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Sample records for glucose metabolic phenotypes

  1. Glucose metabolic phenotype of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anthony KC; Bruce, Jason IE; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To construct a global “metabolic phenotype” of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) reflecting tumour-related metabolic enzyme expression. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed using OvidSP and PubMed databases using keywords “pancreatic cancer” and individual glycolytic and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (MOP) enzymes. Both human and animal studies investigating the oncological effect of enzyme expression changes and inhibitors in both an in vitro and in vivo setting were included in the review. Data reporting changes in enzyme expression and the effects on PDAC cells, such as survival and metastatic potential, were extracted to construct a metabolic phenotype. RESULTS: Seven hundred and ten papers were initially retrieved, and were screened to meet the review inclusion criteria. 107 unique articles were identified as reporting data involving glycolytic enzymes, and 28 articles involving MOP enzymes in PDAC. Data extraction followed a pre-defined protocol. There is consistent over-expression of glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase in keeping with the Warburg effect to facilitate rapid adenosine-triphosphate production from glycolysis. Certain isoforms of these enzymes were over-expressed specifically in PDAC. Altering expression levels of HK, PGI, FBA, enolase, PK-M2 and LDA-A with metabolic inhibitors have shown a favourable effect on PDAC, thus identifying these as potential therapeutic targets. However, the Warburg effect on MOP enzymes is less clear, with different expression levels at different points in the Krebs cycle resulting in a fundamental change of metabolite levels, suggesting that other essential anabolic pathways are being stimulated. CONCLUSION: Further characterisation of the PDAC metabolic phenotype is necessary as currently there are few clinical studies and no successful clinical trials targeting metabolic enzymes. PMID:27022229

  2. Dynamic changes in glucose metabolism accompanying the expression of the neural phenotype after differentiation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Waki, A; Yano, R; Yoshimoto, M; Sadato, N; Yonekura, Y; Fujibayashi, Y

    2001-03-01

    To assess what properties of glucose metabolism are most closely related to expression of the neural phenotype, some parameters of glucose metabolism in PC12 cells before (tumor-type) and after differentiation (neuron-type) were investigated. Neuron-type cells exhibited a 2.7-fold higher level of [3H]DG retention than tumor-type cells, accompanied by a higher glucose transport rate and higher levels of hexokinase activity. [14C]CO2 production from [U-14C]glucose in neuron-type was also more than four-times greater than that in tumor-type cells. The levels of [14C]carbon in macromolecules from [14C]glucose in neuron-type cells were also much higher (10.6-fold) than those in tumor-type cells, and the levels of incorporation of [14C]carbon were almost as high as those of [14C]CO2. From the metabolite analysis, amino acids appeared to be the major compounds converted from glucose. On the other hand, the uptakes of [35S]methionine-[35S]cysteine and [3H]uridine in neuron-type cells were lower than those in tumor-type cells. Following depolarization with 50 mM potassium, [14C]CO2 production increased, but the retention of [14C]carbon was not changed in neuron-type cells. The largest change accompanied by acquisition of the neural phenotype was carbon incorporation into the macromolecules derived from glucose. This property may be important for the expression of the neural phenotype as well as the higher levels of both glucose uptake and oxygen consumption. PMID:11245818

  3. Delivery-Corrected Imaging of Fluorescently-Labeled Glucose Reveals Distinct Metabolic Phenotypes in Murine Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frees, Amy E.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; McCachren, Samuel S.; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2014-01-01

    When monitoring response to cancer therapy, it is important to differentiate changes in glucose tracer uptake caused by altered delivery versus a true metabolic shift. Here, we propose an optical imaging method to quantify glucose uptake and correct for in vivo delivery effects. Glucose uptake was measured using a fluorescent D-glucose derivative 2-(N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)Amino)-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG) in mice implanted with dorsal skin flap window chambers. Additionally, vascular oxygenation (SO2) was calculated using only endogenous hemoglobin contrast. Results showed that the delivery factor proposed for correction, “RD”, reported on red blood cell velocity and injected 2-NBDG dose. Delivery-corrected 2-NBDG uptake (2-NBDG60/RD) inversely correlated with blood glucose in normal tissue, indicating sensitivity to glucose demand. We further applied our method in metastatic 4T1 and nonmetastatic 4T07 murine mammary adenocarcinomas. The ratio 2-NBDG60/RD was increased in 4T1 tumors relative to 4T07 tumors yet average SO2 was comparable, suggesting a shift toward a “Warburgian” (aerobic glycolysis) metabolism in the metastatic 4T1 line. In heterogeneous regions of both 4T1 and 4T07, 2-NBDG60/RD increased slightly but significantly as vascular oxygenation decreased, indicative of the Pasteur effect in both tumors. These data demonstrate the utility of delivery-corrected 2-NBDG and vascular oxygenation imaging for differentiating metabolic phenotypes in vivo. PMID:25526261

  4. Relationship of metabolic and endocrine parameters to brain glucose metabolism in older adults: do cognitively-normal older adults have a particular metabolic phenotype?

    PubMed

    Nugent, S; Castellano, C A; Bocti, C; Dionne, I; Fulop, T; Cunnane, S C

    2016-02-01

    Our primary objective in this study was to quantify whole brain and regional cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRg) in young and older adults in order to determine age-normalized reference CMRg values for healthy older adults with normal cognition for age. Our secondary objectives were to--(i) report a broader range of metabolic and endocrine parameters including body fat composition that could form the basis for the concept of a 'metabolic phenotype' in cognitively normal, older adults, and (ii) to assess whether medications commonly used to control blood lipids, blood pressure or thyroxine affect CMRg values in older adults. Cognition assessed by a battery of tests was normal for age and education in both groups. Compared to the young group (25 years old; n = 34), the older group (72 years old; n = 41) had ~14% lower CMRg (μmol/100 g/min) specifically in the frontal cortex, and 18% lower CMRg in the caudate. Lower grey matter volume and cortical thickness was widespread in the older group. These differences in CMRg, grey matter volume and cortical thickness were present in the absence of any known evidence for prodromal Alzheimer's disease (AD). Percent total body fat was positively correlated with CMRg in many brain regions but only in the older group. Before and after controlling for body fat, HOMA2-IR was significantly positively correlated to CMRg in several brain regions in the older group. These data show that compared to a healthy younger adult, the metabolic phenotype of a cognitively-normal 72 year old person includes similar plasma glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and TSH, higher hemoglobin A1c and percent body fat, lower CMRg in the superior frontal cortex and caudate, but the same CMRg in the hippocampus and white matter. Age-normalization of cognitive test results is standard practice and we would suggest that regional CMRg in cognitively healthy older adults should also be age-normalized. PMID:26364049

  5. Exploring the quantitative relationship between metabolism and enzymatic phenotype by physiological modeling of glucose metabolism and lactate oxidation in solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Vaupel, Peter; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Shi, Kuangyu

    2015-03-01

    Molecular imaging using PET or hyperpolarized MRI can characterize tumor phenotypes by assessing the related metabolism of certain substrates. However, the interpretation of the substrate turnover in terms of a pathophysiological understanding is not straightforward and only semiquantitative. The metabolism of imaging probes is influenced by a number of factors, such as the microvascular structure or the expression of key enzymes. This study aims to use computational simulation to investigate the relationship between the metabolism behind molecular imaging and the underlying tumor phenotype. The study focused on the pathways of glucose metabolism and lactate oxidation in order to establish the quantitative relationship between the expression of several transporters (GLUT, MCT1 and MCT4), expression of the enzyme hexokinase (HK), microvasculature and the metabolism of glucose or lactate and the extracellular pH distribution. A computational model for a 2D tumor tissue phantom was constructed and the spatio-temporal evolution of related species (e.g. oxygen, glucose, lactate, protons, bicarbonate ions) was estimated by solving reaction-diffusion equations. The proposed model was tested by the verification of the simulation results using in vivo and in vitro literature data. The influences of different expression levels of GLUT, MCT1, MCT4, HK and microvessel distribution on substrate concentrations were analyzed. The major results are consistent with experimental data (e.g. GLUT is more influential to glycolytic flux than HK; extracellular pH is not correlated with MCT expressions) and provide theoretical interpretation of the co-influence of multiple factors of the tumor microenvironment. This computational simulation may assist the generation of hypotheses to bridge the discrepancy between tumor metabolism and the functions of transporters and enzymes. It has the potential to accelerate the development of multi-modal imaging strategies for assessment of tumor

  6. Metabolic Phenotypes in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min; Zhou, Quanbo; Zhou, Yu; Fu, Zhiqiang; Tan, Langping; Ye, Xiao; Zeng, Bing; Gao, Wenchao; Zhou, Jiajia; Liu, Yimin; Li, Zhihua; Lin, Ye; Lin, Qing; Chen, Rufu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of present study was to profile the glucose-dependent and glutamine- dependent metabolism in pancreatic cancer. Methods We performed Immunohistochemical staining of GLUT1, CAIX, BNIP3, p62, LC3, GLUD1, and GOT1. Based on the expression of metabolism-related proteins, the metabolic phenotypes of tumors were classified into two categories, including glucose- and glutamine-dependent metabolism. There were Warburg type, reverse Warburg type, mixed type, and null type in glucose-dependent metabolism, and canonical type, non-canonical type, mixed type, null type in glutamine-dependent metabolism. Results Longer overall survival was associated with high expression of BNIP3 in tumor (p = 0.010). Shorter overall survival was associated with high expression of GLUT1 in tumor (P = 0.002) and GOT1 in tumor (p = 0.030). Warburg type of glucose-dependent metabolism had a highest percentage of tumors with nerve infiltration (P = 0.0003), UICC stage (P = 0.0004), and activated autophagic status in tumor (P = 0.0167). Mixed type of glucose-dependent metabolism comprised the highest percentage of tumors with positive marginal status (P<0.0001), lymphatic invasion (P<0.0001), and activated autophagic status in stroma (P = 0.0002). Mixed type and Warburg type had a significant association with shorter overall survival (P = 0.018). Non-canonical type and mixed type of glutamine-dependent metabolism comprised the highest percentage of tumors with vascular invasion (p = 0.0073), highest percentage of activated autophagy in tumors (P = 0.0034). Moreover, these two types of glutamine-dependent metabolism were significantly associated with shorter overall survival (P<0.001). Further analysis suggested that most of tumors were dependent on both glucose- and glutamine-dependent metabolism. After dividing the tumors according to the number of metabolism, we found that the increasing numbers of metabolism subtypes inversely associated with survival outcome. Conclusion

  7. Metabolic phenotype of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Berardi, Rossana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    Metabolism of bladder cancer represents a key issue for cancer research. Several metabolic altered pathways are involved in bladder tumorigenesis, representing therefore interesting targets for therapy. Tumor cells, including urothelial cancer cells, rely on a peculiar shift to aerobic glycolysis-dependent metabolism (the Warburg-effect) as the main energy source to sustain their uncontrolled growth and proliferation. Therefore, the high glycolytic flux depends on the overexpression of glycolysis-related genes (SRC-3, glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT1], GLUT3, lactic dehydrogenase A [LDHA], LDHB, hexokinase 1 [HK1], HK2, pyruvate kinase type M [PKM], and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha [HIF-1α]), resulting in an overproduction of pyruvate, alanine and lactate. Concurrently, bladder cancer metabolism displays an increased expression of genes favoring the pentose phosphate pathway (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G6PD]) and the fatty-acid synthesis (fatty acid synthase [FASN]), along with a decrease of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Krebs cycle activities. Moreover, the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, hyper-activated in bladder cancer, acts as central regulator of aerobic glycolysis, hence contributing to cancer metabolic switch and tumor cell proliferation. Besides glycolysis, glycogen metabolism pathway plays a robust role in bladder cancer development. In particular, the overexpression of GLUT-1, the loss of the tumor suppressor glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL), and the increased activity of the tumor promoter enzyme glycogen phosphorylase impair glycogen metabolism. An increase in glucose uptake, decrease in normal cellular glycogen storage, and overproduction of lactate are consequences of decreased oxidative phosphorylation and inability to reuse glucose into the pentose phosphate and de novo fatty acid synthesis pathways. Moreover, AGL loss determines augmented levels of the serine-to-glycine enzyme

  8. Glucose Metabolism in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Stephen A.; Stein, Stefanie; Hines, James

    1974-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose was examined in several clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Radiorespirometric studies revealed that growing cells metabolized glucose by a combination on the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways. A portion of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate formed via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway was recycled by conversion to glucose-6-phosphate. Subsequent catabolism of this glucose-6-phosphate by either the Entner-Doudoroff or pentose phosphate pathways yielded CO2 from the original C6 of glucose. Enzyme analyses confirmed the presence of all enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff, pentose phosphate, and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathways. There was always a high specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) relative to that of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.44). The glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase utilized either nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as electron acceptor. Acetate was the only detectable nongaseous end product of glucose metabolism. Following the disappearance of glucose, acetate was metabolized by the tricarboxylic acid cycle as evidenced by the preferential oxidation of [1-14C]acetate over that of [2-14C]acetate. When an aerobically grown log-phase culture was subjected to anaerobic conditions, lactate and acetate were formed from glucose. Radiorespirometric studies showed that under these conditions, glucose was dissimilated entirely by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Further studies determined that this anaerobic dissimilation of glucose was not growth dependent. PMID:4156358

  9. Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rizos, Christos V; Elisaf, Moses S

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension plays a major role in the development and progression of micro- and macrovascular disease. Moreover, increased blood pressure often coexists with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance. As a result the need for a comprehensive management of hypertensive patients is critical. However, the various antihypertensive drug categories have different effects on glucose metabolism. Indeed, angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have an overall neutral effect on glucose metabolism. However, some members of the CCBs class such as azelnidipine and manidipine have been shown to have advantageous effects on glucose homeostasis. On the other hand, diuretics and β-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism. Of note, carvedilol as well as nebivolol seem to differentiate themselves from the rest of the β-blockers class, being more attractive options regarding their effect on glucose homeostasis. The adverse effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs on glucose metabolism may, to an extent, compromise their cardiovascular protective role. As a result the effects on glucose homeostasis of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment, especially in patients which are at high risk for developing diabetes. PMID:25068013

  10. Glucose metabolism and cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Tian, Rong

    2011-01-01

    The most notable change in the metabolic profile of hypertrophied hearts is an increased reliance on glucose with an overall reduced oxidative metabolism, i.e. a reappearance of the foetal metabolic pattern. In animal models, this change is attributed to the down-regulation of the transcriptional cascades promoting gene expression for fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in adult hearts. Impaired myocardial energetics in cardiac hypertrophy also triggers AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased glucose uptake and glycolysis. Aside from increased reliance on glucose as an energy source, changes in other glucose metabolism pathways, e.g. the pentose phosphate pathway, the glucosamine biosynthesis pathway, and anaplerosis, are also noted in the hypertrophied hearts. Studies using transgenic mouse models and pharmacological compounds to mimic or counter the switch of substrate preference in cardiac hypertrophy have demonstrated that increased glucose metabolism in adult heart is not harmful and can be beneficial when it provides sufficient fuel for oxidative metabolism. However, improvement in the oxidative capacity and efficiency rather than the selection of the substrate is likely the ultimate goal for metabolic therapies. PMID:21502371

  11. [Glucose metabolic changes in stress].

    PubMed

    Foia, L; Costuleanu, N; Trandafirescu, M; Saila, V; Pavel, M

    1999-01-01

    Provision of a better understanding of the pathogenic pathways underlying injured sugar metabolism during stress should ideally translate into a more rational approach to the provision of nutritional support. Patients with burns, trauma, severe injuries or infections commonly develop a hypermetabolic state that is associated with several changes in carbohydrate metabolism. The hypermetabolic state is induced either by the area of injury and by organs involved in the immunologic response to stress; further it determines a glycemic milieu which will be directed toward satisfaction of the requirements for glucose as an energy support. PMID:10756928

  12. Non-invasive In-cell Determination of Free Cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] Ratios Using Hyperpolarized Glucose Show Large Variations in Metabolic Phenotypes*

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Caspar Elo; Karlsson, Magnus; Winther, Jakob R.; Jensen, Pernille Rose; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that the pyridine nucleotide NAD has far wider biological functions than its classical role in energy metabolism. NAD is used by hundreds of enzymes that catalyze substrate oxidation and, as such, it plays a key role in various biological processes such as aging, cell death, and oxidative stress. It has been suggested that changes in the ratio of free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] reflects metabolic alterations leading to, or correlating with, pathological states. We have designed an isotopically labeled metabolic bioprobe of free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] by combining a magnetic enhancement technique (hyperpolarization) with cellular glycolytic activity. The bioprobe reports free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] ratios based on dynamically measured in-cell [pyruvate]/[lactate] ratios. We demonstrate its utility in breast and prostate cancer cells. The free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio determined in prostate cancer cells was 4 times higher than in breast cancer cells. This higher ratio reflects a distinct metabolic phenotype of prostate cancer cells consistent with previously reported alterations in the energy metabolism of these cells. As a reporter on free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] ratio, the bioprobe will enable better understanding of the origin of diverse pathological states of the cell as well as monitor cellular consequences of diseases and/or treatments. PMID:24302737

  13. Modeling Glucose Metabolism in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Fry, Brendan C; Layton, Anita T

    2016-06-01

    The mammalian kidney consumes a large amount of energy to support the reabsorptive work it needs to excrete metabolic wastes and to maintain homeostasis. Part of that energy is supplied via the metabolism of glucose. To gain insights into the transport and metabolic processes in the kidney, we have developed a detailed model of the renal medulla of the rat kidney. The model represents water and solute flows, transmural fluxes, and biochemical reactions in the luminal fluid of the nephrons and vessels. In particular, the model simulates the metabolism of oxygen and glucose. Using that model, we have identified parameters concerning glucose transport and basal metabolism that yield predicted blood glucose concentrations that are consistent with experimental measurements. The model predicts substantial axial gradients in blood glucose levels along various medullary structures. Furthermore, the model predicts that in the inner medulla, owing to the relatively limited blood flow and low tissue oxygen tension, anaerobic metabolism of glucose dominates. PMID:27371260

  14. Sex steroids and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Allan, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone levels are lower in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and also predict the onset of these adverse metabolic states. Body composition (body mass index, waist circumference) is an important mediator of this relationship. Sex hormone binding globulin is also inversely associated with insulin resistance and T2DM but the data regarding estrogen are inconsistent. Clinical models of androgen deficiency including Klinefelter's syndrome and androgen deprivation therapy in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer confirm the association between androgens and glucose status. Experimental manipulation of the insulin/glucose milieu and suppression of endogenous testicular function suggests the relationship between androgens and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional. Androgen therapy in men without diabetes is not able to differentiate the effect on insulin resistance from that on fat mass, in particular visceral adiposity. Similarly, several small clinical studies have examined the efficacy of exogenous testosterone in men with T2DM, however, the role of androgens, independent of body composition, in modifying insulin resistance is uncertain. PMID:24457840

  15. [Glucose Metabolism: Stress Hyperglycemia and Glucose Control].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-05-01

    It is important for the anesthesiologists to understand pathophysiology of perioperative stress hyperglycemia, because it offers strategies for treatment of stress hyperglycemia. The effect of glucose tolerance is different in the choice of the anesthetic agent used in daily clinical setting. Specifically, the volatile anesthetics inhibit insulin secretion after glucose load and affects glucose tolerance. During minor surgery by the remifentanil anesthesia, the stress reaction is hard to be induced, suggesting that we should consider low-dose glucose load. Finally it is necessary to perform the glycemic control of the patients who fell into stress hyperglycemia depending on the individual patient. However, there are a lot of questions to be answered in the future. The prognosis of the perioperative patients is more likely to be greatly improved if we can control stress hyperglycemia. PMID:27319094

  16. Circadian control of glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne; Fliers, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has risen to epidemic proportions. The pathophysiology of T2DM is complex and involves insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and visceral adiposity. It has been known for decades that a disruption of biological rhythms (which happens the most profoundly with shift work) increases the risk of developing obesity and T2DM. Recent evidence from basal studies has further sparked interest in the involvement of daily rhythms (and their disruption) in the development of obesity and T2DM. Most living organisms have molecular clocks in almost every tissue, which govern rhythmicity in many domains of physiology, such as rest/activity rhythms, feeding/fasting rhythms, and hormonal secretion. Here we present the latest research describing the specific role played by the molecular clock mechanism in the control of glucose metabolism and speculate on how disruption of these tissue clocks may lead to the disturbances in glucose homeostasis. PMID:24944897

  17. Phenotypic bistability in Escherichia coli's central carbon metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kotte, Oliver; Volkmer, Benjamin; Radzikowski, Jakub L; Heinemann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations in intracellular molecule abundance can lead to distinct, coexisting phenotypes in isogenic populations. Although metabolism continuously adapts to unpredictable environmental changes, and although bistability was found in certain substrate-uptake pathways, central carbon metabolism is thought to operate deterministically. Here, we combine experiment and theory to demonstrate that a clonal Escherichia coli population splits into two stochastically generated phenotypic subpopulations after glucose-gluconeogenic substrate shifts. Most cells refrain from growth, entering a dormant persister state that manifests as a lag phase in the population growth curve. The subpopulation-generating mechanism resides at the metabolic core, overarches the metabolic and transcriptional networks, and only allows the growth of cells initially achieving sufficiently high gluconeogenic flux. Thus, central metabolism does not ensure the gluconeogenic growth of individual cells, but uses a population-level adaptation resulting in responsive diversification upon nutrient changes. PMID:24987115

  18. Glucose Transporters in Cardiac Metabolism and Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Dan; Tian, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The heart is adapted to utilize all classes of substrates to meet the high-energy demand, and it tightly regulates its substrate utilization in response to environmental changes. Although fatty acids are known as the predominant fuel for the adult heart at resting stage, the heart switches its substrate preference toward glucose during stress conditions such as ischemia and pathological hypertrophy. Notably, increasing evidence suggests that the loss of metabolic flexibility associated with increased reliance on glucose utilization contribute to the development of cardiac dysfunction. The changes in glucose metabolism in hypertrophied hearts include altered glucose transport and increased glycolysis. Despite the role of glucose as an energy source, changes in other nonenergy producing pathways related to glucose metabolism, such as hexosamine biosynthetic pathway and pentose phosphate pathway, are also observed in the diseased hearts. This article summarizes the current knowledge regarding the regulation of glucose transporter expression and translocation in the heart during physiological and pathological conditions. It also discusses the signaling mechanisms governing glucose uptake in cardiomyocytes, as well as the changes of cardiac glucose metabolism under disease conditions. PMID:26756635

  19. Glucose metabolism in diabetic blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.J.; Crass, M.F. III

    1986-03-05

    Since glycolysis appears to be coupled to active ion transport in vascular smooth muscle, alterations in glucose metabolism may contribute to cellular dysfunction and angiopathy in diabetes. Uptake and utilization of glucose were studied in perfused blood vessels in which pulsatile flow and perfusion pressure were similar to those measured directly in vivo. Thoracic aortae isolated from 8-wk alloxan diabetic (D) and nondiabetic control rabbits were cannulated, tethered, and perfused with oxygenated buffer containing 7 or 25 mM glucose and tracer amounts of glucose-U/sup -14/ C. Norepinephrine (NE) (10/sup -6/ M) and/or insulin (I) (150 ..mu..U/ml) and albumin (0.2%) were added. NE-induced tension development increased glucose uptake 39% and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and lactate production 2.3-fold. With 7 mM glucose, marked decreases in glucose uptake (74%), /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ (68%), lactate (30%), total tissue glycogen (75%), and tissue phospholipids (70%) were observed in D. Addition of I or elevation of exogenous glucose to 25 mM normalized glucose uptake, but had differential effects on the pattern of substrate utilization. Thus, in D, there was a marked depression of vascular glucose metabolism that was partially reversed by addition of low concentrations of insulin or D levels of glucose.

  20. Estimation of liver glucose metabolism after refeeding

    SciTech Connect

    Rognstad, R.

    1987-05-01

    Refeeding or infusing glucose to rats fasted for 24 hr or more causes rapid liver glycogen synthesis, the carbon source now considered to be largely from gluconeogenesis. While substrate cycling between plasma glucose and liver glucose-6P is known to occur, this cycling has apparently been ignored when calculations are made of % contribution of direct and indirect pathways to liver glycogen synthesis, or when hepatic glucose output is calculated from glucose turnover minus the glucose infusion rate. They show that, isotopically, an estimate of the fluxes of liver glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphatase is required to quantitate sources of carbon for liver glycogen synthesis, and to measure hepatic glucose output (or uptake). They propose a method to estimate these fluxes, involving a short infusion of a /sup 14/C labelled gluconeogenic precursor plus (6T)glucose, with determination of isotopic yields in liver glycogen and total glucose. Given also the rate of liver glycogen synthesis, this procedure permits the estimation of net gluconeogenesis and hepatic glucose output or uptake. Also, in vitro evidence against the notion of a drastic zonation of liver carbohydrate metabolism is presented, e.g. raising the glucose concentration from 10 to 25 mM increases the /sup 14/C yield from H/sup 14/CO/sub 3//sup -/ in lactate, with the increased pyruvate kinase flux and decreased gluconeogenesis occurring in the same cell type, not opposing pathways in different hepatocyte types (as has been postulated by some to occur in vivo after refeeding.

  1. Sleep Control, GPCRs, and Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Modern lifestyles prolong daily activities into the nighttime, disrupting circadian rhythms, which may cause sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbances have been implicated in the dysregulation of blood glucose levels and reported to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and diabetic complications. Sleep disorders are treated using anti-insomnia drugs that target ionotropic and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists, melatonin agonists, and orexin receptor antagonists. A deeper understanding of the effects of these medications on glucose metabolism and their underlying mechanisms of action is crucial for the treatment of diabetic patients with sleep disorders. In this review we focus on the beneficial impact of sleep on glucose metabolism and suggest a possible strategy for therapeutic intervention against sleep-related metabolic disorders. PMID:27461005

  2. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress. PMID:16475003

  3. MicroRNA 33 Regulates Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Cristina M.; Goedeke, Leigh; Rotllan, Noemi; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Mattison, Julie A.; Suárez, Yajaira; de Cabo, Rafael; Gorospe, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases are characterized by the failure of regulatory genes or proteins to effectively orchestrate specific pathways involved in the control of many biological processes. In addition to the classical regulators, recent discoveries have shown the remarkable role of small noncoding RNAs (microRNAs [miRNAs]) in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this regard, we have recently demonstrated that miR-33a and miR33b, intronic miRNAs located within the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) genes, regulate lipid metabolism in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that miR-33b also cooperates with SREBP1 in regulating glucose metabolism by targeting phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC), key regulatory enzymes of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of miR-33b in human hepatic cells inhibits PCK1 and G6PC expression, leading to a significant reduction of glucose production. Importantly, hepatic SREBP1c/miR-33b levels correlate inversely with the expression of PCK1 and G6PC upon glucose infusion in rhesus monkeys. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-33b works in concert with its host gene to ensure a fine-tuned regulation of lipid and glucose homeostasis, highlighting the clinical potential of miR-33a/b as novel therapeutic targets for a range of metabolic diseases. PMID:23716591

  4. Role of glucose signaling in yeast metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dam, K. van

    1996-10-05

    The conversion of glucose to ethanol and carbon dioxide by yeast was the first biochemical pathway to be studied in detail. The initial observation that this process is catalyzed by an extract of yeast led to the discovery of enzymes and coenzymes and laid the foundation for modern biochemistry. In this article, knowledge concerning the relation between uptake of and signaling by glucose in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed and compared to the analogous process in prokaryotes. It is concluded that (much) more fundamental knowledge concerning these processes is required before rational redesign of metabolic fluxes from glucose in yeast can be achieved.

