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Sample records for glucose intolerance hypertension

  1. Fatty acid nitroalkenes ameliorate glucose intolerance and pulmonary hypertension in high-fat diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Eric E.; Baust, Jeff; Bonacci, Gustavo; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Devlin, Jason E.; St. Croix, Claudette M.; Watkins, Simon C.; Gor, Sonia; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Weidert, Eric R.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Champion, Hunter C.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Khoo, Nicholas K.H.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Obesity is a risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, with the incidence of these disorders becoming epidemic. Pathogenic responses to obesity have been ascribed to adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction that promotes bioactive mediator secretion from visceral AT and the initiation of pro-inflammatory events that induce oxidative stress and tissue dysfunction. Current understanding supports that suppressing pro-inflammatory and oxidative events promotes improved metabolic and cardiovascular function. In this regard, electrophilic nitro-fatty acids display pleiotropic anti-inflammatory signalling actions. Methods and results It was hypothesized that high-fat diet (HFD)-induced inflammatory and metabolic responses, manifested by loss of glucose tolerance and vascular dysfunction, would be attenuated by systemic administration of nitrooctadecenoic acid (OA-NO2). Male C57BL/6j mice subjected to a HFD for 20 weeks displayed increased adiposity, fasting glucose, and insulin levels, which led to glucose intolerance and pulmonary hypertension, characterized by increased right ventricular (RV) end-systolic pressure (RVESP) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). This was associated with increased lung xanthine oxidoreductase (XO) activity, macrophage infiltration, and enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure remained unaltered, indicating that the HFD produces pulmonary vascular remodelling, rather than LV dysfunction and pulmonary venous hypertension. Administration of OA-NO2 for the final 6.5 weeks of HFD improved glucose tolerance and significantly attenuated HFD-induced RVESP, PVR, RV hypertrophy, lung XO activity, oxidative stress, and pro-inflammatory pulmonary cytokine levels. Conclusions These observations support that the pleiotropic signalling actions of electrophilic fatty acids represent a therapeutic strategy for limiting the complex pathogenic responses instigated by obesity. PMID:24385344

  2. Uteroplacental insufficiency leads to hypertension, but not glucose intolerance or impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, in 12-month-old rats.

    PubMed

    Tran, Melanie; Young, Margaret E; Jefferies, Andrew J; Hryciw, Deanne H; Ward, Michelle M; Fletcher, Erica L; Wlodek, Mary E; Wadley, Glenn D

    2015-09-01

    Growth restriction impacts on offspring development and increases their risk of disease in adulthood which is exacerbated with "second hits." The aim of this study was to investigate if blood pressure, glucose tolerance, and skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis were altered in 12-month-old male and female offspring with prenatal or postnatal growth restriction. Bilateral uterine vessel ligation induced uteroplacental insufficiency and growth restriction in offspring (Restricted). A sham surgery was also performed during pregnancy (Control) and some litters from sham mothers had their litter size reduced (Reduced litter), which restricted postnatal growth. Growth-restricted females only developed hypertension at 12 months, which was not observed in males. In Restricted females only homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance was decreased, indicating enhanced hepatic insulin sensitivity, which was not observed in males. Plasma leptin was increased only in the Reduced males at 12 months compared to Control and Restricted males, which was not observed in females. Compared to Controls, leptin, ghrelin, and adiponectin were unaltered in the Restricted males and females, suggesting that at 12 months of age the reduction in body weight in the Restricted offspring is not a consequence of circulating adipokines. Skeletal muscle PGC-1? levels were unaltered in 12-month-old male and female rats, which indicate improvements in lean muscle mass by 12 months of age. In summary, sex strongly impacts the cardiometabolic effects of growth restriction in 12-month-old rats and it is females who are at particular risk of developing long-term hypertension following growth restriction. PMID:26416974

  3. Uteroplacental insufficiency leads to hypertension, but not glucose intolerance or impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, in 12-month-old rats

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Melanie; Young, Margaret E; Jefferies, Andrew J; Hryciw, Deanne H; Ward, Michelle M; Fletcher, Erica L; Wlodek, Mary E; Wadley, Glenn D

    2015-01-01

    Growth restriction impacts on offspring development and increases their risk of disease in adulthood which is exacerbated with “second hits.” The aim of this study was to investigate if blood pressure, glucose tolerance, and skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis were altered in 12-month-old male and female offspring with prenatal or postnatal growth restriction. Bilateral uterine vessel ligation induced uteroplacental insufficiency and growth restriction in offspring (Restricted). A sham surgery was also performed during pregnancy (Control) and some litters from sham mothers had their litter size reduced (Reduced litter), which restricted postnatal growth. Growth-restricted females only developed hypertension at 12 months, which was not observed in males. In Restricted females only homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance was decreased, indicating enhanced hepatic insulin sensitivity, which was not observed in males. Plasma leptin was increased only in the Reduced males at 12 months compared to Control and Restricted males, which was not observed in females. Compared to Controls, leptin, ghrelin, and adiponectin were unaltered in the Restricted males and females, suggesting that at 12 months of age the reduction in body weight in the Restricted offspring is not a consequence of circulating adipokines. Skeletal muscle PGC-1? levels were unaltered in 12-month-old male and female rats, which indicate improvements in lean muscle mass by 12 months of age. In summary, sex strongly impacts the cardiometabolic effects of growth restriction in 12-month-old rats and it is females who are at particular risk of developing long-term hypertension following growth restriction. PMID:26416974

  4. Hepatic lipase deficiency produces glucose intolerance, inflammation and hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Blasco, Irene; Herrero-Cervera, Andrea; Vinué, Ángela; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Piqueras, Laura; Sanz, María Jesús; Burks, Deborah Jane; González-Navarro, Herminia

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus constitute a major problem to global health, and their incidence is increasing at an alarming rate. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which affects up to 90% of obese people and nearly 70% of the overweight, is commonly associated with MetS characteristics such as obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and dyslipidemia. In the present study, we demonstrate that hepatic lipase (HL)-inactivation in mice fed with a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet produced dyslipidemia including hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and increased non-esterified fatty acid levels. These changes were accompanied by glucose intolerance, pancreatic and hepatic inflammation and steatosis. In addition, compared with WT mice, HL(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced circulating MCP1 levels, monocytosis and higher percentage of CD4+Th17+ cells. Consistent with increased inflammation, livers from HL(-/-) mice had augmented activation of the stress SAPK/JNK- and p38-pathways compared with the activation levels of the kinases in livers from WT mice. Analysis of HL(-/-) and WT mice fed regular chow diet showed dyslipidemia and glucose intolerance in HL(-/-) mice without any other changes in inflammation or hepatic steatosis. Altogether, these results indicate that dyslipidemia induced by HL-deficiency in combination with a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet promotes hepatic steatosis and inflammation in mice which are, at least in part, mediated by the activation of the stress SAPK/JNK- and p38-pathways. Future studies are warranted to asses the viability of therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of these kinases to reduce hepatic steatosis associated to lipase dysfunction. PMID:26423094

  5. Glucose Homeostatic Law: Insulin Clearance Predicts the Progression of Glucose Intolerance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Uda, Shinsuke; Kubota, Hiroyuki; Iwaki, Toshinao; Fukuzawa, Hiroki; Komori, Yasunori; Fujii, Masashi; Toyoshima, Yu; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Wataru; Kuroda, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic control of blood glucose is regulated by a complex feedback loop between glucose and insulin, of which failure leads to diabetes mellitus. However, physiological and pathological nature of the feedback loop is not fully understood. We made a mathematical model of the feedback loop between glucose and insulin using time course of blood glucose and insulin during consecutive hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in 113 subjects with variety of glucose tolerance including normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We analyzed the correlation of the parameters in the model with the progression of glucose intolerance and the conserved relationship between parameters. The model parameters of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion significantly declined from NGT to IGT, and from IGT to T2DM, respectively, consistent with previous clinical observations. Importantly, insulin clearance, an insulin degradation rate, significantly declined from NGT, IGT to T2DM along the progression of glucose intolerance in the mathematical model. Insulin clearance was positively correlated with a product of insulin sensitivity and secretion assessed by the clamp analysis or determined with the mathematical model. Insulin clearance was correlated negatively with postprandial glucose at 2h after oral glucose tolerance test. We also inferred a square-law between the rate constant of insulin clearance and a product of rate constants of insulin sensitivity and secretion in the model, which is also conserved among NGT, IGT and T2DM subjects. Insulin clearance shows a conserved relationship with the capacity of glucose disposal among the NGT, IGT and T2DM subjects. The decrease of insulin clearance predicts the progression of glucose intolerance. PMID:26623647

  6. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage. PMID:25231862

  7. Human gut microbiota changes reveal the progression of glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuying; Shen, Dongqian; Fang, Zhiwei; Jie, Zhuye; Qiu, Xinmin; Zhang, Chunfang; Chen, Yingli; Ji, Linong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the relationship of gut microbiota with the development of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we analyzed 121 subjects who were divided into 3 groups based on their glucose intolerance status: normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n?=?44), prediabetes (Pre-DM; n?=?64), or newly diagnosed T2DM (n?=?13). Gut microbiota characterizations were determined with 16S rDNA-based high-throughput sequencing. T2DM-related dysbiosis was observed, including the separation of microbial communities and a change of alpha diversity between the different glucose intolerance statuses. To assess the correlation between metabolic parameters and microbiota diversity, clinical characteristics were also measured and a significant association between metabolic parameters (FPG, CRP) and gut microbiota was found. In addition, a total of 28 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were found to be related to T2DM status by the Kruskal-Wallis H test, most of which were enriched in the T2DM group. Butyrate-producing bacteria (e.g. Akkermansia muciniphila ATCCBAA-835, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii L2-6) had a higher abundance in the NGT group than in the pre-DM group. At genus level, the abundance of Bacteroides in the T2DM group was only half that of the NGT and Pre-DM groups. Previously reported T2DM-related markers were also compared with the data in this study, and some inconsistencies were noted. We found that Verrucomicrobiae may be a potential marker of T2DM as it had a significantly lower abundance in both the pre-DM and T2DM groups. In conclusion, this research provides further evidence of the structural modulation of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:24013136

  8. Vitamin E and Vitamin C supplementation does not prevent glucose intolerance in obese-prone rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity-induced glucose intolerance affects over 70 million Americans. Elevated oxidative stress is associated with development of glucose intolerance. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that supplementation with the anti-oxidants vitamin E (d-alpha-tocopherol acetate; 0.4 g/kg diet) and vitamin...

  9. Effects of exercise and metformin on the prevention of glucose intolerance: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Molena-Fernandes, C; Bersani-Amado, C A; Ferraro, Z M; Hintze, L J; Nardo, N; Cuman, R K N

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise training (4 days) and metformin exposure on acute glucose intolerance after dexamethasone treatment in rats. Forty-two adult male Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were divided randomly into four groups: sedentary control (SCT), sedentary dexamethasone-treated (SDX), training dexamethasone-treated (DPE), and dexamethasone and metformin treated group (DMT). Glucose tolerance tests and in situ liver perfusion were undertaken on fasting rats to obtain glucose profiles. The DPE group displayed a significant decrease in glucose values compared with the SDX group. Average glucose levels in the DPE group did not differ from those of the DMT group, so we suggest that exercise training corrects dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance and improves glucose profiles in a similar manner to that observed with metformin. These data suggest that exercise may prevent the development of glucose intolerance induced by dexamethasone in rats to a similar magnitude to that observed after metformin treatment. PMID:26421869

  10. Effects of exercise and metformin on the prevention of glucose intolerance: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Molena-Fernandes, C.; Bersani-Amado, C. A.; Ferraro, Z. M.; Hintze, L. J.; Nardo, N.; Cuman, R. K. N.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise training (4 days) and metformin exposure on acute glucose intolerance after dexamethasone treatment in rats. Forty-two adult male Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were divided randomly into four groups: sedentary control (SCT), sedentary dexamethasone-treated (SDX), training dexamethasone-treated (DPE), and dexamethasone and metformin treated group (DMT). Glucose tolerance tests and in situ liver perfusion were undertaken on fasting rats to obtain glucose profiles. The DPE group displayed a significant decrease in glucose values compared with the SDX group. Average glucose levels in the DPE group did not differ from those of the DMT group, so we suggest that exercise training corrects dexamethasone-induced glucose intolerance and improves glucose profiles in a similar manner to that observed with metformin. These data suggest that exercise may prevent the development of glucose intolerance induced by dexamethasone in rats to a similar magnitude to that observed after metformin treatment. PMID:26421869

  11. Plasma Metanephrines Are Associated With Glucose Metabolism in Patients With Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiqing; Mu, Liangshan; Su, Tingwei; Ye, Lei; Jiang, Yiran; Jiang, Lei; Zhou, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is a high incidence of glucose intolerance in essential hypertension. Overactivation of the sympathetic system is one of important causes of essential hypertension. Whether sympathetic system affects glucose metabolism in patients with essential hypertension has never been reported previously. The aim of this study was to explore the association between the sympathetic system activity and glucose metabolism in patients with essential hypertension. A total of 202 essential hypertension inpatients without diabetes were recruited from Shanghai Ruijin Hospital between February 2006 and August 2013. Activity of sympathetic system was quantified by plasma metanephrines (MNs) levels. All subjects received an oral glucose tolerance test. Fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour plasma glucose increased significantly across the quartiles of plasma MNs. The multiple linear regression analysis revealed that plasma MNs were significantly associated with fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour plasma glucose. The area under curve of plasma glucose increased significantly from the lowest plasma MNs quartile across to the highest quartile. The multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for prediabetes in the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile of plasma MNs was 4.00 (95% confidence interval, 1.16–13.86). Plasma MNs levels are positively associated with plasma glucose in patients with essential hypertension. Patients with high plasma MNs levels had an increased risk of prediabetes. PMID:26376391

  12. Plasma Metanephrines Are Associated With Glucose Metabolism in Patients With Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiqing; Mu, Liangshan; Su, Tingwei; Ye, Lei; Jiang, Yiran; Jiang, Lei; Zhou, Weiwei

    2015-09-01

    There is a high incidence of glucose intolerance in essential hypertension. Overactivation of the sympathetic system is one of important causes of essential hypertension. Whether sympathetic system affects glucose metabolism in patients with essential hypertension has never been reported previously. The aim of this study was to explore the association between the sympathetic system activity and glucose metabolism in patients with essential hypertension.A total of 202 essential hypertension inpatients without diabetes were recruited from Shanghai Ruijin Hospital between February 2006 and August 2013. Activity of sympathetic system was quantified by plasma metanephrines (MNs) levels. All subjects received an oral glucose tolerance test.Fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour plasma glucose increased significantly across the quartiles of plasma MNs. The multiple linear regression analysis revealed that plasma MNs were significantly associated with fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour plasma glucose. The area under curve of plasma glucose increased significantly from the lowest plasma MNs quartile across to the highest quartile. The multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for prediabetes in the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile of plasma MNs was 4.00 (95% confidence interval, 1.16-13.86).Plasma MNs levels are positively associated with plasma glucose in patients with essential hypertension. Patients with high plasma MNs levels had an increased risk of prediabetes. PMID:26376391

  13. Abnormal cortisol metabolism and tissue sensitivity to cortisol in patients with glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robert C; Herlihy, Olive; Livingstone, Dawn E W; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R

    2002-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that increased cortisol secretion, altered cortisol metabolism, and/or increased tissue sensitivity to cortisol may link insulin resistance, hypertension, and obesity. Whether these changes are important in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is unknown. We performed an integrated assessment of glucocorticoid secretion, metabolism, and action in 25 unmedicated lean male patients with hyperglycemia (20 with type 2 diabetes and 5 with impaired glucose intolerance by World Health Organization criteria) and 25 healthy men, carefully matched for body mass index, age, and blood pressure. Data are mean +/- SE. Patients with hyperglycemia (DM) had higher HbA(1c) (6.9 +/- 0.2% vs. 6.0 +/- 0.1%, P < 0.0001) and triglycerides. Cortisol secretion was not different, as judged by 0900 h plasma cortisol and 24 h total urinary cortisol metabolites. However, the proportion of cortisol excreted as 5alpha- and 5beta-reduced metabolites was increased in DM patients. Following an oral dose of cortisone 25 mg, generation of plasma cortisol by hepatic 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD 1) was impaired in DM patients (area under the curve, 3617 +/- 281 nM.2 h vs. 4475 +/- 228; P < 0.005). In contrast, in sc gluteal fat biopsies from 17 subjects (5 DM and 12 controls) in vitro 11beta-HSD 1 activity was not different (area under the curve, 128 +/- 56% conversion.30 h DM vs. 119 +/- 21, P = 0.86). Sensitivity to glucocorticoids was increased in DM patients both centrally (0900 h plasma cortisol after overnight 250 micro g oral dexamethasone 172 +/- 16 nM vs. 238 +/- 20 nM, P < 0.01) and peripherally (more intense forearm dermal blanching following overnight topical beclomethasone; 0.56 +/- 0.92 ratio to vehicle vs. 0.82 +/- 0.69, P < 0.05). In summary, in patients with glucose intolerance, cortisol secretion, although normal, is inappropriately high given enhanced central and peripheral sensitivity to glucocorticoids. Normal 11beta-HSD 1 activity in adipose tissue with impaired hepatic conversion of cortisone to cortisol suggests that tissue-specific changes in 11beta-HSD 1 activity in hyperglycemia differ from those in primary obesity but may still be susceptible to pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme to reduce intracellular cortisol concentrations. Thus, altered cortisol action occurs not only in obesity and hypertension but also in glucose intolerance, and could therefore contribute to the link between these multiple cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:12466357

  14. Arsenic Exposure and Glucose Intolerance/Insulin Resistance in Estrogen-Deficient Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Fa; Yang, Ching-Yao; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Wang, Ching-Chia; Huang, Kuo-How; Wu, Chin-Ching; Tsai, Keh-Sung; Yang, Rong-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have reported that the prevalence of diabetes in women > 40 years of age, especially those in the postmenopausal phase, was higher than in men in areas with high levels of arsenic in drinking water. The detailed effect of arsenic on glucose metabolism/homeostasis in the postmenopausal condition is still unclear. Objectives We investigated the effects of arsenic at doses relevant to human exposure from drinking water on blood glucose regulation in estrogen-deficient female mice. Methods Adult female mice who underwent ovariectomy or sham surgery were exposed to drinking water contaminated with arsenic trioxide (0.05 or 0.5 ppm) in the presence or absence of 17?-estradiol supplementation for 2–6 weeks. Assays related to glucose metabolism were performed. Results Exposure of sham mice to arsenic significantly increased blood glucose, decreased plasma insulin, and impaired glucose tolerance, but did not induce insulin resistance. Blood glucose and insulin were higher, and glucose intolerance, insulin intolerance, and insulin resistance were increased in arsenic-treated ovariectomized mice compared with arsenic-treated sham mice. Furthermore, liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA expression was increased and liver glycogen content was decreased in arsenic-treated ovariectomized mice compared with arsenic-treated sham mice. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in islets isolated from arsenic-treated ovariectomized mice was also significantly decreased. Arsenic treatment significantly decreased plasma adiponectin levels in sham and ovariectomized mice. Altered glucose metabolism/homeostasis in arsenic-treated ovariectomized mice was reversed by 17?-estradiol supplementation. Conclusions Our findings suggest that estrogen deficiency plays an important role in arsenic-altered glucose metabolism/homeostasis in females. Citation Huang CF, Yang CY, Chan DC, Wang CC, Huang KH, Wu CC, Tsai KS, Yang RS, Liu SH. 2015. Arsenic exposure and glucose intolerance/insulin resistance in estrogen-deficient female mice. Environ Health Perspect 123:1138–1144;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408663 PMID:25859628

  15. Muscle Histidine-Containing Dipeptides Are Elevated by Glucose Intolerance in Both Rodents and Men

    PubMed Central

    Stegen, Sanne; Everaert, Inge; Deldicque, Louise; Vallova, Silvia; de Courten, Barbora; Ukropcova, Barbara; Ukropec, Jozef; Derave, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Objective Muscle carnosine and its methylated form anserine are histidine-containing dipeptides. Both dipeptides have the ability to quench reactive carbonyl species and previous studies have shown that endogenous tissue levels are decreased in chronic diseases, such as diabetes. Design and Methods Rodent study: Skeletal muscles of rats and mice were collected from 4 different diet-intervention studies, aiming to induce various degrees of glucose intolerance: 45% high-fat feeding (male rats), 60% high-fat feeding (male rats), cafeteria feeding (male rats), 70% high-fat feeding (female mice). Body weight, glucose-tolerance and muscle histidine-containing dipeptides were assessed. Human study: Muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis in 35 males (9 lean, 8 obese, 9 prediabetic and 9 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients) and muscle carnosine and gene expression of muscle fiber type markers were measured. Results Diet interventions in rodents (cafeteria and 70% high-fat feeding) induced increases in body weight, glucose intolerance and levels of histidine-containing dipeptides in muscle. In humans, obese, prediabetic and diabetic men had increased muscle carnosine content compared to the lean (+21% (p>0.1), +30% (p<0.05) and +39% (p<0.05), respectively). The gene expression of fast-oxidative type 2A myosin heavy chain was increased in the prediabetic (1.8-fold, p<0.05) and tended to increase in the diabetic men (1.6-fold, p = 0.07), compared to healthy lean subjects. Conclusion Muscle histidine-containing dipeptides increases with progressive glucose intolerance, in male individuals (cross-sectional). In addition, high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance was associated with increased muscle histidine-containing dipeptides in female mice (interventional). Increased muscle carnosine content might reflect fiber type composition and/or act as a compensatory mechanism aimed at preventing cell damage in states of impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:25803044

  16. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased ?{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone metabolic effects are only slightly exacerbated in geriatric rats.

  17. Glucose intolerance induced by blockade of central FGF receptors is linked to an acute stress response

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Jennifer M.; Matsen, Miles E.; Mundinger, Thomas O.; Morton, Gregory J.; Stefanovski, Darko; Bergman, Richard N.; Kaiyala, Karl J.; Taborsky, Gerald J.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Central administration of ligands for fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) such as fibroblast growth factor-19 (FGF19) and FGF21 exert glucose-lowering effects in rodent models of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Conversely, intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of the non-selective FGFR inhibitor (FGFRi) PD173074 causes glucose intolerance, implying a physiological role for neuronal FGFR signaling in glucose homeostasis. The current studies were undertaken to identify neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying the glucose intolerance induced by pharmacological blockade of central FGFRs. Methods Overnight fasted, lean, male, Long-Evans rats received icv injections of either PD173074 or vehicle (Veh) followed 30 min later by performance of a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT). Minimal model analysis of glucose and insulin data from the FSIGT was performed to estimate insulin-dependent and insulin-independent components of glucose disposal. Plasma levels of lactate, glucagon, corticosterone, non-esterified free fatty acids (NEFA) and catecholamines were measured before and after intravenous (iv) glucose injection. Results Within 20 min of icv PD173074 injection (prior to the FSIGT), plasma levels of lactate, norepinephrine and epinephrine increased markedly, and each returned to baseline rapidly (within 8 min) following the iv glucose bolus. In contrast, plasma glucagon levels were not altered by icv FGFRi at either time point. Consistent with a previous report, glucose tolerance was impaired following icv PD173074 compared to Veh injection and, based on minimal model analysis of FSIGT data, this effect was attributable to reductions of both insulin secretion and the basal insulin effect (BIE), consistent with the inhibitory effect of catecholamines on pancreatic ?-cell secretion. By comparison, there were no changes in glucose effectiveness at zero insulin (GEZI) or the insulin sensitivity index (SI). To determine if iv glucose (given during the FSIGT) contributed to the rapid resolution of the sympathoadrenal response induced by icv FGFRi, we performed an additional study comparing groups that received iv saline or iv glucose 30 min after icv FGFRi. Our finding that elevated plasma catecholamine levels returned rapidly to baseline irrespective of whether rats subsequently received an iv bolus of saline or glucose indicates that the rapid reversal of sympathoadrenal activation following icv FGFRi was unrelated to the subsequent glucose bolus. Conclusions The effect of acute inhibition of central FGFR signaling to impair glucose tolerance likely involves a stress response associated with pronounced, but transient, sympathoadrenal activation and an associated reduction of insulin secretion. Whether this effect is a true consequence of FGFR blockade or involves an off-target effect of the FGFR inhibitor requires additional study. PMID:26266088

  18. Glucose series complexity in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Luis; Condés, Emilia; Varela, Manuel; Rodriguez, Carmen; Colas, Ana; Vargas, Borja; Lopez, Manuel; Cirugeda, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Nonlinear methods have been applied to the analysis of biological signals. Complexity analysis of glucose time series may be a useful tool for the study of the initial phases of glucoregulatory dysfunction. This observational, cross-sectional study was performed in patients with essential hypertension. Glucose complexity was measured with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), and glucose variability was measured by the mean amplitudes of glycemic excursion (MAGE). We included 91 patients with a mean age of 59 ± 10 years. We found significant correlations for the number of metabolic syndrome (MS)-defining criteria with DFA (r = 0.233, P = .026) and MAGE (r = 0.396, P < .0001). DFA differed significantly between patients who complied with MS and those who did not (1.44 vs. 1.39, P = .018). The MAGE (f = 5.3, P = .006), diastolic blood pressures (f = 4.1, P = .018), and homeostasis model assessment indices (f = 4.2, P = .018) differed between the DFA tertiles. Multivariate analysis revealed that the only independent determinants of the DFA values were MAGE (? coefficient = 0.002, 95% confidence interval: 0.001-0.004, P = .001) and abdominal circumference (? coefficient = 0.002, 95% confidence interval: 0.000015-0.004, P = .048). In our population, DFA was associated with MS and a number of MS criteria. Complexity analysis seemed to be capable of detecting differences in variables that are arguably related to the risk of the development of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25065679

  19. Population Health: Modest Glycaemic Improvements in a Pregnant Cohort with Mild Glucose Intolerance Decreased Adverse Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, Erica K.; Boggess, Kim A.; Funk, Michele Jonsson

    2015-01-01

    Background Adverse perinatal outcomes are common with pregnancy-related mild glucose intolerance. The perinatal impact of improving this population’s health, instead of individual health, has not been quantified. Methods We estimated this impact among women with mild glucose intolerance, delivered at The University of North Carolina Women’s Hospital from April 1996 to May 2010. We compared observed with predicted risks of perinatal outcomes after simulating a cohort with a one standard deviation decrease in each glucose value. We estimated absolute and adjusted risks, relative risks, and risk differences with Poisson regression and bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals [CI]. Results Among 3217 women, mean (SD) 1-h screening result was 157 (16) mg/dL; 3-h diagnostic results were 81 (10), 154 (28), 130 (25), and 104 (26) mg/dL for fasting, 1-h, 2-h, and 3-h, respectively. Compared with observed, predicted risks decreased for preeclampsia (9.1% vs. 6.6%, risk ratio [RR] 0.73 [95% CI 0.60, 0.88]), caesarean delivery (30.1% vs. 26.4%, RR 0.88 [95% CI 0.81, 0.96]), preterm birth (13.0% vs. 9.8%, RR 0.75 [95% CI 0.64, 0.87]), birthweight >4000 g (13.4% vs. 10.5%, RR 0.78 [95% CI 0.67, 0.90]), and shoulder dystocia (3.5% vs. 2.2%, RR 0.61 [95% CI 0.46, 0.83]). Conclusions Modestly improved population distribution of glucose tolerance in pregnancies affected by mild glucose intolerance translated to meaningful improvements in perinatal outcomes. PMID:24731066

  20. High prevalence of glucose intolerance even among young adults in south India.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, Palany; Antonisamy, Belavendra; Fall, Caroline H D; Geethanjali, Finney S; Leary, Samantha D; Saperia, Julia; Priya, G; Rajaratnam, Abel; Richard, Joseph

    2007-08-01

    India is experiencing an epidemic of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in young adults. This study reports the prevalence of glucose intolerance, and insulin profiles, and their relationship to lifestyle factors in 2218 young adults (aged 26-32 years; 997 urban, 1221 rural) in south India. They were drawn from a cohort of 10,691 individuals born during 1969-1973 in Vellore and nearby villages. Family history, socio-economic status, physical activity and tobacco and alcohol use were recorded. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed for diagnosis (WHO recommendations). Insulin resistance and secretion were derived from plasma insulin concentrations. Median BMI was 20.0kg/m(2). The prevalence of Type 2 DM and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) was higher in urban than in rural subjects (3.7% versus 2.1%, p=0.02; 18.9% versus 14.3%, p=0.002, respectively), while prevalence of impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) was similar in urban and rural populations (3.8% versus 3.4%, p=0.04). Type 2 DM, IGT, IFG or higher insulin resistance and increment were associated with higher socio-economic status (more household possessions) and higher percentage body fat, body mass index and waist/hip ratio. Insulin increment was lower in men with higher alcohol consumption. Our data suggest high levels of glucose intolerance in young rural and urban adults highlighting an urgent need for preventive action to avert a public health catastrophe in India. PMID:17229484

  1. Insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Brian D.; McNicholas, Walter T.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a highly prevalent disorder, which conveys an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), glucose intolerance and insulin resistance (IR) are common in subjects with OSA, but a shared intimate relationship with obesity makes discerning an independent link challenging. Nonetheless, mechanistic studies suggest that OSA could contribute to impaired glucose metabolism via the effects of sleep fragmentation, sympathetic excitation and intermittent hypoxia (IH) on pancreatic B-cell function, insulin sensitivity, and systemic inflammation. In particular, emerging data suggest that IH may have an important detrimental effect on adipose tissue function and inflammation. Similarly, data from population—and clinic-level studies suggest that OSA is independently related with the prevalence and incidence of T2DM and IR, and may also lead to worse glycaemic control in diabetics. However, the ability of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy to make a meaningful impact on T2DM or IR remains uncertain. In this review we explore the available evidence linking OSA with IR, glucose intolerance and T2DM, and discuss potential pathobiological mechanisms by which sleep disordered breathing can affect metabolic health. PMID:26380761

  2. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Renin Exhibit Glucose Intolerance and Diet-Genotype Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Sarah J.; Kalupahana, Nishan S.; Soltani-Bejnood, Morvarid; Kim, Jung Han; Saxton, Arnold M.; Wasserman, David H.; De Taeye, Bart; Voy, Brynn H.; Quignard-Boulange, Annie; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima

    2013-01-01

    Numerous animal and clinical investigations have pointed to a potential role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the development of insulin resistance and diabetes in conditions of expanded fat mass. However, the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. We used a transgenic mouse model overexpressing renin in the liver (RenTgMK) to examine the effects of chronic activation of RAS on adiposity and insulin sensitivity. Hepatic overexpression of renin resulted in constitutively elevated plasma angiotensin II (four- to six-fold increase vs. wild-type, WT). Surprisingly, RenTgMK mice developed glucose intolerance despite low levels of adiposity and insulinemia. The transgenics also had lower plasma triglyceride levels. Glucose intolerance in transgenic mice fed a low-fat diet was comparable to that observed in high-fat fed WT mice. These studies demonstrate that overexpression of renin and associated hyperangiotensinemia impair glucose tolerance in a diet-dependent manner and further support a consistent role of RAS in the pathogenesis of diabetes and insulin resistance, independent of changes in fat mass. PMID:23308073

  3. Reduced insulin secretion and glucose intolerance are involved in the fasting susceptibility of common vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Mariella B; Queiroz, Joicy F; Dias Gomes, Carolinne I; Collares-Buzato, Carla B; Barbosa, Helena C; Boschero, Antonio C; Gonçalves, Carlos A; Pinheiro, Eliana C

    2013-03-01

    Susceptibility during fasting has been reported for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), to the point of untimely deaths after only 2-3 nights of fasting. To investigate the underlying physiology of this critical metabolic condition, we analyzed serum insulin levels, pancreatic islets morphometry and immunocytochemistry (ICC), static insulin secretion in pancreas fragments, and insulin signaling mechanism in male vampire bats. A glucose tolerance test (ipGTT) was also performed. Serum insulin was found to be lower in fed vampires compared to other mammals, and was significantly reduced after 24h fasting. Morphometrical analyses revealed small irregular pancreatic islets with reduced percentage of ?-cell mass compared to other bats. Static insulin secretion analysis showed that glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was impaired, as insulin levels did not reach significance under high glucose concentrations, whereas the response to the amino acid leucin was preserved. Results from ipGTT showed a failure on glucose clearance, indicating glucose intolerance due to diminished pancreatic insulin secretion and/or decreased ?-cell response to glucose. In conclusion, data presented here indicate lower insulinemia and impaired insulin secretion in D. rotundus, which is consistent with the limited ability to store body energy reserves, previously reported in these animals. Whether these metabolic and hormonal features are associated with their blood diet remains to be determined. The peculiar food sharing through blood regurgitation, reported to this species, might be an adaptive mechanism overcoming this metabolic susceptibility. PMID:23262275

  4. Hepatic Glucose Intolerance Precedes Hepatic Steatosis in the Male Aromatase Knockout (ArKO) Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Van Sinderen, Michelle L.; Steinberg, Gregory R.; Jørgensen, Sebastian B.; To, Sarah Q.; Knower, Kevin C.; Clyne, Colin D.; Honeyman, Jane; Chow, Jenny D.; Herridge, Kerrie A.; Jones, Margaret E. E.; Simpson, Evan R.; Boon, Wah Chin

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens are known to play a role in modulating metabolic processes within the body. The Aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice have been shown to harbor factors of Metabolic syndrome with central adiposity, hyperinsulinemia and male-specific hepatic steatosis. To determine the effects of estrogen ablation and subsequent replacement in males on whole body glucose metabolism, three- and six-month-old male ArKO mice were subjected to whole body glucose, insulin and pyruvate tolerance tests and analyzed for ensuing metabolic changes in liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle. Estrogen-deficient male ArKO mice showed increased gonadal adiposity which was significantly reduced upon 17?-estradiol (E2) treatment. Concurrently, elevated ArKO serum leptin levels were significantly reduced upon E2 treatment and lowered serum adiponectin levels were restored to wild type levels. Three-month-old male ArKO mice were hyperglycemic, and both glucose and pyruvate intolerant. These phenotypes continued through to 6 months of age, highlighting a loss of glycemic control. ArKO livers displayed changes in gluconeogenic enzyme expression, and in insulin signaling pathways upon E2 treatment. Liver triglycerides were increased in the ArKO males only after 6 months of age, which could be reversed by E2 treatment. No differences were observed in insulin-stimulated ex vivo muscle glucose uptake nor changes in ArKO adipose tissue and muscle insulin signaling pathways. Therefore, we conclude that male ArKO mice develop hepatic glucose intolerance by the age of 3 months which precedes the sex-specific development of hepatic steatosis. This can be reversed upon the administration of exogenous E2. PMID:24520329

  5. Arsenate-induced maternal glucose intolerance and neural tube defects in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Denise S.; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2009-08-15

    Background: Epidemiological studies have linked environmental arsenic (As) exposure to increased type 2 diabetes risk. Periconceptional hyperglycemia is a significant risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs), the second most common structural birth defect. A suspected teratogen, arsenic (As) induces NTDs in laboratory animals. Objectives: We investigated whether maternal glucose homeostasis disruption was responsible for arsenate-induced NTDs in a well-established dosing regimen used in studies of arsenic's teratogenicity in early neurodevelopment. Methods: We evaluated maternal intraperitoneal (IP) exposure to As 9.6 mg/kg (as sodium arsenate) in LM/Bc/Fnn mice for teratogenicity and disruption of maternal plasma glucose and insulin levels. Selected compounds (insulin pellet, sodium selenate (SS), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), L-methionine (L-Met), N-tert-Butyl-{alpha}-phenylnitrone (PBN)) were investigated for their potential to mitigate arsenate's effects. Results: Arsenate caused significant glucose elevation during an IP glucose tolerance test (IPGTT). Insulin levels were not different between arsenate and control dams before (arsenate, 0.55 ng/dl; control, 0.48 ng/dl) or after glucose challenge (arsenate, 1.09 ng/dl; control, 0.81 ng/dl). HOMA-IR index was higher for arsenate (3.9) vs control (2.5) dams (p = 0.0260). Arsenate caused NTDs (100%, p < 0.0001). Insulin pellet and NAC were the most successful rescue agents, reducing NTD rates to 45% and 35%. Conclusions: IPGTT, insulin assay, and HOMA-IR results suggest a modest failure of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin resistance characteristic of glucose intolerance. Insulin's success in preventing arsenate-induced NTDs provides evidence that these arsenate-induced NTDs are secondary to elevated maternal glucose. The NAC rescue, which did not restore maternal glucose or insulin levels, suggests oxidative disruption plays a role.

  6. Fermented tea improves glucose intolerance in mice by enhancing translocation of glucose transporter 4 in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoko; Wang, Lihua; Tinshun, Zhang; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2012-11-14

    The antihyperglycemic effects of tea are well documented. However, the effects of fermented tea on the translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), the major glucose transporter for glucose uptake in the postprandial period, in skeletal muscle and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. This study investigated the translocation of GLUT4 and its related signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of male ICR mice given fermented tea. Intake of oolong, black, or pu-erh tea for 7 days enhanced GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane of skeletal muscle. Each type of fermented tea stimulated the phosphorylation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt/protein kinase B, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Fermented tea also increased the protein expression of insulin receptor. These results strongly suggest that fermented tea activates both PI3K/Akt- and AMPK-dependent signaling pathways to induce GLUT4 translocation and increases the expression of insulin receptor to improve glucose intolerance. PMID:23106150

  7. Deletion of Cavin/PTRF causes global loss of caveolae, dyslipidemia and glucose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Libin; Brown, Dennis; McKee, Mary; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; Yang, Dan; Albrecht, Kenneth H.; Ravid, Katya; Pilch, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Caveolae are specialized invaginations of the plasma membrane found in numerous cell types. They have been implicated as playing a role in a variety of physiological processes and are typically characterized by their association with the caveolin family of proteins. We show here by means of targeted gene disruption in mice, that a distinct caveolae-associated protein, Cavin/PTRF, is an essential component of caveolae. Animals lacking Cavin have no morphologically detectable caveolae in any cell type examined and have markedly diminished protein expression of all three caveolin isoforms whilst retaining normal or above normal caveolin mRNA expression. Cavin knockout mice are viable and of normal weight but have higher circulating triglyceride levels, significantly reduced adipose tissue mass, glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, which characteristics constitute a lipodystrophic phenotype. Our results underscore the multi-organ role of caveolae in metabolic regulation and the obligate presence of Cavin for caveolae formation. PMID:18840361

  8. Glucose intolerance and pancreatic ?-cell dysfunction in the anorectic anx/anx mouse.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Charlotte; Katz, Abram; Selander, Lars; Johansen, Jeanette E; Marconi, Giulia; Schalling, Martin; Hökfelt, Tomas; Berggren, Per-Olof; Zaitsev, Sergei; Nilsson, Ida A K

    2015-08-15

    Inflammation and impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are considered key players in the development of several metabolic disorders, including diabetes. We have previously shown inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in the hypothalamus of an animal model for anorexia, the anx/anx mouse. Moreover, increased incidence of eating disorders, e.g., anorexia nervosa, has been observed in diabetic individuals. In the present investigation we evaluated whether impaired mitochondrial phosphorylation and inflammation also occur in endocrine pancreas of anorectic mice, and if glucose homeostasis is disturbed. We show that anx/anx mice exhibit marked glucose intolerance associated with reduced insulin release following an intraperitoneal injection of glucose. In contrast, insulin release from isolated anx/anx islets is increased after stimulation with glucose or KCl. In isolated anx/anx islets there is a strong downregulation of the mitochondrial complex I (CI) assembly factor, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1? subcomplex, assembly factor 1 (Ndufaf1), and a reduced CI activity. In addition, we show elevated concentrations of free fatty acids (FFAs) in anx/anx serum and increased macrophage infiltration (indicative of inflammation) in anx/anx islets. However, isolated islets from anx/anx mice cultured in the absence of FFAs do not exhibit increased inflammation. We conclude that the phenotype of the endocrine pancreas of the anx/anx mouse is characterized by increased levels of circulating FFAs, as well as inflammation, which can inhibit insulin secretion in vivo. The anx/anx mouse may represent a useful tool for studying molecular mechanisms underlying the association between diabetes and eating disorders. PMID:26126683

  9. [Polymorphism of glucose intolerance and insulin resistance susceptibility genes in oncological patients].

    PubMed

    Ulybina, Iu M; Imianitov, E N; Vasil'ev, D A; Bershte?n, L M

    2008-01-01

    Glucose intolerance and insulin resistance belong to the group of leading risk factors for breast (BC) and endometrial cancer (EC). Differences in the intensity of association of these endocrine disturbances with BC and EC may at least partly be explained by non-identity in polygenic nature of the mentioned hormone-metabolic shifts and oncological diseases themselves as well. In this study, which included 105 healthy postmenopausal women and 301 female cancer patients (110 BC and 191 EC) without overt diabetes mellitus, we compared the frequency of the following genetic polymorphisms: insulin receptor substrate-1, IRS Gly972Arg; leptin receptor, LEPR Lys109Arg and Gln223Arg; mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2, UCP2_866G/A; and gene ND3 of mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA 10398A/G. Genotyping was performed with allele-specific real-time PCR. According to data received, certain genetic markers associated with impaired glucose tolerance and/or insulin resistance (namely, leptin receptor genotypes 223 Gln/Arg and Gln/Gln) are revealed in oncological patients more often than in females without cancer. Other markers (like genotype UCP2 866AA and polymorphism mtDNA 10398A) appeared to be relatively more frequent in EC than in BC providing one of the interpretations for the lower insulin sensitivity and higher incidence of carbohydrate metabolism disturbances in the first of these two diseases. PMID:19140314

  10. Glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus in ulcerative colitis: Pathogenetic and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Maconi, Giovanni; Furfaro, Federica; Sciurti, Roberta; Bezzio, Cristina; Ardizzone, Sandro; de Franchis, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most frequent co-morbidities of ulcerative colitis patients. The epidemiological association of these diseases suggested a genetic sharing and has challenged gene identification. Diabetes co-morbidity in ulcerative colitis has also relevant clinical and therapeutic implications, with potential clinical impact on the follow up and outcome of patients. These diseases share specific complications, such as neuropathy, hepatic steatosis, osteoporosis and venous thrombosis. It is still unknown whether the coexistence of these diseases may increase their occurrence. Diabetes and hyperglycaemia represent relevant risk factors for postoperative complications and pouch failure in ulcerative colitis. Medical treatment of ulcerative colitis in patients with diabetes mellitus may be particularly challenging. Corticosteroids are the treatment of choice of active ulcerative colitis. Their use may be associated with the onset of glucose intolerance and diabetes, with difficult control of glucose levels and with complications in diabetic patients. Epidemiologic and genetic evidences about diabetes co-morbidity in ulcerative colitis patients and shared complications and treatment of patients with these diseases have been discussed in the present review. PMID:24707133

  11. Glucose intolerance by race and ethnicity in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

    PubMed Central

    Tull, Eugene S.; LaPorte, Ronald; Kriska, Andrea; Mark, Joseph; Hatcher, Ann T.

    2002-01-01

    This study describes the prevalence on glucose intolerance by race and ethnicity in the United States Virgin Islands. A population-based sample of 1026 individuals 20 years of age or older was recruited on the island of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, where 80% of the population classify their race as African American and 20% indicate their ethnicity as Hispanic. American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria was used to classify glucose tolerance for the entire sample. Persons 40 years of age or older (405) were also administered a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. Among the major race/ethnic groups, the prevalence of diabetes in patients 20 years of age or older (age-adjusted to the 1995 world population) was 14.1% for non-Hispanic blacks (n = 712), 12.1% for Hispanic blacks (n = 145), 13.5% for Hispanic whites (n = 70) and 1.2% for non-Hispanic whites (n = 37). In each group, the prevalence of diabetes increased with age and appeared higher for men. Among individuals 40 years of age or older a slightly higher prevalence of newly diagnosed diabetes was found when using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria compared to ADA criteria (WHO 10.3%, ADA 7.7% for black non-Hispanic persons and WHO 10.4%, ADA 6.0% for all other groups combined). The prevalence of diabetes for African Americans residing in the U.S. Virgin Islands is similar to rates for the African-American population on the United States mainland and is double that of estimates for blacks on neighboring islands. PMID:11918382

  12. Body mass index, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, and glucose intolerance in Chinese and Europid adults in Newcastle, UK. 

    E-print Network

    Unwin, Nigel; Harland, J; White, M; Bhopal, Raj; Winocour, P; Stephenson, P; Watson, W; Turner, C; Alberti, K G

    1997-01-01

    of glucose intolerance in Chinese and Europid men were 13.0% (p = 0.04). Mean BMIs were lower in Chinese men (23.8 v 26.1) and women (23.5 v 26.1) than in the Europids (p values < 0.001), as were waist circumferences (men, 83.3 cm v 90.8, p < 0.001; women, 77.3...

  13. MyD88 regulates physical inactivity-induced skeletal muscle inflammation, ceramide biosynthesis signaling, and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Sung; Tanner, Ruth E; Barrows, Katherine M; Runtsch, Marah; Symons, J David; Jalili, Thunder; Bikman, Benjamin T; McClain, Donald A; O'Connell, Ryan M; Drummond, Micah J

    2015-07-01

    Physical inactivity in older adults is a risk factor for developing glucose intolerance and impaired skeletal muscle function. Elevated inflammation and ceramide biosynthesis have been implicated in metabolic disruption and are linked to Toll-like receptor (TLR)/myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88) signaling. We hypothesize that a physical inactivity stimulus, capable of inducing glucose intolerance, would increase skeletal muscle inflammation and ceramide biosynthesis signaling and that this response would be regulated by the TLR/MyD88 pathway. Therefore, we subjected wild-type (WT) and MyD88(-/-) mice to hindlimb unloading (HU) for 14 days or an ambulatory control period. We observed impaired glucose uptake, muscle insulin signaling (p-Akt), and increased markers of NF-?B signaling (p-I?B?), inflammation (p-JNK, IL-6), TLR4, and the rate-limiting enzyme of ceramide biosynthesis, SPT2, with HU WT (P < 0.05), but not in HU MyD88(-/-) mice. Concurrently, we found that 5 days of bed rest in older adults resulted in whole body glucose dysregulation, impaired skeletal muscle insulin signaling, and upregulation of muscle IL-6 and SPT2 (P < 0.05). Post-bed rest TLR4 abundance was tightly correlated with impaired postprandial insulin and glucose levels. In conclusion, MyD88 signaling is necessary for the increased inflammation, ceramide biosynthesis signaling, and compromised metabolic function that accompanies physical inactivity. PMID:25968578

  14. Ferritin as a Risk Factor for Glucose Intolerance amongst Men and Women Originating from the Indian Subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Elizabeth A.; Patel, Jeetesh V.; Bredow, Zosia; Gill, Paramjit S.; Chackathayil, Julia; Agaoglu, Elif S.; Flinders, Paul; Mirrielees, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Background. Serum ferritin predicts the onset of diabetes; however, this relationship is not clear amongst South Asians, a population susceptible to glucose intolerance and anaemia. Objective. This study tests whether ferritin levels reflect glucose tolerance in South Asians, independent of lifestyle exposures associated with Indian or British residence. Methods. We randomly sampled 227 Gujaratis in Britain (49.8 (14.4) years, 50% men) and 277 contemporaries living in Gujarati villages (47.6 (11.8) years, 41% men). Both groups underwent a 75?g oral-glucose-tolerance test. We evaluated lifestyle parameters with standardised questionnaires and conducted comprehensive clinical and lab measurements. Results. Across sites, the age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes was 9.8%. Serum ferritin was higher amongst diabetics (P = 0.005), irrespective of site, gender, and central obesity (P ? 0.02), and was associated with fasting and postchallenge glucose, anthropometry, blood pressure, triglycerides, and nonesterified fatty acids (P < 0.001). Diabetes was less in those with low ferritin (<20?mg/mL), P < 0.008, and risk estimate = 0.35 (95% CI 0.15–0.81), as were blood pressure and metabolic risk factors. On multivariate analysis, diabetes was independently associated with ferritin (P = 0.001) and age (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Ferritin levels are positively associated with glucose intolerance in our test groups, independent of gender and Indian or UK lifestyle factors. PMID:26347777

  15. Pregnancy complications and glucose intolerance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Mari; Masuyama, Hisashi; Hayata, Kei; Kamada, Yasuhiko; Nakamura, Keiichiro; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2015-11-28

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder characterized by insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism. The interaction of these factors might result in increased risks of miscarriage and pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). To examine the pregnancy risks in women with PCOS, we compared obstetrical outcomes between patients with and without PCOS. We also studied the differences in maternal characteristics, glucose intolerance and pregnancy complications between PCOS patients with and without GDM, with and without obesity, and between successful pregnancies and miscarriages. We observed a high incidence of GDM and prevalence of GDM diagnosis in the first trimester in PCOS. Patients with GDM had higher body mass index (BMI) and lower homeostasis model assessment of ?-cell function (HOMA-?) at preconception than those without GDM. Obese pregnant women with PCOS demonstrated a high incidence of GDM with severe insulin resistance, including high fasting insulin, HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and HOMA-? at preconception compared with normal-weight patients. BMI was significantly correlated with HOMA-IR or HOMA-?, and both indices were lower in PCOS patients with than without GDM for the same BMI. There were no significant differences in maternal characteristics (excluding maternal age) between PCOS patients with successful pregnancy and PCOS patients with miscarriages. Our data suggest that pregnant women with PCOS have an increased risk of GDM, especially if they have obesity and/or poorer insulin secretion. Measure of ?-cell function, such as HOMA-?, at preconception might be a useful predictor of the risk of GDM in pregnant PCOS patients. PMID:26370557

  16. Periodontal Bacteria and Prediabetes Prevalence in ORIGINS: The Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance, and Insulin Resistance Study.

    PubMed

    Demmer, R T; Jacobs, D R; Singh, R; Zuk, A; Rosenbaum, M; Papapanou, P N; Desvarieux, M

    2015-09-01

    Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to be associated. The relationship between periodontal microbiota and early diabetes risk has not been studied. We investigated the association between periodontal bacteria and prediabetes prevalence among diabetes-free adults. ORIGINS (the Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance Study) cross sectionally enrolled 300 diabetes-free adults aged 20 to 55 y (mean ± SD, 34 ± 10 y; 77% female). Prediabetes was defined as follows: 1) hemoglobin A1c values ranging from 5.7% to 6.4% or 2) fasting plasma glucose ranging from 100 to 125 mg/dL. In 1,188 subgingival plaque samples, 11 bacterial species were assessed at baseline, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Actinomyces naeslundii. Full-mouth clinical periodontal examinations were performed, and participants were defined as having no/mild periodontitis vs. moderate/severe periodontitis per the definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / American Academy of Periodontology. Modified Poisson regression evaluated prediabetes prevalence across bacterial tertiles. Prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for third vs. first tertiles are presented. All analyses were adjusted for cardiometabolic risk factors. All results presented currently arise from the baseline cross section. Prediabetes prevalence was 18%, and 58% of participants had moderate/severe periodontitis. Prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) summarizing associations between bacterial levels and prediabetes were as follows: A. actinomycetemcomitans, 2.48 (1.34, 4.58), P = 0.004; P. gingivalis, 3.41 (1.78, 6.58), P = 0.0003; T. denticola, 1.99 (0.992, 4.00), P = 0.052; T. forsythia, 1.95 (1.0, 3.84), P = 0.05; A. naeslundii, 0.46 (0.25, 0.85), P = 0.01. The prevalence ratio for prediabetes among participants with moderate/severe vs. no/mild periodontitis was 1.47 (0.78, 2.74), P = 0.23. Higher colonization levels of specific periodontal microbiota are associated with higher prediabetes prevalence among diabetes-free adults. PMID:26082387

  17. Overexpression of Rad in muscle worsens diet-induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance and lowers plasma triglyceride level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilany, Jacob; Bilan, Philip J.; Kapur, Sonia; Caldwell, James S.; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Marette, Andre; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2006-03-01

    Rad is a low molecular weight GTPase that is overexpressed in skeletal muscle of some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or obesity. Overexpression of Rad in adipocytes and muscle cells in culture results in diminished insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. To further elucidate the potential role of Rad in vivo, we have generated transgenic (tg) mice that overexpress Rad in muscle using the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter-enhancer. Rad tg mice have a 6- to 12-fold increase in Rad expression in muscle as compared to wild-type littermates. Rad tg mice grow normally and have normal glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, but have reduced plasma triglyceride levels. On a high-fat diet, Rad tg mice develop more severe glucose intolerance than the wild-type mice; this is due to increased insulin resistance in muscle, as exemplified by a rightward shift in the dose-response curve for insulin stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake. There is also a unexpected further reduction of the plasma triglyceride levels that is associated with increased levels of lipoprotein lipase in the Rad tg mice. These results demonstrate a potential synergistic interaction between increased expression of Rad and high-fat diet in creation of insulin resistance and altered lipid metabolism present in type 2 diabetes. diabetes mellitus | glucose transport | RGK GTPase | transgenic mouse

  18. The Usefulness of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) for Detection of Glucose Intolerance in Thai Women of Reproductive Age with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wongwananuruk, Thanyarat; Rattanachaiyanont, Manee; Leerasiri, Pichai; Indhavivadhana, Suchada; Techatraisak, Kitirat; Angsuwathana, Surasak; Tanmahasamut, Prasong; Dangrat, Chongdee

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To study the cut-off point of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) as a screening test for detection of glucose intolerance in Thai women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital. Subject. Two hundred and fifty Thai PCOS women who attended the Gynecologic Endocrinology Unit, during May 2007 to January 2009. Materials and Methods. The paitents were interviewed and examined for weight, height, waist circumference, and blood pressure. Venous blood samples were drawn twice, one at 12-hour fasting and the other at 2 hours after glucose loading. Results. The prevalence of glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women was 20.0%. The mean of HOMA-IR was 3.53? ± ?7.7. Area under an ROC curve for HOMA-IR for detecting glucose intolerance was 0.82. Using the cut-off value of HOMA-IR >2.0, there was sensitivity at 84.0%, specificity at 61.0%, positive predictive value at 35.0%, negative predictive value at 93.8%, and accuracy at 65.6%. Conclusion. HOMA-IR >2.0 was used for screening test for glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women. If the result was positive, a specific test should be done to prove the diagnosis. PMID:22737168

  19. The Usefulness of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) for Detection of Glucose Intolerance in Thai Women of Reproductive Age with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wongwananuruk, Thanyarat; Rattanachaiyanont, Manee; Leerasiri, Pichai; Indhavivadhana, Suchada; Techatraisak, Kitirat; Angsuwathana, Surasak; Tanmahasamut, Prasong; Dangrat, Chongdee

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To study the cut-off point of Homeostatic Measurement Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) as a screening test for detection of glucose intolerance in Thai women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital. Subject. Two hundred and fifty Thai PCOS women who attended the Gynecologic Endocrinology Unit, during May 2007 to January 2009. Materials and Methods. The paitents were interviewed and examined for weight, height, waist circumference, and blood pressure. Venous blood samples were drawn twice, one at 12-hour fasting and the other at 2 hours after glucose loading. Results. The prevalence of glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women was 20.0%. The mean of HOMA-IR was 3.53? ± ?7.7. Area under an ROC curve for HOMA-IR for detecting glucose intolerance was 0.82. Using the cut-off value of HOMA-IR >2.0, there was sensitivity at 84.0%, specificity at 61.0%, positive predictive value at 35.0%, negative predictive value at 93.8%, and accuracy at 65.6%. Conclusion. HOMA-IR >2.0 was used for screening test for glucose intolerance in Thai PCOS women. If the result was positive, a specific test should be done to prove the diagnosis. PMID:22737168

  20. Exposure to Common Food Additive Carrageenan Alone Leads to Fasting Hyperglycemia and in Combination with High Fat Diet Exacerbates Glucose Intolerance and Hyperlipidemia without Effect on Weight

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Feferman, Leo; Unterman, Terry; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Major aims were to determine whether exposure to the commonly used food additive carrageenan could induce fasting hyperglycemia and could increase the effects of a high fat diet on glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia. Methods. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to either carrageenan, high fat diet, or the combination of high fat diet and carrageenan, or untreated, for one year. Effects on fasting blood glucose, glucose tolerance, lipid parameters, weight, glycogen stores, and inflammation were compared. Results. Exposure to carrageenan led to glucose intolerance by six days and produced elevated fasting blood glucose by 23 weeks. Effects of carrageenan on glucose tolerance were more severe than from high fat alone. Carrageenan in combination with high fat produced earlier onset of fasting hyperglycemia and higher glucose levels in glucose tolerance tests and exacerbated dyslipidemia. In contrast to high fat, carrageenan did not lead to weight gain. In hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp studies, the carrageenan-exposed mice had higher early glucose levels and lower glucose infusion rate and longer interval to achieve the steady-state. Conclusions. Carrageenan in the Western diet may contribute to the development of diabetes and the effects of high fat consumption. Carrageenan may be useful as a nonobese model of diabetes in the mouse. PMID:25883986

  1. Young and old genetically heterogeneous HET3 mice on a rapamycin diet are glucose intolerant but insulin sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Lamming, Dudley W.; Ye, Lan; Astle, Michael; Baur, Joseph A.; Sabatini, David M.; Harrison, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, extends the lifespan of yeast, worms, flies, and mice. Interventions that promote longevity are often correlated with increased insulin sensitivity, and it therefore is surprising that chronic rapamycin treatment of mice, rats and humans is associated with insulin resistance (Johnston et al. 2008; Houde et al. 2010; Lamming et al. 2012). We examined the effect of dietary rapamycin treatment on glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance in the genetically heterogeneous HET3 mouse strain, a strain in which dietary rapamycin robustly extends mean and maximum lifespan. We find that rapamycin treatment leads to glucose intolerance in both young and old HET3 mice, but in contrast to the previously reported effect of injected rapamycin in C57BL/6 mice, HET3 mice treated with dietary rapamycin responded normally in an insulin tolerance test. To gauge the overall consequences of rapamycin treatment on average blood glucose levels, we measured HBA1c. Dietary rapamycin increased HBA1c over the first three weeks of treatment in young animals, but the effect was lost by three months, and no effect was detected in older animals. Our results demonstrate that the extended lifespan of HET3 mice on a rapamycin diet occurs in the absence of major changes in insulin sensitivity, and highlight the importance of strain background and delivery method in testing effects of longevity interventions. PMID:23648089

  2. Hepatic Branch Vagus Nerve Plays a Critical Role in the Recovery of Post-Ischemic Glucose Intolerance and Mediates a Neuroprotective Effect by Hypothalamic Orexin-A

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Yui; Koda, Shuichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    Orexin-A (a neuropeptide in the hypothalamus) plays an important role in many physiological functions, including the regulation of glucose metabolism. We have previously found that the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance is one of the triggers of ischemic neuronal damage, which is suppressed by hypothalamic orexin-A. Other reports have shown that the communication system between brain and peripheral tissues through the autonomic nervous system (sympathetic, parasympathetic and vagus nerve) is important for maintaining glucose and energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of the hepatic vagus nerve on hypothalamic orexin-A-mediated suppression of post-ischemic glucose intolerance development and ischemic neuronal damage. Male ddY mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 h. Intrahypothalamic orexin-A (5 pmol/mouse) administration significantly suppressed the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and neuronal damage on day 1 and 3, respectively after MCAO. MCAO-induced decrease of hepatic insulin receptors and increase of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes on day 1 after was reversed to control levels by orexin-A. This effect was reversed by intramedullary administration of the orexin-1 receptor antagonist, SB334867, or hepatic vagotomy. In the medulla oblongata, orexin-A induced the co-localization of cholin acetyltransferase (cholinergic neuronal marker used for the vagus nerve) with orexin-1 receptor and c-Fos (activated neural cells marker). These results suggest that the hepatic branch vagus nerve projecting from the medulla oblongata plays an important role in the recovery of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and mediates a neuroprotective effect by hypothalamic orexin-A. PMID:24759941

  3. Tissue Inhibitor Of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Is Required for High-Fat Diet-Induced Glucose Intolerance and Hepatic Steatosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Myrmel, Lene Secher; Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Brünner, Nils; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasma levels of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) are elevated in obesity and obesity-related disorders, such as steatosis, but the metabolic role of TIMP-1 is unclear. Here we investigated how the presence or absence of TIMP-1 affected the development of diet-induced glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis using the Timp1 null mice. Methods Timp1 knockout (TKO) and wild type (TWT) mice were fed chow, high-fat diet (HFD) or intermediate fat and sucrose diet (IFSD). We determined body weight, body composition, lipid content of the liver, energy intake, energy expenditure, oral glucose tolerance, as well as insulin tolerance. In addition, the histology of liver and adipose tissues was examined and expression of selected genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammation in liver and adipose tissues was determined by RT-qPCR. Results TKO mice gained less weight and had lower energy efficiency than TWT mice when fed HFD, but not when fed chow or IFSD. Importantly, TKO mice were protected from development of HFD- as well as IFSD-induced glucose intolerance, hepatic steatosis, and altered expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism and inflammation. Conclusion Collectively, our results indicate that TIMP-1 contributes to the development of diet-induced hepatic steatosis and glucose intolerance and may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26168159

  4. Insulin-like growth factor-I correlates more closely than growth hormone with insulin resistance and glucose intolerance in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, Dan; Purice, Mariana; Coculescu, Mihail

    2013-06-01

    In normal subjects growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) have opposing effects on glucose metabolism. Active acromegaly is associated with insulin resistance (IR) and glucose intolerance although both GH and IGF-I are elevated. Our objective was to compare whether GH or IGF-I correlates more closely with IR and glucose intolerance in acromegaly. Basal serum IGF-I and GH, glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test were measured in 70 normoglycemic and 44 hyperglycemic acromegalic patients (21 impaired fasting glucose, 11 impaired glucose tolerance and 12 diabetes mellitus) according to American Diabetes Association criteria. 55 patients were assessed before any treatment for acromegaly and 59 after surgery and/or radiotherapy (15 patients had normal IGF-I after treatment). Patients treated with somatostatin analogs, GH-receptor antagonists or antidiabetic drugs were excluded. IR was assessed by various basal and stimulated indices. Homeostatic Model Assessment 2-Insulin Resistance (HOMA2-IR) index correlated more closely with IGF-I (r = 0.65, p < 0.0001) than nadir (r = 0.23, p = 0.008) or random GH (r = 0.26, p = 0.002). HOMA2-IR correlated better with IGF-I than nadir or random GH also in normoglycemic (n = 70; r = 0.74, p < 0.0001 vs. r = 0.36, p = 0.001 vs. r = 0.39, p < 0.001) and hyperglycemic patients (n = 44; r = 0.54, p = 0.0002 vs. r = 0.09, p = 0.4 vs. r = 0.14, p = 0.26). In multivariate logistic regression analysis IGF-I but not GH was a significant risk factor for glucose intolerance after adjusting for age, sex, weight and acromegaly duration (OR = 1.56, p = 0.01). In acromegaly IGF-I correlates more closely than GH with IR. IGF-I levels but not GH are associated with glucose intolerance. PMID:22562529

  5. Weight loss results in a small decrease in follicle stimulating hormone in overweight glucose-intolerant postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Randolph, John F.; Golden, Sherita H.; Labrie, Fernand; Kong, Shengchun; Nan, Bin; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective To examine the impact of a weight loss intervention upon follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels in postmenopause. Design and Methods Participants were postmenopausal, overweight, glucose-intolerant women not using exogenous estrogen (n=382) in the Diabetes Prevention Program. Women were randomized to intensive lifestyle change (ILS) with the goals of weight reduction of at least 7% of initial weight and 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity exercise, metformin 850 mg, or placebo administered twice a day. Results Randomization to ILS led to small increases in FSH between baseline and 1-year follow-up vs. placebo (2.3 IU/l vs. -0.81 IU/l, p<0.01). Increases in FSH were correlated with decreases in weight (r=-0.165, p<0.01) and E2 (r=-0.464, p<0.0001) after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, and randomization arm. Changes in FSH were still significantly associated with changes in weight even after adjustment for E2 levels. Metformin users had reductions in weight but non-significant changes in FSH and E2 levels vs. placebo. Conclusions Weight loss leads to small increases in FSH among overweight, postmenopausal women, potentially through pathways mediated by endogenous estrogen as well as other pathways. PMID:25294746

  6. Alteration of NCoR Corepressor Splicing in Mice Causes Increased Body Weight and Hepatosteatosis without Glucose Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, Michael L.; Young, Briana M.; Snyder, Chelsea A.; Schroeder, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is an important means of diversifying function in higher eukaryotes. Notably, both NCoR and SMRT corepressors are subject to alternative mRNA splicing, yielding a series of distinct corepressor variants with highly divergent functions. Normal adipogenesis is associated with a switch in corepressor splicing from NCoR? to NCoR?, which appears to help regulate this differentiation process. We report here that mimicking this development switch in mice by a splice-specific whole-animal ablation of NCoR? is very different from a whole-animal or tissue-specific total NCoR knockout and produces significantly enhanced weight gain on a high-fat diet. Surprisingly, NCoR??/? mice are protected against diet-induced glucose intolerance despite enhanced adiposity and the presence of multiple additional, prodiabetic phenotypic changes. Our results indicate that the change in NCoR splicing during normal development both helps drive normal adipocyte differentiation and plays a key role in determining a metabolically appropriate storage of excess calories. We also conclude that whole-gene “knockouts” fail to reveal how important gene products are customized, tailored, and adapted through alternative mRNA splicing and thus do not reveal all the functions of the protein products of that gene. PMID:25182530

  7. The renin-angiotensin system: a target of and contributor to dyslipidemias, altered glucose homeostasis, and hypertension of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Kelly; Shoemaker, Robin; Yiannikouris, Frederique; Cassis, Lisa A

    2012-03-15

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is an important therapeutic target in the treatment of hypertension. Obesity has emerged as a primary contributor to essential hypertension in the United States and clusters with other metabolic disorders (hyperglycemia, hypertension, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol) defined within the metabolic syndrome. In addition to hypertension, RAS blockade may also serve as an effective treatment strategy to control impaired glucose and insulin tolerance and dyslipidemias in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or specific cholesterol metabolites have been demonstrated to activate components required for the synthesis [angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)], degradation (ACE2), or responsiveness (angiotensin II type 1 receptors, Mas receptors) to angiotensin peptides in cell types (e.g., pancreatic islet cells, adipocytes, macrophages) that mediate specific disorders of the metabolic syndrome. An activated local RAS in these cell types may contribute to dysregulated function by promoting oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. This review will discuss data demonstrating the regulation of components of the RAS by cholesterol and its metabolites, glucose, and/or insulin in cell types implicated in disorders of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, we discuss data supporting a role for an activated local RAS in dyslipidemias and glucose intolerance/insulin resistance and the development of hypertension in the metabolic syndrome. Identification of an activated RAS as a common thread contributing to several disorders of the metabolic syndrome makes the use of angiotensin receptor blockers and ACE inhibitors an intriguing and novel option for multisymptom treatment. PMID:22227126

  8. The renin-angiotensin system: a target of and contributor to dyslipidemias, altered glucose homeostasis, and hypertension of the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Kelly; Shoemaker, Robin; Yiannikouris, Frederique

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is an important therapeutic target in the treatment of hypertension. Obesity has emerged as a primary contributor to essential hypertension in the United States and clusters with other metabolic disorders (hyperglycemia, hypertension, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol) defined within the metabolic syndrome. In addition to hypertension, RAS blockade may also serve as an effective treatment strategy to control impaired glucose and insulin tolerance and dyslipidemias in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or specific cholesterol metabolites have been demonstrated to activate components required for the synthesis [angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)], degradation (ACE2), or responsiveness (angiotensin II type 1 receptors, Mas receptors) to angiotensin peptides in cell types (e.g., pancreatic islet cells, adipocytes, macrophages) that mediate specific disorders of the metabolic syndrome. An activated local RAS in these cell types may contribute to dysregulated function by promoting oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. This review will discuss data demonstrating the regulation of components of the RAS by cholesterol and its metabolites, glucose, and/or insulin in cell types implicated in disorders of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, we discuss data supporting a role for an activated local RAS in dyslipidemias and glucose intolerance/insulin resistance and the development of hypertension in the metabolic syndrome. Identification of an activated RAS as a common thread contributing to several disorders of the metabolic syndrome makes the use of angiotensin receptor blockers and ACE inhibitors an intriguing and novel option for multisymptom treatment. PMID:22227126

  9. Liver fat, visceral adiposity, and sleep disturbances contribute to the development of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance in nondiabetic dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sakkas, Giorgos K; Karatzaferi, Christina; Zintzaras, Elias; Giannaki, Christoforos D; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Lavdas, Eleftherios; Damani, Eleni; Liakos, Nikos; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2008-12-01

    Hemodialysis patients exhibit insulin resistance (IR) in target organs such as liver, muscles, and adipose tissue. The aim of this study was to identify contributors to IR and to develop a model for predicting glucose intolerance in nondiabetic hemodialysis patients. After a 2-h, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), 34 hemodialysis patients were divided into groups with normal (NGT) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Indices of insulin sensitivity were derived from OGTT data. Measurements included liver and muscle fat infiltration and central adiposity by computed tomography scans, body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometer, sleep quality by full polysomnography, and functional capacity and quality of life (QoL) by a battery of exercise tests and questionnaires. Cut-off points, as well as sensitivity and specificity calculations were based on IR (insulin sensitivity index by Matsuda) using a receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. Fifteen patients were assigned to the IGT, and 19 subjects to the NGT group. Intrahepatic fat content and visceral adiposity were significantly higher in the IGT group. IR indices strongly correlated with sleep disturbances, visceral adiposity, functional capacity, and QoL. Visceral adiposity, O2 desaturation during sleep, intrahepatic fat content, and QoL score fitted into the model for predicting glucose intolerance. A ROC curve analysis identified an intrahepatic fat content of > 3.97% (sensitivity, 100; specificity, 35.7) as the best cutoff point for predicting IR. Visceral and intrahepatic fat content, as well as QoL and sleep seemed to be involved at some point in the development of glucose intolerance in hemodialysis patients. Means of reducing fat depots in the liver and splachnic area might prove promising in combating IR and cardiovascular risk in hemodialysis patients. PMID:18832089

  10. Lactose intolerance

    MedlinePLUS

    Lactase deficiency; Milk intolerance; Disaccharidase deficiency; Dairy product intolerance ... make the lactase enzyme so they can digest milk, including breast milk. Babies born too early (premature) ...

