in the LDLN, but also allergen-mediated increases in airway Th2 cytokine/chemokine levels, the subsequent accumulation of CD4+ T cells as well as alternatively activated (M2) macrophages, and the induction of pulmonary histopathologies. Significantly, this allergic respiratory inflammation was dependent on eosinophil-derived IL-13 whereas IL-4 expression by eosinophils had no significant role. Conclusion The data demonstrate the differential activation of eosinophils as a function of cytokine exposure and suggest that eosinophil-specific IL-13 expression by activated cells is a necessary component of the subsequent allergic Th2 pulmonary pathologies. PMID:26009788

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  15. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  16. Eosinophilic Cystitis with Eosinophilic Cholecystitis: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, F.; Hmida, W.; Mestiri, S.; Ziadi, S.; Sriha, B.; Mokni, M.; Mosbah, F.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a rare case of eosinophilic cystitis associated with eosinophilic cholecystitis in a 30-year-old patient who underwent bladder biopsy for irritative voiding symptoms and routine elective cholecystectomy for gallstones. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination. The rarity of this condition prompted us to report this entity in which no specific cause could be found. PMID:24195001

  17. Role of Eosinophil Granulocytes in Allergic Airway Inflammation Endotypes.

    PubMed

    Amin, K; Janson, C; Bystrom, J

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophil granulocytes are intriguing members of the innate immunity system that have been considered important defenders during parasitic diseases as well as culprits during allergy-associated inflammatory diseases. Novel studies have, however, found new homoeostasis-maintaining roles for the cell. Recent clinical trials blocking different Th2 cytokines have uncovered that asthma is heterogeneous entity and forms different characteristic endotypes. Although eosinophils are present in allergic asthma with early onset, the cells may not be essential for the pathology. The cells are, however, likely disease causing in asthma with a late onset, which is often associated with chronic rhinosinusitis. Assessment of eosinophilia, fraction exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and periostin are markers that have emerged useful in assessing and monitoring asthma severity and endotype. Current scientific knowledge suggests that eosinophils are recruited by the inflammatory environment, activated by the innate interleukin (IL)-33 and prevented from apoptosis by both lymphocytes and innate immune cells such as type two innate immune cells. Eosinophils contain four specific granule proteins that exhibit an array of toxic and immune-modulatory activates. The granule proteins can be released by different mechanisms. Additionally, eosinophils contain a number of inflammatory cytokines and lipid mediators as well as radical oxygen species that might contribute to the disease both by the recruitment of other cells and the direct damage to supporting cells, leading to exacerbations and tissue fibrosis. This review aimed to outline current knowledge how eosinophils are recruited, activated and mediate damage to tissues and therapies used to control the cells. PMID:27167590

  18. Allergic mechanisms of Eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Leung, John; Beukema, Koen Robert; Shen, Alice Hangzhou

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is characterized by oesophageal dysfunction and oesophageal eosinophilia refractory to proton-pump-inhibitor treatment. EoE is a food allergy, as elimination of food trigger(s) abrogates the disease, while trigger reintroduction causes recurrence. The allergic mechanism of EoE involves both IgE and non-IgE processes. There is a break in oral tolerance, the immune mechanism allowing enteric exposure to food and micro-organisms without causing deleterious immune responses. Changes in life-style, alterations in gut flora and use of antibiotics may be increasing disease prevalence. Mouse models of EoE and human studies revealed the role of regulatory T-cells and iNKT-cells in the pathogenesis. Th2-cytokines like IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and other cytokines like TGFβ and TSLP are involved, but perhaps no one cytokine is critically important for driving the disease. Control of EoE may require a pharmaceutical approach that blocks more than one target in the Th2-inflammatory pathway. PMID:26552770

  19. Novel Therapies for Eosinophilic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, Bruce S.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Current therapies for eosinophilic disorders are limited. Most treatment approaches remain empirical, are not supported by data from controlled clinical trials, involve the off-label use of agents developed for treatment of other diseases, and tend to rely heavily on the use of glucocorticoids and other agents with significant toxicity. Also lacking are validated outcome metrics and clinically relevant biomarkers to help guide treatment choices, efficacy and assessment of disease activity. Over the last decade, great progress has been made in the discovery, preclinical development and clinical testing of a variety of biologics and small molecules that have the potential to directly or indirectly influence eosinophils, eosinophilic inflammation and the consequences of eosinophil activation. Particularly advanced are studies with biologics that target eosinophil-selective cytokines and their receptors. In addition, other therapies that have received FDA approval in recent years for non-eosinophil-related indications can be considered for testing in eosinophilic disorders. Overall, the landscape of therapeutic options for those suffering from eosinophilic disorders has never been brighter, with many new choices on the horizon. PMID:26209901

  20. Human eosinophil innate response to Alternaria fungus through protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Wada, Kota; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. An association between eosinophilic inflammation and infection or colonization by fungi has also been long recognized. However, the mechanisms underlying how eosinophils are activated and how they release proinflammatory and immunomodulatory mediators such as major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin remain largely unknown. We used a fungus, i.e. Alternaria, as a model microbe relevant to human asthma and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the immune recognition of ubiquitous environmental allergens. Human eosinophils are activated by live Alternaria alternata organisms, release their granule proteins, and kill the fungi. Eosinophils, but not neutrophils, respond to secreted products from A. alternata. We found that eosinophils are equipped with innate cellular activation machinery that responds to an extracellular aspartate protease secreted by Alternaria. Aspartate protease activation of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 probably involves a novel mechanism different from that for serine protease activation of PAR-2. Thus, human eosinophils may recognize certain danger signals or virulence factors produced by fungi and provoke inflammatory responses against these organisms. Dysregulation of such an innate immune mechanism may be involved in the pathophysiology of certain human inflammatory diseases, including asthma and CRS. PMID:21646807

  1. Eosinophilic Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Possa, Samantha S.; Leick, Edna A.; Prado, Carla M.; Martins, Mílton A.; Tibério, Iolanda F. L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils are circulating granulocytes involved in pathogenesis of asthma. A cascade of processes directed by Th2 cytokine producing T-cells influence the recruitment of eosinophils into the lungs. Furthermore, multiple elements including interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, chemoattractants such as eotaxin, Clara cells, and CC chemokine receptor (CCR)3 are already directly involved in recruiting eosinophils to the lung during allergic inflammation. Once recruited, eosinophils participate in the modulation of immune response, induction of airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling, characteristic features of asthma. Various types of promising treatments for reducing asthmatic response are related to reduction in eosinophil counts both in human and experimental models of pulmonary allergic inflammation, showing that the recruitment of these cells really plays an important role in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases such asthma. PMID:23616768

  2. A Player and Coordinator: The Versatile Roles of Eosinophils in the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hai; Liao, Wei; Wang, Ling; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Eosinophils have traditionally been associated with allergic diseases and parasite infection. Research advances in the recent decades have brought evolutionary changes in our understanding of eosinophil biology and its roles in immunity. It is currently recognized that eosinophils play multiple roles in both innate and adaptive immunity. As effector cells in innate immunity, eosinophils exert a pro-inflammatory and destructive role in the Th2 immune response associated with allergic inflammation or parasite infection. Eosinophils can also be recruited by danger signals released by pathogen infections or tissue injury, inducing host defense against parasitic, fungal, bacterial or viral infection or promoting tissue repair and remodeling. Eosinophils also serve as nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells in response to allergen challenge or helminth infection, and, meanwhile, are known to function as a versatile coordinator that actively regulates or interacts with various immune cells including T lymphocytes and dendritic cells. More roles of eosinophils implicated in immunity have been proposed including in immune homeostasis, allograft rejection, and anti-tumor immunity. Eosinophil interactions with structural cells are also implicated in the mechanisms in allergic inflammation and in Helicobacter pylori gastritis. These multifaceted roles of eosinophils as both players and coordinators in immune system are discussed in this review. PMID:27226792

  3. Significance of Mouse Models in Dissecting the Mechanism of Human Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Diseases (EGID)

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that eosinophils play a significant role in promoting several gastrointestinal diseases, and animal models are the significant tools to understand the pathogenesis of eosinophil-associatd inflammatory disorders. The focus of this review is on the significance of mouse models that mimic the characteristics of human eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases. Eosinophils are the important leukocytes with diverse functions in the gastrointestinal tract, such as excretion of intestinal parasites and promoting the pathogenesis of a numerous allergic gastrointestinal disorders like food allergy, parasitic infection, allergic gastroenteritis, allergic colitis, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Among these gastrointestinal diseases, the eosinophilic esophagitis is the most recently recognized disease and the mouse models are proven to be an effective tool to understand the pathophysiology of disease and to test novel treatment strategies. Based on patients allergic conditions and the gene overexpressed in human EGID, a number of gene overexpressed and allergen-challenged mouse models of gastrointestinal disorders were developed. These models were utilized to explore the mechanism(s) that promotes the eosinophil-mediated gastrointestinal diseases including the role of the eosinophil responsive cytokines and chemokines. Herein, we have provided a detailed overviews of the mouse models of gastrointestinal disorders that mimic the human eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases and can be utilized as a tool for understanding the diseases pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25866707

  4. Eosinophil peroxidase-dependent hydroxyl radical generation by human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M L; Roeder, T L; Railsback, M A; Britigan, B E

    1994-11-11

    Eosinophil production of superoxide (O2-.) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is important in host defense. The present study assessed the potential of eosinophils to generate another potent cytotoxic species, the hydroxyl radical (.OH). .OH formation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated eosinophils was demonstrated using an alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butyl nitrone/ethanol spin trapping system. Additionally, .OH was spin trapped following the addition of purified eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) to a cell-free O2-./H2O2 generating systems. Effects of superoxide dismutase, catalase, azide, aminotriazole, chloride-depleted buffer, and extensive metal chelation were consistent with .OH formation via the reaction of O2-. and EPO-generated hypohalous acid. Under chloride-depleted conditions, physiologic concentrations of Br- increased .OH formation by both PMA-stimulated eosinophils and the cell-free EPO system. Physiologic concentrations of SCN-, however, did not increase .OH formation, and in the presence of both Br- and SCN-, .OH formation was similar to SCN- only. Eosinophils appear to form .OH via an EPO-dependent mechanism, the magnitude of which varies with the availability of various EPO substrates. Given the highly reactive nature of this radical and the ability of EPO to adhere to cell membranes, even small amounts of .OH formed at such sites could contribute to eosinophil-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:7961724

  5. Eosinophils in the 1990s: new perspectives on their role in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    Eosinophils are characterized by their unique crystalloid granules that contain four basic proteins--MBP, ECP, EDN and EPO. The cell has many common features with neutrophils but, unlike that cell type, eosinophils utilize VLA-4/VCAM-1 as an adherence pathway and have a number of other receptors not shared by neutrophils. These include recognition units for IgE (distinct from CD23), and receptors for IL-5, IL-3 and RANTES. Following stimulation with a variety of agents, eosinophils preferentially elaborate LTC4 as the major 5-lipoxygenase product of arachidonic acid and produce substantial amounts of PAF. Of particular interest is the ability of eosinophils to synthesize a number of cytokines. Thus eosinophils have marked pro-inflammatory potential. There is now convincing evidence that eosinophilia is T-cell dependent. The Th2-type cell, which selectively secretes IL-5 and IL-4, seems particularly involved. IL-5, IL-3 and GM-CSF are required for eosinophil maturation, and cause activation and prolonged survival of the mature cell. IL-5 is unique in that it promotes terminal differentiation of the committed eosinophil precursor and in vivo in mice appears to be sufficient on its own for eosinophil growth from uncommited stem cells. IL-4 selectively upregulates VCAM-1 expression on endothelial cells thus augmenting VLA-4-dependent eosinophil adhesion. The role of eosinophils in disease is complex but in general their numbers are increased in helminthic parasitic disease and atopic allergy and asthma. Eosinophil products can produce many of the pathological features of asthma, and helminthic larvae coated with immunoglobulin or complement are particularly susceptible to eosinophil-mediated cytotoxicity. Eosinopenia is often related to acute inflammation or stress. PMID:7937446

  6. Eosinophilic ulcer of the tongue--Case report.

    PubMed

    Didona, Dario; Paolino, Giovanni; Donati, Michele; Didona, Biagio; Calvieri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa is a rare, self-limiting, chronic and benign lesion of unknown pathogenesis that affects the oral mucosa. We present the case of a 65 year-old Caucasian female with a five month history of a painful ulcer on the lateral side of her tongue. The ulcer was not adhered to the underlying structures and there was no evidence of regional lymph node involvement. Laboratory examinations and X-rays revealed no abnormalities. Topical treatments had been performed without any improvement. Histopathological examination showed an ulcerated surface and mixed inflammatory infiltrate with several eosinophils extending into the mucosa and submucosa. No cellular atypia was observed. Based on the patient-s history and mucosal biopsy, a final diagnosis of eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa was made. PMID:26312683

  7. Eosinophilic esophagitis: New insights in pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cicala, Michele; Behar, Jose

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinico-pathological entity with esophageal symptoms and dense esophageal eosinophilic infiltration throughout the esophagus that may persist despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. This eosinophilic infiltration is usually absent in the stomach, small intestine and colon, although there are a number of reports of patients with a multi-organ involvement. EoE is associated with abnormalities involving TH2-dependent immunity, with multiple environmental factors strongly contributing to disease expression. The layer of the esophagus affected by the eosinophilic infiltration causes the specific symptoms. Esophageal involvement results mostly in dysphagia for solids that can be severe enough to cause recurrent esophageal obstruction with typical endoscopic features suggesting esophageal remodeling and pathological changes of eosinophilic infiltration of the mucosa, sub-epithelial fibrosis and muscle hypertrophy. This disease is frequently associated with other allergic conditions such as allergic asthma, allergic dermatitis and eosinophilia. The treatment of patients with EoE depends on the severity of the symptoms and of the inflammatory process as well as to their response to a gradual step-up treatment. The first line of treatment consists of steroid containing local inhalers. If unresponsive they are then treated with oral steroids. Intravenous interleukin blockers seem to have a consistent positive therapeutic effect. PMID:26855813

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis: New insights in pathogenesis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Cicala, Michele; Behar, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinico-pathological entity with esophageal symptoms and dense esophageal eosinophilic infiltration throughout the esophagus that may persist despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. This eosinophilic infiltration is usually absent in the stomach, small intestine and colon, although there are a number of reports of patients with a multi-organ involvement. EoE is associated with abnormalities involving TH2-dependent immunity, with multiple environmental factors strongly contributing to disease expression. The layer of the esophagus affected by the eosinophilic infiltration causes the specific symptoms. Esophageal involvement results mostly in dysphagia for solids that can be severe enough to cause recurrent esophageal obstruction with typical endoscopic features suggesting esophageal remodeling and pathological changes of eosinophilic infiltration of the mucosa, sub-epithelial fibrosis and muscle hypertrophy. This disease is frequently associated with other allergic conditions such as allergic asthma, allergic dermatitis and eosinophilia. The treatment of patients with EoE depends on the severity of the symptoms and of the inflammatory process as well as to their response to a gradual step-up treatment. The first line of treatment consists of steroid containing local inhalers. If unresponsive they are then treated with oral steroids. Intravenous interleukin blockers seem to have a consistent positive therapeutic effect. PMID:26855813

  9. Fecal microbiota transplantation and prednisone for severe eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yi-Xuan; Shi, Chuan-Bing; Cui, Bo-Ta; Wang, Min; Ji, Guo-Zhong; Zhang, Fa-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is a rare disease of unknown etiology. It is characterized by patchy or diffuse eosinophilic infiltration of the bowel wall to a variable depth and various gastrointestinal manifestations. We describe a case of severe eosinophilic gastroenteritis presenting as frequent bowel obstruction and diarrhea in a 35-year-old man. The patient was misdiagnosed and underwent surgery because of intestinal obstruction when he was first admitted to a local hospital. Then he was misdiagnosed as having Crohn’s disease in another university teaching hospital. Finally, the patient asked for further treatment from our hospital because of the on-going clinical trial for treating refractory Crohn’s disease by fecal microbiota transplantation. Physical examination revealed a slight distended abdomen with diffuse tenderness. Laboratory investigation showed the total number of normal leukocytes with neutrophilia as 90.5%, as well as eosinopenia, monocytopenia and lymphocytopenia. Barium radiography and sigmoidoscopy confirmed inflammatory stenosis of the sigmoid colon. We diagnosed the patient as having eosinophilic gastroenteritis by multi-examinations. The patient was treated by fecal microbiota transplantation combined with oral prednisone, and was free from gastrointestinal symptoms at the time when we reported his disease. This case highlights the importance of awareness of manifestations of a rare disease like eosinophilic gastroenteritis. PMID:25473198

  10. Uvaol attenuates pleuritis and eosinophilic inflammation in ovalbumin-induced allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Agra, Lais Costa; Lins, Marvin Paulo; da Silva Marques, Patrícia; Smaniotto, Salete; Bandeira de Melo, Christianne; Lagente, Vincent; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-06-01

    Uvaol, a triterpene present in olives and virgin olive oil, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties and antioxidant effects. However, until now, no studies have demonstrated its potential effects on allergic inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of uvaol in a mouse model of allergy characterized by eosinophil-dominant inflammation in actively sensitized mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of uvaol was analyzed in two murine models of allergic inflammation (pleurisy and asthma). In these models, Swiss mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). In the pleurisy model, the pleural eosinophilic inflammation and IL-5 concentrations were examined 24h after the OVA challenge, while in the asthma model were examined the airway inflammation via bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid cytology and lung histopathology analyses. Our results showed that uvaol decreased the accumulation of eosinophils and the concentration of IL-5 in pleural effluent. Uvaol also demonstrated important anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting production of IL-5 and influx of leukocytes, mainly of eosinophils, in BAL fluid, but without interfering with levels of reactive oxygen species in leukocytes. Moreover, the eosinophil infiltration, mucus production, number of alveoli that collapsed, and IL-5 levels in the lung were clearly decreased by uvaol treatment. These findings indicate that uvaol can be a good candidate for the treatment of allergic inflammation by inhibiting eosinophil influx and IL-5 production in ovalbumin-induced allergy. PMID:27038519

  11. Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome With Cutaneous Manifestations and Flame Figures: A Spectrum of Eosinophilic Dermatoses Whose Features Overlap With Wells' Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kiracofe, Elizabeth A.; Clark, Lindsey N.; Gru, Alejandro A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance: Wells syndrome (WS) (eosinophilic cellulitis) is an uncommon eosinophilic dermatitis that has been rarely described in association with, but distinct from, hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). Observations: We report a case of an eosinophilic dermatosis with flame figures in association with idiopathic HES, manifested by inflammatory myocarditis, asthma, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. Conclusions and Relevance: The diagnoses of WS and HES, rather than being distinct findings, may represent 2 entities on a spectrum of hypereosinophilic diseases. The diagnosis of WS should be made with caution and should prompt a thorough investigation that includes a work-up for a systemic eosinophilic disorder. PMID:25839890

  12. Migration of eosinophils across endothelial cell monolayers: interactions among IL-5, endothelial-activating cytokines, and C-C chemokines.

    PubMed

    Shahabuddin, S; Ponath, P; Schleimer, R P

    2000-04-01

    Eosinophils are the predominant cell type recruited in inflammatory reactions in response to allergen challenge. The mechanisms of selective eosinophil recruitment in allergic reactions are not fully elucidated. In this study, the ability of several C-C chemokines to induce transendothelial migration (TEM) of eosinophils in vitro was assessed. Eotaxin, eotaxin-2, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-4, and RANTES induced eosinophil TEM across unstimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in a concentration-dependent manner with the following rank order of potency: eotaxin approximately eotaxin-2 > MCP-4 approximately RANTES. The maximal response induced by eotaxin or eotaxin-2 exceeded that of RANTES or MCP-4. Preincubation of eosinophils with anti-CCR3 Ab (7B11) completely blocked eosinophil TEM induced by eotaxin, MCP-4, and RANTES. Activation of endothelial cells with IL-1beta or TNF-alpha induced concentration-dependent migration of eosinophils, which was enhanced synergistically in the presence of eotaxin and RANTES. Anti-CCR3 also inhibited eotaxin-induced eosinophil TEM across TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC. The ability of eosinophil-active cytokines to potentiate eosinophil TEM was assessed by investigating eotaxin or RANTES-induced eosinophil TEM across resting and IL-1beta-stimulated HUVEC in the presence or absence of IL-5. The results showed synergy between IL-5 and the chemokines but not between IL-5 and the endothelial activator IL-1beta. Our data suggest that eotaxin, eotaxin-2, MCP-4, and RANTES induce eosinophil TEM via CCR3 with varied potency and efficacy. Activation of HUVEC by IL-1beta or TNF-alpha or priming of eosinophils by IL-5 both promote CCR3-dependent migration of eosinophils from the vasculature in conjunction with CCR3-active chemokines. PMID:10725746

  13. Eosinophilic ascites: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hesham; Joseph, Moby

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic ascites is a rare feature of eosinophilic gastroenteritis. We would like to highlight this increasingly recognised diagnosis in a case of unexplained ascites. We present a challenging case of a woman aged 25 years who presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, generalised abdominal pain and swelling 8-week following delivery of her first baby. Her symptoms were primarily aggravated by eating, and she had also noticed postprandial itching and self-limiting generalised rash. She had a strong history of atopy. Physical examination revealed abdominal tenderness and distension with shifting dullness. Urticarial skin rash was noted on the face, neck, chest and abdomen. Routine biochemistry was normal apart from peripheral eosinophilia. Imaging confirmed moderate ascites. Diagnostic paracentesis showed exudative ascites with numerous eosinophils. Histology of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract showed infiltration of the oesophageogastroduodenal and rectosigmoid mucosa with eosinophils. The patient significantly improved following a course of steroids and six-food elimination diet. PMID:27600059

  14. Effects of astragaloside IV on eosinophil activation induced by house dust mite allergen.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Desheng; Wang, Yuwei; Du, Qiang; Cai, Jiankang

    2012-07-01

    Astragaloside IV (AS-IV) has been noted for its reduction of eosinophilic airway inflammation in a murine model of chronic asthma. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this anti-inflammatory phenomenon, the effect of AS-IV on human blood eosinophils was studied in vitro. Eosinophils were isolated from the blood of patients with mild atopic asthma, preincubated with AS-IV for 1 h and stimulated in the presence or absence of the house dust mite allergen Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) 1 for 4 h. The survival of the eosinophils at 48 h was investigated using trypan blue and the surface expression of CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by the eosinophils was analyzed using flow cytometry. The secretion of cytokines in the supernatants and the chemotaxis of the eosinophils were measured by ELISA and the transwell system, respectively. Der p 1 was found to prolong the survival of the eosinophils. Similarly, the expression of CCR3 and ICAM-1, secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-5, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and transmigration of the eosinophils were increased in the presence of Der p 1. However, these inductive effects on the eosinophils were significantly inhibited by AS-IV (50 µg/ml). These findings suggest that AS-IV modulates eosinophil activation and trafficking in response to Der p 1 and may therefore be a useful therapeutic option in eosinophilic asthma. PMID:22505212