  5. Glucose and fructose metabolism in Zymomonas anaerobia

    PubMed Central

    McGill, D. J.; Dawes, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Isotopic and enzymic evidence indicates that Zymomonas anaerobia ferments glucose via the Entner–Doudoroff pathway. The molar growth yields with glucose (5.89) and fructose (5.0) are lower than those for the related organism Zymomonas mobilis and the observed linear growth suggests that energetically uncoupled growth occurs. A survey of enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism revealed the presence of weak phosphofructokinase and fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase activities but phosphoketolase, transketolase and transaldolase were not detected. Fermentation balances for glucose and fructose are reported; acetaldehyde accumulated in both fermentations, to a greater extent with fructose which also yielded glycerol and dihydroxyacetone as minor products. PMID:4259336

  6. Metabolic and Cardiovascular Implications of a Metabolically Healthy Obesity Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Mi Hae

    2014-01-01

    Metabolically healthy obesity (MHO) is a new concept in which an individual may exhibit an obese phenotype in the absence of any metabolic abnormalities. There are a number of definitions of MHO that utilize a variety of components. The findings of clinical and basic studies indicate that subjects with MHO do not exhibit an increased mortality, an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, or an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, as compared to normal-weight controls. Although these findings imply that metabolic health is a more important factor than obesity, several studies have shown that subjects with MHO have a similar risk of metabolic or cardiovascular diseases as those with metabolically unhealthy obesity. Thus, there is still debate regarding not only the implications of the MHO phenotype but its very existence. Accordingly, future studies should focus on developing a unified definition of MHO and distinguishing subjects who will be at a high risk for metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25559571

  7. NIH Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Centers: the power of centralized phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Maren R; Lloyd, K C Kent; Cline, Gary W; Wasserman, David H

    2012-10-01

    The Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Centers (MMPCs) were founded in 2001 by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to advance biomedical research by providing the scientific community with standardized, high-quality phenotyping services for mouse models of diabetes, obesity, and their complications. The intent is to allow researchers to take optimum advantage of the many new mouse models produced in labs and in high-throughput public efforts. The six MMPCs are located at universities around the country and perform complex metabolic tests in intact mice and hormone and analyte assays in tissues on a fee-for-service basis. Testing is subsidized by the NIH in order to reduce the barriers for mouse researchers. Although data derived from these tests belong to the researcher submitting mice or tissues, these data are archived after publication in a public database run by the MMPC Coordinating and Bioinformatics Unit. It is hoped that data from experiments performed in many mouse models of metabolic diseases, using standard protocols, will be useful in understanding the nature of these complex disorders. The current areas of expertise include energy balance and body composition, insulin action and secretion, whole-body and tissue carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cardiovascular and renal function, and metabolic pathway kinetics. In addition to providing services, the MMPC staff provides expertise and advice to researchers, and works to develop and refine test protocols to best meet the community's needs in light of current scientific developments. Test technology is disseminated by publications and through annual courses. PMID:22940748

  8. Glucose metabolism in patients with Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bowes, S B; Benn, J J; Scobie, I N; Umpleby, A M; Lowy, C; Sönksen, P H

    1991-04-01

    Glucose intolerance, sometimes severe enough to cause frank diabetes mellitus, is a frequent feature of Cushing's syndrome. The primary cause of the hyperglycaemia, whether due to glucose over-production or under-utilization, remains unresolved. We therefore measured glucose turnover using an intravenous bolus of 3-3H glucose in 14 normoglycaemic patients with Cushing's syndrome and 14 control subjects. Seven of the patients with Cushing's syndrome were also restudied post-operatively. Plasma glucose concentrations were similar in all three groups whereas glucose metabolic clearance rate (MCR) (1.80 +/- 0.06 ml/min/kg) and glucose turnover rate (9.09 +/- 0.36 mumol/min/kg) were significantly reduced in patients with Cushing's syndrome compared to normal subjects (2.21 +/- 0.1; P less than 0.001; 10.90 +/- 0.50; P less than 0.01) and rose post-operatively to normal values (2.35 +/- 0.14 ml/min/kg; 11.07 +/- 0.48 mumol/min/kg). We conclude from these results that the hyperglycaemia sometimes found in Cushing's syndrome may be primarily due to decreased utilization rather than increased glucose production. PMID:1879061

  9. Hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jones, John G

    2016-06-01

    The liver has a central role in the regulation of systemic glucose and lipid fluxes during feeding and fasting and also relies on these substrates for its own energy needs. These parallel requirements are met by coordinated control of carbohydrate and lipid fluxes into and out of the Krebs cycle, which is highly tuned to nutrient availability and heavily regulated by insulin and glucagon. During progression of type 2 diabetes, hepatic carbohydrate and lipid biosynthesis fluxes become elevated, thus contributing to hyperglycaemia and hypertriacylglycerolaemia. Over this interval there are also significant fluctuations in hepatic energy state. To date, it is not known to what extent abnormal glucose and lipid fluxes are causally linked to altered energy states. Recent evidence that the glucose-lowering effects of metformin appear to be mediated by attenuation of hepatic energy generation places an additional spotlight on the interdependence of hepatic biosynthetic and oxidative fluxes. The transition from fasting to feeding results in a significant re-direction of hepatic glucose and lipid fluxes and may also incur a temporary hepatic energy deficit. At present, it is not known to what extent these variables are additionally modified by type 2 diabetes and/or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Thus, there is a compelling need to measure fluxes through oxidative, gluconeogenic and lipogenic pathways and determine their relationship with hepatic energy state in both fasting and fed conditions. New magnetic resonance-based technologies allow these variables to be non-invasively studied in animal models and humans. This review summarises a presentation given at the symposium entitled 'The liver in focus' at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Kenneth Cusi, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3952-1 , and by Hannele Yki-Järvinen, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3944-1 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Michael

  10. The Role of Glucose Metabolism and Glucose-Associated Signalling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Rainer; Coy, Johannes F.

    2007-01-01

    Aggressive carcinomas ferment glucose to lactate even in the presence of oxygen. This particular metabolism, termed aerobic glycolysis, the glycolytic phenotype, or the Warburg effect, was discovered by Nobel laureate Otto Warburg in the 1920s. Since these times, controversial discussions about the relevance of the fermentation of glucose by tumours took place; however, a majority of cancer researchers considered the Warburg effect as a non-causative epiphenomenon. Recent research demonstrated, that several common oncogenic events favour the expression of the glycolytic phenotype. Moreover, a suppression of the phenotypic features by either substrate limitation, pharmacological intervention, or genetic manipulation was found to mediate potent tumour-suppressive effects. The discovery of the transketolase-like 1 (TKTL1) enzyme in aggressive cancers may deliver a missing link in the interpretation of the Warburg effect. TKTL1-activity could be the basis for a rapid fermentation of glucose in aggressive carcinoma cells via the pentose phosphate pathway, which leads to matrix acidification, invasive growth, and ultimately metastasis. TKTL1 expression in certain non-cancerous tissues correlates with aerobic formation of lactate and rapid fermentation of glucose, which may be required for the prevention of advanced glycation end products and the suppression of reactive oxygen species. There is evidence, that the activity of this enzyme and the Warburg effect can be both protective or destructive for the organism. These results place glucose metabolism to the centre of pathogenesis of several civilisation related diseases and raise concerns about the high glycaemic index of various food components commonly consumed in western diets. PMID:19812737

  11. The cardiovascular phenotype: impact on choice of glucose- lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep; Kishor, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    One of the major endpoints to be considered while choosing glucose-lowering therapy is their impact on cardiovascular outcomes. As a corollary, the cardiovascular health assessment of a person with diabetes informs the choice of glucose-lowering treatment. The clinical aspects included in this bidirectional relationship are described in this review as the cardiovascular phenotype. Vital signs, cardiac autonomic function, myocardial health and coronary status influence, and are influenced by, choice of glucose-lowering therapy. Such therapy also has an impact on cerebrovascular and peripheral arterial health. These aspects should be considered while planning treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27122283

  12. Sample size calculation in metabolic phenotyping studies.

    PubMed

    Billoir, Elise; Navratil, Vincent; Blaise, Benjamin J

    2015-09-01

    The number of samples needed to identify significant effects is a key question in biomedical studies, with consequences on experimental designs, costs and potential discoveries. In metabolic phenotyping studies, sample size determination remains a complex step. This is due particularly to the multiple hypothesis-testing framework and the top-down hypothesis-free approach, with no a priori known metabolic target. Until now, there was no standard procedure available to address this purpose. In this review, we discuss sample size estimation procedures for metabolic phenotyping studies. We release an automated implementation of the Data-driven Sample size Determination (DSD) algorithm for MATLAB and GNU Octave. Original research concerning DSD was published elsewhere. DSD allows the determination of an optimized sample size in metabolic phenotyping studies. The procedure uses analytical data only from a small pilot cohort to generate an expanded data set. The statistical recoupling of variables procedure is used to identify metabolic variables, and their intensity distributions are estimated by Kernel smoothing or log-normal density fitting. Statistically significant metabolic variations are evaluated using the Benjamini-Yekutieli correction and processed for data sets of various sizes. Optimal sample size determination is achieved in a context of biomarker discovery (at least one statistically significant variation) or metabolic exploration (a maximum of statistically significant variations). DSD toolbox is encoded in MATLAB R2008A (Mathworks, Natick, MA) for Kernel and log-normal estimates, and in GNU Octave for log-normal estimates (Kernel density estimates are not robust enough in GNU octave). It is available at http://www.prabi.fr/redmine/projects/dsd/repository, with a tutorial at http://www.prabi.fr/redmine/projects/dsd/wiki. PMID:25600654

  13. Regulation of Blood Glucose by Hypothalamic Pyruvate Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Tony K. T.; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Pocai, Alessandro; Rossetti, Luciano

    2005-08-01

    The brain keenly depends on glucose for energy, and mammalians have redundant systems to control glucose production. An increase in circulating glucose inhibits glucose production in the liver, but this negative feedback is impaired in type 2 diabetes. Here we report that a primary increase in hypothalamic glucose levels lowers blood glucose through inhibition of glucose production in rats. The effect of glucose requires its conversion to lactate followed by stimulation of pyruvate metabolism, which leads to activation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels. Thus, interventions designed to enhance the hypothalamic sensing of glucose may improve glucose homeostasis in diabetes.

  14. Phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Currently, pursuing yeast strains that display both a high potential fitness for alcoholic fermentation and a favorable impact on quality is a major goal in the alcoholic beverage industry. This considerable industrial interest has led to many studies characterizing the phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial yeast populations. In this study, 20 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different geographical origins exhibited high phenotypic diversity when their response to nine biotechnologically relevant conditions was examined. Next, the fermentation fitness and metabolic traits of eight selected strains with a unique phenotypic profile were evaluated in a high-sugar synthetic medium under two nitrogen regimes. Although the strains exhibited significant differences in nitrogen requirements and utilization rates, a direct relationship between nitrogen consumption, specific growth rate, cell biomass, cell viability, acetic acid and glycerol formation was only observed under high-nitrogen conditions. In contrast, the strains produced more succinic acid under the low-nitrogen regime, and a direct relationship with the final cell biomass was established. Glucose and fructose utilization patterns depended on both yeast strain and nitrogen availability. For low-nitrogen fermentation, three strains did not fully degrade the fructose. This study validates phenotypic and metabolic diversity among commercial wine yeasts and contributes new findings on the relationship between nitrogen availability, yeast cell growth and sugar utilization. We suggest that measuring nitrogen during the stationary growth phase is important because yeast cells fermentative activity is not exclusively related to population size, as previously assumed, but it is also related to the quantity of nitrogen consumed during this growth phase. PMID:24949272

  15. Quantification of serial tumor glucose metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsiao-Ming; Hoh, C.K.; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Yao, Wei-Jen

    1996-03-01

    We developed a method to improve the quantitative precision of FDG-PET scans in cancer patients. The total-lesion evaluation method generates a correlation coefficient (r) constrained Patlak parametric image of the lesion together with three calculated glucose metabolic indices: (a) the total-lesion metabolic index ({open_quotes}K{sub T-tie}{close_quotes}, ml/min/lesion); (b) the total-lesion voxel index ({open_quotes}V{sub T-tie}{close_quotes}, voxels/lesion); and (c) the global average metabolic index ({open_quotes}K{sub V-tie}{close_quotes}, ml/min/voxel). The glucose metabolic indices obtained from conventional region of interest (ROI) and multiplane evaluation were used as standards to evaluate the accuracy of the total-lesion evaluation method. Computer simulations and four patients with metastatic melanoma before and after chemotherapy were studied. Computer simulations showed that the total-lesion evaluation method has improved precision (%s.d. <0.6%) and accuracy ({approximately}10% error) compared with the conventional ROI method (%S.d. {approximately}5%; {approximately}25% error). The K{sub T-tie} and V{sub T-tie} indices from human FDG-PET studies using the total-lesion evaluation method showed excellent correlations with the corresponding values obtained from the conventional ROI methods and multiplane evaluation (r{approximately}1.0) and CT lesion volume measurements. This method is a simple but reliable way to quantitatively monitor tumor FDG uptake. The method has several advantages over the conventional ROI method: (a) less sensitive to the ROI definition, (b) no need for image registration of serial scan data and (c) includes tumor volume changes in the global tumor metabolism. 18 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Prediabetes Phenotype Influences Improvements in Glucose Homeostasis with Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Eikenberg, Joshua D.; Savla, Jyoti; Marinik, Elaina L.; Davy, Kevin P.; Pownall, John; Baugh, Mary E.; Flack, Kyle D.; Boshra, Soheir; Winett, Richard A.; Davy, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine if prediabetes phenotype influences improvements in glucose homeostasis with resistance training (RT). Methods Older, overweight individuals with prediabetes (n = 159; aged 60±5 yrs; BMI 33±4 kg/m2) completed a supervised RT program twice per week for 12 weeks. Body weight and composition, strength, fasting plasma glucose, 2-hr oral glucose tolerance, and Matsuda-Defronza estimated insulin sensitivity index (ISI) were assessed before and after the intervention. Participants were categorized according to their baseline prediabetes phenotype as impaired fasting glucose only (IFG) (n = 73), impaired glucose tolerance only (IGT) (n = 21), or combined IFG and IGT (IFG/IGT) (n = 65). Results Chest press and leg press strength increased 27% and 18%, respectively, following the 12-week RT program (both p<0.05). Waist circumference (-1.0%; pre 109.3±10.3 cm, post 108.2±10.6 cm) and body fat (-0.6%; pre 43.7±6.8%, post 43.1±6.8%) declined, and lean body mass (+1.3%; pre 52.0±10.4 kg, post 52.7±10.7 kg) increased following the intervention. Fasting glucose concentrations did not change (p>0.05) following the intervention. However, 2-hr oral glucose tolerance improved in those with IGT (pre 8.94±0.72 mmol/l, post 7.83±1.11 mmol/l, p<0.05) and IFG/IGT (pre 9.66±1.11mmol/l, post 8.60±2.00 mmol/l) but not in those with IFG (pre 6.27±1.28mmol/l, post 6.33± 1.55 mmol/l). There were no significant changes in ISI or glucose area under the curve following the RT program. Conclusions RT without dietary intervention improves 2-hr oral glucose tolerance in individuals with prediabetes. However, the improvements in glucose homeostasis with RT appear limited to those with IGT or combined IFG and IGT. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01112709 PMID:26840904

  17. Enzymes of glucose metabolism in Frankia sp.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M F; Torrey, J G

    1985-04-01

    Enzymes of glucose metabolism were assayed in crude cell extracts of Frankia strains HFPArI3 and HFPCcI2 as well as in isolated vesicle clusters from Alnus rubra root nodules. Activities of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway enzymes glucokinase, phosphofructokinase, and pyruvate kinase were found in Frankia strain HFPArI3 and glucokinase and pyruvate kinase were found in Frankia strain HFPCcI2 and in the vesicle clusters. An NADP+-linked glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and an NAD-linked 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were found in all of the extracts, although the role of these enzymes is unclear. No NADP+-linked 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase was found. Both dehydrogenases were inhibited by adenosine 5-triphosphate, and the apparent Km's for glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate were 6.86 X 10(-4) and 7.0 X 10(-5) M, respectively. In addition to the enzymes mentioned above, an NADP+-linked malic enzyme was detected in the pure cultures but not in the vesicle clusters. In contrast, however, the vesicle clusters had activity of an NAD-linked malic enzyme. The possibility that this enzyme resulted from contamination from plant mitochondria trapped in the vesicle clusters could not be discounted. None of the extracts showed activities of the Entner-Doudoroff enzymes or the gluconate metabolism enzymes gluconate dehydrogenase or gluconokinase. Propionate- versus trehalose-grown cultures of strain HFPArI3 showed similar activities of most enzymes except malic enzyme, which was higher in the cultures grown on the organic acid. Nitrogen-fixing cultures of strain HFPArI3 showed higher specific activities of glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenases and phosphofructokinase than ammonia-grown cultures. PMID:3980434

  18. miR-182 Regulates Metabolic Homeostasis by Modulating Glucose Utilization in Muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duo; Li, Yan; Yao, Xuan; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Lei; Jiang, Haowen; Yao, Xiaohan; Zhang, Shengjie; Ye, Cheng; Liu, Wei; Cao, Hongchao; Yu, Shuxian; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Li, Qiong; Jiang, Jingjing; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Yun; Iwai, Naoharu; Wang, Hui; Li, Jingya; Li, Jia; Li, Xihua; Jin, Zi-Bing; Ying, Hao

    2016-07-19

    Understanding the fiber-type specification and metabolic switch in skeletal muscle provides insights into energy metabolism in physiology and diseases. Here, we show that miR-182 is highly expressed in fast-twitch muscle and negatively correlates with blood glucose level. miR-182 knockout mice display muscle loss, fast-to-slow fiber-type switching, and impaired glucose metabolism. Mechanistic studies reveal that miR-182 modulates glucose utilization in muscle by targeting FoxO1 and PDK4, which control fuel selection via the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC). Short-term high-fat diet (HFD) feeding reduces muscle miR-182 levels by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), which contributes to the upregulation of FoxO1/PDK4. Restoration of miR-182 expression in HFD-fed mice induces a faster muscle phenotype, decreases muscle FoxO1/PDK4 levels, and improves glucose metabolism. Together, our work establishes miR-182 as a critical regulator that confers robust and precise controls on fuel usage and glucose homeostasis. Our study suggests that a metabolic shift toward a faster and more glycolytic phenotype is beneficial for glucose control. PMID:27396327

  19. Longitudinal Investigation into Genetics in the Conservation of Metabolic Phenotypes in Danish and Chinese Twins.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuxia; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Duan, Haiping; Zhang, Dongfeng; Pang, Zengchang; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Tan, Qihua; Kruse, Torben; Dalgård, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal twin studies on long term conservation of individual metabolic phenotypes can help to explore the genetic and environmental basis in maintaining metabolic homeostasis and metabolic health. We performed a longitudinal twin study on 12 metabolic phenotypes from Danish twins followed up for 12 years and Chinese twins traced for 7 years. The study covered a relatively large sample of 502 pairs of Danish adult twins with a mean age at intake of 38 years and a total of 181 Chinese adult twin pairs with a mean baseline age of 39.5 years. Bivariate twin models were fitted to the longitudinal measurements taken at two time points (at baseline and follow-up) to estimate the genetic and environmental contributions to phenotype variation and correlation at and between the two time points. High genetic components in the regulation of intra-individual phenotype correlation or stability over time were estimated in both Danish (h2>0.75 except fasting blood glucose) and Chinese (h2>0.72 except blood pressure) twins; moderate to high genetic contribution to phenotype variation at the two time points were also estimated except for the low genetic regulation on glucose in Danish and on blood pressure in Chinese twins. Meanwhile the bivariate twin models estimated shared environmental contributions to the variance and covariance in fasting blood glucose in Danish twins, and in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, low and high density lipoprotein cholesterol in Chinese twins. Overall, our longitudinal twin study on long-term stability of metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins identified a common pattern of high genetic control over phenotype conservation, and at the same time revealed population-specific patterns of genetic and common environmental regulation on the variance as well as covariance of glucose and blood pressure. PMID:27618179

  20. Impaired glucose metabolism treatment and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    MATYSZEWSKI, ARTUR; CZARNECKA, ANNA; KAWECKI, MACIEJ; KORZEŃ, PIOTR; SAFIR, ILAN J.; KUKWA, WOJCIECH; SZCZYLIK, CEZARY

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism disorders increase the risk of carcinogenesis. Diabetes mellitus alters numerous physiological processes that may encourage cancer growth. However, treating impaired glucose homeostasis may actually promote neoplasia; maintaining proper glucose plasma concentrations reduces metabolic stresses, however, certain medications may themselves result in oncogenic effects. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that metformin reduces the cancer risk. However, the use of sulfonylurea derivatives correlates with an increased risk of developing a malignancy. Another form of treatment, insulin therapy, involves using various forms of insulin that differ in pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Previous studies have indicated that certain insulin variants also affect the cancer risk. The results from analyses that address the safety of long-lasting insulin types raise the most concern regarding the increased risk of malignancy. Rapid development of novel diabetic medications and their widespread use carries the risk of potentially increased rates of cancer, unnoticeable in limited, randomized, controlled trials. In the present review, the results of clinical and epidemiological studies are evaluated to assess the safety of anti-hyperglycemic medications and their effect on cancer risk and outcomes. PMID:26622538

  1. Glucose metabolism and hexosamine pathway regulate oncogene-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Gitenay, D; Wiel, C; Lallet-Daher, H; Vindrieux, D; Aubert, S; Payen, L; Simonnet, H; Bernard, D

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic stress-induced senescence (OIS) prevents the ability of oncogenic signals to induce tumorigenesis. It is now largely admitted that the mitogenic effect of oncogenes requires metabolic adaptations to respond to new energetic and bio constituent needs. Yet, whether glucose metabolism affects OIS response is largely unknown. This is largely because of the fact that most of the OIS cellular models are cultivated in glucose excess. In this study, we used human epithelial cells, cultivated without glucose excess, to study alteration and functional role of glucose metabolism during OIS. We report a slowdown of glucose uptake and metabolism during OIS. Increasing glucose metabolism by expressing hexokinase2 (HK2), which converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), favors escape from OIS. Inversely, expressing a glucose-6-phosphatase, [corrected] pharmacological inhibition of HK2, or adding nonmetabolizable glucose induced a premature senescence. Manipulations of various metabolites covering G6P downstream pathways (hexosamine, glycolysis, and pentose phosphate pathways) suggest an unexpected role of the hexosamine pathway in controlling OIS. Altogether, our results show that decreased glucose metabolism occurs during and participates to OIS. PMID:24577087

  2. Strong mutator phenotype drives faster adaptation from growth on glucose to growth on acetate in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Le Bars, Hervé; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Bousarghin, Latifa

    2014-10-01

    The metabolic adaptation of strong mutator strains was studied to better understand the link between the strong mutator phenotype and virulence. Analysis of the growth curves of isogenic strains of Salmonella, which were previously grown in M63 glucose media, revealed that the exponential phase of growth was reached earlier in an M63 acetate medium with strong mutator strains (mutated in mutS or in mutL) than with normomutator strains (P<0.05). Complemented strains confirmed the direct role of the strong mutator phenotype in this faster metabolic adaptation to the assimilation of acetate. In a mixed cell population, proliferation of strong mutators over normomutators was observed when the carbon source was switched from glucose to acetate. These results add to the sparse body of knowledge about strong mutators and highlight the selective advantage conferred by the strong mutator phenotype to adapt to a switch of carbon source in the environment. This work may provide clinically useful information given that there is a high prevalence of strong mutators among pathogenic strains of Salmonella and that acetate is the principal short chain fatty acid of the human terminal ileum and colon where Salmonella infection is localized. PMID:25031423

  3. Microcalorimetric Measurements of Glucose Metabolism by Marine Bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Andrew S.; Millero, Frank J.; Gerchakov, Sol M.

    1982-01-01

    Microcalorimetric measurements of heat production from glucose by Vibrio alginolyticus were made to assess the viability of calorimetry as a technique for studying the metabolism of marine bacteria at organic nutrient concentrations found in marine waters. The results show that the metabolism of glucose by this bacterium can be measured by calorimetry at submicromolar concentrations. A linear correlation between glucose concentration and total heat production was observed over a concentration range of 8 mM to 0.35 μM. It is suggested that these data indicate a constant efficiency of metabolism for this bacterium over the wide range of glucose concentrations studied. PMID:16346131

  4. Advances in glucose metabolism research in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sitian; Fang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells uptake glucose at a higher rate and produce lactic acid rather than metabolizing pyruvate through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. This adaptive metabolic shift is termed the Warburg effect. Recently progress had been made regarding the mechanistic understanding of glucose metabolism and associated diagnostic and therapeutic methods, which have been investigated in colorectal cancer. The majority of novel mechanisms involve important glucose metabolism associated genes and miRNA regulation. The present review discusses the contribution of these research results to facilitate with the development of novel diagnosis and anticancer treatment options. PMID:27602209

  5. Persistent impaired glucose metabolism in a zebrafish hyperglycemia model.

    PubMed

    Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Antonioli, Régis; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Da Silva, Rosane Souza

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) affects over 10% of the world's population. Hyperglycemia is the main feature for the diagnosis of this disease. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an established model organism for the study of various metabolic diseases. In this paper, hyperglycemic zebrafish, when immersed in a 111 mM glucose solution for 14 days, developed increased glycation of proteins from the eyes, decreased mRNA levels of insulin receptors in the muscle, and a reversion of high blood glucose level after treatment with anti-diabetic drugs (glimepiride and metformin) even after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. Additionally, hyperglycemic zebrafish developed an impaired response to exogenous insulin, which was recovered after 7 days of glucose withdrawal. These data suggest that the exposure of adult zebrafish to high glucose concentration is able to induce persistent metabolic changes probably underlined by a hyperinsulinemic state and impaired peripheral glucose metabolism. PMID:24704522

  6. Cell Based Metabolic Barriers to Glucose Diffusion: Macrophages and Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Klueh, Ulrike; Frailey, Jackman; Qiao, Yi; Antar, Omar; Kreutzer, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    It is assumed that MQ are central to glucose sensor bio-fouling and therefore have a major negative impact on continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) performance in vivo. However to our knowledge there is no data in the literature to directly support or refute this assumption. Since glucose and oxygen (O2) are key to glucose sensor function in vivo, understanding and controlling glucose and O2 metabolic activity of MQ is likely key to successful glucose sensor performance. We hypothesized that the accumulation of MQ at the glucose sensor-tissue interface will act as “Cell Based Metabolic Barriers” (CBMB) to glucose diffusing from the interstitial tissue compartment to the implanted glucose sensor and as such creating an artificially low sensor output, thereby compromising sensor function and CGM. Our studies demonstrated that 1) direct injections of MQ at in vivo sensor implantation sites dramatically decreased sensor output (measured in nA), 2) addition of MQ to glucose sensors in vitro resulted in a rapid and dramatic fall in sensor output and 3) lymphocytes did not affect sensor function in vitro or in vivo. These data support our hypothesis that MQ can act as metabolic barriers to glucose and O2 diffusion in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24461328

  7. Glucosensing in the gastrointestinal tract: Impact on glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fournel, Audren; Marlin, Alysson; Abot, Anne; Pasquio, Charles; Cirillo, Carla; Cani, Patrice D; Knauf, Claude

    2016-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is an important interface of exchange between ingested food and the body. Glucose is one of the major dietary sources of energy. All along the gastrointestinal tube, e.g., the oral cavity, small intestine, pancreas, and portal vein, specialized cells referred to as glucosensors detect variations in glucose levels. In response to this glucose detection, these cells send hormonal and neuronal messages to tissues involved in glucose metabolism to regulate glycemia. The gastrointestinal tract continuously communicates with the brain, especially with the hypothalamus, via the gut-brain axis. It is now well established that the cross talk between the gut and the brain is of crucial importance in the control of glucose homeostasis. In addition to receiving glucosensing information from the gut, the hypothalamus may also directly sense glucose. Indeed, the hypothalamus contains glucose-sensitive cells that regulate glucose homeostasis by sending signals to peripheral tissues via the autonomous nervous system. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which glucosensors along the gastrointestinal tract detect glucose, as well as the results of such detection in the whole body, including the hypothalamus. We also highlight how disturbances in the glucosensing process may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. A better understanding of the pathways regulating glucose homeostasis will further facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metabolic diseases. PMID:26939867