  11. The Association of Elective Hormone Therapy with Changes in Lipids Among Glucose Intolerant Postmenopausal Women in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Sherita H.; Kim, Catherine; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Nan, Bin; Kong, Shengchun; Goldberg, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Objective It is unclear how lipids change in response to lifestyle modification or metformin among postmenopausal glucose intolerant women using and not using hormone therapy (HT). We examined the one-year changes in lipids among postmenopausal, prediabetic women in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), and whether changes were mediated by sex hormones. Materials/Methods We performed a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of 342 women who used HT at baseline and year 1 and 382 women who did not use HT at either time point. Interventions included intensive lifestyle (ILS) with goals of weight reduction of at least 7% of initial weight and 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity exercise, or metformin or placebo administered 850 mg up to twice a day. Women were not randomized to HT. Main outcome measures were changes between baseline and study year 1 in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides. Results Compared to placebo, both ILS and metformin significantly reduced LDL-C and raised HDL-C among HT users, changes partially explained by change in estradiol and testosterone but independent of changes in waist circumference and 1/fasting insulin. In contrast, DPP interventions had no effect on LDL-C and HDL-C among non-HT users. ILS significantly lowered triglycerides among non-users but did not significantly change triglycerides among HT users. Metformin did not significantly change triglycerides among non-users but increased triglycerides among HT users. Conclusions The beneficial effects of ILS and metformin on lowering LDL-C and raising HDL-C differ depending upon concurrent HT use. PMID:23660512

  12. Reversal of glucose intolerance in rat offspring exposed to ethanol before birth through reduction of nuclear skeletal muscle HDAC expression by the bile acid TUDCA

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xing?Hai; Nguyen, Khanh H.; Nyomba, B. L. Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Prenatal ethanol exposure causes cellular stress, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance in adult offspring, with increased gluconeogenesis and reduced muscle glucose transporter?4 (glut4) expression. Impaired insulin activation of Akt and nuclear translocation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the liver partly explain increased gluconeogenesis. The mechanism for the reduced glut4 is unknown. Pregnant rats were gavaged with ethanol over the last week of gestation and adult female offspring were studied. Some ethanol exposed offspring was treated with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) for 3 weeks. All these rats underwent intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance tests. The expression of glut4, HDACs, and markers of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (XBP1, CHOP, ATF6) was examined in the gastrocnemius muscle fractions, and in C2C12 muscle cells cultured with ethanol, TUDCA, and HDAC inhibitors. Non?TUDCA?treated rats exposed to prenatal ethanol were insulin resistant and glucose intolerant with reduced muscle glut4 expression, increased ER marker expression, and increased nuclear HDACs, whereas TUDCA?treated rats had normal insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance with normal glut4 expression, ER marker expression, and HDAC levels. In C2C12 cells, ethanol reduced glut4 expression, but increased ER makers. While TUDCA restored glut4 and ER markers to control levels and HDAC inhibition rescued glut4 expression, HDAC inhibition had no effect on ER markers. The increase in nuclear HDAC levels consequent to prenatal ethanol exposure reduces glut4 expression in adult rat offspring, and this HDAC effect is independent of ER unfolded protein response. HDAC inhibition by TUDCA restores glut4 expression, with improvement in insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. PMID:25538147

  13. Reversal of glucose intolerance in rat offspring exposed to ethanol before birth through reduction of nuclear skeletal muscle HDAC expression by the bile acid TUDCA.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xing-Hai; Nguyen, Khanh H; Nyomba, B L Grégoire

    2014-12-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure causes cellular stress, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance in adult offspring, with increased gluconeogenesis and reduced muscle glucose transporter-4 (glut4) expression. Impaired insulin activation of Akt and nuclear translocation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the liver partly explain increased gluconeogenesis. The mechanism for the reduced glut4 is unknown. Pregnant rats were gavaged with ethanol over the last week of gestation and adult female offspring were studied. Some ethanol exposed offspring was treated with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) for 3 weeks. All these rats underwent intraperitoneal glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance tests. The expression of glut4, HDACs, and markers of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (XBP1, CHOP, ATF6) was examined in the gastrocnemius muscle fractions, and in C2C12 muscle cells cultured with ethanol, TUDCA, and HDAC inhibitors. Non-TUDCA-treated rats exposed to prenatal ethanol were insulin resistant and glucose intolerant with reduced muscle glut4 expression, increased ER marker expression, and increased nuclear HDACs, whereas TUDCA-treated rats had normal insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance with normal glut4 expression, ER marker expression, and HDAC levels. In C2C12 cells, ethanol reduced glut4 expression, but increased ER makers. While TUDCA restored glut4 and ER markers to control levels and HDAC inhibition rescued glut4 expression, HDAC inhibition had no effect on ER markers. The increase in nuclear HDAC levels consequent to prenatal ethanol exposure reduces glut4 expression in adult rat offspring, and this HDAC effect is independent of ER unfolded protein response. HDAC inhibition by TUDCA restores glut4 expression, with improvement in insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. PMID:25538147

  14. Predictors for Glucose Change in Hypertensive Participants Following Short-term Treatment with Atenolol or Hydrochlorothiazide

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Mariellen J.; Gong, Yan; Hou, Wei; Hall, Karen; Schmidt, Siegfried O. F.; Curry, Robert Whitney; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Chapman, Arlene; Turner, Stephen T.; Schwartz, Gary L.; Bailey, Kent; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gums, John G.; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Johnson, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective To develop and validate a predictive model for glucose change and risk for new-onset impaired fasting glucose in hypertensive participants following treatment with atenolol or hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ). Design Randomized multicenter clinical trial. Patients A total of 735 white or African-American men and women with uncomplicated hypertension. Measurements and Main Results Pharmacogenomic Evaluation of Antihypertensive Responses (PEAR) is a randomized clinical trial to assess the genetic and nongenetic predictors of blood pressure response and adverse metabolic effects following treatment with atenolol or HCTZ. To develop and validate predictive models for glucose change, PEAR participants were randomly divided into a derivation cohort of 367 and a validation cohort of 368. Linear and logistic regression modeling were used to build models of drug-associated glucose change and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), respectively, in the derivation cohorts. These models were then evaluated in the validation cohorts. For glucose change after atenolol or HCTZ treatment, baseline glucose was a significant (p<0.0001) predictor, explaining 13% of the variability in glucose change after atenolol and 12% of the variability in glucose change after HCTZ. Baseline glucose was also the strongest and most consistent predictor (p<0.0001) for development of IFG after atenolol or HCTZ monotherapy. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.77 for IFG after atenolol and 0.71 after HCTZ treatment, respectively. Conclusion Baseline glucose is the primary predictor of atenolol or HCTZ-associated glucose increase and development of IFG after treatment with either drug. PMID:25202885

  15. Boehmeria nivea Stimulates Glucose Uptake by Activating Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma in C2C12 Cells and Improves Glucose Intolerance in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hee; Sung, Mi Jeong; Park, Jae Ho; Yang, Hye Jeong; Hwang, Jin-Taek

    2013-01-01

    We examined the antidiabetic property of Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaud. Ethanolic extract of Boehmeria nivea (L.) Gaud. (EBN) increased the uptake of 2-[N-(nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose in C2C12 myotubes. To examine the mechanisms underlying EBN-mediated increase in glucose uptake, we examined the transcriptional activity and expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-?), a pivotal target for glucose metabolism in C2C12 myotubes. We found that the EBN increased both the transcriptional activity and mRNA expression levels of PPAR-?. In addition, we measured phosphorylation and expression levels of other targets of glucose metabolism, such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (Akt/PKB). We found that EBN did not alter the phosphorylation or expression levels of these proteins in a time- or dose-dependent manner, which suggested that EBN stimulates glucose uptake through a PPAR-?-dependent mechanism. Further, we investigated the antidiabetic property of EBN using mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Administration of 0.5% EBN reduced the HFD-induced increase in body weight, total cholesterol level, and fatty liver and improved the impaired fasting glucose level, blood insulin content, and glucose intolerance. These results suggest that EBN had an antidiabetic effect in cell culture and animal systems and may be useful for preventing diabetes. PMID:23690860

  16. Parathyroidectomy Ameliorates Glucose and Blood Pressure Control in a Patient with Primary Hyperparathyroidism, Type 2 Diabetes, and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Singh, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    Effect of parathyroidectomy on glucose control and hypertension is controversial. Here, we report a case of a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension in whom parathyroidectomy ameliorated both glucose control and blood pressure. Once high serum calcium levels were noticed, ultrasonography of neck confirmed a well-defined oval hypoechoic mass posterior to the right lobe of the thyroid, confirmed by scintiscan. Parathyroidectomy resulted in improvement of blood pressure and blood glucose. We could stop insulin and antihypertensive medications. We conclude that in patients with type 2 diabetes with vague complaints like fatigue, body ache, and refractory hypertension, as a part of the diagnostic workup, clinicians should also check serum calcium levels and parathyroid hormone to rule out hyperparathyroidism. Correction of hyperparathyroidism may result in improvement of hypertension and glucose control. PMID:26380561

  17. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Causes Glucose Intolerance with Increased Hepatic Gluconeogenesis and Histone Deacetylases in Adult Rat Offspring: Reversal by Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xing-Hai; Nguyen, Hoa K.; Nyomba, B. L. Grégoire

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure results in increased glucose production in adult rat offspring and this may involve modulation of protein acetylation by cellular stress. We used adult male offspring of dams given ethanol during gestation days 1–7 (early), 8–14 (mid) and 15–21 (late) compared with those from control dams. A group of ethanol offspring was treated with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) for 3 weeks. We determined gluconeogenesis, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose-6-phosphatase, hepatic free radicals, histone deacetylases (HDAC), acetylated foxo1, acetylated PEPCK, and C/EBP homologous protein as a marker of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Prenatal ethanol during either of the 3 weeks of pregnancy increased gluconeogenesis, gluconeogenic genes, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses, sirtuin-2 and HDAC3, 4, 5, and 7 in adult offspring. Conversely, prenatal ethanol reduced acetylation of foxo1 and PEPCK. Treatment of adult ethanol offspring with TUDCA reversed all these abnormalities. Thus, prenatal exposure of rats to ethanol results in long lasting oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses explaining increased expression of gluconeogenic genes and HDAC proteins which, by deacetylating foxo1 and PEPCK, contribute to increased gluconeogenesis. These anomalies occurred regardless of the time of ethanol exposure during pregnancy, including early embryogenesis. As these anomalies were reversed by treatment of the adult offspring with TUDCA, this compound has therapeutic potentials in the treatment of glucose intolerance associated with prenatal ethanol exposure. PMID:23544086

  18. Prenatal ethanol exposure causes glucose intolerance with increased hepatic gluconeogenesis and histone deacetylases in adult rat offspring: reversal by tauroursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xing-Hai; Nguyen, Hoa K; Nyomba, B L Grégoire

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure results in increased glucose production in adult rat offspring and this may involve modulation of protein acetylation by cellular stress. We used adult male offspring of dams given ethanol during gestation days 1-7 (early), 8-14 (mid) and 15-21 (late) compared with those from control dams. A group of ethanol offspring was treated with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) for 3 weeks. We determined gluconeogenesis, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose-6-phosphatase, hepatic free radicals, histone deacetylases (HDAC), acetylated foxo1, acetylated PEPCK, and C/EBP homologous protein as a marker of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Prenatal ethanol during either of the 3 weeks of pregnancy increased gluconeogenesis, gluconeogenic genes, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses, sirtuin-2 and HDAC3, 4, 5, and 7 in adult offspring. Conversely, prenatal ethanol reduced acetylation of foxo1 and PEPCK. Treatment of adult ethanol offspring with TUDCA reversed all these abnormalities. Thus, prenatal exposure of rats to ethanol results in long lasting oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses explaining increased expression of gluconeogenic genes and HDAC proteins which, by deacetylating foxo1 and PEPCK, contribute to increased gluconeogenesis. These anomalies occurred regardless of the time of ethanol exposure during pregnancy, including early embryogenesis. As these anomalies were reversed by treatment of the adult offspring with TUDCA, this compound has therapeutic potentials in the treatment of glucose intolerance associated with prenatal ethanol exposure. PMID:23544086

  19. Oral Supplementation with Non-Absorbable Antibiotics or Curcumin Attenuates Western Diet-Induced Atherosclerosis and Glucose Intolerance in LDLR?/? Mice – Role of Intestinal Permeability and Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Siddhartha S.; Bie, Jinghua; Wang, Jing; Ghosh, Shobha

    2014-01-01

    Association between circulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and metabolic diseases (such as Type 2 Diabetes and atherosclerosis) has shifted the focus from Western diet-induced changes in gut microbiota per se to release of gut bacteria-derived products into circulation as the possible mechanism for the chronic inflammatory state underlying the development of these diseases. Under physiological conditions, an intact intestinal barrier prevents this release of LPS underscoring the importance of examining and modulating the direct effects of Western diet on intestinal barrier function. In the present study we evaluated two strategies, namely selective gut decontamination and supplementation with oral curcumin, to modulate Western-diet (WD) induced changes in intestinal barrier function and subsequent development of glucose intolerance and atherosclerosis. LDLR?/? mice were fed WD for 16 weeks and either received non-absorbable antibiotics (Neomycin and polymyxin) in drinking water for selective gut decontamination or gavaged daily with curcumin. WD significantly increased intestinal permeability as assessed by in vivo translocation of FITC-dextran and plasma LPS levels. Selective gut decontamination and supplementation with curcumin significantly attenuated the WD-induced increase in plasma LPS levels (3.32 vs 1.90 or 1.51 EU/ml, respectively) and improved intestinal barrier function at multiple levels (restoring intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of tight junction proteins, ZO-1 and Claudin-1). Consequently, both these interventions significantly reduced WD-induced glucose intolerance and atherosclerosis in LDLR?/? mice. Activation of macrophages by low levels of LPS (50 ng/ml) and its exacerbation by fatty acids is likely the mechanism by which release of trace amounts of LPS into circulation due to disruption of intestinal barrier function induces the development of these diseases. These studies not only establish the important role of intestinal barrier function, but also identify oral supplementation with curcumin as a potential therapeutic strategy to improve intestinal barrier function and prevent the development of metabolic diseases. PMID:25251395

  20. Comparative effect of antihypertensive therapy on blood glucose level in hypertensive patients in an Indian population.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M A; Kapur, P; Khanam, R; Akhtar, M; Khan, G H; Anwar, M J; Vohora, D

    2014-05-01

    Hypertensive patients have higher prevalence of insulin resistance and are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). There is scarcity of data on the relationship between antihypertensive therapies and glycaemic control in Indian population. Thus, the present study was designed to investigate such association among Indian population in a University teaching hospital.The study was carried out on 177 hypertensive patients (with new onset of diabetes or without diabetes) visiting the OPD of medicine department at Majeedia hospital, New Delhi. The drug history of hypertensive patients and blood glucose levels following 1-5 yrs of antihypertensive therapy were recorded.The gender distribution of hypertensive patients reveals a higher percentage of incidences in males (53.7%) as compared to females (46.3%). Hypertensive patient without DM on beta blockers and on thiazide shows higher incidence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (17.5%, 18.5%) and DM (10%, 11%) as compared to patient receiving other antihypertensive therapy. While in patients of new onset diabetes the incidence was higher with ?-blockers (56.2%) than with thiazides (31.3%) followed by calcium channel blockers (CCBs) (12.5%). There was proportionate increase in incidence with the duration of therapy (3-5 years). None of the patients who were on ACE inhibitors or on angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) reported any incidence of IGT or DM.To conclude, ?-blockers and thiazides increases the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus with long term antihypertensive therapy requiring regular monitoring. CCBs have lowered risks while ACE inhibitors and ARBs are relatively free of such metabolic adverse effects. PMID:24132701

  1. Blood and urine responses to ingesting fluids of various salt and glucose concentrations. [to combat orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Mary A.; Riddle, Jeanne; Charles, John B.; Bungo, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    To compensate for the reduced blood and fluid volumes that develop during weightlessness, the Space Shuttle crewmembers consume salt tablets and water equivalent to 1 l of normal saline, about 2 hrs before landing. This paper compares the effects on blood, urine, and cardiovascular variables of the ingestion of 1 l of normal (0.9 percent) saline with the effects of distilled water, 1 percent glucose, 0.74 percent saline with 1 percent glucose, 0.9 percent saline with 1 percent glucose, and 1.07 percent saline. It was found that the expansion of plasma volume and the concentration of urine were greater 4 hrs after ingestion of 1.07 percent saline solution than after ingestion of normal saline and that the solutions containig glucose did not enhance any variables as compared with normal saline.

  2. Mice Deficient in Proglucagon-Derived Peptides Exhibit Glucose Intolerance on a High-Fat Diet but Are Resistant to Obesity.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Keita; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Seino, Yusuke; Murata, Yoshiharu; Oshida, Yoshiharu; Hayashi, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous glucagon-GFP knock-in mice (Gcggfp/gfp) lack proglucagon derived-peptides including glucagon and GLP-1, and are normoglycemic. We have previously shown that Gcggfp/gfp show improved glucose tolerance with enhanced insulin secretion. Here, we studied glucose and energy metabolism in Gcggfp/gfp mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Male Gcggfp/gfp and Gcggfp/+ mice were fed either a normal chow diet (NCD) or an HFD for 15-20 weeks. Regardless of the genotype, mice on an HFD showed glucose intolerance, and Gcggfp/gfp mice on HFD exhibited impaired insulin secretion whereas Gcggfp/+ mice on HFD exhibited increased insulin secretion. A compensatory increase in ?-cell mass was observed in Gcggfp/+mice on HFD, but not in Gcggfp/gfp mice on the same diet. Weight gain was significantly lower in Gcggfp/gfp mice than in Gcggfp/+mice. Oxygen consumption was enhanced in Gcggfp/gfp mice compared to Gcggfp/+ mice on an HFD. HFD feeding significantly increased uncoupling protein 1 mRNA expression in brown adipose and inguinal white adipose tissues of Gcggfp/gfp mice, but not of Gcggfp/+mice. Treatment with the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide (200 mg/kg) improved glucose tolerance in Gcggfp/gfp mice and insulin content in Gcggfp/gfp and Gcggfp/+ mice was similar after liraglutide treatment. Our findings demonstrate that Gcggfp/gfp mice develop diabetes upon HFD-feeding in the absence of proglucagon-derived peptides, although they are resistant to diet-induced obesity. PMID:26378455

  3. Maternal protein restriction induces early-onset glucose intolerance and alters hepatic genes expression in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathway in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia; Xiao, Xinhua; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Miao; Xu, Jianping; Wang, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Maternal undernutrition during pregnancy and/or lactation can alter the offspring's response to environmental challenges, and thus increases the risk of the development of metabolic diseases at a later age. However, whether maternal protein restriction can modulate glucose metabolism in the early life of offspring is less understood. Furthermore, we explored the potential underlying mechanisms that illustrate this phenotype. Materials and Methods To test this hypothesis, we examined the offspring of C57BL/6J mice at weaning to determine the effects of feeding their mothers a low-protein diet or normal chow diet throughout pregnancy and lactation. Gene array experiments and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were utilized to explore the altered hepatic genes expression. Results The offspring of dams fed a low-protein diet had a lower birthweight and bodyweight, impaired glucose tolerance, decreased insulin sensitivity, and decreased serum cholesterol at weaning. Using gene array experiments, 253 differentially expressed genes were identified in the liver tissues of the offspring between the two groups. Bioinformatic analyses showed that all differentially expressed genes were mapped to 11 pathways. We focused on the ‘peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway,’ because peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors have emerged as central regulators of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was utilized for the validation of genes in the pathway. Conclusions A maternal low-protein diet during pregnancy and lactation promotes early-onset glucose intolerance in the offspring mice, and the altered hepatic genes expression in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway could play role in regulating this phenomenon. PMID:25969711

  4. Diet supplementation with green tea extract epigallocatechin gallate prevents progression to glucose intolerance in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Green tea was suggested as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of diabetes more than 70 years ago, but the mechanisms behind its antidiabetic effect remains elusive. In this work, we address this issue by feeding a green tea extract (TEAVIGO™) with a high content of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) or the thiazolidinedione PPAR-? agonist rosiglitazone, as positive control, to db/db mice, an animal model for diabetes. Methods Young (7 week-old) db/db mice were randomized and assigned to receive diets supplemented with or without EGCG or rosiglitazone for 10 weeks. Fasting blood glucose, body weight and food intake was measured along the treatment. Glucose and insulin levels were determined during an oral glucose tolerance test after 10 weeks of treatment. Pancreata were sampled at the end of the study for blinded histomorphometric analysis. Islets were isolated and their mRNA expression analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The results show that, in db/db mice, EGCG improves glucose tolerance and increases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. EGCG supplementation reduces the number of pathologically changed islets of Langerhans, increases the number and the size of islets, and heightens pancreatic endocrine area. These effects occurred in parallel with a reduction in islet endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, possibly linked to the antioxidative capacity of EGCG. Conclusions This study shows that the green tea extract EGCG markedly preserves islet structure and enhances glucose tolerance in genetically diabetic mice. Dietary supplementation with EGCG could potentially contribute to nutritional strategies for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22333133

  5. Chronic Phase Shifts of the Photoperiod throughout Pregnancy Programs Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Varcoe, Tamara J.; Wight, Nicole; Voultsios, Athena; Salkeld, Mark D.; Kennaway, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Shift work during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk for preterm birth and low birth weight. However, the impact upon the long term health of the children is currently unknown. In this study, we used an animal model to determine the consequences of maternal shift work exposure on the health of the adult offspring. Pregnant rats were exposed to chronic phase shifts (CPS) in their photoperiod every 3–4 days throughout gestation and the first week after birth. Adult offspring were assessed for a range of metabolic, endocrine, circadian and neurobehavioural parameters. At 3 months of age, male pups exposed to the CPS schedule in utero had increased adiposity (+29%) and hyperleptinaemia (+99% at 0700h). By 12 months of age, both male and female rats displayed hyperleptinaemia (+26% and +41% respectively) and hyperinsulinaemia (+110% and +83% respectively). 12 month old female CPS rats displayed poor glucose tolerance (+18%) and increased insulin secretion (+29%) in response to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. In CPS males the glucose response was unaltered, but the insulin response was reduced by 35%. The glucose response to an insulin tolerance test was decreased by 21% in CPS females but unaltered in males. Disruption of circadian rhythmicity during gestation resulted in gender dependent metabolic consequences for the adult offspring. These results highlight the need for a thorough analysis of shift work exposure in utero on the health of the adult offspring in humans. PMID:21494686

  6. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... eNewsletter Archive Buy IFFGD Merchandise Contact Us Donate Lactose Intolerance Lactose is a sugar found in milk ... Did you know... Non-Dairy Sources can Contain Lactose Some non-dairy foods may include ingredients that ...

  7. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... intolerance is an abnormal sensitivity to a cold environment or cold temperatures. ... can be a symptom of a problem with metabolism. Some people (often very thin women) do not tolerate cold environments because they have very little body fat and ...

  8. Glucocorticoid exposure in late gestation permanently programs rat hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucocorticoid receptor expression and causes glucose intolerance in adult offspring.

    PubMed Central

    Nyirenda, M J; Lindsay, R S; Kenyon, C J; Burchell, A; Seckl, J R

    1998-01-01

    Low birth weight in humans is predictive of insulin resistance and diabetes in adult life. The molecular mechanisms underlying this link are unknown but fetal exposure to excess glucocorticoids has been implicated. The fetus is normally protected from the higher maternal levels of glucocorticoids by feto-placental 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type-2 (11beta-HSD2) which inactivates glucocorticoids. We have shown previously that inhibiting 11beta-HSD2 throughout pregnancy in rats reduces birth weight and causes hyperglycemia in the adult offspring. We now show that dexamethasone (a poor substrate for 11beta-HSD2) administered to pregnant rats selectively in the last week of pregnancy reduces birth weight by 10% (P < 0.05), and produces adult fasting hyperglycemia (treated 5.3+/-0.3; control 4.3+/-0.2 mmol/ liter, P = 0.04), reactive hyperglycemia (treated 8.7+/-0.4; control 7.5+/-0.2 mmol/liter, P = 0.03), and hyperinsulinemia (treated 6.1+/-0.4; control 3.8+/-0.5 ng/ml, P = 0.01) on oral glucose loading. In the adult offspring of rats exposed to dexamethasone in late pregnancy, hepatic expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA (and activity) are increased by 25% (P = 0.01) and 60% (P < 0.01), respectively, while other liver enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase, glucokinase, and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type-1) are unaltered. In contrast dexamethasone, when given in the first or second week of gestation, has no effect on offspring insulin/glucose responses or hepatic PEPCK and GR expression. The increased hepatic GR expression may be crucial, since rats exposed to dexamethasone in utero showed potentiated glucose responses to exogenous corticosterone. These observations suggest that excessive glucocorticoid exposure late in pregnancy predisposes the offspring to glucose intolerance in adulthood. Programmed hepatic PEPCK overexpression, perhaps mediated by increased GR, may promote this process by increasing gluconeogenesis. PMID:9593773

  9. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-?. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer's disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes. PMID:26394692

  10. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; et al

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-?. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer’s disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisinglymore »impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.« less

  11. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François- Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-09-23

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-?. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer’s disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes.

  12. Catalytic site inhibition of insulin-degrading enzyme by a small molecule induces glucose intolerance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Bosc, Damien; Liang, Wenguang G.; Enée, Emmanuelle; Marechal, Xavier; Charton, Julie; Totobenazara, Jane; Berte, Gonzague; Jahklal, Jouda; Verdelet, Tristan; Dumont, Julie; Dassonneville, Sandrine; Woitrain, Eloise; Gauriot, Marion; Paquet, Charlotte; Duplan, Isabelle; Hermant, Paul; Cantrelle, François- Xavier; Sevin, Emmanuel; Culot, Maxime; Landry, Valerie; Herledan, Adrien; Piveteau, Catherine; Lippens, Guy; Leroux, Florence; Tang, Wei-Jen; van Endert, Peter; Staels, Bart; Deprez, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a protease that cleaves insulin and other bioactive peptides such as amyloid-?. Knockout and genetic studies have linked IDE to Alzheimer's disease and type-2 diabetes. As the major insulin-degrading protease, IDE is a candidate drug target in diabetes. Here we have used kinetic target-guided synthesis to design the first catalytic site inhibitor of IDE suitable for in vivo studies (BDM44768). Crystallographic and small angle X-ray scattering analyses show that it locks IDE in a closed conformation. Among a panel of metalloproteases, BDM44768 selectively inhibits IDE. Acute treatment of mice with BDM44768 increases insulin signalling and surprisingly impairs glucose tolerance in an IDE-dependent manner. These results confirm that IDE is involved in pathways that modulate short-term glucose homeostasis, but casts doubt on the general usefulness of the inhibition of IDE catalytic activity to treat diabetes. PMID:26394692

  13. Insulin Resistance in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Is It a Novel Disease Modifier?

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Nasim; Boobejame, Pedram; Bakhshandeh, Hooman; Amin, Ahmad; Taghavi, Sepideh; Maleki, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have introduced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance (IR) as novel risk factors in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Objectives: We aimed to investigate the prevalence of glucose intolerance and IR in patients with PAH and their correlation with functional capacity and prognostic factors. Patients and Methods: Sixty-nine patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (class I Pulmonary hypertension in accordance with updated clinical classification of pulmonary hypertension) scheduled for right heart catheterization were enrolled. FBS, HbA1c, lipid profile, pro –BNP and hs-CRP were measured along with a 6-minute walk test (6-MWT) and obtaining demographic, functional and hemodynamic data. Fasting triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (TG/HDL-C) was used as a surrogate of insulin sensitivity. Using published criteria, HbA1c ? 5.9% defined as normal, 6.0-6.4% as glucose intolerance, and ? 6.5% as diabetes. All patients were followed for a year regarding development of any cardiovascular event (mortality and/or hospitalization). Results: In total, 76.8% of patients were female: 61% of them had idiopathic PAH, 33% Eisenmenger syndrome, and 6% PAH secondary to a connective tissue disease. With respect to TG/HDL-C, 43.5% of patients had IR and 47.8% of patients had HbA1c > 6. There was no difference between IR and insulin sensitive (IS) group or glucose intolerance and sensitive group regarding NYHA class, 6MWT, Pro BNP, hs-CRP and hemodynamic data and there was no correlation between IR or glucose intolerance and any event. Conclusions: Unrecognized glucose intolerance and IR are common in PAH. However, further studies are needed to show whether glucose or insulin dysregulation plays any role in PAH pathogenesis or it is secondary to advanced PAH. PMID:25478547

  14. Intestine-specific Deletion of Acyl-CoA:Monoacylglycerol Acyltransferase (MGAT) 2 Protects Mice from Diet-induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance*

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David W.; Gao, Yu; Yen, Mei-I; Yen, Chi-Liang Eric

    2014-01-01

    The absorption of dietary fat involves the re-esterification of digested triacylglycerol in the enterocytes, a process catalyzed by acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) 2. Mice without a functional gene encoding MGAT2 (Mogat2?/?) are protected from diet-induced obesity. Surprisingly, these mice absorb normal amounts of dietary fat but increase their energy expenditure. MGAT2 is expressed in tissues besides intestine, including adipose tissue in both mice and humans. To test the hypothesis that intestinal MGAT2 regulates systemic energy balance, we generated and characterized mice deficient in MGAT2 specifically in the small intestine (Mogat2IKO). We found that, like Mogat2?/? mice, Mogat2IKO mice also showed a delay in fat absorption, a decrease in food intake, and a propensity to use fatty acids as fuel when first exposed to a high fat diet. Mogat2IKO mice increased energy expenditure although to a lesser degree than Mogat2?/? mice and were protected against diet-induced weight gain and associated comorbidities, including hepatic steatosis, hypercholesterolemia, and glucose intolerance. These findings illustrate that intestinal lipid metabolism plays a crucial role in the regulation of systemic energy balance and may be a feasible intervention target. In addition, they suggest that MGAT activity in extraintestinal tissues may also modulate energy metabolism. PMID:24784138

  15. Unacylated ghrelin induces oxidative stress resistance in a glucose intolerance and peripheral artery disease mouse model by restoring endothelial cell miR-126 expression.

    PubMed

    Togliatto, Gabriele; Trombetta, Antonella; Dentelli, Patrizia; Gallo, Sara; Rosso, Arturo; Cotogni, Paolo; Granata, Riccarda; Falcioni, Rita; Delale, Thomas; Ghigo, Ezio; Brizzi, Maria Felice

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are crucial in long-term diabetes complications, including peripheral artery disease (PAD). In this study, we have investigated the potential clinical impact of unacylated ghrelin (UnAG) in a glucose intolerance and PAD mouse model. We demonstrate that UnAG is able to protect skeletal muscle and endothelial cells (ECs) from ROS imbalance in hind limb ischemia-subjected ob/ob mice. This effect translates into reductions in hind limb functional impairment. We show that UnAG rescues sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activity and superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD-2) expression in ECs. This leads to SIRT1-mediated p53 and histone 3 lysate 56 deacetylation and results in reduced EC senescence in vivo. We demonstrate, using small interfering RNA technology, that SIRT1 is also crucial for SOD-2 expression. UnAG also renews micro-RNA (miR)-126 expression, resulting in the posttranscriptional regulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression and a reduced number of infiltrating inflammatory cells in vivo. Loss-of-function experiments that target miR-126 demonstrate that miR-126 also controls SIRT1 and SOD-2 expression, thus confirming its role in driving UnAG-mediated EC protection against ROS imbalance. These results indicate that UnAG protects vessels from ROS imbalance in ob/ob mice by rescuing miR-126 expression, thus emphasizing its potential clinical impact in avoiding limb loss in PAD. PMID:25368096

  16. Self-perceived lactose intolerance results in lower intakes of calcium and dairy foods and is associated with hypertension and diabetes in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Self-perceived lactose intolerance may result in adverse dietary modifications; thus, more studies are needed to understand the prevalence of self-perceived lactose intolerance and how it relates to calcium intake and selected health conditions. The objective was to examine the effects of self-perce...

  17. Secreted factors from dental pulp stem cells improve glucose intolerance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice by increasing pancreatic ?-cell function

    PubMed Central

    Izumoto-Akita, Takako; Tsunekawa, Shin; Yamamoto, Akihito; Uenishi, Eita; Ishikawa, Kota; Ogata, Hidetada; Iida, Atsushi; Ikeniwa, Makoto; Hosokawa, Kaori; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Maekawa, Ryuya; Yamauchi, Yuichiro; Seino, Yusuke; Hamada, Yoji; Hibi, Hideharu; Arima, Hiroshi; Ueda, Minoru; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many studies have reported that stem cell transplantation promotes propagation and protection of pancreatic ?-cells in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice without the differentiation of transplanted cells into pancreatic ?-cells, suggesting that the improvement is due to a paracrine effect of the transplanted cells. We investigated the effects of factors secreted by dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) on ?-cell function and survival. Research design and methods Conditioned medium from SHED (SHED-CM) was collected 48?h after culturing in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). The insulin levels in SHED-CM and serum-free conditioned media from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-CM) were undetectable. STZ-induced diabetic male C57B/6J mice were injected with DMEM as a control, SHED-CM, exendin-4 (Ex-4), or BM-CM for 14?days. Mouse pancreatic ?-cell line MIN6 cells were incubated with different concentrations of STZ with SHED-CM, DMEM, Ex-4, or BM-CM for 6?h. Results Administration of 1?mL of SHED-CM twice a day improved glucose intolerance in STZ-induced diabetic mice and the effect continued for 20?days after the end of treatment. SHED-CM treatment increased pancreatic insulin content and ?-cell mass through proliferation and an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test revealed enhanced insulin secretion. Incubation of MIN6 cells (a mouse pancreatic ?-cell line) with SHED-CM enhanced insulin secretion in a glucose concentration-dependent manner and reduced STZ-induced cell death, indicating that the amelioration of hyperglycemia was caused by the direct effects of SHED-CM on ?-cell function and survival. These effects were more pronounced than with the use of Ex-4, a conventional incretin-based drug, and BM-CM, which is a medium derived from other stem cells. Conclusions These findings suggest that SHED-CM provides direct protection and encourages the propagation of ?-cells, and has potential as a novel strategy for treatment of diabetes. PMID:26504525

  18. Transgenerational glucose intolerance with Igf2/H19 epigenetic alterations in mouse islet induced by intrauterine hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guo-Lian; Wang, Fang-Fang; Shu, Jing; Tian, Shen; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Ning; Luo, Qiong; Zhang, Yu; Jin, Fan; Leung, Peter C K; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2012-05-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has been shown to be associated with high risk of diabetes in offspring. However, the mechanisms involved and the possibilities of transgenerational transmission are still unclear. We intercrossed male and female adult control and first-generation offspring of GDM (F1-GDM) mice to obtain the second-generation (F2) offspring in four groups: C?-C?, C?-GDM?, GDM?-C?, and GDM?-GDM?. We found that birth weight significantly increased in F2 offspring through the paternal line with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Regardless of birth from F1-GDM with or without IGT, high risk of IGT appeared as early as 3 weeks in F2 offspring and progressed through both parental lineages, especial the paternal line. IGT in male offspring was more obvious than that in females, with parental characteristics and sex-specific transmission. In both F1 and F2 offspring of GDM, the expression of imprinted genes Igf2 and H19 was downregulated in pancreatic islets, caused by abnormal methylation status of the differentially methylated region, which may be one of the mechanisms for impaired islet ultrastructure and function. Furthermore, altered Igf2 and H19 gene expression was found in sperm of adult F1-GDM, regardless of the presence of IGT, indicating that changes of epigenetics in germ cells contributed to transgenerational transmission. PMID:22447856

  19. Reduced cortical BACE1 content with one bout of exercise is accompanied by declines in AMPK, Akt, and MAPK signaling in obese, glucose-intolerant mice.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, R E K; Baumeister, P; Peppler, W T; Wright, D C; Little, J P

    2015-11-15

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are significant risk factors in the development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. A variety of cellular mechanisms, such as altered Akt and AMPK and increased inflammatory signaling, contribute to neurodegeneration. Exercise training can improve markers of neurodegeneration, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a single bout of exercise on markers of neurodegeneration and inflammation in brains from mice fed a high-fat diet. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed a low (LFD; 10% kcal from lard)- or a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% kcal from lard) for 7 wk. HFD mice underwent an acute bout of exercise (treadmill running: 15 m/min, 5% incline, 120 min) followed by a recovery period of 2 h. The HFD increased body mass and glucose intolerance (both P < 0.05). This was accompanied by an approximately twofold increase in the phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, and GSK in the cortex (P < 0.05). Following exercise, there was a decrease in beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1; P < 0.05) and activity (P < 0.001). This was accompanied by a reduction in AMPK phosphorylation, indicative of a decline in cellular stress (P < 0.05). Akt and ERK phosphorylation were decreased following exercise in HFD mice to a level similar to that of the LFD mice (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that a single bout of exercise can reduce BACE1 content and activity independent of changes in adiposity. This effect is associated with reductions in Akt, ERK, and AMPK signaling in the cortex. PMID:26404616

  20. Statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zahid

    2014-05-15

    The term statin intolerance refers to an inability to use statins because of muscle symptoms or elevated creatine kinase, and the major diagnostic challenge is to unambiguously link these to statin use. Roughly 5% to 10% of statin users develop statin intolerance, and because statin use is expected to increase--especially after recent updated guidelines have expanded the statin benefit groups--adverse effects from statins will become a growing issue. Unfortunately, the pathophysiology--and even the terminology--of statin-related muscle injury lacks clarity. Several risk factors have been identified, including advanced age, family history of myopathy and statin dose; many cases manifest only after patients are administered an interacting medication (e.g., azole antifungals, cimetidine, clarithromycin, erythromycin and cyclosporine). The diagnosis of myopathy remains challenging, especially because some patients can have normal serum creatine kinase levels despite demonstrable weakness and muscle biopsy-proven statin-induced myopathy. A statin withdrawal and rechallenge helps patients distinguish whether their myalgia symptoms are because of statins, but, in at least 1 clinical trial, even 5% of placebo-treated patients developed myalgias during a controlled withdrawal and rechallenge. No consensus exists for management of patients with statin intolerance. Many patients can eventually tolerate a statin but often at suboptimal doses. A subset of patients do well with nondaily regimens such as every other day or once weekly dosing. Some patients cannot tolerate statins at all, requiring nonstatin lipid-lowering medications--the benefit of which remains unclear with regard to preventing atherosclerotic events. Ultimately, statin intolerance undermines the drug adherence that is critical for achieving the benefits of lifelong lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, statin myopathy is a common challenge in lipid management, and further work is needed to establish a standard diagnostic criterion as well as treatment algorithms. PMID:24792743

  1. [The assessment of glucose tolerance in hypertensive subjects treated with amlodipine].

    PubMed

    Panuccio, D; Romani, A; Trabatti, M R; Romanelli, R; Nardi, R

    1993-10-01

    The authors studied the side effects of amlodipine on glucose metabolism, carrying out an oral glucose tolerance test before and after 8-10 days of treatment, in a group of subjects with normal glucose tolerance. No significant variation in the average plasma glucose and insulin levels was observed. Nevertheless, in some cases, during amlodipine therapy, a decrease in glucose plasma level was found. PMID:8258265

  2. Sardine peptide with angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity improves glucose tolerance in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Otani, Lila; Ninomiya, Toshio; Murakami, Megumi; Osajima, Katsuhiro; Kato, Hisanori; Murakami, Tetsuo

    2009-10-01

    An enzymatic hydrolysate of sardine protein (sardine peptide, SP) derived from sardine muscle possesses angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. In the present study, we investigated the effect of SP on the blood glucose levels in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSPs). Ten-week-old SHRSPs were assigned to three groups. The control group was given tap water for 4 weeks, while the experimental groups were given water containing SP (1 g/kg/d) or an ACE inhibitor, captopril (8 mg/kg/d). Treatment with SP and captopril decreased ACE activity in the kidney, aorta, and mesentery. There were no differences in fasting blood glucose levels among the three groups, whereas SP and captopril administration significantly suppressed the increase in blood glucose after glucose loading in the control SHRSPs. No difference was observed in plasma insulin levels among the three groups. Thus treatment with captopril and ACE-inhibitory sardine peptides ameliorated the glucose tolerance of this rat strain. PMID:19809178

  3. Total adiponectin, but not inflammatory markers C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-?, interluekin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, correlates with increasing glucose intolerance in pregnant Chinese–Americans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So-Young; Sy, Vanessa; Araki, Takako; Babushkin, Nicole; Huang, Diana; Tan, Doris; Liao, Emilia; Liu, George; Wan, Stephen; Poretsky, Leonid; Seto-Young, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, interleukin (IL)-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 levels and decreased high molecular weight adiponectin (HMW-APN) levels have been reported in Caucasians with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). No similar studies have been performed in Chinese women. Methods Serum samples were obtained 1?h after a 50-g glucose challenge test (1HGCT) from Chinese–American women at 24–28 gestational weeks and total adiponectin (T-APN), HMW-APN, CRP, TNF-?, IL-6, and MCP-1 concentrations were measured. Correlation coefficients for glucose (1HGCT), HbA1c, insulin, and body mass index (BMI) were calculated against T-APN, HMW-APN, CRP, TNF-?, IL-6, and MCP-1. Significant P-values were determined using Bonferroni adjustments. Results Women with GDM had higher insulin and 1HGCT and lower T-APN. In addition, T-APN was lower in non-GDM subjects who had 1HGCT ?135?mg/dL with no abnormal or one abnormal glucose value on the 3-h oral glucose tolerance test. There were no significant differences in HMW-APN and inflammatory marker levels between non-GDM and GDM groups. There were negative correlations between T-APN and 1HGCT, insulin, BMI, and HbA1c, as well as between HMW-APN and 1HGCT, insulin, and BMI. No significant correlations were observed between 1HGCT, HbA1c, insulin, or BMI and CRP, TNF-?, IL-6, or MCP-1. Conclusions T-APN is reduced in Chinese women with GDM and those without GDM but with evidence of glucose intolerance. Unlike results reported for Caucasians, Chinese–American women with GDM do not exhibit elevated levels of CRP, TNF-?, IL-6, or MCP-1, possibly because Chinese women are relatively leaner compared with Caucasians. PMID:24330072

  4. In utero growth restriction and catch-up adipogenesis after developmental di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exposure cause glucose intolerance in adult male rats following a high-fat dietary challenge.

    PubMed

    Strakovsky, Rita S; Lezmi, Stéphane; Shkoda, Ielyzaveta; Flaws, Jodi A; Helferich, William G; Pan, Yuan-Xiang

    2015-11-01

    Phthalates impact adipocyte morphology in vitro, but the sex-specific adipogenic signature immediately after perinatal di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) exposure and adulthood physiology following a high-fat (HF) dietary challenge are unknown. In the current study, pregnant and lactating dams received DEHP (300 mg/kg body weight) or oil. At weaning [postnatal day (PND) 21], adipose tissue was sampled for real-time polymerase chain reaction. The remaining offspring consumed a control or HF diet. DEHP decreased % fat in males at birth from 13.9%±0.2 to 11.8%±0.6 (mean±S.E.M.), representing a 15.1% decrease in fat by DEHP, and these males caught up in adiposity to controls by PND21. Adult DEHP-exposed males had a 27.5% increase in fat (12.5%±0.9% in controls vs. 15.9%±1.5% in the DEHP group); adipocyte perimeter was increased as well, with fewer small/medium-sized adipocytes, and decreased cell number compared to oil controls. HF diet intake in DEHP-exposed males further increased male energy intake and body weight and led to glucose intolerance. In PND21 males, DEHP increased the expression of adipogenic markers (Pparg1, Cebpa, Adipoq, Ppard, Fabp4, Fasn, Igf1), decreased Lep, and decreased markers of mesenchymal stem cell commitment to the adipogenic lineage (Bmp2, Bmp4, Stat1, Stat5a) compared to oil controls. These data suggest that DEHP may decrease the adipocyte pool at birth, which initially increases adaptive adipocyte maturation and lipid accumulation, but leads to adipose tissue dysfunction in adulthood, decreasing the capacity to adapt to a HF diet, and leading to systemic glucose intolerance. PMID:26188368

  5. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Poulter, Neil R; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Caulfield, Mark

    2015-08-22

    Raised blood pressure is the biggest single contributor to the global burden of disease and to global mortality. The numbers of people affected and the prevalence of high blood pressure worldwide are expected to increase over the next decade. Preventive strategies are therefore urgently needed, especially in less developed countries, and management of hypertension must be optimised. Genetic advances in some rare causes of hypertension have been made lately, but the aggregate effect on blood pressure of all the genetic loci identified to date is small. Hence, intervention on key environmental determinants and effective implementation of trial-based therapies are needed. Three-drug combinations can control hypertension in about 90% of patients but only if resources allow identification of patients and drug delivery is affordable. Furthermore, assessment of optimal drug therapy for each ethnic group is needed. PMID:25832858

  6. What Causes Lactose Intolerance?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes lactose intolerance? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... lactase in the body is the cause of lactose intolerance. The names for the three types of ...

  7. The effects of antihypertensive drugs on chromium status, glucose metabolism, and antioxidant and inflammatory indices in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Suliburska, Joanna; Krejpcio, Zbigniew; Staniek, Halina; Król, Ewelina; Bogdanski, Pawel; Kupsz, Justyna; Hertig, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    The long-term use of hypotensive drugs may cause side effects, including impaired glucose metabolism and mineral status. This study tested the hypothesis that some hypotensive drugs can affect tissular chromium levels and indices of glucose metabolic and antioxidant potential in rats. The experiment was performed on 40 male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), which were assigned to five groups: control (C), with perindopril (PR), with metoprolol (MT), with indapamide (ID), and with amlodipine (AM). All rats were provided ad libitum standard diet (with or without drugs) and distilled water for 45 days. Glucose and insulin levels, along with total antioxidant status (TAS) and concentrations of TNF-alpha and C-reactive protein, were assayed in serum. Chromium concentrations in the liver and kidney were determined using the flame atomic absorption spectrometry method. Detailed statistical analysis was performed using Statistica for Windows 10.0 (StatSoft, Poland). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by a post hoc Tukey test, was used to compare the data between groups. Treatment with indapamide and amlodipine resulted in significantly higher chromium concentrations in the liver and kidney (AM) of the rats, compared with the control group. A markedly higher concentration of glucose was found in the ID group. Treatment with amlodipine significantly increased TAS levels in serum and decreased TNF-alpha concentration in serum of the rats. A significant positive correlation between chromium concentration in tissues and serum TAS level was observed, as was a significant negative correlation between chromium concentration in the kidneys, and TNF-alpha and glucose levels in serum. In conclusion, the administration of amlodipine may lead to an increase in chromium accumulation in the internal organs, which is associated with increased antioxidant status and suppression of the inflammatory response of cells in SHRs. PMID:24249586

  8. Synergistic effect of uricase blockade plus physiological amounts of fructose-glucose on glomerular hypertension and oxidative stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Edilia; Cristóbal, Magdalena; García-Arroyo, Fernando E.; Soto, Virgilia; Monroy-Sánchez, Fabiola; Pacheco, Ursino; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Roncal-Jiménez, Carlos A.; Cruz-Robles, David; Ishimoto, Takuji; Madero, Magdalena; Johnson, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Fructose in sweetened beverages (SB) increases the risk for metabolic and cardiorenal disorders, and these effects are in part mediated by a secondary increment in uric acid (UA). Rodents have an active uricase, thus requiring large doses of fructose to increase plasma UA and to induce metabolic syndrome and renal hemodynamic changes. We therefore hypothesized that the effects of fructose in rats might be enhanced in the setting of uricase inhibition. Four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 7/group) were studied during 8 wk: water + vehicle (V), water + oxonic acid (OA; 750 mg/k BW), sweetened beverage (SB; 11% fructose-glucose combination) + V, and SB + OA. Systemic blood pressure, plasma UA, triglycerides (TG), glucose and insulin, glomerular hemodynamics, renal structural damage, renal cortex and liver UA, TG, markers of oxidative stress, mitDNA, fructokinase, and fatty liver synthase protein expressions were evaluated at the end of the experiment. Chronic hyperuricemia and SB induced features of the metabolic syndrome, including hypertension, hyperuricemia, hyperglycemia, and systemic and hepatic TG accumulation. OA alone also induced glomerular hypertension, and SB alone induced insulin resistance. SB + OA induced a combined phenotype including metabolic and renal alterations induced by SB or OA alone and in addition also acted synergistically on systemic and glomerular pressure, plasma glucose, hepatic TG, and oxidative stress. These findings explain why high concentrations of fructose are required to induce greater metabolic changes and renal disease in rats whereas humans, who lack uricase, appear to be much more sensitive to the effects of fructose. PMID:23303409

  9. Prevalence of Diabetes and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Hypertensive Adults in Rural China: Far from Leveling-Off

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shasha; Sun, Zhaoqing; Zheng, Liqiang; Guo, Xiaofan; Yang, Hongmei; Sun, Yingxian

    2015-01-01

    In recent years data from many investigations has shown a leveling–off trend in diabetes incidence. In order to explain the diabetes epidemic in rural China during the past ten years, we conducted a survey from July 2012 to August 2013. Data from comprehensive questionnaires, physical examinations, and blood tests were obtained from 5919 residents with hypertension, aged ? 35 years. Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were defined according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) criteria. The overall prevalence of diabetes and IFG were 15.3% (13.6% in men, 16.8% in women) and 40.7% (44.1% in men, 34.7% in women) in the hypertensive rural Chinese population. The prevalence of previously diagnosed diabetes was 6.5% (4.6% in men, 8.4% in women). The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 8.7% (9.0% in men, 8.5% in women). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that increasing age, drinking, overweight or obesity, systolic blood pressure, low HDL-C, high total cholesterol and triglycerides increased the risk of diabetes (p < 0.05). Diabetes is thus still prevalent in rural areas of China and is manifesting an accelerating trend. It remains an important public health problem in China, especially in rural areas and routine assessment for the early detection and treatment of diabetes should be emphasized. PMID:26610531

  10. Development of an HbA1c-Based Conversion Equation for Estimating Glycated Albumin in a Korean Population with a Wide Range of Glucose Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Joon; Cha, Bong Soo; Park, Cheol-Young; Jeon, Won Seon; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Jin, Sang-Man; Rhee, Sang Youl; Woo, Jeong-taek; Lee, Byung-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Background Compared to the golden standard glycation index of HbA1c, glycated albumin (GA) has potentials for assessing insulin secretory dysfunction and glycemic fluctuation as well as predicting diabetic vascular complications. However, the reference ranges of GA and a conversion equation need to be clearly defined. We designed this study to determine the reference ranges in patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) based on conventional measures of glycemic status and to devise a conversion equation for calculating HbA1c and GA in a Korean population. Methodology/Principal Findings In this multicenter, retrospective, cross-sectional study, we recruited antidiabetic drug-naïve patients with available glycemic variables including HbA1c, GA, and fasting plasma glucose regardless of glucose status. For the reference interval of serum GA, 5th to 95th percentile value of GA in subjects with NGT was adopted. The conversion equation between HbA1c and GA was devised using an estimating regression model with unknown break-points method. The reference range for GA was 9.0–14.0% in 2043 subjects. The 95th percentile responding values for FPG, and HbA1c were approximately 5.49 mmol/l, and 5.6%, respectively. The significant glycemic turning points were 5.868% HbA1c and 12.2% GA. The proposed conversion equation for below and above the turning point were GA (%)?=?6.960+0.8963 × HbA1c (%) and GA (%)?=??9.609+3.720 × HbA1c (%), respectively. Conclusions/Significance These results should be helpful in future studies on the clinical implications of high GA relative to HbA1c and the clinical implementation of diabetes management. PMID:24755655

  11. Glucan-rich polysaccharides from Pleurotus sajor-caju (Fr.) Singer prevents glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and inflammation in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pleurotus sajor-caju (P. sajor-caju) has been extremely useful in the prevention of diabetes mellitus due to its low fat and high soluble fiber content for thousands of years. Insulin resistance is a key component in the development of diabetes mellitus which is caused by inflammation. In this study, we aimed to investigate the in vivo efficacy of glucan-rich polysaccharide of P. sajor-caju (GE) against diabetes mellitus and inflammation in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet. Methods Diabetes was induced in C57BL/6J mice by feeding a high-fat diet. The mice were randomly assigned to 7 groups (n=6 per group). The control groups in this study were ND (for normal diet) and HFD (for high-fat diet). The treated groups were ND240 (for normal diet) (240 mg/kg b.w) and HFD60, HFD120 and HFD240 (for high-fat), where the mice were administrated with three dosages of GE (60, 120, 240 mg GE/kg b.w respectively). Metformin (2 mg/kg b.w) served as positive control. The glucose tolerance test, glucose and insulin levels were measured at the end of 16 weeks. Expressions of genes for inflammatory markers, GLUT-4 and adiponectin in the adipose tissue of the mice were assessed. One-way ANOVA and Duncan’s multiple range tests (DMRT) were used to determine the significant differences between groups. Results GE treated groups improved the glucose tolerance, attenuated hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia in the mice by up-regulating the adiponectin and GLUT-4 gene expressions. The mice in GE treated groups did not develop insulin resistance. GE also down-regulated the expression of inflammatory markers (IL-6, TNF-?, SAA2, CRP and MCP-1) via attenuation of nuclear transcription factors (NF-?B). Conclusion Glucan-rich polysaccharide of P. sajor-caju can serve as a potential agent for prevention of glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and inflammation. PMID:23259700

  12. Insulin resistance and its potential role in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seely, Ellen W; Solomon, Caren G

    2003-06-01

    New-onset hypertension (which includes preeclampsia and gestational hypertension) is a common and morbid complication of pregnancy. Many features of the insulin resistance syndrome have been associated with this condition. These include hypertension, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, obesity, and lipid abnormalities. Other accompanying abnormalities may include elevated levels of leptin, TNFalpha, tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and testosterone. The documentation of these features before the onset of hypertension in pregnancy suggests that insulin resistance or associated abnormalities may have a role in this disorder. Furthermore, the recognition that features of the insulin resistance syndrome persist many years after pregnancy among women with this condition raises the possibility that these women may have increased risk for future cardiovascular disease. These observations suggest that interventions to reduce insulin resistance may reduce the risk of both hypertension in pregnancy and later life cardiovascular complications, and warrant further study. PMID:12788833

  13. Dietary fructose intolerance, fructan intolerance and FODMAPs

    PubMed Central

    Fedewa, Amy; Rao, Satish S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intolerances to fructose, fructans and FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) are common, yet poorly recognized and managed. Over the last decade, they have come to the forefront because of new knowledge on the mechanisms and treatment of these conditions. Patients with these problems often present with unexplained bloating, belching, distension, gas, abdominal pain or diarrhea. Here, we have examined the most up-to-date research on these food-related intolerances, discussed controversies, and have provided some guidelines for the dietary management of these conditions. Breath testing for carbohydrate intolerance appears to be standardized and essential for the diagnosis and management of these conditions, especially in the Western population. While current research shows that the FODMAP diet may be effective in treating irritable bowel syndrome, additional research is needed to identify more foods items that are high in FODMAPs, and to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of dietary interventions. PMID:24357350

  14. Determining the amounts of urea and glucose in urine of patients with renal complications from diabetes mellitus and hypertension by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bispo, Jeyse A. M.; Silveira, Landulfo; Vieira, Elzo E. d. S.; Fernandes, Adriana B.

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus and hypertension diseases are frequently found in the same patient, which if untreated predispose to atherosclerotic and kidney diseases. The objective of this study was to identify potential biomarkers in the urine of diabetic and hypertensive patients through dispersive near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Urine samples were collected from patients with diabetes and hypertension but no complications (LG), high degree of complications (HG), and control ones: one fraction was submitted to biochemical tests and another one was stored frozen (-20°C) until spectral analysis. Samples were warmed up and placed in an aluminum sample holder for Raman spectra collection using a dispersive spectrometer (830 nm wavelength, 300 mW laser power and 20 s exposure time). Spectra were then submitted to Principal Components Analysis. The PCA loading vectors 1 and 3 revealed spectral features of urea/creatinine and glucose, respectively; the PCA scores showed that patients with diabetes/hypertension (LG and HG) had higher amount of glucose in the urine compared to the normal group (p < 0.05), which can bring serious consequences to patients. Also, the PCA scores showed that the amount of urea decreased in the groups with diabetes/hypertension (p < 0.05), which generates the same concern as it is a marker that has a strong importance in the metabolic changes induced by such diseases. These results, applied to the analysis of urine of patients with diabetes/hypertension, can lead to early diagnostic information of complications and a possible disease prognosis in the patients where no complications from diabetes and hypertension were found.

  15. CYP1B1 deficiency ameliorates obesity and glucose intolerance induced by high fat diet in adult C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaocong; Huang, Tingting; Li, Lu; Tang, Yumeng; Tian, Yatao; Wang, Suqing; Fan, Cuifang

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) expression increases in multi-potential mesenchymal stromal cells C3H10T1/2 during adipogenesis, which parallel with PPAR?, a critical transcriptional factor in adipogenic process. To assess the role of CYP1B1 in fatty acid metabolism, adult C57BL/6J wild-type and CYP1B1 deficiency mice were fed with high fat diets (HFD) for 6 weeks. CYP1B1 deficiency attenuated HFD-induced obesity when compared with their wild type counterparts, and improve glucose tolerance. The reduction in body weight gain and white adipose tissue in CYP1B1 deficient mice exhibited coordinate decreases in fatty acid synthesis (PPAR?, CD36, FAS, SCD-1) and increases in fatty acid oxidation (UCP-2, CPT-1a) when compared with wild type ones. Lower hepatocyte TG contents were consistent with hepatic Oil-Red-O staining in the CYP1B1 deficiency mice. AMPK, a nutrient sensors for energy homeostasis, was activated in both fat pad and liver by CYP1B1 deficiency. However, in vitro system, knock down CYP1B1 in C3H10T1/2 cells does not abolish adipogenesis induced by adipogenic agents IDM (Insulin, Dexamethasone, Methylisobutylxanthine). Our in vivo and in vitro findings of CYP1B1 deficiency in fat metabolism suggest a complex regulation network between CYP1B1 and energy homeostasis. PMID:26064443

  16. Relation of blood volume and blood pressure in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    A complex but crucial relationship exists between blood volume and blood pressure in human subjects; it has been recognized that in essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma, the relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure is an inverse one. This phenomenon has not been studied in individuals with low normal and reduced blood pressures. Orthostatic intolerance is a commonly encountered abnormality in blood pressure regulation often associated with tachycardia in the standing position. Most of these patients have varying degrees of reduced blood volume. We tested the hypothesis that the relationship previously found between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in pressor states would also hold in orthostatic intolerance. We studied 16 patients with a history of symptomatic orthostatic intolerance associated with an elevation in plasma norepinephrine in the upright posture and hypovolemia in 9 patients and normovolemia in 7 patients. Our studies demonstrate an inverse relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in patients with orthostatic intolerance. This finding also holds for the change in diastolic blood pressure in response to upright posture. In this relationship, patients with orthostatic intolerance with high plasma norepinephrine resemble those with essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma. We conclude that in a variety of conditions at both ends of the blood pressure spectrum, the seemingly paradoxical association of hypovolemia and diastolic blood pressure is preserved.

  17. Lactose Intolerance (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Doctors usually diagnose lactose intolerance through a simple hydrogen breath test. A person blows into a tube ... there is a higher than average level of hydrogen and methane in the breath. That's because undigested ...