  15. Olanzapine-induced eosinophilic pleuritis.

    PubMed

    Evison, Matthew; Holme, Jayne; Alaloul, Mohamed; Doran, Helen; Bishop, Paul; Booton, Richard; Chaudhry, Nauman

    2015-01-01

    An elderly patient, with a history of depression with psychosis, presented with breathlessness, a right exudative pleural effusion and a peripheral eosinophilia. The pleural fluid was eosinophil-rich (10% of leucocytes). Olanzapine therapy had been commenced 12 months previously. There was a family history of TB and the patient was of African origin. A full diagnostic work-up ensued including computed tomography of the thorax and local anaesthetic thoracoscopy. The pleura was unremarkable on CT and displayed bland smooth thickening at visual inspection during thoracoscopy. Pleural biopsies demonstrated chronic inflammation with eosinophils but no evidence of granulomatous inflammation or malignancy. Pleural tissue culture did not yield mycobacteria. A diagnosis of olanzapine-induced eosinophilic pleuritis was suspected and the pleural disease resolved with withdrawal of olanzapine. Eosinophilic pleural fluid is not a marker of non-malignant aetiology and eosinophilic pleural effusions require a careful and systematic diagnostic work-up. This is the second case report to identify olanzapine as a causative agent in eosinophilic pleural effusion. PMID:26029571

  16. Eosinophil viability is increased by acidic pH in a cAMP- and GPR65-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kottyan, Leah C.; Collier, Ann R.; Cao, Khanh H.; Niese, Kathryn A.; Hedgebeth, Megan; Radu, Caius G.; Witte, Owen N.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2009-01-01

    The microenvironment of the lung in asthma is acidic, yet the effect of acidity on inflammatory cells has not been well established. We now demonstrate that acidity inhibits eosinophil apoptosis and increases cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner between pH 7.5 and 6.0. Notably, acidity induced eosinophil cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) production and enhanced cellular viability in an adenylate cyclase–dependent manner. Furthermore, we identify G protein-coupled receptor 65 (GPR65) as the chief acid-sensing receptor expressed by eosinophils, as GPR65-deficient eosinophils were resistant to acid-induced eosinophil cAMP production and enhanced viability. Notably, GPR65−/− mice had attenuated airway eosinophilia and increased apoptosis in 2 distinct models of allergic airway disease. We conclude that eosinophil viability is increased in acidic microenvironments in a cAMP- and GPR65-dependent manner. PMID:19641187

  17. Eosinophil viability is increased by acidic pH in a cAMP- and GPR65-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kottyan, Leah C; Collier, Ann R; Cao, Khanh H; Niese, Kathryn A; Hedgebeth, Megan; Radu, Caius G; Witte, Owen N; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Rothenberg, Marc E; Zimmermann, Nives

    2009-09-24

    The microenvironment of the lung in asthma is acidic, yet the effect of acidity on inflammatory cells has not been well established. We now demonstrate that acidity inhibits eosinophil apoptosis and increases cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner between pH 7.5 and 6.0. Notably, acidity induced eosinophil cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP) production and enhanced cellular viability in an adenylate cyclase-dependent manner. Furthermore, we identify G protein-coupled receptor 65 (GPR65) as the chief acid-sensing receptor expressed by eosinophils, as GPR65-deficient eosinophils were resistant to acid-induced eosinophil cAMP production and enhanced viability. Notably, GPR65(-/-) mice had attenuated airway eosinophilia and increased apoptosis in 2 distinct models of allergic airway disease. We conclude that eosinophil viability is increased in acidic microenvironments in a cAMP- and GPR65-dependent manner. PMID:19641187

  18. Eosinophil granule-derived major basic protein induces IL-8 expression in human intestinal myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Furuta, G T; Ackerman, S J; Varga, J; Spiess, A M; Wang, M Y; Wershil, B K

    2000-10-01

    Eosinophil infiltration occurs in a variety of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The release of preformed mediators from eosinophils may contribute to inflammatory responses. We investigated the ability of eosinophil-derived major basic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin to stimulate production of IL-8 from intestinal myofibroblasts. Intestinal myofibroblasts (18-Co cells) were incubated with major basic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, or a synthetic analogue of major basic protein, poly-L-arginine. Immunoreactive IL-8 was measured by ELISA and IL-8 mRNA levels were analysed by Northern blot or reverse transcription-polymerase chain assay. Major basic protein induced IL-8 mRNA production and release of significant levels of IL-8 immunoreactive protein. By contrast, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin stimulated little IL-8 release. The induction of IL-8 mRNA by poly-L-arginine was significantly inhibited by actinomycin D. These findings demonstrate a novel interaction between eosinophils and intestinal fibroblasts that may be involved in the pathogenesis of diseases associated with tissue eosinophilia. PMID:11012615

  19. Reduced expression of granule proteins during extended survival of eosinophils in splenocyte culture with GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seul Hye; Na, Hye Young; Sohn, Moah; Han, Sun Murray; Choi, Wanho; In, Hyunju; Hong, Sookyung; Jeon, Hyejin; Seo, Jun-Young; Ahn, Jongcheol; Park, Chae Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a multifaceted hematopoietic cytokine and the culture of mouse bone marrow with GM-CSF produces a variety of myeloid cells including granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. In the present study, we cultured mouse splenocytes with GM-CSF and examined the changes in hematopoietic cell populations over a week. Most of the splenic hematopoietic cells disappeared significantly from culture within 6days with or without the presence of GM-CSF. Among the splenic granulocyte populations, only eosinophils fully survived throughout the culture with GM-CSF for more than a week. During 10days of culture with GM-CSF, splenic eosinophils maintained their morphology as well as most of their surface molecules at high levels, including CCR3 and Siglec F. Meanwhile, the expression of mRNAs encoding major basic protein-1 (MBP-1) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), two major eosinophil-derived granule proteins, was diminished significantly from the cultured eosinophils. EPO assays also revealed that eosinophils in culture for more than 5days retained 30% or less EPO activity compared to those in uncultured splenocytes. In contrast, culture of splenocytes with GM-CSF did not change the capacity of eosinophils to migrate in response to eotaxin-1. Our results indicate that mouse splenic eosinophils are effectively cultured for lengthy periods while their expression of eosinophil-derived granule proteins is specifically suppressed. The relevance of these findings to eosinophilic inflammatory response is discussed. PMID:26969350

  20. Human eosinophil activin A synthesis and mRNA stabilization are induced by the combination of IL-3 plus TNF.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Elizabeth A; Esnault, Stephane; Johnson, Sean H; Liu, Lin Ying; Malter, James S; Burnham, Mandy E; Jarjour, Nizar N

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophils contribute to immune regulation and wound healing/fibrosis in various diseases, including asthma. Growing appreciation for the role of activin A in such processes led us to hypothesize that eosinophils are a source of this transforming growth factor-ß superfamily member. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) induces activin A by other cell types and is often present at the site of allergic inflammation along with the eosinophil-activating common ß (ßc) chain-signaling cytokines (interleukin (IL)-5, IL-3, granulocyte-macrophages colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)). Previously, we established that the combination of TNF plus a ßc chain-signaling cytokine synergistically induces eosinophil synthesis of the remodeling enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-9. Therefore, eosinophils were stimulated ex vivo by these cytokines and in vivo through an allergen-induced airway inflammatory response. In contrast to IL-5+TNF or GM-CSF+TNF, the combination of IL-3+TNF synergistically induced activin A synthesis and release by human blood eosinophils. IL-3+TNF enhanced activin A mRNA stability, which required sustained signaling of pathways downstream of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinases. In vivo, following segmental airway allergen challenge of subjects with mild allergic asthma, activin A mRNA was upregulated in airway eosinophils compared with circulating eosinophils, and ex vivo, circulating eosinophils tended to release more activin A in response to IL-3+TNF. These data provide evidence that eosinophils release activin A and that this function is enhanced when eosinophils are present in an allergen-induced inflammatory environment. Moreover, these data provide the first evidence for posttranscriptional control of activin A mRNA. We propose that an environment rich in IL-3+TNF will lead to eosinophil-derived activin A, which has an important role in regulating inflammation and/or fibrosis. PMID:27001469

  1. Emphysematous Eosinophilic Lymphangitis in the Ruminal Submucosa of Cattle.

    PubMed

    Ohfuji, S

    2015-11-01

    Twenty cattle (14 Holstein-Friesian, 3 Japanese Black, 3 Aberdeen Angus) ranging in age from 3 months to 8 years exhibited, at slaughter, emphysematous thickening of the ruminal submucosa owing to the appearance of numerous, contiguous, small gas bubbles. Microscopic changes in the ruminal submucosa consisted of (1) multiple cystic (emphysematous) lymphangiectasis that was frequently lined or occluded by granulomatous inflammatory infiltrates including macrophages, multinucleate giant cells, and eosinophils; (2) intralymphatic phagocytosis by macrophages and giant cells of eosinophils that showed positive labeling with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end-labeling assay; and (3) an inflammatory infiltrate extending from the area of lymphangitis into surrounding tissue, as well as edema, hemorrhage, fibrin exudation, fibroplasia, or capillary proliferation throughout the lesional submucosa. In addition, 15 (75%) of the cattle had globular leukocyte infiltrates in the mucosal epithelia of the rumen. PMID:25710949

  2. Montelukast as a treatment modality for eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    De Maeyer, N; Kochuyt, A-M; Van Moerkercke, W; Hiele, M

    2011-12-01

    Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis (EG) is a rare condition, caused by eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrates in the gastrointestinal tract. It is usually treated successfully with systemic glucocorticoids. Because of frequent relapses, however, there is need for alternatives. We describe a 38-year old man with steroid-dependent EG, who was successfully treated with montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist. It inhibits leukotriene D4, an important cytokine in the inflammatory cascade. Although montelukast could not replace steroid therapy, it acted as a steroid sparing agent in our patient. Review of the literature shows that montelukast is efficient in the treatment of EG in a part of the patients. The low cost, the low number of side effects and its efficiency make it an interesting alternative in relapsing or steroid dependent EG. There is need for multicentric studies regarding the treatment of EG. PMID:22319970

  3. Dermal eosinophilic infiltrate in junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Saraiya, Ami; Yang, Catherine S; Kim, Jinah; Bercovitch, Lionel; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Telang, Gladys

    2015-08-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by a split in the lamina lucida usually because of mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 resulting in absence or reduction of laminin-332. Rare subtypes of JEB have mutations in COL17A1, ITGB4, ITGA6 and ITGA3 leading to reduction or dysfunction of collagen XVII, integrin α6β4 and integrin α3. The classic finding under light microscopy is a paucicellular, subepidermal split. We describe the unusual presence of an eosinophilic infiltrate in the bullae and subjacent dermis in a neonate with JEB, generalized intermediate (formerly known as non-Herlitz-type JEB), discuss the histologic differential diagnosis for a subepidermal blister in a neonate, review the literature regarding cases of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) presenting with inflammatory infiltrates, and discuss mechanisms to explain these findings. This case highlights that eosinophils can rarely be seen in EB and should not mislead the dermatopathologist into diagnosing an autoimmune blistering disorder. PMID:25950805

  4. The eosinophil as a therapeutic target in asthma: beginning of the end, or end of the beginning?

    PubMed

    Adamko, Darryl; Odemuyiwa, Solomon Olawole; Moqbel, Redwan

    2003-06-01

    A major goal in asthma therapy is to reduce or prevent the inflammatory response associated with bronchial hyperresponsiveness, reversible airway obstruction and airway remodelling. However, because of the complex nature of the disease, a single target for such an ideal therapeutic approach remains elusive. To ensure a more rational design of anti-asthma drugs, recent investigations have attempted to elucidate the roles of inflammatory cellular components in asthma. Such studies have shown that eosinophilic infiltration is a prominent feature in the pathophysiology of asthma. Nonetheless, the role of the eosinophil in asthma has been questioned following recent human studies investigating the efficacy of a novel therapeutic strategy targeted at eosinophils. PMID:12810184

  5. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Adolescent Patients Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Basics Overview Eosinophilic esophagitis also known as ( ... children may have vomiting and abdominal pain, and adolescents may complain of the feeling of food getting ...

  6. Allergic Mechanisms in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Paralleling the overall trend in allergic diseases, Eosinophilic Esophagitis is rapidly increasing in incidence. It is associated with food antigen-triggered, eosinophil-predominant inflammation and the pathogenic mechanisms have many similarities to other chronic atopic diseases, such as eczema and allergic asthma. Studies in animal models and from patients over the last 15 years have suggested that allergic sensitization leads to food-specific IgE and T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells, both of which appear to contribute to the pathogenesis along with basophils, mast cells, and antigen-presenting cells. This review will outline our current understandings of the allergic mechanisms that drive eosinophilic esophagitis, drawing from clinical and translational studies in humans as well as experimental animal models. PMID:24813516

  7. Eosinophilic esophagitis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Jay A; Chehade, Mirna

    2012-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a clinicopathologic disease that can present with a constellation of upper gastrointestinal symptoms and endoscopic findings in conjunction with significant infiltration of the esophageal tissue with eosinophils. Clinical and histologic resolution of the disease can be seen with dietary restriction therapies and systemic and topical corticosteroids. Because most patients have an atopic background and the disease seems to have an underlying T-helper type 2 pathogenesis, allergists and gastroenterologists need to be familiar with the diagnosis and management of this disease. In this review, clinical characteristics, endoscopic and histologic findings, and available therapy options are discussed. PMID:22244233

  8. Eosinophilic ascites, as a rare presentation of eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Cuko, L; Bilaj, F; Bega, B; Barbullushi, A; Resuli, B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Eosinophilic ascites is the most unusual presentation of eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE), caused by edema and eosinophilic inflammation of the small bowel wall's serosal layer. Case Report: We report the case of a 37-year-old woman, who presented with diffuse abdominal pain, nausea, abdominal distension, moderate ascites and diarrhea of two weeks duration. The rest of physical and clinical examination was unremarkable, and her past medical history was uneventful. Magnetic Resonance Imaging showed the presence of ascites and diffuse thickening of small bowel wall, but did not detect a primary malignancy in the abdominal cavity; and no signs of portal hypertension or liver damage. Laboratory test results revealed essential peripheral blood eosinophilia, elevated serum IgE and marked increase of eosinophils in the abdominal fluid. Treatment with corticosteroids normalized laboratory tests results, and the ascites resolved immediately. Conclusions: EGE is a rare entity and it should be kept in mind in patients of unexplained ascites. The absence of primary malignancy on imaging, coupled with marked increase of fluid esinophilia and immediate response to treatment with steroids, confirm indirectly the diagnosis of EGE. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (3): 275-277. PMID:25694765

  9. Eosinophilic annular erythema in childhood - Case report.

    PubMed

    Abarzúa, Alvaro; Giesen, Laura; Silva, Sergio; González, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic annular erythema is a rare, benign, recurrent disease, clinically characterized by persistent, annular, erythematous lesions, revealing histopathologically perivascular infiltrates with abundant eosinophils. This report describes an unusual case of eosinophilic annular erythema in a 3-year-old female, requiring sustained doses of hydroxychloroquine to be adequately controlled. PMID:27579748

  10. Eosinophilic annular erythema in childhood - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Abarzúa, Alvaro; Giesen, Laura; Silva, Sergio; González, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic annular erythema is a rare, benign, recurrent disease, clinically characterized by persistent, annular, erythematous lesions, revealing histopathologically perivascular infiltrates with abundant eosinophils. This report describes an unusual case of eosinophilic annular erythema in a 3-year-old female, requiring sustained doses of hydroxychloroquine to be adequately controlled. PMID:27579748

  11. Advances in the immunobiology of eosinophils and their role in disease.

    PubMed

    Walsh, G M

    1999-10-01

    Eosinophils play a protective role in host immunity to infections by parasitic worms and, detrimentally, are involved in the pathophysiology of asthma and other allergic diseases. Airway inflammation is central to the pathology of asthma and is characterized by infiltration of the bronchial mucosa by large numbers of proinflammatory cells, amongst which the eosinophil is prominent despite being a minority constituent of circulating leukocytes. Crucial steps in eosinophilic inflammation include augmented production of eosinophils in the bone marrow, their increased release into the circulation, and their selective accumulation in the conducting airways. The eosinophil has a potent armory of proinflammatory mediators, including cytotoxic granule proteins, cytokines and lipid mediators with considerable potential to initiate and sustain an inflammatory response. Thus there is much interest in the elucidation of the mechanisms responsible for eosinophil accumulation, persistence, activation and ultimate fate. This article reviews our current understanding of the role of the eosinophil in human disease and the immunobiology of this important proinflammatory cell. PMID:10560888

  12. Activated eosinophils and interleukin 5 expression in early recurrence of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dubucquoi, S; Janin, A; Klein, O; Desreumaux, P; Quandalle, P; Cortot, A; Capron, M; Colombel, J F

    1995-01-01

    Endoscopic recurrences after radical surgery for Crohn's disease are useful for studying the pathogenesis of initial lesions of Crohn's disease. Factors predisposing to recurrence are poorly understood, but it has been shown that eosinophilic infiltration of the neoileum may occur within a few weeks of resection. The aim of this study was to compare, in nine patients having an ileocolectomy, the infiltration of eosinophils and their activation state in normal and diseased areas of the neoileum, three months after surgery. Tissue eosinophils were studied by histochemical methods and electron microscopy. Mucosal expression of interleukin 5 (IL 5), an important eosinophil activating factor was studied using in situ hybridisation. Sixty per cent of patients had endoscopic recurrence at three months. Eosinophil infiltration was more pronounced in diseased than in endoscopically normal areas and was associated with a high expression of IL 5 mRNA. Ultrastructural analysis showed features of eosinophil activation, but no cytotoxic lesions of surrounding inflammatory or epithelial cells. This study suggests that local synthesis of IL 5 associated with eosinophil activation in the tissues could participate in early mucosal damage in Crohn's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7557575

  13. Allergen-induced traffic of bone marrow eosinophils, neutrophils and lymphocytes to airways.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anna-Karin; Sergejeva, Svetlana; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lee, James J; Lötvall, Jan

    2004-11-01

    We evaluated whether bone marrow (BM) inflammatory cells have capacity to traffic into the airways following allergen exposure in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. We also evaluated the effect of IL-5 overexpression on (i) the production of eosinophils in BM, (ii) the accumulation of eosinophils, neutrophils and lymphocytes in blood and airways and (iii) the changes in CD34+ cell numbers in BM, blood and airways. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label cells produced during the exposure period. Furthermore, CD3 splenocytes were adoptively transferred to investigate the BM inflammatory response. Allergen exposure induced traffic of BM eosinophils, neutrophils and lymphocytes to the airways and increased the number of BrdU+ eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes and CD34+ cells in BALf. IL-5 overexpression enhanced the eosinophilopoiesis and increased the presence of BrdU+ eosinophils and CD34+ cells in airways and enhanced the number of CD34+ cells in BM and blood after allergen exposure. Adoptive transfer of CD3 lymphocytes overexpressing IL-5 caused increased BM eosinophilia. In conclusion, allergen exposure induces traffic of not only newly produced eosinophils but also newly produced neutrophils and lymphocytes into the airways. PMID:15384047

  14. IL-4 Engagement of the Type I IL-4 Receptor Complex Enhances Mouse Eosinophil Migration to Eotaxin-1 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Nicola M.; Gwinn, William M.; Donnelly, Raymond P.; Constant, Stephanie L.; Keegan, Achsah D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated that IL-4Rα expression on a myeloid cell type was responsible for enhancement of Th2-driven eosinophilic inflammation in a mouse model of allergic lung inflammation. Subsequently, we have shown that IL-4 signaling through type I IL-4 receptors on monocytes/macrophages strongly induced activation of the IRS-2 pathway and a subset of genes characteristic of alternatively activated macrophages. The direct effect(s) of IL-4 and IL-13 on mouse eosinophils are not clear. The goal of this study was determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on mouse eosinophil function. Methods Standard Transwell chemotaxis assay was used to assay migration of mouse eosinophils and signal transduction was assessed by Western blotting. Results Here we determined that (i) mouse eosinophils express both type I and type II IL-4 receptors, (ii) in contrast to human eosinophils, mouse eosinophils do not chemotax to IL-4 or IL-13 although (iii) pre-treatment with IL-4 but not IL-13 enhanced migration to eotaxin-1. This IL-4-mediated enhancement was dependent on type I IL-4 receptor expression: γC-deficient eosinophils did not show enhancement of migratory capacity when pre-treated with IL-4. In addition, mouse eosinophils responded to IL-4 with the robust tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT6 and IRS-2, while IL-13-induced responses were considerably weaker. Conclusions The presence of IL-4 in combination with eotaxin-1 in the allergic inflammatory milieu could potentiate infiltration of eosinophils into the lungs. Therapies that block IL-4 and chemokine receptors on eosinophils might be more effective clinically in reducing eosinophilic lung inflammation. PMID:22761864

  15. Induction of eosinophil apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide promotes the resolution of allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Reis, A C; Alessandri, A L; Athayde, R M; Perez, D A; Vago, J P; Ávila, T V; Ferreira, T P T; de Arantes, A C S; Coutinho, D de Sá; Rachid, M A; Sousa, L P; Martins, M A; Menezes, G B; Rossi, A G; Teixeira, M M; Pinho, V

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are effector cells that have an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. Defective removal of these cells likely leads to chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the elimination of eosinophils from inflammatory sites. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for certain mediators and molecular pathways responsible for the survival and death of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. Reactive oxygen species have been described as proinflammatory mediators but their role in the resolution phase of inflammation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reactive oxygen species in the resolution of allergic inflammatory responses. An eosinophilic cell line (Eol-1) was treated with hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis was measured. Allergic inflammation was induced in ovalbumin sensitized and challenged mouse models and reactive oxygen species were administered at the peak of inflammatory cell infiltrate. Inflammatory cell numbers, cytokine and chemokine levels, mucus production, inflammatory cell apoptosis and peribronchiolar matrix deposition was quantified in the lungs. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine. Hydrogen peroxide accelerates resolution of airway inflammation by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils and decrease remodeling, mucus deposition, inflammatory cytokine production and airway hyperreactivity. Moreover, the inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by apocynin or in gp91(phox-/-) mice prolonged the inflammatory response. Hydrogen peroxide induces Eol-1 apoptosis in vitro and enhances the resolution of inflammation and improves lung function in vivo by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils. PMID:25675292

  16. Induction of eosinophil apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide promotes the resolution of allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, A C; Alessandri, A L; Athayde, R M; Perez, D A; Vago, J P; Ávila, T V; Ferreira, T P T; de Arantes, A CS; de Sá Coutinho, D; Rachid, M A; Sousa, L P; Martins, M A; Menezes, G B; Rossi, A G; Teixeira, M M; Pinho, V