  8. Glucose Metabolism Disorders, HIV and Antiretroviral Therapy among Tanzanian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Maganga, Emmanuel; Smart, Luke R.; Kalluvya, Samuel; Kataraihya, Johannes B.; Saleh, Ahmed M.; Obeid, Lama; Downs, Jennifer A.; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; Peck, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Millions of HIV-infected Africans are living longer due to long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART), yet little is known about glucose metabolism disorders in this group. We aimed to compare the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders among HIV-infected adults on long-term ART to ART-naïve adults and HIV-negative controls, hypothesizing that the odds of glucose metabolism disorders would be 2-fold greater even after adjusting for possible confounders. Methods In this cross-sectional study conducted between October 2012 and April 2013, consecutive adults (>18 years) attending an HIV clinic in Tanzania were enrolled in 3 groups: 153 HIV-negative controls, 151 HIV-infected, ART-naïve, and 150 HIV-infected on ART for ≥ 2 years. The primary outcome was the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders as determined by oral glucose tolerance testing. We compared glucose metabolism disorder prevalence between each HIV group vs. the control group by Fisher’s exact test and used multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with glucose metabolism disorders. Results HIV-infected adults on ART had a higher prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders (49/150 (32.7%) vs.11/153 (7.2%), p<0.001) and frank diabetes mellitus (27/150 (18.0%) vs. 8/153 (5.2%), p = 0.001) than HIV-negative adults, which remained highly significant even after adjusting for age, gender, adiposity and socioeconomic status (OR = 5.72 (2.78–11.77), p<0.001). Glucose metabolism disorders were significantly associated with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. Awareness of diabetes mellitus was <25%. Conclusions HIV-infected adults on long-term ART had 5-fold greater odds of glucose metabolism disorders than HIV-negative controls but were rarely aware of their diagnosis. Intensive glucose metabolism disorder screening and education are needed in HIV clinics in sub-Saharan Africa. Further research should determine how glucose metabolism disorders might be related to immune

  9. Heritability of phenotypes associated with glucose homeostasis and adiposity in a rural area of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pena, Geórgia G; Dutra, Míriam Santos; Gazzinelli, Andrea; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation between glucose homeostasis and adiposity traits in a population in a rural community in Brazil. The Jequitinhonha Community Family Study cohort consists of subjects aged ≥18 years residing in rural areas in Brazil. The data on the following traits were assembled for 280 individuals (51.7% women): body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage, waist and mid-upper arm circumferences, triceps skinfold, conicity index, insulin, glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), triglycerides and C-reactive protein. Extended pedigrees were constructed up to the third generation of individuals using the data management software PEDSYS. The heritability and genetic correlations were estimated using a variance component method. The age- and sex-adjusted heritability values estimated for insulin (h(2) = 52%), glucose (h(2) = 51%), HDLc (h(2) = 58%), and waist circumference (WC; h(2) = 49%) were high. Significantly adjusted genetic correlations were observed between insulin paired with each of the following phenotypes; (BMI; ρg = 0.48), WC (ρg = 0.47) and HDLc (ρg = -0.47). The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was genetically correlated with BMI (ρg = 0.53) and HDLc (ρg = -0.58). The adjusted genetic correlations between traits were consistently higher compared with the environmental correlations. In conclusion, glucose metabolism and adiposity traits are highly heritable and share common genetic effects with body adiposity traits. PMID:24359477

  10. Genetic and Environmental Regulation on Longitudinal Change of Metabolic Phenotypes in Danish and Chinese Adult Twins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuxia; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Dongfeng; Duan, Haiping; Tan, Qihua; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Kruse, Torben; Dalgård, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objective The rate of change in metabolic phenotypes can be highly indicative of metabolic disorders and disorder-related modifications. We analyzed data from longitudinal twin studies on multiple metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins representing two populations of distinct ethnic, cultural, social-economic backgrounds and geographical environments. Materials and Methods The study covered a relatively large sample of 502 pairs of Danish adult twins followed up for a long period of 12 years with a mean age at intake of 38 years (range: 18–65) and a total of 181 Chinese adult twin pairs traced for about 7 years with a mean baseline age of 39.5 years (range: 23–64). The classical twin models were fitted to the longitudinal change in each phenotypephenotype) to estimate the genetic and environmental contributions to the variation in Δphenotype. Results Moderate to high contributions by the unique environment were estimated for all phenotypes in both Danish (from 0.51 for low density lipoprotein cholesterol up to 0.72 for triglycerides) and Chinese (from 0.41 for triglycerides up to 0.73 for diastolic blood pressure) twins; low to moderate genetic components were estimated for long-term change in most of the phenotypes in Danish twins except for triglycerides and hip circumference. Compared with Danish twins, the Chinese twins tended to have higher genetic control over the longitudinal changes in lipids (except high density lipoprotein cholesterol) and glucose, higher unique environmental contribution to blood pressure but no genetic contribution to longitudinal change in body mass traits. Conclusion Our results emphasize the major contribution of unique environment to the observed intra-individual variation in all metabolic phenotypes in both samples, and meanwhile reveal differential patterns of genetic and common environmental regulation on changes over time in metabolic phenotypes across the two samples. PMID:26862898

  11. Regional glucose metabolism using PETT in normal and psychiatric populations

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, J.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Volkow, N.

    1982-01-01

    The metabolism of /sup 18/F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (/sup 18/FDG) in 150 subjects including normals, schizophrenics, senile dementias, and primary affective disorders was studied. Some of the data analyzed to date are discussed.

  12. Glucose metabolism in pregnant sheep when placental growth is restricted

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J.A.; Falconer, J.; Robinson, J.S. )

    1989-08-01

    The effect of restricting placental growth on glucose metabolism in pregnant sheep in late gestation was determined by primed constant infusions of D-(U-{sup 14}C)- and D-(2-{sup 3}H)glucose and antipyrine into fetuses of six control sheep and six sheep from which endometrial caruncles had been removed before pregnancy (caruncle sheep). In the latter, placental and fetal weights were reduced, as was the concentration of glucose in fetal arterial blood. Fetal glucose turnover in caruncle sheep was only 52-59% of that in controls, largely because of lower umbilical loss of glucose back to the placenta (38-39% of control) and lower fetal glucose utilization (61-74% of control). However, fetal glucose utilization on a weight-specific basis was similar in control and caruncle sheep. Significant endogenous glucose production occurred in control and caruncle fetal sheep. Maternal glucose production and partition of glucose between the gravid uterus and other maternal tissues were similar in control and caruncle sheep. In conclusion, when placental and fetal growth are restricted, fetal glucose utilization is maintained by reduced loss of glucose back to the placenta and mother and by maintaining endogenous glucose production.

  13. Glucose Metabolism: A Sweet Relief of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-09-12

    Patients and individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease show reduced glucose metabolism in the brain. A new study takes advantage of a fly model of Alzheimer's disease to demonstrate that enhancing glucose uptake in neurons has strong neuroprotective effects involving improved proteostasis. PMID:27623263

  14. Regulation of glucose metabolism from a liver-centric perspective

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hye-Sook; Kang, Geon; Kim, Jun Seok; Choi, Byeong Hoon; Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2016-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is tightly regulated to meet the energy requirements of the vital organs and maintain an individual's health. The liver has a major role in the control of glucose homeostasis by controlling various pathways of glucose metabolism, including glycogenesis, glycogenolysis, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Both the acute and chronic regulation of the enzymes involved in the pathways are required for the proper functioning of these complex interwoven systems. Allosteric control by various metabolic intermediates, as well as post-translational modifications of these metabolic enzymes constitute the acute control of these pathways, and the controlled expression of the genes encoding these enzymes is critical in mediating the longer-term regulation of these metabolic pathways. Notably, several key transcription factors are shown to be involved in the control of glucose metabolism including glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. In this review, we would like to illustrate the current understanding of glucose metabolism, with an emphasis on the transcription factors and their regulators that are involved in the chronic control of glucose homeostasis. PMID:26964834

  15. Glucose metabolism ontogenesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the light of the recently sequenced genome: new tools for intermediary metabolism programming.

    PubMed

    Marandel, Lucie; Véron, Vincent; Surget, Anne; Plagnes-Juan, Élisabeth; Panserat, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    The rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), a carnivorous fish species, displays a 'glucose-intolerant' phenotype when fed a high-carbohydrate diet. The importance of carbohydrate metabolism during embryogenesis and the timing of establishing this later phenotype are currently unclear. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the poor ability of carnivorous fish to use dietary carbohydrates as a major energy substrate are not well understood. It has recently been shown in trout that duplicated genes involved in glucose metabolism may participate in establishing the glucose-intolerant phenotype. The aim of this study was therefore to provide new understanding of glucose metabolism during ontogenesis and nutritional transition, taking into consideration the complexity of the trout genome. Trout were sampled at several stages of development from fertilization to hatching, and alevins were then fed a non-carbohydrate or a high-carbohydrate diet during first feeding. mRNA levels of all glucose metabolism-related genes increased in embryos during the setting up of the primitive liver. After the first meal, genes rapidly displayed expression patterns equivalent to those observed in the livers of juveniles. g6pcb2.a (a glucose 6-phosphatase-encoding gene) was up-regulated in alevins fed a high-carbohydrate diet, mimicking the expression pattern of gck genes. The g6pcb2.a gene may contribute to the non-inhibition of the last step of gluconeogenesis and thus to establishing the glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout fed a high-carbohydrate diet as early as first feeding. This information is crucial for nutritional programming investigations as it suggests that first feeding would be too late to programme glucose metabolism in the long term. PMID:26747908

  16. Oligodendroglial NMDA Receptors Regulate Glucose Import and Axonal Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saab, Aiman S; Tzvetavona, Iva D; Trevisiol, Andrea; Baltan, Selva; Dibaj, Payam; Kusch, Kathrin; Möbius, Wiebke; Goetze, Bianka; Jahn, Hannah M; Huang, Wenhui; Steffens, Heinz; Schomburg, Eike D; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Pérez-Cerdá, Fernando; Bakhtiari, Davood; Matute, Carlos; Löwel, Siegrid; Griesinger, Christian; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Kirchhoff, Frank; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2016-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes make myelin and support axons metabolically with lactate. However, it is unknown how glucose utilization and glycolysis are adapted to the different axonal energy demands. Spiking axons release glutamate and oligodendrocytes express NMDA receptors of unknown function. Here we show that the stimulation of oligodendroglial NMDA receptors mobilizes glucose transporter GLUT1, leading to its incorporation into the myelin compartment in vivo. When myelinated optic nerves from conditional NMDA receptor mutants are challenged with transient oxygen-glucose deprivation, they show a reduced functional recovery when returned to oxygen-glucose but are indistinguishable from wild-type when provided with oxygen-lactate. Moreover, the functional integrity of isolated optic nerves, which are electrically silent, is extended by preincubation with NMDA, mimicking axonal activity, and shortened by NMDA receptor blockers. This reveals a novel aspect of neuronal energy metabolism in which activity-dependent glutamate release enhances oligodendroglial glucose uptake and glycolytic support of fast spiking axons. PMID:27292539

  17. Peripheral glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kilander, L; Boberg, M; Lithell, H

    1993-04-01

    Twenty-four patients with Alzheimer's disease and matched controls were examined with reference to metabolic parameters such as peripheral insulin and glucose metabolism, serum lipid concentrations and blood pressure levels. Blood glucose levels and insulin response were measured during an intravenous glucose tolerance test and peripheral insulin sensitivity was estimated with the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique. There were no differences recorded between the two groups in glucose metabolism, triglyceride, cholesterol or HDL-cholesterol levels. The patients with Alzheimer's disease had significantly lower blood pressure levels, which partly could be explained by ongoing treatment with neuroleptics and antidepressives. Previous findings of higher insulin levels in Alzheimer's disease could not be verified. PMID:8503259

  18. Diabetes Mellitus and Prediabetes on Kidney Transplant Waiting List- Prevalence, Metabolic Phenotyping and Risk Stratification Approach

    PubMed Central

    Guthoff, Martina; Vosseler, Dorothea; Langanke, Julia; Nadalin, Silvio; Königsrainer, Alfred; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Heyne, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite a significant prognostic impact, little is known about disturbances in glucose metabolism among kidney transplant candidates. We assess the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and prediabetes on kidney transplant waiting list, its underlying pathophysiology and propose an approach for individual risk stratification. Methods All patients on active kidney transplant waiting list of a large European university hospital transplant center were metabolically phenotyped. Results Of 138 patients, 76 (55%) had disturbances in glucose metabolism. 22% of patients had known DM, 3% were newly diagnosed. 30% were detected to have prediabetes. Insulin sensitivity and-secretion indices allowed for identification of underlying pathophysiology and risk factors. Age independently affected insulin secretion, resulting in a relative risk for prediabetes of 2.95 (95%CI 1.38–4.83) with a cut-off at 48 years. Body mass index independently affected insulin sensitivity as a continuous variable. Conclusions The prevalence of DM or prediabetes on kidney transplant waiting list is as high as 55%, with more than one third of patients previously undiagnosed. Oral glucose tolerance test is mandatory to detect all patients at risk. Metabolic phenotyping allows for differentiation of underlying pathophysiology and provides a basis for early individual risk stratification and specific intervention to improve patient and allograft outcome. PMID:26398489

  19. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with alcoholic Korsakoff's syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, R.M.; Parker, E.S.; Clark, C.M.; Martin, P.R.; George, D.T.; Weingartner, H.; Sokoloff, L.; Ebert, M.H.; Mishkin, M.

    1985-05-01

    Seven alcoholic male subjects diagnosed as having Korsakoff's syndrome and eight age-matched male normal volunteers were studied with /sup 18/F 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2/sup 18/FDG). All subjects were examined at rest with eyes covered in a quiet, darkened room. Serial plasma samples were obtained following injection of 4 to 5 mCi of 2/sup 18/FDG. Tomographic slices spaced at 10mm axial increments were obtained (in-plane resolution = 1.75 cm, axial resolution = 1.78 cm). Four planes were selected from each subject, and a total of 46 regions of interest were sampled and glucose metabolic rates for each region calculated. The mean glucose metalbolic rate for the 46 regions in the Korsakoff subjects was significantly lower than that in the normal controls (5.17 +- .43 versus 6.6 +- 1.31). A Q-component analysis, which examined each subject's regional rates relative to his mean rate, revealed two distinct patterns in the Korsakoff group. Glucose metabolism was significantly reduced in 37 of the 46 regions sampled. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism in a nondemented group of subjects has not previously been reported. The reduction in cortical metabolism may be the result of damage to sub-cortical projecting systems. The differing patterns of cerebral metabolism in Korsakoff's syndrome suggests subgroups with differing neuropathology. Regions implicated in memory function, medial temporal, thalamic and medial prefrontal were among the regions reduced in metabolism.

  20. Jejunal epithelial glucose metabolism: effects of Na+ replacement.

    PubMed

    Mallet, R T; Jackson, M J; Kelleher, J K

    1986-11-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of replacement of extracellular Na+ with a nontransportable cation, N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG+) on jejunal epithelial glucose metabolism. Jejunal epithelium isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats was incubated in media containing 5 mM glucose, 0.5 mM glutamine, 0.5 mM beta-hydroxybutyrate, and 0.3 mM acetoacetate as the principal carbon sources. O2 consumption and total glucose utilization were reduced 30 and 50%, respectively, when Na+ was replaced with NMDG+. In both media, approximately 75% of utilized glucose carbon was converted to lactate. The rate of glucose metabolism via the hexose monophosphate shunt, as evaluated using specific 14CO2 yields from [1-14C]glucose and [6-14C]glucose, was not appreciably altered by Na+ replacement. Tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux was evaluated using 14CO2 production from [14C]glucose and [14C]pyruvate radioisotopes. Approximately 50% of TCA cycle flux was shunted into products other than CO2 in both media. The majority of the acetyl-CoA oxidized in the TCA cycle was derived from cytosolic pyruvate. It is concluded that removal of Na+ from the bathing medium substantially reduced glucose utilization via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway and TCA cycle in the jejunal epithelium. PMID:3777159

  1. Cerebral glucose metabolism in Wernicke's, Broca's, and conduction aphasia

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Kempler, D.; Jackson, C.; Hanson, W.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism was evaluated in patients with either Wernicke's (N = 7), Broca's (N = 11), or conduction (N = 10) aphasia using /sup 18/F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose with positron emission tomography. The three aphasic syndromes differed in the degree of left-to-right frontal metabolic asymmetry, with Broca's aphasia showing severe asymmetry and Wernicke's aphasia mild-to-moderate metabolic asymmetry, while patients with conduction aphasia were metabolically symmetric. On the other hand, the three syndromes showed the same degree of metabolic decline in the left temporal region. The parietal region appeared to separate conduction aphasia from both Broca's and Wernicke's aphasias. Common aphasic features in the three syndromes appear to be due to common changes in the temporal region, while unique features were associated with frontal and parietal metabolic differences.

  2. Brain glucose metabolism in an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Detka, J; Kurek, A; Kucharczyk, M; Głombik, K; Basta-Kaim, A; Kubera, M; Lasoń, W; Budziszewska, B

    2015-06-01

    An increasing number of data support the involvement of disturbances in glucose metabolism in the pathogenesis of depression. We previously reported that glucose and glycogen concentrations in brain structures important for depression are higher in a prenatal stress model of depression when compared with control animals. A marked rise in the concentrations of these carbohydrates and glucose transporters were evident in prenatally stressed animals subjected to acute stress and glucose loading in adulthood. To determine whether elevated levels of brain glucose are associated with a change in its metabolism in this model, we assessed key glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase), products of glycolysis, i.e., pyruvate and lactate, and two selected enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Additionally, we assessed glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, a key enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Prenatal stress increased the levels of phosphofructokinase, an important glycolytic enzyme, in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. However, prenatal stress had no effect on hexokinase or pyruvate kinase levels. The lactate concentration was elevated in prenatally stressed rats in the frontal cortex, and pyruvate levels remained unchanged. Among the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, prenatal stress decreased the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase in the hippocampus, but it had no effect on α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. Like in the case of glucose and its transporters, also in the present study, differences in markers of glucose metabolism between control animals and those subjected to prenatal stress were not observed under basal conditions but in rats subjected to acute stress and glucose load in adulthood. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was not reduced by prenatal stress but was found to be even higher in animals exposed to

  3. Perinatal Exposure to Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Affects Glucose Metabolism in Adult Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hin T.; Zhao, Yin G.; Leung, Pik Y.; Wong, Chris K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are globally present in the environment and are widely distributed in human populations and wildlife. The chemicals are ubiquitous in human body fluids and have a long serum elimination half-life. The notorious member of PFAAs, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is prioritized as a global concerning chemical at the Stockholm Convention in 2009, due to its harmful effects in mammals and aquatic organisms. PFOS is known to affect lipid metabolism in adults and was found to be able to cross human placenta. However the effects of in utero exposure to the susceptibility of metabolic disorders in offspring have not yet been elucidated. In this study, pregnant CD-1 mice (F0) were fed with 0, 0.3 or 3 mg PFOS/kg body weight/day in corn oil by oral gavage daily throughout gestational and lactation periods. We investigated the immediate effects of perinatal exposure to PFOS on glucose metabolism in both maternal and offspring after weaning (PND 21). To determine if the perinatal exposure predisposes the risk for metabolic disorder to the offspring, weaned animals without further PFOS exposure, were fed with either standard or high-fat diet until PND 63. Fasting glucose and insulin levels were measured while HOMA-IR index and glucose AUCs were reported. Our data illustrated the first time the effects of the environmental equivalent dose of PFOS exposure on the disturbance of glucose metabolism in F1 pups and F1 adults at PND 21 and 63, respectively. Although the biological effects of PFOS on the elevated levels of fasting serum glucose and insulin levels were observed in both pups and adults of F1, the phenotypes of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance were only evident in the F1 adults. The effects were exacerbated under HFD, highlighting the synergistic action at postnatal growth on the development of metabolic disorders. PMID:24498028

  4. Type 2 Diabetes Dysregulates Glucose Metabolism in Cardiac Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Salabei, Joshua K; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K; Mehra, Parul; Gibb, Andrew A; Haberzettl, Petra; Hong, Kyung U; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Qianhong; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Bolli, Roberto; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Hill, Bradford G

    2016-06-24

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased mortality and progression to heart failure. Recent studies suggest that diabetes also impairs reparative responses after cell therapy. In this study, we examined potential mechanisms by which diabetes affects cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). CPCs isolated from the diabetic heart showed diminished proliferation, a propensity for cell death, and a pro-adipogenic phenotype. The diabetic CPCs were insulin-resistant, and they showed higher energetic reliance on glycolysis, which was associated with up-regulation of the pro-glycolytic enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3). In WT CPCs, expression of a mutant form of PFKFB, which mimics PFKFB3 activity and increases glycolytic rate, was sufficient to phenocopy the mitochondrial and proliferative deficiencies found in diabetic cells. Consistent with activation of phosphofructokinase in diabetic cells, stable isotope carbon tracing in diabetic CPCs showed dysregulation of the pentose phosphate and glycero(phospho)lipid synthesis pathways. We describe diabetes-induced dysregulation of carbon partitioning using stable isotope metabolomics-based coupling quotients, which relate relative flux values between metabolic pathways. These findings suggest that diabetes causes an imbalance in glucose carbon allocation by uncoupling biosynthetic pathway activity, which could diminish the efficacy of CPCs for myocardial repair. PMID:27151219

  5. Association Between Serum Osteocalcin and Markers of Metabolic Phenotype

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteocalcin has been recently reported to contribute to the regulation of glucose tolerance and insulin secretion and sensitivity in experimental animals; however, the data in humans are sparse. To examine the association between serum osteocalcin concentration and markers of dysmetabolic phenotype...

  6. Metabolism of tritiated D-glucose in rat erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel y Keenoy, B.; Malaisse-Lagae, F.; Malaisse, W.J. )

    1991-09-01

    The metabolism of D-(U-14C)glucose, D-(1-14C)glucose, D-(6-14C)glucose, D-(1-3H)glucose, D-(2-3H)glucose, D-(3-3H)glucose, D-(3,4-3H)glucose, D-(5-3H)glucose, and D-(6-3H)glucose was examined in rat erythrocytes. There was a fair agreement between the rate of 3HOH production from either D-(3-3H)glucose and D-(5-3H)glucose, the decrease in the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate pool, its fractional turnover rate, the production of 14C-labeled lactate from D-(U-14C)glucose, and the total lactate output. The generation of both 3HOH and tritiated acidic metabolites from D-(3,4-3H)glucose indicated incomplete detritiation of the C4 during interconversion of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and triose phosphates. Erythrocytes unexpectedly generated 3HOH from D-(6-3H)glucose, a phenomenon possibly attributable to the detritiation of (3-3H)pyruvate in the reaction catalyzed by glutamate pyruvate transaminase. The production of 3HOH from D-(2-3H)glucose was lower than that from D-(5-3H)glucose, suggesting enzyme-to-enzyme tunneling of glycolytic intermediates in the hexokinase/phosphoglucoisomerase/phosphofructokinase sequence. The production of 3HOH from D-(1-3H)glucose largely exceeded that of 14CO2 from D-(1-14C)glucose, a situation tentatively ascribed to the generation of 3HOH in the phosphomannoisomerase reaction. It is further speculated that the adjustment in specific radioactivity of D-(1-3H)glucose-6-phosphate cannot simultaneously match the vastly different degrees of isotopic discrimination in velocity at the levels of the reactions catalyzed by either glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase or phosphoglucoisomerase. The interpretation of the present findings thus raises a number of questions, which are proposed as a scope for further investigations.

  7. Metabolic dysfunction drives a mechanistically distinct pro-inflammatory phenotype in adipose tissue macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Mario; Coats, Brittney R.; Hisert, Katherine B.; Hagman, Derek; Mutskov, Vesco; Peris, Eduard; Schoenfelt, Kelly Q.; Kuzma, Jessica N.; Larson, Ilona; Billing, Peter S.; Landerholm, Robert W.; Crouthamel, Matthew; Gozal, David; Hwang, Seungmin; Singh, Pradeep; Becker, Lev

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue macrophage (ATM)-driven inflammation plays a key role in insulin resistance; however, factors activating ATMs are poorly understood. Using a proteomics approach, we show that markers of classical activation are absent on ATMs from obese humans, but readily detectable on airway macrophages of patients with cystic fibrosis, a disease of chronic bacterial infection. Moreover, treating macrophages with glucose, insulin, and palmitate – conditions characteristic of the metabolic syndrome – produces a ‘metabolically-activated’ phenotype distinct from classical activation. Markers of metabolic activation are expressed by pro-inflammatory ATMs in obese humans/mice and are positively correlated with adiposity. Metabolic activation is driven by independent pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways, which regulate balance between cytokine production and lipid metabolism. We identify PPARγ and p62/SQSTM1 as two key proteins that promote lipid metabolism and limit inflammation in metabolically-activated macrophages. Collectively, our data provide important mechanistic insights into pathways that drive the metabolic disease-specific phenotype of macrophages. PMID:25242226

  8. Metabolic dysfunction drives a mechanistically distinct proinflammatory phenotype in adipose tissue macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Mario; Coats, Brittney R; Hisert, Katherine B; Hagman, Derek; Mutskov, Vesco; Peris, Eduard; Schoenfelt, Kelly Q; Kuzma, Jessica N; Larson, Ilona; Billing, Peter S; Landerholm, Robert W; Crouthamel, Matthew; Gozal, David; Hwang, Seungmin; Singh, Pradeep K; Becker, Lev

    2014-10-01

    Adipose tissue macrophage (ATM)-driven inflammation plays a key role in insulin resistance; however, factors activating ATMs are poorly understood. Using a proteomics approach, we show that markers of classical activation are absent on ATMs from obese humans but are readily detectable on airway macrophages of patients with cystic fibrosis, a disease associated with chronic bacterial infection. Moreover, treating macrophages with glucose, insulin, and palmitate-conditions characteristic of the metabolic syndrome-produces a "metabolically activated" phenotype distinct from classical activation. Markers of metabolic activation are expressed by proinflammatory ATMs in obese humans/mice and are positively correlated with adiposity. Metabolic activation is driven by independent proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways, which regulate balance between cytokine production and lipid metabolism. We identify PPARγ and p62/SQSTM1 as two key proteins that promote lipid metabolism and limit inflammation in metabolically activated macrophages. Collectively, our data provide important mechanistic insights into pathways that drive the metabolic-disease-specific phenotype of macrophages. PMID:25242226

  9. Glucose metabolism in cultured trophoblasts from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, A.J.; Farmer, D.R.; Nelson, D.M.; Smith, C.H. )

    1990-02-26

    The development of appropriate placental trophoblast isolation and culture techniques enables the study of pathways of glucose utilization by this important cell layer in vitro. Trophoblasts from normal term placentas were isolated and cultured 24 hours and 72 hours in uncoated polystyrene culture tubes or tubes previously coated with a fibrin matrix. Trophoblasts cultured on fibrin are morphologically distinct from those cultured on plastic or other matrices and generally resemble in vivo syncytium. Cells were incubated up to 3 hours with {sup 14}C-labeled glucose and reactions were stopped by addition of perchloric acid. {sup 14}CO{sub 2} production by trophoblasts increased linearly with time however the largest accumulation of label was in organic acids. Trophoblasts cultured in absence of fibrin utilized more glucose and accumulated more {sup 14}C in metabolic products compared to cells cultured on fibrin. Glucose oxidation to CO{sub 2} by the phosphogluconate (PG) pathway was estimated from specific yields of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from (1-{sup 14}C)-D-glucose and (6-{sup 14}C)-D-glucose. Approximately 6% of glucose oxidation was by the PG pathway when cells were cultured on fibrin compared to approximately 1% by cells cultured in the absence of fibrin. The presence of a fibrin growth matrix appears to modulate the metabolism of glucose by trophoblast from human placenta in vitro.