  18. Hypertension in the metabolic syndrome: summary of the new position statement of the European Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Redon, Josep; Cífková, Renata; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2009-04-01

    Arterial hypertension is often part of a larger constellation of anthropometric and metabolic abnormalities that includes abdominal (or visceral) obesity, characteristic dyslipidemia (low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high triglycerides), glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and hyperuricemia. Using Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, prevalence is higher than in the general population and the metabolic syndrome (MS) can be found in as many as one third of patients. In hypertensives with MS, a high prevalence of hypertension-induced target organ damage and a negative prognostic value have been described. Dietary advice and life style changes should be strongly recommended and prompt pharmacologic treatment is required to control high blood pressure and to reduce risk. The effect of particular antihypertensive drugs on other components of the MS is an important clinical issue with consequences for the success of the treatment. PMID:19413186

  19. Brief review: hypertension in pregnancy : a manifestation of the insulin resistance syndrome?

    PubMed

    Solomon, C G; Seely, E W

    2001-02-01

    Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), which includes both gestational hypertension and preeclampsia, is a common and morbid pregnancy complication for which the pathogenesis remains unclear. Emerging evidence suggests that insulin resistance, which has been linked to essential hypertension, may play a role in PIH. Conditions associated with increased insulin resistance, including gestational diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome, and obesity, may predispose to hypertensive pregnancy. Furthermore, metabolic abnormalities linked to the insulin resistance syndrome are also observed in women with PIH to a greater degree than in normotensive pregnant women: These include glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, and high levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, leptin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. These observations suggest the possibility that insulin resistance may be involved in the pathogenesis of PIH and that approaches that improve insulin sensitivity might have benefit in the prevention or treatment of this syndrome, although this requires further study. PMID:11230277

  20. Orthostatic intolerance: a disorder of young women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Y. S.; Daamen, N.; Jacob, G.; Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is a cause of significant disability in otherwise healthy women seen by gynecologists. Orthostatic tachycardia is often the most obvious hemodynamic abnormality found in OI patients, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety, and, in some cases, fainting (syncope). It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension, and patients with OI are traditionally women of childbearing age. Estimates suggest that at least 500,000 Americans suffer from some form of OI, and such patients comprise the largest group referred to centers specialized in autonomic disorders. This article reviews recent advances made in the understanding of this condition, potential pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to orthostatic intolerance, and therapeutic alternatives currently available for the management of these patients.

  1. Intolerance of Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Meghan L.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic and progressive neurologic condition that, by its nature, carries uncertainty as a hallmark characteristic. Although all patients face uncertainty, there is variability in how individuals cope with its presence. In other populations, the concept of “intolerance of uncertainty” has been conceptualized to explain this variability such that individuals who have difficulty tolerating the possibility of future occurrences may engage in thoughts or behaviors by which they attempt to exert control over that possibility or lessen the uncertainty but may, as a result, experience worse outcomes, particularly in terms of psychological well-being. This topical review introduces MS-focused researchers, clinicians, and patients to intolerance of uncertainty, integrates the concept with what is already understood about coping with MS, and suggests future steps for conceptual, assessment, and treatment-focused research that may benefit from integrating intolerance of uncertainty as a central feature. PMID:26300700

  2. The Effect of the Missouri WISEWOMAN Program on Control of Hypertension, Hypercholesterolemia, and Elevated Blood Glucose Among Low-Income Women

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Sherri G.; McBride, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Well-Integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation (WISEWOMAN) public health program is designed to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke among low-income, underinsured or uninsured women through clinical screenings, risk factor assessment, and lifestyle interventions. We assessed the effect of the Missouri WISEWOMAN program on the control of high blood pressure, total cholesterol, and blood glucose levels. Methods We calculated the proportion of participants (N = 1,130) with abnormal blood pressure, total cholesterol, or blood glucose levels at an initial screening visit who gained control at a follow-up visit 11 to 18 months later during a 7-year period from June 30, 2005, to June 29, 2012. We used logistic regression to identify sociodemographic characteristics and other factors associated with achieving control. Results Many WISEWOMAN participants gained control of their blood pressure (41.2%), total cholesterol (24.7%), or blood glucose levels (50.0%). After controlling for sociodemographic factors, smoking status, weight status, medication use, and number of lifestyle interventions, nondiabetic women with stage II hypertension (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.21–0.60) and diabetic women with stage I (AOR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.32–0.92) and stage II (AOR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.07–0.77) hypertension were less likely to achieve control of their blood pressure than nondiabetic women with stage I hypertension. Women aged 45 to 64, women with less than a high school education, women who were obese in the initial visit, women who gained 7% or more of their weight, and women who did not participate in any lifestyle intervention sessions were significantly less likely to achieve total cholesterol control than their counterparts. Conclusion The Missouri WISEWOMAN program helps many participants achieve control of blood pressure, total cholesterol, and blood glucose levels; the lifestyle intervention is likely to help participants control total cholesterol. More efforts are needed for women with diabetes and stage II hypertension to achieve blood pressure control. PMID:24784910

  3. Allergies and Intolerance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is affected by genetics (there are two established genetic factors for celiac disease: DQ2 and DQ8) and factors in the environment. ... CeliacDisease.net. Type of Condition Food Allergy Intolerance Celiac Disease Immune System Genetic Risk Involvement? Yes Yes No Yes* Yes Yes ...

  4. Effect of i1 imidazoline receptor agonist, moxonidine, in nitric oxide-deficient hypertension in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Gairard, Alexis; Lopez-Miranda, Visitacion; Pernot, Fanny; Beck, Jean F; Coumaros, Geneviève; Van Overloop, Bruno; La Roche, Benoît; Koehl, Christian; Christen, Marie O

    2004-05-01

    Decreased nitric oxide production has been reported in preeclampsia, which is also frequently associated with glucose intolerance. It was thus considered of interest to investigate the effects of moxonidine, a centrally acting antihypertensive drug that reduces insulin resistance, in a rat model of preeclampsia. Hypertension was induced in Wistar rats by dietary l-NNA (N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine, 0.063%, 31 mg/kg/d, days 13-19 of gestation) and, over the same period, moxonidine or vehicle was administered orally (2 mg/kg/d by gavage). On day 20, blood pressure was measured in the pentobarbital anesthetized animals, glucose tolerance was tested (2 g/kg glucose i.p.), and morphologic studies were conducted on the litter to determine the benefits with respect to fetal outcome. Hypertension was reduced with daily moxonidine treatment (P < 0.05). Basal plasma insulin and insulin/glucose index were decreased with moxonidine treatment evidencing improved insulin sensitivity in the control and l-NNA-treated pregnant rats (P < 0.05). After glucose challenge, plasma insulin increased in all the groups as expected and plasma insulin and insulin/glucose index were significantly higher in the l-NNA group than in the control, moxonidine, or l-NNA + moxonidine groups (P < 0.05 for time 60 minutes). Thus, moxonidine improved glucose tolerance in l-NNA-treated pregnant rats. Moreover, moxonidine treatment very effectively decreased the number of necroses (1 necrosis in 71 fetuses in the l-NNA + moxonidine group versus 15 necroses in 79 fetuses in the l-NNA group, P < 0.01). In conclusion, the 7-day treatment with moxonidine suppressed hypertension and reduced glucose intolerance and fetal necrosis, thus demonstrating the effectiveness of moxonidine in the preeclamptic model. PMID:15071362

  5. Sorbitol intolerance in adults.

    PubMed

    Jain, N K; Rosenberg, D B; Ulahannan, M J; Glasser, M J; Pitchumoni, C S

    1985-09-01

    Sorbitol is a commonly used sugar substitute in "sugar-free" food products. Although sorbitol intolerance manifested by abdominal pain, bloating, and diarrhea has been observed in children, it has not been well documented in adults. Forty-two healthy adults (23 whites, 19 nonwhites) participated in this study. After ingestion of 10 g of sorbitol solution, end expiratory breath samples were collected at 15-min intervals for 4 h and analyzed for H2 concentration. Clinical sorbitol intolerance was detected in 43% of the whites and 55% of the nonwhites, the difference not being statistically significant. However, severe clinical sorbitol intolerance was significantly more prevalent in nonwhites (32%) as compared to whites (4%). There was a good correlation between the severity of symptoms and the amount of hydrogen exhaled. Dietetic foods, many of them containing sorbitol, are very popular with diabetics and "weight watchers." Based on our observations, we believe that a large number of adults could be suffering from sorbitol-induced nonspecific abdominal symptoms and diarrhea. These symptoms could lead to an extensive diagnostic work-up and lifelong diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:4036946

  6. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  7. How Is Lactose Intolerance Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... following tests also can help diagnose lactose intolerance: Hydrogen breath test. For this test, a person drinks ... beverage that has lactose in it. Then, the hydrogen level in the breath is measured at set ...

  8. ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature13793 Artificial sweeteners induce glucose

    E-print Network

    ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature13793 Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results

  9. Pregnancy-induced hypertension and insulin resistance: evidence for a connection.

    PubMed

    Innes, K E; Wimsatt, J H

    1999-04-01

    PIH, the most common complication of pregnancy, remains a major source of maternal-child morbidity and mortality. Yet the etiology of this disorder is still little understood. There is now a growing body of evidence linking PIH and insulin resistance. Both proteinuric and non-proteinuric PIH predict future essential hypertension, and to a lesser extent, diabetes, disorders strongly related to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. PIH is associated with diabetes, occurring in up to 50% of diabetic pregnancies. PIH is characterized by the same features that define IRS, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, disruption of endothelial and platelet function and related disturbances of prostanoid synthesis, coagulation and fibrinolytic abnormalities, hyperuricemia, atherosclerotic changes, and obesity. During the last decade, controlled studies by at least 11 different research groups in nine countries have established significant positive associations between both proteinuric and nonproteinuric PIH and various measures of insulin resistance. In particular, prospective investigations by at least five groups of investigators have indicated that relative hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin insensitivity predict the subsequent development of PIH. These and other studies suggest that insulin resistance may play a causal role in the pathogenesis of PIH, and that some aspects of PIH may represent an early manifestation of IRS, precipitated by the profound metabolic and hemostatic challenges of gestation. PMID:10203292

  10. Ocular Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Eye Health News Consumer Alerts What Is Ocular Hypertension? Tweet Ocular hypertension is when the pressure inside the eye (intraocular ... IOP) is higher than normal. What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes Ocular Hypertension Symptoms Ocular Hypertension ...

  11. Overcoming the barrier of lactose intolerance to reduce health disparities.

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Judith K.; Miller, Gregory D.

    2002-01-01

    Federal health goals for the public have focused on reducing health disparities that exist between whites and various racial and ethnic groups. Many of the chronic diseases for which African Americans are at greater risk- hypertension, stroke, colon cancer, and obesity-may be exacerbated by a low intake of calcium and/or other dairy-related nutrients. For example, a low intake of dairy food nutrients, such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium, may contribute to the high risk of hypertension seen in African Americans. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) study demonstrated that a low-fat diet rich in fruits and vegetables (8 to 10 servings) and low-fat dairy foods (3 servings) significantly reduced blood pressure-and was twice as effective in African-American participants. Calcium and dairy food consumption is particularly low among African-American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. Average intakes are near the threshold of 600 to 700 mg/day, below which bone loss and hypertension can result. Although lactose intolerance may be partly to blame for the low calcium intakes due to reduced dairy food consumption by minority populations, culturally determined food preferences and dietary practices learned early in life also play a role. The high incidence figures for primary lactose maldigestion among minority groups grossly overestimates the number who will experience intolerance symptoms after drinking a glass of milk with a meal. Randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials have demonstrated that by using a few simple dietary strategies, those who maldigest lactose (have low levels of the lactase enzyme) can easily tolerate a dairy-rich diet that meets calcium intake recommendations. Physicians and other health professionals can help their minority patients and the general public understand how to improve calcium nutrition by overcoming the surmountable barrier of lactose intolerance. At the same time they will be helping to reduce the incidence of calcium-related chronic diseases for which minority populations are at high risk. PMID:11853047

  12. Incretins and selective renal sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors in hypertension and coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Ramiro A; Sanabria, Hugo; de los Santos, Cecilia; Ramirez, Agustin J

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and the consequences of intensive therapy may depend on the mechanism of the anti-diabetic agent(s) used to achieve a tight control. In animal models, stable analogues of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were able to reduce body weight and blood pressure and also had favorable effects on ischemia following coronary reperfusion. In a similar way, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) showed to have favorable effects in animal models of ischemia/reperfusion. This could be due to the fact that DPP-IV inhibitors were able to prevent the breakdown of GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, but they also decreased the degradation of several vasoactive peptides. Preclinical data for GLP-1, its derivatives and inhibitors of the DPP-IV enzyme degradation suggests that these agents may be able to, besides controlling glycaemia, induce cardio-protective and vasodilator effects. Notwithstanding the many favorable cardiovascular effects of GLP-1/incretins reported in different studies, many questions remain unanswered due the limited number of studies in human beings that aim to examine the effects of GLP-1 on cardiovascular endpoints. For this reason, long-term trials searching for positive cardiovascular effects are now in process, such as the CAROLINA and CARMELINA trials, which are supported by small pilot studies performed in humans (and many more animal studies) with incretin-based therapies. On the other hand, selective renal sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors were also evaluated in the prevention of cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes. However, it is quite early to draw conclusions, since data on cardiovascular outcomes and cardiovascular death are limited and long-term studies are still ongoing. In this review, we will analyze the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular effects of incretins and, at the same time, we will present a critical position about the real value of these compounds in the cardiovascular system and its protection. PMID:26380062

  13. Incretins and selective renal sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors in hypertension and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ramiro A; Sanabria, Hugo; de Los Santos, Cecilia; Ramirez, Agustin J

    2015-09-10

    Hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and the consequences of intensive therapy may depend on the mechanism of the anti-diabetic agent(s) used to achieve a tight control. In animal models, stable analogues of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were able to reduce body weight and blood pressure and also had favorable effects on ischemia following coronary reperfusion. In a similar way, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) showed to have favorable effects in animal models of ischemia/reperfusion. This could be due to the fact that DPP-IV inhibitors were able to prevent the breakdown of GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, but they also decreased the degradation of several vasoactive peptides. Preclinical data for GLP-1, its derivatives and inhibitors of the DPP-IV enzyme degradation suggests that these agents may be able to, besides controlling glycaemia, induce cardio-protective and vasodilator effects. Notwithstanding the many favorable cardiovascular effects of GLP-1/incretins reported in different studies, many questions remain unanswered due the limited number of studies in human beings that aim to examine the effects of GLP-1 on cardiovascular endpoints. For this reason, long-term trials searching for positive cardiovascular effects are now in process, such as the CAROLINA and CARMELINA trials, which are supported by small pilot studies performed in humans (and many more animal studies) with incretin-based therapies. On the other hand, selective renal sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors were also evaluated in the prevention of cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes. However, it is quite early to draw conclusions, since data on cardiovascular outcomes and cardiovascular death are limited and long-term studies are still ongoing. In this review, we will analyze the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular effects of incretins and, at the same time, we will present a critical position about the real value of these compounds in the cardiovascular system and its protection. PMID:26380062

  14. The effect of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 polymorphisms on blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipid profiles following the supplementation of kale (Brassica oleracea acephala) juice in South Korean subclinical hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jeong-Hwa; Lee, Hye-Jin; Kim, Tae-Seok

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Glutathione S-transferase (GST) forms a multigene family of phase II detoxification enzymes which are involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species. This study examines whether daily supplementation of kale juice can modulate blood pressure (BP), levels of lipid profiles, and blood glucose, and whether this modulation could be affected by the GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms. SUBJECTS/METHODS 84 subclinical hypertensive patients showing systolic BP over 130 mmHg or diastolic BP over 85 mmHg received 300 ml/day of kale juice for 6 weeks, and blood samples were collected on 0-week and 6-week in order to evaluate plasma lipid profiles (total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol) and blood glucose. RESULTS Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was significantly decreased in all patients regardless of their GSTM1 or GSTT1 polymorphisms after kale juice supplementation. Blood glucose level was decreased only in the GSTM1-present genotype, and plasma lipid profiles showed no difference in both the GSTM1-null and GSTM1-present genotypes. In the case of GSTT1, on the other hand, plasma HDL-C was increased and LDL-C was decreased only in the GSTT1-present type, while blood glucose was decreased only in the GSTT1-null genotype. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that the supplementation of kale juice affected blood pressure, lipid profiles, and blood glucose in subclinical hypertensive patients depending on their GST genetic polymorphisms, and the improvement of lipid profiles was mainly greater in the GSTT1-present genotype and the decrease of blood glucose was greater in the GSTM1-present or GSTT1-null genotypes. PMID:25671068

  15. Gluten intolerance and skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Philippe; Pelletier, Fabien; Dreno, Brigitte; Puzenat, Eve; Aubin, François

    2006-01-01

    Gluten sensitivity with or without coeliac disease (CD) symptoms and intestinal pathology has been suggested as a potentially treatable cause of various diseases. CD is a chronic disease which improves on withdrawal of wheat gliadins and barley, rye and oat prolamins from the diet. There have been numerous reports linking CD with several skin conditions. A body of evidence shows that dermatitis herpetiformis is actually a cutaneous manifestation of CD. Autoimmune diseases, allergic diseases, psoriasis and miscellaneous diseases have also been described with gluten intolerance. Dermatologists should be familiar with the appraisal of gluten sensitive enteropathy and should be able to search for an underlying gluten intolerance (GI). Serological screening by means of antigliadin, antiendomysial and transglutaminase antibodies should be performed. HLA typing is often useful in association with serologic tests. Intestinal biopsy is usually needed to establish the diagnosis of CD or GI. Thus, gluten intolerance gives rise to a variety of dermatological manifestations which may benefit from a gluten-free diet. PMID:16436335

  16. Sensory Intolerance: Latent Structure and Psychopathologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Steven; Conelea, Christine A.; McKay, Dean; Crowe, Katherine B.; Abramowitz, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sensory intolerance refers to high levels of distress evoked by everyday sounds (e.g., sounds of people chewing) or commonplace tactile sensations (e.g., sticky or greasy substances). Sensory intolerance may be associated with obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms, OC-related phenomena, and other forms of psychopathology. Sensory intolerance is not included as a syndrome in current diagnostic systems, although preliminary research suggests that it might be a distinct syndrome. Objectives First, to investigate the latent structure of sensory intolerance in adults; that is, to investigate whether it is syndrome-like in nature, in which auditory and tactile sensory intolerance co-occur and are associated with impaired functioning. Second, to investigate the psychopathologic correlates of sensory intolerance. In particular, to investigate whether sensory intolerance is associated with OC-related phenomena, as suggested by previous research. Method A sample of 534 community-based participants were recruited via Amazon.com’s Mechanical Turk program. Participants completed measures of sensory intolerance, OC-related phenomena, and general psychopathology. Results Latent class analysis revealed two classes of individuals: Those who were intolerant of both auditory and tactile stimuli (n = 150), and those who were relatively undisturbed by auditory or tactile stimuli (n = 384). Sensory intolerant individuals, compared to those who were comparatively sensory tolerant, had greater scores on indices of general psychopathology, more severe OC symptoms, a higher likelihood of meeting caseness criteria for OC disorder, elevated scores on measures of OC-related dysfunctional beliefs, a greater tendency to report OC-related phenomena (e.g., a greater frequency of tics), and more impairment on indices of social and occupational functioning. Sensory intolerant individuals had significantly higher scores on OC symptoms even after controlling for general psychopathology. Conclusions Consistent with recent research, these findings provide further evidence for a sensory intolerance syndrome. The findings provide a rationale for conducting future research for determining whether a sensory intolerance syndrome should be included in the diagnostic nomenclature. PMID:24703593

  17. Hypocapnia and cerebral hypoperfusion in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, V.; Spies, J. M.; Novak, P.; McPhee, B. R.; Rummans, T. A.; Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Orthostatic and other stresses trigger tachycardia associated with symptoms of tremulousness, shortness of breath, dizziness, blurred vision, and, often, syncope. It has been suggested that paradoxical cerebral vasoconstriction during head-up tilt might be present in patients with orthostatic intolerance. We chose to study middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow velocity (BFV) and cerebral vasoregulation during tilt in patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI). METHODS: Beat-to-beat BFV from the MCA, heart rate, CO2, blood pressure (BP), and respiration were measured in 30 patients with OI (25 women and 5 men; age range, 21 to 44 years; mean age, 31.3+/-1.2 years) and 17 control subjects (13 women and 4 men; age range, 20 to 41 years; mean age, 30+/-1.6 years); ages were not statistically different. These indices were monitored during supine rest and head-up tilt (HUT). We compared spontaneous breathing and hyperventilation and evaluated the effect of CO2 rebreathing in these 2 positions. RESULTS: The OI group had higher supine heart rates (P<0.001) and cardiac outputs (P<0.01) than the control group. In response to HUT, OI patients underwent a greater heart rate increment (P<0.001) and greater reductions in pulse pressure (P<0.01) and CO2 (P<0.001), but total systemic resistance failed to show an increment. Among the cerebrovascular indices, all BFVs (systolic, diastolic, and mean) decreased significantly more, and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) was increased in OI patients (P<0.01) compared with control subjects. In both groups, hyperventilation induced mild tachycardia (P<0.001), a significant reduction of BFV, and a significant increase of CVR associated with a fall in CO2. Hyperventilation during HUT reproduced hypocapnia, BFV reduction, and tachycardia and worsened symptoms of OI; these symptoms and indices were improved within 2 minutes of CO2 rebreathing. The relationships between CO2 and BFV and heart rate were well described by linear regressions, and the slope was not different between control subjects and patients with OI. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebral vasoconstriction occurs in OI during orthostasis, which is primarily due to hyperventilation, causing significant hypocapnia. Hypocapnia and symptoms of orthostatic hypertension are reversible by CO2 rebreathing.

  18. Correlating the amount of urea, creatinine, and glucose in urine from patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension with the risk of developing renal lesions by means of Raman spectroscopy and principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martins; de Sousa Vieira, Elzo Everton; Silveira, Landulfo; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha

    2013-08-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension (HT) diseases are predisposed to kidney diseases. The objective of this study was to identify potential biomarkers in the urine of diabetic and hypertensive patients through Raman spectroscopy in order to predict the evolution to complications and kidney failure. Urine samples were collected from control subjects (CTR) and patients with diabetes and HT with no complications (lower risk, LR), high degree of complications (higher risk, HR), and doing blood dialysis (DI). Urine samples were stored frozen (-20°C) before spectral analysis. Raman spectra were obtained using a dispersive spectrometer (830-nm, 300-mW power, and 20-s accumulation). Spectra were then submitted to principal component analysis (PCA) followed by discriminant analysis. The first PCA loading vectors revealed spectral features of urea, creatinine, and glucose. It has been found that the amounts of urea and creatinine decreased as disease evoluted from CTR to LR/HR and DI (PC1, p<0.05), and the amount of glucose increased in the urine of LR/HR compared to CTR (PC3, p<0.05). The discriminating model showed better overall classification rate of 70%. These results could lead to diagnostic information of possible complications and a better disease prognosis.

  19. Lactose intolerance and other disaccharidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Balvir S

    2014-09-01

    Intolerance to foods which contain lactose can cause a range of intestinal and systemic symptoms. These symptoms are caused by Lactase deficiency which is encoded by a single gene (LCT) of ? 50 kb located on chromosome 2q21. In some food items, lactose has been missed because of "hidden" lactose due to inadequately labeled, confusing diagnosis of lactose intolerance based on dietary restriction of dairy foods. Two polymorphisms, C/T13910 and G/A22018, linked to hypolactasia, correlate with breath hydrogen and symptoms after lactose. The key in the management of lactose intolerance is the dietary removal of lactose. Patients diagnosed as lactose intolerant must be advised of "risk" foods, inadequately labeled, including processed meats, bread, cake mixes, soft drinks, and lagers. This review highlights the types, symptoms and management of lactose intolerance and also highlights differences from milk allergy which closely mimics the symptoms of lactose intolerance. PMID:24596060

  20. Metabolic syndrome in hypertensive patients: An unholy alliance

    PubMed Central

    Mulè, Giuseppe; Calcaterra, Ilenia; Nardi, Emilio; Cerasola, Giovanni; Cottone, Santina

    2014-01-01

    For many years, it has been recognized that hypertension tends to cluster with various anthropometric and metabolic abnormalities including abdominal obesity, elevated triglycerides, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and hyperuricemia. This constellation of various conditions has been transformed from a pathophysiological concept to a clinical entity, which has been defined metabolic syndrome (MetS). The consequences of the MetS have been difficult to assess without commonly accepted criteria to diagnose it. For this reason, on 2009 the International Diabetes Federation, the American Heart Association and other scientific organizations proposed a unified MetS definition. The incidence of the MetS has been increasing worldwide in parallel with an increase in overweight and obesity. The epidemic proportion reached by the MetS represents a major public health challenge, because several lines of evidence showed that the MetS, even without type 2 diabetes, confers an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in different populations including also hypertensive patients. It is likely that the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with MetS in patients with high blood pressure may be largely mediated through an increased prevalence of preclinical cardiovascular and renal changes, such as left ventricular hypertrophy, early carotid atherosclerosis, impaired aortic elasticity, hypertensive retinopathy and microalbuminuria. Indeed, many reports support this notion, showing that hypertensive patients with MetS exhibit, more often than those without it, these early signs of end organ damage, most of which are recognized as significant independent predictors of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:25276291

  1. Blood pressure-lowering effect of the sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitor ertugliflozin, assessed via ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Amin, N B; Wang, X; Mitchell, J R; Lee, D S; Nucci, G; Rusnak, J M

    2015-08-01

    This study compared the blood pressure-lowering effect of ertugliflozin (1, 5, 25?mg), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ; 12.5?mg) and placebo in 194 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension for 4?weeks using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Endpoints (change from baseline to week?4) were: 24-h mean systolic blood pressure (SBP; primary); daytime, night-time, seated predose SBP, 24-h, daytime, night-time, seated predose diastolic blood pressure, 24-h urinary glucose excretion and fasting plasma glucose (FPG; secondary). Safety and tolerability were monitored. Significant decreases in placebo-corrected 24-h mean SBP (-3.0 to -4.0?mmHg) were recorded for all doses of ertugliflozin (for HCTZ, this was -3.2?mmHg). Daytime, but not night-time SBP was consistently reduced. Ertugliflozin produced dose-dependent significant decreases in FPG and increases in urinary glucose excretion. No notable changes in plasma renin activity or urinary aldosterone were seen. The most common adverse events were urinary tract infection, genital fungal infection, upper respiratory tract infection and musculoskeletal pain. PMID:25951755

  2. Histamine, histamine intoxication and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kovacova-Hanuskova, E; Buday, T; Gavliakova, S; Plevkova, J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of histamine in the body leads to miscellaneous symptoms mediated by its bond to corresponding receptors (H1-H4). Increased concentration of histamine in blood can occur in healthy individuals after ingestion of foods with high contents of histamine, leading to histamine intoxication. In individuals with histamine intolerance (HIT) ingestion of food with normal contents of histamine causes histamine-mediated symptoms. HIT is a pathological process, in which the enzymatic activity of histamine-degrading enzymes is decreased or inhibited and they are insufficient to inactivate histamine from food and to prevent its passage to blood-stream. Diagnosis of HIT is difficult. Multi-faced, non-specific clinical symptoms provoked by certain kinds of foods, beverages and drugs are often attributed to different diseases, such as allergy and food intolerance, mastocytosis, psychosomatic diseases, anorexia nervosa or adverse drug reactions. Correct diagnosis of HIT followed by therapy based on histamine-free diet and supplementation of diamine oxidase can improve patient's quality of life. PMID:26242570

  3. What People with Lactose Intolerance Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What People With Lactose Intolerance Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... Imperfecta Prostate Cancer Rheumatoid Arthritis Smoking Partner Resources Lactose Intolerance (NIDDK) Lactose Intolerance: Information for Researchers and ...

  4. Worry, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Statistics Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Amanda S.

    2013-01-01

    Statistics anxiety is a problem for most graduate students. This study investigates the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, worry, and statistics anxiety. Intolerance of uncertainty was significantly related to worry, and worry was significantly related to three types of statistics anxiety. Six types of statistics anxiety were…

  5. Space Flight Orthostatic Intolerance Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luty, Wei

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes investigations conducted on different orthostatic intolerance protection garments. This paper emphasizes on the engineering and operational aspects of the project. The current Shuttle pneumatic Anti-G Suit or AGS at 25 mmHg (0.5 psi) and customized medical mechanical compressive garments (20-30 mmHg) were tested on human subjects. The test process is presented. The preliminary results conclude that mechanical compressive garments can ameliorate orthostatic hypotension in hypovolemic subjects. A mechanical compressive garment is light, small and works without external pressure gas source; however the current garment design does not provide an adjustment to compensate for the loss of mass and size in the lower torso during long term space missions. It is also difficult to don. Compression garments that do not include an abdominal component are less effective countermeasures than garments which do. An early investigation conducted by the Human Adaptation and Countermeasures Division at Johnson Space Center (JSC) has shown there is no significant difference between the protection function of the AGS (at 77 mmHg or 1.5 psi) and the Russian anti-g suit, Kentavr (at 25 mmHg or 0.5 psi). Although both garments successfully countered hypovolemia-induced orthostatic intolerance, the Kentavr provided protection by using lower levels of compression pressure. This more recent study with a lower AGS pressure shows that pressures at 20-30 mmHg is acceptable but protection function is not as effective as higher pressure. In addition, a questionnaire survey with flight crewmembers who used both AGS and Kentavr during different missions was also performed.

  6. Nervous glucose sensing regulates postnatal ? cell proliferation and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tarussio, David; Metref, Salima; Seyer, Pascal; Mounien, Lourdes; Vallois, David; Magnan, Christophe; Foretz, Marc; Thorens, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    How glucose sensing by the nervous system impacts the regulation of ? cell mass and function during postnatal development and throughout adulthood is incompletely understood. Here, we studied mice with inactivation of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) in the nervous system (NG2KO mice). These mice displayed normal energy homeostasis but developed late-onset glucose intolerance due to reduced insulin secretion, which was precipitated by high-fat diet feeding. The ? cell mass of adult NG2KO mice was reduced compared with that of WT mice due to lower ? cell proliferation rates in NG2KO mice during the early postnatal period. The difference in proliferation between NG2KO and control islets was abolished by ganglionic blockade or by weaning the mice on a carbohydrate-free diet. In adult NG2KO mice, first-phase insulin secretion was lost, and these glucose-intolerant mice developed impaired glucagon secretion when fed a high-fat diet. Electrophysiological recordings showed reduced parasympathetic nerve activity in the basal state and no stimulation by glucose. Furthermore, sympathetic activity was also insensitive to glucose. Collectively, our data show that GLUT2-dependent control of parasympathetic activity defines a nervous system/endocrine pancreas axis that is critical for ? cell mass establishment in the postnatal period and for long-term maintenance of ? cell function. PMID:24334455

  7. Orthostatic intolerance and the headache patient.

    PubMed

    Mack, Kenneth J; Johnson, Jonathan N; Rowe, Peter C

    2010-06-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) refers to a group of clinical conditions, including postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and neurally mediated hypotension (NMH), in which symptoms worsen with upright posture and are ameliorated by recumbence. The main symptoms of chronic orthostatic intolerance syndromes include light-headedness, syncope or near syncope, blurring of vision, headaches, problems with short-term memory and concentration, fatigue, intolerance of low impact exercise, palpitations, chest pain, diaphoresis, tremulousness, dyspnea or air hunger, nausea, and vomiting. This review discusses what is known about the pathophysiology of this disorder, potential treatments, and understanding its role in the patient with chronic headache pain. PMID:20541103

  8. Mechanisms of post-flight orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, C. G.; Buckey, J. C.; Gaffney, F. A.; Lane, L. D.; Levine, B. D.; Watenpaugh, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Post-flight orthostatic intolerance is a dramatic physiological consequence of human adaptation to microgravity made inappropriate by a sudden return to 1-G. The immediate mechanism is almost always a failure to maintain adequate tissue perfusion, specifically perfusion of the central nervous system, but vestibular dysfunction may occasionally be the primary cause. Orthostatic intolerance is present in a wide range of clinical disorders of the nervous and cardiovascular systems. The intolerance that is produced by spaceflight and 1-G analogs (bed rest, head-down tilt at a moderate angle, water immersion) is different from its clinical counterparts by being only transiently present in subjects who otherwise have normal cardiovascular and regulatory systems. However, the same set of basic pathophysiological elements should be considered in the analysis of any form of orthostatic intolerance.

  9. Lactose Intolerance: A Guide for Teens

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are lactose intolerant. You may also have a hydrogen breath test to confirm this diagnosis. A hydrogen breath test is done by breathing into a machine that measures the amount of hydrogen in your breath within 90 minutes of consuming ...

  10. Common Syndromes of Orthostatic Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system, adequate blood volume, and intact skeletal and respiratory muscle pumps are essential components for rapid cardiovascular adjustments to upright posture (orthostasis). Patients lacking sufficient blood volume or having defective sympathetic adrenergic vasoconstriction develop orthostatic hypotension (OH), prohibiting effective upright activities. OH is one form of orthostatic intolerance (OI) defined by signs, such as hypotension, and symptoms, such as lightheadedness, that occur when upright and are relieved by recumbence. Mild OI is commonly experienced during intercurrent illnesses and when standing up rapidly. The latter is denoted “initial OH” and represents a normal cardiovascular adjustment to the blood volume shifts during standing. Some people experience episodic acute OI, such as postural vasovagal syncope (fainting), or chronic OI, such as postural tachycardia syndrome, which can significantly reduce quality of life. The lifetime incidence of ?1 fainting episodes is ?40%. For the most part, these episodes are benign and self-limited, although frequent syncope episodes can be debilitating, and injury may occur from sudden falls. In this article, mechanisms for OI having components of adrenergic hypofunction, adrenergic hyperfunction, hyperpnea, and regional blood volume redistribution are discussed. Therapeutic strategies to cope with OI are proposed. PMID:23569093

  11. Lactose intolerance in Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Hegar, Badriul; Widodo, Ariani

    2015-12-01

    "Lactose intolerance (LI)" is considered a common problem in Asians, and in many parts of the world. Its preva-lence and age of manifestation varies between by Asian country, for possible genetic or cultural reasons. Studies in Indonesian children 3-15 years old (y) are available within the past two decades, using a pure lactose tolerance test. The prevalences of lactose malabsorption (LM) in pre-elementary (3-5 y), elementary (6-11 y), and junior high (12-14 y) school-children were 21.3%, 57.8%, and 73%, respectively. An increasing trend for LM preva-lence was seen within the pre-elementary group, from 9.1% at 3 y to 28.6% at 5 y. The most frequent symptoms of LI in junior high school (JHS) group were abdominal pain (64.1%), abdominal distention (22.6%), nausea (15.1%), flatulence (5.7%), and diarrhea (1.9%), mostly within one hour of lactose ingestion. In children with regular and irregular milk drinking, LM occurred in 81.2% and 69.6%; LI was found in 56.2% and 52.1%, re-spectively. Most JHS children with dairy-associated recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) symptoms proved to be malabsorbers. Dairy products most related to RAP were milk and yogurt. LI was found in 81% of RAP children with abdominal pain most frequently, followed by nausea, bloating, diarrhea, borborygmi, and flatulence. Symp-tom onset occurred 30 minutes after lactose ingestion, especially nausea, bloating, and abdominal pain. In RAP children LI symptoms mostly found in breath hydrogen concentration >20 ppm. More LI symptoms were found in lactose malabsorbers, but symptoms were mild and generally disappeared in 7 hours, and in most by 15 hours. PMID:26715082

  12. [All signs of metabolic syndrome in the hypertensive ISIAH rats are associated with increased activity of transcription factors PPAR, LXR, PXR, and CAR in the liver].

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, E N; Dushkin, M I; Perepechaeva, M L; Kobzev, V F; Trufakin, V A; Markel', A L

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the metabolic syndrome (MS), which includes hypertension, dislipidemia, glucose intolerance, and obesity leads to cardiovascular diseases. The MS risk is growing catastrophically. Molecular mechanisms allowing to understand the reason of integrated dysfunctions, taking place at MS cases, have remained almost unstudied. The chronical stress plays a crucial role in MS development; therefore in the present work a hypertensive rat strain with Inherited Stress-Induced Arterial Hypertension (ISIAH) was used as a model. It was shown that ISIAH rat strain as compared with the control WAG rat strain is characterized by increased content of triglyceride, VLDL and LDL cholesterols, a decreased content of HDL cholesterol, a high level of apolipoprotein B-100, and decreased level of apolipoprotein A-I. The ISIAH rats body weight was higher as compared with WAG rats; ISIAH rats blood glucose content was higher too. Thus, strain hypertension for ISIAH rat is accompanied by dislipidemia, increased glucose content, and increased body weight, representing a whole set of MS signs. Since at MS cases the systemic abnormalities in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism take place, the functional activity of transcription factors (TFs) participating in integral regulation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism genes in liver was measured. PPAR, LXR, PXR, CAR DNA-binding activity was increased in ISIAH rats, suggesting involvement of these TFs in MS development. Integrated investigation of PPAR, LXR, PXR, CAR regulatory mechanisms, signal transduction and transcriptional targets will provide insights into the pathogenesis of MS and offer valuable information for designing of drugs for MS treatment. PMID:22066269

  13. [Lactose intolerance: past and present. Part 1].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-09-20

    Lactose intolerance is the most prevalent intestinal malabsorption disorder. After presentation of its history, the author describes the emergence of lactose intolerance during the evolution of species, and the biochemistry of lactose as well as features of human and bacterial lactase enzymes are then described. The unequal distribution of lactose intolerance in different continents and population is discussed, followed by presentation of past and present prevalence data in Hungary. Adult-type hypolactasia is caused by a polymorphism of the MCM6 gene located upstream from the lactase gene on the long arm of the chromosome 2. It can be determined with the polymerase chain reaction. The intestinal symptoms of lactose intolerance are well known, but its extra-intestinal manifestations are less recognised. Invasive diagnostic methods (determination of lactase activity from small intestinal biopsies, lactose tolerance test), are accurate, but have been replaced by the non-invasive methods; their gold standard is the H2 breath test. Genetic testing is being used more and more frequently in Hungary too, and, presumably, the methane breath test will be also available in the near future. Lactose intolerance can be accompanied by inflammatory bowel diseases, coeliac disease and irritable bowel syndrome; it could be established whether this association is causal or not in order to start a correct diet and therapy. PMID:26550699

  14. Deconditioning in patients with orthostatic intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Parsaik, Ajay; Allison, Thomas G.; Singer, Wolfgang; Sletten, David M.; Joyner, Michael J.; Benarroch, Eduardo E.; Low, Phillip A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency and degree of deconditioning, clinical features, and relationship between deconditioning and autonomic parameters in patients with orthostatic intolerance. Methods: We retrospectively studied all patients seen for orthostatic intolerance at Mayo Clinic between January 2006 and June 2011, who underwent both standardized autonomic and exercise testing. Results: A total of 184 patients (84 with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome [POTS] and 100 without orthostatic tachycardia) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of these, 89% were women, and median age was 27.5 years (interquartile range [IQR] 22–37 years). Symptom duration was 4 years (IQR 2–7.8). Of the patients, 90% had deconditioning (reduced maximum oxygen uptake [VO2max%] <85%) during exercise. This finding was unrelated to age, gender, or duration of illness. The prevalence of deconditioning was similar between those with POTS (95%) and those with orthostatic intolerance (91%). VO2max% had a weak correlation with a few autonomic and laboratory parameters but adequate predictors of VO2max% could not be identified. Conclusion: Reduced VO2max% consistent with deconditioning is present in almost all patients with orthostatic intolerance and may play a central role in pathophysiology. This finding provides a strong rationale for retraining in the treatment of orthostatic intolerance. None of the autonomic indices are reliable predictors of deconditioning. PMID:22993288

  15. Hypertension - overview

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    If left untreated, hypertension can lead to the thickening of arterial walls causing its lumen, or blood passage way, to narrow in diameter. ... the narrowed arterial openings. In addition, people with hypertension may be more susceptible to stroke.

  16. Hypertensive Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Bae

    2014-01-01

    An exclusive interview by Prof. Jeong Bae Park conducted with Dr. Rhian M. Touyz in Seoul while she was visiting for the Korean Society of Hypertension, May 10, 2014. In this interview, Dr. Touyz explains and describes hypertensive vasculopathy.

  17. Intrapulmonary administration of natural honey solution, hyperosmolar dextrose or hypoosmolar distill water to normal individuals and to patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus or hypertension: their effects on blood glucose level, plasma insulin and C-peptide, blood pressure and peaked expiratory flow rate.

    PubMed

    Al-Waili, N

    2003-07-31

    Safety and effect intrapulmonary administration (by inhalation) of 60 % honey solution, 10% dextrose or distill water on blood sugar, plasma insulin and C-peptide, blood pressure, heart rate, and peaked expiratory flow rate (PEFR) in normal or diabetic subjects were studied. - Twenty-four healthy subjects, 16 patients with type 11 diabetes mellitus and six patients with hypertension were entered for study. They were underwent complete physical examination and laboratory investigations. Twelve healthy subjects were subjected for distill water inhalation for 10 min, and after one week they received inhalation of honey solution (60% wt/v) for 10 min. Another 12 healthy subjects received inhalation of 10% dextrose for 10 min. Blood glucose level, plasma insulin and C-peptide, blood pressure, heart rate and PEFR were estimated before inhalation and during 2-3 hrs after inhalation, at 30 min intervals. Random blood glucose level was estimated in eight patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, and repeated 30 min after honey inhalation. One week later, fasting blood glucose level was estimated in each patient and blood glucose level was re-estimated during three hrs after honey inhalation, at 30 min intervals. Glucose tolerance test was performed in another eight patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus, and after one week the procedure was repeated with inhalation of honey, which was started immediately after ingestion of glucose. Six hypertensive patients received honey inhalation for 10 min; supine blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after inhalation. - Results showed that in normal subjects distill water caused mild elevation of blood glucose level, mild lowering of plasma insulin, and significant reduction of plasma C-peptide. 10% dextrose inhalation caused mild reduction of plasma insulin and C-peptide and unremarkable changes in blood glucose level. No significant changes were obtained in blood pressure, heart rate or PEFR after distill water or 10% dextrose inhalation. Honey inhalation caused lowering of blood glucose level and elevation of plasma insulin and C-peptide, mild reduction of blood pressure and up to 11 and 16 percent increase in PEFR. Honey inhalation significantly reduced random blood glucose level from 199 +/- 40.9 mg/dl to 156 +/- 52.3 mg/dl after 30 min (p = 0.0303). Fasting blood glucose level was reduced after honey inhalation during three hr post-inhalation, which was significant at hr three (p<0.05). Intensity of hyperglycemia was significantly lowered in glucose tolerance test when patients received honey inhalation. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was reduced by honey inhalation in hypertensive patients; significant changes were obtained at 60 and 120 min after inhalation. No adverse effects were observed with inhalation of distill water, 10% dextrose and 60% honey solution except for nasal watery discharge experienced by all subjects and mild cough that was experienced by seven subjects after honey inhalation. - The results demonstrated that honey inhalation was safe and effective in reducing blood glucose level, in normal and diabetic subjects, it could improve glucose tolerance test, elevate plasma insulin and C-peptide and PEFR, and reduce elevated blood pressure in hypertensive patients. PMID:12911866

  18. Hypertensive Crisis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... services (EMS), have someone drive you to the hospital right away. Hypertensive Urgency Hypertensive urgency is a situation where the blood ... symptoms: Severe headache Shortness of breath Nosebleeds Severe ... of hypertensive urgency generally requires readjustment and/or additional dosing of ...

  19. Sucrose feeding in mouse pregnancy leads to hypertension, and sex-linked obesity and insulin resistance in female offspring.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, Anne-Maj; Matthews, Phillippa A; Jansen, Eugene; Taylor, Paul D; Poston, Lucilla

    2013-01-01

    Eating an unbalanced diet during pregnancy may induce long-term health consequences in offspring, in particular obesity, insulin resistance, and hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that a maternal diet rich in simple sugars predispose mouse offspring to obesity, glucose intolerance, and cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. Female C57BL/6J mice were fed either a standard chow or a sucrose-rich diet (26% of total energy) 6 weeks prior to mating, throughout pregnancy and lactation. Offspring of control dams (OC) and high sucrose fed dams (OSF) were weaned onto standard control chow, and metabolic and cardiovascular parameters determined at 3 months of age. Both male and female OSF were hyperphagic by 4 weeks of age and females were heavier than OC at 6 weeks. At 3 months, female OSF showed a significant increase in inguinal fat pad mass, whereas skeletal muscle mass (tibialis anterior) and locomotor activity were decreased relative to OC. A 10-fold increase in fasting serum insulin in female OSF vs. OC at 3 months (Insulin [pmol/L] mean ± SEM, OSF, 200.3 ± 16.1, vs. OC, 20.3 ± 1.8, n = 6 P < 0.001), was associated with impaired glucose tolerance (AUC [mmol/L min] mean ± SEM, OSF 1437.4 ± 124.2 vs. OC, 1076.8 ± 83.9, n = 6, P < 0.05). Both male and female OSF were hypertensive as assessed by radiotelemetry (night-time systolic arterial pressure (SAP) [mmHg] mean ± SEM, male OSF, 128 ± 1 vs. OC, 109 ± 1, n = 6, P < 0.01; female OSF, 130 ± 1 vs. OC, 118 ± 1, n = 6, P < 0.05). Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) demonstrated an increased low:high frequency ratio in male and female OSF (P < 0.05), indicative of heightened sympathetic efferent tone. Renal tissue noradrenaline (NA) content was markedly raised in the OSF vs. OC (NA [pg/ml/mg tissue] mean ± SEM, male OSF, 2.28 ± 0.19 vs. OC 0.84 ± 0.09, n = 6, P < 0.01). Exposure to a maternal diet rich in sucrose led to obesity and glucose intolerance in female mice offspring, and hypertension in both sexes. PMID:23423541

  20. Sucrose feeding in mouse pregnancy leads to hypertension, and sex-linked obesity and insulin resistance in female offspring

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsson, Anne-Maj; Matthews, Phillippa A.; Jansen, Eugene; Taylor, Paul D.; Poston, Lucilla

    2013-01-01

    Eating an unbalanced diet during pregnancy may induce long-term health consequences in offspring, in particular obesity, insulin resistance, and hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that a maternal diet rich in simple sugars predispose mouse offspring to obesity, glucose intolerance, and cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. Female C57BL/6J mice were fed either a standard chow or a sucrose-rich diet (26% of total energy) 6 weeks prior to mating, throughout pregnancy and lactation. Offspring of control dams (OC) and high sucrose fed dams (OSF) were weaned onto standard control chow, and metabolic and cardiovascular parameters determined at 3 months of age. Both male and female OSF were hyperphagic by 4 weeks of age and females were heavier than OC at 6 weeks. At 3 months, female OSF showed a significant increase in inguinal fat pad mass, whereas skeletal muscle mass (tibialis anterior) and locomotor activity were decreased relative to OC. A 10-fold increase in fasting serum insulin in female OSF vs. OC at 3 months (Insulin [pmol/L] mean ± SEM, OSF, 200.3 ± 16.1, vs. OC, 20.3 ± 1.8, n = 6 P < 0.001), was associated with impaired glucose tolerance (AUC [mmol/L min] mean ± SEM, OSF 1437.4 ± 124.2 vs. OC, 1076.8 ± 83.9, n = 6, P < 0.05). Both male and female OSF were hypertensive as assessed by radiotelemetry (night-time systolic arterial pressure (SAP) [mmHg] mean ± SEM, male OSF, 128 ± 1 vs. OC, 109 ± 1, n = 6, P < 0.01; female OSF, 130 ± 1 vs. OC, 118 ± 1, n = 6, P < 0.05). Analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) demonstrated an increased low:high frequency ratio in male and female OSF (P < 0.05), indicative of heightened sympathetic efferent tone. Renal tissue noradrenaline (NA) content was markedly raised in the OSF vs. OC (NA [pg/ml/mg tissue] mean ± SEM, male OSF, 2.28 ± 0.19 vs. OC 0.84 ± 0.09, n = 6, P < 0.01). Exposure to a maternal diet rich in sucrose led to obesity and glucose intolerance in female mice offspring, and hypertension in both sexes. PMID:23423541

  1. Milk Intolerance and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Historian, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The intolerance of milk by American Indians and other groups (Thais, Chinese, Filipinos, Melonesians of New Guinea, Australian Aborigines, Black groups of Africa, American Blacks, and Eskimos) due to the lack of the lactose enzyme is discussed in this article. (FF)

  2. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Woodford, Keith; Kukuljan, Sonja; Ho, Suleen

    2015-09-01

    True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption) is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows' milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows' milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates ?-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows' milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed. PMID:26404362

  3. Milk Intolerance, Beta-Casein and Lactose

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sebely; Woodford, Keith; Kukuljan, Sonja; Ho, Suleen

    2015-01-01

    True lactose intolerance (symptoms stemming from lactose malabsorption) is less common than is widely perceived, and should be viewed as just one potential cause of cows’ milk intolerance. There is increasing evidence that A1 beta-casein, a protein produced by a major proportion of European-origin cattle but not purebred Asian or African cattle, is also associated with cows’ milk intolerance. In humans, digestion of bovine A1 beta-casein, but not the alternative A2 beta-casein, releases beta-casomorphin-7, which activates ?-opioid receptors expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and body. Studies in rodents show that milk containing A1 beta-casein significantly increases gastrointestinal transit time, production of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 and the inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase compared with milk containing A2 beta-casein. Co-administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks the myeloperoxidase and gastrointestinal motility effects, indicating opioid signaling pathway involvement. In humans, a double-blind, randomized cross-over study showed that participants consuming A1 beta-casein type cows’ milk experienced statistically significantly higher Bristol stool values compared with those receiving A2 beta-casein milk. Additionally, a statistically significant positive association between abdominal pain and stool consistency was observed when participants consumed the A1 but not the A2 diet. Further studies of the role of A1 beta-casein in milk intolerance are needed. PMID:26404362

  4. Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rizos, Christos V; Elisaf, Moses S

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension plays a major role in the development and progression of micro- and macrovascular disease. Moreover, increased blood pressure often coexists with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance. As a result the need for a comprehensive management of hypertensive patients is critical. However, the various antihypertensive drug categories have different effects on glucose metabolism. Indeed, angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have an overall neutral effect on glucose metabolism. However, some members of the CCBs class such as azelnidipine and manidipine have been shown to have advantageous effects on glucose homeostasis. On the other hand, diuretics and ?-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism. Of note, carvedilol as well as nebivolol seem to differentiate themselves from the rest of the ?-blockers class, being more attractive options regarding their effect on glucose homeostasis. The adverse effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs on glucose metabolism may, to an extent, compromise their cardiovascular protective role. As a result the effects on glucose homeostasis of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment, especially in patients which are at high risk for developing diabetes. PMID:25068013

  5. Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rizos, Christos V; Elisaf, Moses S

    2014-07-26

    Hypertension plays a major role in the development and progression of micro- and macrovascular disease. Moreover, increased blood pressure often coexists with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance. As a result the need for a comprehensive management of hypertensive patients is critical. However, the various antihypertensive drug categories have different effects on glucose metabolism. Indeed, angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have an overall neutral effect on glucose metabolism. However, some members of the CCBs class such as azelnidipine and manidipine have been shown to have advantageous effects on glucose homeostasis. On the other hand, diuretics and ?-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism. Of note, carvedilol as well as nebivolol seem to differentiate themselves from the rest of the ?-blockers class, being more attractive options regarding their effect on glucose homeostasis. The adverse effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs on glucose metabolism may, to an extent, compromise their cardiovascular protective role. As a result the effects on glucose homeostasis of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment, especially in patients which are at high risk for developing diabetes. PMID:25068013

  6. Hypertension exacerbates liver injury and hepatic fibrosis induced by a choline-deficient L-amino acid-defined diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Arima, Shiho; Uto, Hirofumi; Ibusuki, Rie; Kumamoto, Ryo; Tanoue, Shirou; Mawatari, Seiichi; Oda, Kohei; Numata, Masatsugu; Fujita, Hiroshi; Oketani, Makoto; Ido, Akio; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    The effect of hypertension on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remains unclear at the molecular level. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypertension on the degree of hepatic steatosis, liver injury and hepatic fibrosis induced by a choline-deficient L-amino acid-defined (CDAA) diet in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Seven-week-old male SHRs were fed standard chow with high or normal salt concentrations for 7 weeks, followed by a CDAA diet containing high or normal salt for an additional 8 or 24 weeks. Hepatic steatosis was assessed using hepatic triglyceride levels and Oil red O staining. Hepatic fibrosis was evaluated using Sirius red and Azan staining. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) gradually increased with a high-salt diet and was significantly higher after 7 weeks of feeding with high-salt vs. normal-salt chow. After 8 weeks on the CDAA diet, the degree of hepatic steatosis did not differ between the high-salt and normal-salt groups; however, alanine aminotransferase and fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher and hepatic mRNA levels for interleukin (IL)-10 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 were significantly lower in the high-salt group compared with the normal-salt group. After 24 weeks on the CDAA diet, the high-salt group had significantly more severe hepatic fibrosis and a higher hepatic mRNA expression of ?-smooth muscle actin and lower hepatic IL-10 and HO-1 mRNA levels compared with the normal-salt group. In conclusion, our results indicate that hypertension is a potential risk factor for liver injury and hepatic fibrosis through glucose intolerance and decreased IL-10-mediated or HO-1-induced anti-inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:24190226

  7. Food intolerance and the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, R; James, R; Smith, H; Dudley, C R; Jewell, D P

    1989-01-01

    Two hundred patients (156 women) with the irritable bowel syndrome were treated with dietary exclusion for three weeks. Of the 189 who completed this study, 91 (48.2%) showed symptomatic improvement. Subsequent challenge with individual foods showed that 73 of these 91 responders were able to identify one or more food intolerances and 72 remained well on a modified diet during the follow up period (mean (SD), 14.7 (7.98) months). Of the 98 patients who showed no symptomatic improvement after three weeks of strict exclusion only three were symptomatically well at follow up (mean (SD), 12.48 (8.09 months). There was no close correlation between response and symptom complex. There was a wide range of food intolerance. The majority (50%) identified two to five foods which upset them (range 1-14). The foods most commonly incriminated were dairy products (40.7%) and grains (39.4%). PMID:2767507

  8. Hypertensive emergencies.

    PubMed

    Feitosa-Filho, Gilson Soares; Lopes, Renato Delascio; Poppi, Nilson Tavares; Guimarães, Hélio Penna

    2008-09-01

    Emergencies and hypertensive crises are clinical situations which may represent more than 25% of all medical emergency care. Considering such high prevalence, physicians should be prepared to correctly identify these crises and differentiate between urgent and emergent hypertension. Approximately 3% of all visits to emergency rooms are due to significant elevation of blood pressure. Across the spectrum of blood systemic arterial pressure, hypertensive emergency is the most critical clinical situation, thus requiring special attention and care. Such patients present with high blood pressure and signs of acute specific target organ damage (such as acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, acute pulmonary edema, eclampsia, and stroke). Key elements of diagnosis and specific treatment for the different presentations of hypertensive emergency will be reviewed in this article. The MedLine and PubMed databases were searched for pertinent abstracts, using the key words "hypertensive crises" and "hypertensive emergencies". Additional references were obtained from review articles. Available English language clinical trials, retrospective studies and review articles were identified, reviewed and summarized in a simple and practical way. The hypertensive crisis is a clinical situation characterized by acute elevation of blood pressure followed by clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms may be mild (headache, dizziness, tinnitus) or severe (dyspnea, chest pain, coma or death). If the patient presents with mild symptoms, but without acute specific target organ damage, diagnosis is hypertensive urgency. However, if severe signs and symptoms and acute specific target organ damage are present, then the patient is experiencing a hypertensive emergency. Some patients arrive at the emergency rooms with high blood pressure, but without any other sign or symptom. In these cases, they usually are not taking their medications correctly. Therefore, this is not a hypertensive crisis, but rather non-controlled chronic hypertension. This type of distinction is important for those working in emergency rooms and intensive care unit. Correct diagnosis must be made to assure the most appropriate treatment. PMID:25307099

  9. Idiopathic orthostatic intolerance and postural tachycardia syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Upright posture imposes a substantial gravitational stress on the body, for which we are able to compensate, in large part because of the autonomic nervous system. Alteration in autonomic function, therefore, may lead to orthostatic intolerance. On one extreme, patients with autonomic failure caused by degenerative loss of autonomic function are severely disabled by orthostatic hypotension and may faint whenever they stand up. Fortunately, such patients are relatively rare. On the other hand, disabling orthostatic intolerance can develop in otherwise normal young people. These patients can be severely impaired by symptoms of fatigue, tachycardia, and shortness of breath when they stand up. The actual incidence of this disorder is unknown, but these patients make up the largest group of patients referred to centers that specialize in autonomic disorders. We will review recent advances made in the understanding of this condition, potential pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to orthostatic intolerance, therapeutic alternatives currently available for the management of these patients, and areas in which more research is needed.

  10. Hypovolemia in syncope and orthostatic intolerance role of the renin-angiotensin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Robertson, D.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Ertl, A. C.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: Orthostatic intolerance is the cause of significant disability in otherwise normal patients. Orthostatic tachycardia is usually the dominant hemodynamic abnormality, but symptoms may include dizziness, visual changes, discomfort in the head or neck, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety and, in some cases, syncope. It is the most common disorder of blood pressure regulation after essential hypertension. There is a predilection for younger rather than older adults and for women more than men. Its cause is unknown; partial sympathetic denervation or hypovolemia has been proposed. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma renin activity, perhaps from defects in sympathetic innervation of the kidney, could underlie a hypovolemia, giving rise to these clinical symptoms. Sixteen patients (14 female, 2 male) ranging in age from 16 to 44 years were studied. Patients were enrolled in the study if they had orthostatic intolerance, together with a raised upright plasma norepinephrine (> or = 600 pg/mL). Patients underwent a battery of autonomic tests and biochemical determinations. RESULTS: There was a strong positive correlation between the blood volume and plasma renin activity (r = 0.84, P = 0.001). The tachycardic response to upright posture correlated with the severity of the hypovolemia. There was also a correlation between the plasma renin activity measured in these patients and their concomitant plasma aldosterone level. CONCLUSIONS: Hypovolemia occurs commonly in orthostatic intolerance. It is accompanied by an inappropriately low level of plasma renin activity. The degree of abnormality of blood volume correlates closely with the degree of abnormality in plasma renin activity. Taken together, these observations suggest that reduced plasma renin activity may be an important pathophysiologic component of the syndrome of orthostatic intolerance.

  11. ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature13793 Artificial sweeteners induce glucose

    E-print Network

    ARTICLE doi:10.1038/nature13793 Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering Elinav1 Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide NAS comprise ,5% sweetener and ,95% glucose, we used as controls mice drinking only water or water

  12. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  13. Renovascular hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and diagnosis. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ... hypertension: Therapy. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ...

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  15. Hypothalamic NUCKS regulates peripheral glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Beiying; Shi, Xiaohe; Zhou, Qiling; Chen, Hui Shan; Lim, Joy; Han, Weiping; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate (NUCKS) is highly expressed in the brain and peripheral metabolic organs, and regulates transcription of a number of genes involved in insulin signalling. Whole-body depletion of NUCKS (NKO) in mice leads to obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, a tissue-specific contribution of NUCKS to the observed phenotypes remains unknown. Considering the pivotal roles of insulin signalling in the brain, especially in the hypothalamus, we examined the functions of hypothalamic NUCKS in the regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism. Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus was impaired in the NKO mice when insulin was delivered through intracerebroventricular injection. To validate the hypothalamic specificity, we crossed transgenic mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the Nkx2.1 promoter with floxed NUCKS mice to generate mice with hypothalamus-specific deletion of NUCKS (HNKO). We fed the HNKO and littermate control mice with a normal chow diet (NCD) and a high-fat diet (HFD), and assessed glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and metabolic parameters. HNKO mice showed mild glucose intolerance under an NCD, but exacerbated obesity and insulin resistance phenotypes under an HFD. In addition, NUCKS regulated levels of insulin receptor in the brain. Unlike HNKO mice, mice with immune-cell-specific deletion of NUCKS (VNKO) did not develop obesity or insulin-resistant phenotypes under an HFD. These studies indicate that hypothalamic NUCKS plays an essential role in regulating glucose homoeostasis and insulin signalling in vivo. PMID:26205492

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  17. Captopril in essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, E. Rabinad; Morin, M. Ingelmo; Amenos, A. Martinez; Alsina, J.; Gorina, A. Balcells

    1982-01-01

    1 Forty-one patients with essential hypertension, stages I, II, and III, were treated with captopril alone or in combination with hydrochlorothiazide. Forty two percent were responsive to captopril alone, while the remaining 58% also required the diuretic. The need for the diuretic was related to the phase of hypertension. 2 There was no significant relation between drug response and plasma renin activity. Serum concentrations of creatinine and potassium remained normal, and there were no pathological changes in serum glucose, cholesterol, uric acid concentrations, erythrocyte count, packed cell volume, haemoglobin, or heart rate. 3 Captopril was well tolerated. One patient developed a rash and another ageusia, which disappeared spontaneously. A third, who was also taking allopurinol, developed leucopenia but it disappeared after treatment was withdrawn. There were no cases of proteinuria attributable to captopril; and proteinuria disappeared in four of five patients who were proteinuric before the start of treatment. 4 These findings suggest that doses of captopril of 150 mg to 300 mg (with or without a diuretic) may be adequate for controlling the blood pressure of most patients with essential hypertension. PMID:6753890

  18. EEG beta 1 oscillation and sucrose sensitization in fibromyalgia with chemical intolerance.

    PubMed

    Bell, I R; Baldwin, C M; Stoltz, E; Walsh, B T; Schwartz, G E

    2001-08-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia (FM) have diffuse musculoskeletal pain; half report concomitant intolerance for low levels of environmental chemicals (CI). Previous investigators have hypothesized that the chronic pain and chemical intolerance reflect sensitization of different central nervous system limbic and/or mesolimbic reward pathways. We evaluated electroencephalographic (EEG) beta activity and blood glucose responses of FM patients with and without CI and normals during three repeated sucrose ingestion sessions and during a final, water-only session (testing for conditioning). The FM with CI exhibited oscillation (reversal in direction of change from session to session) at rest and then sensitization (progressive amplification) of EEG beta 1 over time across the 3 sucrose sessions versus controls. FM with CI showed sensitization of blood glucose over the 3 sucrose sessions, which, like the EEG findings, reverted toward baseline in the final water-only session. The data suggest that the subset of FM patients with CI have increased susceptibility to oscillation and physiological sensitization without conditioning, perhaps contributing to fluctuations in their chronic course. PMID:11328700

  19. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale for Children: A Psychometric Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Roy, Amy K.; Furr, Jami M.; Gotimer, Kristin; Beidas, Rinad S.; Dugas, Michel J.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has contributed to our understanding of excessive worry and adult anxiety disorders, but there is a paucity of research on IU in child samples. This gap is due to the absence of a psychometrically sound measure of IU in youth. The present study adapted parallel child- and parent-report forms of the Intolerance of…

  20. Intolerance of Uncertainty, Fear of Anxiety, and Adolescent Worry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugas, Michel J.; Laugesen, Nina; Bukowski, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A 5 year, ten wave longitudinal study of 338 adolescents assessed the association between two forms of cognitive vulnerability (intolerance of uncertainty and fear of anxiety) and worry. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed a bidirectional and reciprocal relation between intolerance of uncertainty and worry in which change in one variable…

  1. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    HIV Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you are HIV-positive, you are at risk for pulmonary hypertension? www.PHAssociation.org About Pulmonary Hypertension PULMONARY HYPERTENSION, OR PH, is complex and often misunderstood. PH means high ...

  2. Hypertension and Spina Bifida

    MedlinePLUS

    Hypertension What is hypertension? Hypertension, also called high blood pressure , is a condition in which the arteries of the body have too much ... 60% do not. What are the causes of hypertension in Spina Bil da? It is unclear whether ...

  3. Diagnosing hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Padwal, Raj; Cloutier, Lyne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To highlight the 2015 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension. Quality of evidence A systematic search was performed current to August 2014 by a Cochrane Collaboration librarian using the MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The search results were critically appraised by the CHEP subcommittee on blood pressure (BP) measurement and diagnosis, and evidence-based recommendations were presented to the CHEP Central Review Committee for independent review and grading. Finally, the findings and recommendations were presented to the Recommendations Task Force for discussion, debate, approval, and voting. The main recommendations are based on level II evidence. Main message Based on the most recent evidence, CHEP has made 4 recommendations in 2 broad categories for 2015 to improve BP measurement and the way hypertension is diagnosed. A strong recommendation is made to use electronic BP measurement in the office setting to replace auscultatory BP measurement. For patients with elevated office readings, CHEP is recommending early use of out-of-office BP measurement, preferably ambulatory BP measurement, in order to identify early in the process those patients with white-coat hypertension. Conclusion Improvements in diagnostic accuracy are critical to optimizing hypertension management in Canada. The annual updates provided by CHEP ensure that practitioners have up-to-date evidence-based information to inform practice. PMID:26564654

  4. Inhaled Therapies for Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nicholas S; Preston, Ioana R; Roberts, Kari E

    2015-06-01

    The inhaled route has a number of attractive features for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, including delivery of drug directly to the target organ, thus enhancing pulmonary specificity and reducing systemic adverse effects. It can also improve ventilation/perfusion matching by dilating vessels supplying ventilated regions, thus improving gas exchange. Furthermore, it can achieve higher local drug concentrations at a lower overall dose, potentially reducing drug cost. Accordingly, a number of inhaled agents have been developed to treat pulmonary hypertension. Most in current use are prostacyclins, including epoprostenol, which has been cleared for intravenous applications but is used off-label in acute care settings as a continuously nebulized medication. Aerosolized iloprost and treprostinil are both prostacyclins that have been cleared by the FDA to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both require frequent administration (6 and 4 times daily, respectively), and both have a tendency to cause airway symptoms, including cough and wheeze, which can lead to intolerance. These agents cannot be used to substitute for the infused routes of prostacyclin because they do not permit delivery of medication at high doses. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) is cleared for the treatment of primary pulmonary hypertension in newborns. It is also used off-label to test acute vasoreactivity in PAH during right-heart catheterization and to treat acute right-heart failure in hospitalized patients. In addition, some studies on long-term application of INO either have been recently completed with results pending or are under consideration. In the future, because of its inherent advantages in targeting the lung, the inhaled route is likely to be tested using a variety of small molecules that show promise as PAH therapies. PMID:26070575

  5. Exercise Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Martin G.; Sharman, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Irrespective of apparent ‘normal' resting blood pressure (BP), some individuals may experience an excessive elevation in BP with exercise (i.e. systolic BP ?210 mm Hg in men or ?190 mm Hg in women or diastolic BP ?110 mm Hg in men or women), a condition termed exercise hypertension or a ‘hypertensive response to exercise' (HRE). An HRE is a relatively common condition that is identified during standard exercise stress testing; however, due to a lack of information with respect to the clinical ramifications of an HRE, little value is usually placed on such a finding. In this review, we discuss both the clinical importance and underlying physiological contributors of exercise hypertension. Indeed, an HRE is associated with an increased propensity for target organ damage and also predicts the future development of hypertension, cardiovascular events and mortality, independent of resting BP. Moreover, recent work has highlighted that some of the elevated cardiovascular risks associated with an HRE may be related to high-normal resting BP (pre-hypertension) or ambulatory ‘masked' hypertension and that an HRE may be an early warning signal of abnormal BP control that is otherwise undetected with clinic BP. Whilst an HRE may be amenable to treatment via pharmacological and lifestyle interventions, the exact physiological mechanism of an HRE remains elusive, but it is likely a manifestation of multiple factors including large artery stiffness, increased peripheral resistance, neural circulatory control and metabolic irregularity. Future research focus may be directed towards determining threshold values to denote the increased risk associated with an HRE and further resolution of the underlying physiological factors involved in the pathogenesis of an HRE.