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are effector cells that have an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. Defective removal of these cells likely leads to chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the elimination of eosinophils from inflammatory sites. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for certain mediators and molecular pathways responsible for the survival and death of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. Reactive oxygen species have been described as proinflammatory mediators but their role in the resolution phase of inflammation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reactive oxygen species in the resolution of allergic inflammatory responses. An eosinophilic cell line (Eol-1) was treated with hydrogen peroxide and apoptosis was measured. Allergic inflammation was induced in ovalbumin sensitized and challenged mouse models and reactive oxygen species were administered at the peak of inflammatory cell infiltrate. Inflammatory cell numbers, cytokine and chemokine levels, mucus production, inflammatory cell apoptosis and peribronchiolar matrix deposition was quantified in the lungs. Resistance and elastance were measured at baseline and after aerosolized methacholine. Hydrogen peroxide accelerates resolution of airway inflammation by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils and decrease remodeling, mucus deposition, inflammatory cytokine production and airway hyperreactivity. Moreover, the inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by apocynin or in gp91phox−/− mice prolonged the inflammatory response. Hydrogen peroxide induces Eol-1 apoptosis in vitro and enhances the resolution of inflammation and improves lung function in vivo by inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis of eosinophils. PMID:25675292

  17. Macroscopic Hematuria and a Bladder Mass: Eosinophilic Cystitis in a 7-Year-Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Runge, Stine Bjerrum; Høyer, Søren; Winding, Louise

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of eosinophilic cystitis in a 7-year-old boy with a history of atopic symptoms, with focus on the radiological findings. He presented with hematuria and dysuria and ultrasonography (US) showed irregular bladder wall thickening resembling a bladder mass. CT urography did not characterize the lesion any further and showed no local or distant spread. Biopsies revealed eosinophilic cystitis, a benign inflammatory condition. We found that US characterized the lesion at least as well as CT and should be the first choice of imaging. When staging is considered before biopsy, MRI should be preferred to CT. There are no specific radiological signs of eosinophilic cystitis. On follow-up, US was a safe, cost-effective imaging modality, but findings should be interpreted in a clinical context. In a child with hematuria and a bladder mass, eosinophilic cystitis is a relevant but rare differential diagnosis, especially when there is a known atopic history. PMID:27340584

  18. Eosinophils in mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Travers, J; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils, multifunctional cells that contribute to both innate and adaptive immunity, are involved in the initiation, propagation and resolution of immune responses, including tissue repair. They achieve this multifunctionality by expression of a diverse set of activation receptors, including those that directly recognize pathogens and opsonized targets, and by their ability to store and release preformed cytotoxic mediators that participate in host defense, to produce a variety of de novo pleotropic mediators and cytokines and to interact directly and indirectly with diverse cell types, including adaptive and innate immunocytes and structural cells. Herein, we review the basic biology of eosinophils and then focus on new emerging concepts about their role in mucosal immune homeostasis, particularly maintenance of intestinal IgA. We review emerging data about their development and regulation and describe new concepts concerning mucosal eosinophilic diseases. We describe recently developed therapeutic strategies to modify eosinophil levels and function and provide collective insight about the beneficial and detrimental functions of these enigmatic cells. PMID:25807184

  19. Strongyloidiasis histologically mimicking eosinophilic folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Cannavò, Serafinella P; Guarneri, Fabrizio; Guarneri, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    The authors report an unusual case of strongyloidiasis in an Italian patient, who has always lived in Sicily. The patient presented with marked blood eosinophilia and an itching maculo-papular eruption, histologically simulating eosinophilic folliculitis. The clinical resolution was achieved after albendazol therapy. PMID:15319162

  20. Eosinophilic Endomyocarditis: A Rare Case of Neonatal Mortality.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Allison J; Hitt, Stacy L; Stier, Michael A; Houser, Laura M

    2015-10-01

    Background Eosinophilic endomyocarditis (EEM) is a rare diagnosis that is extremely uncommon in newborns. This case report aimed to present a case of neonatal mortality from acute cardiac failure due to EEM. Case Our report presents a term male neonate with minor complications in the immediate postnatal course, who was discharged at 48 hours of life, but who developed unexpected respiratory distress, followed by cardiac arrest and death at 3 days of life. One day after discharge, the infant developed respiratory distress and cool skin, and then developed cardiac arrest at the pediatrician's office, undergoing resuscitation with intravenous fluid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, epinephrine, atropine, and failed intubation. Autopsy revealed EEM, an inflammatory infiltrative process involving the endomyocardium. Pathology Pathogenesis involves three stages: (1) myocarditis with an acute eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate followed by (2) myocyte necrosis and eventually (3) fibrosis in the final stage of the disease. Discussion The cause of death was acute cardiac failure due to intense eosinophilic infiltration and degranulation with early subendocardial myocyte necrosis but before development of extensive myocyte necrosis. This case appears to be the youngest patient reported with EEM. PMID:26495174

  1. Eosinophilic Endomyocarditis: A Rare Case of Neonatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Allison J.; Hitt, Stacy L.; Stier, Michael A.; Houser, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic endomyocarditis (EEM) is a rare diagnosis that is extremely uncommon in newborns. This case report aimed to present a case of neonatal mortality from acute cardiac failure due to EEM. Case Our report presents a term male neonate with minor complications in the immediate postnatal course, who was discharged at 48 hours of life, but who developed unexpected respiratory distress, followed by cardiac arrest and death at 3 days of life. One day after discharge, the infant developed respiratory distress and cool skin, and then developed cardiac arrest at the pediatrician's office, undergoing resuscitation with intravenous fluid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, epinephrine, atropine, and failed intubation. Autopsy revealed EEM, an inflammatory infiltrative process involving the endomyocardium. Pathology Pathogenesis involves three stages: (1) myocarditis with an acute eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate followed by (2) myocyte necrosis and eventually (3) fibrosis in the final stage of the disease. Discussion The cause of death was acute cardiac failure due to intense eosinophilic infiltration and degranulation with early subendocardial myocyte necrosis but before development of extensive myocyte necrosis. This case appears to be the youngest patient reported with EEM. PMID:26495174

  2. Human peripheral blood eosinophils induce angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Puxeddu, Ilaria; Alian, Akram; Piliponsky, Adrian Martin; Ribatti, Domenico; Panet, Amos; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2005-03-01

    Eosinophils play a crucial role in allergic reactions and asthma. They are also involved in responses against parasites, in autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, and in fibroses. There is increasing evidence that angiogenesis plays an important role in these processes. Since eosinophils are known to produce angiogenic mediators, we have hypothesized a direct contribution of these cells to angiogenesis. The effect of human peripheral blood eosinophil sonicates on rat aortic endothelial cell proliferation (in vitro), rat aorta sprouting (ex vivo) and angiogenesis in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (in vivo) have been investigated. To determine whether eosinophil-derived vascular endothelial growth factor influences the eosinophil pro-angiogenic activity, eosinophil sonicates were incubated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies and then added to the chorioallantoic membrane. Vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor density on the endothelial cells were also evaluated. Eosinophils were found to enhance endothelial cell proliferation and to induce a strong angiogenic response both in the aorta rings and in the chorioallantoic membrane assays. Pre-incubation of eosinophil sonicates with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies partially reduced the angiogenic response of these cells in the chorioallantoic membrane. Eosinophils also increased vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA production on endothelial cells. Eosinophils are able to induce angiogenesis and this effect is partially mediated by their pre-formed vascular endothelial growth factor. This strongly suggests an important role of eosinophils in angiogenesis-associated diseases such as asthma. PMID:15618019

  3. Eosinophilic Gastritis Presenting as Tissue Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yong Min; Jang, Jin Seok; Han, Seung Hee; Kang, Sang Hyun; Kim, Woo Jae; Jeong, Jin Sook

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is very rare disorder that is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of any definite causes of eosinophilia. It is associated with various clinical gastrointestinal manifestations, and depends on the involved layer and site. We report a case of eosinophilic gastritis presenting with severe necrosis. The symptoms disappeared immediately after beginning steroid treatment, and the eosinophil count decreased to the reference range. The patient showed eosinophilic gastritis characterized by necrotic change such as necrotizing gastritis. It is a unique presentation of eosinophilic gastritis. To the best of our knowledge, no case of eosinophilic gastritis characterized by necrotic change such as necrotizing gastritis has been previously reported in Korea. PMID:26668805

  4. Fasciola hepatica induces eosinophil apoptosis in the migratory and biliary stages of infection in sheep.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, A; Bautista, M J; Zafra, R; Pacheco, I L; Ruiz, M T; Martínez-Cruz, S; Méndez, A; Martínez-Moreno, A; Molina-Hernández, V; Pérez, J

    2016-01-30

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the number of apoptotic eosinophils in the livers of sheep experimentally infected with Fasciola hepatica during the migratory and biliary stages of infection. Four groups (n=5) of sheep were used; groups 1-3 were orally infected with 200 metacercariae (mc) and sacrificed at 8 and 28 days post-infection (dpi), and 17 weeks post-infection (wpi), respectively. Group 4 was used as an uninfected control. Apoptosis was detected using immunohistochemistry with a polyclonal antibody against anti-active caspase-3, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Eosinophils were identified using the Hansel stain in serial sections for caspase-3, and by ultrastructural features using TEM. At 8 and 28 dpi, numerous caspase-3(+) eosinophils were mainly found at the periphery of acute hepatic necrotic foci. The percentage of caspase -3(+) apoptotic eosinophils in the periphery of necrotic foci was high (46.1-53.9) at 8 and 28 dpi, respectively, and decreased in granulomas found at 28 dpi (6%). Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of apoptotic eosinophils in hepatic lesions at 8 and 28 dpi. At 17 wpi, apoptotic eosinophils were detected in the infiltrate surrounding some enlarged bile ducts containing adult flukes. This is the first report of apoptosis induced by F. hepatica in sheep and the first study reporting apoptosis in eosinophils in hepatic inflammatory infiltrates in vivo. The high number of apoptotic eosinophils in acute necrotic tracts during the migratory and biliary stages of infection suggests that eosinophil apoptosis may play a role in F. hepatica survival during different stages of infection. PMID:26801599

  5. Eosinophil resistance to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis is mediated by the transcription factor NFIL3.

    PubMed

    Pazdrak, Konrad; Moon, Young; Straub, Christof; Stafford, Susan; Kurosky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The mainstay of asthma therapy, glucocorticoids (GCs) exert their therapeutic effects through the inhibition of inflammatory signaling and induction of eosinophil apoptosis. However, laboratory and clinical observations of GC-resistant asthma suggest that GCs' effects on eosinophil viability may depend on the state of eosinophil activation. In the present study we demonstrate that eosinophils stimulated with IL-5 show impaired pro-apoptotic response to GCs. We sought to determine the contribution of GC-mediated transactivating (TA) and transrepressing (TR) pathways in modulation of activated eosinophils' response to GC by comparing their response to the selective GC receptor (GR) agonist Compound A (CpdA) devoid of TA activity to that upon treatment with Dexamethasone (Dex). IL-5-activated eosinophils showed contrasting responses to CpdA and Dex, as IL-5-treated eosinophils showed no increase in apoptosis compared to cells treated with Dex alone, while CpdA elicited an apoptotic response regardless of IL-5 stimulation. Proteomic analysis revealed that both Nuclear Factor IL-3 (NFIL3) and Map Kinase Phosphatase 1 (MKP1) were inducible by IL-5 and enhanced by Dex; however, CpdA had no effect on NFIL3 and MKP1 expression. We found that inhibiting NFIL3 with specific siRNA or by blocking the IL-5-inducible Pim-1 kinase abrogated the protective effect of IL-5 on Dex-induced apoptosis, indicating crosstalk between IL-5 anti-apoptotic pathways and GR-mediated TA signaling occurring via the NFIL3 molecule. Collectively, these results indicate that (1) GCs' TA pathway may support eosinophil viability in IL-5-stimulated cells through synergistic upregulation of NFIL3; and (2) functional inhibition of IL-5 signaling (anti-Pim1) or the use of selective GR agonists that don't upregulate NFIL3 may be effective strategies for the restoring pro-apoptotic effect of GCs on IL-5-activated eosinophils. PMID:26880402

  6. Tissue localization of transforming growth factor-beta1 in pulmonary eosinophilic granuloma.

    PubMed

    Asakura, S; Colby, T V; Limper, A H

    1996-11-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilic granuloma is characterized by infiltration of the lungs with fibronodular lesions containing specialized Langerhans' cells. In some patients, progressive pulmonary fibrosis leads to significant respiratory impairment. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) promotes fibrosis by enhancing the synthesis of extracellular matrix components. The role of TGF-beta1 in promoting fibrosis in the setting of pulmonary eosinophilic granuloma is currently unknown. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate the extent and distribution of TGF-beta1 and the extracellular matrix components type I collagen and decorin, a TGF-beta1-binding proteoglycan. Lung biopsies from 11 patients with pulmonary eosinophilic granuloma were evaluated. In biopsies with active inflammatory lesions containing Langerhans' cells, hyperplastic type 2 pneumocytes and alveolar macrophages within and surrounding the fibronodular lesions contained abundant TGF-beta1. Langerhans' cells were consistently devoid of immunoreactive TGF-beta1. Active inflammatory lesions also exhibited staining for decorin, in a loosely organized distribution. Advanced fibrotic lesions of eosinophilic granuloma, containing minimal inflammatory cells and few or no Langerhans' cells, exhibited weak or absent staining for TGF-beta1 within either hyperplastic type 2 pneumocytes or alveolar macrophages. The fibroconnective tissues of these advanced fibrotic lesions consistently revealed dense staining for decorin. Through their actions on extracellular matrix protein accumulation, TGF-beta1 and the TGF-beta1-binding proteoglycan decorin may modulate fibrotic repair accompanying pulmonary eosinophilic granuloma. PMID:8912775

  7. Eosinophilic Skin Diseases: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; Zhang, Guiying; Wang, Ling; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophilic skin diseases, commonly termed as eosinophilic dermatoses, refer to a broad spectrum of skin diseases characterized by eosinophil infiltration and/or degranulation in skin lesions, with or without blood eosinophilia. The majority of eosinophilic dermatoses lie in the allergy-related group, including allergic drug eruption, urticaria, allergic contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and eczema. Parasitic infestations, arthropod bites, and autoimmune blistering skin diseases such as bullous pemphigoid, are also common. Besides these, there are several rare types of eosinophilic dermatoses with unknown origin, in which eosinophil infiltration is a central component and affects specific tissue layers or adnexal structures of the skin, such as the dermis, subcutaneous fat, fascia, follicles, and cutaneous vessels. Some typical examples are eosinophilic cellulitis, granuloma faciale, eosinophilic pustular folliculitis, recurrent cutaneous eosinophilic vasculitis, and eosinophilic fasciitis. Although tissue eosinophilia is a common feature shared by these disorders, their clinical and pathological properties differ dramatically. Among these rare entities, eosinophilic pustular folliculitis may be associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or malignancies, and some other diseases, like eosinophilic fasciitis and eosinophilic cellulitis, may be associated with an underlying hematological disorder, while others are considered idiopathic. However, for most of these rare eosinophilic dermatoses, the causes and the pathogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown, and systemic, high-quality clinical investigations are needed for advances in better strategies for clinical diagnosis and treatment. Here, we present a comprehensive review on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and management of these rare entities, with an emphasis on recent advances and current consensus. PMID:25876839

  8. CD63 is tightly associated with intracellular, secretory events chaperoning piecemeal degranulation and compound exocytosis in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Lívia A S; Bonjour, Kennedy; Ueki, Shigeharu; Neves, Josiane S; Liu, Linying; Spencer, Lisa A; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F; Melo, Rossana C N

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophil activation leads to secretion of presynthesized, granule-stored mediators that determine the course of allergic, inflammatory, and immunoregulatory responses. CD63, a member of the transmembrane-4 glycoprotein superfamily (tetraspanins) and present on the limiting membranes of eosinophil-specific (secretory) granules, is considered a potential surface marker for eosinophil degranulation. However, the intracellular secretory trafficking of CD63 in eosinophils and other leukocytes is not understood. Here, we provide a comprehensive investigation of CD63 trafficking at high resolution within human eosinophils stimulated with inflammatory stimuli, CCL11 and tumor necrosis factor α, which induce distinctly differing secretory processes in eosinophils: piecemeal degranulation and compound exocytosis, respectively. By using different transmission electron microscopy approaches, including an immunonanogold technique, for enhanced detection of CD63 at subcellular compartments, we identified a major intracellular pool of CD63 that is directly linked to eosinophil degranulation events. Transmission electron microscopy quantitative analyses demonstrated that, in response to stimulation, CD63 is concentrated within granules undergoing secretion by piecemeal degranulation or compound exocytosis and that CD63 tracks with the movements of vesicles and granules in the cytoplasm. Although CD63 was observed at the cell surface after stimulation, immunonanogold electron microscopy revealed that a strong CD63 pool remains in the cytoplasm. It is remarkable that CCL11 and tumor necrosis factor α triggered increased formation of CD63(+) large vesiculotubular carriers (eosinophil sombrero vesicles), which fused with granules in the process of secretion, likely acting in the intracellular translocation of CD63. Altogether, we identified active, intracellular CD63 trafficking connected to eosinophil granule-derived secretory pathways. This is important for understanding the

  9. Release of O2- and LTC4 by murine eosinophils: role of intra- and extracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    de Andres, B; del Pozo, V; Martin, E; Palomino, P; Lahoz, C

    1990-01-01

    Using an experimental model of mouse peritoneal eosinophilia, we investigated the role of Ca2+ in the in vitro activation of these cells challenged with specific Mesocestoides corti antigen. We have detected LTC4, a metabolite derived from arachidonic acid by way of 5'lipo-oxygenase and superoxide anion from the oxidative burst, as inflammatory mediators produced by activated eosinophils. Preincubation with hyperimmune mice serum increases the amount of LTC4 and superoxide anion in response to the antigenic extract. Release of O2- is inhibited by Verapamil (a voltage-gated calcium channel) and Quin 2 (an intracellular trapped chelator of calcium). Also, LTC4 produced by preincubated eosinophils challenged with M. corti is dramatically inhibited by Quin 2. Our results suggest an intact mechanism for calcium control for the release of these inflammatory mediators by eosinophils, after specific antigenic stimulation. PMID:1689695

  10. Current Approach to Diagnosis and Management of Pulmonary Eosinophilic Syndromes: Eosinophilic Pneumonias, Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis, and Hypereosinophilic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sergew, Amen; Fernández Pérez, Evans R

    2016-06-01

    Eosinophils play a key role in orchestrating the complex clinicopathological pulmonary and extrapulmonary disease features in patients with eosinophilic syndromes. Eosinophilic pulmonary syndromes consist of a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of peripheral blood eosinophilia and/or eosinophilic-related pulmonary impairment. These disorders can present with varying degrees of organ involvement, and while their presentation may be similar, it is important to define the disease state, as management and prognosis differ. In this article, we discuss acute and chronic eosinophilic pneumonias, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and the hypereosinophilic syndromes. The mainstay of therapy for these disorders has been corticosteroids; however, recent and ongoing studies have provided strong grounds for optimism for specific targeted treatment approaches. PMID:27231866

  11. Eosinophilic phenotypes of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Pavord, Ian D

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the clinical implications of eosinophilic airway inflammation has increased significantly over the last 20 years, aided by the development of noninvasive means to assess it. This pattern of airway inflammation can occur in a diverse range of airway diseases. It is associated with a positive response to corticosteroids and a high risk of preventable exacerbations. Our new understanding of the role of eosinophilic airway inflammation has paved the way for the clinical development of a number of more specific inhibitors that may become new treatment options. Different definitions, ideas of disease, and adoption of biomarkers that are not well known are necessary to fully realize the potential of these treatments. PMID:24313765

  12. Eosinophilic leukaemia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Hassan; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Esmaelli, Hossein; Khoshnegah, Javad

    2007-12-01

    A 14-year-old female domestic shorthair cat was presented to Tehran University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for a persistent fever, anorexia, intermittent vomiting, weight loss and weakness. The main clinical signs were pale mucous membranes, dehydration and splenomegaly. The complete blood count and serum biochemistry tests revealed non-regenerative anaemia, thrombocytopenia and increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test for feline leukaemia virus was negative. Blood film and bone marrow examination revealed a large number of immature eosinophils with variable sizes and numbers of faintly azurophilic granules. Cytochemical staining of blood film demonstrated 70% positive cells for ALP activity. Four percent CD34 positive cells were detected by flow cytometry. As eosinophilic leukaemia is difficult to identify by light microscopy, well-defined diagnostic criteria and the use of flow cytometry and cytochemical staining can improve the ability to correctly diagnose this type of leukaemia in cats. PMID:17669677

  13. Human eosinophils modulate peripheral blood mononuclear cell response to Schistosoma mansoni adult worm antigen in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tweyongyere, R; Namanya, H; Naniima, P; Cose, S; Tukahebwa, E M; Elliott, A M; Dunne, D W; Wilson, S

    2016-08-01

    High numbers of eosinophils are observed in parasitic infections and allergic diseases, where they are proposed to be terminally differentiated effector cells that play beneficial role in host defence, or cause harmful inflammatory response. Eosinophils have been associated with killing of schistosomulae in vitro, but there is growing evidence that eosinophils can play additional immuno-regulatory role. Here, we report results of a study that examines peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine responses to Schistosoma mansoni adult worm antigen (SWA) when stimulated alone or enriched with autologous eosinophils. Production of the Th-2 type cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13 was lower (P = 0·017, 0·018 and <0·001, respectively) in PBMC + eosinophil cultures than in PBMC-only cultures stimulated with SWA. Substantial levels of IL-13, IL-10, interferon gamma and tumour necrosis factor alpha were recorded in cultures of eosinophils, but none of these cytokines showed significant association with the observed eosinophil-induced drop in cytokine responses of PBMC. Transwell experiments suggested that the observed effect is due to soluble mediators that downmodulate production of Th-2 type cytokines. This study shows that eosinophils may down-modulate schistosome-specific Th-2 type cytokine responses in S. mansoni-infected individuals. The mechanism of this immune modulation remains to be elucidated. PMID:27169695

  14. In vitro study of histamine and histamine receptor ligands influence on the adhesion of purified human eosinophils to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Marek; Wójcik, Tomasz; Chlopicki, Stefan; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-04-15

    It is a well-known fact that histamine is involved in eosinophil-dependent inflammatory responses including cellular chemotaxis and migration. Nevertheless, the relative role of histamine receptors in the mechanisms of eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells is not known. Therefore the aim of presented study was to examine the effect of selective histamine receptors ligands on eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. For that purpose the highly purified human eosinophils have been isolated from the peripheral blood. The viability and functional integrity of isolated eosinophils have been validated in several tests. Histamine as well as 4-methylhistamine (selective H4 agonist) in concentration-dependent manner significantly increased number of eosinophils that adhere to endothelium. Among the selective histamine receptors antagonist or H1 inverse agonist only JNJ7777120 (histamine H4 antagonist) and thioperamide (dual histamine H3/H4 antagonist) had direct effect on eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells. Antagonists of H1 (diphenhydramine, mepyramine) H2 (ranitidine and famotidine) and H3 (pitolisant) histamine receptors were ineffective. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that histamine receptor H4 plays a dominant role in histamine-induced eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. PMID:26939881

  15. Eosinophils Reduce Chronic Inflammation in Adipose Tissue by Secreting Th2 Cytokines and Promoting M2 Macrophages Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Peng; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Manna; Li, Hong; Qian, Chunhua; Sheng, Chunjun; Qu, Shen; Bu, Le

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is now recognized as a low-grade, chronic inflammatory disease that is linked to a myriad of disorders including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, and liver diseases. Recently it is found that eosinophils accelerate alternative activation macrophage (AAM) polarization by secreting Th2 type cytokines such as interleukin-4 and interleukin-13, thereby reducing metainflammation in adipose tissue. In this review, we focused on the role of eosinophils in regulating metabolic homeostasis and obesity. PMID:26688684

  16. Mechanisms of Acute Eosinophil Mobilization from the Bone Marrow Stimulated by Interleukin 5: The Role of Specific Adhesion Molecules and Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Palframan, Roger T.; Collins, Paul D.; Severs, Nicholas J.; Rothery, Stephen; Williams, Timothy J.; Rankin, Sara M.