  10. Effect of Antibiotics on Gut Microbiota, Gut Hormones and Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Kristian H.; Frost, Morten; Bahl, Martin I.; Licht, Tine R.; Jensen, Ulrich S.; Rosenberg, Jacob; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Rehfeld, Jens F.; Holst, Jens J.; Vilsbøll, Tina; Knop, Filip K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The gut microbiota has been designated as an active regulator of glucose metabolism and metabolic phenotype in a number of animal and human observational studies. We evaluated the effect of removing as many bacteria as possible by antibiotics on postprandial physiology in healthy humans. Methods Meal tests with measurements of postprandial glucose tolerance and postprandial release of insulin and gut hormones were performed before, immediately after and 6 weeks after a 4-day, broad-spectrum, per oral antibiotic cocktail (vancomycin 500 mg, gentamycin 40 mg and meropenem 500 mg once-daily) in a group of 12 lean and glucose tolerant males. Faecal samples were collected for culture-based assessment of changes in gut microbiota composition. Results Acute and dramatic reductions in the abundance of a representative set of gut bacteria was seen immediately following the antibiotic course, but no changes in postprandial glucose tolerance, insulin secretion or plasma lipid concentrations were found. Apart from an acute and reversible increase in peptide YY secretion, no changes were observed in postprandial gut hormone release. Conclusion As evaluated by selective cultivation of gut bacteria, a broad-spectrum 4-day antibiotics course with vancomycin, gentamycin and meropenem induced shifts in gut microbiota composition that had no clinically relevant short or long-term effects on metabolic variables in healthy glucose-tolerant males. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01633762 PMID:26562532

  11. Whole genome sequencing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: from genotype to phenotype for improved metabolic engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The need for rapid and efficient microbial cell factory design and construction are possible through the enabling technology, metabolic engineering, which is now being facilitated by systems biology approaches. Metabolic engineering is often complimented by directed evolution, where selective pressure is applied to a partially genetically engineered strain to confer a desirable phenotype. The exact genetic modification or resulting genotype that leads to the improved phenotype is often not identified or understood to enable further metabolic engineering. Results In this work we performed whole genome high-throughput sequencing and annotation can be used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains S288c and CEN.PK113-7D. The yeast strain S288c was the first eukaryote sequenced, serving as the reference genome for the Saccharomyces Genome Database, while CEN.PK113-7D is a preferred laboratory strain for industrial biotechnology research. A total of 13,787 high-quality SNPs were detected between both strains (reference strain: S288c). Considering only metabolic genes (782 of 5,596 annotated genes), a total of 219 metabolism specific SNPs are distributed across 158 metabolic genes, with 85 of the SNPs being nonsynonymous (e.g., encoding amino acid modifications). Amongst metabolic SNPs detected, there was pathway enrichment in the galactose uptake pathway (GAL1, GAL10) and ergosterol biosynthetic pathway (ERG8, ERG9). Physiological characterization confirmed a strong deficiency in galactose uptake and metabolism in S288c compared to CEN.PK113-7D, and similarly, ergosterol content in CEN.PK113-7D was significantly higher in both glucose and galactose supplemented cultivations compared to S288c. Furthermore, DNA microarray profiling of S288c and CEN.PK113-7D in both glucose and galactose batch cultures did not provide a clear hypothesis for major phenotypes observed, suggesting that genotype to phenotype

  12. Perturbed Glucose Metabolism: Insights into Multiple Sclerosis Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Deepali; López-Rodas, Gerardo; Casanova, Bonaventura; Marti, Maria Burgal

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex debilitating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) perceived to result from the autoimmune effect of T cells in damaging myelin sheath. However, the exact pathogenesis of the disease remains elusive. Initial studies describing the possibility of defective pyruvate metabolism in MS were performed in 1950s. The group observed elevated blood pyruvate level in both fasting and postprandial times in MS patients with relapse. Similarly, other investigators also reported increased fasting pyruvate level in this disease. These reports hint to a possible abnormality of pyruvate metabolism in MS patients. In addition, increase in levels of Krebs cycle acids like alpha-ketoglutarate in fasting and citrate after glucose intake in MS patients further strengthened the connection of disturbed pyruvate metabolism with MS progression. These studies led the investigators to explore the role of disturbed glucose metabolism in pathophysiological brain function. Under normal circumstances, complex molecules are metabolized into simpler molecules through their respective pathways. Differential expression of genes encoding enzymes of the glucose metabolic pathway in CNS may result in neurological deficits. In this review article, we discuss the studies related to disturbed carbohydrate metabolism in MS and other neurodegenerative diseases. These observations open new perspectives for the understanding of metabolic dynamics in MS yet many puzzling aspects and critical questions need to be addressed. Much more research is required to fully unravel the disease mechanism, and a proper understanding of the disease could eventually lead to new treatments. PMID:25520698

  13. Reduced CD300LG mRNA tissue expression, increased intramyocellular lipid content and impaired glucose metabolism in healthy male carriers of Arg82Cys in CD300LG: a novel genometabolic cross-link between CD300LG and common metabolic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Støy, Julie; Kampmann, Ulla; Mengel, Annette; Magnusson, Nils E; Jessen, Niels; Grarup, Niels; Rungby, Jørgen; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Møller, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Background CD300LG rs72836561 (c.313C>T, p.Arg82Cys) has in genetic-epidemiological studies been associated with the lipoprotein abnormalities of the metabolic syndrome. CD300LG belongs to the CD300-family of membrane-bound molecules which have the ability to recognize and interact with extracellular lipids. We tested whether this specific polymorphism results in abnormal lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle and liver and other indices of metabolic dysfunction. Methods 40 healthy men with a mean age of 55 years were characterized metabolically including assessment of insulin sensitivity by the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, intrahepatic lipid content (IHLC) and intramyocellular lipid content (IMCL) by MR spectroscopy, and β-cell function by an intravenous glucose tolerance test. Changes in insulin signaling and CD300LG mRNA expression were determined by western blotting and quantitative PCR in muscle and adipose tissue. Results Compared with the 20 controls (CC carriers), the 20 CT carriers (polymorphism carriers) had higher IMCL (p=0.045), a reduced fasting forearm glucose uptake (p=0.011), a trend toward lower M-values during the clamp; 6.0 mg/kg/min vs 7.1 (p=0.10), and higher IHLC (p=0.10). CT carriers had lower CD300LG mRNA expression and CD300LG expression in muscle correlated with IMCL (β=−0.35, p=0.046), forearm glucose uptake (β=0.37, p=0.03), and tended to correlate with the M-value (β=0.33, p=0.06), independently of CD300LG genotype. β-cell function was unaffected. Conclusions The CD300LG polymorphism was associated with decreased CD300LG mRNA expression in muscle and adipose tissue, increased IMCL, and abnormalities of glucose metabolism. CD300LG mRNA levels correlated with IMCL and forearm glucose uptake. These findings link a specific CD300LG polymorphism with features of the metabolic syndrome suggesting a role for CD300LG in the regulation of common metabolic traits. Trial registration number NCT01571609. PMID:26336608

  14. Metabolic phenotyping for monitoring ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Chaofu; Li, Ang; Hou, Yan; Sun, Meng; Yang, Kai; Cheng, Jinlong; Wang, Jingtao; Ge, Tingting; Zhang, Fan; Li, Qiang; Li, Junnan; Wu, Ying; Lou, Ge; Li, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most deadly of the gynecological cancers. New approaches and better tools for monitoring treatment efficacy and disease progression of EOC are required. In this study, metabolomics using rapid resolution liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was applied to a systematic investigation of metabolic changes in response to advanced EOC, surgery and recurrence. The results revealed considerable metabolic differences between groups. Moreover, 37, 30, and 26 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for primary, surgical and recurrent EOC, respectively. Primary EOC was characterized by abnormal lipid metabolism and energy disorders. Oxidative stress and surgical efficacy were clear in the post-operative EOC patients. Recurrent EOC patients showed increased amino acid and lipid metabolism compared with primary EOC patients. After cytoreductive surgery, eight metabolites (e.g. l-kynurenine, retinol, hydroxyphenyllactic acid, 2-octenoic acid) corrected towards levels of the control group, and four (e.g. hydroxyphenyllactic acid, 2-octenoic acid) went back again to primary EOC levels after disease relapse. In conclusion, this study delineated metabolic changes in response to advanced EOC, surgery and recurrence, and identified biomarkers that could facilitate both understanding and monitoring of EOC development and progression. PMID:26996990

  15. Evolution of E. coli on [U-13C]Glucose Reveals a Negligible Isotopic Influence on Metabolism and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Troy E.; Long, Christopher P.; Gonzalez, Jacqueline E.; Feist, Adam M.; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2016-01-01

    13C-Metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) traditionally assumes that kinetic isotope effects from isotopically labeled compounds do not appreciably alter cellular growth or metabolism, despite indications that some biochemical reactions can be non-negligibly impacted. Here, populations of Escherichia coli were adaptively evolved for ~1000 generations on uniformly labeled 13C-glucose, a commonly used isotope for 13C-MFA. Phenotypic characterization of these evolved strains revealed ~40% increases in growth rate, with no significant difference in fitness when grown on either labeled (13C) or unlabeled (12C) glucose. The evolved strains displayed decreased biomass yields, increased glucose and oxygen uptake, and increased acetate production, mimicking what is observed after adaptive evolution on unlabeled glucose. Furthermore, full genome re-sequencing revealed that the key genetic changes underlying these phenotypic alterations were essentially the same as those acquired during adaptive evolution on unlabeled glucose. Additionally, glucose competition experiments demonstrated that the wild-type exhibits no isotopic preference for unlabeled glucose, and the evolved strains have no preference for labeled glucose. Overall, the results of this study indicate that there are no significant differences between 12C and 13C-glucose as a carbon source for E. coli growth. PMID:26964043

  16. Effects of a lifestyle modification trial among phenotypically obese metabolically normal and phenotypically obese metabolically abnormal adolescents in comparison with phenotypically normal metabolically obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kelishadi, Roya; Hashemipour, Mahin; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Mohammadifard, Noushin; Alikhasy, Hasan; Beizaei, Maryam; Sajjadi, Firouzeh; Poursafa, Parinaz; Amin, Zahra; Ghatreh-Samani, Shohreh; Khavarian, Noushin; Siadat, Zahra Dana

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of a 2-month lifestyle modification trial on cardio-metabolic abnormalities and C-reactive protein (CRP) among obese adolescents with metabolic syndrome [phenotypically obese metabolically abnormal (POMA)] and obese adolescents without a cardio-metabolic disorder [phenotypically obese metabolically normal (POMN)], as well as in normal-weight adolescents with at least one cardio-metabolic disorder [phenotypically normal metabolically obese (PNMO)]. The study comprised 360 adolescents assigned in three groups of equal number of POMN, POMA and PNMO. They were enrolled in a trial consisting of aerobic activity classes, diet and behaviour modification, and were recalled after 6 months. Overall, 94.7% of participants completed the 2-month trial, and 87.3% of them returned after 6 months. The mean CRP was not significantly different between the POMA and PNMO groups, but was higher than in the POMN group. After the trial, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) decreased in obese participants, and the mean body fat mass decreased in all groups. At 2 months, the mean total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG) and CRP decreased in the POMA and PNMO groups. After 2 and 6 months, the decrease in mean TC, LDL-C, TG, CRP and systolic blood pressure was greater in the POMA than in the POMN group. The magnitude of decrease in CRP correlated with that of BMI, WC, fat mass, TG, TC and LDL-C. Lifestyle modification programmes for primordial/primary prevention of chronic diseases would be beneficial at the population level and should not be limited to obese children. PMID:20929499

  17. Metabolic phenotype modulation by caloric restriction in a lifelong dog study.

    PubMed

    Richards, Selena E; Wang, Yulan; Claus, Sandrine P; Lawler, Dennis; Kochhar, Sunil; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2013-07-01

    Modeling aging and age-related pathologies presents a substantial analytical challenge given the complexity of gene-environment influences and interactions operating on an individual. A top-down systems approach is used to model the effects of lifelong caloric restriction, which is known to extend life span in several animal models. The metabolic phenotypes of caloric-restricted (CR; n = 24) and pair-housed control-fed (CF; n = 24) Labrador Retriever dogs were investigated by use of orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) to model both generic and age-specific responses to caloric restriction from the ¹H NMR blood serum profiles of young and older dogs. Three aging metabolic phenotypes were resolved: (i) an aging metabolic phenotype independent of diet, characterized by high levels of glutamine, creatinine, methylamine, dimethylamine, trimethylamine N-oxide, and glycerophosphocholine and decreasing levels of glycine, aspartate, creatine and citrate indicative of metabolic changes associated largely with muscle mass; (ii) an aging metabolic phenotype specific to CR dogs that consisted of relatively lower levels of glucose, acetate, choline, and tyrosine and relatively higher serum levels of phosphocholine with increased age in the CR population; (iii) an aging metabolic phenotype specific to CF dogs including lower levels of liproprotein fatty acyl groups and allantoin and relatively higher levels of formate with increased age in the CF population. There was no diet metabotype that consistently differentiated the CF and CR dogs irrespective of age. Glucose consistently discriminated between feeding regimes in dogs (≥312 weeks), being relatively lower in the CR group. However, it was observed that creatine and amino acids (valine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine, and phenylalanine) were lower in the CR dogs (<312 weeks), suggestive of differences in energy source utilization. ¹H NMR spectroscopic analysis of longitudinal serum

  18. Monoamines, glucose metabolism, aggression towards self and others.

    PubMed

    Roy, A; Virkkunen, M; Linnoila, M

    1988-08-01

    The evidence is reviewed that violent and suicidal behavior is associated with a deficiency of the serotonin system and that individuals with poor impulse control tend to become hypoglycemic during an oral glucose tolerance test, and have low levels of 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid in the cerebrospinal fluid. It is postulated that serotonergic deficits may predispose individuals to poor impulse control, disturbance of glucose metabolism, alcohol abuse, violent behavior and suicide. PMID:2460415

  19. Positive Correlation between Severity of Blepharospasm and Thalamic Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Murai, Hideki; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Kiyosawa, Motohiro; Wakakura, Masato; Mochizuki, Manabu; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ishii, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman with drug-related blepharospasm was followed up for 22 months. She had undergone etizolam treatment for 19 years for indefinite complaints. We examined her cerebral glucose metabolism 5 times (between days 149 and 688 since presentation), using positron emission tomography, and identified regions of interest in the thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and primary somatosensory area on both sides. The severity of the blepharospasm was evaluated by PET scanning using the Wakakura classification. Sixteen women (mean age 42.4 ± 11.7 years) were examined as normal controls. The thalamic glucose metabolism in our patient was significantly increased on days 149, 212, and 688. The severity of the blepharospasm was positively correlated with the thalamic glucose metabolism, suggesting that the severity of blepharospasms reflects thalamic activity. PMID:22110436

  20. Positive Correlation between Severity of Blepharospasm and Thalamic Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Hideki; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Kiyosawa, Motohiro; Wakakura, Masato; Mochizuki, Manabu; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ishii, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman with drug-related blepharospasm was followed up for 22 months. She had undergone etizolam treatment for 19 years for indefinite complaints. We examined her cerebral glucose metabolism 5 times (between days 149 and 688 since presentation), using positron emission tomography, and identified regions of interest in the thalamus, caudate nucleus, putamen, and primary somatosensory area on both sides. The severity of the blepharospasm was evaluated by PET scanning using the Wakakura classification. Sixteen women (mean age 42.4 ± 11.7 years) were examined as normal controls. The thalamic glucose metabolism in our patient was significantly increased on days 149, 212, and 688. The severity of the blepharospasm was positively correlated with the thalamic glucose metabolism, suggesting that the severity of blepharospasms reflects thalamic activity. PMID:22110436

  1. Glutamine and glucose metabolism in enterocytes of the neonatal pig.

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Knabe, D A; Yan, W; Flynn, N E

    1995-02-01

    Glutamine and glucose metabolism was studied in 0- to 21-day-old pig enterocytes. Cells were incubated at 37 degrees C for 30 min in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) in the presence of 2 mM [U-14C]glutamine with or without 5 mM glucose, or 5 mM [U-14C]glucose with or without 2 mM glutamine. Glutamine was metabolized to ammonia, glutamate, alanine, aspartate, CO2, citrulline, ornithine, and proline, whereas glucose was converted to lactate, pyruvate, and CO2 in pig enterocytes. CO2 production from glutamine accounted for 32-36% and 3-4% of utilized glutamine carbons in 0- to 7-day-old and 14- to 21-day-old pigs, respectively. The rates of O2 consumption and metabolism of glutamine and glucose decreased in enterocytes from 2- to 14-day-old pigs compared with 0-day-old pigs. By day 14 after birth, the oxidation of glutamine and glucose as well as citrulline production had decreased by 90-95%. Arginine synthesis from glutamine occurred in cells from 0- to 7-day-old pigs but not 14- to 21-day-old ones. Glucose (5 mM) had no effect on glutamine utilization and oxidation or the production of glutamate and arginine but stimulated the formation of alanine, citrulline, and proline at the expense of aspartate. In contrast, glutamine (2 mM) inhibited glycolysis and glucose oxidation in cells from 0- to 7-day-old pigs and had no effects in 14- to 21-day-old pigs. As a result, glutamine contributed approximately 2-fold greater amounts of ATP to 0- to 7-day-old pig enterocytes than glucose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7864226

  2. Maternal inheritance of severe hypertriglyceridemia impairs glucose metabolism in offspring.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya-Hong; Yu, Caiguo; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Guo, Xin; Ji, Zhili; Liu, George

    2015-04-01

    Maternally inherited familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) impairs glucose metabolism and increases cardiovascular risks in the offspring to a greater degree than paternal inherited FH. However, it remains unknown whether hypertriglyceridemia affects glucose metabolism via inheritance. In this study, we sought to compare the impact of maternally and paternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia on glucose and lipid metabolism in mice. ApoCIII transgenic mice with severe hypertriglyceridemia were mated with non-transgenic control mice to obtain 4 types of offspring: maternal non-transgenic control and maternal transgenic offspring, and paternal control and paternal transgenic offspring. Plasma triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting insulin (FINS) were measured. ApoCIII overexpression caused severe hypertriglyceridemia, but the transgenic female mice had unaltered fertility with normal pregnancy and birth of pups. The 4 groups of offspring had similar birth weight and growth rate. The plasma TG of maternal and paternal transgenic offspring were nearly 40-fold higher than maternal and paternal control mice, but there was no difference in plasma TG between maternal and paternal transgenic offspring. Although the FPG of the 4 groups of animals had no difference, the maternal transgenic mice showed impaired glucose tolerance, increased FINS levels and higher homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) than the other 3 groups. In conclusion, maternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia in ApoCIII transgenic mice displayed impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia and increased HOMA-R, while paternally inherited hypertriglyceridemia did not have such impacts. PMID:25859267

  3. 1-deoxynojirimycin inhibits glucose absorption and accelerates glucose metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, You-Gui; Ji, Dong-Feng; Zhong, Shi; Lin, Tian-Bao; Lv, Zhi-Qiang; Hu, Gui-Yan; Wang, Xin

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) on glucose absorption and metabolism in normal and diabetic mice. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests and labeled 13C6-glucose uptake assays suggested that DNJ inhibited intestinal glucose absorption in intestine. We also showed that DNJ down-regulated intestinal SGLT1, Na+/K+-ATP and GLUT2 mRNA and protein expression. Pretreatment with DNJ (50 mg/kg) increased the activity, mRNA and protein levels of hepatic glycolysis enzymes (GK, PFK, PK, PDE1) and decreased the expression of gluconeogenesis enzymes (PEPCK, G-6-Pase). Assays of protein expression in hepatic cells and in vitro tests with purified enzymes indicated that the increased activity of glucose glycolysis enzymes was resulted from the relative increase in protein expression, rather than from direct enzyme activation. These results suggest that DNJ inhibits intestinal glucose absorption and accelerates hepatic glucose metabolism by directly regulating the expression of proteins involved in glucose transport systems, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis enzymes. PMID:23536174

  4. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  5. Glucose regulates lipid metabolism in fasting king penguins.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Servane F; Orvoine, Jord; Groscolas, René

    2003-08-01

    This study aims to determine whether glucose intervenes in the regulation of lipid metabolism in long-term fasting birds, using the king penguin as an animal model. Changes in the plasma concentration of various metabolites and hormones, and in lipolytic fluxes as determined by continuous infusion of [2-3H]glycerol and [1-14C]palmitate, were examined in vivo before, during, and after a 2-h glucose infusion under field conditions. All the birds were in the phase II fasting status (large fat stores, protein sparing) but differed by their metabolic and hormonal statuses, being either nonstressed (NSB; n = 5) or stressed (SB; n = 5). In both groups, glucose infusion at 5 mg.kg-1.min-1 induced a twofold increase in glycemia. In NSB, glucose had no effect on lipolysis (maintenance of plasma concentrations and rates of appearance of glycerol and nonesterified fatty acids) and no effect on the plasma concentrations of triacylglycerols (TAG), glucagon, insulin, or corticosterone. However, it limited fatty acid (FA) oxidation, as indicated by a 25% decrease in the plasma level of beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-OHB). In SB, glucose infusion induced an approximately 2.5-fold decrease in lipolytic fluxes and a large decrease in FA oxidation, as reflected by a 64% decrease in the plasma concentration of beta-OHB. There were also a 35% decrease in plasma TAG, a 6.5- and 2.8-fold decrease in plasma glucagon and corticosterone, respectively, and a threefold increase in insulinemia. These data show that in fasting king penguins, glucose regulates lipid metabolism (inhibition of lipolysis and/or of FA oxidation) and affects hormonal status differently in stressed vs. nonstressed individuals. The results also suggest that in birds, as in humans, the availability of glucose, not of FA, is an important determinant of the substrate mix (glucose vs. FA) that is oxidized for energy production. PMID:12738609

  6. Activation of bile acid signaling improves metabolic phenotypes in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Joseph F; Martinez, Kristina B; Ye, Honggang; Nadimpalli, Anuradha; Morton, Timothy C; Yang, Jinghui; Wang, Qiang; Patno, Noelle; Chang, Eugene B; Yin, Deng Ping

    2016-08-01

    The metabolic benefits induced by gastric bypass, currently the most effective treatment for morbid obesity, are associated with bile acid (BA) delivery to the distal intestine. However, mechanistic insights into BA signaling in the mediation of metabolic benefits remain an area of study. The bile diversion () mouse model, in which the gallbladder is anastomosed to the distal jejunum, was used to test the specific role of BA in the regulation of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Metabolic phenotype, including body weight and composition, glucose tolerance, energy expenditure, thermogenesis genes, total BA and BA composition in the circulation and portal vein, and gut microbiota were examined. BD improves the metabolic phenotype, which is in accord with increased circulating primary BAs and regulation of enterohormones. BD-induced hypertrophy of the proximal intestine in the absence of BA was reversed by BA oral gavage, but without influencing BD metabolic benefits. BD-enhanced energy expenditure was associated with elevated TGR5, D2, and thermogenic genes, including UCP1, PRDM16, PGC-1α, PGC-1β, and PDGFRα in epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT) and inguinal WAT, but not in brown adipose tissue. BD resulted in an altered gut microbiota profile (i.e., Firmicutes bacteria were decreased, Bacteroidetes were increased, and Akkermansia was positively correlated with higher levels of circulating primary BAs). Our study demonstrates that enhancement of BA signaling regulates glucose and lipid homeostasis, promotes thermogenesis, and modulates the gut microbiota, which collectively resulted in an improved metabolic phenotype. PMID:27340128

  7. The Role of Inflammatory Pathway Genetic Variation on Maternal Metabolic Phenotypes during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Margrit; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Lee, Hoon; Freathy, Rachel M.; Lowe, Lynn P.; Ackerman, Christine; Jafari, Nadereh; Dyer, Alan R.; Cox, Nancy J.; Dunger, David B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Metzger, Boyd E.; Lowe, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Since mediators of inflammation are associated with insulin resistance, and the risk of developing diabetes mellitus and gestational diabetes, we hypothesized that genetic variation in members of the inflammatory gene pathway impact glucose levels and related phenotypes in pregnancy. We evaluated this hypothesis by testing for association between genetic variants in 31 inflammatory pathway genes in the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) cohort, a large multiethnic multicenter study designed to address the impact of glycemia less than overt diabetes on pregnancy outcome. Results Fasting, 1-hour, and 2-hour glucose, fasting and 1-hour C-peptide, and HbA1c levels were measured in blood samples obtained from HAPO participants during an oral glucose tolerance test at 24-32 weeks gestation. We tested for association between 458 SNPs mapping to 31 genes in the inflammatory pathway and metabolic phenotypes in 3836 European ancestry and 1713 Thai pregnant women. The strongest evidence for association was observed with TNF alpha and HbA1c (rs1052248; 0.04% increase per allele C; p-value = 4.4×10−5), RETN and fasting plasma glucose (rs1423096; 0.7 mg/dl decrease per allele A; p-value = 1.1×10−4), IL8 and 1 hr plasma glucose (rs2886920; 2.6 mg/dl decrease per allele T; p-value = 1.3×10−4), ADIPOR2 and fasting C-peptide (rs2041139; 0.55 ug/L decrease per allele A; p-value = 1.4×10−4), LEPR and 1-hour C-peptide (rs1171278; 0.62 ug/L decrease per allele T; p-value = 2.4×10−4), and IL6 and 1-hour plasma glucose (rs6954897; −2.29 mg/dl decrease per allele G, p-value = 4.3×10−4). Conclusions Based on the genes surveyed in this study the inflammatory pathway is unlikely to have a strong impact on maternal metabolic phenotypes in pregnancy although variation in individual members of the pathway (e.g. RETN, IL8, ADIPOR2, LEPR, IL6, and TNF alpha,) may contribute to metabolic phenotypes in pregnant women. PMID

  8. Glucose metabolism in cachectic patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Holroyde, C P; Skutches, C L; Boden, G; Reichard, G A

    1984-12-01

    We have studied a defined group of 12 weight-losing patients with metastatic colorectal cancer to evaluate the occurrence of and possible relationship between those determinants of carbohydrate metabolism which have been reported to occur commonly in cancer cachexia. The rates of endogenous glucose production and recycling via lactate (Cori cycle) were measured following an infusion of 50 to 100 microCi of [1-14C]glucose. Compared to an age-related group of control subjects without cancer, significantly elevated rates of glucose production [136.4 +/- 9.0 (S.E.) versus 101.0 +/- 4.6 mg/kg/hr; p less than 0.01] and recycling (43.0 +/- 7.2 versus 15.4 mg/kg/hr; p less than 0.01) were observed. Values for glucose production and recycling ranged from normal to markedly elevated. Glucose tolerance was then determined following a p.o. glucose load of 40 g/sq m in 10 of the 12 patients. Compared to control subjects, all showed a significantly delayed clearance of glucose (p less than 0.01) and a blunted insulin-secretory responsiveness (p less than 0.025). Increased glucose production and recycling was only observed in the presence of carbohydrate intolerance, but the latter occurred in a manner which seemed independent of the rate of glucose turnover. In order to obtain an estimate of hepatic glycogen reserves, glucagon, 15 ng/kg/min, was infused over 40 min in seven subjects. A significantly blunted glycemic response was observed in the cancer patients compared to controls (delta 25.0 +/- 6.9 versus 57.8 +/- 8.5 mg/dl; p less than 0.025). Neither the rate of glucose production nor the glycemic response to glucagon appeared to correlate with the immediate antecedent caloric intake. An apparent relationship was observed, however, between increased glucose production and recycling and a lack of response to infused glucagon, probably reflecting decreased glycogen stores in the face of an increased glucose requirement by the patient. We have shown that diverse abnormalities

  9. Metabolic phenotyping and systems biology approaches to understanding neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Davidovic, Laetitia