  6. Mechanisms of sympathetic regulation in orthostatic intolerance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Sympathetic circulatory control is key to the rapid cardiovascular adjustments that occur within seconds of standing upright (orthostasis) and which are required for bipedal stance. Indeed, patients with ineffective sympathetic adrenergic vasoconstriction rapidly develop orthostatic hypotension, prohibiting effective upright activities. One speaks of orthostatic intolerance (OI) when signs, such as hypotension, and symptoms, such as lightheadedness, occur when upright and are relieved by recumbence. The experience of transient mild OI is part of daily life. However, many people experience episodic acute OI as postural faint or chronic OI in the form of orthostatic tachycardia and orthostatic hypotension that significantly reduce the quality of life. Potential mechanisms for OI are discussed including forms of sympathetic hypofunction, forms of sympathetic hyperfunction, and OI that results from regional blood volume redistribution attributable to regional adrenergic hypofunction. PMID:22678960

  7. Glucose tolerance, insulin release, and insulin binding to monocytes in kidney transplant recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, W.A.; Wielechowski, K.S.; Mahajan, S.K.; Migdal, S.D.; McDonald, F.D.

    1982-03-01

    In order to evaluate glucose tolerance following renal transplantation, intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT), with evaluation of hormonal responses to the intravenous glucose load and percent specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding to peripheral blood monocytes, were studied in eight clinically stable kidney transplant recipients. For comparison purposes, identical studies were done in eight control subjects and seven clinically stable hemodialysis patients. One transplant recipient was glucose intolerant, with fasting hyperglycemia, elevated HbA1C, and abnormal glucose decay constant. Impaired pancreatic insulin release appeared to be the major factor accounting for his glucose intolerance. The seven glucose-tolerant transplant recipients had significantly increased insulin release during IVGTT compared to control subjects, and significant correlations were found among insulin release, glucose decay constant, and fasting blood sugar in those patients. Insulin binding to monocytes was significantly greater in transplant recipients than control subjects due to an increase in insulin binding capacity per cell. A significant correlation was found between percent specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding and steroid dose, expressed as mg/kg body weight/day, in those patients. Thus, chronic steroid administration does not cause glucose intolerance in transplant recipients who manifest steroid-associated increases in pancreatic insulin release and cellular insulin binding capacity.

  8. From 'lactose intolerance' to 'lactose nutrition'.

    PubMed

    Lukito, Widjaja; Malik, Safarina G; Surono, Ingrid S; Wahlqvist, Mark L

    2015-12-01

    The concept of lactose intolerance has become embedded in Western medicine and developing economy medicine. It is based on evidence that intestinal lactase activity persists into later childhood and throughout life in only a minority of the world's population, notably northern European-derived populations. These people have the T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the rs49882359 allele (C/T), also known as C/T-13910, the MCM6 gene which positively influences the lactase LCT gene. Other lactase persistent (LP) populations are found in Africa and the Middle East with different genetic variants. These SNPs represent co-evolution with dairying since the agricultural revolution and nutrient-dependent ecological adaptation. That said, gastrointestinal symptoms considered due to small intestinal lactose malabsorption are poorly correlated with lactase non-persistence (LNP), the situation for most people. With LNP, colonic microbiome lactase enables lactose fermentation to occur so that none is found in faeces. Whether the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and gases (hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane) produced cause symptoms is dose-dependent. Up to 25 g of lactose at any one time can usually be consumed by a LNP person, but its food and meal pattern context, the microbiomic characteristics, age and other factors may alter tolerance. Thus, the notion that lactose intolerance is a disorder or disease of LNP people is misplaced and has been one of cultural perspective. What actually matters is whether a particular dairy product as normally consumed give rise to symptoms. It is, therefore, proposed that lactose tolerance tests be replaced with dairy food tolerance tests. PMID:26715078

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pressure." Pulmonary hypertension is an increase in blood pressure in the blood vessels that carry blood to the lungs. It is ... the narrowed arteries. This results in high blood pressure in the right side of your heart and in the blood vessels that carry blood to the lungs. Symptoms What ...

  10. Improvement of diabetes, obesity and hypertension in type 2 diabetic KKA{sup y} mice by bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Yoshida, Jiro; Kodera, Yukihiro . E-mail: kodera_y@wakunaga.co.jp; Katoh, Akira . E-mail: katoh@st.seikei.ac.jp; Takada, Jitsuya . E-mail: takada@hl.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Hiromu . E-mail: sakurai@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp

    2006-07-07

    Previously, we found that bis(allixinato)oxovanadium(IV) (VO(alx){sub 2}) exhibits a potent hypoglycemic activity in type 1-like diabetic mice. Since the enhancement of insulin sensitivity is involved in one of the mechanisms by which vanadium exerts its anti-diabetic effects, VO(alx){sub 2} was further tested in type 2 diabetes with low insulin sensitivity. The effect of oral administration of VO(alx){sub 2} was examined in obesity-linked type 2 diabetic KKA{sup y} mice. Treatment of VO(alx){sub 2} for 4 weeks normalized hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension in KKA{sup y} mice; however, it had no effect on hypoadiponectinemia. VO(alx){sub 2} also improved hyperleptinemia, following attenuation of obesity in KKA{sup y} mice. This is the first example in which a vanadium compound improved leptin resistance in type 2 diabetes by oral administration. On the basis of these results, VO(alx){sub 2} is proposed to enhance not only insulin sensitivity but also leptin sensitivity, which in turn improves diabetes, obesity and hypertension in an obesity-linked type 2 diabetic animal.

  11. Osteocalcin as a hormone regulating glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Ippei

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients with osteoporosis and diabetes is rapidly increasing all over the world. Bone is recently recognized as an endocrine organ. Accumulating evidence has shown that osteocalcin, which is specifically expressed in osteoblasts and secreted into the circulation, regulates glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin expression in pancreas and adiponectin expression in adipocytes, resulting in improving glucose intolerance. On the other hand, insulin and adiponectin stimulate osteocalcin expression in osteoblasts, suggesting that positive feedforward loops exist among bone, pancreas, and adipose tissue. In addition, recent studies have shown that osteocalcin enhances insulin sensitivity and the differentiation in muscle, while secreted factors from muscle, myokines, regulate bone metabolism. These findings suggest that bone metabolism and glucose metabolism are associated with each other through the action of osteocalcin. In this review, I describe the role of osteocalcin in the interaction among bone, pancreas, brain, adipose tissue, and muscle. PMID:26722618

  12. Exercise Intolerance in Individuals With Postconcussion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Karl F.; Graham, James; Leddy, John J.; Devinney-Boymel, Lee; Willer, Barry S.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Little is known about exercise intolerance or the utility of an exercise evaluation in patients with postconcussion syndrome (PCS). Objective: To assess exercise intolerance in male and female patients with PCS. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Laboratory setting. Patients or Other Participants: Participants included a convenience sample of 34 patients with PCS (17 males, 17 females; age = 25.9 ± 10.9 years) and 22 uninjured individuals on whom we gathered historical deidentified laboratory data (control group; 11 males, 11 females; age = 23.3 ± 6.2 years). Main Outcome Measure(s): Self-reported symptoms, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures (BPs), and the Borg rating of perceived exertion were measured before, during each minute of, and immediately after a graded treadmill exercise test (Balke protocol). Exercise was stopped when participants could no longer maintain the effort or reported the onset of or increase in PCS symptoms. Results: Exercise test duration (8.5 ± 4.4 minutes versus 17.9 ± 3.6 minutes; t51 = 1.8, P < .001), heart rate (142.8 ± 24.1 versus 175.2 ± 17.4; t54 = ?5.5, P < .001), and systolic BP (142.1 ± 18.3 mm Hg versus 155.5 ± 24.5 mm Hg; t53 = 2.3, P = .02) were lower, and diastolic BP (78.4 ± 10.2 mm Hg versus 73.5 ± 11.7 mm Hg; t53 = 2.2, P = .03) was higher at test cessation in the PCS than control group. Cox regression showed the odds of a shorter exercise duration were nearly 8 times greater in the PCS than control group (hazard ratio = 7.93; 95% confidence interval = 3.39, 18.56). In the general linear models that adjusted for differences in test duration, rating of perceived exertion was the only physiologic measure to show an overall difference between groups, with the control group reporting higher ratings than the PCS group (t53 = ?6.0, P < .001). Within the PCS group, systolic BP was the only measure to show a sex effect, with males showing higher pressure readings than females throughout the exercise tests (t31 = 2.8, P = .009). Conclusions: Patients with PCS had a symptom-limited response to exercise, and the treadmill test was a potentially useful tool to monitor the recovery from PCS. PMID:23952041

  13. [Hypertension treated with isotetrandrine].

    PubMed

    Dong, H Y; Yao, C

    1991-02-01

    The antihypertensive effect of isotetrandrine (IT) has been studied, in 50 cases with hypertension with the cross-over experiment controlled with nitrendipine (NTP). The results of the study demonstrate that the antihypertensive efficacy of IT to the mild and moderate or phase I, II, III hypertension cases was definite. After ingestion of the single-dose 0.2 g of IT, BP fell at 30 min, the maximal fall in BP was observed at 4 h and duration of the action was sustained for 8 hours. After administration of daily dose 0.3-0.6 g of IT for 4 wk, the total response rate of all patients was 84%. Compared with NTP, the total response rate difference was not significant. During treatment, the heart rate was slightly decreased, the blood lipids and glucose were not influenced, the left ventricular functions were obviously improved, and the adverse effects were fewer and milder. The antihypertensive mechanism of it may be associated with the blocking calcium channel. PMID:2060056

  14. Antroduodenal motility in neurologically handicapped children with feeding intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Werlin, Steven L

    2004-01-01

    Background Dysphagia and feeding intolerance are common in neurologically handicapped children. The aim is to determine the etiologies of feeding intolerance in neurologically handicapped children who are intolerant of tube feedings. Methods Eighteen neurologically handicapped children, followed in the Tube Feeding Clinic at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin who were intolerant of gastrostomy feedings. The charts of these 18 patients were reviewed. Past medical history, diagnoses, history of fundoplication and results of various tests of gastrointestinal function including barium contrast radiography, endoscopy and antroduodenal manometry were documented. Results Five of 11 children had abnormal barium upper gastrointestinal series. Seven of 14 had abnormal liquid phase gastric emptying tests. Two of 16 had esophagitis on endoscopy. All 18 children had abnormal antroduodenal motility. Conclusions In neurologically handicapped children foregut dysmotility may be more common than is generally recognized and can explain many of the upper gastrointestinal symptoms in neurologically handicapped children. PMID:15341670

  15. Intolerance of uncertainty and adult separation anxiety.

    PubMed

    Boelen, Paul A; Reijntjes, Albert; Carleton, R Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU)-the tendency to react negatively to situations that are uncertain-is involved in different anxiety disorders and depression. No studies have yet examined the association between IU and symptoms of adult separation anxiety disorder. However, it is possible that greater difficulties tolerating uncertainties that can occur in relationships with attachment figures inflate fears and worries about the consequences of being separated from these attachment figures. The current study examined the possible role of IU in symptoms of adult separation anxiety disorder, relative to its role in symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), social anxiety, and depression, using self-reported data from 215 undergraduates (92% women) with elevated separation anxiety. Findings showed that IU was significantly associated with symptom levels of separation anxiety disorder, GAD, OCD, social anxiety, and depression (rs > .30). IU continued to explain variance in OCD, social anxiety, and depression (but not GAD and separation anxiety) when controlling for the association of neuroticism, attachment anxiety, and attachment avoidance with these symptoms. Additional findings indicated that IU is more strongly associated with symptoms of GAD, OCD, and social anxiety than symptoms of adult separation anxiety disorder and depression. PMID:24601766

  16. Endogenous circulating sympatholytic factor in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, R. E.; Winters, B.; Hales, M.; Barnett, T.; Schwinn, D. A.; Flavahan, N.; Berkowitz, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Sympathotonic orthostatic hypotension (SOH) is an idiopathic syndrome characterized by tachycardia, hypotension, elevated plasma norepinephrine, and symptoms of orthostatic intolerance provoked by assumption of an upright posture. We studied a woman with severe progressive SOH with blood pressure unresponsive to the pressor effects of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists. We tested the hypothesis that a circulating factor in this patient interferes with vascular adrenergic neurotransmission. Preincubation of porcine pulmonary artery vessel rings with patient plasma produced a dose-dependent inhibition of vasoconstriction to phenylephrine in vitro, abolished vasoconstriction to direct electrical stimulation, and had no effect on nonadrenergic vasoconstrictive stimuli (endothelin-1), PGF-2alpha (or KCl). Preincubation of vessels with control plasma was devoid of these effects. SOH plasma inhibited the binding of an alpha(1)-selective antagonist radioligand ([(125)I]HEAT) to membrane fractions derived from porcine pulmonary artery vessel rings, rat liver, and cell lines selectively overexpressing human ARs of the alpha(1B) subtype but not other AR subtypes (alpha(1A) and alpha(1D)). We conclude that a factor in SOH plasma can selectively and irreversibly inhibit adrenergic ligand binding to alpha(1B) ARs. We propose that this factor contributes to a novel pathogenesis for SOH in this patient. This patient's syndrome represents a new disease entity, and her plasma may provide a unique tool for probing the selective functions of alpha(1)-ARs.

  17. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome: Beyond Orthostatic Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Garland, Emily M; Celedonio, Jorge E; Raj, Satish R

    2015-09-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a form of chronic orthostatic intolerance for which the hallmark physiological trait is an excessive increase in heart rate with assumption of upright posture. The orthostatic tachycardia occurs in the absence of orthostatic hypotension and is associated with a >6-month history of symptoms that are relieved by recumbence. The heart rate abnormality and orthostatic symptoms should not be caused by medications that impair autonomic regulation or by debilitating disorders that can cause tachycardia. POTS is a "final common pathway" for a number of overlapping pathophysiologies, including an autonomic neuropathy in the lower body, hypovolemia, elevated sympathetic tone, mast cell activation, deconditioning, and autoantibodies. Not only may patients be affected by more than one of these pathophysiologies but also the phenotype of POTS has similarities to a number of other disorders, e.g., chronic fatigue syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vasovagal syncope, and inappropriate sinus tachycardia. POTS can be treated with a combination of non-pharmacological approaches, a structured exercise training program, and often some pharmacological support. PMID:26198889

  18. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance. PMID:26393648

  19. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary Management.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanyong; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dai, Ning; Fox, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Lactose intolerance related to primary or secondary lactase deficiency is characterized by abdominal pain and distension, borborygmi, flatus, and diarrhea induced by lactose in dairy products. The biological mechanism and lactose malabsorption is established and several investigations are available, including genetic, endoscopic and physiological tests. Lactose intolerance depends not only on the expression of lactase but also on the dose of lactose, intestinal flora, gastrointestinal motility, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and sensitivity of the gastrointestinal tract to the generation of gas and other fermentation products of lactose digestion. Treatment of lactose intolerance can include lactose-reduced diet and enzyme replacement. This is effective if symptoms are only related to dairy products; however, lactose intolerance can be part of a wider intolerance to variably absorbed, fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). This is present in at least half of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and this group requires not only restriction of lactose intake but also a low FODMAP diet to improve gastrointestinal complaints. The long-term effects of a dairy-free, low FODMAPs diet on nutritional health and the fecal microbiome are not well defined. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the genetic basis, biological mechanism, diagnosis and dietary management of lactose intolerance. PMID:26393648

  20. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Small Text Medium Text Large Text Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) YESTERDAY Hypertension is a silent killer because it ...

  1. Hormones and Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    Fact Sheet Hormones and Hypertension What is hypertension? Hypertension, or chronic (long-term) high blood pressure, is a main cause of ... tobacco, alcohol, and certain medications play a part. Hormones made in the kidneys and in blood vessels ...

  2. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) into five groups. These groups are organized based ... lungs. Group 2 Pulmonary Hypertension Group 2 includes PH with left heart disease. Conditions that affect the ...

  3. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension in Scleroderma

    MedlinePLUS

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION IN SCLERODERMA PULMONARY HYPERTENSION Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the blood vessels ... with scleroderma are at increased risk for developing PH from several mechanisms. Frequently patients with scleroderma have ...

  5. Essential Hypertension vs. Secondary Hypertension Among Children

    PubMed Central

    Banker, Ashish; Shete, Sanjay; Hashmi, Syed Sharukh; Tyson, John E.; Barratt, Michelle S.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Milewicz, Diane M.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to determine the proportions and correlates of essential hypertension among children in a tertiary pediatric hypertension clinic. METHODS We evaluated 423 consecutive children and collected demographic and clinical history by retrospective chart review. RESULTS We identified 275 (65%) hypertensive children (blood pressure >95th percentile per the “Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents”) from 423 children referred to the clinic for history of elevated blood pressure. The remainder of the patients had normotension (11%), white coat hypertension (11%), prehypertension (10%), and pending diagnosis (3%). Among the 275 hypertensive children, 43% (n = 119; boys = 56%; median age = 12 years; range = 3–17 years) had essential hypertension and 57% (n = 156; boys = 66%; median age = 9 years; range = 0.08–19 years) had secondary hypertension. When compared with those with secondary hypertension, those with essential hypertension had a significantly older age at diagnosis (P = 0.0002), stronger family history of hypertension (94% vs. 68%; P < 0.0001), and lower prevalence of preterm birth (20% vs. 46%; P < 0.001). There was a bimodal distribution of age of diagnosis in those with secondary hypertension. CONCLUSIONS The phenotype of essential hypertension can present as early as 3 years of age and is the predominant form of hypertension in children after age of 6 years. Among children with hypertension, those with essential hypertension present at an older age, have a stronger family history of hypertension, and have lower prevalence of preterm birth. PMID:24842390

  6. Glucose control.

    PubMed

    Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Stress-related hyperglycemia is a common finding in acutely ill patients, and is related to the severity and outcome of the critical illness. The pathophysiology of stress hyperglycemia includes hormonal and neural signals, leading to increased production of glucose by the liver and peripheral insulin resistance mediated by the translocation of transmembrane glucose transporters. In one pioneering study, tight glycemic control by intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients was associated with improved survival. However, this major finding was not confirmed in several other prospective randomized controlled trials. The reasons underlying the discrepancy between the first and the subsequent studies could include nutritional strategy (amount of calories provided, use of parenteral nutrition), case-mix, potential differences in the optimal blood glucose level (BG) in different types of patients, hypoglycemia and its correction, and the magnitude of glucose variability. Therefore, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of glycemic regulation during acute illness is needed. Safe and effective glucose control will need improvement in the definition of optimal BG and in the measurement techniques, perhaps including continuous monitoring of insulin algorithms and closed-loop systems. PMID:23075589

  7. The effects of combined vitamin D and calcium supplementation on fasting plasma glucose in non-diabetic adults age 65 and older

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Altered vitamin D and calcium homeostasis may play a role in the development of glucose intolerance. In a 3-year randomized controlled trial, we compared the effects of combined vitamin D and calcium supplementation vs. placebo on fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in healthy adults 65 years of age or old...

  8. Hypertensive Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Olson-Chen, Courtney; Seligman, Neil S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is increasing. The etiology and pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain poorly understood. Hypertensive disorders are a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of hypertension decreases the incidence of severe hypertension, but it does not impact rates of preeclampsia or other pregnancy complications. Several antihypertensive medications are commonly used in pregnancy, although there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Severe hypertension should be treated immediately to prevent maternal end-organ damage. Appropriate antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum management is important in caring for patients with hypertensive disorders. PMID:26600442

  9. Adverse reactions to food constituents: allergy, intolerance, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kitts, D; Yuan, Y; Joneja, J; Scott, F; Szilagyi, A; Amiot, J; Zarkadas, M

    1997-04-01

    Food allergies and intolerance represent important health concerns to consumers who are predisposed to these illnesses. Unlike many current food safety issues, food sensitivities are complicated by both complex and multiple individual adverse reactions, which can vary from emotional to pathophysiological ailments. In some instances, the underlying mechanisms that result in the development of food allergies or intolerance have marked differences but produce common symptoms. The present-day diagnosis of these disorders can be impeded by intrinsic limitations in generating accurate information from patient history and biochemical, physicochemical, and immunochemical tests. Oral challenge tests represent effective methods for confirming and testing food allergens and food intolerance; however, these procedures are often restricted to clinical trials. It is important to be able to distinguish among food allergy, intolerance, and autoimmune disease in the management of these disorders. The role of food in the development of autoimmune disease may be exemplified by celiac disease, a food-induced enteropathy, requiring exposure to prolamins in wheat, rye, and barley. Various wheat and soy protein sources, including the soy protein isolates used to make infant formulas, have been related to juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), a common chronic disease of childhood. Employing food process technologies to eliminate food constituents with potential for intolerance in some individuals is a potentially viable approach for reducing risk to food-related disorders. Finally, the development of food labelling regulations that require the identification of potential food allergens or agents for intolerance in the ingredient declaration on prepackaged food is a positive step toward the prevention of severe adverse reactions in hypersensitive individuals. PMID:9196849

  10. Clinical role of a fixed combination of standardized Berberis aristata and Silybum marianum extracts in diabetic and hypercholesterolemic patients intolerant to statins

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Bellone, Iaele; Rapacioli, Giuliana; Putignano, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Background Statin intolerance is a medical condition often leading patients to nonadherence to the prescribed therapy or to a relevant reduction of the statin dosage. Both situations determine a totally or partially uncontrolled lipid profile, and these conditions unquestionably increase the risk of cardiovascular events. Methods We enrolled hypercholesterolemic, type 2 diabetic patients complaining of intolerance to statins. Some of them had reduced the statin dose ‘until the disappearance of symptoms’; others had opted for treatment with ezetimibe; and yet others were not undergoing any treatment at all. All patients of the three groups were then given a fixed combination of berberine and silymarin (Berberol®), known from previous papers to be able to control both lipidic and glycemic profiles. Results The tested product both as a single therapy and as add-on therapy to low-dose statin or to ezetimibe reduced triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin in a significant manner without inducing toxicity conditions that might be somehow ascribed to a statin-intolerant condition. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that use of Berberol®, administered as a single or add-on therapy in statin-intolerant subjects affected by diabetes and hypercholesterolemia is a safe and effective tool capable of improving the patients’ lipidic and glycemic profiles. PMID:25678808

  11. Glucose Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities PLEASE NOTE: Your web browser does not have JavaScript enabled. Unless you enable Javascript , your ability to navigate and access the features of this website will be ... Glucose Tests Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ...

  12. Glucose Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Chris D.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    In the last decade concepts in fluorescence sensing have emerged as powerful techniques with an increasing number of applications in the fields of biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine. The increasing importance of these techniques is typified in one emerging area by developing non-invasive and continuous approaches for physiological glucose monitoring.

  13. [Hypertension in obese children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Peco-Anti?, Amira

    2009-01-01

    Obesity, especially upper body fat distribution, has become an increasingly important medical problem in children and adolescents. Outcomes related to childhood obesity include, as in adult population, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, left ventricular hypertrophy, obstructive sleep apnea, orthopedic and socio-psychological problems. Obese children are at approximately 3-fold higher risk for hypertension from non-obese ones. Obesity-hypertension appears to be characterized by a preponderance of isolated systolic hypertension, increased heart rate and blood pressure variability, increased levels of plasma catecholamine and aldosterone, and salt-sensitivity. Lifestyle changes of weight loss, healthier diet and regular physical exercise are effective in obesity-hypertension control, though pharmacological treatment is frequently necessary. Screening for dyslipidemia and impaired glucose tolerance should be performed in paediatric patients with obese hypertension on regular basis, at least once annually or semiannually to discover metabolic syndrome and to prevent its increased cardiovascular risk. Of course, prevention of obesity is the primary goal. PMID:19370974

  14. How Many People Are Affected or At Risk for Lactose Intolerance?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... many people are affected or at risk for lactose intolerance? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content How many people are lactose intolerant? The true number of people with lactose ...

  15. Impaired fasting glucose, blood pressure and cardiovascular disease mortality.

    PubMed

    Henry, Patrick; Thomas, Frédérique; Benetos, Athanase; Guize, Louis

    2002-10-01

    Impaired fasting glucose (fasting plasma glucose 6.1 to 6.9 mmol/L [110 to 125 mg/dL]) is a common glycemic disorder which usually progress to diabetes mellitus. The relationships between impaired fasting glucose, other risk factors including blood pressure, and mortality have never been clearly investigated. We studied 63 443 consecutive men (ages 21 to 60 years), each of whom had a routine health examination with a fasting plasma glucose measurement. Men with known ischemic cardiac disease and treatment for diabetes or hypertension were excluded. Impaired fasting glucose was found in 10 773 (17.0%) of these men. Mean body mass index, serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels, and systolic, diastolic, and pulse blood pressure were significantly higher for men with impaired fasting glucose compared with those men with normal fasting glucose (fasting plasma glucose 3.9 to 6.0 mmol/L). When adjusted for confounding variables, relative risk of 8-year cardiovascular mortality associated with impaired fasting glucose was dependent on systolic blood pressure level (1.02 [95% CI: 0.62 to 1.70] when <140 mm Hg and 2.10 [95% CI: 1.16 to 3.80] between 140 and 160 mm Hg). Inversely, relative risk of 8-year cardiovascular mortality associated with moderate systolic hypertension (140 to 159 mm Hg) compared with normal systolic blood pressure (<140 mm Hg) was highly dependent on the glycemic status (2.97 [95% CI: 1.58 to 5.55] for men with impaired fasting glucose compared with 1.35 [95% CI: 0.84 to 2.18] in those with normal fasting glucose). Similar results were found concerning overall mortality. In conclusion, the presence of moderate systolic hypertension can identify subjects with impaired fasting glucose who are at risk of cardiovascular and overall mortality, and vice versa, probably through the metabolic syndrome. PMID:12364347

  16. Pharmacologic management of hypertension in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Karen L; Stewart, Robert D

    2008-12-01

    Hypertension is a common comorbidity in patients with diabetes, and adequate control of blood pressure significantly reduces the risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications. Patients with diabetes should achieve a target blood pressure of less than 130/80 mm Hg. The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may slow progression to kidney failure and cardiovascular mortality; these agents are the preferred therapy for managing coexisting diabetes and hypertension. Angiotensin receptor blockers can prevent progression of diabetic kidney disease and are a first-line alternative for patients intolerant of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Thiazide diuretics provide additional antihypertensive effects when combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. With lower doses of these drugs, the risk of clinically significant metabolic alterations is minimal. Beta blockers and calcium channel blockers also have beneficial effects in managing hypertension in patients with diabetes. Beta blockers reduce cardiovascular events and are useful in a multidrug regimen. Dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers should be reserved for patients intolerant of preferred agents or those who need additional therapy to achieve target blood pressure. Many patients with diabetes require combination therapy with multiple antihypertensive agents. PMID:19069021

  17. Preliminary Investigation of Intolerance of Uncertainty Treatment for Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Sarah N.; Egan, Sarah; Rees, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is the tendency to react negatively to uncertain situations or events, and it has been found to be an important maintaining factor in a number of different anxiety disorders. It is often included as a part of cognitive behavioural interventions for anxiety disorders but its specific contribution to treatment outcome…

  18. Are ambiguity aversion and ambiguity intolerance identical? A neuroeconomics investigation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yusuke; Fujino, Junya; Ideno, Takashi; Okubo, Shigetaka; Takemura, Kazuhisa; Miyata, Jun; Kawada, Ryosaku; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Hirose, Kimito; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in understanding a person's reaction to ambiguous situations, and two similar constructs related to ambiguity, “ambiguity aversion” and “ambiguity intolerance,” are defined in different disciplines. In the field of economic decision-making research, “ambiguity aversion” represents a preference for known risks relative to unknown risks. On the other hand, in clinical psychology, “ambiguity intolerance” describes the tendency to perceive ambiguous situations as undesirable. However, it remains unclear whether these two notions derived from different disciplines are identical or not. To clarify this issue, we combined an economic task, psychological questionnaires, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a sample of healthy volunteers. The individual ambiguity aversion tendency parameter, as measured by our economic task, was negatively correlated with agreeableness scores on the self-reported version of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. However, it was not correlated with scores of discomfort with ambiguity, one of the subscales of the Need for Closure Scale. Furthermore, the ambiguity aversion tendency parameter was negatively correlated with gray matter (GM) volume of areas in the lateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex, whereas ambiguity intolerance was not correlated with GM volume in any region. Our results suggest that ambiguity aversion, described in decision theory, may not necessarily be identical to ambiguity intolerance, referred to in clinical psychology. Cautious applications of decision theory to clinical neuropsychiatry are recommended. PMID:25698984

  19. Are ambiguity aversion and ambiguity intolerance identical? A neuroeconomics investigation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yusuke; Fujino, Junya; Ideno, Takashi; Okubo, Shigetaka; Takemura, Kazuhisa; Miyata, Jun; Kawada, Ryosaku; Fujimoto, Shinsuke; Kubota, Manabu; Sasamoto, Akihiko; Hirose, Kimito; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Murai, Toshiya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in understanding a person's reaction to ambiguous situations, and two similar constructs related to ambiguity, "ambiguity aversion" and "ambiguity intolerance," are defined in different disciplines. In the field of economic decision-making research, "ambiguity aversion" represents a preference for known risks relative to unknown risks. On the other hand, in clinical psychology, "ambiguity intolerance" describes the tendency to perceive ambiguous situations as undesirable. However, it remains unclear whether these two notions derived from different disciplines are identical or not. To clarify this issue, we combined an economic task, psychological questionnaires, and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a sample of healthy volunteers. The individual ambiguity aversion tendency parameter, as measured by our economic task, was negatively correlated with agreeableness scores on the self-reported version of the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. However, it was not correlated with scores of discomfort with ambiguity, one of the subscales of the Need for Closure Scale. Furthermore, the ambiguity aversion tendency parameter was negatively correlated with gray matter (GM) volume of areas in the lateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex, whereas ambiguity intolerance was not correlated with GM volume in any region. Our results suggest that ambiguity aversion, described in decision theory, may not necessarily be identical to ambiguity intolerance, referred to in clinical psychology. Cautious applications of decision theory to clinical neuropsychiatry are recommended. PMID:25698984

  20. What I Need to Know about Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... eat. Enzymes are proteins that help to cause chemical changes in the body. *See the Pronunciation Guide for ... with a medical, family, and diet history; a physical exam; and medical ... intolerance, you can make changes to what you eat and drink. Some people ...

  1. Orthostatic Intolerance and Motion Sickness After Parabolic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Brown, Troy E.; Wood, Scott J.; Benavides, Edgar W.; Bondar, Roberta L.; Stein, Flo; Moradshahi, Peyman; Harm, Deborah L.; Low, Phillip A.

    1999-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is common in astronauts after prolonged space flight. However, the "push-pull effect" in military aviators suggests that brief exposures to transitions between hypo- and hypergravity are sufficient to induce untoward autonomic cardiovascular physiology in susceptible individuals. We therefore investigated orthostatic tolerance and autonomic cardiovascular function in 16 healthy test subjects before and after a seated 2-hr parabolic flight. At the same time, we also investigated relationships between parabolic flight-induced vomiting and changes in orthostatic and autonomic cardiovascular function. After parabolic flight, 8 of 16 subjects could not tolerate a 30-min upright tilt test, compared to 2 of 16 before flight. Whereas new intolerance in non-Vomiters resembled the clinical postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), new intolerance in Vomiters was characterized by comparatively isolated upright hypocapnia and cerebral vasoconstriction. As a group, Vomiters also had evidence for increased postflight fluctuations in efferent vagal-cardiac nerve traffic occurring independently of any superimposed change in respiration. Results suggest that syndromes of orthostatic intolerance resembling those occurring after space flight can occur after a brief (i.e., 2-hr) parabolic flight.

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Abnormalities in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Mourani, Peter M; Abman, Steven H

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of preterm infants, these infants remain at risk bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which results in prolonged need for supplemental oxygen, recurrent respiratory exacerbations, and exercise intolerance. Recent investigations have highlighted the important contribution of the developing pulmonary circulation to lung development, showing that these infants are also at risk for pulmonary vascular disease (PVD), including pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary vascular abnormalities. Several epidemiologic studies have delineated the incidence of PH in preterm infants and the impact on outcomes. These studies have also highlighted gaps in the understanding of PVD in BPD. PMID:26593082

  3. Hypertension in women

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Fadi G; Mansur, Sulaf J; Xing, Dongqi; Oparil, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in both men and women. The prevalence and severity of hypertension rise markedly with age, and blood pressure control becomes more difficult with aging in both genders, particularly in women. In addition, there are forms of hypertension that occur exclusively in women, e.g., hypertension related to menopause, oral contraceptive use, or pregnancy (e.g., chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia or eclampsia). Randomized controlled trials show that antihypertensive therapy provides similar reductions in major cardiovascular events in men and women. Therefore, gender should not influence decisions on selection of blood pressure lowering therapies, except for consideration of gender-specific side effects or contraindications for use in women who are or may become pregnant. This article reviews the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in women, as well as recent guidelines for management of hypertension in women. PMID:25028640

  4. Living with Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on Twitter. Living With Pulmonary Hypertension Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has no cure. However, you can work with ... your doctor advises. Call your doctor if your PH symptoms worsen or change. The earlier symptoms are ...

  5. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the cells ... also can affect the pulmonary arteries and cause PH. For example, the condition may develop if: The ...

  6. Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension Overview What is cirrhosis? In people who have ... lead to coma and death. What is portal hypertension? Normally, blood is carried to the liver by ...

  7. Neuronal LRP1 regulates glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in the brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Hu, Jin; Tsai, Chih-Wei; Yue, Mei; Melrose, Heather L; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Bu, Guojun

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurological disorder characterized by profound memory loss and progressive dementia. Accumulating evidence suggests that Type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder characterized by insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, significantly increases the risk for developing AD. Whereas amyloid-? (A?) deposition and neurofibrillary tangles are major histological hallmarks of AD, impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism precedes these pathological changes during the early stage of AD and likely triggers or exacerbates AD pathology. However, the mechanisms linking disturbed insulin signaling/glucose metabolism and AD pathogenesis remain unclear. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), a major apolipoprotein E receptor, plays critical roles in lipoprotein metabolism, synaptic maintenance, and clearance of A? in the brain. Here, we demonstrate that LRP1 interacts with the insulin receptor ? in the brain and regulates insulin signaling and glucose uptake. LRP1 deficiency in neurons leads to impaired insulin signaling as well as reduced levels of glucose transporters GLUT3 and GLUT4. Consequently, glucose uptake is reduced. By using an in vivo microdialysis technique sampling brain glucose concentration in freely moving mice, we further show that LRP1 deficiency in conditional knock-out mice resulted in glucose intolerance in the brain. We also found that hyperglycemia suppresses LRP1 expression, which further exacerbates insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and AD pathology. As loss of LRP1 expression is seen in AD brains, our study provides novel insights into insulin resistance in AD. Our work also establishes new targets that can be explored for AD prevention or therapy. PMID:25855193

  8. Hypertension Research Division

    E-print Network

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Hypertension & Vascular Research Division Department of Internal Medicine Jeffrey L. Garvin, Ph.D. ­ Division Head #12;Prevalence of Hypertension in U.S. Men by Age and Ethnicity 18 ­ 29 30 ­ 39 40 ­ 49 50 Prevalence of High BP Adapted from Burt et al. Hypertension 1995;25:305. 25 50 75 #12;Introduction

  9. CONTROVERSIES in Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    E-print Network

    490 CONTROVERSIES in Continuous Glucose Monitoring Continuous Glucose Monitoring Awaits Its "Killer, Boston, Massachusetts Abbreviations: (BG) blood glucose, (CGM) continuous glucose monitoring, (FDA) Food, closed-loop glucose control, continuous glucose monitoring, diabetes mellitus, intensive insulin therapy

  10. Determination of fructose metabolic pathways in normal and fructose-intolerant children: A sup 13 C NMR study using (U- sup 13 C)fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Gopher, A.; Lapidot, A. ); Vaisman, N. ); Mandel, H. )

    1990-07-01

    An inborn deficiency in the ability of aldolase B to split fructose 1-phosphate is found in humans with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). A stable isotope procedure to elucidate the mechanism of conversion of fructose to glucose in normal children and in HFI children has been developed. A constant infusion of D-(U-{sup 13}C)fructose was given nasogastrically to control and to HFI children. Hepatic fructose conversion to glucose was estimated by examination of {sup 13}C NMR spectra of plasma glucose. Significantly lower values ({approx}3-fold) for fructose conversion to glucose were obtained for the HFI patients as compared to the controls. A quantitative determination of the metabolic pathways of fructose conversion to glucose was derived from {sup 13}C NMR measurement of plasma ({sup 13}C)glucose isotopomer populations. The finding of isotopomer populations of three adjacent {sup 13}C atoms at glucose C-4 ({sup 13}C{sub 3}-{sup 13}C{sub 4}-{sup 13}C{sub 5}) suggests that there is a direct pathway from fructose, by-passing fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The metabolism of fructose by fructose-1-phosphate aldolase activity accounts for only {approx}50% of the total amount of hepatic fructose conversion to glucose. In view of the marked decline by 67% in synthesis of glucose from fructose in HFI subjects found in this study, the extent of ({sup 13}C)glucose formation from a trace amount of (U-{sup 13}C)fructose infused into the patient can be used as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic test for inherent faulty fructose metabolism.

  11. Understanding and treating hypertension in diabetic populations

    PubMed Central

    Battistoni, Allegra; Savoia, Carmine; Tocci, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and diabetes frequently occurs in the same individuals in clinical practice. Moreover, the presence of hypertension does increase the risk of new-onset diabetes, as well as diabetes does promote development of hypertension. Whatever the case, the concomitant presence of these conditions confers a high risk of major cardiovascular complications and promotes the use integrated pharmacological interventions, aimed at achieving the recommended therapeutic targets. While the benefits of lowering abnormal fasting glucose levels in patients with hypertension and diabetes have been consistently demonstrated, the blood pressure (BP) targets to be achieved to get a benefit in patients with diabetes have been recently reconsidered. In the past, randomized clinical trials have, indeed, demonstrated that lowering BP levels to less than 140/90 mmHg was associated to a substantial reduction of the risk of developing macrovascular and microvascular complications in hypertensive patients with diabetes. In addition, epidemiological and clinical reports suggested that “the lower, the better” for BP in diabetes, so that levels of BP even lower than 130/80 mmHg have been recommended. Recent randomized clinical trials, however, designed to evaluate the potential benefits obtained with an intensive antihypertensive therapy, aimed at achieving a target systolic BP level below 120 mmHg as compared to those obtained with less stringent therapy, have challenged the previous recommendations from international guidelines. In fact, detailed analyses of these trials showed a paradoxically increased risk of coronary events, mostly myocardial infarction, in those patients who achieved the lowest BP levels, particularly in the high-risk subsets of hypertensive populations with diabetes. In the light of these considerations, the present article will briefly review the common pathophysiological mechanisms, the potential sites of therapeutic interactions and the currently recommended BP targets to be achieved under pharmacological treatment in hypertension and diabetes. PMID:26543822

  12. Synthetic Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing Multiple Telemeric TTAGGG Motifs Suppress Inflammasome Activity in Macrophages Subjected to Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation and Reduce Ischemic Brain Injury in Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bernstock, Joshua D.; Klimanis, Dace; Wang, Sixian; Spatz, Maria; Maric, Dragan; Johnson, Kory; Klinman, Dennis M.; Li, Xiaohong; Li, Xinhui; Hallenbeck, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a fundamental role in both the development and pathobiology of stroke. Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that have come to be recognized as critical players in the inflammation that ultimately contributes to stroke severity. Inflammasomes recognize microbial and host-derived danger signals and activate caspase-1, which in turn controls the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1?. We have shown that A151, a synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide containing multiple telemeric TTAGGG motifs, reduces IL-1? production by activated bone marrow derived macrophages that have been subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation and LPS stimulation. Further, we demonstrate that A151 reduces the maturation of caspase-1 and IL-1?, the levels of both the iNOS and NLRP3 proteins, and the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential within such cells. In addition, we have demonstrated that A151 reduces ischemic brain damage and NLRP3 mRNA levels in SHR-SP rats that have undergone permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. These findings clearly suggest that the modulation of inflammasome activity via A151 may contribute to a reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages subjected to conditions that model brain ischemia and modulate ischemic brain damage in an animal model of stroke. Therefore, modulation of ischemic pathobiology by A151 may have a role in the development of novel stroke prevention and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26473731

  13. Orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia associated with norepinephrine-transporter deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Flattem, N. L.; Jordan, J.; Jacob, G.; Black, B. K.; Biaggioni, I.; Blakely, R. D.; Robertson, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic intolerance is a syndrome characterized by lightheadedness, fatigue, altered mentation, and syncope and associated with postural tachycardia and plasma norepinephrine concentrations that are disproportionately high in relation to sympathetic outflow. We tested the hypothesis that impaired functioning of the norepinephrine transporter contributes to the pathophysiologic mechanism of orthostatic intolerance. METHODS: In a patient with orthostatic intolerance and her relatives, we measured postural blood pressure, heart rate, plasma catecholamines, and systemic norepinephrine spillover and clearance, and we sequenced the norepinephrine-transporter gene and evaluated its function. RESULTS: The patient had a high mean plasma norepinephrine concentration while standing, as compared with the mean (+/-SD) concentration in normal subjects (923 vs. 439+/-129 pg per milliliter [5.46 vs. 2.59+/-0.76 nmol per liter]), reduced systemic norepinephrine clearance (1.56 vs. 2.42+/-0.71 liters per minute), impairment in the increase in the plasma norepinephrine concentration after the administration of tyramine (12 vs. 56+/-63 pg per milliliter [0.07 vs. 0.33+/-0.37 pmol per liter]), and a disproportionate increase in the concentration of plasma norepinephrine relative to that of dihydroxyphenylglycol. Analysis of the norepinephrine-transporter gene revealed that the proband was heterozygous for a mutation in exon 9 (encoding a change from guanine to cytosine at position 237) that resulted in more than a 98 percent loss of function as compared with that of the wild-type gene. Impairment of synaptic norepinephrine clearance may result in a syndrome characterized by excessive sympathetic activation in response to physiologic stimuli. The mutant allele in the proband's family segregated with the postural heart rate and abnormal plasma catecholamine homeostasis. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic or acquired deficits in norepinephrine inactivation may underlie hyperadrenergic states that lead to orthostatic intolerance.

  14. Proteomic analysis in allergy and intolerance to wheat products.

    PubMed

    Mamone, Gianfranco; Picariello, Gianluca; Addeo, Francesco; Ferranti, Pasquale

    2011-02-01

    Owing to its extensive use in the human diet, wheat is among the most common causes of food-related allergies and intolerances. Allergies to wheat are provoked by ingestion, inhalation or contact with either the soluble or the insoluble gluten proteins in wheat. Gluten proteins, and particularly the gliadin fraction, are also the main factor triggering celiac disease, a common enteropathy induced by ingestion of wheat gluten proteins and related prolamins from oat, rye and barley in genetically susceptible individuals. The role of gliadin and of its derived peptides in eliciting the adverse reactions in celiac disease are still far from being completely explained. Owing to its unique pathogenesis, celiac disease is widely investigated as a model immunogenetic disorder. The structural characterization of the injuring agents, the gluten proteins, assumes a particular significance in order to deepen the understanding of the events that trigger this and similar diseases at the molecular level. Recent developments in proteomics have provided an important contribution to the understanding of several basic aspects of wheat protein-related diseases. These include: the identification of gluten fractions and derived peptides involved in wheat allergy and intolerance, including celiac disease, and the elucidation of their mechanism of toxicity; the development and validation of sensitive and specific methods for detecting trace amounts of gluten proteins in gluten-free foods for intolerant patients; and the formulation of completely new substitute foods and ingredients to replace the gluten-based ones. In this article, the main aspects of current and prospective applications of mass spectrometry and proteomic technologies to the structural characterization of gluten proteins and derived peptides are critically presented, with a focus on issues related to their detection, identification and quantification, which are relevant to the biochemical, immunological and toxicological aspects of wheat intolerance. PMID:21329430

  15. Drug effects on orthostatic intolerance induced by bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Dallman, M. F.; Van Loon, G.; Keil, L. C.

    1991-01-01

    Effective and practical preventive procedures for postflight orthostatic intolerance are highly desirable. The current practice of attempts to expand plasma volume by ingestion of salt and fluids before reentry has proven benefits. This study evaluated alternative options using fludrocortisone (F) to expand plasma volume (PV), dextroamphetamine (Dex) to enhance norepinephrine (NE) release, and atropine (A) to reduce the effects of vagal stimulation. Seven subjects with proven post-bedrest orthostatic intolerance returned for a 7-day 6-deg head-down bedrest study. F (0.2 mg) was given at 8:00 AM and 8:00 PM the day before and 8:00 AM the day the subjects got out of bed (2 hours before standing). PV was measured before and 1 hour after the last dose of F. Dex (5 mg) and A (0.8 mg) were then taken orally 1 hour before the stand test. F expanded PV by 16 percent and caused sodium retention. Four of the 7 subjects stood for 1 hour post-bedrest and heart rate, plasma NE and plasma renin responses to standing were greatly enhanced and sustained. Although there was a narrowing of pulse pressure, the ability to overcome orthostatic intolerance with these countermeasures was largely due to vasoconstriction and sustained high heart rate.

  16. Midodrine prevents orthostatic intolerance associated with simulated spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, C D; Mullen, T J; Sundby, G H; Rostoft, S; Sheynberg, N; Aljuri, N; Maa, M; Mukkamala, R; Sherman, D; Toska, K; Yelle, J; Bloomfield, D; Williams, G H; Cohen, R J

    2001-06-01

    Many astronauts after being weightless in space become hypotensive and presyncopal when they assume an upright position. This phenomenon, known as orthostatic intolerance, may interfere with astronaut function during reentry and after spaceflight and may limit the ability of an astronaut to exit a landed spacecraft unaided during an emergency. Orthostatic intolerance is more pronounced after long-term spaceflight and is a major concern with respect to the extended flights expected aboard the International Space Station and for interplanetary exploration class missions, such as a human mission to Mars. Fully effective countermeasures to this problem have not yet been developed. To test the hypothesis that alpha-adrenergic stimulation might provide an effective countermeasure, we conducted a 16-day head-down-tilt bed-rest study (an analog of weightlessness) using normal human volunteers and administered the alpha(1)-agonist drug midodrine at the end of the bed-rest period. Midodrine was found to significantly ameliorate excessive decreases in blood pressure and presyncope during a provocative tilt test. We conclude that midodrine may be an effective countermeasure for the prevention of orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight. PMID:11356789

  17. Blood Glucose Log

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Of ThiS page. If you have high blood glucose , make notes in your log and talk with ... physical activity, or diabetes medicines. Having low blood glucose means that your blood glucose level is too ...

  18. Blood Test: Glucose

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Blood Glucose Record Definition: Hyperglycemia Definition: Hypoglycemia Helping Kids Deal With Injections and Blood ... Record Getting a Blood Test (Video) Diabetes Center Definition: Blood Glucose Level Blood Test (Video) Blood Glucose ...

  19. HIV-related Social Intolerance and Risky Sexual Behavior in a High HIV Prevalence Environment

    PubMed Central

    Delavande, Adeline; Sampaio, Mafalda

    2014-01-01

    Although most countries state that fighting social intolerance against persons with HIV is part of their national HIV strategy, the impact of reducing intolerance on risky sexual behavior is largely unknown. In this paper, we estimate the effect of social intolerance against HIV+ persons on risky sexual behavior in rural Malawi using data from roughly 2,000 respondents from the 2004 and 2006 waves of the Malawi Longitudional Study of Families and Health (MLSFH). The effect of social intolerance on risky behavior is a priori ambiguous. On the one hand, higher social intolerance or stigma can lead people to disassociate from the stigmatized group and hence promote risky behavior. On the other hand, intolerance can be viewed as a social tax on being HIV+ and thus higher intolerance may reduce risky behavior. We find that a decrease in social intolerance is associated with a decrease in risky behavior, including fewer partners and a lower likelihood of having extra-marital relations. This effect is mainly driven by the impact of social intolerance on men. Overall the results suggests that reducing social intolerance might not only benefit the HIV positive but might also forestall the spread of HIV. PMID:24768779

  20. Prevalence and Characteristics of Chemical Intolerance: A Japanese Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kenichi; Uchiyama, Iwao; Katoh, Takahiko; Ogata, Hiromitsu; Arashidani, Keiichi; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-11-01

    Population-based cross-sectional study was performed to estimate the prevalence of chemical intolerance and to examine the characteristics of the sample. A Web-based survey was conducted that included 7,245 adults in Japan. The criteria for chemical intolerance proposed by Skovbjerg yielded a prevalence of 7.5% that was approximately consistent with that reported from a Danish population-based survey. Female gender, older age, and renovation in the house during the past 7 years were positively associated with chemical intolerance. Improvements in the condition were observed with daily ventilation habits. Medical history of atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, multiple chemical sensitivity, and depression were associated with chemical intolerance. Fatigue, depressed mood, and somatic symptoms were also positively correlated with chemical intolerance. Better elucidation of the causes, comorbidities, concomitants, and consequences of chemical intolerance has the potential to provide effective solutions for its prevention and treatment. PMID:25137616

  1. [Endocrine hypertension in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Launay-Mignot, P; Roueff, S; Tropeano, A-I; Thaunat, O; Plouin, P F

    2002-10-01

    Hypertension is a frequent complication of pregnancy and may compromise fetal and maternal outcome. Hypertension may be pregnancy-induced, essential or secondary to endocrine disorders. Most cases of endocrine hypertension are the consequence of adrenal diseases. Pheochromocytoma, hypercorticism, primary aldosteronism or glucocorticoid-remediable aldosteronism can be present or diagnosed at any term and may cause severe hypertension. The most hazardous form of endocrine hypertension during pregnancy is pheochromocytoma because it may involve paroxysmal arrhythmia and/or hypertension during labor. Clinical clues and biological tests are similar to those used in non-pregnant subjects. Tests for tumor location are limited to ultrasound and magnetic resonance scans in order to avoid maternal and fetal irradiation. Medication to prepare for pheochromocytoma surgery uses alpha- and beta-blockers. The timing of surgery depends on the term of pregnancy at the diagnosis of the tumor. PMID:12442092

  2. [Hypertension in women].

    PubMed

    Tagle, Rodrigo; Tagle V, Rodrigo; Acevedo, Mónica; Valdés, Gloria

    2013-02-01

    The present review examines the types of hypertension that women may suffer throughout life, their physiopathological characteristics and management. In early life, the currently used low-dose oral contraceptives seldom cause hypertension. Pregnancy provokes preeclampsia, its main medical complication, secondary to inadequate transformation of the spiral arteries and the subsequent multisystem endothelial damage caused by deportation of placental factors and microparticles. Hypertension in preeclampsia is an epiphenomenon which needs to be controlled at levels that reduce maternal risk without impairing placental perfusion. The hemodynamic changes of pregnancy may unmask a hypertensive phenotype, may exacerbate a chronic hypertension, or may complicate hypertension secondary to lupus, renovascular lesions, and pheochromocytoma. On the other hand a primary aldosteronism may benefit from the effect of progesterone and present as a postpartum hypertension. A hypertensive pregnancy, especially preeclampsia, represents a risk for cardiac, vascular and renal disease in later life. Menopause may mimic a pheochromocytoma, and is associated to endothelial dysfunction and salt-sensitivity. Among women, non-pharmacological treatment should be forcefully advocated, except for sodium restriction during pregnancy. The blockade of the renin-angiotensin system should be avoided in women at risk of pregnancy; betablockers could be used with precautions during pregnancy; diuretics, ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor antagonists should not be used during breast feeding. Collateral effects of antihypertensives, such as hyponatremia, cough and edema are more common in women. Thus, hypertension in women should be managed according to the different life stages. PMID:23732498

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Robert P; Engel, Peter J; Nathan, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complication of sarcoidosis leading to dyspnea and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH) can be due to several factors, including vascular involvement by the granulomatous inflammation, compression of the pulmonary arteries by adenopathy, fibrotic changes within the lung, and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Several case series have suggested that some patients with SAPH benefit from specific therapy for pulmonary hypertension. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial found 16 weeks' bosentan therapy to be associated with significant improvement in pulmonary artery pressure. Future studies may better define who would respond to treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26593143

  4. Pediatric endocrine hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bhavani, Nisha

    2011-10-01

    Endocrine causes of hypertension are rare in children and screening for endocrine hypertension in children should be carried out only after ruling out renal and renovascular causes. Excess levels and/or action of mineralocorticoids associated with low renin levels lead to childhood hypertension and this can be caused by various conditions which are discussed in detail in the article. Childhood pheochromocytomas are being increasingly diagnosed because of the improved application of genetic testing for familial syndromes associated with pheochromocytomas. Adolescents with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) can also have hypertension associated with their obese phenotype. PMID:22145140

  5. Insulin resistance and hypertension: the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis study.

    PubMed

    Saad, Mohammed F; Rewers, Marian; Selby, Joseph; Howard, George; Jinagouda, Sujata; Fahmi, Salwa; Zaccaro, Dan; Bergman, Richard N; Savage, Peter J; Haffner, Steven M

    2004-06-01

    The association between insulin resistance and insulinemia and hypertension is controversial. We examined the relation between insulin resistance and hypertension in 564 non-Hispanic whites (NHW), 505 Hispanics (H), and 413 African Americans (AA) who participated in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS). Insulin sensitivity was measured with a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test with minimal model analysis. The prevalence of hypertension was 32.5%, 49.4%, and 32.3% in NHW, AA, and H, respectively (P<0.001). When subjects without diabetes in all ethnic groups were combined, age, male sex, race (AA), body mass index (BMI), and insulin resistance, but not fasting insulin, were significantly associated with hypertension. When each ethnic group was analyzed separately, insulin resistance was significantly associated with hypertension in NHW and H, but not AA. After excluding subjects taking antihypertensive medications, male sex, BMI, fasting glucose, and insulin resistance, but not fasting insulin, were significant determinants of blood pressure. When the 3 ethnic groups were analyzed separately, insulin resistance was significantly associated with blood pressure in H, but not NHW, or AA. Neither insulin resistance nor fasting insulin was significantly associated with hypertension or blood pressure in subjects with diabetes of the 3 ethnic groups after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, and waist. In conclusion, insulin resistance, but not insulinemia, was related to hypertension and blood pressure in subjects without diabetes, but ethnic differences in these relations appear to exist. Neither insulin resistance nor insulinemia was related to hypertension or blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes in the 3 ethnic groups. PMID:15123571

  6. Orthostatic intolerance without postural tachycardia: how much dysautonomia?

    PubMed Central

    Parsaik, Ajay K.; Singer, Wolfgang; Allison, Thomas G.; Sletten, David M.; Joyner, Michael J.; Benarroch, Eduardo E.; Low, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic symptoms of orthostatic intolerance occur in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI) without tachycardia. We recently reported that deconditioning is almost universal in both patient groups. In this study, we focussed on the question of how much dysautonomia, besides orthostatic tachycardia, is there in POTS vs. OI, and how the two groups compare in regards to clinical, autonomic, laboratory, and exercise variables. Methods We retrospectively studied all patients referred for orthostatic intolerance at Mayo Clinic between January 2006 and June 2011, who underwent standardized autonomic and exercise testing. Results Eighty-four POTS and 100 OI fulfilled inclusion criteria, 89 % were females. The mean age was 25 and 32 years, respectively. Clinical presentation, autonomic parameters, laboratory findings, and degree of deconditioning were overall similar between the two groups, except for the excessive orthostatic heart rate (HR) rise and mild vasomotor findings observed in POTS but not in OI (slightly larger Valsalva ratio and incomplete blood pressure recovery during Valsalva). Both groups responded poorly to various medications. Severely deconditioned patients were similar to non-deconditioned patients, except for 24 h urine volume (1,555 vs. 2,417 ml), sweat loss on thermoregulatory sweat test (1.5 vs. 0.5 %), and few respiratory parameters during exercise, which are likely clinically insignificant. Conclusion Though similar in clinical presentation, POTS and OI are different entities with greater, albeit still mild, dysautonomia in POTS. The clinical and pathophysiological relevance of minimal dysautonomia in the absence of orthostatic tachycardia as seen in OI remain uncertain. PMID:23729158

  7. Autogenic-feedback training: A countermeasure for orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Miller, Neal E.; Pickering, Thomas G.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has identified cardiovascular deconditioning as a serious biomedical problem associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority has been given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder and the resulting orthostatic intolerance experienced by crewmembers upon their return to the 1g norm of Earth. The present study was designed to examine the feasibility of training human subjects to control their own cardiovascular responses to gravitational stimulation (i.e., a tilt table). Using an operant conditioning procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), we would determine if subjects could learn to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily.

  8. Predictors of hypertension among Filipino immigrants in the Northeast US.

    PubMed

    Ursua, Rhodora A; Islam, Nadia Shilpi; Aguilar, David E; Wyatt, Laura C; Tandon, S Darius; Abesamis-Mendoza, Noilyn; Nur, Potri Ranka Manis Queano; Rago-Adia, Josephine; Ileto, Benjamin; Rey, Mariano J; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2013-10-01

    Hypertension remains disproportionately high among Filipinos compared to other racial and ethnic minority populations, and little research on cardiovascular disease risk factors has been conducted among Filipino immigrants in the Northeastern part of the United States. To determine hypertension prevalence and risk factors among Filipino Americans in the New York City area, blood pressure and other clinical measurements were taken from a sample of Filipino Americans during 119 community health screenings conducted between 2006 and 2010. Additional socio-demographic and health-related characteristics were also collected via a cross-sectional survey. A total of 1,028 Filipino immigrants completed the survey and had clinical readings collected. Bivariate analyses and logistic regression were performed in order to predict and assess risk factors for hypertension among our sample. Fifty-three percent of individuals were hypertensive, and half of hypertensive individuals were uninsured. Logistic regression indicated that older age, male gender, living in the United States for over 5 years, a BMI greater than 23.0 kg/m(2), an elevated glucose reading, a family history of hypertension, and fair or poor self-reported health status were predictors of hypertension. There is a great need to develop more effective community-based interventions in the Filipino community to address cardiovascular health disparities. PMID:23553685

  9. Impaired glucose tolerance in rats fed low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Bielohuby, Maximilian; Sisley, Stephanie; Sandoval, Darleen; Herbach, Nadja; Zengin, Ayse; Fischereder, Michael; Menhofer, Dominik; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Stemmer, Kerstin; Wanke, Rüdiger; Tschöp, Matthias H; Seeley, Randy J; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Moderate low-carbohydrate/high-fat (LC-HF) diets are widely used to induce weight loss in overweight subjects, whereas extreme ketogenic LC-HF diets are used to treat neurological disorders like pediatric epilepsy. Usage of LC-HF diets for improvement of glucose metabolism is highly controversial; some studies suggest that LC-HF diets ameliorate glucose tolerance, whereas other investigations could not identify positive effects of these diets or reported impaired insulin sensitivity. Here, we investigate the effects of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism in a well-characterized animal model. Male rats were fed isoenergetic or hypocaloric amounts of standard control diet, a high-protein "Atkins-style" LC-HF diet, or a low-protein, ketogenic, LC-HF diet. Both LC-HF diets induced lower fasting glucose and insulin levels associated with lower pancreatic ?-cell volumes. However, dynamic challenge tests (oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, insulin-tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps) revealed that LC-HF pair-fed rats exhibited impaired glucose tolerance and impaired hepatic and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity, the latter potentially being mediated by elevated intramyocellular lipids. Adjusting visceral fat mass in LC-HF groups to that of controls by reducing the intake of LC-HF diets to 80% of the pair-fed groups did not prevent glucose intolerance. Taken together, these data show that lack of dietary carbohydrates leads to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rats despite causing a reduction in fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Our results argue against a beneficial effect of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism, at least under physiological conditions. Therefore, use of LC-HF diets for weight loss or other therapeutic purposes should be balanced against potentially harmful metabolic side effects. PMID:23982154

  10. Pancreatic islets of bank vole show signs of dysfunction after prolonged exposure to high glucose concentrations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Blixt, Martin; Niklasson, Bo; Sandler, Stellan

    2010-07-01

    Bank voles develop glucose intolerance/diabetes mellitus when kept in captivity. We have characterized beta-cell function of glucose intolerant/diabetic animals, and found that this animal model has features of both human type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to study the functional alterations of islets isolated from glucose tolerant bank voles after a prolonged exposure to various glucose concentrations in vitro. For this purpose, pancreatic islets from normal (glucose tolerant) male and female bank voles were cultured at different glucose concentrations (5.6, 11.1 (control), or 28 mM) whereupon islet functions were examined. Overall, islet insulin output was lowered at 5.6 mM glucose, and similar to control, or enhanced after culture in 28 mM glucose. High glucose culture led to decreased insulin contents, but there was no change in islet DNA content and in morphological assessments of cell death, with the latter findings suggesting that the so-called glucotoxicity had not evolved. A slight gender difference was observed in that islets isolated from females exhibited a glucose-regulated (pro)insulin biosynthesis rate and insulin gene expression. In conclusion, we have found that islets isolated from female and male bank voles are affected by glucose concentrations in vitro in that some signs of dysfunction were observed upon high glucose exposure. A minor gender difference was observed suggesting that the islets of the females may more readily adapt to the elevated glucose concentration than islets of the male bank voles. It could be that these in vitro gender differences observed may represent a mechanism underlying the gender difference in diabetes development observed among bank voles. PMID:20453078

  11. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... due to hypertension. The NIH is working with scientific and medical communities to update hypertension management guidelines (JNC-8), including integrating them with updated guidelines on management of cholesterol and obesity. For additional information please contact: Carl ... | RePORT Office of Science Policy Analysis | Office of Science Policy | Office of ...

  12. Chinese Hypertension Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji-Guang

    2015-01-01

    According to the 4th National Nutrition and Health Survey in 2002, the prevalence of hypertension in China was 18.8%. Although there are no recent updated nationwide data, it is believed that the prevalence of hypertension has increased substantially in the past decade up to more than 200 million hypertensive patients in the populous country of China. To fight against the growing risk of hypertension, three Chinese hypertension guidelines were compiled in the past two decades, in 1999, 2005, and 2011. The current guidance document for the management of hypertension was named ‘2010 Chinese hypertension guideline’, but it was actually published in 2011. In this guideline, all five classes of antihypertensive drugs were recommended as possible initial and maintenance therapy. The goal of treatment was a systolic/diastolic blood pressure below 140/90 mm Hg in general, 130/80 mm Hg in various groups of high-risk patients, and 150/90 mm Hg in the elderly (?65 years). With the recent publication of several national and international hypertension guidelines, the Chinese guideline is now under discussion for updating.