    1998-01-01

    Mobilization of bone marrow eosinophils is a critical early step in their trafficking to the lung during allergic inflammatory reactions. We have shown previously that the cytokine interleukin (IL)-5, generated during an allergic inflammatory reaction in the guinea pig, acts systemically to mobilize eosinophils from the bone marrow. Here, we have investigated the mechanisms underlying this release process. Examination by light and electron microscopy revealed the rapid migration of eosinophils from the hematopoietic compartment and across the bone marrow sinus endothelium in response to IL-5. Using an in situ perfusion system of the guinea pig hind limb, we showed that IL-5 stimulated a dose-dependent selective release of eosinophils from the bone marrow. Eosinophils released from the bone marrow in response to IL-5 expressed increased levels of β2 integrin and a decrease in L-selectin, but no change in α4 integrin levels. A β2 integrin–blocking antibody markedly inhibited the mobilization of eosinophils from the bone marrow stimulated by IL-5. In contrast, an α4 integrin blocking antibody increased the rate of eosinophil mobilization induced by IL-5. In vitro we demonstrated that IL-5 stimulates the selective chemokinesis of bone marrow eosinophils, a process markedly inhibited by two structurally distinct inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, wortmannin and LY294002. Wortmannin was also shown to block eosinophil release induced by IL-5 in the perfused bone marrow system. The parallel observations on the bone marrow eosinophil release process and responses in isolated eosinophils in vitro suggest that eosinophil chemokinesis is the driving force for release in vivo and that this release process is regulated by α4 and β2 integrins acting in opposite directions. PMID:9802974

  17. Integrin alpha 4 beta 7 mediates human eosinophil interaction with MAdCAM-1, VCAM-1 and fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, G M; Symon, F A; Lazarovils, A L; Wardlaw, A J

    1996-01-01

    binding to VCAM-1 or MAdCAM-1 was alpha 4 beta 7-dependent. In addition treatment with TS2 16 resulted in a alpha 4 beta 7-dependent enhancement of eosinophil binding to VCAM-1, MAdCAM-1 and Fn. We therefore hypothesize that alpha 4 beta 7 may have an important role in eosinophil localization in diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. Images Figure 2 PMID:8911148

  18. Fatal eosinophilic myocarditis develops in the absence of IFNγ and IL17A

    PubMed Central

    Barin, Jobert G.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Talor, Monica V.; Wu, Lei; Ong, SuFey; Fairweather, DeLisa; Bedja, Djahida; Stickel, Natalie R.; LeGault, Jillian A.; Cardamone, Ashley B.; Zheng, Dongfeng; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.; Rose, Noel R.; Cihakova, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a central role in inflammatory heart disease, implicating a cytokine product associated with helper T cell effector function as a necessary mediator of this pathophysiology. IFNγ-deficient mice developed severe autoimmune myocarditis (EAM), in which mice are immunized with cardiac myosin peptide, while IL17A-deficient mice were protected from progression to dilated cardiomyopathy. We generated IFNγ−/−IL17A−/− mice to assess whether IL17 signaling was responsible for the severe EAM of IFNγ−/− mice. Surprisingly, IFNγ−/−IL17A−/− mice developed a rapidly fatal EAM. Eosinophils comprised a third of infiltrating leukocytes, qualifying this disease eosinophilic myocarditis. We found increased cardiac production of CCL11/eotaxin, and Th2 deviation among heart-infiltrating CD4+ cells. Ablation of eosinophil development improved survival of IFNγ−/−IL17A−/− mice, demonstrating the necessity of eosinophils in fatal heart failure. The severe and rapidly fatal autoimmune inflammation that developed in the combined absence of IFNγ and IL17A constitutes a novel model of eosinophilic heart disease in humans. This is also the first demonstration that eosinophils have the capacity to act as necessary mediators of morbidity in an autoimmune process. PMID:24048893

  19. Toxicity of eosinophil MBP is repressed by intracellular crystallization and promoted by extracellular aggregation.

    PubMed

    Soragni, Alice; Yousefi, Shida; Stoeckle, Christina; Soriaga, Angela B; Sawaya, Michael R; Kozlowski, Evelyne; Schmid, Inès; Radonjic-Hoesli, Susanne; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M Marvin; Cascio, Duilio; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Burghammer, Manfred; Riekel, Christian; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Riek, Roland; Eisenberg, David S; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2015-03-19

    Eosinophils are white blood cells that function in innate immunity and participate in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and neoplastic disorders. Their secretory granules contain four cytotoxic proteins, including the eosinophil major basic protein (MBP-1). How MBP-1 toxicity is controlled within the eosinophil itself and activated upon extracellular release is unknown. Here we show how intragranular MBP-1 nanocrystals restrain toxicity, enabling its safe storage, and characterize them with an X-ray-free electron laser. Following eosinophil activation, MBP-1 toxicity is triggered by granule acidification, followed by extracellular aggregation, which mediates the damage to pathogens and host cells. Larger non-toxic amyloid plaques are also present in tissues of eosinophilic patients in a feedback mechanism that likely limits tissue damage under pathological conditions of MBP-1 oversecretion. Our results suggest that MBP-1 aggregation is important for innate immunity and immunopathology mediated by eosinophils and clarify how its polymorphic self-association pathways regulate toxicity intra- and extracellularly. PMID:25728769

  20. Elevated IgG antibody to Sarcocystis cruzi associated with eosinophilic myositis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Ely, R W; Fox, J C

    1989-01-01

    Blood sera, skeletal muscle, and cardiac muscle from 24 bovine carcasses condemned for eosinophilic myositis by US Department of Agriculture meat inspection veterinarians were compared with similar specimens from 35 random carcasses passed for human consumption. Fluorescence values determined by using a fluorometric immunoassay system were used to measure the specific antibodies to Sarcocystis cruzi. The values were significantly elevated in carcasses condemned for eosinophilic myositis as compared to carcasses passed for human consumption. The elevated fluorescence values appeared to be more than coincidental, suggesting that S. cruzi may be a causative agent of eosinophilic myositis. Microscopic examination of affected muscle revealed lesions typical of eosinophilic myositis. Lesions were characterized by extensive multifocal areas of myofiber hyaline degeneration, necrosis with sarcoplasmic fragmentation, mineralization of occasional myofibers, and atrophy of fibers with varied stages of fibrosis. Inflammatory cell exudates were predominantly eosinophils, with some macrophages and lymphocytes, and extravasated erythrocytes within, and adjacent to, affected myofibers. Affected muscles contained more S. cruzi than unaffected muscle from passed carcasses. However, a distinct cause and effect relationship could not be determined between the parasite and the presence of eosinophilic myositis. PMID:2518705

  1. Eosinophil infiltration into human skin is antigen-dependent in the late-phase reaction.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, T M; Smith, C H; Atkinson, B A; Norris, P G; Elliott, P; Haskard, D O; Lee, T H

    1996-06-01

    Eosinophils play a critical role in late-phase reaction allergic inflammatory responses, although the factors responsible for selective tissue eosinophilia are currently ill-defined. To determine whether recruitment of eosinophils is allergen-specific, or a feature of inflammation in allergic individuals, we have examined cutaneous cell infiltrates and endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression in atopic subjects 6 h (n = 8) and 24 h (n = 7) following ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation, or intradermal injection of late-phase reaction allergens or diluent control, using standard immunohistochemical techniques. The numbers of eosinophils were increased significantly, when compared to controls, at both 6 h (P < 0.01) and 24 h (P < 0.05), following intradermal allergen challenge, whereas no significant increase in eosinophils was observed following UVB irradiation. UVB and allergen both induced significant increases in neutrophils, monocytes and T cells at 24 h compared to control sites. An increased expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), was observed in both models of inflammation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was induced weakly on some biopsies following allergen, and not at all following UVB. These data indicate that eosinophil infiltration in susceptible individuals is a specific property of allergen. Although this study would support the postulated role of VCAM-1 in selective eosinophil recruitment, given its variable and weak expression, additional factors are likely to be involved. PMID:8763415

  2. Toxicity of Eosinophil MBP Is Repressed by Intracellular Crystallization and Promoted by Extracellular Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Soragni, Alice; Yousefi, Shida; Stoeckle, Christina; Soriaga, Angela B.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Kozlowski, Evelyne; Schmid, Inès; Radonjic-Hoesli, Susanne; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Cascio, Duilio; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Burghammer, Manfred; Riekel, Christian; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Riek, Roland; Eisenberg, David; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Eosinophils are white blood cells that function in innate immunity and participate in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and neoplastic disorders. Their secretory granules contain four cytotoxic proteins, including the eosinophil major basic protein (MBP-1). How MBP-1 toxicity is controlled within the eosinophil itself and activated upon extracellular release is unknown. Here we show how intragranular MBP-1 nanocrystals restrain toxicity, enabling its safe storage, and characterize them with an X-ray-free electron laser. Following eosinophil activation, MBP-1 toxicity is triggered by granule acidification, followed by extracellular aggregation, which mediates the damage to pathogens and host cells. Larger non-toxic amyloid plaques are also present in tissues of eosinophilic patients in a feedback mechanism that likely limits tissue damage under pathological conditions of MBP-1 oversecretion. Our results suggest that MBP-1 aggregation is important for innate immunity and immunopathology mediated by eosinophils and clarify how its polymorphic self-association pathways regulate toxicity intra- and extracellularly. PMID:25728769

  3. Human eosinophils - potential pharmacological model applied in human histamine H4 receptor research.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Marek; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Histamine and histamine receptors are well known for their immunomodulatory role in inflammation. In this review we describe the role of histamine and histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils. In the first part of article we provide short summary of histamine and histamine receptors role in physiology and histamine related therapeutics used in clinics. We briefly describe the human histamine receptor H4 and its ligands, as well as human eosinophils. In the second part of the review we provide detailed description of known histamine effects on eosinophils including: intracellular calcium concentration flux, actin polymerization, cellular shape change, upregulation of adhesion proteins and cellular chemotaxis. We provide proofs that these effects are mainly connected with the activation of histamine H4 receptor. When examining experimental data we discuss the controversial results and limitations of the studies performed on isolated eosinophils. In conclusion we believe that studies on histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils can provide interesting new biomarkers that can be used in clinical studies of histamine receptors, that in future might result in the development of new strategies in the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions like asthma or allergy, in which eosinophils are involved. PMID:25760088

  4. Eosinophils in the lung - modulating apoptosis and efferocytosis in airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Felton, Jennifer M; Lucas, Christopher D; Rossi, Adriano G; Dransfield, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Due to the key role of the lung in efficient transfer of oxygen in exchange for carbon dioxide, a controlled inflammatory response is essential for restoration of tissue homeostasis following airway exposure to bacterial pathogens or environmental toxins. Unregulated or prolonged inflammatory responses in the lungs can lead to tissue damage, disrupting normal tissue architecture, and consequently compromising efficient gaseous exchange. Failure to resolve inflammation underlies the development and/or progression of a number of inflammatory lung diseases including asthma. Eosinophils, granulocytic cells of the innate immune system, are primarily involved in defense against parasitic infections. However, the propagation of the allergic inflammatory response in chronic asthma is thought to involve excessive recruitment and impaired apoptosis of eosinophils together with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis). In terms of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of asthma, the widespread use of glucocorticoids is associated with a number of adverse health consequences after long-term use, while some patients suffer from steroid-resistant disease. A new approach for therapeutic intervention would be to promote the resolution of inflammation via modulation of eosinophil apoptosis and the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. This review focuses on the mechanisms underpinning eosinophil-mediated lung damage, currently available treatments and therapeutic targets that might in future be harnessed to facilitate inflammation resolution by the manipulation of cell survival and clearance pathways. PMID:25071763

  5. Eosinophils in the Lung – Modulating Apoptosis and Efferocytosis in Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Felton, Jennifer M.; Lucas, Christopher D.; Rossi, Adriano G.; Dransfield, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Due to the key role of the lung in efficient transfer of oxygen in exchange for carbon dioxide, a controlled inflammatory response is essential for restoration of tissue homeostasis following airway exposure to bacterial pathogens or environmental toxins. Unregulated or prolonged inflammatory responses in the lungs can lead to tissue damage, disrupting normal tissue architecture, and consequently compromising efficient gaseous exchange. Failure to resolve inflammation underlies the development and/or progression of a number of inflammatory lung diseases including asthma. Eosinophils, granulocytic cells of the innate immune system, are primarily involved in defense against parasitic infections. However, the propagation of the allergic inflammatory response in chronic asthma is thought to involve excessive recruitment and impaired apoptosis of eosinophils together with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis). In terms of therapeutic approaches for the treatment of asthma, the widespread use of glucocorticoids is associated with a number of adverse health consequences after long-term use, while some patients suffer from steroid-resistant disease. A new approach for therapeutic intervention would be to promote the resolution of inflammation via modulation of eosinophil apoptosis and the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. This review focuses on the mechanisms underpinning eosinophil-mediated lung damage, currently available treatments and therapeutic targets that might in future be harnessed to facilitate inflammation resolution by the manipulation of cell survival and clearance pathways. PMID:25071763

  6. Eosinophilic jejunitis presenting as intractable abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Mungan, Zeynel; Attila, Tan; Kapran, Yersu; Tokatli, Ilyas Pinar; Unal, Zeynep

    2014-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical manifestations are related to the layer(s) and extent of the bowel involved. In this paper, we present a case of intractable abdominal pain caused by jejunal submucosal eosinophilic infiltration without mucosal involvement, diagnosed by deep endoscopic biopsies. The patient was successfully treated with steroids without need for surgery for diagnosis or therapy. PMID:25565932

  7. [Eosinophilic esophagitis: a rare cause of dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Billot, D; Pernin, M; Pillot, C; Bredin, C; Hoeffler, P; Graffin, B; Rey, P

    2010-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is an unrecognized and emerging entity. Its incidence increases with allergic disorders. A 29-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of intermittent and paroxysmal dysphagia. The triad including allergy, young age, and impaction of foreign bodies, combined with a chronic dysphagia is almost pathognomonic of eosinophilic esophagitis. Endoscopic esophageal features can be diverse, so systematic esophageal biopsies are required. Diagnosis is established with the demonstration of an eosinophilic infiltrate with a cell count exceeding 15 eosinophils per high power field (×400). First line therapy includes swallowed topical corticosteroids and removal of an allergic cause, when it could be identified. PMID:20605659

  8. Eosinophils: changing perspectives in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Helene F.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Foster, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils have been traditionally perceived as largely end-stage, cytotoxic effector cells. Recent studies have profoundly altered this simplistic view of eosinophils and their function. New insights into the molecular basis of development, trafficking and degranulation of eosinophils have provided a better understanding of the role of these cells in promoting homeostasis through their immunomodulatory functions. Likewise, recent developments have generated a more sophisticated view of how eosinophils contribute to the pathogenesis of disease, including asthma and primary hypereosinophilic syndromes, and also a more complete appreciation of their activities in parasitic infection. PMID:23154224

  9. Eosinophilic Disorders of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Samiullah; Bhurgri, Hadi; Sohail, Umair

    2016-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders represent a spectrum of disorders demonstrating gastrointestinal eosinophilia without any known cause for eosinophilia. Pathogenesis is not clearly established, but immune responses to dietary antigens are implicated. These disorders affect children and adults and are seen in association with allergic disorders. Eosinophilic esophagitis is diagnosed in the setting of mucosal eosinophilia on endoscopic biopsy and symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is also diagnosed with endoscopic biopsies. Eosinophilic colitis commonly presents with lower gastrointestinal symptoms and is a diagnosis of exclusion. PMID:27545738

  10. The Consequences of Not Having Eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Gleich, G. J.; Klion, A. D.; Lee, J. J.; Weller, P. F.

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that deficiency of eosinophils is not associated with any characteristic abnormality. Patients lacking eosinophils, in the setting of immunodeficiency or as a consequence of IgG-mediated eosinophil precursor destruction, do not display any distinguishing abnormalities related to eosinophil reduction. The observation that eosinophil-deficient mice do not display any distinctive syndrome or failure of their health is evidence that, under ordinary laboratory conditions, the eosinophil does not play a critical role in the well-being of mammals. Observations that monoclonal antibodies to interleukin-5 (IL-5) are well tolerated appear unsurprising in light of these findings. For example, patients with the hypereosinophilic syndrome have received mepolizumab, an anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibody, for as long as 6 years and have not developed any characteristic set of adverse events. Safety data for reslizumab, another anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibody, and benralizumab, a monoclonal antibody to the IL-5 receptor α-chain, are comparatively limited, especially for benralizumab, although reports of administration of these antibodies to humans suggest that they are well tolerated. Thus, data to the present suggest that reduction of eosinophils appears to have no characteristic ill effects on normal health, and monoclonal antibodies that deplete eosinophils have the potential to be widely employed in the treatment of eosinophil-associated diseases. PMID:23742015

  11. Roles of integrin activation in eosinophil function and the eosinophilic inflammation of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Steven R.; Johansson, Mats W.; McNamee, Dawn M.; Mosher, Deane F.

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophilic inflammation is a characteristic feature of asthma. Integrins are highly versatile cellular receptors that regulate extravasation of eosinophils from the postcapillary segment of the bronchial circulation to the airway wall and airspace. Such movement into the asthmatic lung is described as a sequential, multistep paradigm, whereby integrins on circulating eosinophils become activated, eosinophils tether in flow and roll on bronchial endothelial cells, integrins on rolling eosinophils become further activated as a result of exposure to cytokines, eosinophils arrest firmly to adhesive ligands on activated endothelium, and eosinophils transmigrate to the airway in response to chemoattractants. Eosinophils express seven integrin heterodimeric adhesion molecules: alpha4beta1 (CD49d/29), alpha6beta1 (CD49f/29), alphaMbeta2 (CD11b/18), alphaLbeta2 (CD11a/18), alphaXbeta2 (CD11c/18), alphaDbeta2 (CD11d/18), and alpha4beta7 (CD49d/beta7). The role of these integrins in eosinophil recruitment has been elucidated by major advances in the understanding of integrin structure, integrin function, and modulators of integrins. Such findings have been facilitated by cellular experiments of eosinophils in vitro, studies of allergic asthma in humans and animal models in vivo, and crystal structures of integrins. Here, we elaborate on how integrins cooperate to mediate eosinophil movement to the asthmatic airway. Antagonists that target integrins or the effectors that regulate integrins of eosinophils represent potentially promising therapies in the treatment of asthma. PMID:17906117

  12. Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis of Sinonasal Region: A Rare & Under Reported Entity

    PubMed Central

    Selhi, Pavneet Kaur; Munjal, Manish; Sood, Neena

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis is a rare pathology of the sinonasal tract and the upper respiratory system characterised by fibrosis with poorly understood pathogenesis. A 47-year-old male presented with a swelling over the dorsum of the nose. The possibility of fungal granuloma was being suggested on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Histopathology showed thick collagen bundles whorling around vessels giving an onion skin appearance with focal area of vasculitis. An inflammatory reaction rich in eosinophils along with a fibrotic stroma was seen which was highly characteristic of eosinophilic angiocentric fibrosis. Clinically & microscopically it mimics Granuloma faciale, Wegener’s Granulomatosis, Churg-Strauss Syndrome, Kimura’s disease and few other granulomatous conditions thus making diagnosis difficult. A probable allergic origin is being suggested because of the typical eosinophil-rich inflammatory reaction. Finally the diagnosis of Eosinophilic Angiocentric Fibrosis was given. It is a diagnosis of exclusion having characteristic histomorphological findings thus biopsy is always required to distinguish it from other lesions whose treatment differs. PMID:26674883

  13. Characterization of the relationship between dose and blood eosinophil response following subcutaneous administration of mepolizumab

    PubMed Central

    Pouliquen, Isabelle J.; Kornmann, Oliver; Barton, Sharon V.; Price, Jeffrey A.; Ortega, Hector G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Mepolizumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that blocks human IL-5 from binding to the IL-5 receptor, which is mainly expressed on eosinophils. Eosinophils are key cells in the inflammatory cascade of various diseases, including asthma. This study investigated the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) relationship between exposure of mepolizumab subcutaneous (SC) administration and blood eosinophil reduction compared with intravenous (IV) administration in adult subjects with asthma. Methods: In this multi-center, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, repeat-dose study, 70 adult subjects received one of four possible treatment regimens: mepolizumab 12.5, 125, or 250 mg SC or 75 mg IV. In addition to analyzing the dose and PK/PD relationship, absolute bioavailability, safety, tolerability, and incidence of anti-mepolizumab antibodies were evaluated. Results: Blood eosinophil levels decreased in a dose-dependent manner with the lowest (12.5 mg) dose clearly differentiating from the other doses. A non-linear inhibition Imax model based on blood eosinophil levels at week 12 identified that the SC doses providing 50% and 90% of maximal blood eosinophil inhibition were 11 mg (95% confidence interval (CI): 5.19 – 16.85) and 99 mg (95% CI: 47 – 152), respectively. The route of administration did not affect the exposure-response relationship. The estimated mepolizumab SC absolute bioavailability (arm) was 74% (90% CI: 54 – 102%). The safety profile of mepolizumab was favorable. Conclusions: A dose-dependent reduction in blood eosinophils across all mepolizumab doses investigated was observed. The subcutaneous absolute bioavailability was 74%. The route of administration did not affect the mepolizumab exposure eosinophil response relationship. PMID:26445140

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis: an immune-mediated esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Weinbrand-Goichberg, Jenny; Segal, Idit; Ovadia, Adi; Levine, Arie; Dalal, Ilan

    2013-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease defined by esophageal dysfunction, by typical endoscopic findings and by abnormal eosinophilic inflammation within the esophagus. Eosinophilic accumulation in the esophagus occurs as a result of esophageal overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediators, including T cells and mast cells, cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-13, IL-5 and IL-15, as well as chemoattractants (eotaxin and transforming growth factor-β1, fibroblast growth factor and the newly characterized gene--thymic stromal lymphopoietin, which is a key regulator of allergic sensitization initiation). The role of allergy, particularly food allergy in EoE is indisputable, as elimination diet is a proven commonly used treatment for the disease. However, unlike classical immediate IgE-mediated reaction to allergen, EoE is associated with an altered immune response, characterized by a combination of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms. In this review, we aim to discuss the many typical aspects of EoE as opposed to other entities involving the esophagus, with focusing on the aberrant immune-mediated key players contributing to the pathogenesis of this unique disease. PMID:23579771

  15. Biodegradation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Eosinophil Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Andón, Fernando T.; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Feng, Weihong; Baygan, Arjang; Chambers, Benedict J.; Hultenby, Kjell; Ye, Fei; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Brandner, Birgit D.; Fornara, Andrea; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) is one of the major oxidant-producing enzymes during inflammatory states in the human lung. The degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) upon incubation with human EPO and H2O2 is reported. Biodegradation of SWCNTs is higher in the presence of NaBr, but neither EPO alone nor H2O2 alone caused the degradation of nanotubes. Molecular modeling reveals two binding sites for SWCNTs on EPO, one located at the proximal side (same side as the catalytic site) and the other on the distal side of EPO. The oxidized groups on SWCNTs in both cases are stabilized by electrostatic interactions with positively charged residues. Biodegradation of SWCNTs can also be executed in an ex vivo culture system using primary murine eosinophils stimulated to undergo degranulation. Biodegradation is proven by a range of methods including transmission electron microscopy, UV-visible-NIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and confocal Raman imaging. Thus, human EPO (in vitro) and ex vivo activated eosinophils mediate biodegradation of SWCNTs: an observation that is relevant to pulmonary responses to these materials. PMID:23447468

  16. Eosinophilic Cystitis: A Rare Cause of Nocturnal Enuresis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Ozcan; Akand, Murat; Gul, Murat; Karabagli, Pinar; Goktas, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is a rare and poorly understood inflammatory condition, characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of all layers of the bladder wall, which mimics bladder tumors. EC may present with symptoms such as increased urination frequency, dysuria, gross/microscopic hematuria, suprapubic pain and urinary retention. Case Presentation We present a 17-year-old male patient, who was continent night and day in his childhood, and was admitted to our clinic for complaints of hematuria and nocturnal enuresis for the past six months. His history and physical examination were unremarkable, and routine hematological and biochemical tests were normal. Cystoscopy revealed a 4 × 3 cm erythematous, polypoidal, solid lesion on the bladder dome. Histopathological examination of the lesion revealed transitional epithelium with stromal edema, where diffuse, dense infiltration of lamina propria by eosinophils and lymphocytes was also seen. According to these findings, a histopathological diagnosis of EC was made, and the patient was treated with corticosteroids, antimicrobial agents and antihistamines. His symptoms dramatically improved and nocturnal enuresis also recovered after treatment. Conclusions Although it is a rare entity, EC should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with dysuria, hematuria and any kind of acquired voiding dysfunction, including frequency, pollakiuria and incontinence.