    2013-01-01

    The development of high-throughput metabolic profiling and the study of the metabolome are particularly important in brain research where small molecules or metabolites play fundamental signalling roles: neurotransmitters, signalling lipids, osmolytes and even ions. Metabolic profiling has shown that metabolic perturbations in the brain go beyond alterations of neurotransmission and that variations in brain metabolic homeostasis are associated with neurological disorders. In this report, we will focus on recent developments in the field of metabolic phenotyping that have contributed to unravelling the pathophysiology of neurological diseases. Also, we will highlight the necessity of implementing systems biology approaches to integrate metabolic data and tackle the structural and functional complexity of the brain in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:23755365

  10. Glucose metabolism and effect of acetate in ovine adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y T; White, L S; Muir, L A

    1982-08-01

    Isolated ovine adipocytes were incubated in vitro with specifically labeled 14C-glucose in the presence or absence of acetate. The flux patterns of glucose carbon through major metabolic pathways were estimated. When glucose was added as the sole substrate, approximately equal portions of glucose carbon (10%) were oxidized to CO2 in the pentose phosphate pathway, in the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction and in the citrate cycle. Fifteen percent of the glucose carbon was incorporated into fatty acids and 43% was released as lactate and pyruvate. Addition of acetate to the medium increased glucose carbon uptake by 1.5-fold. Most of this increase was accounted for by a sevenfold increase in the activity of the pentose phosphate pathway. Acetate increased glucose carbon fluxes via pentose phosphate pathway to triose phosphates, from triose phosphate to pyruvate, into glyceride glycerol, into lactate and pyruvate and into pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate cycle CO2. Glucose carbon incorporated into fatty acids was decreased 50% by acetate while, carbon fluxes through the phosphofructokinase-aldolase reactions were not significantly increased. Results of this study suggest that, when glucose is the sole substrate, the conversion of glucose to fatty acids in ovine adipocytes may not be limited by the maximum capacity of hexokinase, the pentose phosphate pathway or enzymes involved in the conversion of triose phosphates to pyruvate and of pyruvate to fatty acid. Acetate increased glucose utilization apparently by increasing activity of the pentose phosphate pathway as a result of enhanced NADPH utilization for fatty acid synthesis. PMID:7142048

  11. Proximal correlates of metabolic phenotypes during ‘at-risk' and ‘case' stages of the metabolic disease continuum

    PubMed Central

    Haren, M T; Misan, G; Grant, J F; Buckley, J D; Howe, P R C; Taylor, A W; Newbury, J; McDermott, R A

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the social and behavioural correlates of metabolic phenotypes during ‘at-risk' and ‘case' stages of the metabolic disease continuum. Design: Cross-sectional study of a random population sample. Participants: A total of 718 community-dwelling adults (57% female), aged 18–92 years from a regional South Australian city. Measurements: Total body fat and lean mass and abdominal fat mass were assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Fasting venous blood was collected in the morning for assessment of glycated haemoglobin, plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, cholesterol lipoproteins and insulin. Seated blood pressure (BP) was measured. Physical activity and smoking, alcohol and diet (96-item food frequency), sleep duration and frequency of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) symptoms, and family history of cardiometabolic disease, education, lifetime occupation and household income were assessed by questionnaire. Current medications were determined by clinical inventory. Results: 36.5% were pharmacologically managed for a metabolic risk factor or had known diabetes (‘cases'), otherwise were classified as the ‘at-risk' population. In both ‘at-risk' and ‘cases', four major metabolic phenotypes were identified using principal components analysis that explained over 77% of the metabolic variance between people: fat mass/insulinemia (FMI); BP; lipidaemia/lean mass (LLM) and glycaemia (GLY). The BP phenotype was uncorrelated with other phenotypes in ‘cases', whereas all phenotypes were inter-correlated in the ‘at-risk'. Over and above other socioeconomic and behavioural factors, medications were the dominant correlates of all phenotypes in ‘cases' and SDB symptom frequency was most strongly associated with FMI, LLM and GLY phenotypes in the ‘at-risk'. Conclusion: Previous research has shown FMI, LLM and GLY phenotypes to be most strongly predictive of diabetes development. Reducing SDB symptom frequency and optimising the duration

  12. PAFR in adipose tissue macrophages is associated with anti-inflammatory phenotype and metabolic homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras, Luciano Ribeiro; Koga, Marianna Mainardi; Quaresma, Paula G; Ishizuka, Edson Kiyotaka; Montes, Marlise B A; Prada, Patricia O; Saad, Mario J; Jancar, Sonia; Rios, Francisco J

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic dysfunction is associated with adipose tissue inflammation and macrophage infiltration. PAFR (platelet-activating factor receptor) is expressed in several cell types and binds to PAF (platelet-activating factor) and oxidized phospholipids. Engagement of PAFR in macrophages drives them towards the anti-inflammatory phenotype. In the present study, we investigated whether genetic deficiency of PAFR affects the phenotype of ATMs (adipose tissue macrophages) and its effect on glucose and insulin metabolism. PARFKO (PAFR-knockout) and WT (wild-type) mice were fed on an SD (standard diet) or an HFD (high-fat diet). Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed by blood monitoring. ATMs were evaluated by FACS for phenotypic markers. Gene and protein expression was investigated by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and Western blotting respectively. Results showed that the epididymal adipose tissue of PAFRKO mice had increased gene expression of Ccr7, Nos2, Il6 and Il12, associated with pro-inflammatory mediators, and reduced expression of the anti-inflammatory Il10. Moreover, the adipose tissue of PAFRKO mice presented more pro-inflammatory macrophages, characterized by an increased frequency of F4/80(+)CD11c(+) cells. Blood monocytes of PAFRKO mice also exhibited a pro-inflammatory phenotype (increased frequency of Ly6C(+) cells) and PAFR ligands were detected in the serum of both PAFRKO and WT mice. Regarding metabolic parameters, compared with WT, PAFRKO mice had: (i) higher weight gain and serum glucose concentration levels; (ii) decreased insulin-stimulated glucose disappearance; (iii) insulin resistance in the liver; (iv) increased expression of Ldlr in the liver. In mice fed on an HFD, some of these changes were potentiated, particularly in the liver. Thus it seems that endogenous ligands of PAFR are responsible for maintaining the anti-inflammatory profile of blood monocytes and ATMs under physiological conditions. In the absence of

  13. Metabolic Profiling of the Response to an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Detects Subtle Metabolic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Wopereis, Suzan; Rubingh, Carina M.; van Erk, Marjan J.; Verheij, Elwin R.; van Vliet, Trinette; Cnubben, Nicole H. P.; Smilde, Age K.; van der Greef, Jan; van Ommen, Ben; Hendriks, Henk F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of overweight is increasing globally and has become a serious health problem. Low-grade chronic inflammation in overweight subjects is thought to play an important role in disease development. Novel tools to understand these processes are needed. Metabolic profiling is one such tool that can provide novel insights into the impact of treatments on metabolism. Methodology To study the metabolic changes induced by a mild anti-inflammatory drug intervention, plasma metabolic profiling was applied in overweight human volunteers with elevated levels of the inflammatory plasma marker C-reactive protein. Liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometric methods were used to detect high and low abundant plasma metabolites both in fasted conditions and during an oral glucose tolerance test. This is based on the concept that the resilience of the system can be assessed after perturbing a homeostatic situation. Conclusions Metabolic changes were subtle and were only detected using metabolic profiling in combination with an oral glucose tolerance test. The repeated measurements during the oral glucose tolerance test increased statistical power, but the metabolic perturbation also revealed metabolites that respond differentially to the oral glucose tolerance test. Specifically, multiple metabolic intermediates of the glutathione synthesis pathway showed time-dependent suppression in response to the glucose challenge test. The fact that this is an insulin sensitive pathway suggests that inflammatory modulation may alter insulin signaling in overweight men. PMID:19242536

  14. Glycolysis-induced discordance between glucose metabolic rates measured with radiolabeled fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, R.F.; Lear, J.L. )

    1989-12-01

    We have developed an autoradiographic method for estimating the oxidative and glycolytic components of local CMRglc (LCMRglc), using sequentially administered ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and ({sup 14}C)-6-glucose (GLC). FDG-6-phosphate accumulation is proportional to the rate of glucose phosphorylation, which occurs before the divergence of glycolytic (GMg) and oxidative (GMo) glucose metabolism and is therefore related to total cerebral glucose metabolism GMt: GMg + GMo = GMt. With oxidative metabolism, the {sup 14}C label of GLC is temporarily retained in Krebs cycle-related substrate pools. We hypothesize that with glycolytic metabolism, however, a significant fraction of the {sup 14}C label is lost from the brain via lactate production and efflux from the brain. Thus, cerebral GLC metabolite concentration may be more closely related to GMo than to GMt. If true, the glycolytic metabolic rate will be related to the difference between FDG- and GLC-derived LCMRglc. Thus far, we have studied normal awake rats, rats with limbic activation induced by kainic acid (KA), and rats visually stimulated with 16-Hz flashes. In KA-treated rats, significant discordance between FDG and GLC accumulation, which we attribute to glycolysis, occurred only in activated limbic structures. In visually stimulated rats, significant discordance occurred only in the optic tectum.

  15. Glycolysis-induced discordance between glucose metabolic rates measured with radiolabeled fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, R F; Lear, J L

    1989-12-01

    We have developed an autoradiographic method for estimating the oxidative and glycolytic components of local CMRglc (LCMRglc), using sequentially administered [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and [14C]-6-glucose (GLC). FDG-6-phosphate accumulation is proportional to the rate of glucose phosphorylation, which occurs before the divergence of glycolytic (GMg) and oxidative (GMo) glucose metabolism and is therefore related to total cerebral glucose metabolism GMt: GMg + GMo = GMt. With oxidative metabolism, the 14C label of GLC is temporarily retained in Krebs cycle-related substrate pools. We hypothesize that with glycolytic metabolism, however, a significant fraction of the 14C label is lost from the brain via lactate production and efflux from the brain. Thus, cerebral GLC metabolite concentration may be more closely related to GMo than to GMt. If true, the glycolytic metabolic rate will be related to the difference between FDG- and GLC-derived LCMRglc. Thus far, we have studied normal awake rats, rats with limbic activation induced by kainic acid (KA), and rats visually stimulated with 16-Hz flashes. In KA-treated rats, significant discordance between FDG and GLC accumulation, which we attribute to glycolysis, occurred only in activated limbic structures. In visually stimulated rats, significant discordance occurred only in the optic tectum. PMID:2584274

  16. Reaction phenotyping of vinblastine metabolism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Achanta, S; Maxwell, L K

    2016-06-01

    Vinblastine is a vinca alkaloid used either as a single agent or in combination therapy for the treatment of canine mast cell tumours and lymphomas. The objective of this study was to determine which isoform of cytochrome P450 enzyme is responsible for the majority of vinblastine metabolism in dogs. A panel of eight recombinant canine cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP3A12, CYP3A26, CYP2B11, CYP2C41, CYP2C21 and CYP2D15) were incubated in vitro with vinblastine. Findings were confirmed by the use of canine polyclonal antibodies of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP1A1, CYP3A12, CYP2B11 and CYP2C21) that were pre-incubated with individual and pooled hepatic microsomes that were purified from canine liver. Substrate depletion was observed in the presence of recombinant CYP3A12, whereas depletion did not substantially occur when microsomes were pre-incubated with polyclonal antibodies against CYP3A12. These findings confirmed that CYP3A12 is the major cytochrome P450 isoform responsible for the metabolism of vinblastine in dogs. PMID:24502418

  17. Altered glucose metabolism in mouse and humans conceived by IVF.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miaoxin; Wu, Linda; Zhao, Junli; Wu, Fang; Davies, Michael J; Wittert, Gary A; Norman, Robert J; Robker, Rebecca L; Heilbronn, Leonie K

    2014-10-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) may influence the metabolic health of children. However, in humans, it is difficult to separate out the relative contributions of genetics, environment, or the process of IVF, which includes ovarian stimulation (OS) and embryo culture. Therefore, we examined glucose metabolism in young adult humans and in adult male C57BL/6J mice conceived by IVF versus natural birth under energy-balanced and high-fat-overfeeding conditions. In humans, peripheral insulin sensitivity, as assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (80 mU/m(2)/min), was lower in IVF patients (n = 14) versus control subjects (n = 20) after 3 days of an energy-balanced diet (30% fat). In response to 3 days of overfeeding (+1,250 kcal/day, 45% fat), there was a greater increase in systolic blood pressure in IVF versus controls (P = 0.02). Mice conceived after either OS alone or IVF weighed significantly less at birth versus controls (P < 0.01). However, only mice conceived by IVF displayed increased fasting glucose levels, impaired glucose tolerance, and reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the liver after 8 weeks of consuming either a chow or high-fat diet (60% fat). Thus, OS impaired fetal growth in the mouse, but only embryo culture resulted in changes in glucose metabolism that may increase the risk of the development of metabolic diseases later in life, in both mice and humans. PMID:24760136

  18. Pear Bud Metabolism: Seasonal Changes in Glucose Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Richard H.; Faust, Miklos

    1969-01-01

    Utilization of glucose, uracil and valine by flower and leaf buds of seedling pear trees (Pyrus calleryana Decne.) from the time of flower bud initiation to flowering was investigated. A very high rate of glucose utilization through the pentose phosphate pathway was observed throughout the development of buds. There was no difference in the type of glucose metabolism between flower and leaf buds except immediately before flowering, when the metabolism in flower buds was shifted toward the glycolytic pathway. Such a shift did not occur in leaf buds. The incorporation of uracil and valine into the nucleic acid and protein fraction of buds, respectively, was high throughout bud development, perhaps indicating a high rate of turnover in the resting buds. Incorporation of both compounds decreased when buds started to expand prior to flowering. PMID:16657202

  19. A computer model simulating human glucose absorption and metabolism in health and metabolic disease states

    PubMed Central

    Naftalin, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    A computer model designed to simulate integrated glucose-dependent changes in splanchnic blood flow with small intestinal glucose absorption, hormonal and incretin circulation and hepatic and systemic metabolism in health and metabolic diseases e.g. non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, (NAFLD), non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, (NASH) and type 2 diabetes mellitus, (T2DM) demonstrates how when glucagon-like peptide-1, (GLP-1) is synchronously released into the splanchnic blood during intestinal glucose absorption, it stimulates superior mesenteric arterial (SMA) blood flow and by increasing passive intestinal glucose absorption, harmonizes absorption with its distribution and metabolism. GLP-1 also synergises insulin-dependent net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU). When GLP-1 secretion is deficient post-prandial SMA blood flow is not increased and as NHGU is also reduced, hyperglycaemia follows. Portal venous glucose concentration is also raised, thereby retarding the passive component of intestinal glucose absorption.   Increased pre-hepatic sinusoidal resistance combined with portal hypertension leading to opening of intrahepatic portosystemic collateral vessels are NASH-related mechanical defects that alter the balance between splanchnic and systemic distributions of glucose, hormones and incretins.The model reveals the latent contribution of portosystemic shunting in development of metabolic disease. This diverts splanchnic blood content away from the hepatic sinuses to the systemic circulation, particularly during the glucose absorptive phase of digestion, resulting in inappropriate increases in insulin-dependent systemic glucose metabolism.  This hastens onset of hypoglycaemia and thence hyperglucagonaemia. The model reveals that low rates of GLP-1 secretion, frequently associated with T2DM and NASH, may be also be caused by splanchnic hypoglycaemia, rather than to intrinsic loss of incretin secretory capacity. These findings may have therapeutic implications on GLP

  20. Education-Associated Cortical Glucose Metabolism during Sustained Attention

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Daniel P.; London, Edythe D.; Matochik, John A.; Derbyshire, Stuart; Cohen, Lisa J.; Steinfeld, Matthew; Prosser, James; Galynker, Igor I.

    2007-01-01

    Despite research suggesting that education may mitigate cognitive sequelae of neural injury, little is known about interactions between education and regional brain function. We examined whether educational experience is associated with relative glucose metabolism in brain regions that are important for sustained attention and learning. Fourteen healthy adults, with twelve to eighteen years of schooling, underwent positron emission tomography (PET) scanning with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) during an auditory continuous discrimination task. Years of education correlated positively with relative glucose metabolism in the lingual gyri (bilaterally), left posterior cingulate gyrus, and left precuneus. Previously, these structures have shown early impairment in dementia. Further investigation should explore whether metabolic changes in these regions contribute to the possible protective effect of education on cognition. PMID:16110274

  1. Cerebral glucose metabolism in the course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, M.; Herholz, K.; Pawlik, G.; Szelies, B.; Juergens, R.H.; Heiss, W.D.

    1989-01-01

    Regional cerebral glucose metabolism was studied in a 15-year-old boy with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis before and after therapy with human interferon beta, using positron emission tomography of fluorine 18-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose. At first examination, metabolism was symmetrically decreased in the thalamus, cerebellum, and all cortical areas except prerolandic motor cortex, but increased in lentiform nucleus. A computed tomographic scan was normal. Six months later, bilateral focal necrosis centered in the previously hypermetabolic putamen was demonstrated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The caudate nucleus and the superoposterior part of the putamen were spared, still showing increased metabolism. Corresponding with some clinical improvement, cortical glucose consumption rates had returned to a normal level.

  2. Probing the Metabolic Network in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei Using Untargeted Metabolomics with Stable Isotope Labelled Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Creek, Darren J.; Mazet, Muriel; Achcar, Fiona; Anderson, Jana; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kamour, Ruwida; Morand, Pauline; Millerioux, Yoann; Biran, Marc; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Weidt, Stefan K.; Burgess, Karl E. V.; Breitling, Rainer; Watson, David G.; Bringaud, Frédéric; Barrett, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate. PMID:25775470

  3. Main characteristics of metabolically obese normal weight and metabolically healthy obese phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Tatiana F S; Alves, Raquel D M; Moreira, Ana Paula B; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo G

    2015-03-01

    In this review, the influence of fat depots on insulin resistance and the main characteristics of metabolically obese normal-weight and metabolically healthy obese phenotypes are discussed. Medline/PubMed and Science Direct were searched for articles related to the terms metabolically healthy obesity, metabolically obese normal weight, adipose tissue, and insulin resistance. Normal weight and obesity might be heterogeneous in regard to their effects. Fat distribution and lower insulin sensitivity are the main factors defining phenotypes within the same body mass index. Although these terms are interesting, controversies about them remain. Future studies exploring these phenotypes will help elucidate the roles of adiposity and/or insulin resistance in the development of metabolic alterations. PMID:26024540

  4. Pregnancy-induced metabolic phenotype variations in maternal plasma.

    PubMed

    Luan, Hemi; Meng, Nan; Liu, Ping; Feng, Qiang; Lin, Shuhai; Fu, Jin; Davidson, Robert; Chen, Xiaomin; Rao, Weiqiao; Chen, Fang; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Xun; Cai, Zongwei; Wang, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic variations occur during normal pregnancy to provide the growing fetus with a supply of nutrients required for its development and to ensure the health of the woman during gestation. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics was employed to study the metabolic phenotype variations in the maternal plasma that are induced by pregnancy in each of its three trimesters. Nontargeted metabolomics analysis showed that pregnancy significantly altered the profile of metabolites in maternal plasma. The levels of six metabolites were found to change significantly throughout pregnancy, with related metabolic pathway variations observed in biopterin metabolism, phospholipid metabolism, amino acid derivatives, and fatty acid oxidation. In particular, there was a pronounced elevation of dihydrobiopterin (BH₂), a compound produced in the synthesis of dopa, dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine, in the second trimester, whereas it was markedly decreased in the third trimester. The turnover of BH₂ and tryptophan catabolites indicated that the fluctuations of neurotransmitters throughout pregnancy might reveal the metabolic adaption in the maternal body for the growth of the fetus. Furthermore, 11 lipid classes and 41 carnitine species were also determined and this showed variations in the presence of long-chain acylcarnitines and lysophospholipids in later pregnancy, suggesting changes of acylcarnitines and lysophospholipids to meet the energy demands in pregnant women. To our knowledge, this work is the first report of dynamic metabolic signatures and proposed related metabolic pathways in the maternal plasma for normal pregnancies and provided the basis for time-dependent metabolic trajectory against which disease-related disorders may be contrasted. PMID:24450375

  5. Uric acid as a modulator of glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lima, William Gustavo; Martins-Santos, Maria Emília Soares; Chaves, Valéria Ernestânia

    2015-09-01

    In humans, uric acid is the final oxidation product of purine catabolism. The serum uric acid level is based on the balance between the absorption, production and excretion of purine. Uric acid is similarly produced in the liver, adipose tissue and muscle and is primarily excreted through the urinary tract. Several factors, including a high-fructose diet and the use of xenobiotics and alcohol, contribute to hyperuricaemia. Hyperuricaemia belongs to a cluster of metabolic and haemodynamic abnormalities, called metabolic syndrome, characterised by abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and hypertension. Hyperuricaemia reduction in the Pound mouse or fructose-fed rats, as well as hyperuricaemia induction by uricase inhibition in rodents and studies using cell culture have suggested that uric acid plays an important role in the development of metabolic syndrome. These studies have shown that high uric acid levels regulate the oxidative stress, inflammation and enzymes associated with glucose and lipid metabolism, suggesting a mechanism for the impairment of metabolic homeostasis. Humans lacking uricase, the enzyme responsible for uric acid degradation, are susceptible to these effects. In this review, we summarise the current knowledge of the effects of uric acid on the regulation of metabolism, primarily focusing on liver, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. PMID:26133655

  6. Gut microbiome phenotypes driven by host genetics affect arsenic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kun; Mahbub, Ridwan; Cable, Peter Hans; Ru, Hongyu; Parry, Nicola M A; Bodnar, Wanda M; Wishnok, John S; Styblo, Miroslav; Swenberg, James A; Fox, James G; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2014-02-17

    Large individual differences in susceptibility to arsenic-induced diseases are well-documented and frequently associated with different patterns of arsenic metabolism. In this context, the role of the gut microbiome in directly metabolizing arsenic and triggering systemic responses in diverse organs raises the possibility that gut microbiome phenotypes affect the spectrum of metabolized arsenic species. However, it remains unclear how host genetics and the gut microbiome interact to affect the biotransformation of arsenic. Using an integrated approach combining 16S rRNA gene sequencing and HPLC-ICP-MS arsenic speciation, we demonstrate that IL-10 gene knockout leads to a significant taxonomic change of the gut microbiome, which in turn substantially affects arsenic metabolism. PMID:24490651

  7. Gut microbe-derived extracellular vesicles induce insulin resistance, thereby impairing glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngwoo; Kwon, Yonghoon; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Jeon, Jinseong; Jang, Su Chul; Wang, Taejun; Ban, Minjee; Kim, Min-Hye; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Kim, Min-Sun; Choi, Cheol Soo; Jee, Young-Koo; Gho, Yong Song; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbes might influence host metabolic homeostasis and contribute to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), which is characterized by insulin resistance. Bacteria-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been suggested to be important in the pathogenesis of diseases once believed to be non-infectious. Here, we hypothesize that gut microbe-derived EVs are important in the pathogenesis of T2D. In vivo administration of stool EVs from high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance compared to regular diet (RD)-fed mice. Metagenomic profiling of stool EVs by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing revealed an increased amount of EVs derived from Pseudomonas panacis (phylum Proteobacteria) in HFD mice compared to RD mice. Interestingly, P. panacis EVs blocked the insulin signaling pathway in both skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Moreover, isolated P. panacis EVs induced typical diabetic phenotypes, such as glucose intolerance after glucose administration or systemic insulin injection. Thus, gut microbe-derived EVs might be key players in the development of insulin resistance and impairment of glucose metabolism promoted by HFD. PMID:26510393

  8. Quantifying the Contribution of the Liver to Glucose Homeostasis: A Detailed Kinetic Model of Human Hepatic Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    König, Matthias; Bulik, Sascha; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2012-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of the liver in glucose homeostasis, a detailed mathematical model of human hepatic glucose metabolism is lacking so far. Here we present a detailed kinetic model of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in human hepatocytes integrated with the hormonal control of these pathways by insulin, glucagon and epinephrine. Model simulations are in good agreement with experimental data on (i) the quantitative contributions of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism to hepatic glucose production and hepatic glucose utilization under varying physiological states. (ii) the time courses of postprandial glycogen storage as well as glycogen depletion in overnight fasting and short term fasting (iii) the switch from net hepatic glucose production under hypoglycemia to net hepatic glucose utilization under hyperglycemia essential for glucose homeostasis (iv) hormone perturbations of hepatic glucose metabolism. Response analysis reveals an extra high capacity of the liver to counteract changes of plasma glucose level below 5 mM (hypoglycemia) and above 7.5 mM (hyperglycemia). Our model may serve as an important module of a whole-body model of human glucose metabolism and as a valuable tool for understanding the role of the liver in glucose homeostasis under normal conditions and in diseases like diabetes or glycogen storage diseases. PMID:22761565

  9. [GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN SURFACTANTS PRODUCER NOCARDIA VACCINII IMV B-7405].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Shevchuk, T A; Beregova, K A

    2015-01-01

    Key enzymes of glucose metabolism were detected in the cells of surfactants producer Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 grown on this substrate. It has been established that glucose catabolism is performed through gluconate (FAD(+)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase activity 698 ± 35 nmol x min(-1) x mg(-1) of protein). Oxidation of gluconate to 6-phosphogluconate is catalised by gluconokinase (178 ± 9 nmol x min(-1) x mg(-1) of protein). 6-Phosphogluconate was involved into pentose phosphate cycle by constitutive NADP(+)-dependent 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (activity 357 ± 17 nmol x min(-1) x mg(-1) of protein). The data obtained serve as the basis for theoretical calculations of optimal molar ratio of concentrations of energetically nonequivalent substrates for intensifying the surfactants synthesis on their mixture. PMID:26638479

  10. Circadian System and Glucose Metabolism: Implications for Physiology and Disease.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jingyi; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2016-05-01

    The circadian system serves one of the most fundamental properties present in nearly all organisms: it generates 24-h rhythms in behavioral and physiological processes and enables anticipating and adapting to daily environmental changes. Recent studies indicate that the circadian system is important in regulating the daily rhythm in glucose metabolism. Disturbance of this circadian control or of its coordination relative to the environmental/behavioral cycle, such as in shift work, eating late, or due to genetic changes, results in disturbed glucose control and increased type 2 diabetes risk. Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms underlying glucose regulation by the circadian system and its disturbance may help in the development of therapeutic interventions against the deleterious health consequences of circadian disruption. PMID:27079518

  11. Population-specific metabolic phenotypes of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea.

    PubMed

    Davey, Matthew P; Burrell, Mike M; Woodward, F Ian; Quick, W Paul

    2008-01-01

    Plant populations growing at the margin of their range may exhibit traits that indicate genetic differentiation and adaptation to their local abiotic environment. Here, it was investigated whether geographically separated marginal populations of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea have distinct metabolic phenotypes within the plant foliage. Seeds of A. petraea were obtained from populations along a latitudinal gradient (49-64 N), namely Germany, Wales, Sweden and Iceland and grown in a controlled cabinet environment. Targeted metabolic profiles and fingerprints were obtained at the same initial developmental stage. The free amino acid compositions were population specific, with fold differences in arginine, aspartic acid, asparagines, glycine, phenylalanine, alanine, threonine, histidine, serine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations. Sucrose, mannose and fructose concentrations were also different between populations but polyhydric alcohol concentrations were not. Principal component analysis (PCA) of metabolite fingerprints revealed metabolic phenotypes for each population. It is suggested that glucosinolates were responsible for discriminating populations within the PCA. Metabolite fingerprinting and profiling has proved to be sufficiently sensitive to identify metabolic differences between plant populations. These findings show that there is significant natural variation in metabolism among populations of A. petraea. PMID:18028292

  12. Genes in Glucose Metabolism and Association With Spina Bifida

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Christina M.; Northrup, Hope; King, Terri M.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Townsend, Irene; Tyerman, Gayle H.