  13. Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25755321

  14. Validation of Point-of-Care Glucose Testing for Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Boži?evi?, Sandra; Pape-Medvidovi?, Edita; Ljubi?, Spomenka

    2013-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) glucose technology is currently considered to be insufficiently accurate for the diagnosis of diabetes. The objective of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of an innovative, interference-resistant POC glucose meter (StatStrip glucose hospital meter, Nova Biomedical, USA) in subjects with a previous history of dysglycaemia, undergoing a 75?g diagnostic oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT). Venous and capillary blood sampling for the reference laboratory procedure (RLP) and POC-glucose measurement was carried out at fasting and 2?h oGTT, and categories of glucose tolerance were classified according to 2006 WHO diagnostic criteria for the respective sample type. We found an excellent between-method correlation at fasting (r = 0.9681, P < 0.0001) and 2?h oGTT (r = 0.9768, P < 0.0001) and an almost perfect diagnostic agreement (weighted Kappa?=?0.858). Within a total of 237 study subjects, 137 were diagnosed with diabetes with RLP, and only 6 of them were reclassified as having glucose intolerance with POC. The diagnostic performance of POC-fasting glucose in discriminating between the normal and any category of disturbed glucose tolerance did not differ from the RLP (P = 0.081). Results of this study indicate that StatStrip POC glucose meter could serve as a reliable tool for the diabetes diagnosis, particularly in primary healthcare facilities with dispersed blood sampling services. PMID:24382960

  15. FGF19 action in the brain induces insulin-independent glucose lowering

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Gregory J.; Matsen, Miles E.; Bracy, Deanna P.; Meek, Thomas H.; Nguyen, Hong T.; Stefanovski, Darko; Bergman, Richard N.; Wasserman, David H.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-independent glucose disposal (referred to as glucose effectiveness [GE]) is crucial for glucose homeostasis and, until recently, was thought to be invariable. However, GE is reduced in type 2 diabetes and markedly decreased in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Strategies aimed at increasing GE should therefore be capable of improving glucose tolerance in these animals. The gut-derived hormone FGF19 has previously been shown to exert potent antidiabetic effects in ob/ob mice. In ob/ob mice, we found that systemic FGF19 administration improved glucose tolerance through its action in the brain and that a single, low-dose i.c.v. injection of FGF19 dramatically improved glucose intolerance within 2 hours. Minimal model analysis of glucose and insulin data obtained during a frequently sampled i.v. glucose tolerance test showed that the antidiabetic effect of i.c.v. FGF19 was solely due to increased GE and not to changes of either insulin secretion or insulin sensitivity. The mechanism underlying this effect appears to involve increased metabolism of glucose to lactate. Together, these findings implicate the brain in the antidiabetic action of systemic FGF19 and establish the brain’s capacity to rapidly, potently, and selectively increase insulin-independent glucose disposal. PMID:24084738

  16. FGF19 action in the brain induces insulin-independent glucose lowering.

    PubMed

    Morton, Gregory J; Matsen, Miles E; Bracy, Deanna P; Meek, Thomas H; Nguyen, Hong T; Stefanovski, Darko; Bergman, Richard N; Wasserman, David H; Schwartz, Michael W

    2013-11-01

    Insulin-independent glucose disposal (referred to as glucose effectiveness [GE]) is crucial for glucose homeostasis and, until recently, was thought to be invariable. However, GE is reduced in type 2 diabetes and markedly decreased in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Strategies aimed at increasing GE should therefore be capable of improving glucose tolerance in these animals. The gut-derived hormone FGF19 has previously been shown to exert potent antidiabetic effects in ob/ob mice. In ob/ob mice, we found that systemic FGF19 administration improved glucose tolerance through its action in the brain and that a single, low-dose i.c.v. injection of FGF19 dramatically improved glucose intolerance within 2 hours. Minimal model analysis of glucose and insulin data obtained during a frequently sampled i.v. glucose tolerance test showed that the antidiabetic effect of i.c.v. FGF19 was solely due to increased GE and not to changes of either insulin secretion or insulin sensitivity. The mechanism underlying this effect appears to involve increased metabolism of glucose to lactate. Together, these findings implicate the brain in the antidiabetic action of systemic FGF19 and establish the brain’s capacity to rapidly, potently, and selectively increase insulin-independent glucose disposal. PMID:24084738

  17. Hypertension and the pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leguizamón, Gustavo F; Zeff, Natalia P; Fernández, Alberto

    2006-08-01

    Diabetes is a frequent complication of pregnancy. Type 1 diabetes is associated with an increased incidence of preeclampsia and pregnancy-induced hypertension. When renal dysfunction is present, the incidence of these complications is remarkably increased. White's class, poor glycemic control during the first half of pregnancy, and early blood pressure elevation are also independent risk factors for developing preeclampsia. Whether gestational diabetes increases the background incidence of preeclampsia is still debated. Because therapeutic interventions such as low-dose aspirin and antioxidants have not been shown to be effective, preventive measures rely on tight blood glucose control, as well as adequate blood pressure treatment. PMID:16879782

  18. Hypertension Risk Subsequent to Gestational Dysglycemia Is Modified by Race/Ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Bentley-Lewis, Rhonda; Huynh, Jennifer; Li, Sylvia; Wenger, Julia; Thadhani, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Additionally, gestational dysglycemia has been associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus but not yet associated with hypertension subsequent to pregnancy in long-term follow-up. Therefore, we set out to examine this relationship as well as the role of race/ethnicity in modifying this relationship. We analyzed a prospective observational cohort followed between 1998 and 2007. There were 17 655 women with self-reported race/ethnicity and full-term, live births. A 1-hour 50 g oral glucose-load test and a 3-hour 100 g oral glucose-tolerance test enabled third trimester stratification of women into 1 of 4 glucose-tolerance groups: (1) normal (n=15 056); (2) abnormal glucose-load test (n=1558); (3) abnormal glucose-load and -tolerance tests (n=520); and (4) gestational diabetes mellitus (n=521). Women were then followed for a mean±standard deviation of 4.1±2.9 years after delivery for the development of hypertension. Although gestational diabetes mellitus was associated with an increased risk of hypertension after pregnancy (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.58 [1.02, 2.45]; P=0.04), dysglycemia defined by an abnormal glucose-load test predicted hypertension only among black women (4.52 [1.24, 16.52]; P=0.02). The risk of hypertension after pregnancy among dysglycemia groups not meeting criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus varied based on the race/ethnicity of the population. Further research on the implications of the intersection of race/ethnicity and gestational dysglycemia on subsequent hypertension is warranted. PMID:26573715

  19. [Psychological factors in hypertension].

    PubMed

    Manuck, S; Morrison, R; Bellack, A

    1986-01-01

    We briefly overview behavioral factors of possible relevance to essential hypertension. We examine, in particular, dimensions of individual differences relating to: (a) problems of anger and assertion; and (b) cardiovascular responsivity to behavioral stressors. Hypertensive patients do show larger cardiovascular reactions to common laboratory stressors than normotensive, controls, and similar differences emerge in comparisons of normotensive individuals with and without a family history of hypertension. Concerning the purported dispositional attributes of hypertensives, we also propose re-examining psychodynamic notions regarding the suppression or denial of anger within a more objective, behavioral framework-specifically, as measurable deficits in assertive skill. Preliminary observations point to the presence of lower assertiveness in some hypertensive patients and increased hostility among others. These behavioral characteristics also appear to be associated with different patterns of cardiovascular reactivity, as recorded during interpersonal encounters that call for assertive responding. PMID:3512899

  20. Intergenerational transmission of prejudice, sex role stereotyping, and intolerance.

    PubMed

    O'Bryan, Megan; Fishbein, Harold D; Ritchey, P Neal

    2004-01-01

    The attitudes of 111 ninth and eleventh graders and both of their biological parents were independently assessed for prejudice against people with HIV/ AIDS, homosexuals, Blacks, and fat people, as well as for male and female sex role stereotyping. This study corrected for two shortcomings in previous research: neglecting to assess both parents and assessing only a single domain of prejudice. We addressed the intergenerational transmission of prejudice and stereotyping using three competing models: same-sex, parent equivalent, and differential effects. Using multiple regressions in which parents' scores were entered separately, along with control variables, different maternal and paternal influences were detected. Mothers were the primary influence for prejudice regarding HIV/AIDS, fatness, and race, and fathers were the primary influence for male and female stereotyping and prejudice against homosexuals, supporting the differential effects model. We also established that prejudice and stereotyping in specific domains reflected a more general proclivity to be intolerant. In contrast to prejudice and stereotyping in specific domains, fathers and mothers about equally shaped the adolescents' intolerance, supporting the parent equivalent model. PMID:15673220

  1. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Elberling, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI). Methods The study included participants who had previously participated in a general population-based study and reported symptoms of environmental intolerance (n = 787) and patients with IEI (n = 237). The participants completed questionnaires assessing IEI, namely, a measure of repressive coping combining scores on the Marlowe–Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS) and the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and a negative affectivity scale (NAS). Multiple, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted using IEI variables as the dependent variables. Results The TMAS and MCSDS scores were independently associated with the IEI variables, but there was no evidence of a role of the repressive coping construct. While the total alexithymia score was unrelated to IEI, the TAS-20 subscale of difficulties identifying feelings (DIF) was independently associated with symptoms attributed to IEI. Negative affectivity was a strong independent predictor of the IEI variables and a mediator of the association between DIF and IEI. Conclusion Our results provide no evidence for a role of repressive coping in IEI, and our hypothesis of an association with alexithymia was only partly supported. In contrast, strong associations between IEI and negative emotional reactions, defensiveness and difficulties identifying feelings were found, suggesting a need for exploring the influence of these emotional reactions in IEI. PMID:21432559

  2. Intolerance of sexy peers: intrasexual competition among women.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, Tracy; Sharma, Aanchal

    2011-01-01

    Intrasexual competition among males of different species, including humans, is well documented. Among females, far less is known. Recent nonexperimental studies suggest that women are intolerant of attractive females and use indirect aggression to derogate potential rivals. In Study 1, an experimental design was used to test the evolutionary-based hypothesis that women would be intolerant of sexy women and would censure those who seem to make sex too readily available. Results provide strong empirical support for intrasexual competition among women. Using independent raters, blind to condition, we found that almost all women were rated as reacting negatively ("bitchy") to an attractive female confederate when she was dressed in a sexually provocative manner. In contrast, when she was dressed conservatively, the same confederate was barely noticed by the participants. In Study 2, an experimental design was used to assess whether the sexy female confederate from Study 1 was viewed as a sexual rival by women. Results indicated that as hypothesized, women did not want to introduce her to their boyfriend, allow him to spend time alone with her, or be friends with her. Findings from both studies are discussed in terms of evolutionary theory. PMID:21932332

  3. Four faces of baroreflex failure: hypertensive crisis, volatile hypertension, orthostatic tachycardia, and malignant vagotonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketch, Terry; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, RoseMarie; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The baroreflex normally serves to buffer blood pressure against excessive rise or fall. Baroreflex failure occurs when afferent baroreceptive nerves or their central connections become impaired. In baroreflex failure, there is loss of buffering ability, and wide excursions of pressure and heart rate occur. Such excursions may derive from endogenous factors such as stress or drowsiness, which result in quite high and quite low pressures, respectively. They may also derive from exogenous factors such as drugs or environmental influences. METHODS AND RESULTS: Impairment of the baroreflex may produce an unusually broad spectrum of clinical presentations; with acute baroreflex failure, a hypertensive crisis is the most common presentation. Over succeeding days to weeks, or in the absence of an acute event, volatile hypertension with periods of hypotension occurs and may continue for many years, usually with some attenuation of pressor surges and greater prominence of depressor valleys during long-term follow-up. With incomplete loss of baroreflex afferents, a mild syndrome of orthostatic tachycardia or orthostatic intolerance may appear. Finally, if the baroreflex failure occurs without concomitant destruction of the parasympathetic efferent vagal fibers, a resting state may lead to malignant vagotonia with severe bradycardia and hypotension and episodes of sinus arrest. CONCLUSIONS: Although baroreflex failure is not the most common cause of the above conditions, correct differentiation from other cardiovascular disorders is important, because therapy of baroreflex failure requires specific strategies, which may lead to successful control.

  4. Prevalence of self-reported lactose intolerance in multiethnic sample of adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, between 30 and 50 million Americans have the potential for lactose-intolerance symptoms. However, lactose-intolerance prevalence rates in practical life settings may be lower than originally suggested. The goal of thi...

  5. Relationships among Perceived Racial Stress, Intolerance of Uncertainty, and Worry in a Black Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucker, LaTanya S.; West, Lindsey M.; Roemer, Lizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among chronic worry, perceived racial stress, and intolerance of uncertainty in a sample of adults who racially identify as Black. Intolerance of uncertainty has been associated with worry and generalized anxiety disorder in predominantly White samples. Given that racial stress is likely…

  6. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Index: Replication and Extension with an English Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carleton, R. Nicholas; Gosselin, Patrick; Asmundson, Gordon J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is related to anxiety, depression, worry, and anxiety sensitivity. Precedent IU measures were criticized for psychometric instability and redundancy; alternative measures include the novel 45-item measure (Intolerance of Uncertainty Index; IUI). The IUI was developed in French with 2 parts, assessing general…

  7. Lactose Intolerance: Exploring Reaction Kinetics Governing Lactose Conversion of Dairy Products within the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Jimmy L.

    2008-01-01

    Lactose intolerance is a condition suffered by an estimated 50 million Americans. Certain ethnic and racial populations are more widely affected than others. As many as 75 percent of all African-American, Jewish, Native American, and Mexican-American adults, and 90 percent of Asian-American adults are lactose intolerant. Some populations in Africa…

  8. A Comparison of the 27-Item and 12-Item Intolerance of Uncertainty Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Yu, Lai Ngo Heidi

    2010-01-01

    The 27-item Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS) has become one of the most frequently used measures of Intolerance of Uncertainty. More recently, an abridged, 12-item version of the IUS has been developed. The current research used clinical (n = 50) and non-clinical (n = 56) samples to examine and compare the psychometric properties of both…

  9. Discomfort Intolerance: Evaluation of a Potential Risk Factor for Anxiety Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Richey, J. Anthony; Cromer, Kiara R.; Buckner, Julia D.

    2007-01-01

    Discomfort intolerance, defined as an individual difference in the capacity to tolerate unpleasant bodily sensations, is a construct recently posited as a risk factor for panic and anxiety psychopathology. The present report used a biological challenge procedure to evaluate whether discomfort intolerance predicts fearful responding beyond the…

  10. Promoting Good Campus Relations: Dealing with Hate Crimes and Intolerance. Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This guidance has been produced to help higher education institutions (HEIs) deal with hate crimes and intolerance. Aiming to replace the previous Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals' guidance on extremism and intolerance, this publication provides an overview of the ways in which HEIs can encourage tolerance and respect and ensure that…

  11. GLP-2 as Beneficial Factor in the Glucose Homeostasis in Mice Fed a High Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Baldassano, Sara; Rappa, Francesca; Amato, Antonella; Cappello, Francesco; Mulè, Flavia

    2015-12-01

    Glucagon like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a gastrointestinal hormone released in response to dietary nutrients, which acts through a specific receptor, the GLP-2 receptor (GLP-2R). The physiological effects of GLP-2 are multiple, involving also the intestinal adaptation to high fat diet (HFD). In consideration of the well-known relationship between chronic HFD and impaired glucose metabolism, in the present study we examined if the blocking of the GLP-2 signaling by chronic treatment with the GLP-2R antagonist, GLP-2 (3-33), leads to functional consequences in the regulation of glucose metabolism in HFD-fed mice. Compared with animals fed standard diet (STD), mice at the 10th week of HFD showed hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, high plasma insulin level after glucose load, increased pancreas weight and ? cell expansion, but not insulin resistance. In HFD fed mice, GLP-2 (3-33) treatment for 4 weeks (from the 6th to the 10th week of diet) did not affect fasting glycaemia, but it significantly increased the glucose intolerance, both fasting and glucose-induced insulin levels, and reduced the sensitivity to insulin leading to insulin-resistance. In GLP-2 (3-33)-treated HFD mice pancreas was significantly heavier and displayed a significant increase in ?-cell mass in comparison with vehicle-treated HFD mice. In STD mice, the GLP-2 (3-33) treatment did not affect fasted or glucose-stimulated glycemia, insulin, insulin sensitivity, pancreas weight and beta cell mass. The present study suggests that endogenous GLP-2 may act as a protective factor against the dysregulation of the glucose metabolism that occurs in HFD mice, because GLP-2 (3-33) worsens glucose metabolism disorders. PMID:25967277

  12. Excessive insulin secretion in Japanese schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotics despite normal fasting glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Takuro; Suzuki, Yutaro; Fukui, Naoki; Watanabe, Junzo; Ono, Shin; Tsuneyama, Nobuto; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2012-12-01

    The development of impaired glucose tolerance induced by antipsychotics (APs) is of concern as a serious adverse effect of psychiatric drug therapy. However, the mechanism by which APs cause dysfunction of the glucose-insulin response is not fully understood. Recent studies have shown that patients treated with APs for schizophrenia were more likely to exhibit impaired glucose tolerance after a glucose load compared with healthy control subjects, even if fasting glucose levels were within the reference range. To explain these findings, we hypothesized that insulin secretion is increased in schizophrenic patients treated with AP, even those normal fasting glucose (NFG) levels. Therefore, oral glucose tolerance tests were conducted in 159 Japanese inpatients with AP-treated schizophrenia and in 90 healthy subjects without schizophrenia. Plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations were measured before (0 minute) and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after the oral glucose load. Although insulin levels at 0 minute were similar in both groups of subjects, insulin levels were significantly higher in the patients treated with AP at all times after the glucose load than in the healthy subjects. In analyses of NFG subjects, insulin levels were significantly higher in the patients treated with AP compared with the healthy subjects at all times after glucose loading. Overall, we found that insulin secretion in response to a glucose load was significantly higher in the patients treated with AP, irrespective of NFG. These results suggest that APs affect the glucose-insulin response, which may lead to subclinical insulin resistance before the onset of overt glucose intolerance. PMID:23131894

  13. Lung Disease and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. Airflow limitation is a predictor of future risks of hypertension and cardiovascular events. COPD is now understood as a systemic inflammatory disease, with the focus on inflammation of the lungs. An association between inflammation and sympathetic overactivity has also been reported. In this article, we review the association between chronic lung disease and the risks of hypertension, cardiovascular morbidity, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic approach to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in patients with lung diseases.

  14. Management of Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Castillo, Leonardo; Gopinath, Shankar; Robertson, Claudia S.

    2008-01-01

    Effective management of intracranial hypertension involves meticulous avoidance of factors that precipitate or aggravate increased intracranial pressure. When intracranial pressure becomes elevated, it is important to rule out new mass lesions that should be surgically evacuated. Medical management of increased intracranial pressure should include sedation, drainage of cerebrospinal fluid, and osmotherapy with either mannitol or hypertonic saline. For intracranial hypertension refractory to initial medical management, barbiturate coma, hypothermia, or decompressive craniectomy should be considered. Steroids are not indicated and may be harmful in the treatment of intracranial hypertension resulting from traumatic brain injury. PMID:18514825

  15. Perioperative hypertension management

    PubMed Central

    Varon, Joseph; Marik, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Perioperative hypertension is commonly encountered in patients that undergo surgery. While attempts have been made to standardize the method to characterize the intraoperative hemodynamics, these methods still vary widely. In addition, there is a lack of consensus concerning treatment thresholds and appropriate therapeutic targets, making absolute recommendations about treatment difficult. Nevertheless, perioperative hypertension requires careful management. When treatment is necessary, therapy should be individualized for the patient. This paper reviews the pharmacologic agents and strategies commonly used in the management of perioperative hypertension. PMID:18827911

  16. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Caren G; Seely, Ellen W

    2011-12-01

    Hypertension is a common complication of pregnancy. Preeclampsia, in particular, is associated with substantial risk to both the mother and the fetus. Several risk factors have been recognized to predict risk for preeclampsia. However, at present no biomarkers have sufficient discriminatory ability to be useful in clinical practice, and no effective preventive strategies have yet been identified. Commonly used medications for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy include methyldopa and labetalol. Blood pressure thresholds for initiating antihypertensive therapy are higher than outside of pregnancy. Women with prior preeclampsia are at increased risk of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease. PMID:22108284

  17. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    MedlinePLUS

    ... glucose levels. What are the prospects for an artificial pancreas? To overcome the limitations of current insu ... glucose monitoring and insulin delivery by developing an artificial pancreas. An artificial pancreas is a system that ...

  18. Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Bar for Blood Glucose Meter Performance Recalls & Alerts Shasta Technologies GenStrip Blood Glucose Test Strips May ... Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety Alerts News Releases Consumer Updates About FDA Contact FDA ...

  19. PKA Enhances the Acute Insulin Response Leading to the Restoration of Glucose Control.

    PubMed

    Kaihara, Kelly A; Dickson, Lorna M; Ellenbroek, Johanne H; Orr, Caitlin M D; Layden, Brian T; Wicksteed, Barton

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes arises from insufficient insulin secretion and failure of the ?-cell mass to persist and expand. These deficits can be treated with ligands to Gs-coupled G-protein-coupled receptors that raise ?-cell cAMP. Here we studied the therapeutic potential of ?-cell cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity in restoring glucose control using ?-caPKA mice. PKA activity enhanced the acute insulin response (AIR) to glucose, which is a primary determinant of the efficacy of glucose clearance. Enhanced AIR improved peripheral insulin action, leading to more rapid muscle glucose uptake. In the setting of pre-established glucose intolerance caused by diet-induced insulin resistance or streptozotocin-mediated ?-cell mass depletion, PKA activation enhanced ?-cell secretory function to restore glucose control, primarily through augmentation of the AIR. Enhanced AIR and improved glucose control were maintained through 16 weeks of a high-fat diet and aging to 1 year. Importantly, improved glucose tolerance did not increase the risk for hypoglycemia, nor did it rely upon hyperinsulinemia or ?-cell hyperplasia, although PKA activity was protective for ?-cell mass. These data highlight that improving ?-cell function through the activation of PKA has a large and underappreciated capacity to restore glucose control with minimal risk for adverse side effects. PMID:25475437

  20. CSF glucose test

    MedlinePLUS

    Glucose test - CSF; Cerebrospinal fluid glucose test ... The glucose level in the CSF should be 50 to 80 mg/100 mL (or greater than 2/3 of the blood sugar level). Note: Normal value ranges may vary slightly ...

  1. All about Blood Glucose

    MedlinePLUS

    Toolkit No. 15 All About Blood Glucose Keeping your blood glucose (sugar)in your target range can prevent or delay the health problems ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 2/14 Toolkit No.15: All About Blood Glucose continued team about when and ...

  2. PROX1 GENE VARIANT IS ASSOCIATED WITH FASTING GLUCOSE CHANGE AFTER ANTIHYPERTENSIVE TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yan; McDonough, Caitrin W; Beitelshees, Amber L; Karnes, Jason H; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Turner, Stephen T; Chapman, Arlene B; Gums, John G; Bailey, Kent R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Johnson, Julie A; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective To assess the relationship of the 33 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with fasting glucose in Caucasians in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with glucose response to antihypertensive drugs shown to increase risk for hyperglycemia and diabetes. Design Randomized, multicenter clinical trial. Subjects A total of 456 Caucasian men and women with uncomplicated hypertension Measurements and Main Results The Pharmacogenomic Evaluation of Antihypertensives Responses study evaluated blood pressure and glucose response in uncomplicated hypertensive patients randomized to either atenolol or hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) monotherapy, followed by combination therapy with both agents. Association of these SNPs with atenolol- or HCTZ-induced glucose response was evaluated in 456 Caucasian patients using linear regression adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, baseline glucose, baseline insulin, and principal component for ancestry. SNP rs340874 in the 5’ region of PROX1 gene was significantly associated with atenolol-induced glucose change (p=0.0013). Participants harboring the C allele of this SNP had greater glucose elevation after approximately 9 weeks of atenolol monotherapy (beta = +2.39 mg/dL per C allele), consistent with the direction of effect in fasting glucose GWAS that C allele is associated with higher fasting glucose. Conclusion These data suggest that PROX1 SNP rs340874 discovered in fasting glucose GWAS may also be a pharmacogenetic risk factor for antihypertensive - induced hyperglycemia. ?-blockers and thiazides may interact with genetic risk factors to increase risk for dysglycemia and diabetes. PMID:24122840

  3. Hypertensive heart disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... failure: pathophysiology and diagnosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Victor RG. Arterial hypertension. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  4. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  5. Pathophysiology of Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Iwakiri, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a major complication of liver disease, which results from a variety of pathological conditions that increase the resistance to the portal blood flow into the liver. The primary cause of portal hypertension in cirrhosis is an increase in intrahepatic vascular resistance due to massive structural changes associated with fibrosis and increased vascular tone in the hepatic microcirculation. As portal hypertension develops, the formation of collateral vessels and arterial vasodilation progress, which results in increased blood flow to the portal circulation. Eventually the hyperdynamic circulatory syndrome develops, leading to esophageal varices or ascites. This review article will summarize the factors that increase 1) intrahepatic vascular resistance and 2) the blood flow in the splanchnic and systemic circulations in liver cirrhosis. Finally, the future directions of basic/clinical research in portal hypertension will be discussed. PMID:24679494

  6. Resistant Hypertension and Chronotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing’s syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient’s history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of “non-dipper” hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  7. Resistant hypertension and chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-04-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient's history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of "non-dipper" hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  8. Novel treatment approaches in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Castro Torres, Yaniel; Katholi, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension represent two common conditions worldwide. Their frequent association with cardiovascular diseases makes management of hypertensive patients with T2DM an important clinical priority. Carvedilol and renal denervation are two promising choices to reduce plasma glucose levels and blood pressure in hypertensive patients with T2DM to reduce future complications and improve clinical outcomes and prognosis. Pathophysiological mechanisms of both options are under investigation, but one of the most accepted is an attenuation in sympathetic nervous system activity which lowers blood pressure and improves insulin sensitivity. Choice of these therapeutic approaches should be individualized based on specific characteristics of each patient. Further investigations are needed to determine when to consider their use in clinical practice. PMID:25126399

  9. [Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Dürig, P; Ferrier, C; Schneider, H

    1999-10-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is defined by a systolic blood pressure > or = 140 mm Hg and a diastolic blood pressure of > or = 90 mm Hg or by a rise in blood pressure of systolic > or = 30 mm Hg and diastolic > or = 15 mm Hg. High blood pressures are found in 5-10% of all pregnancies. The outcome of pregnancy is influenced by the fact whether there occurs a proteinuria in addition to hypertension. While the prognosis of an isolated hypotension is good, the combination of hypertension and proteinuria leading to preeclampsia is the primary cause of maternal death in many countries and is responsible for 20-25% of perinatal mortality. A simple classification divides between chronic hypertension, preeclampsia, preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension and transient hypertension. With chronic hypertension pregnancy outcome is determined by a preexisting nephropathy and the occurrence of a superimposed preeclampsia. Preeclampsia and superimposed preeclampsia are pregnancy induced multiorganic diseases, endangering both the mother and the fetus. Transient hypertension is a benign pathology, which occurs toward the end of pregnancy usually on the basis of a latent essential hypertension, which is laid open through pregnancy. While a severe chronic hypertension in pregnancy must be treated to prevent a hypertensive maternal encephalopathy, a less severe chronic hypertension should not be treated as the risk of a superimposed preeclampsia and the maternal and fetal outcome cannot be influenced by antihypertensive therapy. The incidence of preeclampsia is 3-5% in nulliparae and 0.5% in multiparae. Preeclampsia is a severe and dangerous pathology with an unknown etiology. Pregnancy termination is the only causal therapy. At present it is still recommended to terminate a severe preeclampsia after stabilizing the mother, irrespective of gestational age. In less severe preeclampsia occurring before 32 weeks of gestation, termination of pregnancy can be postponed under intensive monitoring and a prophylaxis with magnesium sulfate in order to accelerate the fetal lung maturation with glucocorticoids. A conservative management in the case of a HELLP-syndrome (Haemolyis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelets), which is a very severe form of preeclampsia, is not recommended because it hasn't been validated in prospective controlled studies. The most dangerous complication of preeclampsia is eclampsia, which is defined by general tonic-clonic convulsions before or after birth. The most effective prophylaxis of eclamptic attacks is the intravenous therapy with magnesium sulfate. A primary prohylaxis for preeclampsia doesn't exist. Treatment with low-dose aspirin in high-risk patients, i.e. after a severe preeclampsia, in cases of chronic hypertension, in cases of nephropathy and in cases with antiphospholipid-syndrome++ can be recommended. The prophylactic use of low-dose heparin, which has lead to a significant decreased incidence of preeclampsia in retrospective analysis, is now the object of a randomized, controlled trial in our hospital. All women who suffered from a preeclampsia should have a check-up after 3-6 months. Preexisting pathologies are found in up to 40% of patients, mostly in multiparae, i.e. chronic hypertension, nephropathy, endocrine pathologies, anomalies of blood coagulation and antiphospolipid-syndrome. PMID:10549228

  10. Fetal Programming of Adult Glucose Homeostasis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cederroth, Christopher R.; Nef, Serge

    2009-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence suggests that dietary soy and phytoestrogens can have beneficial effects on lipid and glucose metabolism. We have previously shown that male mice fed from conception to adulthood with a high soy-containing diet had reduced body weight, adiposity and a decrease in glucose intolerance, an early marker of insulin resistance and diabetes. Objectives The purpose of this study was to identify the precise periods of exposure during which phytoestrogens and dietary soy improve lipid and glucose metabolism. Since intrauterine position (IUP) has been shown to alter sensitivity to endocrine disruptors, we also investigated whether the combination of IUP and fetal exposure to dietary phytoestrogens could potentially affect adult metabolic parameters. Methods Male outbred mice (CD-1) were allowed ad libitum access to either a high soy-containing diet or a soy-free diet either during gestation, lactation or after weaning. Adiposity and bone mass density was assessed by dual x-ray absorptiometry. Glucose tolerance was assessed by a glucose tolerance test. Blood pressure was examined by the tail-cuff system. Results Here we show that metabolic improvements are dependent on precise windows of exposure during life. The beneficial effects of dietary soy and phytoestrogens on adiposity were apparent only in animals fed post-natally, while the improvements in glucose tolerance are restricted to animals with fetal exposure to soy. Interestingly, we observed that IUP influenced adult glucose tolerance, but not adiposity. Similar IUP trends were observed for other estrogen-related metabolic parameters such as blood pressure and bone mass density. Conclusion Our results suggest that IUP and fetal exposure to estrogenic environmental disrupting compounds, such as dietary phytoestrogens, could alter metabolic and cardiovascular parameters in adult individuals independently of adipose gain. PMID:19789640

  11. Knowledge and awareness of hypertension among patients with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Familoni, B. Oluranti; Ogun, S. Abayomi; Aina, A. Olutoyin

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Nigeria, systemic hypertension is the commonest noncommunicable disease, and public awareness about hypertension and its determinants is poor. This study aims to assess the knowledge and level of awareness of the disease among hypertensive patients attending the medical outpatient clinic of Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital (OOUTH). METHODOLOGY: Hypertensive patients who attended the medical outpatient clinic during the one-year study period and gave their consent were recruited into the study. Response to a questionnaire on various aspects of hypertension was analyzed using the STATA for Windows software. RESULTS: There were 254 hypertensive patients, of which 111 were males and 143 were females, giving a male: female ratio of 1:1.3. The mean age (SD) of the patients was 51 years +/- 12.2; 52.4% of the participants were aware that hypertension was the commonest noncommunicable disease in Nigeria. About one in 10 patients (11.4%) was aware that "nil symptom" is the commonest symptom of hypertension, while 37% were not aware that hypertension could cause renal failure. Only about one-third (35.4%) of the patients knew that hypertension should ideally be treated for life, while 58.3% believed that antihypertensive drugs should be used only when there are symptoms. The remaining 6.3% believed that the treatment of hypertension should be for periods ranging from two weeks to five years but not for life. CONCLUSION: This study has demonstrated inadequate knowledge of hypertension in patients with hypertension in our study population. Conscious efforts should be made and time set aside to health educate hypertensive patients. Organization of "hypertensive club or society" could be encouraged. These will reduce dissemination of false or inaccurate information by hypertensive patients to the public and its attendant dangers. PMID:15160976

  12. Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and nonallergic food intolerance: FODMAPs or food chemicals?

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Food intolerance in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is increasingly being recognized, with patients convinced that diet plays a role in symptom induction. Evidence is building to implicate fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) in the onset of abdominal pain, bloating, wind and altered bowel habit through their fermentation and osmotic effects. Hypersensitivity to normal levels of luminal distension is known to occur in patients with IBS, with consideration of food chemical intolerance likely to answer many questions about this physiological process. This paper summarizes the evidence and application of the most common approaches to managing food intolerance in IBS: the low-FODMAP diet, the elimination diet for food chemical sensitivity and others including possible noncoeliac gluten intolerance. PMID:22778791

  13. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Treated? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has no cure. However, treatment may help relieve symptoms and slow the progress of the disease. PH is treated with medicines, procedures, and other therapies. ...

  14. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) based on your medical and family histories, a ... exam, and the results from tests and procedures. PH can develop slowly. In fact, you may have ...

  15. Methamphetamine Use and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    Methamphetamine Use Pulmonary & PH Hypertension Did you know that if you have used methamphetamines you are at risk for Pulmonary Hypertension? www. ... are made every year. PH in Association with Methamphetamine Use My doctor recently told me that I ...

  16. [Treatment of hypertension crises].

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Akiyo

    2015-11-01

    A hypertensive emergency is medical condition with severe hypertension involves acute and rapidly progressed target cardiovascular organ damage. This situation requires immediate blood pressure reduction to prevent lethal target-organ damage. A patient must be treated under intensive-care monitoring and with intravenous antihypertensive medicines. To avoid organ ischemia which is caused by rapid reduction in blood pressure, the recommended aims are reduction of mean arterial pressure by no more than 25% during the first one hour, followed by 160/100-110 mmHg within the next 2-6 hours. While a hypertensive urgency which does not accompany any evidence of target-organ damages can be treated with oral antihypertensives agents. PMID:26619669

  17. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Doan-Wiggins, L

    1987-08-01

    Pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, or pregnancy-induced hypertension, is an uncommon but life-threatening complication of pregnancy associated with significant perinatal morbidity. When superimposed on underlying chronic hypertension, its impact on the fetus becomes even greater. Although the pathophysiology of the disease has not been fully defined, vasospasm appears to be the principal, underlying, etiologic mechanism. Therapy of the disease is principally aimed at controlling convulsions with magnesium sulfate and controlling hypertension with the antihypertensive agent hydralazine. Because development of the disease depends on the presence of trophoblastic tissue, the only true cure for pre-eclampsia/eclampsia is removal of the trophoblast through delivery of the infant. The timing and type of delivery is dependent on the severity of the disease and gestational age of the infant. PMID:3308427

  18. [Therapy of hypertension--2015].

    PubMed

    Kintscher, Ulrich; Mahfoud, Felix

    2015-05-01

    With an prevalence of 32%, arterial hypertension remains on of the most common diseases among adults in Germany. The ESH/ESC-guidelines from 2013 and the corresponding pocket guidelines of the DHL(®)/DGK from 2014 contain multiple modifications in diagnosis and therapy that are discussed in the present review. Target blood pressure recommendations have been simplified to <140/90 mmHg for almost all hypertensive patients. Exceptions include: diabetic patients, elderly, and patients with chronic kidney disease and proteinuria. The recommendations for pharmacological antihypertensive therapy remained mainly unchanged. Critical evaluation of renal denervation in therapy resistant hypertension requires additional randomized controlled trials in Germany to finally assess the clinical relevance of this intervention. Currently, renal denervation does not provide an alternative strategy for an established pharmacological or non-pharmacological approach. PMID:26080725

  19. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  20. Gut microbe-derived extracellular vesicles induce insulin resistance, thereby impairing glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngwoo; Kwon, Yonghoon; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Jeon, Jinseong; Jang, Su Chul; Wang, Taejun; Ban, Minjee; Kim, Min-Hye; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Kim, Min-Sun; Choi, Cheol Soo; Jee, Young-Koo; Gho, Yong Song; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbes might influence host metabolic homeostasis and contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), which is characterized by insulin resistance. Bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been suggested to be important in the pathogenesis of diseases once believed to be non-infectious. Here, we hypothesize that gut microbe-derived EVs are important in the pathogenesis of T2D. In vivo administration of stool EVs from high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance compared to regular diet (RD)-fed mice. Metagenomic profiling of stool EVs by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing revealed an increased amount of EVs derived from Pseudomonas panacis (phylum Proteobacteria) in HFD mice compared to RD mice. Interestingly, P. panacis EVs blocked the insulin signaling pathway in both skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Moreover, isolated P. panacis EVs induced typical diabetic phenotypes, such as glucose intolerance after glucose administration or systemic insulin injection. Thus, gut microbe-derived EVs might be key players in the development of insulin resistance and impairment of glucose metabolism promoted by HFD. PMID:26510393

  1. Gut microbe-derived extracellular vesicles induce insulin resistance, thereby impairing glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngwoo; Kwon, Yonghoon; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Jeon, Jinseong; Jang, Su Chul; Wang, Taejun; Ban, Minjee; Kim, Min-Hye; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Kim, Min-Sun; Choi, Cheol Soo; Jee, Young-Koo; Gho, Yong Song; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbes might influence host metabolic homeostasis and contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), which is characterized by insulin resistance. Bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been suggested to be important in the pathogenesis of diseases once believed to be non-infectious. Here, we hypothesize that gut microbe-derived EVs are important in the pathogenesis of T2D. In vivo administration of stool EVs from high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance compared to regular diet (RD)-fed mice. Metagenomic profiling of stool EVs by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing revealed an increased amount of EVs derived from Pseudomonas panacis (phylum Proteobacteria) in HFD mice compared to RD mice. Interestingly, P. panacis EVs blocked the insulin signaling pathway in both skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Moreover, isolated P. panacis EVs induced typical diabetic phenotypes, such as glucose intolerance after glucose administration or systemic insulin injection. Thus, gut microbe-derived EVs might be key players in the development of insulin resistance and impairment of glucose metabolism promoted by HFD. PMID:26510393

  2. Pharmacological therapy of feed intolerance in the critically ills

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam Q

    2014-01-01

    Feed intolerance in the setting of critical illness is associated with higher morbidity and mortality, and thus requires promptly and effective treatment. Prokinetic agents are currently considered as the first-line therapy given issues relating to parenteral nutrition and post-pyloric placement. Currently, the agents of choice are erythromycin and metoclopramide, either alone or in combination, which are highly effective with relatively low incidence of cardiac, hemodynamic or neurological adverse effects. Diarrhea, however, can occur in up to 49% of patients who are treated with the dual prokinetic therapy, which is not associated with Clostridium difficile infection and settled soon after the cessation of the drugs. Hence, the use of prokinetic therapy over a long period or for prophylactic purpose must be avoided, and the indication for ongoing use of the drug(s) must be reviewed frequently. Second line therapy, such as total parenteral nutrition and post-pyloric feeding, must be considered once adverse effects relating the prokinetic therapy develop. PMID:25133043

  3. Wheat Allergy and Intolerence; Recent Updates and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Imran; Saeed, Farhan; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Batool, Rizwana; Aziz, Mahwash; Ahmed, Waqas

    2016-01-01

    The current review paper highlights the complicacies associated with communities relying on wheat as their dietary staple. Although, wheat is an important source of nutrients but is also linked with allergenic responses in genetically susceptible subjects. The wheat proteins especially ?-amylase inhibitors, ?-5 gliadins, prolamins, nonprolamin, glucoprotein, and profilins are of significance importance. The allergenic responses are further categorized into IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated reactions. Conjugation and degranulation of the IgEs with the allergens results in release of several mediators. In contrary, non-IgE-mediated wheat allergy depends on immune complexes formed by food and food antibodies and cell-mediated immunity. As results, different diseases tend to occur on the completion of these reactions, i.e., celiac disease, baker's asthma, diarrhea, atopic dermatitis, and urticaria. This instant paper highlighted the concept of food allergy with special reference to wheat. The models are developed that are included in this paper showing the wheat allergen, their possible routes, impact on human health, and indeed possible remedies. The paper would provide the basic information for the researchers, common man, and allied stakeholders to cater the issue in details. However, the issue needs the attention of the researchers as there is a need to clarify the issues of wheat allergy and wheat intolerance. PMID:24915366

  4. Higher cholesterol and insulin levels in pregnancy are associated with increased risk for pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Solomon, C G; Carroll, J S; Okamura, K; Graves, S W; Seely, E W

    1999-03-01

    Hyperinsulinemia and dyslipidemia are known to be associated with essential hypertension but their role in pregnancy-induced hypertension remains unclear. We performed a case-control study comparing cholesterol, insulin, and glucose levels in the early third trimester of pregnancy among 31 women who developed pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) (either preeclampsia [n = 6] or nonproteinuric gestational hypertension [n = 25]), with 31 women remaining normotensive through pregnancy. As compared with women remaining normotensive, women subsequently developing PIH had higher fasting cholesterol levels (279 v 247 mg/dL; P = .02) and higher fasting insulin levels (13.3 v 7.9 microU/mL; P = .03), although fasting glucose levels and levels of glucose and insulin after glucose load did not differ significantly between groups. In comparing hypertensive subgroups, fasting insulin levels were significantly higher among women who subsequently developed preeclampsia, but not among those subsequently developing nonproteinuric gestational hypertension. Although women developing PIH had higher pregravid body mass index (25.1 v 22.6 kg/m2, P = .06), fasting cholesterol and insulin levels were associated with risk for PIH even after adjustment for body mass index and age (relative risks for one unit increase, respectively: 1.02 (P = .03) and 1.12 (P = .03). Higher fasting cholesterol and insulin levels in mid- to late pregnancy are associated with increased risk for PIH. These observations support a role for insulin resistance in the development of this complication of pregnancy. PMID:10192230

  5. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Caroline; Montani, David; Savale, Laurent; Sitbon, Olivier; Parent, Florence; Seferian, Andrei; Bulifon, Sophie; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Dartevelle, Philippe; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Jaïs, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by the persistence of thromboembolic obstructing the pulmonary arteries as an organized tissue and the presence of a variable small vessel arteriopathy. The consequence is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in progressive right heart failure. CTEPH is classified as group IV pulmonary hypertension according to the WHO classification of pulmonary hypertension. CTEPH is defined as precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure?25mmHg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure?15mmHg) associated with mismatched perfusion defects on ventilation-perfusion lung scan and signs of chronic thromboembolic disease on computed tomography pulmonary angiogram and/or conventional pulmonary angiography, in a patient who received at least 3 months of therapeutic anticoagulation. CTEPH as a direct consequence of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) is rare, and a significant number of CTEPH cases develop in the absence of history of PE. Thus, CTEPH should be considered in any patient with unexplained PH. Splenectomy, chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, indwelling catheters and cardiac pacemakers have been identified as associated conditions increasing the risk of CTEPH. Ventilation-perfusion scan (V/Q) is the best test available for establishing the thromboembolic nature of PH. When CTEPH is suspected, patients should be referred to expert centres where pulmonary angiography, right heart catheterization and high-resolution CT scan will be performed to confirm the diagnosis and to assess the operability. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) remains the gold standard treatment for CTEPH when organized thrombi involve the main, lobar or segmental arteries. This operation should only be performed by experienced surgeons in specialized centres. For inoperable patients, current ESC/ERS guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension recommend the use of riociguat and say that off-label use of drugs approved for PAH and pulmonary angioplasty may be considered in expert centres. PMID:26585271

  6. Histamine 50-Skin-Prick Test: A Tool to Diagnose Histamine Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Lukas; Ulmer, Hanno; Kofler, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    Background. Histamine intolerance results from an imbalance between histamine intake and degradation. In healthy persons, dietary histamine can be sufficiently metabolized by amine oxidases, whereas persons with low amine oxidase activity are at risk of histamine toxicity. Diamine oxidase (DAO) is the key enzyme in degradation. Histamine elicits a wide range of effects. Histamine intolerance displays symptoms, such as rhinitis, headache, gastrointestinal symptoms, palpitations, urticaria and pruritus. Objective. Diagnosis of histamine intolerance until now is based on case history; neither a validated questionnaire nor a routine test is available. It was the aim of this trial to evaluate the usefullness of a prick-test for the diagnosis of histamine intolerance. Methods. Prick-testing with 1% histamine solution and wheal size-measurement to assess the relation between the wheal in prick-test, read after 20 to 50 minutes, as sign of slowed histamine degradation as well as history and symptoms of histamine intolerance. Results. Besides a pretest with 17 patients with HIT we investigated 156 persons (81 with HIT, 75 controls): 64 out of 81 with histamine intolerance(HIT), but only 14 out of 75 persons from the control-group presented with a histamine wheal ?3?mm after 50 minutes (P < .0001). Conclusion and Clinical Relevance. Histamine-50 skin-prickt-test offers a simple tool with relevance. PMID:23724226

  7. An examination of distress intolerance in undergraduate students high in symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Emma M; Pawluk, Elizabeth J; Koerner, Naomi; Goodwill, Alasdair M

    2015-01-01

    People with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) engage in maladaptive coping strategies to reduce or avoid distress. Evidence suggests that uncertainty and negative emotions are triggers for distress in people with GAD; however, there may also be other triggers. Recent conceptualizations have highlighted six types of experiences that people report having difficulty withstanding: uncertainty, negative emotions, ambiguity, frustration, physical discomfort, and the perceived consequences of anxious arousal. The present study examined the extent to which individuals high in symptoms of GAD are intolerant of these distress triggers, compared to individuals high in depressive symptoms, and individuals who are low in GAD and depressive symptoms. Undergraduate students (N = 217) completed self-report measures of GAD symptoms, depressive symptoms, and distress intolerance. Individuals high in GAD symptoms reported greater intolerance of all of the distress triggers compared to people low in symptoms of GAD and depression. Individuals high in GAD symptoms reported greater intolerance of physical discomfort compared to those high in depressive symptoms. Furthermore, intolerance of physical discomfort was the best unique correlate of GAD status, suggesting that it may be specific to GAD (versus depression). These findings support continued investigation of the transdiagnosticity and specificity of distress intolerance. PMID:25299853

  8. The treatment of hypertension in patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mikhailidis, D P; Khan, M A; Milionis, H J; Morgan, R J

    2000-01-01

    Hypertension is another predictor of erectile dysfunction (ED). This is further evidence supporting a link between the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic disease and ED. In one study (TOMHS) involving hypertensive patients, the incidence of ED was 14.4%. The drugs used to treat hypertension may cause ED. However, there is little trial-based evidence to indicate which drugs are more likely to cause this side effect. In general, thiazide diuretics and beta-blockers seem to cause ED more often. In contrast, the alpha-blocker, doxazosin, has not been associated with an increased incidence of ED as a side effect. Doxazosin also improves urinary flow in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This condition is common in elderly men as is hypertension and ED. Therefore, doxazosin may present a special advantage among this group of patients. This alpha-blocker would also be a good choice in patients with impaired glucose tolerance/diabetes because it improves insulin sensitivity. Moreover, ED and hypertension are more prevalent among diabetics. On a more speculative note, doxazosin may potentiate the therapeutic impact of specific treatments for ED. PMID:11329820

  9. Oxidative stress and hypertension: Possibility of hypertension therapy with antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and aortic aneurysm, and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Hypertension is often associated with metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and the rate of these diseases is increasing nowadays. Recently it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress is a key player in the pathogenesis of hypertension. A reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity has been observed in newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive subjects, which are inversely correlated with blood pressure. Hydrogen peroxide production is also higher in hypertensive subjects. Furthermore, hypertensive patients have higher lipid hydroperoxide production. Oxidative stress is also markedly increased in hypertensive patients with renovascular disease. If oxidative stress is indeed a cause of hypertension, then, antioxidants should have beneficial effects on hypertension control and reduction of oxidative damage should result in a reduction in blood pressure. Although dietary antioxidants may have beneficial effects on hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors, however, antioxidant supplementation has not been shown consistently to be effective and improvement is not usually seen in blood pressure after treatment with single or combination antioxidant therapy in subjects thought to be at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This matter is the main focus of this paper. A list of medicinal plants that have been reported to be effective in hypertension is also presented. PMID:25097610

  10. Characterization of Bglu3, a mouse fasting glucose locus, and identification of Apcs as an underlying candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Lu, Zongji; Wang, Qian; Su, Zhiguang; Bao, Yongde; Shi, Weibin

    2012-03-19

    Bglu3 is a quantitative trait locus for fasting glucose on distal chromosome 1 identified in an intercross between C57BL/6 (B6) and C3H/HeJ (C3H) apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice. This locus was subsequently replicated in two separate mouse intercrosses. The objective of this study was to characterize Bglu3 through construction and analysis of a congenic strain and identify underlying candidate genes. Congenic mice were constructed by introgressing a genomic region harboring Bglu3 from C3H.apoE(-/-) into B6.apoE(-/-) mice. Mice were started with a Western diet at 6 wk of age and maintained on the diet for 12 wk. Gene expression in the liver was analyzed by microarrays. Congenic mice had significantly higher fasting glucose levels and developed more significant glucose intolerance compared with B6.apoE(-/-) mice on the Western diet. Microarray analysis revealed 336 genes to be differentially expressed in the liver of congenic mice. Further pathway analysis suggested a role for acute phase response signaling in regulating glucose intolerance. Apcs, encoding an acute phase response protein serum amyloid P (SAP), is located underneath the linkage peak of Bglu3. Multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms between B6 and C3H mice were detected within and surrounding Apcs. Apcs expression in the liver was significantly higher in congenic and C3H mice compared with B6 mice. The Western diet consumption led to a gradual rise in plasma SAP levels, which was accompanied by rising fasting glucose in both B6 and C3H apoE(-/-) mice. Expression of C3H Apcs in B6.apoE(-/-) mice aggravated glucose intolerance. Bglu3 is confirmed to be a locus affecting diabetes susceptibility, and Apcs is a probable candidate gene. PMID:22274563

  11. Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Pregnancy-induced Hypertension Overview What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the pressure in the blood vessels in ... The cause of PIH isn't known. Diagnosis & Tests What tests can show if I have PIH? ...

  12. Glucose: detection and analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucose is an aldosic monosaccharide that is centrally entrenched in the processes of photosynthesis and respiration, serving as an energy reserve and metabolic fuel in most organisms. As both a monomer and as part of more complex structures such as polysaccharides and glucosides, glucose also pla...

  13. Intestinal glucose metabolism revisited.

    PubMed

    Mithieux, Gilles; Gautier-Stein, Amandine

    2014-09-01

    It is long known that the gut can contribute to the control of glucose homeostasis via its high glucose utilization capacity. Recently, a novel function in intestinal glucose metabolism (gluconeogenesis) was described. The intestine notably contributes to about 20-25% of total endogenous glucose production during fasting. More importantly, intestinal gluconeogenesis is capable of regulating energy homeostasis through a communication with the brain. The periportal neural system senses glucose (produced by intestinal gluconeogenesis) in the portal vein walls, which sends a signal to the brain to modulate hunger sensations and whole body glucose homeostasis. Relating to the mechanism of glucose sensing, the role of the glucose receptor SGLT3 has been strongly suggested. Moreover, dietary proteins mobilize intestinal gluconeogenesis as a mandatory link between their detection in the portal vein and their effect of satiety. In the same manner, dietary soluble fibers exert their anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects via the induction of intestinal gluconeogenesis. FFAR3 is a key neural receptor involved in the specific sensing of propionate to activate a gut-brain reflex arc triggering the induction of the gut gluconeogenic function. Lastly, intestinal gluconeogenesis might also be involved in the rapid metabolic improvements induced by gastric bypass surgeries of obesity. PMID:24969963

  14. Hypertension, a health economics perspective.

    PubMed

    Alcocer, Luis; Cueto, Liliana

    2008-06-01

    The economic aspects of hypertension are critical to modern medicine. The medical, economic, and human costs of untreated and inadequately controlled hypertension are enormous. Hypertension is distributed unequally and with iniquity in different countries and regions of the world. Treatment of hypertension requires an investment over many years to prolong disease-free quality years of life. The high prevalence and high cost of the disease impacts on the microeconomics and macroeconomics of countries and regions. The criteria used for inclusion in clinical guidelines for hypertension impact on the cost and cost/utility of diagnosis or treatment. PMID:19124418

  15. Saturated- and n-6 Polyunsaturated-Fat Diets Each Induce Ceramide Accumulation in Mouse Skeletal Muscle: Reversal and Improvement of Glucose Tolerance by Lipid Metabolism Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Frangioudakis, G.; Garrard, J.; Raddatz, K.; Nadler, J. L.; Mitchell, T. W.; Schmitz-Peiffer, C.

    2010-01-01

    Lipid-induced insulin resistance is associated with intracellular accumulation of inhibitory intermediates depending on the prevalent fatty acid (FA) species. In cultured myotubes, ceramide and phosphatidic acid (PA) mediate the effects of the saturated FA palmitate and the unsaturated FA linoleate, respectively. We hypothesized that myriocin (MYR), an inhibitor of de novo ceramide synthesis, would protect against glucose intolerance in saturated fat-fed mice, while lisofylline (LSF), a functional inhibitor of PA synthesis, would protect unsaturated fat-fed mice. Mice were fed diets enriched in saturated fat, n-6 polyunsaturated fat, or chow for 6 wk. Saline, LSF (25 mg/kg · d), or MYR (0.3 mg/kg · d) were administered by mini-pumps in the final 4 wk. Glucose homeostasis was examined by glucose tolerance test. Muscle ceramide and PA were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Expression of LASS isoforms (ceramide synthases) was evaluated by immunoblotting. Both saturated and polyunsaturated fat diets increased muscle ceramide and induced glucose intolerance. MYR and LSF reduced ceramide levels in saturated and unsaturated fat-fed mice. Both inhibitors also improved glucose tolerance in unsaturated fat-fed mice, but only LSF was effective in saturated fat-fed mice. The discrepancy between ceramide and glucose tolerance suggests these improvements may not be related directly to changes in muscle ceramide and may involve other insulin-responsive tissues. Changes in the expression of LASS1 were, however, inversely correlated with alterations in glucose tolerance. The demonstration that LSF can ameliorate glucose intolerance in vivo independent of the dietary FA type indicates it may be a novel intervention for the treatment of insulin resistance. PMID:20660065

  16. Saturated- and n-6 polyunsaturated-fat diets each induce ceramide accumulation in mouse skeletal muscle: reversal and improvement of glucose tolerance by lipid metabolism inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Frangioudakis, G; Garrard, J; Raddatz, K; Nadler, J L; Mitchell, T W; Schmitz-Peiffer, C

    2010-09-01

    Lipid-induced insulin resistance is associated with intracellular accumulation of inhibitory intermediates depending on the prevalent fatty acid (FA) species. In cultured myotubes, ceramide and phosphatidic acid (PA) mediate the effects of the saturated FA palmitate and the unsaturated FA linoleate, respectively. We hypothesized that myriocin (MYR), an inhibitor of de novo ceramide synthesis, would protect against glucose intolerance in saturated fat-fed mice, while lisofylline (LSF), a functional inhibitor of PA synthesis, would protect unsaturated fat-fed mice. Mice were fed diets enriched in saturated fat, n-6 polyunsaturated fat, or chow for 6 wk. Saline, LSF (25 mg/kg x d), or MYR (0.3 mg/kg x d) were administered by mini-pumps in the final 4 wk. Glucose homeostasis was examined by glucose tolerance test. Muscle ceramide and PA were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Expression of LASS isoforms (ceramide synthases) was evaluated by immunoblotting. Both saturated and polyunsaturated fat diets increased muscle ceramide and induced glucose intolerance. MYR and LSF reduced ceramide levels in saturated and unsaturated fat-fed mice. Both inhibitors also improved glucose tolerance in unsaturated fat-fed mice, but only LSF was effective in saturated fat-fed mice. The discrepancy between ceramide and glucose tolerance suggests these improvements may not be related directly to changes in muscle ceramide and may involve other insulin-responsive tissues. Changes in the expression of LASS1 were, however, inversely correlated with alterations in glucose tolerance. The demonstration that LSF can ameliorate glucose intolerance in vivo independent of the dietary FA type indicates it may be a novel intervention for the treatment of insulin resistance. PMID:20660065

  17. Cerebral vasoconstriction precedes orthostatic intolerance after parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrador, J. M.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Brown, T. E.; Kassam, M. S.; Bondar, R. L.; Schlegel, T. T.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of brief but repeated bouts of micro- and hypergravity on cerebrovascular responses to head-up tilt (HUT) were examined in 13 individuals after (compared to before) parabolic flight. Middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA MFV; transcranial Doppler ultrasound), eye level blood pressure (BP) and end tidal CO(2) (P(ET)CO(2)) were measured while supine and during 80 degrees HUT for 30 min or until presyncope. In the postflight tests subjects were classified as being orthostatically tolerant (OT) (n = 7) or intolerant (OI) (n = 6). BP was diminished with HUT in the OT group in both tests (p < 0.05) whereas postflight BP was not different from supine in the OI group. Postflight compared to preflight, the reduction in P(ET)CO(2) with HUT (p < 0.05) increased in both groups, although significantly so only in the OI group (p < 0.05). The OI group also had a significant decrease in supine MCA MFV postflight (p < 0.05) that was unaccompanied by a change in supine P(ET)CO(2). The decrease in MCA MFV that occurred during HUT in both groups preflight (p < 0.05) was accentuated only in the OI group postflight, particularly during the final 30 s of HUT (p < 0.05). However, this accentuated decrease in MCA MFV was not correlated to the greater decrease in P(ET)CO(2) during the same period (R = 0.20, p = 0.42). Although cerebral vascular resistance (CVR) also increased in the OI group during the last 30 s of HUT postflight (p < 0.05), the dynamic autoregulatory gain was not simultaneously changed. Therefore, we conclude that in the OI individuals, parabolic flight was associated with cerebral hypoperfusion following a paradoxical augmentation of CVR by a mechanism that was not related to changes in autoregulation nor strictly to changes in P(ET)CO(2).

  18. [Celiac disease--the chameleon among the food intolerances].

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Alexander; Wolters, Maike; Hahn, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder resulting from gluten intolerance and is based on a genetically predisposition. Symptoms occur upon exposure to prolamin from wheat, rye, barley and related grain. The pathogenesis of celiac disease has not yet been sufficiently elucidated but is being considered as an autoimmune process. At its core are the deamidation of prolamin fragments, the building of specific antibodies and the activation of cytotoxic T-cells. The immunological inflammatory process is accompanied by structural damages of the enterocytes (villous atrophy, colonization and crypt hyperplasia). The symptoms and their extent depend on the type of the celiac disease; classic and non-classic forms are being distinguished (atypical, oligosymptomatic, latent and silent celiac disease). Characteristics of the classic presentation are malabsorption syndrome and intestinal symptoms such as mushy diarrhea and abdominal distension. The diagnosis of celiac disease is based on four pillars: Anamnesis and clinical presentation, serological evidence of coeliac specific antibodies (IgA-t-TG; IgA-EmA), small intestine biopsy and improvement of symptoms after institution of a gluten-free diet. The basis of the therapy is a lifelong gluten-free diet, i. e. wheat, rye, barley, spelt, green-core, faro-wheat, kamuth and conventional oats as well as food items obtained therefrom. Small amounts of up to 50 mg gluten per day are usually tolerated by most patients; amounts of > or = 100 mg/day lead mostly to symptoms. Gluten-free foods contain < or = 20 ppm or 20 mg/kg (Sign: symbol of the 'crossed ear' or label 'gluten-free'). At the beginning of the therapy the fat and lactose intake may need to be reduced; also the supplementation of single micronutrients (fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid, B12, iron, and calcium) may be required. Alternative therapies are being developed but have not yet been clinically tested. PMID:24266248

  19. Visual height intolerance and acrophobia: clinical characteristics and comorbidity patterns.

    PubMed

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Huppert, Doreen; Grill, Eva; Fitz, Werner; Brandt, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the general population lifetime and point prevalence of visual height intolerance and acrophobia, to define their clinical characteristics, and to determine their anxious and depressive comorbidities. A case-control study was conducted within a German population-based cross-sectional telephone survey. A representative sample of 2,012 individuals aged 14 and above was selected. Defined neurological conditions (migraine, Menière's disease, motion sickness), symptom pattern, age of first manifestation, precipitating height stimuli, course of illness, psychosocial impairment, and comorbidity patterns (anxiety conditions, depressive disorders according to DSM-IV-TR) for vHI and acrophobia were assessed. The lifetime prevalence of vHI was 28.5% (women 32.4%, men 24.5%). Initial attacks occurred predominantly (36%) in the second decade. A rapid generalization to other height stimuli and a chronic course of illness with at least moderate impairment were observed. A total of 22.5% of individuals with vHI experienced the intensity of panic attacks. The lifetime prevalence of acrophobia was 6.4% (women 8.6%, men 4.1%), and point prevalence was 2.0% (women 2.8%; men 1.1%). VHI and even more acrophobia were associated with high rates of comorbid anxious and depressive conditions. Migraine was both a significant predictor of later acrophobia and a significant consequence of previous acrophobia. VHI affects nearly a third of the general population; in more than 20% of these persons, vHI occasionally develops into panic attacks and in 6.4%, it escalates to acrophobia. Symptoms and degree of social impairment form a continuum of mild to seriously distressing conditions in susceptible subjects. PMID:25262317

  20. Utility of Corrected QT Interval in Orthostatic Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Bin; Hong, Soonwoong; Park, Jin-Woo; Cho, Dong-Hyuk; Park, Ki-Jong; Kim, Byung-Jo

    2014-01-01

    We performed this study to determine whether electrocardiographic corrected QT (QTc) interval predicts alterations in sympathovagal balance during orthostatic intolerance (OI). We reviewed 1,368 patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of OI who underwent electrocardiography and composite autonomic function tests (AFTs). Patients with a positive response to the head-up tilt test were classified into orthostatic hypotension (OH), neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS), or postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) groups. A total of 275 patients (159 OH, 54 NCS, and 62 POTS) were included in the final analysis. Between-group comparisons of OI symptom grade, QTc interval, QTc dispersion, and each AFT measure were performed. QTc interval and dispersion were correlated with AFT measures. OH Patients had the most severe OI symptom grade and NCS patients the mildest. Patients with OH showed the longest QTc interval (448.8±33.6 msec), QTc dispersion (59.5±30.3 msec) and the lowest values in heart rate response to deep breathing (HRDB) (10.3±6.0 beats/min) and Valsalva ratio (1.3±0.2). Patients with POTS showed the shortest QTc interval (421.7±28.6 msec), the highest HRDB values (24.5±9.2 beats/min), Valsalva ratio (1.8±0.3), and proximal and distal leg sweat volumes in the quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test. QTc interval correlated negatively with HRDB (r?=??0.443, p<0.001) and Valsalva ratio (r?=??0.425, p<0.001). We found negative correlations between QTc interval and AFT values representing cardiovagal function in patients with OI. Our findings suggest that prolonged QTc interval may be considered to be a biomarker for detecting alterations in sympathovagal balance, especially cardiovagal dysfunction in OH. PMID:25180969

  1. Differential and Complementary Effects of Glucose and Prolactin on Islet DNA Synthesis and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Ramamani; Fleenor, Donald; Lu, Danhong

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms by which lactogenic hormones promote ?-cell expansion remain poorly understood. Because prolactin (PRL) up-regulates ?-cell glucose transporter 2, glucokinase, and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities, we reasoned that glucose availability might mediate or modulate the effects of PRL on ?-cell mass. Here, we used male rat islets to show that PRL and glucose have differential but complementary effects on the expression of cell cyclins, cell cycle inhibitors, and various other genes known to regulate ?-cell replication, including insulin receptor substrate 2, IGF-II, menin, forkhead box protein M1, tryptophan hydroxylase 1, and the PRL receptor. Differential effects on gene expression are associated with synergistic effects of glucose and PRL on islet DNA synthesis. The effects of PRL on gene expression are mirrored by ?-cell overexpression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b and are opposed by dexamethasone. An ad-small interfering RNA specific for cyclin D2 attenuates markedly the effects of PRL on islet DNA synthesis. Our studies suggest a new paradigm for the control of ?-cell mass and insulin production by hormones and nutrients. PRL up-regulates ?-cell glucose uptake and utilization, whereas glucose increases islet PRL receptor expression and potentiates the effects of PRL on cell cycle gene expression and DNA synthesis. These findings suggest novel targets for prevention of neonatal glucose intolerance and gestational diabetes and may provide new insight into the pathogenesis of ?-cell hyperplasia in obese subjects with insulin resistance. PMID:21239441

  2. Effect of guanylate cyclase-C activity on energy and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Begg, Denovan P; Steinbrecher, Kris A; Mul, Joram D; Chambers, Adam P; Kohli, Rohit; Haller, April; Cohen, Mitchell B; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J

    2014-11-01

    Uroguanylin is a gastrointestinal hormone primarily involved in fluid and electrolyte handling. It has recently been reported that prouroguanylin, secreted postprandially, is converted to uroguanylin in the brain and activates the receptor guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C) to reduce food intake and prevent obesity. We tested central nervous system administration of two GC-C agonists and found no significant reduction of food intake. We also carefully phenotyped mice lacking the GC-C receptor and found them to have normal body weight, adiposity, and glucose tolerance. Interestingly, uroguanylin knockout mice had a small but significant increase in body weight and adiposity that was accompanied by glucose intolerance. Our data indicate that the modest effects of uroguanylin on energy and glucose homeostasis are not mediated by central GC-C receptors. PMID:24898144

  3. Fetuin B Is a Secreted Hepatocyte Factor Linking Steatosis to Impaired Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Meex, Ruth C; Hoy, Andrew J; Morris, Alexander; Brown, Russell D; Lo, Jennifer C Y; Burke, Melissa; Goode, Robert J A; Kingwell, Bronwyn A; Kraakman, Michael J; Febbraio, Mark A; Greve, Jan Willem; Rensen, Sander S; Molloy, Mark P; Lancaster, Graeme I; Bruce, Clinton R; Watt, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Liver steatosis is associated with the development of insulin resistance and the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. We tested the hypothesis that protein signals originating from steatotic hepatocytes communicate with other cells to modulate metabolic phenotypes. We show that the secreted factors from steatotic hepatocytes induce pro-inflammatory signaling and insulin resistance in cultured cells. Next, we identified 168 hepatokines, of which 32 were differentially secreted in steatotic versus non-steatotic hepatocytes. Targeted analysis showed that fetuin B was increased in humans with liver steatosis and patients with type 2 diabetes. Fetuin B impaired insulin action in myotubes and hepatocytes and caused glucose intolerance in mice. Silencing of fetuin B in obese mice improved glucose tolerance. We conclude that the protein secretory profile of hepatocytes is altered with steatosis and is linked to inflammation and insulin resistance. Therefore, preventing steatosis may limit the development of dysregulated glucose metabolism in settings of overnutrition. PMID:26603189

  4. TREATMENT OF THE METABOLIC SYNDROME: THE IMPACT OF LIFESTYLE MODIFICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Along with the increasing prevalence of obesity comes a constellation of metabolic derangements: dyslipidemias, hypertension, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance, as well as increased prothrombotic and inflammatory markers. The association of these factors has been termed the "metabolic synd...