  17. Distinguishing GERD from eosinophilic oesophagitis: concepts and controversies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the detection of oesophageal mucosal eosinophils has transitioned from a biomarker of GERD to a diagnostic criterion for eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE). In GERD, oesophageal eosinophils are considered part of the chronic inflammatory response to acid reflux, whereas the marked eosinophilia in EoE is viewed as a central feature of the immune response to ingested food and/or environmental antigen stimulation. Descriptions of a considerable subset of patients with symptomatic, endoscopic and histological findings of EoE that resolve with PPI therapy has led to confusion and controversy regarding the distinction of EoE from GERD. Study findings indicate that PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE) more closely resembles EoE than GERD, both from a clinical and immunological aspect. Although responsiveness to PPI therapy should not be utilized to exclude EoE, PPI therapy is effective at reducing oesophageal eosinophilia in ~40% of patients, and PPI therapy is both a safe and practical initial step in the management of patients with oesophageal eosinophilia. Ongoing studies elucidating the mechanism behind PPI-REE will improve our understanding and management of EoE. In this Review, the mechanisms and evidence that underlie the controversy in the distinction between GERD and EoE are evaluated. PMID:25986303

  18. Genetics Home Reference: PDGFRB-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia PDGFRB-associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description PDGFRB -associated chronic eosinophilic leukemia is a type of cancer of blood-forming ...

  19. Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Burk, Caitlin M; Long, Millie D; Dellon, Evan S

    2016-07-01

    There are currently limited data on the management of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) during pregnancy. At our center, however, we have followed several pregnant women with EoE and others have asked pertinent questions in pre-pregnancy counseling. The relatively young age of patients with EoE implies that many practitioners will also encounter patients with these questions. In this review, we use four cases to prompt a discussion about concerns focused on the safety of steroids and diet therapy during pregnancy and breast-feeding, potential nutritional risks with dietary elimination, how to optimize therapy, and whether endoscopic evaluation for monitoring of disease activity is safe during pregnancy and breast-feeding. An additional concern is whether the disease could progress during pregnancy and breast-feeding if no therapies are used. Although there are no studies specifically examining pregnant EoE patients, we have reviewed the literature relevant to this population as informed by the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease patients during pregnancy, where these issues have been studied in more depth. Providers who care for EoE patients who could become pregnant should familiarize themselves with these issues. PMID:26888769

  20. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging chronic atopic clinical-pathologic disease with an estimated prevalence of 1/1000 similar to the one of Crohn's diseases. Usually, EoE is firstly suspected due to symptoms that are caused by esophageal dysfunction and/or fibrosis. EoE diagnosis is confirmed if the esophageal biopsy shows at least 15 eosinophils per high power field (eos/hpf) as a peak value in one or more of at least four specimens obtained randomly from the esophagus. Most of the patients affected by EoE have other atopic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, IgE-mediated food allergies, and/or atopic dermatitis. The local inflammation is a T helper type 2 (Th2) flogosis, which most likely is driven by a mixed IgE and non-IgE-mediated reaction to food and/or environmental allergens. Recently published genetic studies showed also that EoE is associated with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on genes which are important in atopic inflammation such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) located close to the Th2 cytokine cluster (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) on chromosome 5q22. When the EoE diagnosis is made, it is imperative to control the local eosinophilic inflammation not only to give symptomatic relief to the patient but also to prevent complications such as esophageal stricture and food impaction. EoE is treated like many other atopic diseases with a combination of topical steroids and/or food antigen avoidance. PMID:26194940

  1. Full recovery from Baylisascaris procyonis eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Poulomi J; Blackburn, Brian G; Kazacos, Kevin R; Warrier, Rajasekharan P; Bégué, Rodolfo E

    2007-06-01

    Infection by Baylisascaris procyonis is an uncommon but devastating cause of eosinophilic meningitis. We report the first case-patient, to our knowledge, who recovered from B. procyonis eosinophilic meningitis without any recognizable neurologic deficits. The spectrum of illness for this organism may be wider than previously recognized. PMID:17553240

  2. Antagonism of eosinophil accumulation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Garry M

    2010-11-01

    There is considerable evidence that implicates eosinophils as important effector cells and immunomodulators in the inflammation characteristic of asthma. Numerous in vitro and animal studies have demonstrated essential roles for cell adhesion molecules in eosinophil adhesion and transendothelial migration including the selectins, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 together with many of the 1 and β2 integrins. A large body of evidence has also implicated several cytokines and chemokines in the selective recruitment of eosinophils to sites of asthmatic inflammation. Biopharmaceutical approaches have been used to identify inhibitory molecules that target key elements in the processes controlling eosinophil accumulation in asthma. This review will summarise, the problems and successes regarding recent patents and developments in adhesion-based therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing eosinophil-mediated inflammation in the asthmatic lung. PMID:20804449

  3. β-lactam-associated eosinophilic colitis.

    PubMed

    Mogilevski, Tamara; Nickless, David; Hume, Sam

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old man with a history of childhood asthma presented with a 2-week history of watery diarrhoea and marked peripheral eosinophilia in the setting of recent use of cephalexin. His colonoscopy revealed patchy colitis. Biopsies were consistent with eosinophilic colitis. Two months later he received a course of amoxicillin resulting in recurrence of peripheral eosinophilia. Given the time-frame of β-lactam administration to symptom onset and elimination of all other precipitating causes, he was diagnosed with β-lactam-associated eosinophilic colitis. The patient's symptoms resolved and peripheral eosinophil count decreased with no specific treatment. Eosinophilic colitis is a rare heterogeneous condition, the pathogenesis of which is likely to be an interplay between environmental and genetic factors. It can be secondary to a helminthic infection or a drug reaction and has been associated with ulcerative colitis. If secondary causes of eosinophilic colitis have been excluded, the mainstay of treatment is with corticosteroids. PMID:26106168

  4. Clinical evaluation of eosinophils in the sputum.

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, V G; Prolla, J C

    1979-01-01

    The sputum differential eosinophil/neutrophil count was done in 384 patients using Leishman staining. The patients were distributed in four groups: bronchial asthma (197 patients); chronic bronchitis with wheezing (45 patients); chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema without wheezing (73 patients); other pulmonary diseases (64 patients). Eosinophils were present in patients from all groups but more frequently (P less than 0.001) in asthma: 142 (72%) of 197 patients. In bronchial asthma and chronic bronchitis with wheezing the percentages of eosinophils were more frequently (P less than 0.001) above 80%: 57% and 58% of the patients respectively. The other two groups had more cases with 19% or less eosinophils. There is no percentage level specific for asthma but levels above 80% of eosinophils are strongly suggestive of asthma or of chronic bronchitis with wheezing. PMID:521497

  5. Molecular, Genetic, and Cellular Bases for Treating Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was historically distinguished from gastroesophageal reflux disease on the basis of histology and lack of responsiveness to acid suppressive therapy, but it is now appreciated that esophageal eosinophilia can respond to proton pump inhibitors. Genetic and environmental factors contribute to risk for EoE—particularly early-life events. Disease pathogenesis involves activation of epithelial inflammatory pathways (production of eotaxin-3 [encoded by CCL26]), impaired barrier function (mediated by loss of desmoglein-1), increased production and/or activity of transforming growth factor-β, and induction of allergic inflammation by eosinophils and mast cells. Susceptibility has been associated with variants at 5q22 (TSLP) and 2p23 (CAPN14), indicating roles for allergic sensitization and esophageal specific protease pathways. We propose that EoE is a unique disease characterized by food hypersensitivity, strong hereditability influenced by early-life exposures and esophageal specific genetic risk variants, and allergic inflammation and that the disease is remitted by disrupting inflammatory and T-helper type 2 cytokine–mediated responses and through dietary elimination therapy. PMID:25666870

  6. Expression and subcellular localization of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin17 in human eosinophils

    SciTech Connect

    Carmo, Lívia A.S.; Dias, Felipe F.; Malta, Kássia K.; Amaral, Kátia B.; Shamri, Revital; Weller, Peter F.; Melo, Rossana C.N.

    2015-10-01

    Background: SNARE members mediate membrane fusion during intracellular trafficking underlying innate and adaptive immune responses by different cells. However, little is known about the expression and function of these proteins in human eosinophils, cells involved in allergic, inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses. Here, we investigate the expression and distribution of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin17 (STX17) within human eosinophils isolated from the peripheral blood. Methods: Flow cytometry and a pre-embedding immunonanogold electron microscopy (EM) technique that combines optimal epitope preservation and secondary Fab-fragments of antibodies linked to 1.4 nm gold particles for optimal access to microdomains, were used to investigate STX17. Results: STX17 was detected within unstimulated eosinophils. Immunogold EM revealed STX17 on secretory granules and on granule-derived vesiculotubular transport carriers (Eosinophil Sombrero Vesicles-EoSVs). Quantitative EM analyses showed that 77.7% of the granules were positive for STX17 with a mean±SEM of 3.9±0.2 gold particles/granule. Labeling was present on both granule outer membranes and matrices while EoSVs showed clear membrane-associated labeling. STX17 was also present in secretory granules in eosinophils stimulated with the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or the CC-chemokine ligand 11 CCL11 (eotaxin-1), stimuli that induce eosinophil degranulation. The number of secretory granules labeled for STX17 was significantly higher in CCL11 compared with the unstimulated group. The level of cell labeling did not change when unstimulated cells were compared with TNF-α-stimulated eosinophils. Conclusions: The present study clearly shows by immunanonogold EM that STX17 is localized in eosinophil secretory granules and transport vesicles and might be involved in the transport of granule-derived cargos. - Highlights: • First demonstration of the Qa-SNARE syntaxin-17 (STX17) in human eosinophils. • High

  7. Effects of prednisone on eosinophilic bronchitis in asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis*,**

    PubMed Central

    Sakae, Thiago Mamôru; Maurici, Rosemeri; Trevisol, Daisson José; Pizzichini, Marcia Margaret Menezes; Pizzichini, Emílio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect size of oral corticosteroid treatment on eosinophilic bronchitis in asthma, through systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: We systematically reviewed articles in the Medline, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, and LILACS databases. We selected studies meeting the following criteria: comparing at least two groups or time points (prednisone vs. control, prednisone vs. another drug, or pre- vs. post-treatment with prednisone); and evaluating parameters before and after prednisone use, including values for sputum eosinophils, sputum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and sputum IL-5-with or without values for post-bronchodilator FEV1-with corresponding 95% CIs or with sufficient data for calculation. The independent variables were the use, dose, and duration of prednisone treatment. The outcomes evaluated were sputum eosinophils, IL-5, and ECP, as well as post-bronchodilator FEV1. RESULTS: The pooled analysis of the pre- vs. post-treatment data revealed a significant mean reduction in sputum eosinophils (↓8.18%; 95% CI: 7.69-8.67; p < 0.001), sputum IL-5 (↓83.64 pg/mL; 95% CI: 52.45-114.83; p < 0.001), and sputum ECP (↓267.60 µg/L; 95% CI: 244.57-290.63; p < 0.0001), as well as a significant mean increase in post-bronchodilator FEV1 (↑8.09%; 95% CI: 5.35-10.83; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with moderate-to-severe eosinophilic bronchitis, treatment with prednisone caused a significant reduction in sputum eosinophil counts, as well as in the sputum levels of IL-5 and ECP. This reduction in the inflammatory response was accompanied by a significant increase in post-bronchodilator FEV1. PMID:25410844

  8. Severe Aplastic Anemia Associated With Eosinophilic Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    de Masson, Adèle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Benhamou, Ygal; Moluçon-Chabrot, Cécile; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Laquerrière, Annie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Michonneau, David; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Rybojad, Michel; Bonnotte, Bernard; Jardin, Fabrice; Lévesque, Hervé; Bagot, Martine; Socié, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Diffuse eosinophilic fasciitis (Shulman disease) is a rare sclerodermiform syndrome that, in most cases, resolves spontaneously or after corticosteroid therapy. It has been associated with hematologic disorders, such as aplastic anemia. The clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia have been poorly described. We report the cases of 4 patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated severe aplastic anemia. For 3 of these patients, aplastic anemia was refractory to conventional immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. One of the patients received rituximab as a second-line therapy with significant efficacy for both the skin and hematologic symptoms. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe rituximab used to treat eosinophilic fasciitis with associated aplastic anemia. In a literature review, we identified 19 additional cases of eosinophilic fasciitis and aplastic anemia. Compared to patients with isolated eosinophilic fasciitis, patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia were more likely to be men (70%) and older (mean age, 56 yr; range, 18–71 yr). Corticosteroid-containing regimens improved skin symptoms in 5 (42%) of 12 cases but were ineffective in the treatment of associated aplastic anemia in all but 1 case. Aplastic anemia was profound in 13 cases (57%) and was the cause of death in 8 cases (35%). Only 5 patients (22%) achieved long-term remission (allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: n = 2; cyclosporine-containing regimen: n = 2; high-dose corticosteroid-based regimen: n = 1). PMID:23429351

  9. Simvastatin Inhibits IL-5-Induced Chemotaxis and CCR3 Expression of HL-60-Derived and Human Primary Eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Tsai, Wan-Chun; Lee, Ta-Jen; Huang, Chi-Che; Chang, Po-Hung; Su Pang, Jong-Hwei

    2016-01-01

    IL-5-induced chemotaxis of eosinophils is an important feature of allergic airway inflammatory diseases. Simvastatin, a lipid lowering agent, has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects. Our aim was to investigate the effect of simvastatin on IL-5-induced eosinophil chemotaxis and its regulatory mechanisms. Eosinophils were derived by treating HL-60 clone 15 (HC15) cells with butyric acid (BA) in an alkaline condition or through direct isolation from human peripheral blood. The expressions of CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) and interleukin (IL)-5 receptors (IL5Rα and β) were analyzed using RT/real-time PCR. The granular proteins were stained using fast green. Eotaxin-induced chemotaxis was measured using a transwell migration assay. CCR3 protein expression was revealed by immunocytochemistry. An animal model of allergic rhinitis was established by challenging Sprague–Dawley® rats repeatedly with ovalbumin. Butyric acid significantly increased the expression of IL5Rα and IL5Rβ, CCR3 and granular proteins in HC15 cells, indicating the maturation of eosinophils (BA-E cells). IL-5 further enhanced the CCR3 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels and the eotaxin-induced chemotaxis of BA-E cells. Simvastatin inhibited the effects of IL-5 on BA-E cells, but not in the presence of mevalonate. Similar results were also exhibited in human primary eosinophils. In vivo animal studies further confirmed that oral simvastatin could significantly suppress the infiltration of eosinophils into turbinate tissues of allergic rats. Therefore, simvastatin was demonstrated to inhibit IL-5-induced CCR3 expression and chemotaxis of eosinophils mediated via the mevalonate pathway. We confirmed that simvastatin also reduced eosinophilic infiltration in allergic rhinitis. PMID:27275740

  10. Use of AN Eosinophil Specific Monoclonal Antibody in Assessing Eosinophil Function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkoff, Marjorie Sue

    A monoclonal antibody to an eosinophil specific determinant is very important in assessing eosinophil function during helminthic infection. Eosinophils induced by Schistosoma mansoni infection in BALB/c mice were used to induce C57B1/6 immunocytes for production of hybridomas secreting eosinophil monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies were shown to react with an eosinophil surface epitope but not with neutrophils or macrophages as determined by ELISA, immunodiffusion, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot assay. Affinity chromatography with eosinophil chemotactic factor-sepharose consistently selected out a { rm M_ R} 67,000 protein from solubilized eosinophil membrane antigens but not from neutrophil and macrophage antigens. In vitro studies showed that the eosinophil-specific monoclonal antibodies abrogated antibody-dependent eosinophil -mediated killing of S. mansoni schistosomula using mouse, rat or human eosinophils. Neutrophil and macrophage killing activities were unaffected. The monoclonal antibodies effected complement-dependent lysis of mouse and rat eosinophils but not of human eosinophils. ECF-treated eosinophils showed enhanced killing of schistosomula which was blocked by the monoclonal antibody. Murine and human eosinophils preincubated with monoclonal antibody exhibited decreased chemotaxis to ECF at optimal chemotactic concentrations. The monoclonal antibody also blocked eosinophil binding to ECF- sepharose beads. In vivo induction of peripheral blood eosinophilia by injection of S. mansoni eggs was suppressed by injections of monoclonal antibodies 2CD13 and 2QD45 in mouse and rat experimental models. Eosinophilia induced by keyhole limpet hemocyanin- cyclophosphamide treatment was also suppressed by monoclonal antibody in both murine and rat systems. Pulmonary granulomas in mice given egg injection and monoclonal antibody were smaller and contained fewer eosinophils than those granulomas from mice given eggs only. In immuno-biochemical studies, the

  11. Eosinophilic follicular reaction induced by Demodex folliculorum mite: a different disease from eosinophilic folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Marco, V; Escutia-Muñoz, B; Botella-Estrada, R

    2015-06-01

    Eosinophilic folliculitis (EF) is an idiopathic dermatitis included in the spectrum of eosinophilic pustular follicular reactions. Demodex folliculorum has been implicated as contributing to the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus-associated EF, but it has not been described outside this context. We present an immunocompetent 65-year-old white man with a 5-year history of recurrent pruritic erythematous and oedematous lesions on his face, neck and scalp. Histopathologically, an eosinophilic microabcess with Demodex folliculorum mite within a pilosebaceous follicle was seen, and considered the causal agent. There were also accumulations of eosinophil granules on collagen bundles, and flame figure formations in the dermis. We believe that 'eosinophilic follicular reaction' is an appropriate term to describe this case of EF induced by D. folliculorum and thus distinguish it from the idiopathic form of EF. Moreover, this case suggests that D. folliculorum can sometimes induce an eosinophilic immune reaction. PMID:25623943

  12. Imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Foong, Kap Sum; Lee, Ashley; Pekez, Marijeta; Bin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Drugs, toxins, and infections are known to cause acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Daptomycin and minocycline are the commonly reported antibiotics associated with acute eosinophilic pneumonia. In this study, we present a case of imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. The patient presented with fever, acute hypoxic respiratory distress, and diffuse ground-glass opacities on the chest CT a day after the initiation of imipenem/cilastatin. Patient also developed peripheral eosinophilia. A reinstitution of imipenem/cilastatin resulted in recurrence of the signs and symptoms. A bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage showed 780 nucleated cells/mm(3) with 15% eosinophil. The patient's clinical condition improved significantly after the discontinuation of imipenem/cilastatin therapy and the treatment with corticosteroid. PMID:26944380

  13. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Barbie, David A; Mangi, Abeel A; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2004-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease with an obscure etiology, although associations with allergy, the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome, and connective tissue disease have been reported. We present the case of a 37-year-old woman with a history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura who presented with refractory nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Imaging studies were significant for bowel wall thickening and ascites, while laboratory studies revealed a positive antinuclear antibody (ANA), a positive anti-double stranded (DS) DNA antibody, low complement, and proteinuria. Exploratory laparotomy with gastric and small bowel biopsies established the diagnosis of eosinophilic gastroenteritis. In addition, the patient met clinical criteria for the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Previous studies have described eosinophilic gastroenteritis in patients with scleroderma, polymyositis, or dermatomyositis. This is the first report to our knowledge of an individual with eosinophilic gastroenteritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:15492606

  14. Spectrum of surgical presentation of eosinophilic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Spoorthy Sudhakar; Shetty, Charan Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic enteritis is a rare disorder presenting mostly with diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain, weight loss, and hypersensitivity. Surgical manifestation of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders depends on the site and extent of involvement. In our case series of four patients two of them had ileocaecal masses with recurrent subacute intestinal obstruction with past history of intake of antitubercular drugs for 9 months. On histopathological examination both of them proved to have eosinophilic enterocolitis. Thus it is a clinical dilemma to differentiate between these two conditions. The other two patients presented as acute abdomen with perforation and intussusception. All four patients were treated surgically. Postoperatively they recovered well with no symptoms on one year follow-up. In Indian setup tuberculosis being rampant there may be under reporting or wrongly diagnosed cases of eosinophilic enteritis. Thus a strong clinical suspicion and awareness of this clinical entity are essential among surgical community. PMID:25960910