    2008-01-01

    The authors tested single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in coding sequences of candidate genes involved in glucose metabolism and obesity for associations with spina bifida (SB). Coding SNPs on 12 candidate genes was investigated. Genotyping was performed on 507 children with SB and their parents plus anonymous control DNAs from Hispanic and Caucasian individuals. The transmission disequilibrium test was performed to test for genetic associations between transmission of alleles and SB in the offspring (P < .05). A statistically significant association between Lys481 of HK1 (G allele), Arg109Lys of LEPR (G allele), and Pro196 of GLUT1 (A allele) was found (P = .019, .039 and .040, respectively). Three SNPs on 3 genes involved with glucose metabolism and obesity may be associated with increased susceptibility to SB. PMID:18212354

  13. Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer: The cutting-edge

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lian-Wen; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer cells differs from that of normal epithelial cells. Upregulated aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) in gastric cancer meeting the demands of cell proliferation is associated with genetic mutations, epigenetic modification and proteomic alteration. Understanding the mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis may contribute to our knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis. Metabolomic studies offer novel, convenient and practical tools in the search for new biomarkers for early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and chemosensitivity prediction of gastric cancer. Interfering with the process of glycolysis in cancer cells may provide a new and promising therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. In this article, we present a brief review of recent studies of glucose metabolism in gastric cancer, with primary focus on the clinical applications of new biomarkers and their potential therapeutic role in gastric cancer. PMID:26877609

  14. Cerebral metabolism of glucose in benign hereditary chorea

    SciTech Connect

    Suchowersky, O.; Hayden, M.R.; Martin, W.R.; Stoessl, A.J.; Hildebrand, A.M.; Pate, B.D.

    1986-01-01

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by chorea of early onset with little or no progression. There is marked clinical variability in this disease with some subjects having onset in infancy and others with onset in early adulthood. In contrast to Huntington's disease (HD), there is no dementia. Computed tomography is normal in all subjects with no evidence of caudate nucleus atrophy. We present the results of positron emission tomography using YF-2-fluorodeoxyglucose on three patients with this disorder from two families. Cerebral glucose metabolism in one patient was decreased in the caudate nucleus, as previously reported in HD. The other two persons from a second family showed a relative decrease in metabolic rates of glucose in the caudate when compared with the thalamus. It appears that caudate hypometabolism is not specific for HD. These findings suggest that the caudate nucleus may play a significant role in the pathophysiology of some persons with BHC.

  15. Serotonin modulation of cerebral glucose metabolism: sex and age effects.

    PubMed

    Munro, Cynthia A; Workman, Clifford I; Kramer, Elisse; Hermann, Carol; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Chaly, Thomas; Eidelberg, David; Smith, Gwenn S

    2012-11-01

    The serotonin system is implicated in a variety of psychiatric disorders whose clinical presentation and response to treatment differ between males and females, as well as with aging. However, human neurobiological studies are limited. Sex differences in the cerebral metabolic response to an increase in serotonin concentrations were measured, as well as the effect of aging, in men compared to women. Thirty-three normal healthy individuals (14 men/19 women, age range 20-79 years) underwent two resting positron emission tomography studies with the radiotracer [18F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ([(18)F]-FDG) after placebo and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram) infusions on two separate days. Results indicated that women demonstrated widespread areas of increased cortical glucose metabolism with fewer areas of decrease in metabolism in response to citalopram. Men, in contrast, demonstrated several regions of decreased cortical metabolism, but no regions of increased metabolism. Age was associated with greater increases in women and greater decreases in men in most brain regions. These results support prior studies indicating that serotonin function differs in men and women across the lifespan. Future studies aimed at characterizing the influences of age and sex on the serotonin system in patients with psychiatric disorders are needed to elucidate the relationship between sex and age differences in brain chemistry and associated differences in symptom presentation and treatment response. PMID:22836227

  16. Reproducibility of cerebral glucose metabolic measurements in resting human subjects.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, E J; Brodie, J D; Wolf, A P; Christman, D R; Laska, E; Meissner, M

    1988-08-01

    Positron emission tomography with 11C-2-deoxyglucose was used to determine the test-retest variability of regional cerebral glucose metabolism in 22 young normal right-handed men scanned twice in a 24-h period under baseline (resting) conditions. To assess the effects of scan order and time of day on variability, 12 subjects were scanned in the morning and afternoon of the same day (a.m.-p.m.) and 10 in the reverse order (p.m.-a.m.) with a night in between. The effect of anxiety on metabolism was also assessed. Seventy-three percent of the total subject group showed changes in whole brain metabolism from the first to the second measurement of 10% or less, with comparable changes in various cortical and subcortical regions. When a scaling factor was used to equate the whole brain metabolism in the two scans for each individual, the resulting average regional changes for each group were no more than 1%. This suggests that the proportion of the whole brain metabolism utilized regionally is stable in a group of subjects over time. Both groups of subjects had lower morning than afternoon metabolism, but the differences were slight in the p.m.-a.m. group. One measure of anxiety (pulse at run 1) was correlated with run 1 metabolism and with the percentage of change from run 1 to run 2. No significant run 2 correlations were observed. This is the first study to measure test-retest variability in cerebral glucose metabolism in a large sample of young normal subjects. It demonstrates that the deoxyglucose method yields low intrasubject variability and high stability over a 24-h period. PMID:3260593

  17. Association between DNA Methylation in Whole Blood and Measures of Glucose Metabolism: KORA F4 Study.

    PubMed

    Kriebel, Jennifer; Herder, Christian; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Wahl, Simone; Kunze, Sonja; Molnos, Sophie; Volkova, Nadezda; Schramm, Katharina; Carstensen-Kirberg, Maren; Waldenberger, Melanie; Gieger, Christian; Peters, Annette; Illig, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Roden, Michael; Grallert, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation has been postulated to affect glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we performed an epigenome-wide association study for measures of glucose metabolism in whole blood samples of the population-based Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg F4 study using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450 BeadChip. We identified a total of 31 CpG sites where methylation level was associated with measures of glucose metabolism after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, and estimated white blood cell proportions and correction for multiple testing using the Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H) method (four for fasting glucose, seven for fasting insulin, 25 for homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]; B-H-adjusted p-values between 9.2x10(-5) and 0.047). In addition, DNA methylation at cg06500161 (annotated to ABCG1) was associated with all the aforementioned phenotypes and 2-hour glucose (B-H-adjusted p-values between 9.2x10(-5) and 3.0x10(-3)). Methylation status of additional three CpG sites showed an association with fasting insulin only after additional adjustment for body mass index (BMI) (B-H-adjusted p-values = 0.047). Overall, effect strengths were reduced by around 30% after additional adjustment for BMI, suggesting that this variable has an influence on the investigated phenotypes. Furthermore, we found significant associations between methylation status of 21 of the aforementioned CpG sites and 2-hour insulin in a subset of samples with seven significant associations persisting after additional adjustment for BMI. In a subset of 533 participants, methylation of the CpG site cg06500161 (ABCG1) was inversely associated with ABCG1 gene expression (B-H-adjusted p-value = 1.5x10(-9)). Additionally, we observed an enrichment of the top 1,000 CpG sites for diabetes-related canonical pathways using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. In conclusion, our study indicates that DNA methylation and diabetes

  18. Association between DNA Methylation in Whole Blood and Measures of Glucose Metabolism: KORA F4 Study

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Simone; Kunze, Sonja; Molnos, Sophie; Volkova, Nadezda; Schramm, Katharina; Carstensen-Kirberg, Maren; Waldenberger, Melanie; Gieger, Christian; Peters, Annette; Illig, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Roden, Michael; Grallert, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation has been postulated to affect glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we performed an epigenome-wide association study for measures of glucose metabolism in whole blood samples of the population-based Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg F4 study using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450 BeadChip. We identified a total of 31 CpG sites where methylation level was associated with measures of glucose metabolism after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, and estimated white blood cell proportions and correction for multiple testing using the Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H) method (four for fasting glucose, seven for fasting insulin, 25 for homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]; B-H-adjusted p-values between 9.2x10-5 and 0.047). In addition, DNA methylation at cg06500161 (annotated to ABCG1) was associated with all the aforementioned phenotypes and 2-hour glucose (B-H-adjusted p-values between 9.2x10-5 and 3.0x10-3). Methylation status of additional three CpG sites showed an association with fasting insulin only after additional adjustment for body mass index (BMI) (B-H-adjusted p-values = 0.047). Overall, effect strengths were reduced by around 30% after additional adjustment for BMI, suggesting that this variable has an influence on the investigated phenotypes. Furthermore, we found significant associations between methylation status of 21 of the aforementioned CpG sites and 2-hour insulin in a subset of samples with seven significant associations persisting after additional adjustment for BMI. In a subset of 533 participants, methylation of the CpG site cg06500161 (ABCG1) was inversely associated with ABCG1 gene expression (B-H-adjusted p-value = 1.5x10-9). Additionally, we observed an enrichment of the top 1,000 CpG sites for diabetes-related canonical pathways using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. In conclusion, our study indicates that DNA methylation and diabetes-related traits

  19. A review of standardized metabolic phenotyping of animal models.

    PubMed

    Rozman, Jan; Klingenspor, Martin; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Metabolic phenotyping of genetically modified animals aims to detect new candidate genes and related metabolic pathways that result in dysfunctional energy balance regulation and predispose for diseases such as obesity or type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview on the technologies available to monitor energy flux (food uptake, bomb calorimetry of feces and food, and indirect calorimetry) and body composition (qNMR, DXA, and MRI) in animal models for human diseases with a special focus on phenotyping methods established in genetically engineered mice. We use an energy flux model to illustrate the principles of energy allocation, describe methodological aspects how to monitor energy balance, and introduce strategies for data analysis and presentation. PMID:25199945

  20. The Lin28/let-7 axis regulates glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Segrè, Ayellet V; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar P; Einhorn, William S; Takeuchi, Ayumu; Engreitz, Jesse M; Hagan, John P; Kharas, Michael G; Urbach, Achia; Thornton, James E; Triboulet, Robinson; Gregory, Richard I; Altshuler, David; Daley, George Q

    2011-09-30

    The let-7 tumor suppressor microRNAs are known for their regulation of oncogenes, while the RNA-binding proteins Lin28a/b promote malignancy by inhibiting let-7 biogenesis. We have uncovered unexpected roles for the Lin28/let-7 pathway in regulating metabolism. When overexpressed in mice, both Lin28a and LIN28B promote an insulin-sensitized state that resists high-fat-diet induced diabetes. Conversely, muscle-specific loss of Lin28a or overexpression of let-7 results in insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. These phenomena occur, in part, through the let-7-mediated repression of multiple components of the insulin-PI3K-mTOR pathway, including IGF1R, INSR, and IRS2. In addition, the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, abrogates Lin28a-mediated insulin sensitivity and enhanced glucose uptake. Moreover, let-7 targets are enriched for genes containing SNPs associated with type 2 diabetes and control of fasting glucose in human genome-wide association studies. These data establish the Lin28/let-7 pathway as a central regulator of mammalian glucose metabolism. PMID:21962509

  1. Normalizing the metabolic phenotype after myocardial infarction; impact of subchronic high fat feeding

    PubMed Central

    Berthiaume, Jessica M.; Young, Martin E.; Chen, Xiaoqin; McElfresh, Tracy A.; Yu, Xin; Chandler, Margaret P.

    2012-01-01

    The normal heart relies primarily on the oxidation of fatty acids (FA) for ATP production, whereas during heart failure (HF) glucose utilization increases, implying pathological changes to cardiac energy metabolism. Despite the noted lipotoxic effects of elevating FA, our work has demonstrated a cardioprotective effect of a high fat diet (SAT) when fed after myocardial infarction (MI), as compared to normal chow (NC) fed cohorts. This data has suggested a mechanistic link to energy metabolism. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of SAT on the metabolic phenotype of the heart after MI. Male Wistar rats underwent coronary ligation surgery (MI) and were evaluated after 8 weeks of SAT. Induction of MI was verified by echocardiography. LV function assessed by in vivo hemodynamic measurements revealed improvements in the MI-SAT group as compared to MI-NC. Perfused working hearts revealed a decrease in cardiac work in MI-NC that was improved in MI-SAT. Glucose oxidation was increased and FA oxidation decreased in MINC compared to shams suggesting an alteration in the metabolic profile that was ameliorated by SAT. 31P NMR analysis of Langendorff perfused hearts revealed no differences in PCr:ATP indicating no overt energy deficit in MI groups. Phospho-PDH and PDK4 were increased in MI-SAT, consistent with a shift towards fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Overall, these results support the hypothesis that SAT post-infarction promotes a normal metabolic phenotype that may serve a cardioprotective role in the injured heart. PMID:22542451

  2. Inferring metabolic phenotypes from the exometabolome through a thermodynamic variational principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Martino, Daniele; Capuani, Fabrizio; De Martino, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Networks of biochemical reactions, like cellular metabolic networks, are kept in non-equilibrium steady states by the exchange fluxes connecting them to the environment. In most cases, feasible flux configurations can be derived from minimal mass-balance assumptions upon prescribing in- and outtake fluxes. Here we consider the problem of inferring intracellular flux patterns from extracellular metabolite levels. Resorting to a thermodynamic out of equilibrium variational principle to describe the network at steady state, we show that the switch from fermentative to oxidative phenotypes in cells can be characterized in terms of the glucose, lactate, oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations. Results obtained for an exactly solvable toy model are fully recovered for a large scale reconstruction of human catabolism. Finally we argue that, in spite of the many approximations involved in the theory, available data for several human cell types are well described by the predicted phenotypic map of the problem.

  3. Dietary patterns in men and women are simultaneously determinants of altered glucose metabolism and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Langsetmo, Lisa; Barr, Susan I; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Berger, Claudie; Kovacs, Christopher S; Josse, Robert G; Adachi, Jonathan D; Hanley, David A; Prior, Jerilynn C; Brown, Jacques P; Morin, Suzanne N; Davison, Kenneth S; Goltzman, David; Kreiger, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that diet would have direct effects on glucose metabolism with direct and indirect effects on bone metabolism in a cohort of Canadian adults. We assessed dietary patterns (Prudent [fruit, vegetables, whole grains, fish, and legumes] and Western [soft drinks, potato chips, French fries, meats, and desserts]) from a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used fasting blood samples to measure glucose, insulin, homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), parathyroid hormone, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (a bone formation marker), and serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX; a bone resorption marker). We used multivariate regression models adjusted for confounders and including/excluding body mass index. In a secondary analysis, we examined relationships through structural equations models. The Prudent diet was associated with favorable effects on glucose metabolism (lower insulin and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (lower CTX in women; higher 25OHD and lower parathyroid hormone in men). The Western diet was associated with deleterious effects on glucose metabolism (higher glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (higher bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and lower 25OHD in women; higher CTX in men). Body mass index adjustment moved point estimates toward the null, indicating partial mediation. The structural equation model confirmed the hypothesized linkage with strong effects of Prudent and Western diet on metabolic risk, and both direct and indirect effects of a Prudent diet on bone turnover. In summary, a Prudent diet was associated with lower metabolic risk with both primary and mediated effects on bone turnover, suggesting that it is a potential target for reducing fracture risk. PMID:27001278

  4. Brain glucose metabolism during hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes: insights from functional and metabolic neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Rooijackers, Hanne M M; Wiegers, Evita C; Tack, Cees J; van der Graaf, Marinette; de Galan, Bastiaan E

    2016-02-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most frequent complication of insulin therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes. Since the brain is reliant on circulating glucose as its main source of energy, hypoglycemia poses a threat for normal brain function. Paradoxically, although hypoglycemia commonly induces immediate decline in cognitive function, long-lasting changes in brain structure and cognitive function are uncommon in patients with type 1 diabetes. In fact, recurrent hypoglycemia initiates a process of habituation that suppresses hormonal responses to and impairs awareness of subsequent hypoglycemia, which has been attributed to adaptations in the brain. These observations sparked great scientific interest into the brain's handling of glucose during (recurrent) hypoglycemia. Various neuroimaging techniques have been employed to study brain (glucose) metabolism, including PET, fMRI, MRS and ASL. This review discusses what is currently known about cerebral metabolism during hypoglycemia, and how findings obtained by functional and metabolic neuroimaging techniques contributed to this knowledge. PMID:26521082

  5. Metabolic phenotype of phosphoglucose isomerase mutants of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Marx, Achim; Hans, Stephan; Möckel, Bettina; Bathe, Brigitte; de Graaf, Albert A; McCormack, Ashling C; Stapleton, Cliona; Burke, Kevin; O'Donohue, Michael; Dunican, L K

    2003-09-01

    A series of experiments reported in the literature using fluxomics as an efficient functional genomics tool revealed that the L-lysine production of the Corynebacterium glutamicum strain MH20-22B correlates with the extent of intracellular NADPH supply. Some alternative metabolic engineering strategies to increase intracellular NADPH supply in the C. glutamicum strain DSM5715 were considered and finally the redirection of carbon flux through the pentose phosphate pathway with two NADPH generating enzymatic reactions was favored. Elsewhere, the construction of a phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) null mutant of the C. glutamicum strain DSM5715 has been described by utilizing genetic engineering as well as some aspects of its metabolic phenotype. Most interestingly, it was shown that not only could the L-lysine formation be increased by 1.7-fold but the by-product concentration for the null mutant strain was also able to be drastically reduced. In this publication we discuss this metabolic phenotype in detail and present additional data on by-product formation as well as yield considerations. Results from isotope based metabolic flux analysis in combination with considerations on NADPH metabolism clearly exclude the existence of Pgi isoenzymes in C. glutamicum strain DSM5715. The genome region containing the pgi gene was analyzed. It cannot be excluded that polar effects might have been caused by the disruption of the pgi gene and might have contributed to the observed metabolic phenotype of C. glutamicum Pgi mutants. We illustrate growth characteristics of a Pgi mutant of an industrial L-lysine production strain. A reduced growth rate and a biphasic growth behavior was observed. The importance of NADPH reoxidation for well balanced growth in Pgi mutants is discussed. Another phosphoglucose isomerase mutant of C. glutamicum has been described in literature with which an increase in L-lysine yield from 42 to 52% was observed. This finding highlights the general potential

  6. Simvastatin Inhibits Glucose Metabolism and Legumain Activity in Human Myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert; Solberg, Rigmor; Jacobsen, Linn Løkken; Voreland, Anette Larsen; Rustan, Arild Christian; Thoresen, G. Hege; Johansen, Harald Thidemann

    2014-01-01

    Simvastatin, a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, is prescribed worldwide to patients with hypercholesterolemia. Although simvastatin is well tolerated, side effects like myotoxicity are reported. The mechanism for statin-induced myotoxicity is still poorly understood. Reports have suggested impaired mitochondrial dysfunction as a contributor to the observed myotoxicity. In this regard, we wanted to study the effects of simvastatin on glucose metabolism and the activity of legumain, a cysteine protease. Legumain, being the only known asparaginyl endopeptidase, has caspase-like properties and is described to be involved in apoptosis. Recent evidences indicate a regulatory role of both glucose and statins on cysteine proteases in monocytes. Satellite cells were isolated from the Musculus obliquus internus abdominis of healthy human donors, proliferated and differentiated into polynuclear myotubes. Simvastatin with or without mevalonolactone, farnesyl pyrophosphate or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate were introduced on day 5 of differentiation. After 48 h, cells were either harvested for immunoblotting, ELISA, cell viability assay, confocal imaging or enzyme activity analysis, or placed in a fuel handling system with [14C]glucose or [3H]deoxyglucose for uptake and oxidation studies. A dose-dependent decrease in both glucose uptake and oxidation were observed in mature myotubes after exposure to simvastatin in concentrations not influencing cell viability. In addition, simvastatin caused a decrease in maturation and activity of legumain. Dysregulation of glucose metabolism and decreased legumain activity by simvastatin points out new knowledge about the effects of statins on skeletal muscle, and may contribute to the understanding of the myotoxicity observed by statins. PMID:24416446

  7. Predicting Development of the Metabolically Healthy Obese Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Achilike, Immaculeta; Hazuda, Helen P.; Fowler, Sharon P.; Aung, KoKo; Lorenzo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective The metabolically healthy (MHO) and unhealthy obese (MUHO) differ in terms of cardiovascular risk. However, little is known about predicting the development of these phenotypes and the future stability of the MHO phenotype. Therefore, we examined these two issues in the San Antonio Heart Study. Design Longitudinal, population-based study of cardiometabolic risk factors among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites in San Antonio. Subjects The study sample included 2,368 participants with neither MUHO nor diabetes at baseline. Median follow-up was 7.8 years. MHO was defined as obesity with ≤1 metabolic abnormality; MUHO, as obesity with ≥2 abnormalities. Results At baseline, 1,595 and 498 individuals were non-obese with ≤1 and ≥2 metabolic abnormalities, respectively; 275 were MHO. Among non-obese individuals, independent predictors of incident MHO (OR for 1-SD change [95% CI]) included body mass index (8.12 [5.66 – 11.7]), triglycerides (0.52 [0.39 – 0.68]), and HDL-C (1.41 [1.11 – 1.81]), whereas independent predictors of incident MUHO included BMI (5.97 [4.58 – 7.77]) and triglycerides (1.26 [1.05 – 1.51]). Among participants with ≤1 metabolic abnormality, obesity was associated with greater odds of developing multiple metabolic abnormalities (OR 2.26 [1.74 – 2.95]). Conclusions Triglycerides and HDL-C may be useful for predicting progression to MHO. MHO may not be a stable condition, because it confers an increased risk of developing multiple metabolic abnormalities. PMID:24984752

  8. Metabolic Imaging: A link between Lactate Dehydrogenase A, Lactate and Tumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Sunitha B.; Vider, Jelena; Russell, James; Blasberg, Ronald; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We compared the metabolic profiles and the association between LDH-A expression and lactate production in two isogenic murine breast cancer cell lines and tumors (67NR and 4T1). These cell lines were derived from a single mammary tumor and have different growth and metabolic phenotypes. Experimental Design LDH-A expression, lactate concentration, glucose utilization and oxygen consumption were measured in cells, and the potential relationship between tumor lactate levels (measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI)) and tumor glucose utilization (measured by [18F] 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET)) was assessed in orthotopic breast tumors derived from these cell lines. Results We show a substantial difference in LDH-A expression between 67NR and 4T1 cells under normoxia and hypoxia. We also show that small orthotopic 4T1 tumors generate tenfold more lactate than corresponding 67NR tumors. The high lactate levels in small primary 4T1 tumors are associated with intense pimonidazole staining (a hypoxia indicator). Less intense hypoxia staining was observed in the larger 67NR tumors, and is consistent with the gradual increase and plateau of lactate concentration in enlarging 67NR tumors. Conclusions Lactate-MRSI has a greater dynamic range than [18F]FDG-PET and may be a more sensitive measure with which to evaluate the aggressive and metastatic potential of primary breast tumors. PMID:21844011

  9. In Vivo Metabolic Phenotyping of Myocardial Substrate Metabolism in Rodents: Differential Efficacy of Metformin and Rosiglitazone Monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shoghi, Kooresh I.; Finck, Brian N.; Schechtman, Kenneth B.; Sharp, Terry; Herrero, Pilar; Gropler, Robert J.; Welch, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among diabetic patients with alterations in myocardial substrate metabolism being a likely contributor. We aimed to assess noninvasively the efficacy of Metformin and Rosiglitazone monotherapy in normalizing myocardial substrate metabolism in an animal model of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results The study utilized 18 male ZDF rats (fa/fa) with 6 rats in each group: an untreated group; a group treated with Metformin (16.6mg/kg/day) and a group treated with Rosiglitazone (4mg/kg). Each rat was scanned at age 14 weeks (baseline) and subsequently at 19 weeks with small animal PET to estimate myocardial glucose utilization (MGU) and myocardial utilization (MFAU), oxidation (MFAO) and esterification (MFAE). Treatment lasted for 5 weeks following baseline imaging. At week 19, rats were sacrificed and hearts extracted for expression analysis of select genes encoding for GLUT transporters and fatty acid transport and oxidation genes. In addition, echocardiography (ECHO) measurements were obtained at week 13 and 18 to characterize cardiac function. Metformin had no significant effect on either MGU or MFAU and MFAO. In contrast, Rosiglitazone tended to enhance MGU and significantly reduced MFAU and MFAO. Rosiglitazone-induced increase in glucose uptake correlated significantly with increased expression of GLUT4 while diminished MFAO correlated significantly with decreased expression of FATP-1 and MCAD. Finally, changes in fractional shortening as a measure of cardiac function were unchanged throughout the study. Conclusions Treatment with Rosiglitazone enhanced glucose utilization and diminished MFAO, thus reversing the metabolic phenotype of the diabetic heart. PMID:19808625

  10. Interaction between Glucose and Lipid Metabolism: More than Diabetic Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glucose and lipid metabolism are linked to each other in many ways. The most important clinical manifestation of this interaction is diabetic dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated triglycerides, low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and predominance of small-dense LDL particles. However, in the last decade we have learned that the interaction is much more complex. Hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-C cannot only be the consequence but also the cause of a disturbed glucose metabolism. Furthermore, it is now well established that statins are associated with a small but significant increase in the risk for new onset diabetes. The underlying mechanisms are not completely understood but modulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG CoA)-reductase may play a central role as genetic data indicate that mutations resulting in lower HMG CoA-reductase activity are also associated with obesity, higher glucose concentrations and diabetes. Very interestingly, this statin induced increased risk for new onset type 2 diabetes is not detectable in subjects with familial hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, patients with familial hypercholesterolemia seem to have a lower risk for type 2 diabetes, a phenomenon which seems to be dose-dependent (the higher the low density lipoprotein cholesterol, the lower the risk). Whether there is also an interaction between lipoprotein(a) and diabetes is still a matter of debate. PMID:26566492

  11. GSM mobile phone radiation suppresses brain glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Myoung Soo; Vorobyev, Victor; Kännälä, Sami; Laine, Matti; Rinne, Juha O; Toivonen, Tommi; Johansson, Jarkko; Teräs, Mika; Lindholm, Harri; Alanko, Tommi; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mobile phone radiation on cerebral glucose metabolism using high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) with the 18F-deoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. A long half-life (109 minutes) of the 18F isotope allowed a long, natural exposure condition outside the PET scanner. Thirteen young right-handed male subjects were exposed to a pulse-modulated 902.4 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications signal for 33 minutes, while performing a simple visual vigilance task. Temperature was also measured in the head region (forehead, eyes, cheeks, ear canals) during exposure. 18F-deoxyglucose PET images acquired after the exposure showed that relative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was significantly reduced in the temporoparietal junction and anterior temporal lobe of the right hemisphere ipsilateral to the exposure. Temperature rise was also observed on the exposed side of the head, but the magnitude was very small. The exposure did not affect task performance (reaction time, error rate). Our results show that short-term mobile phone exposure can locally suppress brain energy metabolism in humans. PMID:21915135

  12. GSM mobile phone radiation suppresses brain glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Myoung Soo; Vorobyev, Victor; Kännälä, Sami; Laine, Matti; Rinne, Juha O; Toivonen, Tommi; Johansson, Jarkko; Teräs, Mika; Lindholm, Harri; Alanko, Tommi; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the effects of mobile phone radiation on cerebral glucose metabolism using high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) with the (18)F-deoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. A long half-life (109 minutes) of the (18)F isotope allowed a long, natural exposure condition outside the PET scanner. Thirteen young right-handed male subjects were exposed to a pulse-modulated 902.4 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications signal for 33 minutes, while performing a simple visual vigilance task. Temperature was also measured in the head region (forehead, eyes, cheeks, ear canals) during exposure. (18)F-deoxyglucose PET images acquired after the exposure showed that relative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was significantly reduced in the temporoparietal junction and anterior temporal lobe of the right hemisphere ipsilateral to the exposure. Temperature rise was also observed on the exposed side of the head, but the magnitude was very small. The exposure did not affect task performance (reaction time, error rate). Our results show that short-term mobile phone exposure can locally suppress brain energy metabolism in humans. PMID:21915135