  5. Glucose-6-Phosphate–Mediated Activation of Liver Glycogen Synthase Plays a Key Role in Hepatic Glycogen Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, Alexander; Hunter, Roger W.; García-Rocha, Mar; Kang, Li; López-Soldado, Iliana; Lantier, Louise; Patel, Kashyap; Peggie, Mark W.; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Voss, Martin; Calbó, Joaquim; Cohen, Patricia T.W.; Wasserman, David H.; Guinovart, Joan J.; Sakamoto, Kei

    2013-01-01

    The liver responds to an increase in blood glucose levels in the postprandial state by uptake of glucose and conversion to glycogen. Liver glycogen synthase (GYS2), a key enzyme in glycogen synthesis, is controlled by a complex interplay between the allosteric activator glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and reversible phosphorylation through glycogen synthase kinase-3 and the glycogen-associated form of protein phosphatase 1. Here, we initially performed mutagenesis analysis and identified a key residue (Arg582) required for activation of GYS2 by G6P. We then used GYS2 Arg582Ala knockin (+/R582A) mice in which G6P-mediated GYS2 activation had been profoundly impaired (60–70%), while sparing regulation through reversible phosphorylation. R582A mutant–expressing hepatocytes showed significantly reduced glycogen synthesis with glucose and insulin or glucokinase activator, which resulted in channeling glucose/G6P toward glycolysis and lipid synthesis. GYS2+/R582A mice were modestly glucose intolerant and displayed significantly reduced glycogen accumulation with feeding or glucose load in vivo. These data show that G6P-mediated activation of GYS2 plays a key role in controlling glycogen synthesis and hepatic glucose-G6P flux control and thus whole-body glucose homeostasis. PMID:23990365

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate-mediated activation of liver glycogen synthase plays a key role in hepatic glycogen synthesis.

    PubMed

    von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, Alexander; Hunter, Roger W; García-Rocha, Mar; Kang, Li; López-Soldado, Iliana; Lantier, Louise; Patel, Kashyap; Peggie, Mark W; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Voss, Martin; Calbó, Joaquim; Cohen, Patricia T W; Wasserman, David H; Guinovart, Joan J; Sakamoto, Kei

    2013-12-01

    The liver responds to an increase in blood glucose levels in the postprandial state by uptake of glucose and conversion to glycogen. Liver glycogen synthase (GYS2), a key enzyme in glycogen synthesis, is controlled by a complex interplay between the allosteric activator glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and reversible phosphorylation through glycogen synthase kinase-3 and the glycogen-associated form of protein phosphatase 1. Here, we initially performed mutagenesis analysis and identified a key residue (Arg(582)) required for activation of GYS2 by G6P. We then used GYS2 Arg(582)Ala knockin (+/R582A) mice in which G6P-mediated GYS2 activation had been profoundly impaired (60-70%), while sparing regulation through reversible phosphorylation. R582A mutant-expressing hepatocytes showed significantly reduced glycogen synthesis with glucose and insulin or glucokinase activator, which resulted in channeling glucose/G6P toward glycolysis and lipid synthesis. GYS2(+/R582A) mice were modestly glucose intolerant and displayed significantly reduced glycogen accumulation with feeding or glucose load in vivo. These data show that G6P-mediated activation of GYS2 plays a key role in controlling glycogen synthesis and hepatic glucose-G6P flux control and thus whole-body glucose homeostasis. PMID:23990365

  7. Statin intolerance – an attempt at a unified definition. Position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P.; Farnier, Michel; Davidson, Michael H.; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Athyros, Vasilis; Djuric, Dragan M.; Ezhov, Marat V.; Greenfield, Robert S.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kostner, Karam; Serban, Corina; Lighezan, Daniel; Fras, Zlatko; Moriarty, Patrick M.; Muntner, Paul; Goudev, Assen; Ceska, Richard; Nicholls, Stephen J.; Broncel, Marlena; Nikolic, Dragana; Pella, Daniel; Puri, Raman; Rysz, Jacek; Wong, Nathan D.; Bajnok, Laszlo; Jones, Steven R.; Ray, Kausik K.; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.

    2015-01-01

    Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical practice. They are usually well tolerated and effectively prevent cardiovascular events. Most adverse effects associated with statin therapy are muscle-related. The recent statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has focused on statin associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and avoided the use of the term ‘statin intolerance’. Although muscle syndromes are the most common adverse effects observed after statin therapy, excluding other side effects might underestimate the number of patients with statin intolerance, which might be observed in 10–15% of patients. In clinical practice, statin intolerance limits effective treatment of patients at risk of, or with, cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of the most common adverse effects of statin therapy that might cause statin intolerance and the clear definition of this phenomenon is crucial to effectively treat patients with lipid disorders. Therefore, the aim of this position paper was to suggest a unified definition of statin intolerance, and to complement the recent EAS statement on SAMS, where the pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management were comprehensively presented. PMID:25861286

  8. Statin intolerance - an attempt at a unified definition. Position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P; Farnier, Michel; Davidson, Michael H; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Aronow, Wilbert S; Athyros, Vasilis; Djuric, Dragan M; Ezhov, Marat V; Greenfield, Robert S; Hovingh, G Kees; Kostner, Karam; Serban, Corina; Lighezan, Daniel; Fras, Zlatko; Moriarty, Patrick M; Muntner, Paul; Goudev, Assen; Ceska, Richard; Nicholls, Stephen J; Broncel, Marlena; Nikolic, Dragana; Pella, Daniel; Puri, Raman; Rysz, Jacek; Wong, Nathan D; Bajnok, Laszlo; Jones, Steven R; Ray, Kausik K; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-03-16

    Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical practice. They are usually well tolerated and effectively prevent cardiovascular events. Most adverse effects associated with statin therapy are muscle-related. The recent statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has focused on statin associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and avoided the use of the term 'statin intolerance'. Although muscle syndromes are the most common adverse effects observed after statin therapy, excluding other side effects might underestimate the number of patients with statin intolerance, which might be observed in 10-15% of patients. In clinical practice, statin intolerance limits effective treatment of patients at risk of, or with, cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of the most common adverse effects of statin therapy that might cause statin intolerance and the clear definition of this phenomenon is crucial to effectively treat patients with lipid disorders. Therefore, the aim of this position paper was to suggest a unified definition of statin intolerance, and to complement the recent EAS statement on SAMS, where the pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management were comprehensively presented. PMID:25861286

  9. Hypertension in perspective

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, W.F.; Zijlstra, F.

    2005-01-01

    Decisions about the management of hypertensive patients should not be based on the level of blood pressure alone, but also on the presence of other risk factors, target organ damage and cardiovascular and renal disease. The results of echocardiography and carotid ultrasonography aids in the stratification of absolute cardiovascular risk as recently advocated by the guidelines of the European Society of Hypertension 2003. Therefore, the detection of target organ damage by ultrasound techniques allows an accurate identification of high-risk patients. Cardiovascular risk stratification only based on a simple routine work-up can often underestimate overall risk, thus leading to a potentially inadequate therapeutic management especially of low-medium risk patients. PMID:25696486

  10. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Anyaegbunam, A.; Edwards, C.

    1994-01-01

    Hypertension, which is the most common complication of pregnancy, is a leading cause of both maternal and perinatal morbidity. Advances in research related to hypertensive disorders in pregnancy have facilitated a better general understanding of the pathophysiologic processes associated with this disease. Strategies of prevention, early diagnosis, and newer treatments have contributed to a more favorable outcome for mothers and their babies. The exact cause of preeclampsia remains elusive; however, recent investigations suggest that endothelial cell injury due to free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation may be the initiator of the pathophysiologic events of preeclampsia. Future challenges in this area should include efforts to elucidate mechanisms involved in free radical cell-mediated vascular disturbances and antioxidant defenses. PMID:8040904

  11. Gestational pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Matthew; Payne, Julie G.; Tukey, Melissa H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease marked by the irreversible pulmonary vascular changes of vasoconstriction, thrombosis, and proliferation of smooth muscle and endothelial cells. The untreated clinical course is characterized by progressive dyspnea and a median survival of less than 3 years. Many of these patients are of child-bearing age; however, pregnancy leads to physiologic changes that are particularly poorly tolerated in PAH, conferring a 30%–56% mortality. We present a case of PAH that spontaneously resolved after termination of pregnancy and recurred during each of two subsequent pregnancies. To our knowledge, this case is unique, because no cases of spontaneous resolution of idiopathic PAH have been reported in adults, nor have there been any reports of pulmonary hypertension that is isolated to the gestational period. PMID:26697182

  12. FMRF-amide is a glucose-lowering hormone in the snail Helix aspersa.

    PubMed

    R?szer, Tamás; Kiss-Tóth, Éva D

    2014-11-01

    Although glucose is metabolically the most important carbohydrate in almost all living organisms, still little is known about the evolution of the hormonal control of cellular glucose uptake. In this study, we identify Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide (FMRFa), also known as molluscan cardioexcitatory tetrapeptide, as a glucose-lowering hormone in the snail Helix aspersa. FMRFa belongs to an evolutionarily conserved neuropeptide family and is involved in the neuron-to-muscle signal transmission in the snail digestive system. This study shows that, beyond this function, FMRFa also has glucose-lowering activity. We found neuronal transcription of genes encoding FMRFa and its receptor and moreover the hemolymph FMRFa levels were peaking at metabolically active periods of the snails. In turn, hypometabolism of the dormant periods was associated with abolished FMRFa production. In the absence of FMRFa, the midintestinal gland ("hepatopancreas") cells were deficient in their glucose uptake, contributing to the development of glucose intolerance. Exogenous FMRFa restored the absorption of hemolymph glucose by the midintestinal gland cells and improved glucose tolerance in dormant snails. We show that FMRFa was released to the hemolymph in response to glucose challenge. FMRFa-containing nerve terminals reach the interstitial sinusoids between the chondroid cells in the artery walls. We propose that, in addition to the known sites of possible FMRFa secretion, these perivascular sinusoids serve as neurohemal organs and allow FMRFa release. This study suggests that in evolution, not only the insulin-like peptides have adopted the ability to increase cellular glucose uptake and can act as hypoglycemic hormones. PMID:25096715

  13. Senescence marker protein-30/gluconolactonase deletion worsens glucose tolerance through impairment of acute insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Goji; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kadono, Mayuko; Tanaka, Muhei; Asano, Mai; Senmaru, Takafumi; Kondo, Yoshitaka; Fukui, Michiaki; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Naoki; Nakamura, Naoto; Ishigami, Akihito

    2010-02-01

    Senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) is an androgen-independent factor that decreases with age. We recently identified SMP30 as the lactone-hydrolyzing enzyme gluconolactonase (GNL), which is involved in vitamin C biosynthesis in animal species. To examine whether the age-related decrease in SMP30/GNL has effects on glucose homeostasis, we used SMP30/GNL knockout (KO) mice treated with L-ascorbic acid. In an ip glucose tolerance test at 15 wk of age, blood glucose levels in SMP30/GNL KO mice were significantly increased by 25% at 30 min after glucose administration compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Insulin levels in SMP30/GNL KO mice were significantly decreased by 37% at 30 min after glucose compared with WT mice. Interestingly, an insulin tolerance test showed a greater glucose-lowering effect in SMP30/GNL KO mice. High-fat diet feeding severely worsened glucose tolerance in both WT and SMP30/GNL KO mice. Morphometric analysis revealed no differences in the degree of high-fat diet-induced compensatory increase in beta-cell mass and proliferation. In the static incubation study of islets, insulin secretion in response to 20 mm glucose or KCl was significantly decreased in SMP30/GNL KO mice. On the other hand, islet ATP content at 20 mm in SMP30/GNL KO mice was similar to that in WT mice. Collectively, these data indicate that impairment of the early phase of insulin secretion due to dysfunction of the distal portion of the secretion pathway underlies glucose intolerance in SMP30/GNL KO mice. Decreased SMP30/GNL may contribute to the worsening of glucose tolerance that occurs in normal aging. PMID:19934374

  14. Young and old genetically heterogeneous HET3 mice on a rapamycin diet are glucose intolerant but insulin sensitive

    E-print Network

    Lamming, Dudley W.

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, extends the life span of yeast, worms, flies, and mice. Interventions that promote longevity are often correlated with increased ...

  15. Managing hypertension by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Camps, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Some polyphenols, obtained from plants of broad use, induce a favorable endothelial response in hypertension and beneficial effects in the management of other metabolic cardiovascular risks. Previous studies in our laboratories using the calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa as a source of polyphenols show that significant effects on hypertension are noticeable in humans only when provided in high amounts. Available data are suggestive in animal models and ex vivo experiments, but data in humans are difficult to acquire. Additionally, and despite the low bioavailability of polyphenols, intervention studies provide evidence for the protective effects of secondary plant metabolites. Assumptions on public health benefits are limited by the lack of scientific knowledge, robust data derived from large randomized clinical trials, and an accurate assessment of the bioactive components provided by common foodstuff. Because it is likely that clinical effects are the result of multiple interactions among different polyphenols rather than the isolated action of unique compounds, to provide polyphenol-rich botanical extracts as dietary supplements is a suggestive option. Unfortunately, the lack of patent perspectives for the pharmaceutical industries and the high cost of production and release for alimentary industries will hamper the performance of the necessary clinical trials. Here we briefly discuss whether and how such limitations may complicate the extensive use of plant-derived products in the management of hypertension and which steps are the necessary to deal with the predictable complexity in a possible clinical practice. PMID:25714729

  16. Glucose urine test

    MedlinePLUS

    Urine sugar test; Urine glucose test; Glucosuria test; Glycosuria test ... After you provide a urine sample, it is tested right away. The health care provider uses a dipstick made with a color-sensitive pad. The ...

  17. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    MedlinePLUS

    ... levels. [ Top ] What are the prospects for an artificial pancreas? To overcome the limitations of current insulin ... glucose monitoring and insulin delivery by developing an artificial pancreas. An artificial pancreas is a system that ...

  18. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Snoep, Jacob L. (Groede, NL); Arfman, Nico (Delft, NL)

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  19. Glucose: Detection and analysis.

    PubMed

    Galant, A L; Kaufman, R C; Wilson, J D

    2015-12-01

    Glucose is an aldosic monosaccharide that is centrally entrenched in the processes of photosynthesis and respiration, serving as an energy reserve and metabolic fuel in most organisms. As both a monomer and as part of more complex structures such as polysaccharides and glucosides, glucose also plays a major role in modern food products, particularly where flavor and or structure are concerned. Over the years, many diverse methods for detecting and quantifying glucose have been developed; this review presents an overview of the most widely employed and historically significant, including copper iodometry, HPLC, GC, CZE, and enzyme based systems such as glucose meters. The relative strengths and limitations of each method are evaluated, and examples of their recent application in the realm of food chemistry are discussed. PMID:26041177

  20. [Management of pregnancy induced hypertension].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshikatsu; Matsuura, Ayano; Yamamoto, Tamao

    2015-11-01

    Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) is classified according to the severity of hypertension. The Japan Society of Hypertension made practice guidelines in 2014, and the Japan Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy made guidelines subsequently in 2015, too. Both guidelines state that the basic treatment for PIH is the interruption of pregnancy, and antihypertensive therapy should be given for protection in mother complicated by severe hypertension. The fetal heart rates should be monitored enough due to worsening fetal circulation. It recommends that methyldopa, hydralazine, labetalol, and long-acting nifedipine (only after 20 weeks of gestation) should be used as the first-choice antihypertensive oral drugs. Intravenous administration should be selected when a hypertensive emergency occurs. PMID:26619665

  1. Association between fried food consumption and hypertension in Korean adults.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yunjin; Kim, Jihye

    2016-01-01

    The present study explored the relationships between fried food consumption and metabolic risk factors and hypertension in Korean adults. The study was based on the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2010 and 2011. A total of 9221 Korean adults aged ?19 years were studied. Fried food consumption was assessed using a validated FFQ. Metabolic risk factors such as waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), TAG, HDL-cholesterol and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) were measured. Hypertension was defined as SBP?140 mmHg, DBP?90 mmHg or current use of antihypertensive medication. Adjusted OR for elevated blood pressure significantly increased in men (OR 1·62; 95 % CI 1·11, 2·37; P trend=0·0447) and women (OR 2·20; 95 % CI 1·21, 4·00; P trend=0·0403) with a greater than twice a week consumption of fried food compared with those who rarely consumed fried food. However, fried food consumption was not associated with other metabolic risk factors (abdominal obesity, high FPG, hypertriacylglycerolaemia, low HDL-cholesterol and the metabolic syndrome). The adjusted OR for hypertension increased by 2·4-fold in women (OR 2·37; 95 % CI 1·19, 4·72; P trend=0·0272) with a greater than twice a week fried food consumption compared with those who rarely consumed it. No significant association was found between fried food consumption and hypertension in men. This study suggests that frequent fried food consumption is associated with hypertension in Korean women. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of different types of fried foods on hypertension. PMID:26449129

  2. Blood pressure and plasma renin activity as predictors of orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. H.; Kravik, S. E.; Geelen, G.; Keil, L.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 3 h standing, followed by a period of head-up tilt (HUT) on physiological response (orthostatic tolerance, blood pressure and heart rate), as well as on plasma vasopressin (PVP) and renin activity (PRA) were studied in 13 dehydrated (to 2.4 pct loss of body weight) subjects. Seven subjects showed signs of orthostatic intolerance (INT), manifested by sweating, pallor, nausea and dizziness. Prior to these symptoms, the INT subjects exhibited lower systolic (SP) and pulse (PP) pressures, and an elevated PRA, compared to the tolerant (TOL) subjects. HUT has aggravated increases of RPA in the INT subjects and caused an increase, higher than in TOL subjects, in PVP, while rehydration has greatly attenuated the PVP response to the HUT and decreased the PRA response. It is concluded that dehydration, together with measurements of SP, PP and PRA, may serve as a means of predicting orthostatic intolerance and may provide a physiological model for studying the causes of intolerance.

  3. Odor and Noise Intolerance in Persons with Self-Reported Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Steven; Neely, Gregory; Olsson, David; Sandström, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Lack of confirmation of symptoms attributed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) and triggered by EMF exposure has highlighted the role of individual factors. Prior observations indicate intolerance to other types of environmental exposures among persons with electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS). This study assessed differences in odor and noise intolerance between persons with EHS and healthy controls by use of subscales and global measures of the Chemical Sensitivity Scale (CSS) and the Noise Sensitivity Scale (NSS). The EHS group scored significantly higher than the controls on all CSS and NSS scales. Correlation coefficients between CSS and NSS scores ranged from 0.60 to 0.65 across measures. The findings suggest an association between EHS and odor and noise intolerance, encouraging further investigation of individual factors for understanding EMF-related symptoms. PMID:25166918

  4. (51Cr)EDTA intestinal permeability in children with cow's milk intolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Schrander, J.J.; Unsalan-Hooyen, R.W.; Forget, P.P.; Jansen, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Making use of ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA as a permeability marker, we measured intestinal permeability in a group of 20 children with proven cow's milk intolerance (CMI), a group of 17 children with similar complaints where CMI was excluded (sick controls), and a group of 12 control children. ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test results (mean +/- SD) were 6.85 +/- 3.64%, 3.42 +/- 0.94%, and 2.61 +/- 0.67% in the group with CMI, the sick control, and the control group, respectively. When compared to both control groups, patients with cow's milk intolerance (CMI) showed a significantly increased small bowel permeability. We conclude that the ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test can be helpful for the diagnosis of cow's milk intolerance.

  5. Orthostatic intolerance and the postural tachycardia syndrome: genetic and environment pathophysiologies. Neurolab Autonomic Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Shannon, J. R.; Biaggioni, I.; Ertl, A. C.; Diedrich, A.; Carson, R.; Furlan, R.; Jacob, G.; Jordan, J.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is a common problem for inbound space travelers. There is usually tachycardia on standing but blood pressure may be normal, low or, rarely, elevated. This condition is analogous to the orthostatic intolerance that occurs on Earth in individuals with orthostatic tachycardia, palpitations, mitral valve prolapse, and light-headedness. Our studies during the Neurolab mission indicated that sympathetic nerve traffic is raised in microgravity and that plasma norepinephrine is higher than baseline supine levels but lower than baseline upright levels. A subgroup of patients with familial orthostatic intolerance differ from inbound space travelers in that they have an alanine-to-to-proline mutation at amino acid position 457 in their norepinephrine transporter gene. This leads to poor clearance of norepinephrine from synapses, with consequent raised heart rate. Clinical features of these syndromes are presented.

  6. Regional Myocardial Substrate Uptake in Hypertensive Rats: A Quantitative Autoradiographic Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Bertrand Brill, A.; Som, Prantika; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Srivastava, Suresh C.; Iwai, Junichi; Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli; Strauss, H. William; Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Furn F.

    1985-03-01

    Severe hypertension causes global and regional changes in myocardial perfusion and substrate utilization. Regional perfusion and fatty acid utilization were evaluated by dual-tracer autoradiography in normotensive and hypertensive rats of the Dahl strain. The regional distributions of perfusion and fatty acid utilization were homogeneous in normotensive rats. Severe hypertension was associated with a homogeneous pattern of regional perfusion, but fatty acid utilization was focally decreased in the free wall of the left ventricle. The decrease in fatty acid uptake was associated with a concomitant increase in glucose utilization. These findings suggest that severe hypertension is associated with uniform myocardial perfusion and focal alterations in the substrates used for the performance of myocardial work.

  7. Orthostatic intolerance predicts mild cognitive impairment: incidence of mild cognitive impairment and dementia from the Swedish general population cohort Good Aging in Skåne

    PubMed Central

    Elmståhl, Sölve; Widerström, Elisabet

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Contradictory results have been reported on the relationship between orthostatic hypotension (OH) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Objective To study the incidence of MCI and dementia and their relationship to OH and subclinical OH with orthostatic symptoms (orthostatic intolerance). Study design and setting This study used a prospective general population cohort design and was based on data from the Swedish Good Aging in Skåne study (GÅS-SNAC), they were studied 6 years after baseline of the present study, with the same study protocol at baseline and at follow-up. The study sample comprised 1,480 randomly invited subjects aged 60 to 93 years, and had a participation rate of 82% at follow-up. OH test included assessment of blood pressure and symptoms of OH. Results The 6-year incidence of MCI was 8%, increasing from 12.1 to 40.5 per 1,000 person-years for men and 6.9 to 16.9 per 1,000 person-years for women aged 60 to >80 years. The corresponding 6-year incidence of dementia was 8%. Orthostatic intolerance during uprising was related to risk for MCI at follow-up (odds ratio [OR] =1.84 [1.20–2.80][95% CI]), adjusted for age and education independently of blood pressure during testing. After stratification for hypertension (HT), the corresponding age-adjusted OR for MCI in the non-HT group was 1.71 (1.10–2.31) and 1.76 (1.11–2.13) in the HT group. Among controls, the proportion of those with OH was 16%; those with MCI 24%; and those with dementia 31% (age-adjusted OR 1.93 [1.19–3.14]). Conclusion Not only OH, but also symptoms of OH, seem to be a risk factor for cognitive decline and should be considered in the management of blood pressure among the elderly population. PMID:25429211

  8. Regulation of glucose tolerance and sympathetic activity by MC4R signaling in the lateral hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Donald A; McDaniel, Latisha N; Yin, Terry; Khan, Michael; Jiang, Jingwei; Acevedo, Michael R; Walsh, Susan A; Ponto, Laura L Boles; Norris, Andrew W; Lutter, Michael; Rahmouni, Kamal; Cui, Huxing

    2015-06-01

    Melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) signaling mediates diverse physiological functions, including energy balance, glucose homeostasis, and autonomic activity. Although the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) is known to express MC4Rs and to receive input from leptin-responsive arcuate proopiomelanocortin neurons, the physiological functions of MC4Rs in the LHA are incompletely understood. We report that MC4R(LHA) signaling regulates glucose tolerance and sympathetic nerve activity. Restoring expression of MC4Rs specifically in the LHA improves glucose intolerance in obese MC4R-null mice without affecting body weight or circulating insulin levels. Fluorodeoxyglucose-mediated tracing of whole-body glucose uptake identifies the interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) as a primary source where glucose uptake is increased in MC4R(LHA) mice. Direct multifiber sympathetic nerve recording further reveals that sympathetic traffic to iBAT is significantly increased in MC4R(LHA) mice, which accompanies a significant elevation of Glut4 expression in iBAT. Finally, bilateral iBAT denervation prevents the glucoregulatory effect of MC4R(LHA) signaling. These results identify a novel role for MC4R(LHA) signaling in the control of sympathetic nerve activity and glucose tolerance independent of energy balance. PMID:25605803

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Pulmonary arterial hypertension On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... definitions Reviewed September 2012 What is pulmonary arterial hypertension? Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disorder characterized ...

  10. Exercise Appears Safe, Helpful for Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 154487.html Exercise Appears Safe, Helpful for Pulmonary Hypertension Research review might reassure concerned cardiologists To use ... be beneficial and safe for people with pulmonary hypertension, researchers report. Pulmonary hypertension is a type of ...

  11. Contact lens intolerance: refitting with dual axis lens for corneal refractive therapy

    PubMed Central

    López-López, María; Pelegrín-Sánchez, José Miguel; Sobrado-Calvo, Paloma; García-Ayuso, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Corneal refractive therapy is a non-surgical procedure whose main purpose is to improve uncorrected visual acuity during the day, without spectacles or contact lenses. We report an adult woman who shows contact lens intolerance and does not want to wear eyeglasses. We used dual axis contact lens to improve lens centration. We demonstrate a maintained unaided visual acuity during one year of treatment. In conclusion, we can consider refitting with dual axis lens for corneal refractive therapy as a non-surgical option for patients who show contact lens intolerance.

  12. Inference of Blood Glucose Concentrations from Subcutaneous Glucose Concentrations: Applications to Glucose Biosensors

    E-print Network

    Inference of Blood Glucose Concentrations from Subcutaneous Glucose Concentrations: Applications to Glucose Biosensors ANGELA C. FREELAND and ROGER T. BONNECAZE Department of Chemical Engineering--An approach for inference of blood glucose concen- trations in real time is considered. First, a model

  13. What constitutes controlled hypertension? Patient based comparison of hypertension guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, T. P.; Peters, T. J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate and quantify the extent to which variations in guidelines influence assessment of control of hypertension. DESIGN--Cross sectional study. Selected patients had hypertension assessed as controlled or uncontrolled with guidelines from New Zealand, Canada, the United States, Britain, and the World Health Organisation. SETTING--18 general practices in Oxfordshire. SUBJECTS--876 patients with diagnosed hypertension and taking antihypertensive drugs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Proportion of patients with controlled hypertension according to each set of guidelines. RESULTS--The proportion of patients with controlled hypertension varied from 17.5% to 84.6% with the different guidelines after adjustment for the sampling method. All five sets of guidelines agreed on the classification for 31% (277) of the patients. The New Zealand guidelines calculate an absolute risk of a cardiovascular event. When this was taken as the standard half of the patients with uncontrolled hypertension by the United States criteria would be treated unnecessarily and 31% of those classified as having controlled hypertension by the Canadian guidelines would be denied beneficial treatment. CONCLUSIONS--Hypertension guidelines are inconsistent in their recommendations and need to make clear the absolute benefits and risks of treatment. PMID:8688763

  14. Drug induced hypertension--An unappreciated cause of secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Messerli, Franz H; Grossman, Ehud

    2015-09-15

    Most patients with hypertension have essential hypertension or well-known forms of secondary hypertension, such as renal disease, renal artery stenosis, or common endocrine diseases (hyperaldosteronism or pheochromocytoma). Physicians are less aware of drug induced hypertension. A variety of therapeutic agents or chemical substances may increase blood pressure. When a patient with well controlled hypertension is presented with acute blood pressure elevation, use of drug or chemical substance which increases blood pressure should be suspected. Drug-induced blood pressure increases are usually minor and short-lived, although rare hypertensive emergencies associated with use of certain drugs have been reported. Careful evaluation of prescription and non-prescription medications is crucial in the evaluation of the hypertensive individual and may obviate the need for expensive and unnecessary evaluations. Discontinuation of the offending agent will usually achieve adequate blood pressure control. When use of a chemical agent which increases blood pressure is mandatory, anti-hypertensive therapy may facilitate continued use of this agent. We summarize the therapeutic agents or chemical substances that elevate blood pressure and their mechanisms of action. PMID:26096556

  15. Effects of Estrogens on Adipokines and Glucose Homeostasis in Female Aromatase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Van Sinderen, Michelle L.; Steinberg, Gregory R.; Jørgensen, Sebastian B.; Honeyman, Jane; Chow, Jenny D.; Herridge, Kerrie A.; Winship, Amy L.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia; Jones, Margaret E. E.; Simpson, Evan R.; Boon, Wah Chin

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of glucose homeostasis within the body is crucial for constant and precise performance of energy balance and is sustained by a number of peripheral organs. Estrogens are known to play a role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Aromatase knockout (ArKO) mice are estrogen-deficient and display symptoms of dysregulated glucose metabolism. We aim to investigate the effects of estrogen ablation and exogenous estrogen administration on glucose homeostasis regulation. Six month-old female wildtype, ArKO, and 17?-estradiol (E2) treated ArKO mice were subjected to whole body tolerance tests, serum examination of estrogen, glucose and insulin, ex-vivo muscle glucose uptake, and insulin signaling pathway analyses. Female ArKO mice display increased body weight, gonadal (omental) adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, and liver triglycerides, which were ameliorated upon estrogen treatment. Tolerance tests revealed that estrogen-deficient ArKO mice were pyruvate intolerant hence reflecting dysregulated hepatic gluconeogenesis. Analyses of skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissues supported a hepatic-based glucose dysregulation, with a down-regulation of Akt phosphorylation (a key insulin signaling pathway molecule) in the ArKO liver, which was improved with E2 treatment. Concurrently, estrogen treatment lowered ArKO serum leptin and adiponectin levels and increased inflammatory adipokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF?) and interleukin 6 (IL6). Furthermore, estrogen deficiency resulted in the infiltration of CD45 macrophages into gonadal adipose tissues, which cannot be reversed by E2 treatment. This study describes the effects of estrogens on glucose homeostasis in female ArKO mice and highlights a primary phenotype of hepatic glucose dysregulation and a parallel estrogen modified adipokine profile. PMID:26317527

  16. Correlation between hypertension and hyperglycemia among young adults in India

    PubMed Central

    Midha, Tanu; Krishna, Vinay; Shukla, Rishi; Katiyar, Praveen; Kaur, Samarjeet; Martolia, Dinesh Singh; Pandey, Umeshwar; Rao, Yashwant Kumar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the correlation between blood pressure levels and fasting plasma glucose levels among young adults attending Chatrapati Shahuji Maharaj University, Kanpur, India. METHODS: The present study was cross-sectional in nature, conducted among students in the Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Chatrapati Shahuji Maharaj University, Kanpur. Study subjects included 185 young adults. Among them, 94 were males and 91 were females, in the age group 17 to 19 years. RESULTS: Mean age among males was 18.5 ± 1.5 years and among females was 17.9 ± 1.8 years. Of the total 185 study subjects, 61 (32.9%) were classified as pre-diabetic and 20 (10.8%) as pre-hypertensive. Mean waist circumference, systolic blood pressure and serum high density lipoprotein did not vary significantly between normoglycemic and pre-diabetic subjects. However, the mean diastolic blood pressure of pre-diabetics (82 ± 5 mmHg) was significantly higher than normoglycemics (79 ± 6 mmHg). Mean serum cholesterol, serum triglycerides, serum low density lipoprotein (LDL) and serum very low density lipoprotein was also higher among pre-diabetic subjects in comparison to normoglycemic subjects and the difference was statistically significant. Upon multiple linear regression analysis, it was observed that body mass index (BMI) (? = 0.149), diastolic blood pressure (? = 0.375) and serum LDL (? = 0.483) were significantly associated with fasting plasma glucose. Multiple linear regression with diastolic blood pressure as the outcome variable showed that BMI (? = 0.219), fasting blood glucose (? = 0.247) and systolic blood pressure (? = 0.510) were significantly associated. CONCLUSION: A significant prevalence of pre-diabetes and pre-hypertension in young adults is a matter of concern therefore all young adults need to be targeted for screening of diabetes and hypertension and lifestyle modification. PMID:25685764

  17. Qigong for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xingjiang; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Xiaoke; Zhang, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of qigong for hypertension. A systematic literature search was performed in 7 databases from their respective inceptions until April 2014, including the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Wanfang database, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials of qigong as either monotherapy or adjunctive therapy with antihypertensive drugs versus no intervention, exercise, or antihypertensive drugs for hypertension were identified. The risk of bias was assessed using the tool described in Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions, version 5.1.0. Twenty trials containing 2349 hypertensive patients were included in the meta-analysis. The risk of bias was generally high. Compared with no intervention, qigong significantly reduced systolic blood pressure (SBP) (weighted mean difference [WMD]?=??17.40?mm Hg, 95% confidence interval [CI] ?21.06 to ?13.74, P?hypertension. However, more rigorously designed randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up focusing on hard clinical outcomes are required to confirm the results. PMID:25569652

  18. Quantitative autoradiographic measurement of regional myocardial substrate uptake in hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yonekura, Y.; Tamaki, N.; Torizuka, K.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Yamamoto, K.; Srivastava, S.; Iwai, J.; Elmaleh, D.R.; Livni, E.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative double tracer autoradiographic technique permits to study the distribution of two tracers in the same section of small animals with high spatial resolution. The authors have applied this technique to measure regional myocardial perfusion and substrate uptake in hypertensive rats. To compate regional myocardial uptake of fatty acid and glucose analogs with regional myocardial perfusion, three different double tracer experiments were conducted utilizing the difference of physical half-lives as follows: I) (C-14)3-methyl-heptadecanoic acid (BMHDA) and T1-201 (TL), II) (C-14)2-deoxy-D-glucose (DG) and TL, III) (F-18)2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and BMHDA. DG (or FDG), BMHDA and TL were administered to rats 45 min, 15 min and 5 min prior to sacrifice, respectively. The autoradiograms were digitized and quantitated using a videodensitometry film analysis system. Myocardial perfusion as indicated by TL distribution was homogeneous in both normotensive and hypertensive rats. However, hypertensive myocardium showed decreased uptake of BMHDA in the endocardial and septal regions, where DG showed markedly increased uptake. Double tracer experiment with BMHDA and FDG clearly demonstrated this complementary relation in the same section. These data indicate that hypertensive myocardium was abnormal substrate utilization although regional myocardial perfusion is not impaired. Moreover, (C-11)BMHDA and (F-18)FDG may be used to measure regional myocardial substrate utilization in humans with positron emission tomography.

  19. The Immune System in Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  20. Pre-hypertension: another ‘pseudodisease’?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important and common cardiovascular risk factors. Defining the level at which blood pressure starts causing end-organ damage is challenging, and is not easily answered. The threshold of blood pressure defining hypertension has progressively been reduced over time, from systolic >160 mmHg to >150 mmHg, then to >140 mmHg; and now even blood pressures above 130 to 120 mmHg are labeled as ‘pre-hypertension’ by some expert committees. Are interest groups creating another ‘pseudodisease’ or is this trend scientifically justified? A recent meta-analysis published in BMC Medicine by Huang et al. clearly indicates that pre-hypertension (120 to 140/80 to 90 mmHg) is a significant marker of increased cardiovascular risk. This raises the question as to whether we now need to lower the threshold of ‘hypertension’ (as opposed to ‘pre-hypertension’) to >120/80 mmHg, redefining a significant proportion of currently healthy people as ‘patients’ with an established disease. These data need to be interpreted with some caution. It is controversial whether pre-hypertension is an independent risk factor or just a risk marker and even more controversial whether treatment of pre-hypertension will lower cardiovascular risk. Please see related research: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/177. PMID:24229371

  1. Dietary Approaches to Prevent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Lydia A.; Green, Torrance; Harrison, Teresa N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure arises from a combination of environmental and genetic factors and the interactions of these factors. A substantial body of evidence from animal studies, epidemiologic studies, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials has demonstrated that certain dietary patterns and individual dietary elements play a prominent role in the development of hypertension. Changes in diet can lower blood pressure, prevent the development of hypertension, and reduce the risk of hypertension-related complications. Dietary strategies for the prevention of hypertension include reducing sodium intake, limiting alcohol consumption, increasing potassium intake, and adopting an overall dietary pattern such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet or a Mediterranean diet. In order to reduce the burden of blood pressure-related complications, efforts that focus on environmental and individual behavioral changes that encourage and promote healthier food choices are warranted. PMID:24091874

  2. Exercise, the Brain, and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Peri-Okonny, Poghni; Fu, Qi; Zhang, Rong; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-10-01

    Exercise training is the cornerstone in the prevention and management of hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, blood pressure (BP) response to exercise is exaggerated in hypertension often to the range that raises the safety concern, which may prohibit patients from regular exercise. This augmented pressor response is shown to be related to excessive sympathetic stimulation caused by overactive muscle reflex. Exaggerated sympathetic-mediated vasoconstriction further contributes to the rise in BP during exercise in hypertension. Exercise training has been shown to reduce both exercise pressor reflex and attenuate the abnormal vasoconstriction. Hypertension also contributes to cognitive impairment, and exercise training has been shown to improve cognitive function through both BP-dependent and BP-independent pathways. Additional studies are still needed to determine if newer modes of exercise training such as high-intensity interval training may offer advantages over traditional continuous moderate training in improving BP and brain health in hypertensive patients. PMID:26341655

  3. Autogenic-feedback training: A potential treatment for post-flight orthostatic intolerance in aerospace crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Miller, Neil E.; Pickering, Thomas G.; Shapiro, David

    1993-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance was identified as a serious biomedical problem associated with long duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority was given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder which are both effective and practical. A considerable body of clinical research demonstrated that people can be taught to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily and that this is an effective treatment for chronic orthostatic intolerance in paralyzed patients. The present pilot study was designed to examine the feasibility of adding training in control of blood pressure to an existing preflight training program designed to facilitate astronaut adaptation to microgravity. Using an operant conditioning procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), three men and two women participated in four to nine (15-30 training sessions). At the end of training, the average increase in systolic and diastolic pressure, as well as mean arterial pressures that the subjects made, ranged between 20 and 5O mmHg under both supine and 45 deg head-up tilt conditions. These findings suggest that AFT may be a useful alternative treatment or supplement to existing approaches for preventing postflight orthostatic intolerance. Further, the use of operant conditioning methods for training cardiovascular responses may contribute to the general understanding of the mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance.

  4. Defining Distinct Negative Beliefs about Uncertainty: Validating the Factor Structure of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Kathryn A.; Dugas, Michel J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the English version of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale (IUS; French version: M. H. Freeston, J. Rheaume, H. Letarte, M. J. Dugas, & R. Ladouceur, 1994; English version: K. Buhr & M. J. Dugas, 2002) using a substantially larger sample than has been used in previous studies. Nonclinical undergraduate…

  5. Do Metacognitions and Intolerance of Uncertainty Predict Worry in Everyday Life? An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study.

    PubMed

    Thielsch, Carolin; Andor, Tanja; Ehring, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Cognitive models of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) suggest that excessive worry is due to positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and/or intolerance of uncertainty. Empirical support mainly derives from cross-sectional studies with limited conclusiveness, using self-report measures and thereby possibly causing recall biases. The aim of the present study therefore was to examine the power of these cognitive variables to predict levels of worry in everyday life using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA). Metacognitions and intolerance of uncertainty were assessed using well-established self-report questionnaires in 41 nonclinical participants who subsequently completed ratings on worry intensity and burden on a portable device for 1week at seven times a day once every 2hours. Results showed significant associations of negative metacognitive beliefs and intolerance of uncertainty, but not positive metacognitive beliefs, with worry in everyday life. In multilevel regression analyses, a substantial proportion of variance of everyday worry could be accounted for by negative metacognitions over and above trait worry and daily hassles. Intolerance of uncertainty likewise emerged as a valid predictor when tested in isolation, but did not explain additional variance once negative metacognitions were controlled. The findings support current cognitive models of excessive worry and highlight the role of negative metacognitions. By using EMA to assess levels of worry in everyday life, they extend earlier findings focusing exclusively on retrospective questionnaire measures. PMID:26163716

  6. Computer simulation studies in fluid and calcium regulation and orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The systems analysis approach to physiological research uses mathematical models and computer simulation. Major areas of concern during prolonged space flight discussed include fluid and blood volume regulation; cardiovascular response during shuttle reentry; countermeasures for orthostatic intolerance; and calcium regulation and bone atrophy. Potential contributions of physiologic math models to future flight experiments are examined.

  7. Portraits of Religion in Introductory American Government Textbooks: Images of Tolerance or Intolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenstein, Marie A.; Clark, April K.

    2013-01-01

    The link between religion and political tolerance in the United States, which has focused predominantly on Christianity, is replete with unfavorable images. Often, religious adherents (largely Evangelicals or the Christian right) are characterized as uneducated, poor, and white, suggesting that members of these groups may act in an intolerant

  8. Gamma Knife radiosurgery in steroid-intolerant Tolosa-Hunt syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Myong; Park, Jung-Soo; Koh, Eun-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Tolosa-Hunt syndrome is a rare cause of painful ophthalmoplegia due to idiopathic chronic granulomatous inflammation in the cavernous sinus. Usually clinical manifestations are well controlled by corticosteroid therapy, but steroid dependency or resistance is common. We report a case of marked improvement of Tolosa-Hunt syndrome without symptom relapse after Gamma Knife radiosurgery in a patient with steroid intolerance. PMID:26611689

  9. Does Homeschooling or Private Schooling Promote Political Intolerance? Evidence from a Christian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Political tolerance is the willingness to extend civil liberties to people who hold views with which one disagrees. Some have claimed that private schooling and homeschooling are institutions that propagate political intolerance by fostering separatism and an unwillingness to consider alternative viewpoints. I empirically test this claim by…

  10. [Pharmaceutical drugs containing lactose can as a rule be used by persons with lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Vinther, Siri; Rumessen, Jöri Johannes; Christensen, Mikkel

    2015-03-01

    Lactose is often used as an excipient in pharmaceutical drugs. Current evidence indicates that the amount of lactose in most drugs is not sufficient to cause symptoms in persons with lactose intolerance, although interindividual differences in sensitivity probably exist. Patient preferences and/or suboptimal treatment adherence could be reasons for considering lactose-free drug alternatives. PMID:25786702

  11. Novel MTND1 mutations cause isolated exercise intolerance, complex I deficiency and increased assembly factor expression

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Grainne S.; Blakely, Emma L.; Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Tuppen, Helen A.L.; Greaves, Laura C.; He, Langping; Baker, Angela; Falkous, Gavin; Newman, Jane; Trenell, Michael I.; Lecky, Bryan; Petty, Richard K.; Turnbull, Doug M.; McFarland, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterization of two adults with progressive exercise intolerance and severe isolated mitochondrial complex I (CI) deficiency due to novel MTND1 mutations. We demonstrate compensatory CI assembly factor up-regulation probably partially rescuing the clinical phenotype. PMID:25626417

  12. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition Relationships between Feeding Intolerance and Stress Biomarkers in Preterm Infants

    E-print Network

    French, Jeffrey A.

    and Stress Biomarkers in Preterm Infants --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: JPGN-NA-12-284R1 Full Title: Relationships between Feeding Intolerance and Stress Biomarkers in Preterm Infants Article Type: Original variables and biomarker levels at each time and over time for the sample; describe/compare variables

  13. Segmental portal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, M S; Petersen, T H; Sommer, H

    1986-01-01

    Isolated obstruction of the splenic vein leads to segmental portal hypertension, which is a rare form of extrahepatic portal hypertension, but it is important to diagnose, since it can be cured by splenectomy. In a review of the English literature, 209 patients with isolated splenic vein obstruction were found. Pancreatitis caused 65% of the cases and pancreatic neoplasms 18%, whereas the rest was caused by various other diseases. Seventy-two per cent of the patients bled from gastroesophageal varices, and most often the bleeding came from isolated gastric varices. The spleen was enlarged in 71% of the patients. A correct diagnosis in connection with the first episode of bleeding was made in only 49%; 22% were operated on because of gastrointestinal bleeding, but the cause of bleeding was not found. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients with gastroesophageal varices, but without signs of a liver disease, especially if isolated gastric varices are found. The diagnosis is confirmed by portography. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. PMID:3729585

  14. Genealogical analysis as a new approach for the investigation of drug intolerance heritability.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marc; Bouhali, Tarek; Gaudet, Daniel; Brisson, Diane

    2014-07-01

    Genealogical analysis has proven a useful method to understand the origins and frequencies of hereditary diseases in many populations. However, this type of analysis has not yet been used for the investigation of drug intolerance among patients suffering from inherited disorders. This study aims to do so, using data from familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients receiving high doses of statins. The objective is to measure and compare various genealogical parameters that could shed light on the origins and heritability of muscular intolerance to statins using FH as a model. Analysis was performed on 224 genealogies from 112 FH subjects carrying either the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) prom_e1 deletion>15?kb (n=28) or c.259T>G (p.Trp87Gly) (n=84) mutations and 112 non-FH controls. Number of ancestors, geographical origins and genetic contribution of founders, inbreeding and kinship coefficients were calculated using the S-Plus-based GENLIB software package. For both mutations, repeated occurrences of the same ancestors are more frequent among the carriers' genealogies than among the controls', but no difference was observed between tolerant and intolerant subjects. Founders who may have introduced both mutations in the population appear with approximately the same frequencies in all genealogies. Kinship coefficients are higher among carriers, with no difference according to statins tolerance. Inbreeding coefficients are slightly lower among >15-kb deletion carriers than among c.259?T>G carriers, but the differences between tolerants and intolerants are not significant. These findings suggest that although muscular intolerance to statins shows a family aggregation, it is not transmitted through the same Mendelian pattern as LDLR mutations. PMID:24281370

  15. Weight control in the management of hypertension. World Hypertension League.

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    This article, which includes a brief description of the mechanisms and some epidemiological findings in obesity and high blood pressure, sums up present knowledge on a complex subject and provides guidance to medical practitioners on the management of obese hypertensive patients. Weight reduction, together with drug therapy in severe and moderate hypertension, and other non-pharmacological methods and continuing observation in mild hypertension are the essential measures to be applied. In addition to the lowering of blood pressure, weight loss offers several other metabolic and haemodynamic benefits. PMID:2670295

  16. Sustained Decrease of Early-Phase Insulin Secretion in Japanese Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Who Developed Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Impaired Fasting Glucose Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Hiroko; Tachibana, Daisuke; Hamuro, Akihiro; Misugi, Takuya; Motoyama, Koka; Morioka, Tomoaki; Fukumoto, Shinya; Emoto, Masanori; Inaba, Masaaki; Koyama, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to compare glucose intolerance in the antenatal and the postpartum periods using a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in the Japanese women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) using a retrospective design. PATIENTS AND METHODS Data were obtained from 85 Japanese women with GDM who delivered from April 2011 through April 2015 and who underwent an OGTT 6–14 weeks postpartum. The women were divided into two groups based on the results of the postpartum OGTT: one group with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and the other with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) as well as impaired fasting glucose (IFG). We analyzed the associations between postpartum IGT–IFG and various factors. RESULTS Antenatally, a significant difference was observed between the groups only in the 1-hour plasma glucose level of the 75-g OGTT. Postpartum results of plasma glucose level were significantly higher at 0.5, 1, and 2 hours in the IGT–IFG group than those in the NGT group. Moreover, a significant decrease in the levels of 0.5-hour immunoreactive insulin and insulinogenic index was observed in the IGT–IFG group compared to those in the NGT group. Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance and homeostasis model assessment ?-cell function of both groups were found to significantly decrease in the postpartum period; however, there was no significant change in the insulinogenic index of either group. CONCLUSIONS Our study clearly showed that the postpartum IGT and IFG levels of Japanese women with GDM are affected by impaired early-phase insulin secretion; however, insulin resistance promptly improves. PMID:26688669

  17. Cardiovascular risk in Mozambique: who should be treated for hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Albertino; Padrão, Patricia; Silva-Matos, Carla; Prista, António; Azevedo, Ana; Lunet, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    Aim To estimate the proportion of Mozambicans eligible for pharmacological treatment for hypertension, according to single risk factor and total cardiovascular risk approaches. Methods A representative sample of Mozambicans aged 40–64 years (n = 1116) was evaluated according to the WHO STEPwise Approach to Chronic Disease Risk Factor Surveillance (STEPS). We measured blood pressure (BP) and 12-h fasting blood glucose levels and collected data on sociodemographic characteristics, smoking, and use of antidiabetic and antihypertensive drugs. We estimated the 10-year risk of a fatal or nonfatal major cardiovascular event (WHO/lnternational Society of Hypertension risk prediction charts), and computed the proportion of untreated participants eligible for pharmacological treatment for hypertension, according to BP values alone and accounting also for the total cardiovascular risk (WHO guidelines for assessment and management of cardiovascular diseases). Results Among the Mozambicans aged 40–64 years and not taking antihypertensive drugs, less than 4% were classified as having cardiovascular risk at least 20% whereas the prevalence of SBP/DBP at least 140/90 mmHg was nearly 40%. A total of 19.8% of 40–64-year-olds would be eligible for pharmacological treatment of hypertension according to the WHO guidelines, all of whom had SBP/DBP at least 160/100 mmHg. Conclusion Among the Mozambicans aged 40–64 years not taking antihypertensive drugs and having SBP/DBP at least 140/90 mmHg, only half were eligible for pharmacological treatment according to the WHO guidelines. Taking the latter into account, when defining strategies to control hypertension at a population level, may allow a more efficient use of the scarce resources available in developing settings. PMID:24220589

  18. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  19. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Vinicius Barbosa; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25742420

  20. Dermatoglyphics in hypertension: a review.

    PubMed

    Wijerathne, Buddhika T B; Meier, Robert J; Agampodi, Thilini C; Agampodi, Suneth B

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a major contributor to the global burden of disease and mortality. A major medical advancement would be a better means to ascertain which persons are at higher risk for becoming hypertensive beforehand. To that end, there have been a number of studies showing that certain dermatoglyphic markers are associated with hypertension. This association could be explained if the risk toward developing hypertension later on in life is somehow connected with fetal development of dermatoglyphics. It would be highly valuable from a clinical standpoint if this conjecture could be substantiated since dermatoglyphic markers could then be used for screening out individuals who might be at an elevated risk of becoming hypertensive. The aim of this review was to search for and appraise available studies that pertain to the association between hypertension and dermatoglyphics.A systematic literature search conducted using articles from MEDLINE (PubMed), Trip, Cochran, Google scholar, and gray literature until December 2014. Of the 37 relevant publications, 17 were included in the review. The review performed according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement.This review showed a fairly consistent finding of an increased frequency of whorl patterns along with a higher mean total ridge count in digital dermatoglyphic results in hypertensive samples compared to controls. However, it was imperative to discuss several limitations found in the studies that could make this association as yet unsettled. PMID:26265377

  1. Hypertension in the elderly: some practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kashif N; Chavez, Patricia; Gasowski, Jerzy; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Messerli, Franz H

    2012-10-01

    Data from randomized controlled trials suggest that treating hypertension in the elderly, including octogenarians, may substantially reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and death. However, treatment remains challenging because of comorbidities and aging-related changes. We present common case scenarios encountered while managing elderly patients with hypertension, including secondary hypertension, adverse effects of drugs, labile hypertension, orthostatic hypotension, and dementia. PMID:23027728

  2. Change in Intra-Abdominal Fat Predicts the Risk of Hypertension in Japanese Americans.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Catherine A; Kahn, Steven E; Fujimoto, Wilfred Y; Hayashi, Tomoshige; Leonetti, Donna L; Boyko, Edward J

    2015-07-01

    In Japanese Americans, intra-abdominal fat area measured by computed tomography is positively associated with the prevalence and incidence of hypertension. Evidence in other populations suggests that other fat areas may be protective. We sought to determine whether a change in specific fat depots predicts the development of hypertension. We prospectively followed up 286 subjects (mean age, 49.5 years; 50.4% men) from the Japanese American Community Diabetes Study for 10 years. At baseline, subjects did not have hypertension (defined as blood pressure ?140/90 mm?Hg) and were not taking blood pressure or glucose-lowering medications. Mid-thigh subcutaneous fat area, abdominal subcutaneous fat area, and intra-abdominal fat area were directly measured by computed tomography at baseline and 5 years. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds of incident hypertension over 10 years in relation to a 5-year change in fat area. The relative odds of developing hypertension for a 5-year increase in intra-abdominal fat was 1.74 (95% confidence interval, 1.28-2.37), after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, baseline intra-abdominal fat, alcohol use, smoking status, and weekly exercise energy expenditure. This relationship remained significant when adjusted for baseline fasting insulin and 2-hour glucose levels or for diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes mellitus classification. There were no significant associations between baseline and change in thigh or abdominal subcutaneous fat areas and incident hypertension. In conclusion, in this cohort of Japanese Americans, the risk of developing hypertension is related to the accumulation of intra-abdominal fat rather than the accrual of subcutaneous fat in either the thigh or the abdominal areas. PMID:26063668

  3. Hypertension is an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes: the Korean genome and epidemiology study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ju; Lim, Nam-Kyoo; Choi, Sun-Ja; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and diabetes share common risk factors and frequently co-occur. Although high blood pressure (BP) was reported as a significant predictor of type 2 diabetes, little is known about this association in Korea. This study investigated the relationship of prehypertension and hypertension with type 2 diabetes in 7150 middle-aged Koreans, as well as the effect of BP control on diabetes development over 8 years. At 8 years, 1049 (14.7%) of the 7150 participants had newly developed diabetes, including 11.2, 16.7 and 21.5% of baseline normotensive, prehypertensive and hypertensive subjects, respectively. The overall incidence rate of diabetes was 22.3 events per 1000 person-years. Subjects with baseline prehypertension (hazard ratio (HR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09–1.48) and hypertension (HR 1.51; 95% CI, 1.29–1.76) were at higher risk of diabetes than normotensive subjects after controlling for potential confounders (P-value for trend <0.001). These associations persisted even when subjects were stratified by baseline glucose status, sex and body mass index (BMI). The risk of diabetes was significantly higher in subjects who had normal BP at baseline and progressed to prehypertention or hypertension at 8 years (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20–1.83) than those with controlled BP, but these associations were not observed in subjects with baseline prehypertension and hypertension. These findings showed that prehypertension and hypertension are significantly associated with the development of diabetes, independent of baseline glucose status, sex and BMI. Active BP control reduced incident diabetes only in normotensive individuals, suggesting the need for early BP management. PMID:26178151

  4. Benign intracranial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Edward R

    1993-01-01

    Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) is a syndrome characterized by papilledema and elevated intracranial pressure in the absence of hydrocephalus or intracranial mass. The condition is found most often in obese females in the fourth decade of life. Etiology remains unclear but a wide variety of medications, disease states and altered physiology have been associated with its onset. The complaints of headache and disturbed visual acuity are those directly related to increased intracranial pressure. The most serious sequelae of untreated BIH is permanent, partial visual deficit. Early diagnosis and referral is important if visual loss is to be minimized or prevented. The case of a 33-year-old female with BIH presenting to a chiropractic office is described. The limited role of the chiropractor in diagnosis and monitoring of the condition is reviewed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 1

  5. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ? 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ? 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role, essentially in the screening proposing criteria for estimating the presence of PH mainly based on tricuspid regurgitation peak velocity and systolic artery pressure (sPAP). The therapy of PAH consists of non-specific drugs including oral anticoagulation and diuretics as well as PAH specific therapy. Diuretics are one of the most important treatment in the setting of PH because right heart failure leads to fluid retention, hepatic congestion, ascites and peripheral edema. Current recommendations propose oral anticoagulation aiming for targeting an International Normalized Ratio (INR) between 1.5-2.5. Target INR for patients displaying chronic thromboembolic PH is between 2–3. Better understanding in pathophysiological mechanisms of PH over the past quarter of a century has led to the development of medical therapeutics, even though no cure for PAH exists. Several specific therapeutic agents were developed for the medical management of PAH including prostanoids (epoprostenol, trepoprostenil, iloprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, ambrisentan) and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil). This review discusses the current state of art regarding to epidemiologic aspects of PH, diagnostic approaches and the current classification of PH. In addition, currently available specific PAH therapy is discussed as well as future treatments. PMID:23829793

  6. Collateral Pathways in Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram S.

    2012-01-01

    Presence of portosystemic collateral veins (PSCV) is common in portal hypertension due to cirrhosis. Physiologically, normal portosystemic anastomoses exist which exhibit hepatofugal flow. With the development of portal hypertension, transmission of backpressure leads to increased flow in these patent normal portosystemic anastomoses. In extrahepatic portal vein obstruction collateral circulation develops in a hepatopetal direction and portoportal pathways are frequently found. The objective of this review is to illustrate the various PSCV and portoportal collateral vein pathways pertinent to portal hypertension in liver cirrhosis and EHPVO. PMID:25755456

  7. Myelofibrosis, splenomegaly, and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P; Maze, S; Tayob, F; Harries-Jones, E P

    1985-01-01

    A patient with chronic myelofibrosis and massive splenomegaly developed portal hypertension with haematemesis occurring from radiologically proven oesophageal varices. Transjugular liver biopsy showed only myeloid metaplasia, and radiological evaluation of the portal vascular system was undertaken to establish a diagnosis of hyperkinetic portal hypertension as a basis for therapeutic splenectomy. The alternative and rare situation of splenic and portal vein occlusion was demonstrated and therefore removal of the spleen was not an appropriate procedure for relief of portal hypertension. The variceal bleeding was successfully controlled with injection sclerotherapy. PMID:3934908

  8. Postpartum Healthcare After Gestational Diabetes and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Maiden, Kristin; Rogers, Stephanie; Ball, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy identify women with an elevated lifetime risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Methods: Prospective cohort of women recruited from the postpartum service of a large community-based academic obstetrical hospital after delivery of a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes (GDM) or a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP). Interviews were conducted, and validated surveys completed, before hospital discharge and again 3 months postpartum. Results: The study sample included 249 women: 111 with GDM, 127 with HDP, and 11 with both. Most, 230 (92.4%) had a PCP prior to pregnancy and 97 (39.0%) reported an office visit with their PCP during the prenatal period. Of the 176 (70.7%) participants who attended the 3-month study visit, 169 (96.0%) women with either diagnosis reported they had attended their 6-week postpartum visit. By the 3-month study visit, 51 (57.9%) women with GDM had completed follow-up glucose testing; 93 (97.9%) with HDP had follow-up blood pressure testing; and 101 (57.4%) with either diagnosis recalled ever having completed lipid screening. Women least likely to complete screening tests were those who had no college education, less than a high school level of health literacy, and who were not privately insured. Conclusion: There are important opportunities to improve postpartum testing for diabetes and CVD risk factor assessment. Most women were connected to primary care suggesting a “hand-off” to a primary care physician after pregnancy is feasible. More robust strategies may be needed to improve follow-up care for women with less education, lower health literacy, and those without private health insurance. PMID:25089915

  9. Anchored phosphatases modulate glucose homeostasis

    E-print Network

    Wang, Edith

    EMBO open Anchored phosphatases modulate glucose homeostasis Simon A Hinke1 , Manuel F Navedo2 principally controls glucose homeostasis. Nutrient-induced exocytosis of insulin granules from pancreatic b signalling events that facilitate insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis may be set by AKAP150 associated

  10. Insulin signalling and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, Alan R.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2001-12-01

    The epidemic of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In both disorders, tissues such as muscle, fat and liver become less responsive or resistant to insulin. This state is also linked to other common health problems, such as obesity, polycystic ovarian disease, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The pathophysiology of insulin resistance involves a complex network of signalling pathways, activated by the insulin receptor, which regulates intermediary metabolism and its organization in cells. But recent studies have shown that numerous other hormones and signalling events attenuate insulin action, and are important in type 2 diabetes.

  11. Clinical overview of hypertensive crisis in children.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Mao-Jen; Chen, Chun-Yu; Wu, Han-Ping

    2015-06-16

    Hypertensive emergencies and hypertensive urgencies in children are uncommonly encountered in the pediatric emergency department and intensive care units, but the diseases are potentially a life-threatening medical emergency. In comparison with adults, hypertension in children is mostly asymptomatic and most have no history of hypertension. Additionally, measuring accurate blood pressure values in younger children is not easy. This article reviews current concepts in pediatric patients with severe hypertension. PMID:26090371

  12. Clinical overview of hypertensive crisis in children

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Mao-Jen; Chen, Chun-Yu; Wu, Han-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Hypertensive emergencies and hypertensive urgencies in children are uncommonly encountered in the pediatric emergency department and intensive care units, but the diseases are potentially a life-threatening medical emergency. In comparison with adults, hypertension in children is mostly asymptomatic and most have no history of hypertension. Additionally, measuring accurate blood pressure values in younger children is not easy. This article reviews current concepts in pediatric patients with severe hypertension. PMID:26090371

  13. Hydroalcoholic extract of Allium eriophyllum leaves attenuates cardiac impairment in rats with simultaneous type 2 diabetes and renal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Janahmadi, Z.; Nekooeian, A.A.; Mozafari, M.

    2015-01-01

    Some species of Allium family have been shown to offer cardioprotection in animal studies. This study aimed at examining possible role of oxidative stress in the cardioprotective effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Allium eriophyllum in rats with simultaneous type 2 diabetes and renal hypertension. Six groups of male Spargue-Dawley rats (8-10 rats each) including a sham-control, a diabetic group, a renal hypertensive group, three groups of animals with simultaneous diabetes and hypertension receiving vehicle, or the extract at 30 or 100 mg/kg/day were used. Four weeks after receiving vehicle or extract, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and serum superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase levels were measured, and isolated heart studies were performed. Systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, coronary effluent creatine kinase-MB, infarct size and coronary resistance of diabetic hypertensive group receiving vehicle were significantly higher than those of the sham-control group and treatment with the extract prevented the increase of these variables. Moreover, rate of rise and decrease of left ventricular pressure, left ventricular developed pressure, rate pressure product and serum levels of superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase of diabetic hypertensive group receiving vehicle were significantly lower than those the sham-control group, and treatment with the extract prevented the decrease of these variables. The findings indicate that hydroalcoholic extract of A. eriophyllum leaves, possibly by an antioxidant mechanism, protected against simultaneous diabetes and hypertension-induced cardiac dysfunction. PMID:26487889

  14. Sex differences in primary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Men have higher blood pressure than women through much of life regardless of race and ethnicity. This is a robust and highly conserved sex difference that it is also observed across species including dogs, rats, mice and chickens and it is found in induced, genetic and transgenic animal models of hypertension. Not only do the differences between the ovarian and testicular hormonal milieu contribute to this sexual dimorphism in blood pressure, the sex chromosomes also play a role in and of themselves. This review primarily focuses on epidemiological studies of blood pressure in men and women and experimental models of hypertension in both sexes. Gaps in current knowledge regarding what underlie male-female differences in blood pressure control are discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying sex differences in hypertension may lead to the development of anti-hypertensives tailored to one's sex and ultimately to improved therapeutic strategies for treating this disease and preventing its devastating consequences. PMID:22417477

  15. [Surgically curable hypertension (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gilloz, A; Tostain, J; Richard, A; Peyrard, A; Drogue, M

    A case of hypertension was cured by simultaneous surgical treatment of an obstructive urolithiasis associated with a pheochromocytoma. Primary devascularization of the adrenal tumor, reducing blood pressure and cardiac rhythm variations was allowed by preoperative arteriography. PMID:6275533

  16. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... http://www.ihrfoundation.org/hypertension/info/C172 Surgery Optic Nerve Fenestration When sight is at risk and drug therapy has been unsuccessful, an optic nerve fenestration (also called an optic nerve sheath ...

  17. Schistosomiasis-associated pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mocumbi, Ana Olga H.; Kim, Nick H.; Mandel, Jess

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Schistosomiasis, a parasite-borne disease, is highly prevalent in Africa and Asia; it is estimated that close to 20 million people worldwide have a severe form of the disease. The chronic form can affect the gastrointestinal system and lead to hepatosplenic disease, and it may cause cardiopulmonary complications, including pulmonary hypertension. The exact pathogenesis of schistosomiasis-associated pulmonary hypertension (Sch-PH) remains unclear, although several mechanisms, including parasitic arterial embolization, pulmonary arteriopathy, and portopulmonary hypertension–like pathophysiology, have been suggested. The immunopathology of the disease is also unclear, although there are similarities with the immunology of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Finally, the treatment of Sch-PH has not been well studied. There is some evidence on treating the underlying infection, with unclear effect on Sch-PH, and advanced PAH therapies are now being suggested, but more studies are needed to confirm their efficacy. PMID:25610596

  18. Glucose and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2008-04-01

    When a human's enzymes attach glucose to proteins they do so at specific sites on a specific molecule for a specific purpose that also can include ascorbic acid (AA) at a high level such as 1 gram per hour during exposure. In an AA synthesizing animal the manifold increase of AA produced in response to illness is automatic. In contrast, the human non-enzymatic process adds glucose haphazardly to any number of sites along available peptide chains. As Cerami clarified decades ago, extensive crosslinking of proteins contributes to loss of elasticity in aging tissues. Ascorbic acid reduces the random non-enyzmatic glycation of proteins. Moreover, AA is a cofactor for hydroxylase enzymes that are necessary for the production and replacement of collagen and other structural proteins. We will discuss the relevance of ``aging is scurvy'' to the biochemistry of human aging.