  15. Spectrum of Surgical Presentation of Eosinophilic Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Spoorthy Sudhakar; Shetty, Charan Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic enteritis is a rare disorder presenting mostly with diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain, weight loss, and hypersensitivity. Surgical manifestation of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders depends on the site and extent of involvement. In our case series of four patients two of them had ileocaecal masses with recurrent subacute intestinal obstruction with past history of intake of antitubercular drugs for 9 months. On histopathological examination both of them proved to have eosinophilic enterocolitis. Thus it is a clinical dilemma to differentiate between these two conditions. The other two patients presented as acute abdomen with perforation and intussusception. All four patients were treated surgically. Postoperatively they recovered well with no symptoms on one year follow-up. In Indian setup tuberculosis being rampant there may be under reporting or wrongly diagnosed cases of eosinophilic enteritis. Thus a strong clinical suspicion and awareness of this clinical entity are essential among surgical community. PMID:25960910

  16. Manifold significance of serum eosinophil cationic protein in asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Zubović, Ivan; Rozmanić, Vojko; Ahel, Vladimir; Banac, Srdan

    2002-01-01

    Asthma is the result of complex interaction between different cells, mediators and nervous system that leads to an inflammatory response accompanied by increased bronchial hyperactivity. Its clinical manifestations include recurrent cough, wheezing and difficult breathing. The purpose of this study was to establish the possibility of diagnosing inflammation in asthmatic patients based on the assessment of serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and of following the efficacy of asthmatic treatment by the levels of inflammation mediators. In a prospective study, 134 children aged 1 to 18 (mean 8) years underwent serum ECP assessment. Experimental group included 87 patients with asthma, 56 boys and 31 girls, mean age 9.1 (range 2-17) years. Control group included patients with recurrent non-allergic disorders, 27 boys and 20 girls aged 1-16 (mean 6.1) years. Serum ECP was assessed using the Pharmacia CAP system ECP-FEIA method, i.e. fluoroimmunoassay test for quantitative assessment of serum ECP levels. Serum values of ECP were significantly higher in asthmatics than in controls (p = 0.001). Our results showed that increased levels of serum ECP to significantly correlate with increased eosinophil (p = 0.018) and immunoglobulin E (p = 0.003) levels. Increased ECP levels reflect the degree of inflammation and correlate with the clinical picture severity in asthmatic patients. Assessment of serum ECP levels can reveal eosinophilic activity, and indirectly detect immunologic inflammation in asthmatics. It is possible to follow the dynamics of immunologic inflammation during the course of treatment as well as treatment efficacy. PMID:12596625

  17. Reflectance confocal microscopy for the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis: a pilot study conducted on biopsy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hongki; Kang, DongKyun; Katz, Aubrey J.; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Nishioka, Norman S.; Yagi, Yukako; Tanpowpong, Pornthep; Namati, Jacqueline; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) currently requires endoscopic biopsy and histopathologic analysis of the biopsy specimens to count intraepithelial eosinophils. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is an endomicroscopy technology that is capable of obtaining high-resolution, optically sectioned images of esophageal mucosa without the administration of exogenous contrast. Objective In this study, we investigated the capability of a high-speed form of RCM, termed spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM), to count intraepithelial esophageal eosinophils and characterize other microscopic findings of EoE. Design A total of 43 biopsy samples from 35 pediatric patients and 8 biopsy samples from 8 adult patients undergoing EGD for EoE were imaged by SECM immediately after their removal and then processed for routine histopathology. Two SECM readers, trained on adult cases, prospectively counted intraepithelial eosinophils and detected the presence of abscess, degranulation, and basal cell hyperplasia on SECM images from the pediatric patients. A pathologist blinded to the SECM data analyzed the same from corresponding slides. Setting The Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital. Results Eosinophils by SECM demonstrated a higher reflectance than the surrounding cells and other inflammatory cells. There was good correlation between SECM and histology maximum eosinophil counts/high-power field (R = 0.76, P < .0001). Intra- and interobserver correlations for SECM counts were very good (R = 0.93 and R = 0.92, respectively; P < .0001). For the commonly used eosinophil count cutoff of 15 per high-power field, the sensitivity and specificity of SECM for EoE were 100%. The sensitivity and specificity for abscess, degranulation, and basal cell hyperplasia were 100% and 82%, 91% and 60%, and 94% and 80%, respectively. Intra- and interobserver agreements for these microscopic features of EoE were very good (κ = 0.9/0.9, 0.84/1.0, 0

  18. [Inflammatory mechanisms in nasal polyposis].

    PubMed

    Perić, Aleksandar; Vojvodić, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Nasal polyposis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the nasal and paranasal sinuses mucosa, characterized by prolapse of edematous mucosa, most commonly from the area of anterior ethmoid. The mean histological characteristics are proliferation of pseudostratified respiratory epithelium, thickening of the basement membrane, focal fibrosis and eosinophilic and lymphocytic infiltration of the lamina propria. Although etiology is unknown, two hypotheses are dominant among the scientists: "hypothesis of staphylococcal superantigens" and "hypothesis of immune barrier dysfunction". Although we have not yet achieved a full understanding of the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this disease, it is known that nasal polyposis is associated with intensive chronic inflammation, followed by dysregulation of chemotaxis, migration, activation and function of eosinophils. A great number of cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules are involved in the regulation of these complex mechanisms. After activation, eosinophils produce and release enzymes, which can lead to the damage of mucosa and tissue remodeling. Hyperactive eosinophils release a new amount of chemokines and cytokines, attracting new eosinophils into the site of inflammation, and may cause the persistence of chronic inflammation. PMID:25731009

  19. Mesenteric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Poras

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs), also known as inflammatory pseudotumors and inflammatory fibrosarcomas, are uncommon mesenchymal tumors composed of myofibroblastic spindle cells admixed with lymphocytes, plasma cells and eosinophils. Once thought to be reactive, these lesions are now considered to be neoplastic. These tumors can occur throughout the body, most commonly in the lung, mesentery and omentum. Patients commonly present with painless abdominal mass or with intestinal obstruction. IMTs may be multicentric, have a high local recurrence rate and may metastasize in rare cases. The lesions show wide variability in their histologic features and cellularity, and marked inflammatory infiltration, predominantly of plasmatocytes and lymphocytes, and occasionally neutrophils and eosinophils. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements and/or ALK1 and p80 immunoreactivity are reported in 33-67% of the tumors. Owing to the rarity of these lesions, there are no specific imaging findings that distinguish IMTs from other mesenteric masses. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. Local recurrence rates are high, and re-excision is the preferred therapy for local recurrences. ALK-positive tumors show good response to ALK inhibitors. Current knowledge and comprehensive review of the available literature on IMTs is herein presented. PMID:25608706

  20. Brief Report: Eosinophilic Esophagitis as a Cause of Feeding Problems in Autistic Boy. The First Reported Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarocka-Cyrta, Elzbieta; Wasilewska, Jolanta; Kaczmarski, Maciej Gustaw

    2011-01-01

    Unrecognized gastrointestinal disorders may contribute to the behavioral problems in non-verbal patients, but they are often overlooked since the clinical symptoms are nonspecific. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is a chronic inflammatory disorder manifesting itself predominantly in reflux-type symptoms that do not respond to standard anti-reflux…

  1. Elimination diets in the management of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Schwartz, Sally; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, an increasingly recognized chronic inflammatory disorder isolated to the esophagus, is triggered by an abnormal allergic response to dietary antigens. Current treatment includes swallowed topical steroids and dietary modification, which aim to resolve symptoms and prevent long-term complications such as formation of strictures. The dietary approach has become more widely accepted because long-term steroid therapy is associated with potential risks. Dietary treatment includes elemental and elimination diets. An exclusive elemental diet, which requires replacement of all intact protein with amino acid-based formula, offers the best response of all available therapies, with remission in up to 96% of subjects proving it to be superior to all other available therapies including topical steroids. However, compliance with this approach is challenging because of poor taste and monotony. The high cost of formula and the associated psychosocial problems are additional drawbacks of this approach. Empiric and allergy test-directed elimination diets have gained popularity given that elimination of a limited number of foods is much easier and as such is more readily acceptable. There is a growing body of literature supporting this type of therapy in both children and adults. This paper reviews the evidence for all types of dietary therapy in eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:24920928

  2. Treatment of eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells syndrome) - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Räßler, F; Lukács, J; Elsner, P

    2016-09-01

    Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells syndrome) is a rare inflammatory skin disease defined by erythematous, tender, sometimes urticarial plaques, possibly with vesicles and bullae, and granulomatous eosinophilic infiltrates in the dermis. Usually the disease has a benign course with spontaneous remission within a few weeks. Nevertheless, recurrences are quite frequent and may occur for several years. The objective of this study was to review the so far reported treatment options for Wells syndrome in a systematic manner. This systematic review is based on a search on Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register for English and German articles from 1970 to 2015. Advices on the treatment of Wells syndrome are limited predominately to case reports or to small case series. There are no randomized controlled trials, and control groups are missing. A variety of treatment options for Wells syndrome were reported including topical and systemic corticosteroids, antihistamines, cyclosporine, dapsone, azathioprine, griseofulvin, doxycycline, minocycline, antimalarial medications, oral tacrolimus/topical tacrolimus, sulfasalazine, interferon alpha and gamma, TNF alpha inhibitors, colchicine and PUVA therapy. As well-designed, randomized controlled trials are missing, no guidelines for the treatment of this disease can be given. Due to the small number of patients and the frequent misdiagnosis of this clinical entity, the aim of this systematic overview is to call attention to this rare condition and to help clinicians to diagnose and treat Wells syndrome effectively. Due to the good prognosis and tendency to resolve, systemic treatment should be limited to cases resistant to local therapy or with widespread lesions. PMID:27357601

  3. Diagnostic Approach to Eosinophilic Renal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Jorda, Merce; Argani, Pedram; Epstein, Jonathan I.

    2015-01-01

    Context Eosinophilic renal neoplasms include a spectrum of solid and papillary tumors ranging from indolent benign oncocytoma to highly aggressive malignancies. Recognition of the correct nature of the tumor, especially in biopsy specimens, is paramount for patient management. Objective To review the diagnostic approach to eosinophilic renal neoplasms with light microscopy and ancillary techniques. Data Sources Review of the published literature and personal experience. Conclusions The following tumors are in the differential diagnosis of oncocytic renal cell neoplasm: oncocytoma, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC), hybrid tumor, tubulocystic carcinoma, papillary RCC, clear cell RCC with predominant eosinophilic cell morphology, follicular thyroid-like RCC, hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC, acquired cystic disease–associated RCC, rhabdoid RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor translocation RCC, epithelioid angiomyolipoma, and unclassified RCC. In low-grade nonpapillary eosinophilic neoplasms, distinction between oncocytoma and low-grade RCC mostly rests on histomorphology; however, cytokeratin 7 immunostain may be helpful. In high-grade nonpapillary lesions, there is more of a role for ancillary techniques, including immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin 7, CA9, CD10, racemase, HMB45, and Melan-A. In papillary eosinophilic neoplasms, it is important to distinguish sporadic type 2 papillary RCC from microphthalmia transcription factor translocation and hereditary leiomyomatosis–associated RCC. Histologic and cytologic features along with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization tests for TFE3 (Xp11.2) and TFEB [t(6;11)] are reliable confirmatory tests. Eosinophilic epithelial neoplasms with architecture, cytology, and/or immunoprofile not qualifying for either of the established types of RCC should be classified as unclassified eosinophilic RCC and arbitrarily assigned a grade (low or high). PMID:25357116

  4. IL-4 induces adherence of human eosinophils and basophils but not neutrophils to endothelium. Association with expression of VCAM-1.

    PubMed

    Schleimer, R P; Sterbinsky, S A; Kaiser, J; Bickel, C A; Klunk, D A; Tomioka, K; Newman, W; Luscinskas, F W; Gimbrone, M A; McIntyre, B W

    1992-02-15

    The present studies were performed to explore potentially selective mechanisms of leukocyte adhesion in an attempt to understand how preferential recruitment of eosinophils and basophils might occur during allergic and other inflammatory reactions. Stimulation of human vascular endothelial cells for 24 h with IL-4 (30 to 1,000 U/ml) induced adhesion for eosinophils (up to approximately four-fold of control) and basophils (up to approximately twofold of control) but not neutrophils (less than 125% of control). Analysis of endothelial expression of adhesion molecules by flow cytometry revealed that IL-4 treatment induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression without significantly affecting the expression of other adhesion molecules, namely endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1) or intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). The concentration-response curve for IL-4-induced VCAM-1 expression paralleled that for adhesion. Endothelial cells stimulated with IL-4 expressed adhesive properties for eosinophils by 3 h; the response increased steadily during a 24-h time course study. Eosinophils and basophils adhered to plates coated with a recombinant form of VCAM-1. This adhesion was blocked with antibodies to VCAM-1 but not ELAM-1. mAb directed against either VCAM-1 or VLA-4 inhibited (by approximately 75%) the binding of eosinophils and basophils to IL-4-stimulated endothelial cells. Because VLA-4 and VCAM-1 have been demonstrated to bind to each other in other adhesion systems, these results suggest that IL-4 stimulates eosinophil and basophil adhesion by inducing endothelial cell expression of VCAM-1 which binds to eosinophil and basophil VLA-4. The lack of expression of VLA-4 on neutrophils and the failure of IL-4 to stimulate neutrophil adherence support this conclusion. It is proposed that local release of IL-4 in vivo in allergic diseases or after experimental allergen challenge may partly explain the enrichment of eosinophils and

  5. Novel Targeted Therapies for Eosinophil-Associated Diseases and Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Radonjic-Hoesli, Susanne; Valent, Peter; Klion, Amy D.; Wechsler, Michael E.; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophil-associated diseases often present with life-threatening manifestations and/or chronic organ damage. Currently available therapeutic options are limited to a few drugs that often have to be prescribed on a life-long basis to keep eosinophil counts under control. In the last 10 years, treatment options and outcomes in patients with clonal eosinophilic and other eosinophilic disorders have improved substantially. Several new targeted therapies have emerged, addressing different aspects of eosinophil expansion and inflammation. In this review, we discuss available and currently tested agents, as well as new strategies and drug targets relevant to both primary and secondary eosinophilic diseases, including allergic disorders. PMID:25340931

  6. Thalidomide attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilic inflammation in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Asano, Toshiaki; Kume, Hiroaki; Taki, Fumitaka; Ito, Satoru; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by chronic eosinophilic inflammation and hyperresponsiveness of the airways. We hypothesized that thalidomide, which has numerous immunomodulatory properties, may have anti-inflammatory effects in allergic asthma. BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) were treated orally with thalidomide (30, 100, or 300 mg/kg) or a vehicle. When thalidomide was administered to OVA-challenged mice, the number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was significantly decreased. The numbers of inflammatory cells other than eosinophils were not reduced by thalidomide. Thalidomide inhibited the elevated levels of interleukin-5 (IL-5) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in BALF by OVA challenges. Histological analysis of the lung revealed that both the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the hyperplasia of goblet cells were significantly suppressed by thalidomide treatment. Furthermore, thalidomide significantly inhibited the response to methacholine induced by OVA challenges. Taken together, thalidomide treatment decreased airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of allergic asthma. These results might provide an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutics to treat severe asthma. PMID:20522972

  7. Translating New Developments in Eosinophilic Esophagitis Pathogenesis into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Edaire

    2015-01-01

    Opinion Statement New developments in eosinophilic esophagitis pathogenesis are shaping our current therapeutic and management strategies. EoE is a chronic allergic inflammatory disease with progression to fibrostenotic disease. The disease warrants early diagnosis and long-term maintenance therapy. The diagnosis of EoE should be based on the concept of an allergy-mediated disease with esophageal dysfunction and esophageal eosinophilia. Recent findings suggest PPI-REE is likely a continuum of EoE or similar Th2-mediated allergic process. PPIs have therapeutic properties that can benefit both GERD and EoE. Therefore, PPIs should not be considered a diagnostic tool, but rather a therapeutic option for EoE. If patients are PPI-nonresponsive, then dietary therapy or steroid therapy should be considered. Dilation can be reserved as adjuvant therapy for severe fibrostenotic lesions. PMID:25598233

  8. Eosinophilic abscesses: a new facet of hepatic visceral larva migrans.

    PubMed

    Mukund, Amar; Arora, Ankur; Patidar, Yashwant; Mangla, Vivek; Bihari, Chhagan; Rastogi, Archana; Sarin, Shiv K

    2013-08-01

    Hepatic visceral larva migrans (VLM) refers to a condition characterized by granulomatous liver lesions containing eosinophils and inflammatory cells associated with migration of second-stage larvae of certain nematodes such as toxocara canis. The typical imaging findings described in the literature include small, ill-defined, oval or elongated, low-attenuating nodules with fuzzy margins, non-spherical shape, and absent or insignificant rim enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT scan. The present series in contrast depicts a new imaging manifestation of hepatic VLM presenting as confluent and clustered complex cystic liver lesions. Pre-treatment imaging studies including contrast-enhanced CT/MRI of three patients are presented. One of the patients underwent liver resection while post-treatment follow-up scan at 6 months in the remaining two displayed regression of the lesions with antihelminthic treatment. PMID:22801750

  9. [Drug induced eosinophilic pleural effusion].

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, Raluca

    2014-01-01

    The hypersensitivity reactions induced by drugs, some widely used, like central nervous system medication, can have various presentations. The lung is a frequent target for such events. We present the case of 40-year-old male patient, non-smoker, with infant encephalopaty, seizures since age of 6 with polimorphic crisis (mainly absences), with anticonvulsivant treatment since 2011 (carbamazepine, sodium valproate, levetiracetam), with no respiratory medical history. Current symptoms started two weeks before, with chest pain, dry cough. He received no antibiotics. Chest X-ray and thoracic CT scan (27 June 2013) showed a left pleral effusion. Left exploratory thoracocentesis extracted 20 ml reddish pleural fluid: eosinophilic exsudate (60%) with normal adenosin deaminase. He also presents moderate blood eosinophilia (13.7%-1780/mm3). Pulmonary infarction with secondary pleurisy, thoracic trauma, acute pancreatitis with secondary pleurisy were excluded. No Loeffler transient infiltrates were documented, serology for Toxocara is IgG positive (historical) and not significant for current episode, no symptoms suggestive for toxocarosis (characteristic to young children, patient had no liver enlargement etc.), no hidatidosis or trichinelosis were found. As an exclusion diagnosis, a hypersensitivity reaction to anticonvulsivant medication was considered (mentioned in literature) carbamazepine and sodium valproate (even if medication was taken for a longer time), with blood and pleural eosinophilia. Together with the neurologist, the mentioned drugs were stopped and he was started on lamotrigine 2 tb/day and levetiracetam 1 tb/day, well tolerated, no absences were noticed. Total remission of blood eosinophilia and partial remission of pleural effusion were noticed. Subsequent follow-ups confirm favourable evolution, with healing of pleurisy and normal blood cell count, which are stable at 7 months after changing anticonvulsivant treatment. PMID:25241560

  10. Does bee pollen cause to eosinophilic gastroenteropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Güç, Belgin Usta; Asilsoy, Suna; Canan, Oğuz; Kayaselçuk, Fazilet

    2015-01-01

    Bee pollen is given to children by mothers in order to strengthen their immune systems. There are no studies related with the side effects of bee polen in the literature. In this article, the literature was reviewed by presenting a case of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy related with bee polen. A 5-year old child was admitted due to abdominal pain. Edema was detected on the eyelids and pretibial region. In laboratory investigations, pathology was not detected in terms of hepatic and renal causes that would explain the protein loss of the patient diagnosed with hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia. Urticaria was detected during the follow-up visit. When the history of the patient was deepened, it was learned that bee pollen was given to the patient every day. The total eosinophil count was found to be 1 800/mm3. Allergic gastroenteropathy was considered because of hypereosinophilia and severe abdominal pain and endoscopy was performed. Biopsy revealed abundant eosinophils in the whole gastric mucosa. A diagnosis of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy was made. Bee polen was discontinued. Abdominal pain and edema disappeared in five days. Four weeks later, the levels of serum albumin and total eosinophil returned to normal. PMID:26568697

  11. Does bee pollen cause to eosinophilic gastroenteropathy?

    PubMed

    Güç, Belgin Usta; Asilsoy, Suna; Canan, Oğuz; Kayaselçuk, Fazilet

    2015-09-01

    Bee pollen is given to children by mothers in order to strengthen their immune systems. There are no studies related with the side effects of bee polen in the literature. In this article, the literature was reviewed by presenting a case of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy related with bee polen. A 5-year old child was admitted due to abdominal pain. Edema was detected on the eyelids and pretibial region. In laboratory investigations, pathology was not detected in terms of hepatic and renal causes that would explain the protein loss of the patient diagnosed with hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia. Urticaria was detected during the follow-up visit. When the history of the patient was deepened, it was learned that bee pollen was given to the patient every day. The total eosinophil count was found to be 1 800/mm(3). Allergic gastroenteropathy was considered because of hypereosinophilia and severe abdominal pain and endoscopy was performed. Biopsy revealed abundant eosinophils in the whole gastric mucosa. A diagnosis of allergic eosinophilic gastropathy was made. Bee polen was discontinued. Abdominal pain and edema disappeared in five days. Four weeks later, the levels of serum albumin and total eosinophil returned to normal. PMID:26568697

  12. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: a novel treatment using Montelukast

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, S E A; Lewis, C J; Bronder, C S; Morris, C D; Armstrong, G R; Whittam, J

    2003-01-01

    Background: Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a rarely diagnosed condition involving eosinophil infiltration of the oesophageal mucosa and creating significant symptoms of dysphagia. Failure to diagnose this disorder relates to reluctance to biopsy an apparently normal oesophagus. This is essential for histological diagnosis. To date, treatment success has been achieved only with corticosteroids. We describe here the use of an eosinophil stabilising agent Montelukast for the symptomatic relief of these patients. Patients and methods: Twelve patients have been identified with this condition in our unit since 1995, after thorough investigation of their dysphagia. We commenced eight of these patients on the leukotriene receptor antagonist Montelukast to symptomatically improve their swallowing while avoiding the use of long term corticosteroids. Results: Many of these patients had been previously misdiagnosed, and therefore inappropriately and unsuccessfully treated for an extensive period prior to referral to our unit. All patients were unresponsive to acid suppression therapy alone but showed improvement in their swallowing on Montelukast. Six of eight reported complete subjective improvement, five patients remaining completely asymptomatic on a maintenance regimen. Conclusions: Eosinophilic oesophagitis is a disease that is often misdiagnosed due to lack of awareness and reluctance of clinicians to biopsy an apparently normal oesophagus in dysphagic patients, and therefore obtain a histological diagnosis. Investigation of these patients adds further evidence to this condition being a separate pathological state from gastro-oesophageal reflux and eosinophilic enteritis. Montelukast has been found to be of significant help in the symptomatic control of these patients while avoiding long term corticosteroids use. PMID:12524397

  13. New Insights into Eosinophilic Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Hiromi; Yoshida, Naohiro; Iino, Yukiko

    2015-12-01

    Eosinophilic otitis media (EOM) is a type of intractable otitis media that occurs mainly in patients with bronchial asthma (BA). In 2011, the diagnostic criteria for EOM were established. EOM is characterized by the presence of a highly viscous yellowish effusion containing eosinophils and immunoglobulin E (IgE), eosinophil chemoattractants, such as eosinophil cationic protein, interleukin-5, and eotaxin. Local sensitization against foreign agents such as fungi or bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus) may result in local IgE production in the middle ear and may be responsible for the severity of EOM. The clinical features of EOM closely resemble localized eosinophilic granulomatosis polyangiitis, therefore it is necessary to be vigilant to the symptoms of mononeuritis, polyneuritis, and skin purpura during diagnosis. Standard treatment for EOM is the instillation of triamcinolone acetonide into the mesotympanum. However, severe cases exhibiting strong inflammation and otorrhea are not easily controlled with antibiotics and/or corticosteroids. We proposed the introduction of a severity score to evaluate the severity of EOM. This score correlated with local IgE levels in middle ear effusion. Clinically, the risk factors associated with this severity score were body mass index, and the duration of bronchial asthma (from the onset of BA to the age of the first consultation of otitis media to our hospital). We emphasize that early diagnosis and adequate treatment are vital in preventing progressive and sudden hearing loss resulting from EOM. PMID:26546407

  14. THE EFFECTS OF COMBINATORIAL EXPOSURE OF PRO-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES ON AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RELEASE OF CHEMOTACTIC MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting nearly 15 million individuals nationally. Within the inflamed asthmatic airway there exist complex interactions between many cells and the cytokines they release, in particular mast cells, eosinophils, T-lymphocy...