  13. Cerebral glucose metabolic abnormality in patients with congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Weon Wook; Suh, Kuen Tak; Kim, Jeung Il; Ku, Ja Gyung; Lee, Hong Seok; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Yong-Ki; Lee, Jung Sub

    2008-07-01

    A possible association between congenital scoliosis and low mental status has been recognized, but there are no reports describing the mental status or cerebral metabolism in patients with congenital scoliosis in detail. We investigated the mental status using a mini-mental status exam as well as the cerebral glucose metabolism using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography in 12 patients with congenital scoliosis and compared them with those of 14 age-matched patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The mean mini-mental status exam score in the congenital scoliosis group was significantly lower than that in the adolescent idiopathic scoliosis group. Group analysis found that various brain areas of patients with congenital scoliosis showed glucose hypometabolisms in the left prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10), right orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9), left anterior cingulate gyrus (Brodmann area 24) and pulvinar of the left thalamus. From this study, we could find the metabolic abnormalities of brain in patients with congenital scoliosis and suggest the possible role of voxel-based analysis of brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. PMID:18446384

  14. Posterior Cingulate Glucose Metabolism, Hippocampal Glucose Metabolism, and Hippocampal Volume in Cognitively Normal, Late-Middle-Aged Persons at 3 Levels of Genetic Risk for Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Protas, Hillary D.; Chen, Kewei; Langbaum, Jessica B. S.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Alexander, Gene E.; Lee, Wendy; Bandy, Daniel; de Leon, Mony J.; Mosconi, Lisa; Buckley, Shannon; Truran-Sacrey, Diana; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.; Caselli, Richard J.; Reiman, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize and compare measurements of the posterior cingulate glucose metabolism, the hippocampal glucose metabolism, and hippocampal volume so as to distinguish cognitively normal, late-middle-aged persons with 2, 1, or 0 copies of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele, reflecting 3 levels of risk for late-onset Alzheimer disease. Design Cross-sectional comparison of measurements of cerebral glucose metabolism using 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography and measurements of brain volume using magnetic resonance imaging in cognitively normal ε4 homozygotes, ε4 heterozygotes, and noncarriers. Setting Academic medical center. Participants A total of 31 ε4 homozygotes, 42 ε4 heterozygotes, and 76 noncarriers, 49 to 67 years old, matched for sex, age, and educational level. Main Outcome Measures The measurements of posterior cingulate and hippocampal glucose metabolism were characterized using automated region-of-interest algorithms and normalized for whole-brain measurements. The hippocampal volume measurements were characterized using a semiautomated algorithm and normalized for total intracranial volume. Results Although there were no significant differences among the 3 groups of participants in their clinical ratings, neuropsychological test scores, hippocampal volumes (P=.60), or hippocampal glucose metabolism measurements (P = .12), there were significant group differences in their posterior cingulate glucose metabolism measurements (P=.001). The APOE ε4 gene dose was significantly associated with posterior cingulate glucose metabolism (r=0.29, P=.0003), and this association was significantly greater than those with hippocampal volume or hippocampal glucose metabolism (P<.05, determined by use of pairwise Fisher z tests). Conclusions Although our findings may depend in part on the analysis algorithms used, they suggest that a reduction in posterior cingulate glucose metabolism precedes a reduction in hippocampal volume or

  15. Fractional uptake value as a good indicator for glucose metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizawa, S.; Yonekura, Y.; Mukai, T. |

    1995-05-01

    In a previous paper, we demonstrated that hyperglycemia enhanced brain tumor detection in FDG-PET studies. However, the autoradiographic method underestimated cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglc) in hyperglycemia, while dynamic PET scans are often not feasible due to patient`s condition. For such situations, we propose the use of the fractional uptake value (FUV) which is given by Ci(t)/{integral}Ca(t)dt where Ci(t) and Ca(t) are radio-activities in brain and plasma. In this study, we tested FUV as an indicator of the net clearance coefficient of FDG (K*) over a side range of plasma glucose levels. Seven patients with brain tumor underwent FDG-PET studies in normoglycemia (mean: 5.2 mM) and hyperglycemia (mean: 14.6 mM) on separate days. Dynamic PET scan was performed for 40 min with arterial sampling after an i.v. injection of 160-370 MBq of FDG. Data analysis was carried out on cortices contralateral of the tumor. The rate constants (K1*,k2*,k3*, and k4*) and cerebral blood volume of a 3 compartment model were estimated by non-linear least squared optimization. K* was defined as K*=K1*,k3*/(k2*+k3*). FUV was calculated using 4-min scan data from 36 to 40 min of the dynamic scan. The FUV demonstrated a good relationship with K value over a wide range of plasma glucose level (K*=2.0 10{sup -3} +1.02 FUV r=0.99), and proved to be a good indicator for cerebral glucose metabolism.

  16. Insulin signalling and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, Alan R.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2001-12-01

    The epidemic of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In both disorders, tissues such as muscle, fat and liver become less responsive or resistant to insulin. This state is also linked to other common health problems, such as obesity, polycystic ovarian disease, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The pathophysiology of insulin resistance involves a complex network of signalling pathways, activated by the insulin receptor, which regulates intermediary metabolism and its organization in cells. But recent studies have shown that numerous other hormones and signalling events attenuate insulin action, and are important in type 2 diabetes.

  17. The promise of metabolic phenotyping in gastroenterology and hepatology.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Elaine; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2015-08-01

    Disease risk and treatment response are determined, at the individual level, by a complex history of genetic and environmental interactions, including those with our endogenous microbiomes. Personalized health care requires a deep understanding of patient biology that can now be measured using a range of '-omics' technologies. Patient stratification involves the identification of genetic and/or phenotypic disease subclasses that require different therapeutic strategies. Stratified medicine approaches to disease diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic response monitoring herald a new dimension in patient care. Here, we explore the potential value of metabolic profiling as applied to unmet clinical needs in gastroenterology and hepatology. We describe potential applications in a number of diseases, with emphasis on large-scale population studies as well as metabolic profiling on the individual level, using spectrometric and imaging technologies that will leverage the discovery of mechanistic information and deliver novel health care solutions to improve clinical pathway management. PMID:26194948

  18. Power Analysis and Sample Size Determination in Metabolic Phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Benjamin J; Correia, Gonçalo; Tin, Adrienne; Young, J Hunter; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Lewis, Matthew; Pearce, Jake T M; Elliott, Paul; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Holmes, Elaine; Ebbels, Timothy M D

    2016-05-17

    Estimation of statistical power and sample size is a key aspect of experimental design. However, in metabolic phenotyping, there is currently no accepted approach for these tasks, in large part due to the unknown nature of the expected effect. In such hypothesis free science, neither the number or class of important analytes nor the effect size are known a priori. We introduce a new approach, based on multivariate simulation, which deals effectively with the highly correlated structure and high-dimensionality of metabolic phenotyping data. First, a large data set is simulated based on the characteristics of a pilot study investigating a given biomedical issue. An effect of a given size, corresponding either to a discrete (classification) or continuous (regression) outcome is then added. Different sample sizes are modeled by randomly selecting data sets of various sizes from the simulated data. We investigate different methods for effect detection, including univariate and multivariate techniques. Our framework allows us to investigate the complex relationship between sample size, power, and effect size for real multivariate data sets. For instance, we demonstrate for an example pilot data set that certain features achieve a power of 0.8 for a sample size of 20 samples or that a cross-validated predictivity QY(2) of 0.8 is reached with an effect size of 0.2 and 200 samples. We exemplify the approach for both nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data from humans and the model organism C. elegans. PMID:27116637

  19. Transcriptional and metabolic effects of glucose on Streptococcus pneumoniae sugar metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Paixão, Laura; Caldas, José; Kloosterman, Tomas G.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vinga, Susana; Neves, Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a strictly fermentative human pathogen that relies on carbohydrate metabolism to generate energy for growth. The nasopharynx colonized by the bacterium is poor in free sugars, but mucosa lining glycans can provide a source of sugar. In blood and inflamed tissues glucose is the prevailing sugar. As a result during progression from colonization to disease S. pneumoniae has to cope with a pronounced shift in carbohydrate nature and availability. Thus, we set out to assess the pneumococcal response to sugars found in glycans and the influence of glucose (Glc) on this response at the transcriptional, physiological, and metabolic levels. Galactose (Gal), N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and mannose (Man) affected the expression of 8 to 14% of the genes covering cellular functions including central carbon metabolism and virulence. The pattern of end-products as monitored by in vivo 13C-NMR is in good agreement with the fermentation profiles during growth, while the pools of phosphorylated metabolites are consistent with the type of fermentation observed (homolactic vs. mixed) and regulation at the metabolic level. Furthermore, the accumulation of α-Gal6P and Man6P indicate metabolic bottlenecks in the metabolism of Gal and Man, respectively. Glc added to cells actively metabolizing other sugar(s) was readily consumed and elicited a metabolic shift toward a homolactic profile. The transcriptional response to Glc was large (over 5% of the genome). In central carbon metabolism (most represented category), Glc exerted mostly negative regulation. The smallest response to Glc was observed on a sugar mix, suggesting that exposure to varied sugars improves the fitness of S. pneumoniae. The expression of virulence factors was negatively controlled by Glc in a sugar-dependent manner. Overall, our results shed new light on the link between carbohydrate metabolism, adaptation to host niches and virulence. PMID:26500614

  20. Transcriptional and metabolic effects of glucose on Streptococcus pneumoniae sugar metabolism.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Laura; Caldas, José; Kloosterman, Tomas G; Kuipers, Oscar P; Vinga, Susana; Neves, Ana R

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a strictly fermentative human pathogen that relies on carbohydrate metabolism to generate energy for growth. The nasopharynx colonized by the bacterium is poor in free sugars, but mucosa lining glycans can provide a source of sugar. In blood and inflamed tissues glucose is the prevailing sugar. As a result during progression from colonization to disease S. pneumoniae has to cope with a pronounced shift in carbohydrate nature and availability. Thus, we set out to assess the pneumococcal response to sugars found in glycans and the influence of glucose (Glc) on this response at the transcriptional, physiological, and metabolic levels. Galactose (Gal), N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and mannose (Man) affected the expression of 8 to 14% of the genes covering cellular functions including central carbon metabolism and virulence. The pattern of end-products as monitored by in vivo (13)C-NMR is in good agreement with the fermentation profiles during growth, while the pools of phosphorylated metabolites are consistent with the type of fermentation observed (homolactic vs. mixed) and regulation at the metabolic level. Furthermore, the accumulation of α-Gal6P and Man6P indicate metabolic bottlenecks in the metabolism of Gal and Man, respectively. Glc added to cells actively metabolizing other sugar(s) was readily consumed and elicited a metabolic shift toward a homolactic profile. The transcriptional response to Glc was large (over 5% of the genome). In central carbon metabolism (most represented category), Glc exerted mostly negative regulation. The smallest response to Glc was observed on a sugar mix, suggesting that exposure to varied sugars improves the fitness of S. pneumoniae. The expression of virulence factors was negatively controlled by Glc in a sugar-dependent manner. Overall, our results shed new light on the link between carbohydrate metabolism, adaptation to host niches and virulence. PMID:26500614

  1. Polysaccharides from Enteromorpha prolifera Improve Glucose Metabolism in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wenting; Wang, Wenxiang; Liao, Dongdong; Chen, Damiao; Zhu, Pingping; Cai, Guoxi; Kiyoshi, Aoyagi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of polysaccharides from Enteromorpha prolifera (PEP) on glucose metabolism in a rat model of diabetes mellitus (DM). PEP (0, 150, 300, and 600 mg/kg) was administered intragastrically to rats for four weeks. After treatment, fasting blood glucose (FBG) and insulin (INS) levels were measured, and the insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was calculated. The morphopathological changes in the pancreas were observed. Serum samples were collected to measure the oxidant-antioxidant status. The mRNA expression levels of glucokinase (GCK) and insulin receptor (InsR) in liver tissue and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT-4) and adiponectin (APN) in adipose tissue were determined. Compared with the model group, the FBG and INS levels were lower, the ISI was higher, and the number of islet β-cells was significantly increased in all the PEP groups. In the medium- and high-dose PEP groups, MDA levels decreased, and the enzymatic activities of SOD and GSH-Px increased. The mRNA expression of InsR and GCK increased in all the PEP groups; APN mRNA expression increased in the high-dose PEP group, and GLUT-4 mRNA expression increased in adipose tissue. These findings suggest that PEP is a potential therapeutic agent that can be utilized to treat DM. PMID:26347892

  2. Energetics of Glucose Metabolism: A Phenomenological Approach to Metabolic Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Diederichs, Frank

    2010-01-01

    A new formalism to describe metabolic fluxes as well as membrane transport processes was developed. The new flux equations are comparable to other phenomenological laws. Michaelis-Menten like expressions, as well as flux equations of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, can be regarded as special cases of these new equations. For metabolic network modeling, variable conductances and driving forces are required to enable pathway control and to allow a rapid response to perturbations. When applied to oxidative phosphorylation, results of simulations show that whole oxidative phosphorylation cannot be described as a two-flux-system according to nonequilibrium thermodynamics, although all coupled reactions per se fulfill the equations of this theory. Simulations show that activation of ATP-coupled load reactions plus glucose oxidation is brought about by an increase of only two different conductances: a [Ca2+] dependent increase of cytosolic load conductances, and an increase of phosphofructokinase conductance by [AMP], which in turn becomes increased through [ADP] generation by those load reactions. In ventricular myocytes, this feedback mechanism is sufficient to increase cellular power output and O2 consumption several fold, without any appreciable impairment of energetic parameters. Glucose oxidation proceeds near maximal power output, since transformed input and output conductances are nearly equal, yielding an efficiency of about 0.5. This conductance matching is fulfilled also by glucose oxidation of β-cells. But, as a price for the metabolic mechanism of glucose recognition, β-cells have only a limited capability to increase their power output. PMID:21152283

  3. Alteration of the regional cerebral glucose metabolism in healthy subjects by glucose loading.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kenji; Wagatsuma, Kei; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ishii, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    High plasma glucose (PG) levels can reduce fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG) uptake, especially in the Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related regions. This fact is supported by studies showing that the resting-state activity in diabetes can be altered in the default mode network (DMN)-related regions, which considerably overlap with the AD-related regions. In order to expand the current knowledge, we aimed to investigate the relationship between increasing PG levels and the regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (CMRglc ) as a direct index of brain activity. We performed dynamic (18) F-FDG positron emission tomography with arterial blood sampling once each in the fasting and glucose-loading conditions on 12 young, healthy volunteers without cognitive impairment or insulin resistance. The absolute CMRglc values were calculated for the volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis, and normalized CMRglc maps were generated for the voxelwise analysis. The normalized measurement is known to have smaller intersubject variability than the absolute measurement, and may, thus, lead to greater statistical power. In VOI analysis, no regional difference in the CMRglc was found between the two conditions. In exploratory voxelwise analysis, however, significant clusters were identified in the precuneus, posterior cingulate, lateral parietotemporal, and medial prefrontal regions where the CMRglc decreased upon glucose loading (P < 0.05, corrected). These regions include the representative components of both the DMN and AD pathology. Taken together with the previous knowledge on the relationships between the DMN, AD, and diabetes, it may be inferred that glucose loading induces hypometabolism in the AD-related and DMN-related regions. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2823-2832, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061859

  4. Reproductive and metabolic phenotype of a mouse model of PCOS.

    PubMed

    van Houten, E Leonie A F; Kramer, Piet; McLuskey, Anke; Karels, Bas; Themmen, Axel P N; Visser, Jenny A

    2012-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder in women in their reproductive age, is characterized by both reproductive and metabolic features. Recent studies in human, nonhuman primates, and sheep suggest that hyperandrogenism plays an important role in the development of PCOS. We investigated whether chronic dihydrotestosterone (DHT) exposure in mice reproduces both features of PCOS. Such a model would allow us to study the mechanism of association between the reproductive and metabolic features in transgenic mice. In this study, prepubertal female mice received a 90 d continuous release pellet containing the nonaromatizable androgen DHT or vehicle. At the end of the treatment period, DHT-treated mice were in continuous anestrous, their ovaries contained an increased number of atretic follicles, with the majority of atretic antral follicles having a cyst-like structure. Chronic DHT-exposed mice had significantly higher body weights (21%) than vehicle-treated mice. In addition, fat depots of DHT-treated mice displayed an increased number of enlarged adipocytes (P < 0.003). Leptin levels were elevated (P < 0.013), adiponectin levels were diminished (P < 0.001), and DHT-treated mice were glucose intolerant (P < 0.001). In conclusion, a mouse model of PCOS has been developed showing reproductive and metabolic characteristics associated with PCOS in women. PMID:22334715

  5. [Metabolism of labeled exogenous glucose in fiber flax tissues].

    PubMed

    Chikov, V I; Avvakumova, N Iu; Bakirova, G G; Khamidullina, L A

    2005-01-01

    A labeled glucose solution was introduced into cut fiber flax plants (45-50 cm high) using a special unit under a pressure of 0.1 atm for 30 min, 1, and 2 h. The highest quantities of labeled carbon were revealed in the woody tissue. Sucrose made up a considerable proportion in low molecular weight products of [ [2-14C]-glucose transformation (23.5%). Metabolism of labeled glucose in the leaves exposed to sunlight yielded a set of metabolites similar to products of 14CO2 photoassimilation. In the shade, the pattern of 14C distribution in labeled compounds of the water/alcohol soluble fraction remained similar in mature leaves, while in juvenile leaves, 14C content decreased in sucrose and increased in organic and amino acids. In the shade, the incorporation of 14C into starch and hot water soluble polysaccharides increased at the expense of the acetone fraction (lipids and pigments), water/salt soluble proteins, and cellulose. Low light conditions increased the radioactivity ratio of sparingly soluble (KOH and Triton X-100 soluble) proteins to albumins and globulins. We propose that the synthesis of components of the photosynthetic apparatus in juvenile leaves is directly powered by photosynthesis and the photosynthesis of glucose and the polymers compete for ATP energy. Appearance of sucrose in the woody tissue is due to its release from the phloem to the stem apoplast and the radial transfer to the xylem, where it is transported to the upper shoot with the transpiration flow. PMID:16004260

  6. Focal adhesion kinase-promoted tumor glucose metabolism is associated with a shift of mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Gao, Q; Zhou, Y; Dier, U; Hempel, N; Hochwald, S N

    2016-04-14

    Cancer cells often gains a growth advantage by taking up glucose at a high rate and undergoing aerobic glycolysis through intrinsic cellular factors that reprogram glucose metabolism. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a key transmitter of growth factor and anchorage stimulation, is aberrantly overexpressed or activated in most solid tumors, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We determined whether FAK can act as an intrinsic driver to promote aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. FAK inhibition decreases and overexpression increases intracellular glucose levels during unfavorable conditions, including growth factor deficiency and cell detachment. Amplex glucose assay, fluorescence and carbon-13 tracing studies demonstrate that FAK promotes glucose consumption and glucose-to-lactate conversion. Extracellular flux analysis indicates that FAK enhances glycolysis and decreases mitochondrial respiration. FAK increases key glycolytic proteins, including enolase, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), lactate dehydrogenase and monocarboxylate transporter. Furthermore, active/tyrosine-phosphorylated FAK directly binds to PKM2 and promotes PKM2-mediated glycolysis. On the other hand, FAK-decreased levels of mitochondrial complex I can result in reduced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Attenuation of FAK-enhanced glycolysis re-sensitizes cancer cells to growth factor withdrawal, decreases cell viability and reduces growth of tumor xenografts. These observations, for the first time, establish a vital role of FAK in cancer glucose metabolism through alterations in the OXPHOS-to-glycolysis balance. Broadly targeting the common phenotype of aerobic glycolysis and more specifically FAK-reprogrammed glucose metabolism will disrupt the bioenergetic and biosynthetic supply for uncontrolled growth of tumors, particularly glycolytic PDAC. PMID:26119934

  7. Resistance training improves isokinetic strength and metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Pedro Ferreira Alves; Gadelha, André Bonadias; Gauche, Rafael; Paiva, Flávio Macedo Lahud; Bottaro, Martim; Vianna, Lauro C; Lima, Ricardo Moreno

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of resistance training (RT) on metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes in postmenopausal women. Patients and methods Twenty-two postmenopausal women (65.0±4.2 years) underwent 12 weeks of whole body progressive training with intensity prescribed based on rating of perceived exertion. Dominant knee extension strength was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer before and after the intervention. Moreover, all volunteers had blood samples collected for lipid profile, glycemic control, and C-reactive protein analyses. Waist circumference and arterial blood pressure were also measured at baseline and after the training period. Student’s t-tests for paired samples and repeated measures ANOVA were used to compare dependent variables, and statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results Isokinetic muscle strength significantly increased (P<0.01) with training. It was observed that waist circumference as well as total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels significantly decreased with training (P<0.01). Total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, an important marker of cardiovascular disease incidence, was also significantly reduced (from 3.91±0.91 to 3.60±0.74; P<0.01) after the program. Blood glucose, basal insulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance were also significantly reduced (P<0.01). No significant alterations were observed for resting blood pressure, triglycerides, or C-reactive protein. Conclusion Based on the observed results, it can be concluded that a 12-week progressive RT program, besides increasing isokinetic muscle strength, induces beneficial alterations on metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes in postmenopausal women. These findings highlight this mode of exercise as an important component of public health promotion programs for aged women. RT improves isokinetic strength and metabolic syndrome-related phenotypes in postmenopausal women. PMID:26300634

  8. Insulin Stimulates S100B Secretion and These Proteins Antagonistically Modulate Brain Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; de Souza, Daniela F; Biasibetti, Regina; Bobermin, Larissa D; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Brain metabolism is highly dependent on glucose, which is derived from the blood circulation and metabolized by the astrocytes and other neural cells via several pathways. Glucose uptake in the brain does not involve insulin-dependent glucose transporters; however, this hormone affects the glucose influx to the brain. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of S100B (an astrocyte-derived protein) have been associated with alterations in glucose metabolism; however, there is no evidence whether insulin modulates glucose metabolism and S100B secretion. Herein, we investigated the effect of S100B on glucose metabolism, measuring D-(3)H-glucose incorporation in two preparations, C6 glioma cells and acute hippocampal slices, and we also investigated the effect of insulin on S100B secretion. Our results showed that: (a) S100B at physiological levels decreases glucose uptake, through the multiligand receptor RAGE and mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK signaling, and (b) insulin stimulated S100B secretion via PI3K signaling. Our findings indicate the existence of insulin-S100B modulation of glucose utilization in the brain tissue, and may improve our understanding of glucose metabolism in several conditions such as ketosis, streptozotocin-induced dementia and pharmacological exposure to antipsychotics, situations that lead to changes in insulin signaling and extracellular levels of S100B. PMID:26875731

  9. Cytokinin-Regulated Sucrose Metabolism in Stay-Green Wheat Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqiang; Hao, Qunqun; Tian, Fengxia; Li, Qinxue; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A wheat stay-green mutant, tasg1, was observed to exhibit significantly delayed senescence in the late developmental stage. The photosynthetic capacity of the flag leaf was greater in tasg1 than in wild type (WT) plants. In addition, the grain volume of tasg1 was significantly higher than that of WT at the early filling stage. The content of various cytokinins (CKs) in the grain was significantly higher in tasg1 than in WT and was accompanied by an upregulated expression of some cell cycle-related genes. Examination of the metabolism of soluble sugars in tasg1 and WT revealed that the concentrations of glucose (Glu), fructose (Fru), and sucrose (Suc) were higher in the flag leaves and grains of tasg1 than in WT plants. The activities of sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), sucrose synthase (SuSy), and cell wall invertase (CW-invertase) were higher in tasg1, suggesting an altered metabolism and transport of soluble sugars. Furthermore, when tasg1 was treated with the CK inhibitor lovastatin, the activity of invertase was inhibited and was associated with premature senescence phenotype. However, the activity of invertase was partially recovered in tasg1 when treated with 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). The trend of change in the concentrations of Glu, Fru, and Suc was similar to that of invertase. Our results suggest that CKs might regulate the stay-green phenotype of tasg1 by regulating the invertase activity involved in Suc remobilization. PMID:27580166

  10. 1H NMR global metabolic phenotyping of acute pancreatitis in the emergency unit.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor, Alma; Kinross, James M; Li, Jia V; Penney, Nicholas; Barton, Richard H; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Darzi, Ara; Barbas, Coral; Holmes, Elaine

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the urinary and plasma metabolic phenotype of acute pancreatitis (AP) patients presenting to the emergency room at a single center London teaching hospital with acute abdominal pain using (1)H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate modeling. Patients were allocated to either the AP (n = 15) or non-AP patients group (all other causes of abdominal pain, n = 21) on the basis of the national guidelines. Patients were assessed for three clinical outcomes: (1) diagnosis of AP, (2) etiology of AP caused by alcohol consumption and cholelithiasis, and (3) AP severity based on the Glasgow score. Samples from AP patients were characterized by high levels of urinary ketone bodies, glucose, plasma choline and lipid, and relatively low levels of urinary hippurate, creatine and plasma-branched chain amino acids. AP could be reliably identified with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity (OPLS-DA model R(2) = 0.76 and Q(2)Y = 0.59) using panel of discriminatory biomarkers consisting of guanine, hippurate and creatine (urine), and valine, alanine and lipoproteins (plasma). Metabolic phenotyping was also able to distinguish between cholelithiasis and colonic inflammation among the heterogeneous non-AP group. This work has demonstrated that combinatorial biomarkers have a strong diagnostic and prognostic potential in AP with relevance to clinical decision making in the emergency unit. PMID:25160714

  11. Sex-Specific Differences in Lipid and Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Varlamov, Oleg; Bethea, Cynthia L.; Roberts, Charles T.

    2014-01-01

    Energy metabolism in humans is tuned to distinct sex-specific functions that potentially reflect the unique requirements in females for gestation and lactation, whereas male metabolism may represent a default state. These differences are the consequence of the action of sex chromosomes and sex-specific hormones, including estrogens and progesterone in females and androgens in males. In humans, sex-specific specialization is associated with distinct body-fat distribution and energy substrate-utilization patterns; i.e., females store more lipids and have higher whole-body insulin sensitivity than males, while males tend to oxidize more lipids than females. These patterns are influenced by the menstrual phase in females, and by nutritional status and exercise intensity in both sexes. This minireview focuses on sex-specific mechanisms in lipid and glucose metabolism and their regulation by sex hormones, with a primary emphasis on studies in humans and the most relevant pre-clinical model of human physiology, non-human primates. PMID:25646091

  12. Identification of Genes and Networks Driving Cardiovascular and Metabolic Phenotypes in a Mouse F2 Intercross

    PubMed Central

    Derry, Jonathan M. J.; Zhong, Hua; Molony, Cliona; MacNeil, Doug; Guhathakurta, Debraj; Zhang, Bin; Mudgett, John; Small, Kersten; El Fertak, Lahcen; Guimond, Alain; Selloum, Mohammed; Zhao, Wenqing; Champy, Marie France; Monassier, Laurent; Vogt, Tom; Cully, Doris; Kasarskis, Andrew; Schadt, Eric E.