  19. Green tea extract with polyethylene glycol-3350 reduces body weight and improves glucose tolerance in db/db and high-fat diet mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Choi, Yoon Jung; Kim, Yong Woon; Kim, Sang Pyo; Cho, Ho-Chan; Ahn, Shinbyoung; Bae, Ki-Cheor; Im, Seung-Soon; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2013-08-01

    Green tea extract (GTE) is regarded to be effective against obesity and type 2 diabetes, but definitive evidences have not been proven. Based on the assumption that the gallated catechins (GCs) in GTE attenuate intestinal glucose and lipid absorption, while enhancing insulin resistance when GCs are present in the circulation through inhibiting cellular glucose uptake in various tissues, this study attempted to block the intestinal absorption of GCs and prolong their residence time in the lumen. We then observed whether GTE containing the nonabsorbable GCs could ameliorate body weight (BW) gain and glucose intolerance in db/db and high-fat diet mice. Inhibition of the intestinal absorption of GCs was accomplished by co-administering the nontoxic polymer polyethylene glycol-3350 (PEG). C57BLKS/J db/db and high-fat diet C57BL/6 mice were treated for 4 weeks with drugs as follows: GTE, PEG, GTE+PEG, voglibose, or pioglitazone. GTE mixed with meals did not have any ameliorating effects on BW gain and glucose intolerance. However, the administration of GTE plus PEG significantly reduced BW gain, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance, without affecting food intake and appetite. The effect was comparable to the effects of an ?-glucosidase inhibitor and a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-?/? agonist. These results indicate that prolonging the action of GCs of GTE in the intestinal lumen and blocking their entry into the circulation may allow GTE to be used as a prevention and treatment for both obesity and obesity-induced type 2 diabetes. PMID:23620335

  20. The Diverse Forms of Lactose Intolerance and the Putative Linkage to Several Cancers.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mahdi; Diekmann, Lena; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Naim, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) is a membrane glycoprotein and the only ?-galactosidase of the brush border membrane of the intestinal epithelium. Besides active transcription, expression of the active LPH requires different maturation steps of the polypeptide through the secretory pathway, including N- and O-glycosylation, dimerization and proteolytic cleavage steps. The inability to digest lactose due to insufficient lactase activity results in gastrointestinal symptoms known as lactose intolerance. In this review, we will concentrate on the structural and functional features of LPH protein and summarize the cellular and molecular mechanism required for its maturation and trafficking. Then, different types of lactose intolerance are discussed, and the molecular aspects of lactase persistence/non-persistence phenotypes are investigated. Finally, we will review the literature focusing on the lactase persistence/non-persistence populations as a comparative model in order to determine the protective or adverse effects of milk and dairy foods on the incidence of colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancers. PMID:26343715

  1. The Diverse Forms of Lactose Intolerance and the Putative Linkage to Several Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mahdi; Diekmann, Lena; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Naim, Hassan Y.

    2015-01-01

    Lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) is a membrane glycoprotein and the only ?-galactosidase of the brush border membrane of the intestinal epithelium. Besides active transcription, expression of the active LPH requires different maturation steps of the polypeptide through the secretory pathway, including N- and O-glycosylation, dimerization and proteolytic cleavage steps. The inability to digest lactose due to insufficient lactase activity results in gastrointestinal symptoms known as lactose intolerance. In this review, we will concentrate on the structural and functional features of LPH protein and summarize the cellular and molecular mechanism required for its maturation and trafficking. Then, different types of lactose intolerance are discussed, and the molecular aspects of lactase persistence/non-persistence phenotypes are investigated. Finally, we will review the literature focusing on the lactase persistence/non-persistence populations as a comparative model in order to determine the protective or adverse effects of milk and dairy foods on the incidence of colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancers. PMID:26343715

  2. [Fiber, food intolerances, FODMAPs, gluten and functional gastrointestinal disorders--update 2014].

    PubMed

    Leiß, O

    2014-11-01

    The controversial effects of dietary fiber on symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders are summarized. Studies concerning adverse reaction to foods are mentioned and the possible role of food allergy and food intolerances, especially pseudoallergic reactions to biogenes amines, in symptom provocation is discussed. The known effects of lactose deficiency and fructose malabsorption are reviewed. The FODMAP concept (fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols) is presented in more detail and recent studies on pathophysiological effects of FODMAP constituents and of therapeutic effects of a low FODMAP diet on symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome are discussed. Finally, studies on the new disorder non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) are summarized and the state of the discussion whether wheat intolerance is due to gluten or the grains is given. PMID:25390215

  3. EvoTol: a protein-sequence based evolutionary intolerance framework for disease-gene prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Rackham, Owen J. L.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Johnson, Michael R.; Petretto, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Methods to interpret personal genome sequences are increasingly required. Here, we report a novel framework (EvoTol) to identify disease-causing genes using patient sequence data from within protein coding-regions. EvoTol quantifies a gene's intolerance to mutation using evolutionary conservation of protein sequences and can incorporate tissue-specific gene expression data. We apply this framework to the analysis of whole-exome sequence data in epilepsy and congenital heart disease, and demonstrate EvoTol's ability to identify known disease-causing genes is unmatched by competing methods. Application of EvoTol to the human interactome revealed networks enriched for genes intolerant to protein sequence variation, informing novel polygenic contributions to human disease. PMID:25550428

  4. Age-dependent impairment of glucose tolerance in the 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vandal, Milene; White, Phillip J; Chevrier, Geneviève; Tremblay, Cyntia; St-Amour, Isabelle; Planel, Emmanuel; Marette, Andre; Calon, Frederic

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been associated with type II diabetes (T2D) and obesity in several epidemiologic studies. To determine whether AD neuropathology can cause peripheral metabolic impairments, we investigated metabolic parameters in the triple-transgenic (3xTg)-AD mouse model of AD, compared with those in nontransgenic (non-Tg) controls, at 6, 8, and 14 mo of age. We found a more pronounced cortical A? accumulation (2- and 3.5-fold increase in A?42 in the soluble and insoluble protein fractions, respectively) in female 3xTg-AD mice than in the males. Furthermore, female 3xTg-AD mice displayed a significant deterioration in glucose tolerance (AUC, +118% vs. non-Tg mice at 14 mo). Fasting plasma insulin levels rose 2.5-fold from 6 to 14 mo of age in female 3xTg-AD mice. Glucose intolerance and cortical amyloid pathology worsened with age, and both were more pronounced in the females. Pancreatic amyloidopathy was revealed and could underlie the observed deficit in glycemic response in 3xTg-AD mice. The present results suggest that AD-like neuropathology extends to the pancreas in the 3xTg-AD mouse, leading to glucose intolerance and contributing to a pathologic self-amplifying loop between AD and T2D. PMID:26108977

  5. Portopulmonary hypertension: from diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Giusca, Sorin; Jinga, Mariana; Jurcut, Ciprian; Jurcut, Ruxandra; Serban, Marinela; Ginghina, Carmen

    2011-10-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension is a form of pulmonary arterial hypertension that has gained interest in recent years with the development of liver transplantation techniques and new pulmonary vasodilator therapies. Portopulmonary hypertension is defined as pulmonary artery hypertension associated with portal hypertension with or without advanced hepatic disease. Echocardiography plays a major role in screening for portopulmonary hypertension but right heart catheterization remains the gold standard for diagnosis. The treatment of patients with portopulmonary hypertension consists of general measures that apply to all patients that carry the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension and specific vasodilator therapies. These new therapies showed encouraging results in patients who would otherwise have a contraindication for liver transplantation. The review presents a summary of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of patients with portopulmonary hypertension. PMID:21925050

  6. Hypertension in pregnancy: new recommendations for management.

    PubMed

    Shear, R; Leduc, L; Rey, E; Moutquin, J M

    1999-12-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is a frequent complication that has substantial adverse perinatal outcomes. Hypertension may be preexisting (chronic) essential or secondary hypertension; a second entity is pregnancy induced (gestational hypertension, preeclampsia). Recent advances have identified newer markers for pregnancy hypertension: several potential candidate genes may explain the apparent family inheritance of preeclampsia, and some thrombophilic markers have been associated with the condition. Management options for mild to moderate hypertension include a short hospital stay to exclude ongoing severe hypertension and to ascertain fetal well-being. Outpatient care with appropriate maternal and fetal surveillance, including umbilical artery doppler velocimetry, is recommended for better perinatal outcomes. Acute care for severe hypertension includes the use of magnesium sulfate to prevent eclampsia and antihypertensive medication. Expeditious delivery is recommended when the maternal or fetal states cannot be stabilized. Follow-up after delivery allows the uncovering of any other coexisting hypertensive or cardiovascular disorder. PMID:10981117

  7. Intermittent high glucose implements stress-induced senescence in human vascular endothelial cells: role of superoxide production by NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Morihiko; Hayashi, Toshio; Mizuno, Natsumi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance characterized by postprandial hyperglycemia, which occurs frequently in elderly persons and represents an important preliminary step in diabetes mellitus, poses an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. Endothelial cellular senescence is reported to precede atherosclerosis. We reported that continuous high glucose stimulus causes endothelial senescence more markedly than hypertension or dyslipidemia stimulus. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of fluctuating glucose levels on human endothelial senescence. Constant high glucose increased senescence-associated-?-galactosidase (SA-?-gal) activity, a widely used marker for cellular senescence. Interestingly, in intermittent high glucose, this effect was more pronounced as well as increase of p21 and p16INK4a , senescence related proteins with DNA damage. However, telomerase was not activated and telomere length was not shortened, thus stress-induced senescence was shown. However, constant high glucose activated telomerase and shortened telomere length, which suggested replicative senescence. Intermittent but not constant high glucose strikingly up-regulated the expression of p22phox, an NADPH oxidase component, increasing superoxide. The small interfering RNA of p22phox undermined the increase in SA-?-gal activity induced by intermittent high glucose. Conclusively, intermittent high glucose can promote vascular endothelial senescence more than constant high glucose, which is in partially dependent on superoxide overproduction. PMID:25879533

  8. Intermittent High Glucose Implements Stress-Induced Senescence in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells: Role of Superoxide Production by NADPH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Morihiko; Hayashi, Toshio; Mizuno, Natsumi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kuzuya, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance characterized by postprandial hyperglycemia, which occurs frequently in elderly persons and represents an important preliminary step in diabetes mellitus, poses an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. Endothelial cellular senescence is reported to precede atherosclerosis. We reported that continuous high glucose stimulus causes endothelial senescence more markedly than hypertension or dyslipidemia stimulus. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of fluctuating glucose levels on human endothelial senescence. Constant high glucose increased senescence-associated-?-galactosidase(SA-?-gal) activity, a widely used marker for cellular senescence. Interestingly, in intermittent high glucose, this effect was more pronounced as well as increase of p21 and p16INK4a , senescence related proteins with DNA damage. However, telomerase was not activated and telomere length was not shortened, thus stress-induced senescence was shown. However, constant high glucose activated telomerase and shortened telomere length, which suggested replicative senescence. Intermittent but not constant high glucose strikingly up-regulated the expression of p22phox, an NADPH oxidase component, increasing superoxide. The small interfering RNA of p22phox undermined the increase in SA-?-gal activity induced by intermittent high glucose. Conclusively, intermittent high glucose can promote vascular endothelial senescence more than constant high glucose, which is in partially dependent on superoxide overproduction. PMID:25879533

  9. Psychological characteristics of people with perceived food intolerance in a community sample.

    PubMed

    Knibb, R C; Armstrong, A; Booth, D A; Platts, R G; Booth, I W; MacDonald, A

    1999-12-01

    In most adults who believe themselves to be food intolerant there is no objective supporting evidence. It has therefore been proposed that the misperception of intolerance to food is linked to psychiatric illness or personality disorder. This hypothesis was tested in a community-derived sample of individuals who attributed an adverse symptom to a type of food. A random mailing recruited 955 participants aged > or =18 years, of whom 232 perceived themselves to be food intolerant (PFI). All recruits were sent two questionnaires, the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28) and the shortened version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R). A total of 535 GHQ-28 and 518 EPQ-R forms were returned that were correctly completed, an overall response rate of 55%. For the subscales of the EPQ-R, neuroticism was greater in those with a PFI than those without. Women with a PFI were more extroverted than control women. For the GHQ-28 subscales, women with a PFI had significantly higher scores than control women on somatic symptoms, anxiety, insomnia, and severe depression. There was a greater percentage of psychiatric caseness among women with a PFI than among men with a PFI or control women. Nevertheless, this percentage was no greater than that reported among a reference sample derived from NHS and university staff. It is concluded that perceived food intolerance is associated with psychological distress in women with a PFI, and neurotic symptoms in both men and women with a PFI, but there is no greater prevalence of psychiatric disorder among women or men with a PFI than there is in some professional groups. PMID:10661602

  10. The Interrelationships between Lactose Intolerance and the Modern Dairy Industry: Global Perspectives in Evolutional and Historical Backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Silanikove, Nissim; Leitner, Gabriel; Merin, Uzi

    2015-09-01

    Humans learned to exploit ruminants as a source of milk about 10,000 years ago. Since then, the use of domesticated ruminants as a source of milk and dairy products has expanded until today when the dairy industry has become one of the largest sectors in the modern food industry, including the spread at the present time to countries such as China and Japan. This review analyzes the reasons for this expansion and flourishing. As reviewed in detail, milk has numerous nutritional advantages, most important being almost an irreplaceable source of dietary calcium, hence justifying the effort required to increase its consumption. On the other hand, widespread lactose intolerance among the adult population is a considerable drawback to dairy-based foods consumption. Over the centuries, three factors allowed humans to overcome limitations imposed by lactose intolerance: (i) mutations, which occurred in particular populations, most notably in the north European Celtic societies and African nomads, in which carriers of the lactose intolerance gene converted from being lactose intolerant to lactose tolerant; (ii) the ability to develop low-lactose products such as cheese and yogurt; and (iii) colon microbiome adaptation, which allow lactose intolerant individuals to overcome its intolerance. However, in a few examples in the last decade, modern dairy products, such as the popular and widespread bio-cultured yogurts, were suspected to be unsuitable for lactose intolerant peoples. In addition, the use of lactose and milk-derived products containing lactose in non-dairy products has become widespread. For these reasons, it is concluded that it might be important and helpful to label food that may contain lactose because such information will allow lactose intolerant groups to control lactose intake within the physiological limitations of ~12 g per a single meal. PMID:26404364

  11. The Interrelationships between Lactose Intolerance and the Modern Dairy Industry: Global Perspectives in Evolutional and Historical Backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Silanikove, Nissim; Leitner, Gabriel; Merin, Uzi

    2015-01-01

    Humans learned to exploit ruminants as a source of milk about 10,000 years ago. Since then, the use of domesticated ruminants as a source of milk and dairy products has expanded until today when the dairy industry has become one of the largest sectors in the modern food industry, including the spread at the present time to countries such as China and Japan. This review analyzes the reasons for this expansion and flourishing. As reviewed in detail, milk has numerous nutritional advantages, most important being almost an irreplaceable source of dietary calcium, hence justifying the effort required to increase its consumption. On the other hand, widespread lactose intolerance among the adult population is a considerable drawback to dairy-based foods consumption. Over the centuries, three factors allowed humans to overcome limitations imposed by lactose intolerance: (i) mutations, which occurred in particular populations, most notably in the north European Celtic societies and African nomads, in which carriers of the lactose intolerance gene converted from being lactose intolerant to lactose tolerant; (ii) the ability to develop low-lactose products such as cheese and yogurt; and (iii) colon microbiome adaptation, which allow lactose intolerant individuals to overcome its intolerance. However, in a few examples in the last decade, modern dairy products, such as the popular and widespread bio-cultured yogurts, were suspected to be unsuitable for lactose intolerant peoples. In addition, the use of lactose and milk-derived products containing lactose in non-dairy products has become widespread. For these reasons, it is concluded that it might be important and helpful to label food that may contain lactose because such information will allow lactose intolerant groups to control lactose intake within the physiological limitations of ~12 g per a single meal. PMID:26404364

  12. Paranormal healing and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Beutler, Jaap J; Attevelt, Johannes T M; Schouten, Sybo A; Faber, Joop A J; Mees, Evert J Dorhout; Geijskes, Gijsbert G

    1988-01-01

    A prospective randomised trial was carried out to see whether paranormal healing by laying on of hands might reduce blood pressure in essential hypertension and whether such an effect might be due to a paranormal, psychological, or placebo factor. Patients were randomised to three treatment groups: paranormal healing by laying on of hands (n=40), paranormal healing at a distance (n=37), and no paranormal healing (controls; n=38). Healing at a distance and no paranormal healing were investigated double blind. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly reduced in all three groups at week 15 (mean reduction (95% confidence interval) 17·1 (14·0 to 20·2)/8·3 (6·6 to 10·0) mm Hg). Only the successive reductions in diastolic blood pressures among the groups from week to week were significantly different. Each week diastolic pressure was consistently lower (average 1·9 mm Hg) after healing at a distance compared with control, but on paired comparison these differences were not significant. Probably week to week variations among the groups accounted for any differences noted. In this study no treatment was consistently better than another and the data cannot therefore be taken as evidence of a paranormal effect on blood pressure. Probably the fall in blood pressure in all three groups either was caused by the psychosocial approach or was a placebo effect of the trial itself. PMID:3134082

  13. Developmental programming and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nuyt, Anne Monique; Alexander, Barbara T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review There is a growing body of evidence linking adverse events or exposures during early life and adult-onset diseases. After important epidemiological studies from many parts of the world, research now focuses on mechanisms of organ dysfunction and on refining the understanding of the interaction between common elements of adverse perinatal conditions, such as nutrition, oxidants, and toxins exposures. This review will focus on advances in our comprehension of developmental programming of hypertension. Recent findings Recent studies have unraveled important mechanisms of oligonephronia and impaired renal function, altered vascular function and structure as well as sympathetic regulation of the cardiovascular system. Furthermore, interactions between prenatal insults and postnatal conditions are the subject of intensive research. Prematurity vs. intrauterine growth restriction modulate differently programming of high blood pressure. Along with antenatal exposure to glucocorticoids and imbalanced nutrition, a critical role for perinatal oxidative stress is emerging. Summary While the complexity of the interactions between antenatal and postnatal influences on adult blood pressure is increasingly recognized, the importance of postnatal life in (positively) modulating developmental programming offers the hope of a critical window of opportunity to reverse programming and prevent or reduce related adult-onset diseases. PMID:19434052

  14. Neutralization by insulin of the hypertensive effect of dermcidin isoform 2: an environmentally induced diabetogenic and hypertensive protein.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Bank, Sarbashri; Bhattacharya, Rabindra; Khan, Nighat N; Sinha, A Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The effect of dermcidin isoform 2 (dermcidin), an environmentally induced stress protein, was investigated on the genesis of diabetes mellitus and hypertension, the two major atherosclerotic risk factors. The role of dermcidin as an atherosclerotic risk factor related to the impaired systemic insulin level was investigated. Dermcidin was prepared by electrophoresis using plasma from the subjects with acute ischemic heart disease. Injection of 0.2??M dermcidin in mice increased the blood glucose level from 98 ± 2.45?mg/dL to 350? ± 10.2?mg/dL which was normalized by the oral administration of acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) after 24?h. Hypertensive subjects with systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 165?mm and 95?mm of Hg, respectively, had plasma dermcidin level of 95?nM. Ingestion of acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) (150?mg/70?kg body weight) decreased the systolic and diastolic pressures to 125?mm and 80?mm of Hg, respectively, with decrease of dermcidin level to 15?nM. Incubation of kidney cortex cells with 0.2??M dermcidin-inhibited synthesis of (r)-cortexin, an antihypertensive protein, and the basal (r)-cortexin level was reduced from 33?nM to 15?nM. Addition of 25??units of insulin/mL was found to reverse the inhibition of cortexin synthesis. The effect of dermcidin as a diabetogenic and a hypertensive agent could be controlled either by aspirin or by insulin. PMID:24649391

  15. A case of chlorpheniramine maleate-induced hypersensitivity with aspirin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Hye; Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, So-Hee; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Kim, You-Young; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2011-01-01

    Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic disease, such as allergic rhinitis, urticaria, and angioedema. Although several previous reports describe hypersensitivity to antihistamines such as cetirizine and hydroxyzine, documented cases of chlorpheniramine hypersensitivity are extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old Korean woman who presented with urticaria after ingesting a cold medication. Over the previous 5 years, she had also experienced a food allergy to crab and shrimp, allergic rhinitis, and repeated urticaria after ingesting cold medication. Provocation with aspirin elicited generalized urticaria. Intravenous chlorpheniramine and methylprednisolone was injected for symptom control, but in fact appeared to aggravate urticaria. A second round of skin and provocation tests for chlorpheniramine and methylprednisolone showed positive results only for chlorpheniramine. She was diagnosed with aspirin intolerance and chlorpheniramine hypersensitivity, and was instructed to avoid these drugs. To date, this is the second of only two cases of chlorpheniramine-induced type I hypersensitivity with aspirin intolerance. Although the relationship between aspirin intolerance and chlorpheniramine-induced type I hypersensitivity is unclear, physicians should be aware of the possibility of urticaria or other allergic reactions in response to antihistamines. PMID:21217928

  16. Decrease in TSH levels after lactose restriction in Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients with lactose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Asik, Mehmet; Gunes, Fahri; Binnetoglu, Emine; Eroglu, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Neslihan; Sen, Hacer; Akbal, Erdem; Bakar, Coskum; Beyazit, Yavuz; Ukinc, Kubilay

    2014-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of lactose intolerance (LI) in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis(HT) and the effects of lactose restriction on thyroid function in these patients. Eighty-three HT patients taking L-thyroxine (LT4) were enrolled, and lactose tolerance tests were performed on all patients. Lactose intolerance was diagnosed in 75.9 % of the patients with HT. Thirty-eight patients with LI were started on a lactose-restricted diet for 8 weeks. Thirty-eight patients with LI (30 euthyroid and 8 with subclinical hypothyroidism), and 12 patients without LI were included in the final analysis. The level of TSH significantly decreased in the euthyroid and subclinical hypothyroid patients with LI [from 2.06 ± 1.02 to 1.51 ±1.1 IU/mL and from 5.45 ± 0.74 to 2.25 ± 1.88 IU/mL,respectively (both P<0.05)]. However, the level of TSH in patients without LI did not change significantly over the 8 weeks (P>0.05). Lactose intolerance occurs at a high frequency in HT patients. Lactose restriction leads to decreased levels of TSH, and LI should be considered in hypothyroid patients who require increasing LT4 doses,have irregular TSH levels and are resistant to LT4 treatment. PMID:24078411

  17. Contributions of MSNA and stroke volume to orthostatic intolerance following bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1999-01-01

    We examined whether the altered orthostatic tolerance following 14 days of head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) was related to inadequate sympathetic outflow or to excessive reductions in cardiac output during a 10- to 15-min head-up tilt (HUT) test. Heart rate, blood pressure (BP, Finapres), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, microneurography), and stroke volume blood velocity (SVV, Doppler ultrasound) were assessed during supine 30 degrees (5 min) and 60 degrees (5-10 min) HUT positions in 15 individuals who successfully completed the pre-HDBR test without evidence of orthostatic intolerance. Subjects were classified as being orthostatically tolerant (OT, n = 9) or intolerant (OI, n = 6) following the post-HDBR test. MSNA, BP, and SVV during supine and HUT postures were not altered in the OT group. Hypotension during 60 degrees HUT in the post-bed rest test for the OI group (P < 0.05) was associated with a blunted increase in MSNA (P < 0.05). SVV was reduced following HDBR in the OI group (main effect of HDBR, P < 0.02). The data support the hypothesis that bed rest-induced orthostatic intolerance is related to an inadequate increase in sympathetic discharge that cannot compensate for a greater postural reduction in stroke volume.

  18. Effects of standing on cerebrovascular resistance in patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Atkinson, D.; Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Furlan, R.; Black, B. K.; Robertson, D.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance often have debilitating symptoms on standing that are suggestive of cerebral hypoperfusion despite the absence of orthostatic hypotension. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We evaluated the effects of graded head-up tilt on cerebral blood flow as determined by transcranial Doppler measurements in 10 patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance (nine women, one man, 22 to 47 years) and nine age- and sex-matched control subjects. RESULTS: In patients, mean (+/- SD) arterial pressure at 0 degrees head-up tilt was 90 +/- 11 mm Hg and was well maintained at all tilt angles (90 +/- 11 mm Hg at 75 degrees). In controls, mean arterial pressure was 85 +/- 7 mm Hg at 0 degrees and 82 +/- 11 mm Hg at 75 degrees head-up tilt. There was a substantial decrease in peak velocity with increasing tilt angle in patients (28% +/- 10%) but not in controls (10% +/- 10% at 75 degrees, P <0.001). Similarly, mean velocity decreased 26% +/- 13% in patients and 12% +/- 11% in controls (P = 0.01). With increasing head-up tilt, patients had a significantly greater increase in regional cerebrovascular resistance than controls. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance, peak and mean middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity decreased in response to head-up tilt despite well sustained arterial blood pressure. These observations indicate that in this group of patients, regulation of cerebrovascular tone may be impaired and might therefore be a target for therapeutic interventions.

  19. Nitric oxide in microgravity-induced orthostatic intolerance: relevance to spinal cord injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, N. D.; Purdy, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity results in cardiovascular deconditioning which is marked by orthostatic intolerance in the returning astronauts and recovering bed-ridden patients. Recent studies conducted in our laboratories at University of California, Irvine have revealed marked elevation of nitric oxide (NO) production in the kidney, heart, brain, and systemic arteries coupled with significant reduction of NO production in the cerebral arteries of microgravity-adapted animals. We have further demonstrated that the observed alteration of NO metabolism is primarily responsible for the associated cardiovascular deconditioning. Recovery from acute spinal cord injury (SCI) is frequently complicated by orthostatic intolerance that is due to the combined effects of the disruption of efferent sympathetic pathway and cardiovascular deconditioning occasioned by prolonged confinement to bed. In this presentation, I will review the nature of altered NO metabolism and its role in the pathogenesis of microgravity-induced cardiovascular deconditioning. The possible relevance of the new findings to orthostatic intolerance in patients with acute SCI and its potential therapeutic implications will be discussed.

  20. Clinical and biochemical characteristics of acromegalic patients with different abnormalities in glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-de-los-Monteros, Ana Laura; González, Baldomero; Vargas, Guadalupe; Sosa, Ernesto; Mercado, Moisés

    2011-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of diabetes, glucose intolerance and impaired fasting glucose in Mexican patients with acromegaly and establish associations with clinical, anthropometric and biochemical variables. 257 patients with acromegaly were evaluated by a 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test with measurements of both GH and glucose (0, 30, 60, 90 120 min) as well as baseline IGF-1. Normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and diabetes (DM) were defined based on the 2003 ADA criteria. NGT, IFG, IGT and DM were found in 27.6, 8.9, 31.6 and 31.9% of the subjects, respectively; 42 of the DM patients were unaware of the diagnosis. Patients with diabetes were older than subjects in the other 3 categories (P = 0.001), and the proportion of women was significantly higher in the DM (74%) and IGT (68%) groups than in the NGT group (52%) (P = 0.004). Odds ratio for the development of DM was 3.29 (95% CI 3.28-3.3). GH and IGF-1 levels were comparable among the different groups. In a multivariable analysis DM was significantly associated with age, presence of a macroadenoma, disease duration and a basal GH > 30 ?g/dl. DM and probably IGT are more prevalent in acromegaly than in the general Mexican population. DM was more frequent in females of all ages, in subjects with severely elevated GH concentrations, in patients with macroadenomas, and long-standing disease duration. The odds ratio for DM in our subjects with acromegaly is more than 3 times higher than in the general population. PMID:21161601

  1. Nrf2 Deficiency Improves Glucose Tolerance in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Wu, Kai Connie; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    Nrf2, a master regulator of intracellular redox homeostasis, is indicated to participate in fatty acid metabolism in liver. However, its role in diet-induced obesity remains controversial. In the current study, genetically engineered Nrf2-null, wild-type (WT), and Nrf2-activated, Keap1-knockdown (K1-KD) mice were fed either a control or a high-fat western diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. The results indicate that the absence or enhancement of Nrf2 activity did not prevent diet-induced obesity, had limited effects on lipid metabolism, but affected blood glucose homeostasis. Whereas the Nrf2-null mice were resistant to HFD-induced glucose intolerance, the Nrf2-activated K1-KD mice exhibited prolonged elevation of circulating glucose during a glucose tolerance test even on the control diet. Feeding a HFD did not activate the Nrf2 signaling pathway in mouse livers. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (Fgf21) is a liver-derived anti-diabetic hormone that exerts glucose- and lipid-lowering effects. Fgf21 mRNA and protein were both elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice, and Fgf21 protein was lower in K1-KD mice than WT mice. The inverse correlation between Nrf2 activity and hepatic expression of Fgf21 might explain the improved glucose tolerance in Nrf2-null mice. Furthermore, a more oxidative cellular environment in Nrf2-null mice could affect insulin signaling in liver. For example, mRNA of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1, a gene repressed by insulin in hepatocytes, was markedly elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, genetic alteration of Nrf2 does not prevent diet-induced obesity in mice, but deficiency of Nrf2 improves glucose homeostasis, possibly through its effects on Fgf21 and/or insulin signaling. PMID:23017736

  2. Drug-induced hypertension: an unappreciated cause of secondary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2012-01-01

    A myriad variety of therapeutic agents or chemical substances can induce either a transient or persistent increase in blood pressure, or interfere with the blood pressure-lowering effects of antihypertensive drugs. Some agents cause either sodium retention or extracellular volume expansion, or activate directly or indirectly the sympathetic nervous system. Other substances act directly on arteriolar smooth muscle or do not have a defined mechanism of action. Some medications that usually lower blood pressure may paradoxically increase blood pressure, or an increase in pressure may be encountered after their discontinuation. In general, drug-induced pressure increases are small and transient: however, severe hypertension involving encephalopathy, stroke, and irreversible renal failure have been reported. The deleterious effect of therapeutic agents is more pronounced in patients with preexisting hypertension, in those with renal failure, and in the elderly. Careful evaluation of a patient's drug regimen may identify chemically induced hypertension and obviate unnecessary evaluation and facilitate antihypertensive therapy. Once chemical-induced hypertension has been identified, discontinuation of the causative agent is recommended, although hypertension can often be managed by specific therapy and dose adjustment if continued use of the offending agent is mandatory. The present review summarizes the therapeutic agents or chemical substances that elevate blood pressure and their mechanisms of action. PMID:22195528

  3. Decreased senescence marker protein-30 could be a factor that contributes to the worsening of glucose tolerance in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Goji

    2010-01-01

    In our recent paper, we proposed that senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) could be a novel molecule which was involved in an impairment of ?-cell function with aging. SMP30 knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a standard diet (SD) or a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks from 7 weeks of age. In an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test at 15 weeks of age, blood glucose levels in SD-fed KO mice were significantly increased by 25% at 30 min after glucose administration compared to SD-fed WT mice. Insulin levels in SD-fed KO mice were significantly decreased by 37% at 30 min postglucose compared to SD-fed WT mice. Interestingly, an insulin tolerance test showed a greater glucose lowering effect in SD-fed KO mice. Morphometric analysis revealed no differences in the degree of HFD-induced compensatory increase in ?-cell mass and proliferation. Collectively, these data indicate that impairment of the early phase of insulin secretion underlies glucose intolerance in KO mice. Decreased SMP30 may contribute to the worsening of glucose tolerance that occurs in normal aging. PMID:21099321

  4. Limited OXPHOS capacity in white adipocytes is a hallmark of obesity in laboratory mice irrespective of the glucose tolerance status

    PubMed Central

    Schöttl, Theresa; Kappler, Lisa; Fromme, Tobias; Klingenspor, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several human and rodent obesity studies speculate on a causal link between altered white adipocyte mitochondria in the obese state and changes in glucose homeostasis. We here aimed to dissect whether alterations in white adipocyte mitochondrial respiratory function are a specific phenomenon of obesity or impaired glucose tolerance or both. Methods Mature white adipocytes were purified from posterior subcutaneous and intraabdominal epididymal fat of four murine obesity models characterized by either impaired or normal oral glucose tolerance. Bioenergetic profiles, including basal, leak, and maximal respiration, were generated using high-resolution respirometry. Cell respiratory control ratios were calculated to evaluate mitochondrial respiratory function. Results Maximal respiration capacity and cell respiratory control ratios were diminished in white adipocytes of each of the four murine obesity models, both in the absence and the presence of impaired glucose tolerance. Limitation was more pronounced in adipocytes of intraabdominal versus subcutaneous fat. Conclusion Reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity in white adipocytes is a hallmark of murine obesity irrespective of the glucose tolerance status. Impaired respiratory capacity in white adipocytes solely is not sufficient for the development of systemic glucose intolerance. PMID:26413469

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in children.

    PubMed

    Lurbe, Empar; Álvarez, Julio; Redon, Josep

    2010-12-01

    Hypertension is a global problem, affecting both developed and developing nations. In children and adolescents, hypertension has gained ground in cardiovascular medicine, thanks to the progress made in several areas of pathophysiologic and clinical research. Childhood hypertension is often asymptomatic and is easily missed, even by health professionals. Target organ damage is detectable in children and adolescents. Management of hypertension includes lifestyle changes and pharmacologic treatment. In the case of secondary hypertension, pharmacologic treatment usually is required. In essential hypertension, assessment of early organ damage provides a useful tool for treatment decisions. PMID:20872099

  6. DPP-4 Inhibitor Reduces Central Blood Pressure in a Diabetic and Hypertensive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Cosenso-Martin, Luciana Neves; Giollo-Junior, Luiz Tadeu; Vilela-Martin, José Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are among the main risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. Pharmacotherapy for DM should not only improve blood glucose control, but also provide beneficial glucose-independent cardiovascular effects. The central systolic blood pressure (SBP) has become more important than the brachial SBP in the assessment of cardiovascular risk. This case report describes the effect of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, on the central SBP in a 54-year-old woman with hypertension and DM. She was submitted to applanation tonometry (AT) before and after vildagliptin association. AT of the radial artery is a non-invasive method that indirectly assesses arterial stiffness by calculating the central SBP and the augmentation index (AIx). After 3 months of follow-up using vildagliptin, central SBP and AIx were improved. Moreover, she presented better glycemic control. This case suggests an effect of DPP-4 inhibitor on arterial stiffness parameter (central SBP) in a hypertensive and diabetic patient, which shows a glucose-independent beneficial cardiovascular effect of this group of drugs. PMID:26166078

  7. The influence of selected antihypertensive drugs on zinc, copper, and iron status in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Suliburska, Joanna; Bogdanski, Pawe?; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2014-09-01

    Mineral homeostasis in hypertensive patients may be affected by hypotensive drugs. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of selected antihypertensive drugs on mineral homeostasis in a rat model of hypertension. Eight-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were treated with perindopril, metoprolol, indapamide, amlodipine, or no drug for 45 days. In another experiment, the SHRs were treated with indapamide or amlodipine in the presence of zinc and copper gluconate supplement. Lipids, glucose, and insulin levels along with superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were assayed in serum. Iron, zinc, and copper concentrations in serum, erythrocytes, and tissues were determined using the flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Blood pressure was measured using a tail-cuff plethysmograph. Treatment with indapamide and amlodipine was found to significantly lower zinc levels in serum, erythrocytes, livers, and spleens of the SHRs, as well as copper levels in the kidneys, compared with the control no-drug group. A markedly higher concentration of glucose was found in the indapamide-treated rats. Supplementing the indapamide-treated SHRs with zinc and copper gluconate resulted in a significant decrease in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and also lowered serum glucose and triglyceride concentrations and HOMA (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance) values. The results show that indapamide and amlodipine disturb zinc and copper homeostasis in SHRs. Supplementation with zinc and copper restores mineral homeostasis in SHRs treated with indapamide and amlodipine, and also corrects metabolic imbalances while improving the antihypertensive efficiency of indapamide. PMID:24927993

  8. Cerebral angiography, blood flow and vascular reactivity in progressive hypertension

    E-print Network

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Cerebral angiography, blood flow and vascular reactivity in progressive hypertension Yunxia Li a Hypercapnia Spontaneous hypertensive rat Wistar Kyoto rats Chronic hypertension alters cerebral vascular to hypercapnia of multiple brain regions using arterial-spin-labeling technique in spontaneously hypertensive

  9. High Intensity Exercise Countermeasures does not Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance Following Prolonged Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.; Lee, Stuart M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 20% of Space Shuttle astronauts became presyncopal during operational stand and 80deg head-up tilt tests, and the prevalence of orthostatic intolerance increases after longer missions. Greater than 60% of the US astronauts participating in Mir and early International Space Station missions experienced presyncope during post-flight tilt tests, perhaps related to limitations of the exercise hardware that prevented high intensity exercise training until later ISS missions. The objective of this study was to determine whether an intense resistive and aerobic exercise countermeasure program designed to prevent cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning during 70 d of bed rest (BR), a space flight analog, would protect against post-BR orthostatic intolerance. METHODS Twenty-six subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups: non-exercise controls (n=11) or one of two exercise groups (ExA, n=8; ExB, n=7). Both ExA and ExB groups performed the same resistive and aerobic exercise countermeasures during BR, but one exercise group received testosterone supplementation while the other received a placebo during BR in a double-blinded fashion. On 3 d/wk, subjects performed lower body resistive exercise and 30 min of continuous aerobic exercise (=75% max heart rate). On the other 3 d/wk, subjects performed only highintensity, interval-style aerobic exercise. Orthostatic intolerance was assessed using a 15-min 80? head-up tilt test performed 2 d (BR-2) before and on the last day of BR (BR70). Plasma volume was measured using carbon monoxide rebreathing on BR-3 and before rising on the first recovery day (BR+0). The code for the exercise groups has not been broken, and results are reported here without group identification. RESULTS Only one subject became presyncopal during tilt testing on BR-2, but 7 of 11 (63%) controls, 3 of 8 (38%) ExA, and 4 of 7 (57%) ExB subjects were presyncopal on BR70. Survival analysis of post-BR tilt tests revealed no differences (p=0.77) between groups. Plasma volume (absolute or relative to body mass index) decreased (p<0.001) from pre to post-BR, with no differences between groups. CONCLUSIONS These preliminary results corroborate previous reports that the performance of a vigorous exercise countermeasure protocol during BR, even with testosterone supplementation, does not protect against orthostatic intolerance or plasma volume loss. Preventing post-BR orthostatic intolerance may require additional countermeasures, such as orthostatic stress during BR or end-of-BR fluid infusion.

  10. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  11. Heat stress proteins in hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, D.; Tremblay, J.; Pang, S.C.; Schlager, G.; Hamet, P.

    1986-03-05

    It has been described that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are more sensitive to an acute environmental heat stress and that cultured cardiomyocytes from neonatal SHR are demonstrated to be more thermosensitive. In addition, chronically heat exposed spontaneously hypertensive mice leads to a decrease of blood pressure in these animals. Heat shock is known to induce the synthesis of a new set of proteins (HSP) in every cell tested. This ubiquitous response seems to be involved in the induction of a thermotolerant state. The synthesis of 70K HSP was observed in lymphocytes isolated from the spleen of chronically heated mice. They used lymphocytes, previously isolated on a ficoll gradient, to evaluate the HSP induction in normotensive (WKY) and hypertensive (SHR) rats. The heat shock was induced by exposing the lymphocytes at 46/sup 0/C during 5 min in a hot water bath. The cells were then labeled with (/sup 75/Se)-methionine, washed, homogenized and separated on 5-30% SDS-polyacrylamide gel. Preliminary results suggest an abnormal pattern of induction of 70K and 90K HSP in hypertension. Heat sensitivity, thermotolerance and expression of HSP may, thus, be related to hypertension.

  12. Deficiency in apolipoprotein A-I ablates the pharmacological effects of metformin on plasma glucose homeostasis and hepatic lipid deposition.

    PubMed

    Karavia, Eleni A; Hatziri, Aikaterini; Kalogeropoulou, Christina; Papachristou, Nikolaos I; Xepapadaki, Eva; Constantinou, Caterina; Natsos, Anastasios; Petropoulou, Peristera-Ioanna; Sasson, Shlomo; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Kypreos, Kyriakos E

    2015-11-01

    Recently, we showed that deficiency in apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) sensitizes mice to diet-induced obesity, glucose intolerance and NAFLD. Here we investigated the potential involvement of ApoA-I in the pharmacological effects of metformin on glucose intolerance and NAFLD development. Groups of apoa1-deficient (apoa1(-/-)) and C57BL/6 mice fed western-type diet were either treated with a daily dose of 300mg/kg metformin for 18 weeks or left untreated for the same period. Then, histological and biochemical analyses were performed. Metformin treatment led to a comparable reduction in plasma insulin levels in both C57BL/6 and apoa1(-/-) mice following intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. However, only metformin-treated C57BL/6 mice maintained sufficient peripheral insulin sensitivity to effectively clear glucose following the challenge, as indicated by a [(3)H]-2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake assay in isolated soleus muscle. Similarly, deficiency in ApoA-I ablated the effect of metformin on hepatic lipid deposition and NAFLD development. Gene expression analysis indicated that the effects of ApoA-I on metformin treatment may be independent of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and de novo lipogenesis. Interestingly, metformin treatment reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation function only in apoa1(-/-) mice. Our data show that the role of ApoA-I in diabetes extends to the modulation of the pharmacological actions of metformin, a common drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26420354

  13. Microalbuminuria in untreated prehypertension and hypertension without diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Yontar, Osman Can; Karaagac, Kemal; Agca, Fahriye Vatansever; Tutuncu, Ahmet; Kuzeytemiz, Mustafa; Bekler, Adem; Senturk, Muhammed; Aydin, Ufuk; Demir, ?erafettin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hypertension (HT) and prehypertension (preHT) were independent predictors of cardiovascular diseases. Urinary albumin leakage is a manifestation of generalized vascular damage. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a vasoactive peptide secreted by left ventricle in response to myocytic stretch. We aimed to investigate relationship between microalbuminuria (MA) and BNP in untreated elevated blood pressures. Methods: Of 105 untreated prehypertensive subjects (53 men, 52 women), 100 hypertensive subjects (51 men, 49 women) and 57 normotensive subjects (32 men, 25 women) none had history of diabetes. Urine albumin excretion was measured by immunoradiometric assay in morning urine sample. Results: The prevalence of MA was higher in hypertensive group than in prehypertensive group and in normotensive group (Hypertensive group; 33.9%, prehypertensive; 25.9%, normotensive; 10%). Subjects with HT had higher prevalence of microalbminuria; larger body mass index, higher levels of triglycerides, blood glucose and creatinin were more common in subjects with HT than in those with preHT. In hypertensive group; patients with microalbuminuria had higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), BNP, LVMI and lower eGFR as compared to those without MA. MA was significantly correlated with LVMI, BNP and SBP. In multivariate regression analysis, SBP (?: 0.361; P < 0.001), LVMII (?: 0.267; P = 0.011) and BNP (?: 0.284; P = 0.005) were independent variables associated with MA in hypertensives. In prehypertensive group; patients with microalbuminuria had higher SBP, BNP, LVMI and lower eGFR as compared to those without MA. MA was significantly correlated with LVMI, BNP and SBP. In multivariate regression analysis, SBP (?: 0.264; P = 0.002), LVMI (?: 0.293; P = 0.001) and BNP (?: 0.168; P = 0.045) were associated with MA in prehypertensives. Conclusions: In preHT and HT, SBP, BNP and LVMI are associated with MA. In the evaluation of increased blood pressures, in case of increased BNP and LVMI, MA should be investigated even in prehypertensive stages. The subjects with increased blood pressures should get medical treatment to prevent the effects on vascular structure and myocardium even in prehypertensive phase. PMID:25419378

  14. Retinal microangiopathy and pigment epithelial lesions in subjects with normal, borderline, and decreased oral glucose tolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Algvere, P; Efendi?, S; Luft, R; Wajngot, A

    1985-01-01

    Retinal fluorescein angiography was performed in 150 subjects: 64 with normal fasting blood glucose and normal oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), 49 with borderline, and 37 with decreased OGTT. Microaneurysms were noted in only two subjects, both with decreased OGTT. Minute changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) were seen in 23% of the 64 normal persons, in 35% of those with borderline, and 49% of those with decreased OGTT (p less than 0.05). The impact of glucose intolerance was more pronounced in subjects under the age of 50 years, RPE changes being rare (7%) in those with normal OGTT but occurring in 32% of those with borderline or decreased OGTT (p less than 0.01). The corresponding figures among subjects aged 50 or more were 55% and 57%, respectively. We conclude that at least half of the subjects above 50 years show RPE alterations, and that minimal changes in glucose metabolism may precipitate the development of such changes at an earlier age. Images PMID:4005209

  15. Optoelectronic Apparatus Measures Glucose Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Rovati, Luigi L.

    2003-01-01

    An optoelectronic apparatus has been invented as a noninvasive means of measuring the concentration of glucose in the human body. The apparatus performs polarimetric and interferometric measurements of the human eye to acquire data from which the concentration of glucose in the aqueous humor can be computed. Because of the importance of the concentration of glucose in human health, there could be a large potential market for instruments based on this apparatus.

  16. Who Is at Risk for Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... exact number of people who have pulmonary hypertension (PH) isn't known. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension ( ... have group 1 PAH tend to be overweight . PH that occurs with another disease or condition is ...

  17. Hypertension—Listen to Your Heart

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Hypertension —Listen to Your Heart Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... G. Nabel Why should Americans be concerned about high blood pressure? Hypertension—or high blood pressure—is a serious ...

  18. [Benign intracranial hypo- and hypertension].

    PubMed

    Delvaux, V; Dioh, A; Schoenen, J

    1999-08-01

    Chronic headaches due to intracranial hypo- or hypertension (IHS codes 7.2 and 7.1) may be difficult to diagnose. In this article, we review their principal clinical characteristics, etiologies and therapies. Intracranial hypotension may be caused by CSF linkage, e.g. after lumbar puncture. It may also be "idiopathic" in which case a CSF leak, usually at the spinal level, may be difficult to demonstrate. Postural headache is the clinical hallmark of intracranial hypotension. The diagnosis is confirmed by leptomeningeal enhancement on MRI scans. The headache of benign intracranial hypertension may be aggravated by the supine position and accompanied by transient visual obscurations and tinnitus. Papillary edema supports the diagnosis but may be absent in some cases. Increased opening pressure of the CSF will confirm the diagnosis. Etiologies such as cerebral venous thrombosis, have to be excluded by adequate imaging methods. In both hypo- and hypertension syndromes, various therapeutic strategies have been proposed. PMID:10548894

  19. Prostacyclins in pulmonary hypertension treatment.

    PubMed

    Pereszlenyi, A; Harustiak, S; Klepetko, W

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a rare, treacherous disease affecting the lungs and heart. Elevated pulmonary artery pressure (above 2.67 kPa) and pathologically high pulmonary vascular resistance are characteristic for this disease. This disease is insidiously progressive and often leads to sudden death mainly in middle and younger middle ages. Exhausting the traditional conservative means of treatment, lung/heart-lung transplantation offers the only possibility to improve the quality of patient's life. Nowadays more and more reports about the successful application of intravenous prostacyclin for treatment of this disease appear in specialized literature. Epoprostenol (prostacyclin PGI2) represents a new, potent drug for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. The objective of this paper is to introduce prostacyclin PGI2 to experts and demonstrate new possibilities, procedures, trends in treatment of pulmonary hypertension. (Tab. 1, Ref. 30.). PMID:12413209

  20. Memories that last in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Itani, Hana A; Harrison, David G

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that the immune system contributes to the genesis of hypertension. Hypertensive stimuli, such as angiotensin II, DOCA-salt, and norepinephrine, cause T cells and monocytes/macrophages to accumulate in the kidney and vasculature. These cells release inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, interferon-?, and IL-17, that promote renal and vascular dysfunction. These cytokines also promote angiotensinogen production in the proximal tubule and Na(+) retention in the distal nephron and contribute to renal fibrosis and glomerular damage. For several years, we have observed accumulation of memory T cells in the kidney and vasculature. Given the propensity for memory cells to produce cytokines such as interferon-? and IL-17, interventions to prevent the formation or renal accumulation of specific memory T cell subsets could prevent end-organ damage and blood pressure elevation in response to hypertensive stimuli. PMID:25834073

  1. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Hypertension: A Crossectional Community Based Study in Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Abebe, Solomon Mekonnen; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu; Getachew, Assefa

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension, being the root cause of many of the body sytem and organs failure, remains to be a major public health challenge globally. Though the problem is huge in both developed and developing countries, data are scarce in developing countries like Ethiopia. Therefore, this study was aimed to determine the magnitude and associated factors of hypertension in North West Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted on adults aged 35 years and above in the rural and urban communities of Dabat district and Gondar town in 2012. The data were collected using the WHO STEPwise strategy. Hypertension was defined as having a Systolic blood pressure of ?140 mmHg and/ or a Diastolic BP of ? 90mmHg or a reported use of anti-hypertensive medications for raised blood pressure. Prevalence was computed with a 95% confidence interval. Selected risk factors were assessed using a biviarete logistic regression. Results A total of 2200 participants were included in the study. The median age (±SD) was 47 (±12.4) years. The overall prevalence of hypertension was found to be 27.9% [95% CI 26.0, 29.8], with the proportion in the urban and rural residents being 30.7% and 25.3% respectively. The prevalence of hypertension was 29.3% for women and 26.3% for men. Out of the 598 hypertensive patients 241 (40.3%) had blood pressure measurements, and 99 (16.6%) had known hypertension and were on treatment. The proportion of systolic and diastolic hypertension in this subgroup of adults was 133(6.2%). The multivariable logistic regression analysis showed older age (AOR = 1.06; 1.05, 1.07), raised fasting glucose (AOR = 1.01; 1.001, 1.01), alcohol consumption (AOR = 1.71; 1.24, 2.36), and raised BMI (AOR =1.07; 1.04, 1.10) were significantly associated with hypertension. Conclusion The prevalence of hypertension was considerably higher in rural areas than previously reported. The health system needs to develop strategies to increase the reach of relevant screening and diagnostic services to both rural and urban populations. PMID:25909382

  2. Refeeding hypertension in dietary obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Ernsberger, P.; Nelson, D.O. )

    1988-01-01

    A novel model of nutritionally induced hypertension in the rat is described. Dietary obesity was produced by providing sweet milk in addition to regular chow, which elicited a 52% increase in caloric intake. Despite 54% greater body weight gain and 139% heavier retroperitoneal fat pads, 120 days of overfeeding failed to increase systolic pressure in the conscious state or mean arterial pressure under urethan anesthesia. In contrast, mild hypertension developed in intermittantly fasted obese animals. The first 4-day supplemented fast was initiated 4 wk after the introduction of sweet milk, when the animals were 47 g overweight relative to chow-fed controls. Thereafter, 4 days of starvation were alternated with 2 wk of refeeding for a total of 4 cycles. A rapid fall in systolic blood pressure accompanied the onset of supplemented fasting and was maintained thereafter. With refeeding, blood pressure rose precipitously, despite poststarvation anorexia. Blood pressure tended to rise slightly over the remainder of the realimentation period. After the 4th supplemented fast, hypertension was sustained during 30 days of refeeding. Cumulative caloric intake in starved-refed rats fell within 2% of that in chow-fed controls. Refeeding hypertension appeared to be due to increased sympathetic nervous activity, since (1) cardiac {beta}-adrenergic receptors were downregulated, as indicated by a 40% decrease in the maximum binding of ({sup 3}H)dihydroalpranolol; and (2) the decrease in heart rate as a result of {beta}-blockade was enhanced. Refeeding hypertension in the dietary obese rat may be a potential animal model for some forms of human obesity-related hypertension.

  3. Dietary fructose and glucose differentially affect lipid and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Absorbed glucose and fructose differ in that glucose largely escapes first-pass removal by the liver, whereas fructose does not, resulting in different metabolic effects of these 2 monosaccharides. In short-term controlled feeding studies, dietary fructose significantly increases postprandial trigly...

  4. Dietary fructose and glucose differentially affect lipid and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Absorbed glucose and fructose differ in that glucose largely escapes first pass removal by the liver, whereas fructose does not, resulting in different metabolic effects of these two monosaccharides. In short-term controlled feeding studies, dietary fructose significantly increases postprandial trig...

  5. Fetal and infant growth and impaired glucose tolerance at age 64.

    PubMed Central

    Hales, C N; Barker, D J; Clark, P M; Cox, L J; Fall, C; Osmond, C; Winter, P D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To discover whether reduced fetal and infant growth is associated with non-insulin dependent diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in adult life. DESIGN--Follow up study of men born during 1920-30 whose birth weights and weights at 1 year were known. SETTING--Hertfordshire, England. SUBJECTS--468 men born in east Hertfordshire and still living there. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, proinsulin, and 32-33 split pro-insulin concentrations and plasma glucose and insulin concentrations 30 and 120 minutes after a 75 g glucose drink. RESULTS--93 men had impaired glucose tolerance or hitherto undiagnosed diabetes. They had had a lower mean birth weight and a lower weight at 1 year. The proportion of men with impaired glucose tolerance fell progressively from 26% (6/23) among those who had weighted 18 lb (8.16 kg) or less at 1 year to 13% (3/24) among those who had weighed 27 lb (12.25 kg) or more. Corresponding figures for diabetes were 17% (4/23) and nil (0/24). Plasma glucose concentrations at 30 and 120 minutes fell with increasing birth weight and weight at 1 year. Plasma 32-33 split proinsulin concentration fell with increasing weight at 1 year. All these trends were significant and independent of current body mass. Blood pressure was inversely related to birth weight and strongly related to plasma glucose and 32-33 split proinsulin concentrations. CONCLUSIONS--Reduced growth in early life is strongly linked with impaired glucose tolerance and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Reduced early growth is also related to a raised plasma concentration of 32-33 split proinsulin, which is interpreted as a sign of beta cell dysfunction. Reduced intrauterine growth is linked with high blood pressure, which may explain the association between hypertension and impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:1954451

  6. GLUCOSE OXIDASE REDUCES OXIDATION IN FROZEN SHRIMP

    E-print Network

    GLUCOSE OXIDASE REDUCES OXIDATION IN FROZEN SHRIMP Carolyn Kelley Glucose oxidase-cat alase role oxygen can have during storage of foods (Scott, 1958). Glucose oxidase-catalase preparations are used to carry out the net reaction: 2 glucose + oxygen glucose oxidase > 2 gluconic acid. catalase

  7. Plasma Glucose Lab Problems --Solutions 1 Plasma Glucose Regulation Problems --Solutions

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    Plasma Glucose Lab Problems -- Solutions 1 Plasma Glucose Regulation Problems of glucose and that all of it enters the blood and none is metabolized or excreted. Calculate the concentration (in mg glucose/dl plasma) in that person

  8. Renovascular hypertension: Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Glorioso, N.; Laragh, J.H.; Rappelli, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 42 selections. Some of the titles are: Clinical Pharmacology of Two Synthetic Atrial Natriuretics Peptides; Reflex Control of Renin Release in Normotensive and Hypertensive Humans; Renal Blood flow in Renovascular Hypertension; and Radioisotopic Studies in Renovascular Hypertension Before and After Surgery or Percutaneous Transluminal Renal Angioplasty.

  9. American Journal of Hypertension 1 Original article

    E-print Network

    Zabulis, Xenophon

    American Journal of Hypertension 1 Original article Assessment of microcirculation in the arterial disease. The predictive value of mild hypertensive retinopathy in terms of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity has not only been demonstrated in a recent multitudinal study among hypertensive and normotensive

  10. American Journal of Hypertension 1 Original article

    E-print Network

    Zabulis, Xenophon

    American Journal of Hypertension 1 Original article Divergent Retinal Vascular Abnormalities in Normotensive Persons and Patients With Never-Treated, Masked, White Coat Hypertension Areti Triantafyllou,1 Haidich,4 Chrysanthos Zamboulis1 and Stella Douma1 Background Hypertensive patients with retinal

  11. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePLUS

    ... providers engage in frequent follow-ups with ongoing discussions about the management of their condi- tion. Current ... glucose in the blood. Most importantly for this discussion, however, the liver filters the blood and removes ...

  12. Comparison of dietary energy and macronutrient intake at different levels of glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li-Jun; Jiang, Sheng; Sun, Shi-An; Xie, Zi-Jing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate energy and glycolipid metabolism by determining the intake of energy and macronutrients in persons with differing glucose metabolisms. In total, 147 patients who were newly diagnosed with pre-diabetes, 177 patients with diabetes, 139 patients who were previously diagnosed with diabetes, and 140 patients with normal blood sugar were selected from the 103rd Regiment of Xinjiang. All patients had Han nationality and were over 30 years old. Their energy and macronutrient intakes were analyzed from data obtained from a 3-day food weighing household investigation. Compared to the normal group, the patients in the previously and newly diagnosed diabetic groups were older, less educated, and had a greater prevalence of hypertension (P<0.05). Compared to the normal group, patients with abnormal glucose metabolism had larger waist circumferences; higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure; higher postprandial glucose; higher total cholesterol; lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; P<0.05); higher intakes of energy, carbohydrates, and fat; and lower intakes of protein and fiber. In addition, the newly and previously diagnosed patients had higher fasting glucose levels (P<0.05). Compared to the normal group, patients with abnormal glucose metabolism in each sex subgroup also had larger waist circumferences, and more men had abdominal obesity (P<0.05). Diabetes or pre-diabetes patients had a higher intake of energy, carbohydrates, and fat, but a lower intake of proteins and fiber. They had severe abdominal obesity, a greater prevalence of hypertension, higher total cholesterol levels, lower HDL-C, and poor blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels, especially postprandial plasma glucose levels. PMID:26550212

  13. Effect of total knee arthroplasty on type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Shrinand V; Arora, Arvind; Mathesul, Ambarish A

    2013-01-01

    Context: Advanced osteoarthritis of knee joint if bilateral, severely restricts patient mobility. This acts as an aggravating factor for pre existing comorbid elements of metabolical syndrome (MS) like Type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension as patients are unable to carry out therapeutic walks. Successfully implanted total knee arthroplasty (TKA) increases physical activity and enables to carry out therapeutic walks thus may help in better control of type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The objective of this prospective study was to find whether TKA for osteoarthritis knee had any effect to improve blood glucose levels and reduce blood pressure. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done in which patients operated for tricompartmental osteoarthritis of knee with associated comorbidities like Type II diabetes mellitus or hypertension during a period of 2008 and 2009 were studied. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled (55 diabetics, 65 hypertensives) who met our inclusion criteria. Preoperative knee society score, lower extremity activity scale fasting blood glucose level and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were compared with one year followup values. The KSS and LEAS scores were analysed by the Wilcoxon signed ranked test, while the fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels and systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels were analysed by paired ‘t’ test. Results: The reduction of systolic blood pressure by 8 mmHg (t = 5.6, P value < 0.05) and diastolic blood pressure by 6 mmHg (t = 7.6, P value < 0.05) was recorded which was statistically significant. However, no statistically significant effect on fasting blood glucose levels was observed (t = -0.77, P value = 0.442). KSS improved in DM from preoperative 29 to 86 and LEAS improved from 6.7 to 11.3. Conclusions: Authors are of the opinion that successful total knee replacement results in increased physical activity and reduces blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) in hypertensives. However, the same is not seen in blood glucose level. Increased physical activity and reduced dependence on NSAIDS postoperatively, may be contributing in reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Further studies in this aspect are necessary. PMID:23532862

  14. [The incidence of intolerance for stainless-steal dentures based on data from a questionnaire and from clinical laboratory research methods].

    PubMed

    Pyrkov, S T; Pogodin, V S; Podkin, Iu S

    1990-01-01

    Questionnaires were distributed among 1042 patients with stainless steel dentures. 178 of these complained of symptoms characteristic of denture intolerance. Clinical examinations, pH-metry of mixed saliva and stationary potential of the dentures, epicutaneous allergologic tests, and removal of dentures in intricate cases to specify the diagnosis have revealed intolerance of electrogalvanic nature in 62 patients. Such intolerance was more frequent (2.9 times) in women than in men. No allergic reactions to denture components were detected. PMID:2087728

  15. Effect of nifedipine, captopril and prazosin on secretory function of pancreatic beta-cells in hypertensive patients with type-2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes and in hypertensive non-diabetics.