  15. Functional expression of IL-12 receptor by human eosinophils: IL-12 promotes eosinophil apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nutku, E; Zhuang, Q; Soussi-Gounni, A; Aris, F; Mazer, B D; Hamid, Q

    2001-07-15

    In murine models of allergic inflammation, IL-12 has been shown to decrease tissue eosinophilia, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. We evaluated the expression of IL-12R and the effect of IL-12 on eosinophil survival. In situ hybridization demonstrated the presence of mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-12Rbeta1 and -beta2 subunits in human peripheral blood eosinophils. Surface expression of IL-12Rbeta1 and -beta2 subunits on freshly isolated human eosinophils was optimally expressed after incubation with PMA. To determine the functional significance of IL-12R studies, we studied cell viability and apoptosis. Morphological analysis and propidium iodide staining for cell cycle demonstrated that recombinant human IL-12 increased in vitro human eosinophil apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of IL-5 together with IL-12 abrogated eosinophil apoptosis, suggesting that IL-12 and IL-5 have antagonistic effects. Our findings provide evidence for a novel role for IL-12 in regulating eosinophil function by increasing eosinophil apoptosis. PMID:11441113

  16. Clara cells drive eosinophil accumulation in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Ehmke, M; Marsh, L M; Dietze, J; Dudda, J C; Conrad, M L; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2012-02-01

    Development of allergic asthma is a complex process involving immune, neuronal and tissue cells. In the lung, Clara cells represent a major part of the "immunomodulatory barrier" of the airway epithelium. To understand the contribution of these cells to the inflammatory outcome of asthma, disease development was assessed using an adjuvant-free ovalbumin model. Mice were sensitised with subcutaneous injections of 10 μg endotoxin-free ovalbumin in conjunction with naphthalene-induced Clara cell depletion. Clara epithelial cell depletion in the lung strongly reduced eosinophil influx, which correlated with decreased eotaxin levels and, moreover, diminished the T-helper cell type 2 inflammatory response, including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13. In contrast, airway hyperresponsiveness was increased. Further investigation revealed Clara cells as the principal source of eotaxin in the lung. These findings are the first to show that Clara airway epithelial cells substantially contribute to the infiltration of eotaxin-responsive CCR3+ immune cells and augment the allergic immune response in the lung. The present study identifies Clara cells as a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory lung diseases such as allergic asthma. PMID:21828027

  17. [FEATURES OF TREATMENT OF EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS IN SCHOOLCHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Horodylovska, M I

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of probiotic L. reuteri into the complex therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis significantly affect the outcomes of children--there was significant decrease in the number of eosinophils in the esophageal mucosa of children. PMID:26118052

  18. Dynamics of eosinophil infiltration in the bronchial mucosa before and after the late asthmatic reaction.

    PubMed

    Aalbers, R; de Monchy, J G; Kauffman, H F; Smith, M; Hoekstra, Y; Vrugt, B; Timens, W

    1993-06-01

    We wanted to determine whether changes in bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) following allergen challenge show a time relationship with inflammatory events in the airways of allergic asthmatic subjects. Lavage was performed and endobronchial biopsies were taken via the fiberoptic bronchoscope, before, and 3 and 24 h after, allergen challenge, on separate occasions, in nine dual asthmatic responders. The numbers of activated eosinophils, identified by immunohistochemistry, using the monoclonal anti-eosinophil cationic protein antibody, EG2, were significantly increased both at 3 h and at 24 h in the submucosa and bronchial lavage. A significant negative correlation was found between the number of EG2+ cells in the submucosa and in the bronchial lavage 24 h after the allergen challenge (r = -0.70). At 24 h, the amount of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) was increased in the bronchial lavage. A significant correlation was observed between the amount of ECP at 3 h and the log provocative dose of house dust mite producing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (PD20 HDM) (r = -0.63). The results suggest a recruitment of activated eosinophils to the submucosa and, further, to the epithelial lining, followed by degranulation. This process has already started 3 h after allergen challenge, and lasts for at least 24 h, which may result in mucosal damage and subsequent allergen-induced increase in BHR, before and after the late asthmatic reaction. PMID:8339804

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis: emerging therapies and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Straumann, Alex

    2014-06-01

    Twenty years have passed since eosinophilic esophagitis was first recognized as a new and distinct entity. Current treatment modalities for eosinophilic esophagitis include the "3 Ds": drugs, allergen avoidance with diet, and esophageal dilation. Drugs entail the limitation that only corticosteroids have a proven efficacy; most other compounds evoke only a minimal effect. Diets must be maintained continuously and they interfere markedly with the quality of life, possibly even involving some risk of malnutrition. A greater understanding of the immunopathogenesis, natural history, and disease spectrum will inevitably lead to improved therapeutic outcomes for this emerging entity. PMID:24813523

  20. Eosinophilic pleural effusion complicating allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Austin N; Kuhlmann, Erica; Kuzniar, Tomasz J

    2011-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is primarily a disease of patients with cystic fibrosis or asthma, who typically present with bronchial obstruction, fever, malaise, and expectoration of mucus plugs. We report a case of a young man with a history of asthma who presented with cough, left-sided pleuritic chest pain and was found to have lobar atelectasis and an eosinophilic, empyematous pleural effusion. Bronchoscopy and sputum cultures grew Aspergillus fumigatus, and testing confirmed strong allergic response to this mold, all consistent with a diagnosis of ABPA. This novel and unique presentation of ABPA expands on the differential diagnosis of eosinophilic pleural effusions. PMID:21311176

  1. [The eosinophilic otitis media's research progress].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2015-09-01

    The eosinophilic otitis media(EOM) is an intractable disease characterized by the presence of a highly viscous yellow effusion with extensive accumulation of eosinophils in the middle ear; granulation tissue can been discovered in the middle ear cavity; most of patients have association with bronchial asthma; resist to conventional treatment for otitis media; EOM patients show gradual deterioration of hearing and sometimes become deaf suddenly; effective treatment involves use of topical and oral steroids. This article summarizes the progress of the EOM's diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26647553

  2. Eosinophil-Rich Acute Febrile Neutrophilic Dermatosis in a Patient With Enteropathy-Associated T-cell Lymphoma, Type 1.

    PubMed

    Soon, Christopher W; Kirsch, Ilan R; Connolly, Andrew J; Kwong, Bernice Y; Kim, Jinah

    2016-09-01

    The presence of eosinophils within the neutrophilic infiltrates of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet syndrome) is documented in the literature. Here, the authors describe a case of eosinophil-rich acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis in the setting of new onset enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL), type 1. Histopathologic evaluation of the skin biopsies demonstrated a mixed superficial perivascular and inflammatory infiltrate composed of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and abundant eosinophils. EATL, type 1 is an aggressive although rare primary intestinal lymphoma that may be associated with celiac disease. This lymphoma is associated with a poor prognosis due to treatment resistance or bowel perforation. To the authors' knowledge, Sweet syndrome has not been reported in a patient with EATL. PMID:27097333

  3. Lipid Bodies in Inflammatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C. N.; D’Avila, Heloisa; Wan, Hsiao-Ching; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Weller, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid bodies (LBs), also known as lipid droplets, have increasingly been recognized as functionally active organelles linked to diverse biological functions and human diseases. These organelles are actively formed in vivo within cells from the immune system, such as macrophages, neutrophils, and eosinophils, in response to different inflammatory conditions and are sites for synthesis and storage of inflammatory mediators. In this review, the authors discuss structural and functional aspects of LBs and current imaging techniques to visualize these organelles in cells engaged in inflammatory processes, including infectious diseases. The dynamic morphological aspects of LBs in leukocytes as inducible, newly formable organelles, elicitable in response to stimuli that lead to cellular activation, contribute to the evolving understanding of LBs as organelles that are critical regulators of different inflammatory diseases, key markers of leukocyte activation, and attractive targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:21430261

  4. Diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Asifa K; Mussarat, Ahad; Mishra, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a recently recognized allergic disorder, characterized by eosophageal dysfunction, accumulation of ≥15 eosinophils/high-powered field, eosinophil microabssess, basal cell hyperplasia, extracellular eosinophilic granules in the esophageal epithelial mucosal biopsy and a lack of response to a 8-week proton pump inhibitor treatment. Despite the increased incidences and considerable progress made in understanding EoE pathogenesis, there are limited diagnostic and therapeutic options available for EoE. Currently, the only criterion for diagnosing EoE is repetitive esophageal endoscopic biopsies and histopathological evaluation. Antigen elimination or corticosteroid therapies are effective therapies for EoE but are expensive and have limitations, if continued in the long term. Hence, there is a great necessity for novel noninvasive diagnostic biomarkers that can easily diagnose EoE and assess effectiveness of therapy. Herein, we have provided an update on key molecules involved in the disease initiation, and progression and proposed novel noninvasive diagnostic molecules and strategies for EoE therapy. PMID:25400904

  5. Eosinophilic esophagitis: asthma of the esophagus?

    PubMed

    Arora, Amindra S; Yamazaki, Kiyoshi

    2004-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is rapidly emerging as a distinct disease entity in both pediatric and adult gastroenterology. The typical clinical presentation includes solid food dysphagia in young men who have an atopic predisposition. Food impaction necessitating endoscopic intervention is common. EE should be suspected, in particular, in patients with unexplained dysphagia or those with no response to antacid or anti-acid secretory therapy. Careful endoscopic and radiographic examinations reveal furrows, corrugations, rings, whitish plaques, fragile crêpe paper-like appearance, and a small-caliber esophagus. Mucosal erosion in the distal esophagus, characteristic to reflux esophagitis, is absent in EE. Marked eosinophil infiltration in the esophageal epithelia (>20 eosinophils per high-power field) is the diagnostic hallmark. Food antigens and aeroallergens may play a role in the pathogenesis of EE. The mechanisms may be dependent or independent of immunoglobulin E. Elimination diets, systemic and topical corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and, most recently, an anti-interleukin-5 monoclonal antibody have been used to treat EE. EE likely represents another example of eosinophil-associated inflammation of epithelia at the interface between external and internal milieu, similar to bronchial asthma and atopic dermatitis. This review summarizes recent progress in the diagnosis and management of EE and discusses future research directions. PMID:15224275

  6. Association of eosinophilic myositis with an unusual species of Sarcocystis in a beef cow.

    PubMed Central

    Gajadhar, A A; Yates, W D; Allen, J R

    1987-01-01

    The carcass of a mature cow had numerous, disseminated lesions typical of eosinophilic myositis. To elucidate the nature and possible cause of the lesions, histological sections were examined by light microscopy and selected areas were removed and processed for electron microscopy. The lesions were granulomatous in nature. Each granuloma contained at its centre an intact or ruptured sarcocyst associated with degenerate muscle fibers. Surrounding this was a layer of epithelioid cells and an intense accumulation of inflammatory cells, most of which were eosinophils. The primary cyst wall of the sarcocysts in these granulomas consisted of hair-like protrusions that featured many unusual electron-dense bodies. Sarcocysts with ultrastructures characteristic of Sarcocystis cruzi and Sarcocystis hirsuta were also present in muscle from the same animal, but these sarcocysts lacked any associated cellular responses. The eosinophilic myositis in this case appeared to be associated with sarcocystosis of an unknown species. Possibly, the inflammatory reaction was due to the host-parasite interaction in an unusual host. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:3115553

  7. Participation of eosinophils in the toxic oil syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ten, R M; Kephart, G M; Posada, M; Abaitua, I; Soldevilla, L; Kilbourne, E M; Dunnette, S L; Gleich, G J

    1990-01-01

    The participation of eosinophils in the Spanish toxic oil syndrome (TOS) was investigated. Eosinophil infiltration and degranulation in tissues from 52 patients with the TOS were examined by immunofluorescence staining for the eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP). Serum MBP levels were determined in sera from 323 patients. Eosinophil infiltration and degranulation were found in several tissues, especially during the acute phase of the TOS, and serum MBP was significantly elevated during all phases of the disease, suggesting that eosinophils play a role in the pathogenesis of the TOS. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2242612

  8. RNA Seq profiling reveals a novel expression pattern of TGF-β target genes in human blood eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhong-Jian; Hu, Jie; Esnault, Stephane; Dozmorov, Igor; Malter, James S

    2015-09-01

    Despite major advances in our understanding of TGF-β signaling in multiple cell types, little is known about the direct target genes of this pathway in human eosinophils. These cells constitute the major inflammatory component present in the sputum and lung of active asthmatics and their numbers correlate well with disease severity. During the transition from acute to chronic asthma, TGF-β levels rise several fold in the lung which drives fibroblasts to produce extracellular matrix (ECM) and participate in airway and parenchymal remodeling. In this report, we use purified blood eosinophils from healthy donors and analyze baseline and TGF-β responsive genes by RNA Seq, and demonstrate that eosinophils (PBE) express 7981 protein-coding genes of which 178 genes are up-regulated and 199 genes are down-regulated by TGF-β. While 18 target genes have been previously associated with asthma and eosinophilic disorders, the vast majority have been implicated in cell death and survival, differentiation, and cellular function. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that 126 canonical pathways are activated by TGF-β including iNOS, TREM1, p53, IL-8 and IL-10 signaling. As TGF-β is an important cytokine for eosinophil function and survival, and pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis, our results represent a significant step toward the identification of novel TGF-β responsive genes and provide a potential therapeutic opportunity by selectively targeting relevant genes and pathways. PMID:26112417

  9. Selective eosinophil transendothelial migration triggered by eotaxin via modulation of Mac-1/ICAM-1 and VLA-4/VCAM-1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Jia, G Q; Gonzalo, J A; Hidalgo, A; Wagner, D; Cybulsky, M; Gutierrez-Ramos, J C

    1999-01-01

    We have recently cloned eotaxin, a highly efficacious eosinophilic chemokine involved in the development of lung eosinophilia during allergic inflammatory reactions. To understand more precisely how eotaxin facilitates the specific migration of eosinophils, we have studied which adhesion receptors are essential for eotaxin action both in vivo and in vitro. Experiments using mice genetically deficient in adhesion receptors demonstrated that molecules previously reported to be involved in both leukocyte tethering/rolling (P-selectin and E-selectin) and in sticking/ transmigration (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) are required for eotaxin action in vivo. To further elucidate the mechanism(s) involved in this process, we have used an in vitro transendothelial chemotaxis model. mAb neutralization studies performed in this system suggest that the integrins Mac-1 (CD11b/18), VLA-4 (alpha4beta1) and LFA-1 (CD11a/18) are involved in the transendothelial chemotaxis of eosinophils to eotaxin. Accordingly, the expression of these integrins on eosinophils is elevated by direct action of this chemokine in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that eotaxin-induced eosinophil transendothelial migration in vivo and in vitro relies on Mac-1/ICAM-1 and VLA-4NCAM-1 interactions, the latter ones becoming more relevant at later time points of the eotaxin-induced recruitment process. PMID:10050668

  10. Human ecalectin, a variant of human galectin-9, is a novel eosinophil chemoattractant produced by T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, R; Matsumoto, H; Seki, M; Hata, M; Asano, Y; Kanegasaki, S; Stevens, R L; Hirashima, M

    1998-07-01

    A 1.6-kilobase pair cDNA was isolated from a human T-cell-derived expression library that encodes a novel eosinophil chemoattractant (designated ecalectin) expressed during allergic and parasitic responses. Based on its deduced amino acid sequence, ecalectin is a 36-kDa protein consisting of 323 amino acids. Although ecalectin lacks a hydrophobic signal peptide, it is secreted from mammalian cells. Ecalectin is not related to any known cytokine or chemokine but rather is a variant of human galectin-9, a member of the large family of animal lectins that have affinity for beta-galactosides. Recombinant ecalectin, expressed in COS cells and insect cells, exhibited potent eosinophil chemoattractant activity and attracted eosinophils in vitro and in vivo in a dose-dependent manner but not neutrophils, lymphocytes, or monocytes. The finding that the ecalectin transcript is present in abundance in various lymphatic tissues and that its expression increases substantially in antigen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells suggests that ecalectin is an important T-cell-derived regulator of eosinophil recruitment in tissues during inflammatory reactions. We believe that this is the first report of the expression of an immunoregulatory galectin expressed by a T-cell line that is selective for eosinophils. PMID:9642261

  11. Galectin-10, a Potential Biomarker of Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Justin C.; Douglass, Jo A.; Gillman, Andrew; O'Hehir, Robyn E.; Meeusen, Els N.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of eosinophilic airway inflammation can assist in the diagnosis of allergic asthma and in the management of exacerbations, however its clinical implementation remains difficult. Galectin-10 has been associated with eosinophilic inflammation and has the potential to be used as a surrogate biomarker. This study aimed to assess the relationship between galectin-10 in sputum with sputum eosinophil counts, the current gold standard of eosinophil inflammation in the lung. Thirty-eight sputum samples were processed for both eosinophil counts by cytospins and semi-quantitative measurements of galectin-10 by western blots. A strong association was observed between galectin-10 levels in sputum and sputum eosinophil measurements, and they accurately determined sputum eosinophilia. The results support the potential for galectin-10 to be used as a surrogate biomarker of eosinophilic airway inflammation. PMID:22880030

  12. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB in tumour necrosis factor-induced eotaxin release of human eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    WONG, C K; ZHANG, J P; IP, W K; LAM, C W K

    2002-01-01

    The CC chemokine eotaxin is a potent eosinophil-specific chemoattractant that is crucial for allergic inflammation. Allergen-induced tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has been shown to induce eotaxin synthesis in eosinophils. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) have been found to play an essential role for the eotaxin-mediated eosinophilia. We investigated the modulation of NF-κB and MAPK activation in TNF-induced eotaxin release of human eosinophils. Human blood eosinophils were purified from fresh buffy coat using magnetic cell sorting. NF-κB pathway-related genes were evaluated by cDNA expression array system. Degradation of IκBα and phosphorylation of MAPK were detected by Western blot. Activation of NF-κB was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Eotaxin released into the eosinophil culture medium was measured by ELISA. TNF was found to up-regulate the gene expression of NF-κB and IκBα in eosinophils. TNF-induced IκBα degradation was inhibited by the proteasome inhibitor N-cbz-Leu-Leu-leucinal (MG-132) and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sodium salicylate (NaSal). Using EMSA, both MG-132 and NaSal were found to suppress the TNF-induced NF-κB activation in eosinophils. Furthermore, TNF was shown to induce phosphorylation of p38 MAPK time-dependently but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). Inhibition of NF-κB activation and p38 MAPK activity decreased the TNF-induced release of eotaxin from eosinophils. These results indicate that NF-κB and p38 MAPK play an important role in TNF-activated signalling pathway regulating eotaxin release by eosinophils. They have also provided a biochemical basis for the potential of using specific inhibitors of NF-κB and p38 MAPK for treating allergic inflammation. PMID:12067303

  13. Enhanced expression of neuropeptide S (NPS) receptor in eosinophils from severe asthmatics and subjects with total IgE above 100IU/ml.

    PubMed

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; James, Anna; Moilanen, Eeva; Pulkkinen, Ville; Daham, Kameran; Saarelainen, Seppo; Laitinen, Tarja; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Kere, Juha; Dahlén, Barbro; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are inflammatory cells of particular relevance to asthma exacerbations. Neuropeptide S (NPS) receptor was identified in a search for asthma susceptibility genes, where the risk haplotypes of the NPS receptor gene associated with total serum IgE above 100IU/ml and asthma. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare expression of NPS receptor in human peripheral blood eosinophils derived from subjects with total serum IgE above and below 100IU/ml and patients with different phenotypes of asthma. Additionally, we aimed to study the function of NPS receptor in human eosinophils. We found higher NPS receptor protein expression in eosinophils derived from subjects with high IgE when compared to those from subjects with low IgE and the level of NPS receptor positively correlated with serum IgE. NPS receptor expression was also higher in eosinophils from patients with severe asthma than in cells from mild asthmatics or healthy controls. The receptor agonist NPS was a chemotactic agent for eosinophils. NPS also increased N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-stimulated CD11b integrin levels in eosinophils from subjects with high IgE. Furthermore, eosinophils from those subjects exhibited Ca(2+) mobilization but not cAMP rise in response to NPS. Altogether, NPS receptor may have a pathological role in individuals with severe asthma and/or elevated serum IgE levels as eosinophils from these patients express higher levels of NPS receptor protein and respond to NPS by enhanced migration and adhesion molecule expression. PMID:24239856

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis that develops during therapy with proton pump inhibitors : case series and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Orel, R; Murch, S; Amil Dias, J; Vandenplas, Y; Homan, M

    2016-01-01

    Therapy with proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) results in remission in at least one third of patients with esophageal eosinophilia, presumably because of both their acid-related and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of action. However, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) may also develop during therapy with PPIs. We present a case series of four children who were initially diagnosed with infectious esophagitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease or gastric ulcer, who had no eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus, but subsequently developed symptoms, endoscopic features and histological picture of typical EoE. We discuss mechanisms of action of PPIs of likely relevance to an increased risk of development of EoE in some patients, such as their influence on mucosal barrier function, interference with pH-related protein digestion by pepsin, and antigen processing by immune cells. PMID:27382946

  15. An eosinophilic variant granulomatosis with polyangiitis involving the dura, bilateral orbits, and mastoids

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hakami, Hasan; Al-Arfaj, Abdurhman S.; Al-Sohaibani, Mohammed; Khalil, Najma A.

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) formerly called Wegener’s granulomatosis is a chronic necrotizing granulomatous inflammatory disease with systemic vasculitis involving the upper and lower respiratory tract, and kidneys. The typical histopathology is that of necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with palisading histiocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes. We report a case of a 57-year-old lady presenting with left eye swelling, left ear pain and discharge, but with no pulmonary or renal symptoms. Investigations revealed positive cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and proteinase 3 antibodies. The CT and MRI showed meningeal thickening and bilateral structural changes of the orbits and mastoids. Lacrimal gland biopsy showed non necrotizing granulation with an eosinophilic infiltration. She was diagnosed with eosinophilic variant of GPA of the eyes and mastoid bones bilaterally extending to dura and sparing the lungs and kidneys. She responded to corticosteroids and rituximab. PMID:27279517

  16. An eosinophilic variant granulomatosis with polyangiitis involving the dura, bilateral orbits, and mastoids.

    PubMed

    Al-Hakami, Hasan; Al-Arfaj, Abdurhman S; Al-Sohaibani, Mohammed; Khalil, Najma A

    2016-06-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) formerly called Wegener's granulomatosis is a chronic necrotizing granulomatous inflammatory disease with systemic vasculitis involving the upper and lower respiratory tract, and kidneys. The typical histopathology is that of necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with palisading histiocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes. We report a case of a 57-year-old lady presenting with left eye swelling, left ear pain and discharge, but with no pulmonary or renal symptoms. Investigations revealed positive cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies  and proteinase 3 antibodies. The CT and MRI showed meningeal thickening and bilateral structural changes of the orbits and mastoids. Lacrimal gland biopsy showed non necrotizing granulation with an eosinophilic infiltration. She was diagnosed with eosinophilic variant of GPA of the eyes and mastoid bones bilaterally extending to dura and sparing the lungs and kidneys. She responded to corticosteroids and rituximab. PMID:27279517

  17. Three cases of idiopathic eosinophilic enteritis with chronic obstinate diarrhea in Japanese Black fattening cattle

    PubMed Central

    FUSHIMI, Yasuo; TAKAGI, Mitsuhiro; KAWAGUCHI, Hiroaki; MIYOSHI, Noriaki; TSUKA, Takeshi; DEGUCHI, Eisaburo

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic enteritis (EOE) is a type of inflammatory bowel disease and is characterized clinically by chronic obstinate diarrhea. Three Japanese Black (JB) fattening cattle (2 males and 1 female) on different cattle farms presented with chronic episodic diarrhea without fever or dehydration. Soft reddish spherical carneous tissues (1−3 cm) were occasionally excreted within the diarrheic feces. Administration of antibiotics, antidiarrheal drugs and vermicides had no therapeutic effect, but dexamethasone improved the fecal characteristics. The symptoms persisted until the animals were slaughtered at 27–30 months of age. Histopathological examination of the intestines revealed marked eosinophilic infiltration in the lamina propria and submucosa. From these findings, we diagnosed these cattle as the first cases of EOE in JB cattle. PMID:25391396

  18. Kimura's disease with eosinophilic panniculitis - treated with cyclosporine: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Kimura's disease is a rare, benign, slow growing chronic inflammatory swelling with a predilection for the head and neck region and almost always with peripheral blood eosinophilia and elevated serum IgE levels. Here, we report a 25-year-old male patient with asthma, Reynaud phenomenon, eosinophilic panniculitis, bilateral inguinal lymphadenopathy and peripheral blood eosinophilia. He responded initially to oral prednisolone with the subsidence of peripheral blood eosinophilia, asthma and the Reynaud phenomenon. But with tapering of prednisolone symptoms reappeared and hereby he was treated with cyclosporine. He has been symptom free for 6 months of follow up while taking cyclosporine 25 mg orally per day. Eosinophilia has resolved. This case shows that in addition to previously reported associations, Kimura disease may be associated with eosinophilic panniculitis and that cyclosporine could be effective in its treatment. PMID:20236545

  19. Cyclophilin D regulates necrosis, but not apoptosis, of murine eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiang; Hogan, Simon P; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Zimmermann, Nives

    2016-04-15

    Eosinophil degranulation and clusters of free extracellular granules are frequently observed in diverse diseases, including atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Whether these intact granules are released by necrosis or a biochemically mediated cytolysis remains unknown. Recently, a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase located within the mitochondrial matrix, cyclophilin D (PPIF), was shown to regulate necrotic, but not apoptotic, cell death in vitro in fibroblasts, hepatocytes, and cardiomyocytes. Whether cyclophilin D regulates necrosis in hematopoietic cells such as eosinophils remains unknown. We used PPIF-deficient (Ppif(-/-)) mice to test whether cyclophilin D is required for regulating eosinophil necrosis. PPIF deficiency did not affect eosinophil development or maturation at baseline. After in vitro ionomycin or H2O2 treatment, Ppif(-/-) eosinophils were significantly protected from Ca(2+) overload- or oxidative stress-induced necrosis. Additionally, Ppif(-/-) eosinophils demonstrated significantly decreased necrosis, but not apoptosis, in response to Siglec-F cross-linking, a stimulus associated with eosinophil-mediated processes in vitro and in vivo. When treated with apoptosis inducers, Ppif(+/+) and Ppif(-/-) eosinophils exhibited no significant difference in apoptosis or secondary necrosis. Finally, in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model, although levels of colitogenic cytokines and eosinophil-selective chemokines were comparable between Ppif(+/+) and Ppif(-/-) mice, the latter exhibited decreased clinical outcomes. This correlated with significantly reduced eosinophil cytolysis in the colon. Collectively, our present studies demonstrate that murine eosinophil necrosis is regulated in vitro and in vivo by cyclophilin D, at least in part, thus providing new insight into the mechanism of eosinophil necrosis and release of free extracellular granules in eosinophil-associated diseases. PMID:26893161

  20. Repeated Nitrogen Dioxide Exposures and Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthmatics: A Randomized Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Guillossou, Gaëlle; Neukirch, Catherine; Dehoux, Monique; Koscielny, Serge; Bonay, Marcel; Cabanes, Pierre-André; Samet, Jonathan M.; Mure, Patrick; Ropert, Luc; Tokarek, Sandra; Lambrozo, Jacques; Aubier, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), a ubiquitous atmospheric pollutant, may enhance the asthmatic response to allergens through eosinophilic activation in the airways. However, the effect of NO2 on inflammation without allergen exposure is poorly studied. Objectives: We investigated whether repeated peaks of NO2, at various realistic concentrations, induce changes in airway inflammation in asthmatics. Methods: Nineteen nonsmokers with asthma were exposed at rest in a double-blind, crossover study, in randomized order, to 200 ppb NO2, 600 ppb NO2, or clean air once for 30 min on day 1 and twice for 30 min on day 2. The three series of exposures were separated by 2 weeks. The inflammatory response in sputum was measured 6 hr (day 1), 32 hr (day 2), and 48 hr (day 3) after the first exposure, and compared with baseline values measured twice 10–30 days before the first exposure. Results: Compared with baseline measurements, the percentage of eosinophils in sputum increased by 57% after exposure to 600 ppb NO2 (p = 0.003) but did not change significantly after exposure to 200 ppb. The slope of the association between the percentage of eosinophils and NO2 exposure level was significant (p = 0.04). Eosinophil cationic protein in sputum was highly correlated with eosinophil count and increased significantly after exposure to 600 ppb NO2 (p = 0.001). Lung function, which was assessed daily, was not affected by NO2 exposure. Conclusions: We observed that repeated peak exposures of NO2 performed without allergen exposure were associated with airway eosinophilic inflammation in asthmatics in a dose-related manner. Citation: Ezratty V, Guillossou G, Neukirch C, Dehoux M, Koscielny S, Bonay M, Cabanes PA, Samet JM, Mure P, Ropert L, Tokarek S, Lambrozo J, Aubier M. 2014. Repeated nitrogen dioxide exposures and eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatics: a randomized crossover study. Environ Health Perspect 122:850–855; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307240 PMID

  1. Serum eosinophil cationic protein and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to hypoosmolar challenge in naive atopic asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Dal Negro, R; Tognella, S; Micheletto, C; Pomari, C; Burti, E; Mauroner, L; Turco, P

    1998-01-01

    Inhaled nonisotonic solutions (e.g., ultrasonically nebulized distilled water, UNDW) are sensitive bronchoconstrictive agents in asthmatics, their suggested mechanism of action being the release of mediators from some inflammatory cells. Studies assessing the relationship between degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness to UNDW and plasma levels of eosinophilic markers are not available to date. Fourteen asymptomatic, nonsmoking, naive asthmatics (8 males, aged 18 to 45; mean basal FEV1 = 93.8% predicted +/- 1.7 SE), monosensitized to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, and twelve normal subjects (9 males, aged 19 to 40, mean basal FEV1 = 93.3% predicted +/- 1.4 SE) entered the study after informed consent. Each subject performed the UNDW challenge while the transcutaneous pO2 (PtcO2) was monitored. Serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) was measured together with blood eosinophils 60 min before UNDW. The bronchial response was expressed as FEV1 and PtcO2% drop from baseline, as assessed 10 min following UNDW. Mean blood eosinophils were 3.4% total leukocytes +/- 0.3 SE in normal subjects and 7.9% total leukocytes +/- 0.4 SE in asthmatics (p < 0.001). Mean serum ECP was 4.6 micrograms/l +/- 0.6 SE in normal subjects and 22.4 micrograms/l +/- 1.3 SE in asthmatics (p < 0.001). Mean FEV1 drop was 2.1% +/- 1.1 SE in normal subjects and 24.2% +/- 1.1 SE in asthmatics; the corresponding mean PtcO2% drop was 3.6 +/- 0.7 SE in normal subjects and 28.6 +/- 1.4 SE in asthmatics. Serum ECP was found to be related to blood eosinophils (r = 0.7, p = 0.003); despite the eosinophils, serum ECP proved to be related to a drop in both FEV1 and PtcO2, atr = 0.6 (p = 0.024) and r = 0.7 (p = 0.006), respectively. In conclusion, serum ECP, but not eosinophils per se, can differentiate normal subjects from naive asthmatics hyperresponsive to UNDW. Serum ECP was also proven to be directly related to both the UNDW-induced bronchoconstriction and hypoxemia, thus confirming that proximal, but

  2. Role of P2 Receptors as Modulators of Rat Eosinophil Recruitment in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Alberto, Anael Viana Pinto; Faria, Robson Xavier; de Menezes, Joao Ricardo Lacerda; Surrage, Andrea; da Rocha, Natasha Cristina; Ferreira, Leonardo Gomes Braga; Frutuoso, Valber da Silva; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2016-01-01

    ATP and other nucleotides are released from cells through regulated pathways or following the loss of plasma membrane integrity. Once outside the cell, these compounds can activate P2 receptors: P2X ionotropic receptors and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. Eosinophils represent major effector cells in the allergic inflammatory response and they are, in fact, associated with several physiological and pathological processes. Here we investigate the expression of P2 receptors and roles of those receptors in murine eosinophils. In this context, our first step was to investigate the expression and functionality of the P2X receptors by patch clamping, our results showed a potency ranking order of ATP>ATPγS> 2meSATP> ADP> αβmeATP> βγmeATP>BzATP> UTP> UDP>cAMP. This data suggest the presence of P2X1, P2X2 and P2X7. Next we evaluate by microfluorimetry the expression of P2Y receptors, our results based in the ranking order of potency (UTP>ATPγS> ATP > UDP> ADP >2meSATP > αβmeATP) suggests the presence of P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6 and P2Y11. Moreover, we confirmed our findings by immunofluorescence assays. We also did chemotaxis assays to verify whether nucleotides could induce migration. After 1 or 2 hours of incubation, ATP increased migration of eosinophils, as well as ATPγS, a less hydrolysable analogue of ATP, while suramin a P2 blocker abolished migration. In keeping with this idea, we tested whether these receptors are implicated in the migration of eosinophils to an inflammation site in vivo, using a model of rat allergic pleurisy. In fact, migration of eosinophils has increased when ATP or ATPγS were applied in the pleural cavity, and once more suramin blocked this effect. We have demonstrated that rat eosinophils express P2X and P2Y receptors. In addition, the activation of P2 receptors can increase migration of eosinophils in vitro and in vivo, an effect blocked by suramin. PMID:26784445

  3. Eosinophil extracellular DNA trap cell death mediates lytic release of free secretion-competent eosinophil granules in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Shigeharu; Melo, Rossana C. N.; Ghiran, Ionita; Spencer, Lisa A.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Weller, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils release their granule proteins extracellularly through exocytosis, piecemeal degranulation, or cytolytic degranulation. Findings in diverse human eosinophilic diseases of intact extracellular eosinophil granules, either free or clustered, indicate that eosinophil cytolysis occurs in vivo, but the mechanisms and consequences of lytic eosinophil degranulation are poorly understood. We demonstrate that activated human eosinophils can undergo extracellular DNA trap cell death (ETosis) that cytolytically releases free eosinophil granules. Eosinophil ETosis (EETosis), in response to immobilized immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA), cytokines with platelet activating factor, calcium ionophore, or phorbol myristate acetate, develops within 120 minutes in a reduced NADP (NADPH) oxidase-dependent manner. Initially, nuclear lobular formation is lost and some granules are released by budding off from the cell as plasma membrane–enveloped clusters. Following nuclear chromatolysis, plasma membrane lysis liberates DNA that forms weblike extracellular DNA nets and releases free intact granules. EETosis-released eosinophil granules, still retaining eosinophil cationic granule proteins, can be activated to secrete when stimulated with CC chemokine ligand 11 (eotaxin-1). Our results indicate that an active NADPH oxidase-dependent mechanism of cytolytic, nonapoptotic eosinophil death initiates nuclear chromatolysis that eventuates in the release of intact secretion-competent granules and the formation of extracellular DNA nets. PMID:23303825

  4. Asian sand dust enhances ovalbumin-induced eosinophil recruitment in the alveoli and airway of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hiyoshi, Kyoko; Ichinose, Takamichi; Sadakane, Kaori; Takano, Hirohisa; Nishikawa, Masataka; Mori, Ikuko; Yanagisawa, Rie; Yoshida, Seiichi; Kumagai, Yoshito; Tomura, Shigeo; Shibamoto, Takayuki . E-mail: tshibamoto@ucdavis.edu

    2005-11-15

    Asian sand dust (ASD) containing sulfate (SO{sub 4} {sup 2-}) reportedly causes adverse respiratory health effects but there is no experimental study showing the effect of ASD toward allergic respiratory diseases. The effects of ASD and ASD plus SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} toward allergic lung inflammation induced by ovalbumin (OVA) were investigated in this study. ICR mice were administered intratracheally with saline; ASD alone (sample from Shapotou desert); and ASD plus SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} (ASD-SO{sub 4}); OVA+ASD; OVA+ASD-SO{sub 4}. ASD or ASD-SO{sub 4} alone caused mild nutrophilic inflammation in the bronchi and alveoli. ASD and ASD-SO{sub 4} increased pro-inflammatory mediators, such as Keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). ASD and ASD-SO{sub 4} enhanced eosinophil recruitment induced by OVA in the alveoli and in the submucosa of the airway, which has a goblet cell proliferation in the bronchial epithelium. However, a further increase of eosinophils by addition of SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} was not observed. The two sand dusts synergistically increased interleukin-5 (IL-5) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), which were associated with OVA, in BALF. However, the increased levels of IL-5 were lower in the OVA+ASD-SO{sub 4} group than in the OVA+ASD group. ASD caused the adjuvant effects to specific-IgG1 production by OVA, but not to specific-IgE. These results suggest that the enhancement of eosinophil recruitment in the lung is mediated by synergistically increased IL-5 and MCP-1. IgG1 antibodies may play an important role in the enhancement of allergic reaction caused by OVA and sand dust. However, extra sulfate may not contribute to an increase of eosinophils.

  5. Elevated expression of CC Chemokine ligand 23 in eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Poposki, Julie A.; Uzzaman, Ashraf; Nagarkar, Deepti R.; Chustz, Regina T.; Peters, Anju T.; Suh, Lydia A.; Carter, Roderick; Norton, James; Harris, Kathleen E.; Grammer, Leslie C.; Tan, Bruce K.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Conley, David B.; Kern, Robert C.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Kato, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a heterogeneous chronic disease characterized by local inflammation of the sinonasal tissues. The pathogenesis of CRS remains controversial but it has been associated with the accumulation of various immune and inflammatory cells in sinus tissue. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of chemokine CCL23, known to bind to CCR1 and recruit monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, in patients with CRS. Methods We collected nasal tissue from patients with CRS and control subjects. We assayed mRNA for CCL23 by using real-time PCR and measured CCL23 protein by ELISA, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Results CCL23 mRNA was significantly elevated in nasal polyps from patients with polypoid CRS (CRSwNP) (p<0.05) compared to inferior turbinate and uncinate tissue from patients with CRS or control subjects. CCL23 protein was also elevated in nasal polyps, although these levels were not statistically significant. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed CCL23 expression in mucosal epithelial cells and inflammatory cells, but accumulation of CCL23 positive inflammatory cells occurred only in nasal polyps. Immunofluorescence data showed CCL23 co-localization with ECP positive eosinophils. The concentration of CCL23 in nasal polyps positively correlated with the concentration of ECP, suggesting that eosinophils are major CCL23 producing cells in nasal polyps. Finally, we found that CCL23 protein was significantly elevated in nasal polyps from patients with CRSwNP with aspirin sensitivity. Conclusion Overproduction of CCL23 in nasal polyps may contribute to the pathogenesis of eosinophilic CRSwNP via the recruitment of CCR1 positive inflammatory cells including monocytes and macrophages, and the amplification of local inflammation. PMID:21497884

  6. Orbital inflammatory pseudotumor associated with multifocal systemic neoplastic immunoincompetence.

    PubMed

    Wesley, R E; Cooper, J; Litchford, D W

    1988-04-01

    A 52-year-old man developed proptosis from an orbital mass which was documented histopathologically to be an inflammatory orbital pseudotumor. When the lesion failed to resolve after six months of adrenocorticosteroid treatment, a second biopsy showed an inflammatory mass with nests of eosinophilic granuloma. The patient soon developed a lymphoma of the soft palate and a glioblastoma multiforme which led to the patient's rapid demise. Eosinophilic granuloma is known to represent the more benign end of the spectrum of histiocytic disorders in which a proliferation of Langerhans' cells and an abnormality of T-suppressor cells occur. Our case represents the first report of multifocal tumor immunoincompetence occurring with eosinophilic granuloma in an orbital inflammatory pseudotumor. PMID:2837126

  7. GWAS identifies four novel eosinophilic esophagitis loci

    PubMed Central

    Sleiman, Patrick MA; Wang, Mei-Lun; Cianferoni, Antonella; Aceves, Seema; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Nadeau, Kari; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic disorder characterized by infiltration of the esophagus with eosinophils. We had previously reported association of the TSLP/WDR36 locus with EoE. Here we report genome-wide significant associations at four additional loci; c11orf30 and STAT6, which have been previously associated with both atopic and autoimmune disease, and two EoE-specific loci, ANKRD27 that regulates the trafficking of melanogenic enzymes to epidermal melanocytes and CAPN14, that encodes a calpain whose expression is highly enriched in the esophagus. The identification of five EoE loci, not only expands our etiological understanding of the disease but may also represent new therapeutic targets to treat the most debilitating aspect of EoE, esophageal inflammation and remodeling. PMID:25407941

  8. Mepolizumab: A Review in Eosinophilic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Emma D

    2016-08-01

    Mepolizumab (Nucala(®)) is a humanized monoclonal antibody against interleukin-5, a cytokine involved in the development, recruitment and activation of eosinophils (cellular mediators of airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and tissue remodelling). The drug is indicated as an add-on treatment for severe eosinophilic asthma, on the basis of its clinical benefit in this setting in the placebo-controlled DREAM, MENSA and SIRIUS trials. Based on the 52-week, phase II, DREAM study (which assessed varying intravenous mepolizumab dosages), intravenous mepolizumab 75 mg every 4 weeks (q4w) and the corresponding (recommended) subcutaneous dosage of 100 mg q4w were studied in the 32- and 24-week phase III MENSA and SIRIUS trials. In patients aged ≥12 years with severe eosinophilic asthma in the phase III studies, adding subcutaneous mepolizumab 100 mg q4w to current asthma therapy significantly reduced the rate of clinically relevant asthma exacerbations and, in those dependent on oral glucocorticoids (OCSs) for asthma control, enabled the daily OCS dose to be significantly reduced, relative to adding placebo. This mepolizumab regimen also significantly improved asthma control, health-related quality of life and (in one of the two studies) lung function, and had acceptable tolerability (with headache the most common adverse event). In the MENSA and SIRIUS extension, COSMOS, mepolizumab provided durable clinical benefit over up to 84 weeks' therapy with no new tolerability concerns. Thus, mepolizumab is a valuable add-on treatment option for adults and adolescents aged ≥12 years who have severe eosinophilic asthma despite optimized standard therapies. PMID:27311938

  9. A spectrum of hypereosinophilic syndromes exemplified by six cats with eosinophilic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, M

    1981-03-01

    Of six cats with eosinophilic enteritis, two had lesions confined to the intestinal tract, and four had varied disseminated eosinophilic infiltration of other organs. The lesions in these cats are similar to those of the hypereosinophilic syndrome in man. A feline hypereosinophilic syndrome is proposed, consisting of eosinophilic enteritis, disseminated eosinophilic disease, and eosinophilic leukemia. PMID:7467078

  10. Further characterization of human eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, R L; Syse, K; Little, C; Christensen, T B

    1985-01-01

    The large and the small subunits (Mr 50 000 and 10 500 respectively) of human eosinophil peroxidase were isolated by gel filtration under reducing conditions. The subunits were very strongly associated but not apparently cross-linked by disulphide bridges. During storage, the large subunit tended to form aggregates, which required reduction to dissociate them. Amino acid analysis of the performic acid-treated large subunit showed the presence of 19 cysteic acid residues. The small subunit of eosinophil peroxidase had the same Mr value as the small subunit of myeloperoxidase. However, although these subunits have very similar amino acid compositions, they showed different patterns of peptide fragmentation after CNBr treatment. The carbohydrate of eosinophil peroxidase seemed associated exclusively with the large subunit and comprised mannose (4.5%, w/w) and N-acetylglucosamine (0.8%, w/w). The far-u.v.c.d. spectrum of the enzyme indicated the presence of relatively little ordered secondary structure. Images Fig. 3. PMID:4052025