    PubMed

    Jasik, M; Kasperska-Dworak, A; Czyzyk, A

    1996-06-01

    The aim of our study was to compare the effect of captopril--the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, nifedipine--the calcium antagonist, and prazosin--the alpha blocker, on the secretory function of pancreatic beta-cells in hypertensive patients with NIDDM and with normal glucose tolerance. The effect of a 2-week treatment with nifedipine, captopril and prazosin upon glycaemia, serum insulin (IRI) and C-peptide (CP) following oral and intravenous glucose load were investigated in three groups, each including 10 non-diabetic patients with essential hypertension (h) and 10 hypertensive type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetics (h + d), aged 32-63 years. Nifedipine produced increase in glycaemia in the oral test in both groups. In the (h) group, but not in the (h + d) group, the drug caused reduction of the glucose-dependent increases in serum IRI and CP, more marked with respect to CP, as expressed by the decrease in the molar serum CP/IRI ratio. These results indicate that in non-diabetic patients, nifedipine reduces the early response of beta-cells to glucose, but this effect is partly compensated by a decreased insulin uptake by the liver. In patients with type 2 diabetes, this phenomenon does not become manifest because of absence or reduction in the early glucose-dependent insulin release. After captopril, lower values of glycaemia and serum IRI and CP were observed in both groups suggesting an improvement of insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, nifedipine has a small influence, and captopril and prazosin are devoided of any influence on the secretory function of pancreatic beta-cells. These drugs may be recommended for the treatment of hypertension in patients with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. PMID:8877277

  16. Hepatoprotective Effect of Silymarin (Silybum marianum) on Hepatotoxicity Induced by Acetaminophen in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cardia, Gabriel Fernando Esteves; da Rocha, Bruno Ambrósio; Aguiar, Rafael Pazzinatto; Spironello, Ricardo Alexandre; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of Silymarin (SLM) on the hypertension state and the liver function changes induced by acetaminophen (APAP) in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Animals normotensive (N) or hypertensive (SHR) were treated or not with APAP (3?g/kg, oral) or previously treated with SLM. Twelve hours after APAP administration, plasmatic levels of liver function markers: alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glucose (GLU), gamma glutamyl transferase (?-GT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) of all groups, were determined. Liver injury was assessed using histological studies. Samples of their livers were then used to determine the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and nitric oxide (NO) production and were also sectioned for histological analysis. No differences were observed for ALT, ?-GT, and GLU levels between SHR and normotensive rats groups. However, AST and ALP levels were increased in hypertensive animals. APAP treatment promoted an increase in ALT and AST in both SHR and N. However, only for SHR, ?-GT levels were increased. The inflammatory response evaluated by MPO activity and NO production showed that SHR was more susceptible to APAP effect, by increasing leucocyte infiltration. Silymarin treatment (Legalon) restored the hepatocyte functional and histopathological alterations induced by APAP in normotensive and hypertensive animals. PMID:25821491

  17. N-Domain Isoform of Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme as a Marker of Hypertension: Populational Study

    PubMed Central

    Maluf-Meiken, Leila C. V.; Fernandes, Fernanda B.; Aragão, Danielle S.; Ronchi, Fernanda A.; Andrade, Maria C. C.; Franco, Maria C.; Febba, Andreia C. S.; Plavnik, Frida L.; Krieger, José E.; Mill, Jose G.; Sesso, Ricardo C. C.; Casarini, Dulce E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the presence of the urinary 90?kDa N-domain ACE in a cohort of the population from Vitoria, Brazil, to verify its association with essential hypertension since this isoform could be a possible genetic marker of hypertension. Anthropometric, clinical, and laboratory parameters of the individuals were evaluated (n = 1150) and the blood pressure (BP) was measured. The study population was divided according to ACE isoforms in urine as follows: ACE 65/90/190, presence of three ACE isoforms (n = 795), ACE 90+ (65/90) (n = 186), and ACE 90? (65/190) (n = 169) based on the presence (+) or absence (?) of the 90?kDa ACE isoform. The anthropometric parameters, lipid profile, serum levels of uric acid, glucose, and the systolic and diastolic BP were significantly greater in the ACE 90+ compared with the ACE 90? and ACE 65/90/190 individuals. We found that 98% of individuals from the ACE 90+ group and 38% from the ACE 65/90/190 group had hypertension, compared to only 1% hypertensive individuals in the ACE 90? group. There is a high presence of the 90?kDa N-domain ACE isoform (85%) in the studied population. The percentile of normotensive subjects with three isoforms was 62%. Our findings could contribute to the development of new efficient strategy to prevent and treat hypertension to avoid the development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22666552

  18. Reductions in glucose among postmenopausal women who use and do not use estrogen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Kong, Shengchun; Laughlin, Gail A.; Golden, Sherita H.; Mather, Kieren J.; Nan, Bin; Randolph, John F.; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Labrie, Fernand; Buschur, Elizabeth; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective Among postmenopausal women who do not use estrogen hormone therapy (HT) we have previously reported that intensive lifestyle intervention (ILS) leads to increases in sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and such increases were associated with reductions in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-hour post-challenge glucose (2HG). Oral HT decreases FPG and increases 2HG, while increasing both SHBG and estradiol (E2). It is unknown if ILS reduces glucose among HT users, if changes in SHBG and E2 might mediate any glucose decreases in HT users, and if these patterns differ from non-HT users. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of postmenopausal women in the Diabetes Prevention Program who used HT at baseline and 1 year follow-up (n=324) and who did not use HT at either time point (n=382). Participants were randomized to ILS, metformin, or placebo administered 850 mg twice a day. Results HT users were younger, more often white, and more likely to have had bilateral oophorectomy than non-HT users. Among HT users, ILS reduced FPG (p<0.01) and 2HG (p<0.01), and metformin reduced FPG (p<0.01) but not 2HG (p=0.56), compared to placebo. Associations between SHBG and total E2 with FPG and 2HG were not significant among women randomized to ILS or to metformin. These patterns differed from those observed among women who did not use HT. Conclusions We conclude that among glucose intolerant HT users, interventions to reduce glucose are effective but possibly mediated through different pathways than among women who did not use HT. PMID:23168523

  19. Lactation Intensity and Postpartum Maternal Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Resistance in Women With Recent GDM

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Erica P.; Hedderson, Monique M.; Chiang, Vicky; Crites, Yvonne; Walton, David; Azevedo, Robert A.; Fox, Gary; Elmasian, Cathie; Young, Stephen; Salvador, Nora; Lum, Michael; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Lo, Joan C.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Ferrara, Assiamira; Selby, Joseph V.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between breastfeeding intensity in relation to maternal blood glucose and insulin and glucose intolerance based on the postpartum 2-h 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results at 6–9 weeks after a pregnancy with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We selected 522 participants enrolled into the Study of Women, Infant Feeding, and Type 2 Diabetes (SWIFT), a prospective observational cohort study of Kaiser Permanente Northern California members diagnosed with GDM using the 3-h 100-g OGTT by the Carpenter and Coustan criteria. Women were classified as normal, prediabetes, or diabetes according to American Diabetes Association criteria based on the postpartum 2-h 75-g OGTT results. RESULTS Compared with exclusive or mostly formula feeding (>17 oz formula per 24 h), exclusive breastfeeding and mostly breastfeeding (?6 oz formula per 24 h) groups, respectively, had lower adjusted mean (95% CI) group differences in fasting plasma glucose (mg/dL) of ?4.3 (?7.4 to ?1.3) and ?5.0 (?8.5 to ?1.4), in fasting insulin (?U/mL) of ?6.3 (?10.1 to ?2.4) and ?7.5 (?11.9 to ?3.0), and in 2-h insulin of ?21.4 (?41.0 to ?1.7) and ?36.5 (?59.3 to ?13.7) (all P < 0.05). Exclusive or mostly breastfeeding groups had lower prevalence of diabetes or prediabetes (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS Higher intensity of lactation was associated with improved fasting glucose and lower insulin levels at 6–9 weeks’ postpartum. Lactation may have favorable effects on glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity that may reduce diabetes risk after GDM pregnancy. PMID:22011407

  20. Participation of ERalpha and ERbeta in glucose homeostasis in skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Barros, Rodrigo P A; Gabbi, Chiara; Morani, Andrea; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2009-07-01

    Glucose uptake and homeostasis are regulated mainly by skeletal muscle (SM), white adipose tissue (WAT), pancreas, and the liver. Participation of estradiol in this regulation is still under intense investigation. We have demonstrated that, in SM of male mice, expression of the insulin-regulated glucose transporter (GLUT)4 is reduced by estrogen receptor (ER)beta agonists. In the present study, to investigate the relative contributions of ERalpha and ERbeta in glucose homeostasis, we examined the effects of tamoxifen (Tam) on GLUT4 expression in SM and WAT in wild-type (WT) and ER-/- mice. ERbeta-/- mice were characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, increased levels of SM GLUT4, pancreatic islet hypertrophy, and a belated rise in plasma insulin in response to a glucose challenge. ERalpha-/- mice, on the contrary, were hyperglycemic and glucose intolerant, and expression of SM GLUT4 was markedly lower than in WT mice. Tam had no effect on glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity in WT mice. In ERalpha-/- mice, Tam increased GLUT4 and improved insulin sensitivity. i.e., it behaved as an ERbeta antagonist in SM but had no effect on WAT. In ERbeta-/- mice, Tam did not affect GLUT4 in SM but acted as an ERalpha antagonist in WAT, decreasing GLUT4. Thus, in the interplay between ERalpha and ERbeta, ERbeta-mediated repression of GLUT4 predominates in SM but ERalpha-mediated induction of GLUT4 predominates in WAT. This tissue-specific difference in dominance of one ER over the other is reflected in the ratio of the expression of the two receptors. ERalpha predominates in WAT and ERbeta in SM. PMID:19366879

  1. Role of the Immune System in Hypertension: Modulation by Dietary Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Vasdev, Sudesh; Stuckless, Jennifer; Richardson, Vernon

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a major health problem worldwide. Individuals with hypertension are at an increased risk for stroke, heart disease, and kidney failure. Although the etiology of essential hypertension has a genetic component, lifestyle factors such as diet play an important role. Insulin resistance is a common feature of hypertension in both humans and animal models affecting glucose and lipid metabolism producing excess aldehydes including methylglyoxal. These aldehydes react with proteins to form conjugates called advanced glycation end products (AGEs). This alters protein structure and function and can affect vascular and immune cells leading to their activation and secretion of inflammatory cytokines. AGEs also act via receptors for advanced glycation end products on these cells altering the function of antioxidant and metabolic enzymes, and ion channels. This results in an increase in cytosolic free calcium, decrease in nitric oxide, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, peripheral vascular resistance, and infiltration of vascular and kidney tissue with inflammatory cells leading to hypertension. Supplementation with dietary antioxidants including vitamins C, E, or B6, thiols such as cysteine and lipoic acid, have been shown to lower blood pressure and plasma inflammatory cytokines in animal models and humans with essential hypertension. A well-balanced diet rich in antioxidants that includes vegetables, fruits, low fat dairy products, low salt, and includes whole grains, poultry, fish and nuts, lowers blood pressure and vascular inflammation. These antioxidants may achieve their antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory/immunomodulatory effects by reducing AGEs and improving insulin resistance and associated alterations. Dietary supplementation with antioxidants may be a beneficial, inexpensive, front-line alterative treatment modality for hypertension. PMID:23204821

  2. Marked exacerbation of orthostatic intolerance after long- vs. short-duration spaceflight in veteran astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, J. V.; Reyes, C. J.; Perez, S. A.; Goldberger, A. L.; Ziegler, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The incidence of postflight orthostatic intolerance after short-duration spaceflight is about 20%. However, the incidence after long-duration spaceflight was unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that orthostatic intolerance is more severe after long-duration than after short-duration flight. METHODS: We performed tilt tests on six astronauts before and after long-duration (129-190 days) spaceflights and compared these data with data obtained during stand tests before and after previous short-duration missions. RESULTS: Five of the six astronauts studied became presyncopal during tilt testing after long-duration flights. Only one had become presyncopal during stand testing after short-duration flights. We also compared the long-duration flight tilt test data to tilt test data from 20 different astronauts who flew on the short-duration Shuttle missions that delivered and recovered the astronauts to and from the Mir Space Station. Five of these 20 astronauts became presyncopal on landing day. Heart rate responses to tilt were no different between astronauts on long-duration flights and astronauts on short-duration flights, but long-duration subjects had lower stroke volumes and cardiac outputs than short-duration presyncopal subjects, suggesting a possible decrease in cardiac contractile function. One subject had subnormal norepinephrine release with upright posture after the long flight but not after the short flight. Plasma volume losses were not greater after long flights. CONCLUSION: Long-duration spaceflight markedly increases orthostatic intolerance, probably with multiple contributing factors.

  3. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... field defects. These defects can occur in the central as well as the peripheral vision. Loss of color vision. What causes idiopathic intracranial hypertension? The cause is usually not known. A common explanation for increased pressure is a problem with the reabsorption of this ...

  4. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension without papilledema.

    PubMed

    Marcelis, J; Silberstein, S D

    1991-04-01

    We describe 10 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension who did not have papilledema. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension without papilledema, although rarely reported, may well be a clinically important headache syndrome. Historical and demographic features of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension without papilledema are similar to those of patients with papilledema. Obese women with chronic daily headache and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure, pulsatile tinnitus, history of head trauma or meningitis, an empty sella on imaging studies, or a headache that is unrelieved by standard therapy should have a diagnostic lumbar puncture. Findings from laboratory and neurologic investigations are normal in most patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension without papilledema. Initial management should include removal of possible inciting agents, weight loss if applicable, and standard headache therapy. Lumbar puncture and diuretic therapy should precede a trial of corticosteroids. Surgery (lumboperitoneal or ventriculoperitoneal shunt or perhaps optic nerve sheath fenestration) may be indicated for prolonged incapacitating headache that is not responsive to medical management or lumbar puncture. PMID:2012512

  5. Hypertension control in brazilian publications

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Natália de Alencar; Pierin, Angela Maria Geraldo

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a major public health problem due to its high prevalence and cardiovascular complications. Its treatment is aimed at reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, its goal being to maintain blood pressure levels below 140/90 mm Hg. Hypertension control in Brazil is low, and nationwide rates are unknown. The objective of this review was to provide an overview on hypertension control in Brazil from publications in a database. We identified 45 publications. In population-based studies, the highest control rate (57.6%) was reported in a multicenter study in 100 municipalities and the city of São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo state (52.4%), while the lowest rates (around 10%) were identified in microregions of the Rio Grande do Sul state and in the city of Tubarão, Santa Catarina state. In conclusion, the studies assessed showed a wide variation in hypertension control rates. It is worth noting that the comparison between studies was a major limiting factor, because of the different methods used. PMID:24061761

  6. Hypertension screening in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    In 1974 eight general practitioners decided to co-operate in a hypertension screening exercise in their practices. The reasons for the survey and the methodology are described and the results of screening over 28,000 patients are given. The cut-off point for normal diastolic blood pressure was 89 mmHg and 23,979 (85 per cent) patients were considered to be normosensitive on this criterion, 694 (2.5 per cent) patients were already known by their doctors to have hypertension; 991 (3.5 per cent) had an initial abnormal reading but subsequent readings were normal. The survey identified 2,018 patients (7.12 per cent) as being hypertensive and 575 (2 per cent) failed to complete the survey. Because of the ever-changing population in the practices, 100 per cent surveillance was not achieved. It is considered necessary to carry out continuous case finding for the presence of hypertensive patients in general practice. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:6887113

  7. Management of Hypertension in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Sofia F; Braz, Caio V; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Drager, Luciano F

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered to be a secondary form of hypertension and in clinical practice OSA is frequently associated with hypertension, even if proof of causality cannot be established. Growing evidence suggests that OSA is associated with worse blood pressure control, alterations in night-time blood pressure dipping, increased target organ damage, and arterial stiffness in patients with hypertension. This review summarizes the current evidence for managing hypertension in patients with OSA. Particular focus will be devoted to discuss the impact of lifestyle changes, preferences for anti-hypertensive treatment in patients with OSA, and the effects of OSA treatment with continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure. PMID:26482751

  8. Misconceptions and facts about treating hypertension.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2015-05-01

    Hypertension is a powerful risk factor strongly linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Because of its high prevalence, health care providers at many levels are involved in treating hypertension. Distinct progress has been made in improving the rates of hypertension awareness and treatment over years, but the overall control of hypertension remains inadequate. Several recent guidelines from different sources have been put forward in an attempt to bridge the gap between existing evidence and clinical practice. Despite this effort, several misconceptions about treating hypertensive cardiovascular disease continue to persist among clinicians. This review highlights some of the misconceptions regarding antihypertensive therapy. PMID:25486449

  9. Genetic mutation underlying orthostatic intolerance and diagnostic and therapeutic methods relating thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, David (Inventor); Blakely, Randy D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Isolated polynucleotide molecules and peptides encoded by these molecules are used in the analysis of human norepinephrine (NE) transporter variants, as well as in diagnostic and therapeutic applications, relating to a human NE transporter polymorphism. By analyzing genomic DNA or amplified genomic DNA, or amplified cDNA derived from mRNA, it is possible to type a human NE transporter with regard to the human NE transporter polymorphism, for example, in the context of diagnosing and treating NE transport impairments, and disorders associated with NE transport impairments, such as orthostatic intolerance.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Glucose-galactose malabsorption

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Glucose-galactose malabsorption On this page: Description Genetic changes ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed July 2007 What is glucose-galactose malabsorption? Glucose-galactose malabsorption is a condition ...

  11. Plasma Glucose Regulation Problems Physiology Biology 390

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    Plasma Glucose Regulation Problems Physiology ­ Biology 390 1. Assume that a person ingests 50g of glucose and that all of it enters the blood and none is metabolized or excreted. Calculate the concentration (in mg glucose/dl plasma

  12. Glucose screening and tolerance tests during pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy (OGTT); Glucose challenge test - pregnancy ... For the glucose screening test: You do not need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a ...

  13. Family history: an opportunity for early interventions and improved control of hypertension, obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    van der Sande, M. A.; Walraven, G. E.; Milligan, P. J.; Banya, W. A.; Ceesay, S. M.; Nyan, O. A.; McAdam, K. P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether a family history of high-risk groups for major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) was a significant risk factor for these conditions among family members in a study population in the Gambia, where strong community and family coherence are important determinants that have to be taken into consideration in promoting lifestyle changes. METHODS: We questioned 5389 adults as to any first-degree family history of major noncommunicable diseases (hypertension, obesity, diabetes and stroke), and measured their blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI). Total blood cholesterol, triglyceride, uric acid, and creatinine concentrations were measured in a stratified subsample, as well as blood glucose (2 hours after ingesting 75 g glucose) in persons aged > or = 35 years. FINDINGS: A significant number of subjects reported a family history of hypertension (8.0%), obesity (5.4%), diabetes (3.3%) and stroke (1.4%), with 14.6% of participants reporting any of these NCDs. Subjects with a family history of hypertension had a higher diastolic BP and BMI, higher cholesterol and uric acid concentrations, and an increased risk of obesity. Those with a family history of obesity had a higher BMI and were at increased risk of obesity. Individuals with a family history of diabetes had a higher BMI and higher concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and uric acid, and their risk of obesity and diabetes was increased. Subjects with a family history of stroke had a higher BMI, as well as higher cholesterol, triglyceride and uric acid concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: A family history of hypertension, obesity, diabetes, or stroke was a significant risk factor for obesity and hyperlipidaemia. With increase of age, more pathological manifestations can develop in this high-risk group. Health professionals should therefore utilize every opportunity to include direct family members in health education. PMID:11357211

  14. Taurine supplementation ameliorates glucose homeostasis, prevents insulin and glucagon hypersecretion, and controls ?, ?, and ?-cell masses in genetic obese mice.

    PubMed

    Santos-Silva, Junia C; Ribeiro, Rosane Aparecida; Vettorazzi, Jean F; Irles, Esperanza; Rickli, Sarah; Borck, Patrícia C; Porciuncula, Patricia M; Quesada, Ivan; Nadal, Angel; Boschero, Antonio C; Carneiro, Everardo M

    2015-08-01

    Taurine (Tau) regulates ?-cell function and glucose homeostasis under normal and diabetic conditions. Here, we assessed the effects of Tau supplementation upon glucose homeostasis and the morphophysiology of endocrine pancreas, in leptin-deficient obese (ob) mice. From weaning until 90-day-old, C57Bl/6 and ob mice received, or not, 5% Tau in drinking water (C, CT, ob and obT). Obese mice were hyperglycemic, glucose intolerant, insulin resistant, and exhibited higher hepatic glucose output. Tau supplementation did not prevent obesity, but ameliorated glucose homeostasis in obT. Islets from ob mice presented a higher glucose-induced intracellular Ca(2+) influx, NAD(P)H production and insulin release. Furthermore, ?-cells from ob islets displayed a higher oscillatory Ca(2+) profile at low glucose concentrations, in association with glucagon hypersecretion. In Tau-supplemented ob mice, insulin and glucagon secretion was attenuated, while Ca(2+) influx tended to be normalized in ?-cells and Ca(2+) oscillations were increased in ?-cells. Tau normalized the inhibitory action of somatostatin (SST) upon insulin release in the obT group. In these islets, expression of the glucagon, GLUT-2 and TRPM5 genes was also restored. Tau also enhanced MafA, Ngn3 and NeuroD mRNA levels in obT islets. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that the hypertrophy of ob islets tends to be normalized by Tau with reductions in islet and ?-cell masses, but enhanced ?-cell mass in obT. Our results indicate that Tau improves glucose homeostasis, regulating ?-, ?-, and ?-cell morphophysiology in ob mice, indicating that Tau may be a potential therapeutic tool for the preservation of endocrine pancreatic function in obesity and diabetes. PMID:25940922

  15. The IRE1?/XBP1s Pathway Is Essential for the Glucose Response and Protection of ? Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hassler, Justin R.; Scheuner, Donalyn L.; Wang, Shiyu; Han, Jaeseok; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Li, Philip; Nguyen, Julie; George, Jenny S.; Davis, Cory; Wu, Shengyang P.; Bai, Yongsheng; Sartor, Maureen; Cavalcoli, James; Malhi, Harmeet; Baudouin, Gregory; Zhang, Yaoyang; Yates III, John R.; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela; Volkmann, Niels; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2015-01-01

    Although glucose uniquely stimulates proinsulin biosynthesis in ? cells, surprisingly little is known of the underlying mechanism(s). Here, we demonstrate that glucose activates the unfolded protein response transducer inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha (IRE1?) to initiate X-box-binding protein 1 (Xbp1) mRNA splicing in adult primary ? cells. Using mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq), we show that unconventional Xbp1 mRNA splicing is required to increase and decrease the expression of several hundred mRNAs encoding functions that expand the protein secretory capacity for increased insulin production and protect from oxidative damage, respectively. At 2 wk after tamoxifen-mediated Ire1? deletion, mice develop hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, due to defective ? cell function that was exacerbated upon feeding and glucose stimulation. Although previous reports suggest IRE1? degrades insulin mRNAs, Ire1? deletion did not alter insulin mRNA expression either in the presence or absence of glucose stimulation. Instead, ? cell failure upon Ire1? deletion was primarily due to reduced proinsulin mRNA translation primarily because of defective glucose-stimulated induction of a dozen genes required for the signal recognition particle (SRP), SRP receptors, the translocon, the signal peptidase complex, and over 100 other genes with many other intracellular functions. In contrast, Ire1? deletion in ? cells increased the expression of over 300 mRNAs encoding functions that cause inflammation and oxidative stress, yet only a few of these accumulated during high glucose. Antioxidant treatment significantly reduced glucose intolerance and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in mice with ? cell-specific Ire1? deletion. The results demonstrate that glucose activates IRE1?-mediated Xbp1 splicing to expand the secretory capacity of the ? cell for increased proinsulin synthesis and to limit oxidative stress that leads to ? cell failure. PMID:26469762

  16. Diabetes-Related Ankyrin Repeat Protein (DARP/Ankrd23) Modifies Glucose Homeostasis by Modulating AMPK Activity in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Yoshiaki; Matsuo, Kiyonari; Kitamura, Youhei; Ono, Kazunori; Ueyama, Tomomi; Matoba, Satoaki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Wu, Tongbin; Chen, Ju; Emoto, Noriaki; Ikeda, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major site for glucose disposal, the impairment of which closely associates with the glucose intolerance in diabetic patients. Diabetes-related ankyrin repeat protein (DARP/Ankrd23) is a member of muscle ankyrin repeat proteins, whose expression is enhanced in the skeletal muscle under diabetic conditions; however, its role in energy metabolism remains poorly understood. Here we report a novel role of DARP in the regulation of glucose homeostasis through modulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. DARP is highly preferentially expressed in skeletal muscle, and its expression was substantially upregulated during myotube differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. Interestingly, DARP-/- mice demonstrated better glucose tolerance despite similar body weight, while their insulin sensitivity did not differ from that in wildtype mice. We found that phosphorylation of AMPK, which mediates insulin-independent glucose uptake, in skeletal muscle was significantly enhanced in DARP-/- mice compared to that in wildtype mice. Gene silencing of DARP in C2C12 myotubes enhanced AMPK phosphorylation, whereas overexpression of DARP in C2C12 myoblasts reduced it. Moreover, DARP-silencing increased glucose uptake and oxidation in myotubes, which was abrogated by the treatment with AICAR, an AMPK activator. Of note, improved glucose tolerance in DARP-/- mice was abolished when mice were treated with AICAR. Mechanistically, gene silencing of DARP enhanced protein expression of LKB1 that is a major upstream kinase for AMPK in myotubes in vitro and the skeletal muscle in vivo. Together with the altered expression under diabetic conditions, our data strongly suggest that DARP plays an important role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions, and thus DARP is a new therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26398569

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Renal Tubular Glucose Absorption after Glucose Load

    PubMed Central

    De Gaetano, Andrea; Panunzi, Simona; Eliopoulos, Dimitris; Hardy, Thomas; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2014-01-01

    A partial differential Progressive Tubular Reabsorption (PTR) model, describing renal tubular glucose reabsorption and urinary glucose excretion following a glucose load perturbation, is proposed and fitted to experimental data from five subjects. For each subject the Glomerular Filtration Rate was estimated and both blood and urine glucose were sampled following an Intra-Venous glucose bolus. The PTR model was compared with a model representing the conventional Renal Threshold Hypothesis (RTH). A delay bladder compartment was introduced in both formulations. For the RTH model, the average threshold for glycosuria varied between 9.90±4.50 mmol/L and 10.63±3.64 mmol/L (mean ± Standard Deviation) under different hypotheses; the corresponding average maximal transport rates varied between 0.48±0.45 mmol/min (86.29±81.22 mg/min) and 0.50±0.42 mmol/min (90.62±76.15 mg/min). For the PTR Model, the average maximal transports rates varied between 0.61±0.52 mmol/min (109.57±93.77 mg/min) and 0.83±0.95 mmol/min (150.13±171.85 mg/min). The time spent by glucose inside the tubules before entering the bladder compartment varied between 1.66±0.73 min and 2.45±1.01 min. The PTR model proved much better than RTH at fitting observations, by correctly reproducing the delay of variations of glycosuria with respect to the driving glycemia, and by predicting non-zero urinary glucose elimination at low glycemias. This model is useful when studying both transients and steady-state glucose elimination as well as in assessing drug-related changes in renal glucose excretion. PMID:24489817

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Olgunturk, Rana; Cevik, Ayhan; Terlemez, Semiha; Kacar, Emre; Oner, Yusuf Ali

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to determine the efficacy and reliability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in establishing the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension in children. This is a retrospective comparison of 25 children with pulmonary hypertension and a control group comprising 19 healthy children. The diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension was made when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was ?25 mmHg by catheter angiography. The children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly lower body mass indices than did the healthy children (P=0.048). In addition, the children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main pulmonary artery diameters and ascending aortic diameters (both P=0.001) but statistically similar ratios of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aortic diameter. If the main pulmonary artery diameter was ?25 mm, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 72% sensitivity and 84% specificity. In the event that the ratio of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aorta diameter was ?1, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 60% sensitivity and 53% specificity. When compared with children who had New York Heart Association functional class II pulmonary hypertension, the children with functional class III pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main (P=0.046), right (P=0.036), and left (P=0.003) pulmonary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is useful in the diagnosis of children with pulmonary hypertension. Pediatric pulmonary hypertension can be diagnosed with high sensitivity and specificity when the main pulmonary artery diameter measures ?25 mm. PMID:26175631

  19. The Effects of Resveratrol in Rats with Simultaneous Type 2 Diabetes and Renal Hypertension: a Study of Antihypertensive Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mozafari, Masoud; Nekooeian, Ali Akbar; Panjeshahin, Mohammad Reza; Zare, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background Resveratrol has beneficial effects on cardiovascular system. This study aimed at examining antidiabetic and antihypertensive effects of resveratrol in rats with simultaneous type 2 diabetes and renal hypertension. Methods Eight groups (8-10 each) of male Spargue-Dawley rats, including a control, a diabetic (induced by streptozotocin and nicotinamide), a renal hypertensive (induced by placing plexiglas clips on the left renal arteries), a sham, a simultaneously hypertensive-diabetic receiving vehicle, and 3 simultaneous hypertensive-diabetic receiving resveratrol at 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg/day were used. Four weeks after the induction of diabetes, renal hypertension was induced and animals were given vehicle or resveratrol for the next four weeks. Afterwards, blood pressure and glucose, serum markers of oxidative stress were measured and animal’s aortic rings were used for isolated studies. Results Serum malondialdehyde, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, fasting blood glucose, maximal response and effective concentration 50 of phenylephrine, and inhibitory concentration 50 of acetylcholine of hypertensive-diabetic group receiving vehicle were significantly higher than those of the control group, and treatment with resveratrol caused significant reduction of these variables. Moreover, serum superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and maximal response to acetylcholine of hypertensive-diabetic group receiving vehicle were significantly lower than those of the control group, and treatment with resveratrol caused significant increase of these variables. Conclusion The findings indicate that resveratrol has antidiabetic and antihypertensive effects, which may be partly due to antioxidant mechanism. They also show that antihypertensive effect of resveratrol may be additionally mediated by improving the release of nitric oxide and sympathoplegic activities. PMID:25821295

  20. The treatment of hypertension in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Marion R; Smith, Grant; Minor, Deborah S

    2008-04-01

    Hypertension causes a significant disease burden in all racial and ethnic groups and is directly attributable to excess weight in most cases. The relationship between increasing body mass index and hypertension prevalence has been recognized for decades. Epidemiologic studies clearly demonstrate the correlation between body weight and blood pressure in obese and lean populations. Most patients with hypertension are overweight or obese, and loss of excess weight lowers blood pressure. Although the epidemiologic relationship is clear, the understanding of mechanisms linking hypertension and weight gain is still evolving. Lifestyle modifications and specific pharmacologic agents address many of the known mechanisms; however, blood pressure remains difficult to control in obese hypertensive patients. This review highlights the association of obesity and hypertension, identifies potential mechanisms for this association, and describes nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies that offer potential benefits for the obese patient with hypertension. PMID:18474182

  1. Inverse Correlation Between Plasma Adropin and ET-1 Levels in Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaosong; Li, Hui; Zhu, Xinyi; Gu, Haibo; Chen, Jianchang; Wang, Luchen; Harding, Pamela; Xu, Weiting

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adropin is a recently identified bioactive protein that promotes energy homeostasis by affecting glucose and lipid metabolism. Recently, adropin has also been reported to be associated with endothelial dysfunction. Also, ET-1, as a biomarker for endothelial dysfunction, is a key regulator in hypertension. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to detect the relationship between plasma adropin and ET-1 levels in hypertension. A total of 123 participants, diagnosed with primary hypertension on the basis of World Health Organization criteria (systolic blood pressure [SBP] ?140?mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ?90?mmHg), and 58 normotensive subjects were enrolled in the cross-sectional study from October 2011 to December 2013. All study participants were older than 18 years of age. Adropin and ET-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that plasma adropin levels were significantly lower in hypertensives compared with controls (3.18?±?1.00 vs 4.21?±?1.14?ng/mL, P?hypertensives than controls (2.60?±?1.14 vs 1.54?±?0.66?pg/mL, P?glucose, TC, TG, LDL, and Cr, there was a negative correlation between ET-1 and adropin (r?=??0.20, P?=?0.04). In multivariate logistic regression analysis of the variables, ET-1 (odds ratio [OR], 3.84; 95% CI, 2.16–6.81; P?hypertension. In conclusion, decreased plasma adropin levels are associated with increased blood pressure in hypertension. Adropin is an independent predictor for hypertension, and may influence blood pressure by protecting endothelial function. PMID:26448026

  2. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in them. Lactose is the sugar found in milk and foods made with milk. After eating foods with lactose in them, you ... get enough of it from your diet, since milk and foods made with milk are the most ...

  3. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dairy in their diet. Foods like cheese or yogurt may be easier to digest than milk, so try a cup of yogurt for dessert or add a piece of cheese ... such as cheddar, which are lower in lactose. Yogurts that contain active cultures are easier to digest ...

  4. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... measures breath hydrogen level. In most cases, a health care provider performs this test at a hospital, on an outpatient basis. Smoking ... acidity test can detect in a stool sample. Health care providers sometimes use this test to check acidity in the stools of infants ...

  5. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Vitamin D. 2010. Report. [ Top ] What products contain lactose? Lactose is present in many food products ... aware of the many food products that may contain even small amounts of lactose, such as bread ...

  6. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... do not make enough lactase. Lactase is an enzyme made in the small intestine. Lactase breaks down lactose into simpler forms of sugar, which are easily absorbed into the blood. Undigested lactose can lead to unpleasant digestive symptoms People vary in their degree of lactose ...

  7. Lactose Intolerance

    MedlinePLUS

    ... weekend, everyone pigged out on cheese pizza and ice cream. Then they flopped on their sleeping bags for ... feel bad after drinking milk or eating cheese, ice cream, or anything else containing lactose. As with everything ...

  8. Impedance Cardiographic (ICG) Assessment of Pregnant Women With Severe Hypertension to Assess Impact of Standard Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-11

    Pregnancy; Proteinuria, With Hypertension (Severe Pre-eclampsia); Delivery; Proteinuria, With Gestational Hypertension (Pre-eclampsia, Severe); Pregnancy; Hypertension, Gestational Hypertension, With Albuminuria (Severe Pre-eclampsia)

  9. Fetal hyperglycemia and a high fat diet contribute to aberrant glucose tolerance and hematopoiesis in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Blue, Emily K.; Ballman, Kimberly; Boyle, Frances; Oh, Eunjin; Kono, Tatsuyoshi; Quinney, Sara K.; Thurmond, Debbie C.; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Haneline, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Children exposed to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during pregnancy are at increased risk of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Our goal was to identify metabolic and hematopoietic alterations after intrauterine exposure to maternal hyperglycemia that may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic morbidities. Methods Streptozotocin treatment induced maternal hyperglycemia during the last third of gestation in rat dams. Offspring of control mothers (OCM) and diabetic mothers (ODM) were evaluated for weight, glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance, and hematopoiesis defects. The effects of aging were examined in normal and high fat diet (HFD)-fed young (8-week-old) and aged (11-month-old) OCM and ODM rats. Results Young adult ODM males on a normal diet, but not females, displayed improved glucose tolerance due to increased insulin levels. Aged ODM males and females gained more weight than OCM on a HFD and had worse glucose tolerance. Aged ODM males fed a HFD were also neutrophilic. Increases in bone marrow cellularity and myeloid progenitors preceded neutrophilia in ODM males fed a HFD. Conclusion When combined with other risk factors like HFD and aging, changes in glucose metabolism and hematopoiesis may contribute to the increased risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension observed in children of GDM mothers. PMID:25412163

  10. Evidence of non-pancreatic beta cell-dependent roles of Tcf7l2 in the regulation of glucose metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kathleen A.; Savic, Daniel; Zielinski, Mark; Park, Soo-Young; Wang, Ling-jia; Witkowski, Piotr; Brady, Matthew; Hara, Manami; Bell, Graeme I.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding variation within TCF7L2 remains the strongest genetic determinant of type 2 diabetes risk in humans. A considerable effort has been placed in understanding the functional roles of TCF7L2 in pancreatic beta cells, despite evidence of TCF7L2 expression in various peripheral tissues important in glucose homeostasis. Here, we use a humanized mouse model overexpressing Tcf7l2, resulting in glucose intolerance, to infer the contribution of Tcf7l2 overexpression in beta cells and in other tissues to the metabolic phenotypes displayed by these mice. Restoring Tcf7l2 expression specifically in beta cells to endogenous levels, in face of its overexpression elsewhere, results in impaired insulin secretion, reduced beta cell number and islet area, corroborating data obtained in humans showing similar phenotypes as a result of manipulations leading to Tcf7l2 loss of function. Interestingly, the persistent overexpression of Tcf7l2 in non-pancreatic tissues results in a significant worsening in glucose tolerance in vivo, indicating that Tcf7l2 overexpression in beta cells does not account for the glucose intolerance in the Tcf7l2 overexpression mouse model. Collectively, these data posit that Tcf7l2 plays key roles in glucose metabolism through actions beyond pancreatic beta cells, and further points to functionally opposing cell-type specific effects for Tcf7l2 on the maintenance of balanced glucose metabolism, thereby urging a careful examination of its role in non-pancreatic tissues as well as its composite metabolic effects across distinct tissues. Uncovering these roles may lead to new therapeutic targets for type 2 diabetes. PMID:25398947

  11. Knockdown of neuropeptide Y in the dorsomedial hypothalamus reverses high-fat diet-induced obesity and impaired glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonwook J; Bi, Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) plays an important role in the regulation of energy balance. While DMH NPY overexpression causes hyperphagia and obesity in rats, knockdown of NPY in the DMH via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated RNAi (AAVshNPY) ameliorates these alterations. Whether this knockdown has a therapeutic effect on obesity and glycemic disorder has yet to be determined. The present study sought to test this potential using a rat model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and insulin resistance, mimicking human obesity with impaired glucose homeostasis. Rats had ad libitum access to rodent regular chow (RC) or HFD. Six weeks later, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed for verifying HFD-induced glucose intolerance. After verification, obese rats received bilateral DMH injections of AAVshNPY or the control vector AAVshCTL, and OGTT and insulin tolerance test (ITT) were performed at 16 and 18 wk after viral injection (23 and 25 wk on HFD), respectively. Rats were killed at 26 wk on HFD. We found that AAVshCTL rats on HFD remained hyperphagic, obese, glucose intolerant, and insulin resistant relative to lean control RC-fed rats receiving DMH injection of AAVshCTL, whereas these alterations were reversed in NPY knockdown rats fed a HFD. NPY knockdown rats exhibited normal food intake, body weight, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity, as seen in lean control rats. Together, these results demonstrate a therapeutic action of DMH NPY knockdown against obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis in rats, providing a potential target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. PMID:26561644

  12. Interaction of genetic predisposition and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of idiopathic orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Jacob, G.; Pohar, B.; Robertson, D.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities in idiopathic orthostatic intolerance (IOI) have been studied extensively. However, the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are not understood. If genetic predisposition were important in the pathogenesis of IOI, monozygotic twins of patients with IOI should have similar hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities. METHODS: We studied two patients with IOI and their identical twins. Both siblings in the first twin pair had orthostatic symptoms, significant orthostatic tachycardia, increased plasma norepinephrine levels with standing, and a greater than normal decrease in systolic blood pressure with trimethaphan infusion. RESULTS: Both siblings had a normal response of plasma renin activity to upright posture. In the second twin pair, only one sibling had symptoms of orthostatic intolerance, an orthostatic tachycardia, and raised plasma catecholamines with standing. The affected sibling had inappropriately low plasma renin activity with standing and was 8-fold more sensitive to the pressor effect of phenylephrine than the unaffected sibling. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that in some patients, IOI seems to be strongly influenced by genetic factors. In others, however, IOI may be mainly caused by nongenetic factors. These findings suggest that IOI is heterogenous, and that both genetic and environmental factors contribute individually or collectively to create the IOI phenotype.

  13. Maternal breast milk transforming growth factor beta and feeding intolerance in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Brandy L.; Jilling, Tamas; Lapin, Brittany; Maheshwari, Akhil; Caplan, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Feeding intolerance occurs commonly in the NICU. Breast milk contains a large pool of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Few studies describe TGF-beta levels in preterm milk, and the relationship to feeding intolerance (FI) remains unexplored. We measured TGF-beta levels in preterm breast milk to investigate a correlation with FI in preterm infants. Methods Prospective observational trial of 100 mother-infant pairs, enrolling infants born below 32 weeks gestation and less than 1500 grams, and mothers who planned to provide breast milk. TGF-beta levels were measured using ELISA. Infant charts were reviewed for outcomes. Results TGF-beta declined postnatally, most elevated in colostrum (p<0.01). TGF-beta 2 levels were higher than TGF-beta 1 at all time points (p<0.01). Colostrum TGF-beta levels correlated inversely with birth weight (p<0.01) and gestational age (p<0.05). One week TGF-beta 2 levels were reduced in growth-restricted infants with FI (p<0.01). Of infants with NEC, TGF-beta 2 levels appeared low, but small sample size precluded meaningful statistical comparisons. Conclusions TGF-beta levels decline temporally in preterm milk. TGF-beta 1 colostrum levels correlate inversely with birth weight and gestational age. TGF-beta 2 may play a role in FI in growth-restricted infants. The relationship of TGF-beta 2 and NEC merits future investigation. PMID:24995914

  14. Dynamic tracheal collapse as a cause of exercise intolerance in a thoroughbred.

    PubMed

    Tetens, J; Hubert, J D; Eddy, A L; Moore, R M

    2000-03-01

    A 2-year-old Thoroughbred filly was admitted to the hospital for evaluation of exercise intolerance. Resting videoendoscopic evaluation (i.e., while the horse was standing) of the nasopharynx and trachea revealed right arytenoid paresis and a tracheal defect that was 100 cm distal to the external nares. Surgery, consisting of a right prosthetic laryngoplasty, was performed. However, postoperative videoendoscopic evaluation revealed minimal abduction of the affected arytenoid cartilage. Dynamic videoendoscopic evaluation (i.e., while the horse was exercising) revealed the right arytenoid to be fixed in a submaximal position with no evidence of collapse into the airway. When the endoscope was positioned in the midcervical tracheal region, marked tracheal collapse was identified during exercise. Tracheal collapse can critically limit athletic function. Treatment of tracheal collapse depends on causative factors, the length of the trachea involved, and accessibility of the affected tracheal segment. The use of dynamic tracheal videoendoscopy should be considered in athletic horses with exercise intolerance in which the cause cannot be determined from resting or dynamic videoendoscopic evaluations of the nasopharynx. PMID:10707689

  15. Marked Exacerbation of Orthostatic Intolerance After Long vs. Short-Duration Spaceflight in Veteran Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Reyes, Carlos; Perez, Sondra A.; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ziegler, Michael G.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The incidence of postflight orthostatic intolerance following short-duration spaceflight is about 20%. However, the incidence following long-duration spaceflight is unknown. We performed tilt tests on six astronauts before and after their long-duration (129 - 190 days) spaceflights and compared these data to those obtained during stand tests before and after their previous short-duration missions and also to tilt test data from 20 different short-duration (8 - 16 days) flight astronauts. Five of these six became presyncopal during tilt testing after long-duration flights: only one had become presyncopal during stand testing after short-duration flights. Five of the twenty astronauts who flew on other short-duration flights, became presyncopal during upright tilt on landing day. Long-duration presyncopal subjects had lower stroke volumes, lower cardiac outputs and higher peripheral vascular resistance than short-duration presyncopal subjects, but their heart rate responses were not different. One subject had subnormal norepinephrine release with upright posture after a long but not short flight. Plasma volume losses were not greater after long flights. Long-duration spaceflight markedly increases orthostatic intolerance, probably related to altered autonomic function.

  16. Baroreflex dysfunction induced by microgravity: potential relevance to postflight orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, A. C.; Diedrich, A.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity imposes adaptive changes in the human body. This review focuses on the changes in baroreflex function produced by actual spaceflight, or by experimental models that simulate microgravity, e.g., bed rest. We will analyze separately studies involving baroreflexes arising from carotid sinus and aortic arch afferents ("high-pressure baroreceptors"), and cardiopulmonary afferents ("low-pressure receptors"). Studies from unrelated laboratories using different techniques have concluded that actual or simulated exposure to microgravity reduces baroreflex function arising from carotid sinus afferents ("carotic-cardiac baroreflex"). The techniques used to study the carotid-cardiac baroreflex, using neck suction and compression to simulate changes in blood pressure, have been extensively validated. In contrast, it is more difficult to selectively study aortic arch or cardiopulmonary baroreceptors. Nonetheless, studies that have examined these baroreceptors suggest that microgravity produces the opposite effect, ie, an increase in the gain of aortic arch and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes. Furthermore, most studies have focus on instantaneous changes in heart rate, which almost exclusively examines the vagal limb of the baroreflex. In comparison, there is limited information about the effect of microgravity on sympathetic function. A substantial proportion of subjects exposed to microgravity develop transient orthostatic intolerance. It has been proposed that alterations in baroreflex function play a role in the orthostatic intolerance induced by microgravity. The evidence in favor and against this hypothesis is reviewed.

  17. Spreading of intolerance under economic stress: results from a reputation-based model.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Vaquero, Luis A; Cuesta, José A

    2014-08-01

    When a population is engaged in successive prisoner's dilemmas, indirect reciprocity through reputation fosters cooperation through the emergence of moral and action rules. A simplified model has recently been proposed where individuals choose between helping others or not and are judged good or bad for it by the rest of the population. The reputation so acquired will condition future actions. In this model, eight strategies (referred to as "leading eight") enforce a high level of cooperation, generate high payoffs, and are therefore resistant to invasions by other strategies. Here we show that, by assigning each individual one of two labels that peers can distinguish (e.g., political ideas, religion, and skin color) and allowing moral and action rules to depend on the label, intolerant behaviors can emerge within minorities under sufficient economic stress. We analyze the sets of conditions where this can happen and also discuss the circumstances under which tolerance can be restored. Our results agree with empirical observations that correlate intolerance and economic stress and predict a correlation between the degree of tolerance of a population and its composition and ethical stance. PMID:25215779

  18. Spreading of intolerance under economic stress: Results from a reputation-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Vaquero, Luis A.; Cuesta, José A.

    2014-08-01

    When a population is engaged in successive prisoner's dilemmas, indirect reciprocity through reputation fosters cooperation through the emergence of moral and action rules. A simplified model has recently been proposed where individuals choose between helping others or not and are judged good or bad for it by the rest of the population. The reputation so acquired will condition future actions. In this model, eight strategies (referred to as "leading eight") enforce a high level of cooperation, generate high payoffs, and are therefore resistant to invasions by other strategies. Here we show that, by assigning each individual one of two labels that peers can distinguish (e.g., political ideas, religion, and skin color) and allowing moral and action rules to depend on the label, intolerant behaviors can emerge within minorities under sufficient economic stress. We analyze the sets of conditions where this can happen and also discuss the circumstances under which tolerance can be restored. Our results agree with empirical observations that correlate intolerance and economic stress and predict a correlation between the degree of tolerance of a population and its composition and ethical stance.

  19. Lower fasting blood glucose in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Martins, Aline Stangherlin; Jansen, Ann Kristine; Rodrigues, Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro; Matos, Camila Maria; Souza, Marcio Leandro Ribeiro; de Souza, Juliana Ferreira; Diniz, Maria de Fátima Haueisen Sander; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Diniz, Leonardo Mauricio; de Rezende, Nilton Alves; Riccardi, Vincent Michael

    2016-01-01

    Studies indicate a lower occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) level is the main criterion used to diagnose DM and glucose intolerance. Therefore, this study compared FBG level between adults with NF1 and non-NF1 controls. We selected clinical records of 57 out of 701 individuals attending the Neurofibromatosis Outpatient Reference Center of the Clinics Hospital of the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil. The selected patients with NF1 were matched to non-NF1 controls selected from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health according to sex, age (range, 35-74 years) and BMI at a ratio of 1:3. In both groups, individuals with DM were excluded. Median FBG level in the NF1 group (86?mg/dl (range, 56-127?mg/dl)) was lower than that in the non-NF1 control group (102?mg/dl (range, 85-146?mg/dl)) (P<0.001). Prevalence of FBG level ?100?mg/dl in the NF1 group (16%) was lower than that in the non-NF1 control group (63%) (P<0.05). The chance of a high FBG level was 89% lower in the NF1 group (odds ratio, 0.112; 95% CI, 0.067-0.188) (P<0.05). In conclusion, adults with NF1 showed a lower FBG level and a lower prevalence of high FBG level compared with non-NF1 controls. PMID:26631381

  20. Nrf2 deficiency improves glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu-Kun Jennifer; Wu, Kai Connie; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-11-01

    Nrf2, a master regulator of intracellular redox homeostasis, is indicated to participate in fatty acid metabolism in liver. However, its role in diet-induced obesity remains controversial. In the current study, genetically engineered Nrf2-null, wild-type (WT), and Nrf2-activated, Keap1-knockdown (K1-KD) mice were fed either a control or a high-fat Western diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. The results indicate that the absence or enhancement of Nrf2 activity did not prevent diet-induced obesity, had limited effects on lipid metabolism, but affected blood glucose homeostasis. Whereas the Nrf2-null mice were resistant to HFD-induced glucose intolerance, the Nrf2-activated K1-KD mice exhibited prolonged elevation of circulating glucose during a glucose tolerance test even on the control diet. Feeding a HFD did not activate the Nrf2 signaling pathway in mouse livers. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (Fgf21) is a liver-derived anti-diabetic hormone that exerts glucose- and lipid-lowering effects. Fgf21 mRNA and protein were both elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice, and Fgf21 protein was lower in K1-KD mice than WT mice. The inverse correlation between Nrf2 activity and hepatic expression of Fgf21 might explain the improved glucose tolerance in Nrf2-null mice. Furthermore, a more oxidative cellular environment in Nrf2-null mice could affect insulin signaling in liver. For example, mRNA of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1, a gene repressed by insulin in hepatocytes, was markedly elevated in livers of Nrf2-null mice. In conclusion, genetic alteration of Nrf2 does not prevent diet-induced obesity in mice, but deficiency of Nrf2 improves glucose homeostasis, possibly through its effects on Fgf21 and/or insulin signaling. -- Highlights: ? Nrf2 deficiency improves glucose tolerance in mice fed a high-fat diet. ? The anti-diabetic hormone, Fgf21, is highly expressed in livers of Nrf2-null mice. ? The absence of Nrf2 increases the insulin-regulated Igfbp-1 mRNA in liver. ? Nrf2 deficiency improves glucose tolerance by influencing Fgf21 and insulin signaling.

  1. Canadian efforts to prevent and control hypertension.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Norman R C; Chen, Guanmin

    2010-01-01

    Suboptimum blood pressure is estimated to be the leading risk factor for death worldwide and is associated with 13.5% of deaths globally. The clinical diagnosis of hypertension affects one in four adults globally and is expected to increase by 60% between 2000 and 2025. Clearly, global efforts to prevent and control hypertension are important health issues. While Canada had a prevalence of hypertension similar to that of the United States in the early 1990 s, the treatment and control rate was only 13% compared with 25% in the United States. A national strategic plan was developed, and a coalition of organizations and health care professional and scientist volunteers actively implemented parts of the strategy. Specific initiatives that have evolved include the development of hypertension knowledge translation programs for health professionals, the public and people with hypertension, an outcomes research program to assess the impact of hypertension and guide national-, regional- and community-based knowledge translation interventions, and a program to reduce the prevalence of hypertension by decreasing sodium additives in food. These initiatives have relied on the active involvement of health care professional volunteers, health care professional and scientific organizations and various government departments. There have been large increases in the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, with corresponding reductions in cardiovascular disease and total mortality associated with the start of the hypertension initiatives. As a result, Canada is becoming recognized as a world leader in the prevention, treatment and control of hypertension. PMID:20847986

  2. Emergency Management of Hypertension in Children

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dinesh; Akingbola, Olugbenga; Yosypiv, Ihor; El-Dahr, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension in children has traditionally been thought to be secondary in origin. Increased incidence of risk factors like obesity, sedentary life-styles, and faulty dietary habits has led to increased prevalence of the primary arterial hypertension (PAH), particularly in adolescent age children. PAH has become a global epidemic worldwide imposing huge economic constraint on health care. Sudden acute increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure can lead to hypertensive crisis. While it generally pertains to secondary hypertension, occurrence of hypertensive crisis in PAH is however rare in children. Hypertensive crisis has been further subclassified depending on presence or absence of end-organ damage into hypertensive emergency or urgency. Both hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are known to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Increasing awareness among the physicians, targeted at investigation of the pathophysiology of hypertension and its complications, better screening methods, generation, and implementation of novel treatment modalities will impact overall outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, and management of hypertensive crisis in children. An extensive database search using keywords was done to obtain the information. PMID:22577545

  3. Status of lifestyle modifications in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, M K; Lal, A; Sharma, K K

    2001-09-01

    Hypertension is essentially the elevation of arterial blood pressure beyond an arbitrary cut off point, though the dividing line between normal and elevated BP is lacking. Hypertension can be classified into primary, essential or idiopathic hypertension on one hand, and secondary one due to some disease itself. In treating hypertension, antihypertensives have their role, but attention may be directed towards some lifestyle modifications. As regarding dietary interventions, calorie restriction may influence the minimisation of BP. Body weight reduction, less alcohol consumption, salt restriction, potassium and calcium supplementation can enhance the process of lowering BP. The role of magnesium in hypertension is debatable. Serum cholesterol level is commonly elevated in hypertensive patients and its reduction reduces the risk of non-fatal coronary events. Diet rich in plant fibres either alone or with a low fat, low sodium could lower the BP by about 5 mm Hg in hypertensives. The omega-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids found in highest concentrations in cold water fishes have a modest antihypertensive effect. Caffeine contained in two cups of coffee may raise the BP by 5 mm Hg in infrequent users but in habitual users, caffeine has no role. Deficiency of vitamin C might lead to hypertension. As regarding behavioural changes, stopping smoking, regular physical exercise, relaxation therapies like yoga, etc, have definite beneficial effect on hypertensives. The antihypertensive effect of lifestyle modifications may obviate drug therapy. For this one or more of the lifestyle modifications should be tried initially in all hypertensive patients. PMID:12018559

  4. Burden of Diabetes Related Complications Among Hypertensive and Non Hypertensive Diabetics: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kesavamoorthy, Goutham; Singh, Awnish K; Sharma, Shruti; Kasav, Jyoti Bala; Joshi, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes and hypertension are the conditions with overlapping risk factors and complications. Objective of present study was to compare the burden of complications of diabetes among hypertensive and non hypertensive diabetes individuals. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at Saveetha medical college and hospital, Chennai, India. A total of 100 diabetics having hypertension and 50 non-hypertensive diabetic patients were enrolled on the basis of purposive sampling. Information about sociodemograpic characteristics, general health, health distress, diabetes symptoms, communication with physician, healthcare utilization and lifetime occurrence of diabetes related complications. Mean, standard deviation and median of continuous variables and proportion of categorical variables were recorded. Results Average age of the hypertensive diabetes patients (M=57; SD=11) was higher than non hypertensive diabetes patients (M=52; SD=11) which was statistically significant (p=.009). Diabetic neuropathy was reported by 45% of the hypertensive and 38% of the non-hypertensive diabetics. Mean self reported general health score was higher among hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3.4; SD=1) in comparison to non hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3; SD=1) and it was found statistically significant (p=.03) indicating towards poor self health perception among hypertensive’s. Results of the study have shown that the proportion of participants who have prepared any list of questions before visiting doctor’s clinic (fairly often to always) was significantly higher among hypertensive diabetics (30%) in comparison to non-hypertensive diabetics (14%). Conclusion The proportion of participants reporting diabetes neuropathy and retinopathy was higher among hypertensive diabetics in comparison to non hypertensive diabetics. PMID:26500926

  5. Inflammation and therapy for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Laffer, Cheryl L; Elijovich, Fernando

    2010-08-01

    It is currently accepted that hypertension, atherosclerosis, and diabetes are disorders with subtle or overt activation of inflammatory mediators. Therefore, it has become increasingly important to ascertain whether current antihypertensive drug families have proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory actions that modify the outcomes of their hemodynamic effects on blood pressure. We review the current state of knowledge about the effects of the major classes of available antihypertensive agents on inflammation and speculate on the possible contribution of these effects to observations in clinical trials. We suggest that a strategy of drug development specifically addressing inflammation in hypertension may provide increased benefit in terms of target organ damage, and we describe some examples of these promising developments. PMID:20524088

  6. Hypertension induced by liquorice tea.

    PubMed

    Allcock, Emily; Cowdery, James

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented to her general practitioner with a 4-month history of hot flushes, sweating and headaches. On examination, she was found to be hypertensive, and blood tests revealed mild hypokalaemia. While awaiting the results of further investigation into the cause of her elevated blood pressure, the patient conducted her own research and identified liquorice tea as the potential cause of her symptoms. The patient had been drinking up to six cups of liquorice tea per day as a substitute for caffeinated tea and fruit-based infusions. The patient immediately stopped consuming the drink and within 2 weeks her symptoms, hypertension and hypokalaemia had entirely resolved. PMID:26077805

  7. Hypertension reduction through forgiveness training.

    PubMed

    Tibbits, Dick; Ellis, Greg; Piramelli, Chris; Luskin, Fred; Lukman, Roy

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if patients with diagnosed stage-1 hypertension could benefit by a forgiveness training program to achieve measurable reductions in anger expression and blood pressure. Twenty-five participants were randomly divided into wait-listed control and intervention groups. The control group monitored blood pressure while the intervention group participated in an 8-week forgiveness training program. At the end of eight weeks, the wait listed group became an intervention group. Those who received forgiveness training achieved significant reductions in anger expression when compared to the control group. While reductions in blood pressure were not achieved by all the participants, those participants who entered the program with elevated anger expression scores did achieve significant reductions in blood pressure. It is suggested that forgiveness training may be an effective clinical intervention for some hypertensive patients with elevated levels of anger. PMID:16733947

  8. [Management of juvenile ocular hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xing-huai

    2012-06-01

    Ocular hypertensions (OHTs) in juvenile are characterized by occurrence in teenage with intraocular pressure (IOP) frequently fluctuated and increased over 30 mm Hg (1 mm Hg = 0.133 kPa) without any ocular symptoms and disturbance of visual acuity. IOPs are normalized in the majorities of juvenile over adolescence stage with long-term follow up. The medical terminology of 'adolescence IOP fluctuation' or 'adolescence ocular hypertension' is therefore used. The diagnosis and management of juvenile OHT remain difficult clinical challenges. OHTs in juvenile sometimes are incorrectly diagnosed due to inappropriate IOP measurement and thicker central cornea as younger children are non-compliant and resisting the examination. In this paper, we reviewed OHT in juvenile in the light of significant studies in the past and based on our experience of clinical practice in order to provide a better understanding and management of OHTs in juvenile. PMID:22943799

  9. Monitoring blood glucose - Series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... finger with the lancet to draw out a drop of blood. ... Touch the test strip to the drop of blood. The blood is automatically pulled into the test strip. The meter then calculates your blood glucose ...

  10. The relationships between blood pressure, blood glucose, and bone mineral density in postmenopausal Turkish women

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Cakmak, Burcu Dincgez; Yumru, Ayse Ender; Aslan, Serkan; Enhos, Asim; Kalkan, Ali Kemal; Coskun, Ebru Inci; Acikgoz, Abdullah Serdar; Karatas, Suat

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and osteoporosis are important comorbidities commonly seen in postmenopausal women. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships between blood pressure, blood glucose, and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal Turkish women. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 270 consecutive patients who were admitted to an outpatient clinic with vasomotor symptoms and/or at least 1 year of amenorrhea were included. The patients were categorized into three groups according to their blood pressure and metabolic status as follows: normotensive, hypertensive nondiabetics, and hypertensive diabetics. The T- and z-scores of the proximal femur and lumbar vertebrae were measured with the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry method to assess the BMD of the study groups. Results Lumbar vertebral T-scores (P<0.001), lumbar vertebral z-scores (P<0.003), and proximal femoral T-scores (P<0.001) were demonstrated to be significantly lower in the hypertensive diabetic group compared to the hypertensive nondiabetic and normotensive groups. Systolic blood pressure was significantly inversely correlated with lumbar vertebral T-scores (r=?0.382; P=0.001), lumbar vertebral z-scores (r=?0.290; P=0.001), and proximal femoral T-scores (r=?0.340; P=0.001). Moreover, diastolic blood pressure was significantly inversely correlated with lumbar vertebral T-scores (r=?0.318; P=0.001), lumbar vertebral z-scores (r=?0.340; P=0.001), and proximal femoral T-scores (r=?0.304; P=0.001). Hypertension (odds ratio [OR]: 2.541, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46–3.48, P=0.003), diabetes mellitus (OR: 2.136, 95% CI: 1.254–3.678, P=0.006), and age (OR: 1.069, 95% CI: 1.007–1.163, P=0.022) were found to be significant independent predictors of osteopenia in a multivariate analysis, after adjusting for other risk parameters. Conclusion The present study is the first to evaluate the relationships between blood pressure, blood glucose, and BMD in postmenopausal Turkish women. Moreover, both hypertension and diabetes were demonstrated as significant independent predictors of osteopenia in postmenopausal Turkish women. Clinicians should be aware of the high risk of developing osteopenia in diabetic hypertensive postmenopausal women. PMID:26586948

  11. Exercise training is an effective alternative to estrogen supplementation for improving glucose homeostasis in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Tara L; Ritchie, Kerry L; Davies, Sarah; Hamilton, Melissa J; Cervone, Daniel T; Dyck, David J

    2015-01-01

    The irreversible loss of estrogen (specifically 17-?-estradiol; E2) compromises whole-body glucose tolerance in women. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is frequently prescribed to treat estrogen deficiency, but has several deleterious side effects. Exercise has been proposed as an HRT substitute, however, their relative abilities to treat glucose intolerance are unknown. Thirty ovariectomized (OVX) and 20 SHAM (control) rats underwent glucose tolerance tests (GTT) 10 weeks post surgery. Area under the curve (AUC) for OVX rats was 60% greater than SHAM controls (P = 0.0005). Rats were then randomly assigned to the following treatment groups: SHAM sedentary (sed) or exercise (ex; 60 min, 5×/weeks), OVX sed, ex, or E2 (28 ?g/kg bw/day) for 4 weeks. OVX ex rats experienced a ?45% improvement in AUC relative to OVX sed rats, whereas OVX E2 underwent a partial reduction (17%; P = 0.08). Maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in soleus and EDL was not impaired in OVX rats, or augmented with exercise or E2. Akt phosphorylation did not differ in soleus, EDL, or liver of any group. However, OVX ex and OVX E2 experienced greater increases in p-Akt Ser473 in VAT and SQ tissues compared with SHAM and OVX sed groups. Mitochondrial markers CS, COXIV, and core1 were increased in soleus posttraining in OVX ex rats. The content of COXIV was reduced by 52% and 61% in SQ of OVX sed and E2 rats, compared to SHAM controls, but fully restored in OVX ex rats. In summary, exercise restores glucose tolerance in OVX rats more effectively than E2. This is not reflected by alterations in muscle maximal insulin response, but increased insulin signaling in adipose depots may underlie whole-body improvements. PMID:26603453

  12. Echocardiography in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jone, Pei-Ni; Ivy, D. Dunbar

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) can be a rapidly progressive and fatal disease. Although right heart catheterization remains the gold standard in evaluation of PH, echocardiography remains an important tool in screening, diagnosing, evaluating, and following these patients. In this article, we will review the important echocardiographic parameters of the right heart in evaluating its anatomy, hemodynamic assessment, systolic, and diastolic function in children with PH. PMID:25429362

  13. [Neurogenic arterial hypertension in humans].

    PubMed

    Chamontin, B; Senard, J M; Amar, J; Doazan, J P; Guittard, J; Montastruc, J L; Salvador, M

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate baroreflex activity in hypertensive patients with orthostatic hypotension (OH) due to sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation. The study concerned 3 patients (pts), 58-63 years, mean age 60.6 +/- 2 with both arterial hypertension (paroxysms recorded at 250/130 mmHg) and OH. They received radiation therapy to the entire cervical area for neoplasm, 9.6 +/- 2.8 years ago and had a carotid murmur without significant stenosis. Every pt had a severe and symptomatic OH: blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were respectively 163 +/- 17/105 +/- 7, 82 +/- 5 b/mn in lying position and 82 +/- 16/53 +/- 9 mmHg, 99 +/- 1 b/mm in standing position. The standing-induced increase in HR was lower (delta HR = + 17.3 b/mn) than expected; atropine (0.02 mg/kg) infusion and cold pressor test were ineffective; the massage of sinocarotid receptors induced a slight decrease in HR (delta HR = - 8 b/mn) and BP was not modified by Valsalva's maneuver. Infusion of norepinephrine (0.016 mg/mn) performed in one pt, increased BP without effect on HR. Platelet alpha 2-adrenoreceptors (alpha 2AR) evaluated by (3H) Yohimbine binding showed a significant increase in alpha 2AR number (Bmax), without any significant change in affinity (KD) when compared with normotensive and essential hypertensive pts: (table; see text) This study described an unusual etiology of a paroxysmal hypertension with orthostatic hypotension, demonstrated the impairment of baroreflex activity and suggested the potential interest of platelet alpha 2 adrenoceptors measurement to evaluate sympathetic tone in these patients. PMID:2510640

  14. A dual role of lipasin (betatrophin) in lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis: consensus and controversy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ren; Abou-Samra, Abdul B

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome includes glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia, both of which are strong risk factors for developing diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Recently, multiple groups independently studied a previously uncharacterized gene, officially named C19orf80 (human) and Gm6484 (mouse), but more commonly known as RIFL, Angptl8, betatrophin and lipasin. Both exciting and conflicting results have been obtained, and significant controversy is ongoing. Accumulating evidence from genome wide association studies and mouse genetic studies convincingly shows that lipasin is involved in lipid regulation. However, the mechanism of action, the identity of transcription factors mediating its nutritional regulation, circulating levels, and relationship among lipasin, Angptl3 and Angptl4, remain elusive. Betatrophin represents a promising drug target for replenishing ?-cell mass, but current results have not been conclusive regarding its potency and specificity. Here, we summarize the consensus and controversy regarding functions of lipasin/betatrophin based on currently available evidence. PMID:25212743

  15. CHROMIUM AND INSULIN RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin resistance leads to the inability of insulin to control the utilization and storage of glucose. It is associated initially with elevated levels of circulating insulin followed by glucose intolerance which may progress to type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity and cardiovascu...

  16. Capsaicin and arterial hypertensive crisis.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; La Rosa, Felice Carmelo; La Rocca, Roberto

    2010-10-01

    Chili peppers are rich in capsaicin. The potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is stored in a population of C-fiber afferents that are sensitive to capsaicin. CGRP and peptides released from cardiac C fibers have a beneficial effect in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It has been reported that capsaicin pretreatment can deplete cardiac C-fiber peptide stores. Furthermore, it has also been reported that capsaicin-treated pigs have significantly increased mean arterial blood pressure compared with controls, and that the decrease in CGRP synthesis and release contributes to the elevated blood pressure. A case has also been reported of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a patient with a large ingestion of peppers and chili peppers the day before. We present a case of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a 19-year-old Italian man with an abundant ingestion of peppers and of chili peppers the preceding day. This case describes an unusual pattern of arterial hypertensive crisis due to capsaicin. PMID:19168246

  17. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed by G6PC (GSDIa) or SLC37A4 (GSDIb) gene analysis, and the indications of liver biopsy to measure G6P activity are getting rarer and rarer. Differential diagnoses include the other GSDs, in particular type III (see this term). However, in GSDIII, glycemia and lactacidemia are high after a meal and low after a fast period (often with a later occurrence than that of type I). Primary liver tumors and Pepper syndrome (hepatic metastases of neuroblastoma) may be evoked but are easily ruled out through clinical and ultrasound data. Antenatal diagnosis is possible through molecular analysis of amniocytes or chorionic villous cells. Pre-implantatory genetic diagnosis may also be discussed. Genetic counseling should be offered to patients and their families. The dietary treatment aims at avoiding hypoglycemia (frequent meals, nocturnal enteral feeding through a nasogastric tube, and later oral addition of uncooked starch) and acidosis (restricted fructose and galactose intake). Liver transplantation, performed on the basis of poor metabolic control and/or hepatocarcinoma, corrects hypoglycemia, but renal involvement may continue to progress and neutropenia is not always corrected in type Ib. Kidney transplantation can be performed in case of severe renal insufficiency. Combined liver-kidney grafts have been performed in a few cases. Prognosis is usually good: late hepatic and renal complications may occur, however, with adapted management, patients have almost normal life span. Disease name and synonyms Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency or G6P deficiency or glycogen storage disease type I or GSDI or type I glycogenosis or Von Gierke disease or Hepatorenal glycogenosis. PMID:21599942

  18. 21 CFR 168.120 - Glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glucose sirup. 168.120 Section 168.120 Food and... § 168.120 Glucose sirup. (a) Glucose sirup is the purified, concentrated, aqueous solution of nutritive... equivalent), expressed as D-glucose, is not less than 20.0 percent m/m calculated on a dry basis. (2)...

  19. Is Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) Dangerous?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diabetes Sign Up forJoslin Newsletters Is Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) Dangerous? Low blood glucose or hypoglycemia is one of the most common ... In general, hypoglycemia is defined as a blood glucose level below 70 mg/dl. Low blood glucose ...

  20. 21 CFR 168.120 - Glucose sirup.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glucose sirup. 168.120 Section 168.120 Food and... § 168.120 Glucose sirup. (a) Glucose sirup is the purified, concentrated, aqueous solution of nutritive... equivalent), expressed as D-glucose, is not less than 20.0 percent m/m calculated on a dry basis. (2)...