    2010-01-01

    To identify the genes and pathways that underlie cardiovascular and metabolic phenotypes we performed an integrated analysis of a mouse C57BL/6J x A/J F2 (B6AF2) cross by relating genome-wide gene expression data from adipose, kidney, and liver tissues to physiological endpoints measured in the population. We have identified a large number of trait QTLs including loci driving variation in cardiac function on chromosomes 2 and 6 and a hotspot for adiposity, energy metabolism, and glucose traits on chromosome 8. Integration of adipose gene expression data identified a core set of genes that drive the chromosome 8 adiposity QTL. This chromosome 8 trans eQTL signature contains genes associated with mitochondrial function and oxidative phosphorylation and maps to a subnetwork with conserved function in humans that was previously implicated in human obesity. In addition, human eSNPs corresponding to orthologous genes from the signature show enrichment for association to type II diabetes in the DIAGRAM cohort, supporting the idea that the chromosome 8 locus perturbs a molecular network that in humans senses variations in DNA and in turn affects metabolic disease risk. We functionally validate predictions from this approach by demonstrating metabolic phenotypes in knockout mice for three genes from the trans eQTL signature, Akr1b8, Emr1, and Rgs2. In addition we show that the transcriptional signatures for knockout of two of these genes, Akr1b8 and Rgs2, map to the F2 network modules associated with the chromosome 8 trans eQTL signature and that these modules are in turn very significantly correlated with adiposity in the F2 population. Overall this study demonstrates how integrating gene expression data with QTL analysis in a network-based framework can aid in the elucidation of the molecular drivers of disease that can be translated from mice to humans. PMID:21179467

  13. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. PMID:26964832

  14. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. PMID:26964832

  15. Phenotype-based cell-specific metabolic modeling reveals metabolic liabilities of cancer.

    PubMed

    Yizhak, Keren; Gaude, Edoardo; Le Dévédec, Sylvia; Waldman, Yedael Y; Stein, Gideon Y; van de Water, Bob; Frezza, Christian; Ruppin, Eytan

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing molecular data to derive functional physiological models tailored for specific cancer cells can facilitate the use of individually tailored therapies. To this end we present an approach termed PRIME for generating cell-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GSMMs) based on molecular and phenotypic data. We build >280 models of normal and cancer cell-lines that successfully predict metabolic phenotypes in an individual manner. We utilize this set of cell-specific models to predict drug targets that selectively inhibit cancerous but not normal cell proliferation. The top predicted target, MLYCD, is experimentally validated and the metabolic effects of MLYCD depletion investigated. Furthermore, we tested cell-specific predicted responses to the inhibition of metabolic enzymes, and successfully inferred the prognosis of cancer patients based on their PRIME-derived individual GSMMs. These results lay a computational basis and a counterpart experimental proof of concept for future personalized metabolic modeling applications, enhancing the search for novel selective anticancer therapies. PMID:25415239

  16. Phenotype-based cell-specific metabolic modeling reveals metabolic liabilities of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Le Dévédec, Sylvia; Waldman, Yedael Y; Stein, Gideon Y; van de Water, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing molecular data to derive functional physiological models tailored for specific cancer cells can facilitate the use of individually tailored therapies. To this end we present an approach termed PRIME for generating cell-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GSMMs) based on molecular and phenotypic data. We build >280 models of normal and cancer cell-lines that successfully predict metabolic phenotypes in an individual manner. We utilize this set of cell-specific models to predict drug targets that selectively inhibit cancerous but not normal cell proliferation. The top predicted target, MLYCD, is experimentally validated and the metabolic effects of MLYCD depletion investigated. Furthermore, we tested cell-specific predicted responses to the inhibition of metabolic enzymes, and successfully inferred the prognosis of cancer patients based on their PRIME-derived individual GSMMs. These results lay a computational basis and a counterpart experimental proof of concept for future personalized metabolic modeling applications, enhancing the search for novel selective anticancer therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03641.001 PMID:25415239

  17. Rumen microbial communities influence metabolic phenotypes in lambs.

    PubMed

    Morgavi, Diego P; Rathahao-Paris, Estelle; Popova, Milka; Boccard, Julien; Nielsen, Kristian F; Boudra, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The rumen microbiota is an essential part of ruminants shaping their nutrition and health. Despite its importance, it is not fully understood how various groups of rumen microbes affect host-microbe relationships and functions. The aim of the study was to simultaneously explore the rumen microbiota and the metabolic phenotype of lambs for identifying host-microbe associations and potential biomarkers of digestive functions. Twin lambs, separated in two groups after birth were exposed to practices (isolation and gavage with rumen fluid with protozoa or protozoa-depleted) that differentially restricted the acquisition of microbes. Rumen microbiota, fermentation parameters, digestibility and growth were monitored for up to 31 weeks of age. Microbiota assembled in isolation from other ruminants lacked protozoa and had low bacterial and archaeal diversity whereas digestibility was not affected. Exposure to adult sheep microbiota increased bacterial and archaeal diversity independently of protozoa presence. For archaea, Methanomassiliicoccales displaced Methanosphaera. Notwithstanding, protozoa induced differences in functional traits such as digestibility and significantly shaped bacterial community structure, notably Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae lower up to 6 folds, Prevotellaceae lower by ~40%, and Clostridiaceae and Veillonellaceae higher up to 10 folds compared to microbiota without protozoa. An orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis of urinary metabolome matched differences in microbiota structure. Discriminant metabolites were mainly involved in amino acids and protein metabolic pathways while a negative interaction was observed between methylotrophic methanogens Methanomassiliicoccales and trimethylamine N-oxide. These results stress the influence of gut microbes on animal phenotype and show the potential of metabolomics for monitoring rumen microbial functions. PMID:26528248

  18. Rumen microbial communities influence metabolic phenotypes in lambs

    PubMed Central

    Morgavi, Diego P.; Rathahao-Paris, Estelle; Popova, Milka; Boccard, Julien; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Boudra, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The rumen microbiota is an essential part of ruminants shaping their nutrition and health. Despite its importance, it is not fully understood how various groups of rumen microbes affect host-microbe relationships and functions. The aim of the study was to simultaneously explore the rumen microbiota and the metabolic phenotype of lambs for identifying host-microbe associations and potential biomarkers of digestive functions. Twin lambs, separated in two groups after birth were exposed to practices (isolation and gavage with rumen fluid with protozoa or protozoa-depleted) that differentially restricted the acquisition of microbes. Rumen microbiota, fermentation parameters, digestibility and growth were monitored for up to 31 weeks of age. Microbiota assembled in isolation from other ruminants lacked protozoa and had low bacterial and archaeal diversity whereas digestibility was not affected. Exposure to adult sheep microbiota increased bacterial and archaeal diversity independently of protozoa presence. For archaea, Methanomassiliicoccales displaced Methanosphaera. Notwithstanding, protozoa induced differences in functional traits such as digestibility and significantly shaped bacterial community structure, notably Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae lower up to 6 folds, Prevotellaceae lower by ~40%, and Clostridiaceae and Veillonellaceae higher up to 10 folds compared to microbiota without protozoa. An orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis of urinary metabolome matched differences in microbiota structure. Discriminant metabolites were mainly involved in amino acids and protein metabolic pathways while a negative interaction was observed between methylotrophic methanogens Methanomassiliicoccales and trimethylamine N-oxide. These results stress the influence of gut microbes on animal phenotype and show the potential of metabolomics for monitoring rumen microbial functions. PMID:26528248

  19. Specific inactivation of glucose metabolism from eucaryotic cells by pentalenolactone.

    PubMed

    Duszenko, M; Balla, H; Mecke, D

    1982-02-01

    Pentalenolactone, an antibiotic related to the class of the sesquiterpene-lactones and produced by the strain Streptomyces arenae Tü-469, inhibits specifically the glucose metabolism by inactivation of the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD oxidoreductase (phosphorylating) ED 1.2.1.1.2). The sensitivity of several eucaryotic cell-systems for pentalenolactone was shown under in vivo conditions. The glycolytic as well as the gluconeogenetic pathway of mammalian cells can be completely inhibited with low concentrations of the antibiotic. In all cases, the minimum inhibitory concentration is dependent on cell density. The inhibitory effect in vivo and in vitro does not seem to be species-specific. In erythrocytes from rats, in Ehrlich-ascites tumor cells and in Plasmodium vinckei infected erythrocytes from mice glycolysis can be inhibited with concentrations of 18--90 micrometers pentalenolactone. In hepatocytes, glycolysis as well as gluconeogenesis in prevented by the same concentrations. In contrast to these results, in yeast the inhibition depends on growth conditions. The inhibition in glucose medium is cancelled by precultivation on acetate-containing medium. PMID:7034785

  20. Correlations Between Abnormal Glucose Metabolism and Bone Mineral Density or Bone Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yang; Kang, Ming-Yang; Dong, Rong-Peng; Zhao, Jian-Wu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore the correlations of abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) with bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism. MATERIAL AND METHODS Relevant studies were identified using computerized and manual search strategies. The included studies were in strict accordance with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Statistical analyses were conducted with the Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 (Biostat Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA). RESULTS Our present meta-analysis initially searched 844 studies, and 7 studies were eventually incorporated in the present meta-analysis. These 7 cohort studies included 1123 subjects altogether (560 patients with AGM and 563 healthy controls). The results showed that bone mass index (BMI), insulin, and insulin resistance (IR) of patients with AGM were significantly higher than that of the population with normal glucose metabolism (BMI: SMD=1.658, 95% CI=0.663~2.654, P=0.001; insulin: SMD=0.544, 95% CI=0.030~1.058, P=0.038; IR: SMD=8.767, 95% CI=4.178~13.356, P<0.001). However, the results also indicated there was no obvious difference in osteocalcin (OC) and BMD in patients with AGM and the population with normal glucose metabolism (OC: SMD=0.293, 95% CI=-0.023~0.609, P=0.069; BMD: SMD=0.805, 95% CI=-0. 212~1.821, P=0.121). CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis results suggest that AGM might lead to increased BMI, insulin, and IR, while it has no significant correlation with BMD or bone metabolism. PMID:26970713

  1. Correlations Between Abnormal Glucose Metabolism and Bone Mineral Density or Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yang; Kang, Ming-Yang; Dong, Rong-Peng; Zhao, Jian-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore the correlations of abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) with bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism. Material/Methods Relevant studies were identified using computerized and manual search strategies. The included studies were in strict accordance with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Statistical analyses were conducted with the Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 (Biostat Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA). Results Our present meta-analysis initially searched 844 studies, and 7 studies were eventually incorporated in the present meta-analysis. These 7 cohort studies included 1123 subjects altogether (560 patients with AGM and 563 healthy controls). The results showed that bone mass index (BMI), insulin, and insulin resistance (IR) of patients with AGM were significantly higher than that of the population with normal glucose metabolism (BMI: SMD=1.658, 95% CI=0.663~2.654, P=0.001; insulin: SMD=0.544, 95% CI=0.030~1.058, P=0.038; IR: SMD=8.767, 95% CI=4.178~13.356, P<0.001). However, the results also indicated there was no obvious difference in osteocalcin (OC) and BMD in patients with AGM and the population with normal glucose metabolism (OC: SMD=0.293, 95% CI=−0.023~0.609, P=0.069; BMD: SMD=0.805, 95% CI=−0. 212~1.821, P=0.121). Conclusions Our meta-analysis results suggest that AGM might lead to increased BMI, insulin, and IR, while it has no significant correlation with BMD or bone metabolism. PMID:26970713

  2. Failure of Hyperglycemia and Hyperinsulinemia to Compensate for Impaired Metabolic Response to an Oral Glucose Load

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M; Janghorbani, M; Schuette, S; Considine, RV; Chisholm, RL; Mather, KJ

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the augmented insulin and glucose response to a glucose challenge is sufficient to compensate for defects in glucose utilization in obesity and type 2 diabetes, using a breath test measurement of integrated glucose metabolism. Methods Non-obese, obese normoglycemic and obese Type 2 diabetic subjects were studied on 2 consecutive days. A 75g oral glucose load spiked with 13C-glucose was administered, measuring exhaled breath 13CO2 as an integrated measure of glucose metabolism and oxidation. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp was performed, measuring whole body glucose disposal rate. Body composition was measured by DEXA. Multivariable analyses were performed to evaluate the determinants of the breath 13CO2. Results Breath 13CO2 was reduced in obese and type 2 diabetic subjects despite hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The primary determinants of breath response were lean mass, fat mass, fasting FFA concentrations, and OGTT glucose excursion. Multiple approaches to analysis showed that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were not sufficient to compensate for the defect in glucose metabolism in obesity and diabetes. Conclusions Augmented insulin and glucose responses during an OGTT are not sufficient to overcome the underlying defects in glucose metabolism in obesity and diabetes. PMID:25511878

  3. Variations in the Ghrelin Receptor Gene Associate with Obesity and Glucose Metabolism in Individuals with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Mager, Ursula; Degenhardt, Tatjana; Pulkkinen, Leena; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Lindström, Jaana; Eriksson, Johan G.; Carlberg, Carsten; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti

    2008-01-01

    Background Ghrelin may influence the development of obesity through its role in the control of energy balance, food intake, and regulation of body weight. The effects of ghrelin are mediated via the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Methodology/Principal Findings We genotyped 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the GHSR gene and assessed the association between those SNPs and obesity and type 2 diabetes-related phenotypes from 507 middle-aged overweight persons with impaired glucose tolerance participating in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS). Additionally, we performed in silico screening of the 5′-regulatory region of GHSR and evaluated SNPs disrupting putative transcription factor (TF) binding sites in vitro with gelshift assays to determine differences in protein binding between different alleles of SNPs. Rs9819506 in the promoter region of GHSR was associated with body weight (p = 0.036); persons with rs9819506-AA genotype having the lowest body weight. Individuals with rs490683-CC genotype displayed highest weight loss in the whole study population (p = 0.032). The false discovery rate for these results was <10%. Rs490683 and rs509035 were associated with several measures of glucose and insulin metabolism during the follow-up. Rs490683 may be a functional SNP, since gelshift experiments showed differential protein binding between the alleles, with higher binding to the G-allele. Rs490683-C may disrupt a putative binding site for the TF nuclear factor 1 (NF-1), thus rs4906863-GG genotype where the NF-1 site is intact may lead to a higher GHSR gene expression. Conclusion/Significance Polymorphisms in the GHSR promoter may modify changes in body weight during long-term lifestyle intervention and affect ghrelin receptor signalling through modulation of GHSR gene expression. PMID:18698404

  4. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Posar, Annio; Santucci, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1) deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity); and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches). During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reported, has expanded. We report the atypical phenotype of a boy with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, characterized by mild mental retardation and drug-resistant absence seizures with onset at the age of 6 years, without movement disorders nor decrease of head circumference. A prompt diagnosis of this disorder is mandatory since the ketogenic diet might represent an effective treatment. PMID:24891901

  5. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Posar, Annio; Santucci, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1) deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity); and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches). During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reported, has expanded. We report the atypical phenotype of a boy with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, characterized by mild mental retardation and drug-resistant absence seizures with onset at the age of 6 years, without movement disorders nor decrease of head circumference. A prompt diagnosis of this disorder is mandatory since the ketogenic diet might represent an effective treatment. PMID:24891901

  6. Phylloquinone intake is associated with glucose metabolism in middle- and older-aged men and women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal and metabolic studies suggest that vitamin K may have a beneficial role in glucose homeostasis. The aim of this study was to examine the association between vitamin K intake and measures of glucose metabolism in a community-based sample of healthy adults. We assessed the cross-sectional assoc...

  7. Hybridization in sunfish influences the muscle metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Davies, R; Mathers, K E; Hume, A D; Bremer, K; Wang, Y; Moyes, C D

    2012-01-01

    Hybridization has the potential to exert pleiotropic effects on metabolism. Effects on mitochondrial enzymes may arise through incompatibilities in nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the enzyme complexes of oxidative phosphorylation. We explored the metabolic phenotype of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus), and their unidirectional F(1) hybrids (male bluegill × female pumpkinseed). In hybrids, glycolytic enzyme activities were indistinguishable from (aldolase, pyruvate kinase) or intermediate to (lactate dehydrogenase, phosphoglucoisomerase) parentals, but complex IV activities aligned with pumpkinseed, both 30% lower than bluegill. In isolated mitochondria, the specific activities of complexes I, II, and V were indistinguishable between groups. However, both complex III and IV showed indications of depressed activities in hybrid mitochondria, though no effects on mitochondrial state 3 or state 4 respiration were apparent. The patterns in complex IV activities were due to differences in enzyme content rather than enzyme V(max); immunoblots comparing complex IV content with catalytic activity were indistinguishable between groups. The sequence differences in complex IV catalytic subunits (CO1, CO2, CO3) were minor in nature; however, the mtDNA-encoded subunit of complex III (cytochrome b) showed eight differences between bluegill and pumpkinseed, several of which could have structural consequences to the multimeric enzyme, contributing to the depressed complex III catalytic activity in hybrids. PMID:22705483

  8. Thyroid hormone’s role in regulating brain glucose metabolism and potentially modulating hippocampal cognitive processes

    PubMed Central

    Jahagirdar, V; McNay, EC

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive performance is dependent on adequate glucose supply to the brain. Insulin, which regulates systemic glucose metabolism, has been recently shown both to regulate hippocampal metabolism and to be a mandatory component of hippocampally-mediated cognitive performance. Thyroid hormones (TH) regulate systemic glucose metabolism and may also be involved in regulation of brain glucose metabolism. Here we review potential mechanisms for such regulation. Importantly, TH imbalance is often encountered in combination with metabolic disorders, such as diabetes, and may cause additional metabolic dysregulation and hence worsening of disease states. TH’s potential as a regulator of brain glucose metabolism is heightened by interactions with insulin signaling, but there have been relatively few studies on this topic or on the actions of TH in a mature brain. This review discusses evidence for mechanistic links between TH, insulin, cognitive function, and brain glucose metabolism, and suggests that TH is a good candidate to be a modulator of memory processes, likely at least in part by modulation of central insulin signaling and glucose metabolism. PMID:22437199

  9. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Pichette, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed. PMID:27478532

  10. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Jennifer; Gagnon, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed. PMID:27478532

  11. Linking cytoarchitecture to metabolism: sarcolemma-associated plectin affects glucose uptake by destabilizing microtubule networks in mdx myofibers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most frequent forms of muscular disorders. It is caused by the absence of dystrophin, a core component of the sarcolemma-associated junctional complex that links the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. We showed previously that plectin 1f (P1f), one of the major muscle-expressed isoforms of the cytoskeletal linker protein plectin, accumulates at the sarcolemma of DMD patients as well as of mdx mice, a widely studied animal model for DMD. Based on plectin’s dual role as structural protein and scaffolding platform for signaling molecules, we speculated that the dystrophic phenotype observed after loss of dystrophin was caused, at least to some extent, by excess plectin. Thus, we hypothesized that elimination of plectin expression in mdx skeletal muscle, while probably resulting in an overall more severe phenotype, may lead to a partial phenotype rescue. In particular, we wanted to assess whether excess sarcolemmal plectin contributes to the dysregulation of sugar metabolism in mdx myofibers. Methods We generated plectin/dystrophin double deficient (dKO) mice by breeding mdx with conditional striated muscle-restricted plectin knockout (cKO) mice. The phenotype of these mice was comparatively analyzed with that of mdx, cKO, and wild-type mice, focusing on structural integrity and dysregulation of glucose metabolism. Results We show that the accumulation of plectin at the sarcolemma of mdx muscle fibers hardly compensated for their loss of structural integrity. Instead, it led to an additional metabolic deficit by impairing glucose uptake. While dKO mice suffered from an overall more severe form of muscular dystrophy compared to mdx or plectin-deficient mice, sarcolemmal integrity as well as glucose uptake of their myofibers were restored to normal levels upon ablation of plectin. Furthermore, microtubule (MT) networks in intact dKO myofibers, including subsarcolemmal areas, were found to be more robust

  12. Cattle temperament influences metabolism: metabolic response to glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Burdick Sanchez, N C; Carroll, J A; Broadway, P R; Hughes, H D; Roberts, S L; Richeson, J T; Schmidt, T B; Vann, R C

    2016-07-01

    Cattle temperament, defined as the reactivity of cattle to humans or novel environments, can greatly influence several physiological systems in the body, including immunity, stress, and most recently discovered, metabolism. Greater circulating concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) found in temperamental cattle suggest that temperamental cattle are metabolically different than calm cattle. Further, elevated NEFA concentrations have been reported to influence insulin sensitivity. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether cattle temperament would influence the metabolic response to a glucose tolerance test (GTT) and insulin sensitivity test (IST). Angus-cross steers (16 calm and 15 temperamental; 216 ± 6 kg BW) were selected based on temperament score measured at weaning. On day 1, steers were moved into indoor stanchions to allow measurement of individual ad libitum feed intake. On day 6, steers were fitted with indwelling rectal temperature probes and jugular catheters. At 9 AM on day 7, steers received the GTT (0.5-mL/kg BW of a 50% dextrose solution), and at 2 PM on day 7, steers received the IST (2.5 IU bovine insulin/kg BW). Blood samples were collected and serum isolated at -60, -45, -30, -15, 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 150 min relative to each challenge. Serum was stored at -80°C until analyzed for cortisol, glucose, NEFA, and blood urea nitrogen concentrations. All variables changed over time (P < 0.01). For the duration of the study, temperamental steers maintained greater (P < 0.01) serum NEFA and less (P ≤ 0.01) serum blood urea nitrogen and insulin sensitivity (calculated using Revised Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index) compared with calm steers. During the GTT, temperamental steers had greater (P < 0.01) serum glucose, yet decreased (P = 0.03) serum insulin and (P < 0.01) serum insulin: serum glucose compared to calm cattle. During the IST, temperamental steers had greater (P < 0.01) serum

  13. High-fat diets exaggerate endocrine and metabolic phenotypes in a rat model of DHEA-induced PCOS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haolin; Yi, Ming; Zhang, Yan; Jin, Hongyan; Zhang, Wenxin; Yang, Jingjing; Yan, Liying; Li, Rong; Zhao, Yue; Qiao, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine and metabolic disorder with unclear etiology and unsatisfactory management. Effects of diets on the phenotype of PCOS were not fully understood. In the present study, we applied 45 and 60% high-fat diets (HFDs) on a rat model of PCOS induced by postnatal DHEA injection. We found that both DHEA and DHEA+HFDs rats exhibited reproductive abnormalities, including hyperandrogenism, irregular cycles and polycystic ovaries. The addition of HFDs, especially 60% HFDs, exaggerated morphological changes of ovaries and a number of metabolic changes, including increased body weight and body fat content, impaired glucose tolerance and increased serum insulin levels. Results from qPCR showed that DHEA-induced increased expression of hypothalamic androgen receptor and LH receptor were reversed by the addition of 60% HFDs. In contrast, the ovarian expression of LH receptor and insulin receptor mRNA was upregulated only with the addition of 60% HFDs. These findings indicated that DHEA and DHEA+HFDs might influence PCOS phenotypes through distinct mechanisms: DHEA affects the normal function of hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian axis through LH, whereas the addition of HFDs exaggerated endocrine and metabolic dysfunction through ovarian responses to insulin-related mechanisms. We concluded that the addition of HFDs yielded distinct phenotypes of DHEA-induced PCOS and could be used for studies on both reproductive and metabolic features of the syndrome. PMID:26814210

  14. Peritoneal Dialysate Glucose Load and Systemic Glucose Metabolism in Non-Diabetics: Results from the GLOBAL Fluid Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chess, James; Do, Jun-Young; Noh, Hyunjin; Lee, Hi-Bahl; Kim, Yong-Lim; Summers, Angela; Williams, Paul Ford; Davison, Sara; Dorval, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Glucose control is a significant predictor of mortality in diabetic peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. During PD, the local toxic effects of intra-peritoneal glucose are well recognized, but despite large amounts of glucose being absorbed, the systemic effects of this in non-diabetic patients are not clear. We sought to clarify whether dialysate glucose has an effect upon systemic glucose metabolism. Methods and Materials We analysed the Global Fluid Study cohort, a prospective, observational cohort study initiated in 2002. A subset of 10 centres from 3 countries with high data quality were selected (368 incident and 272 prevalent non-diabetic patients), with multilevel, multivariable analysis of the reciprocal of random glucose levels, and a stratified-by-centre Cox survival analysis. Results The median follow up was 5.6 and 6.4 years respectively in incident and prevalent patients. On multivariate analysis, serum glucose increased with age (β = -0.007, 95%CI -0.010, -0.004) and decreased with higher serum sodium (β = 0.002, 95%CI 0.0005, 0.003) in incident patients and increased with dialysate glucose (β = -0.0002, 95%CI -0.0004, -0.00006) in prevalent patients. Levels suggested undiagnosed diabetes in 5.4% of prevalent patients. Glucose levels predicted death in unadjusted analyses of both incident and prevalent groups but in an adjusted survival analysis they did not (for random glucose 6–10 compared with <6, Incident group HR 0.92, 95%CI 0.58, 1.46, Prevalent group HR 1.42, 95%CI 0.86, 2.34). Conclusions In prevalent non-diabetic patients, random glucose levels at a diabetic level are under-recognised and increase with dialysate glucose load. Random glucose levels predict mortality in unadjusted analyses, but this association has not been proven in adjusted analyses. PMID:27249020

  15. Decreased Insulin Receptors but Normal Glucose Metabolism in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pirro, Roberto; Lauro, Renato; Testa, Ivano; Ferretti, Ginofabrizio; de Martinis, Carlo; Dellantonio, Renzo

    1982-04-01

    Compared to matched controls, 17 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy showed decreased insulin binding to monocytes due to decreased receptor concentration. These patients showed no signs of altered glucose metabolism and retrospective analysis of the clinical records of a further 56 such patients revealed no modification in carbohydrate metabolism. These data suggest that reduced insulin receptor number does not produce overt modifications of glucose metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  16. [Relationships of glucose transporter 4 with cognitive changes induced by high fat diet and glucose metabolism in hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Li; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-25

    The hippocampus not only plays a role in appetite and energy balance, but also is particularly important in learning and memory. Figuring out the relationships of hippocampal glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) with hippocampal glucose metabolism and hippocampus-dependent cognitive function is very important to clearly understand the pathophysiological basis of nutritional obesity and diabetes-related diseases, and treat obesity and cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, this study reviewed recent researches conducted on hippocampal GLUT4, hippocampal glucose metabolism, and hippocampus-dependent cognitive function. In this review, we mainly discussed: (1) The structure of GLUT4 and the distribution and function of GLUT4 in the hippocampus; (2) The translocation of GLUT4 in the hippocampus; (3) The relationships of the PI3K-Akt-GLUT4 signaling pathway with the high fat diet-induced changes of cognitive function and the glucose metabolism in the hippocampus; (4) The associations of the PI3K-Akt-GLUT4 signaling pathway with the diabetes-related cognitive dysfunction in the hippocampus; (5) The potential mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction induced by glucose metabolic disorder. PMID:27350206

  17. A link between hepatic glucose production and peripheral energy metabolism via hepatokines

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Wahed, Aya; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Casteras, Sylvie; Soty, Maud; Roussel, Damien; Romestaing, Caroline; Guillou, Hervé; Tourette, Jean-André; Pleche, Nicolas; Zitoun, Carine; Gri, Blandine; Sardella, Anne; Rajas, Fabienne; Mithieux, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a deterioration of glucose tolerance, which associates insulin resistance of glucose uptake by peripheral tissues and increased endogenous glucose production. Here we report that the specific suppression of hepatic glucose production positively modulates whole-body glucose and energy metabolism. We used mice deficient in liver glucose-6 phosphatase that is mandatory for endogenous glucose production. When they were fed a high fat/high sucrose diet, they resisted the development of diabetes and obesity due to the activation of peripheral glucose metabolism and thermogenesis. This was linked to the secretion of hepatic hormones like fibroblast growth factor 21 and angiopoietin-like factor 6. Interestingly, the deletion of hepatic glucose-6 phosphatase in previously obese and insulin-resistant mice resulted in the rapid restoration of glucose and body weight controls. Therefore, hepatic glucose production is an essential lever for the control of whole-body energy metabolism during the development of obesity and diabetes. PMID:25061558

  18. Experimental evidence and isotopomer analysis of mixotrophic glucose metabolism in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterotrophic fermentation using simple sugars such as glucose is an established and cost-effective method for synthesizing bioproducts from bacteria, yeast and algae. Organisms incapable of metabolizing glucose have limited applications as cell factories, often despite many other advantageous characteristics. Therefore, there is a clear need to investigate glucose metabolism in potential cell factories. One such organism, with a unique metabolic network and a propensity to synthesize highly reduced compounds as a large fraction of its biomass, is the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Pt). Although Pt has been engineered to metabolize glucose, conflicting lines of evidence leave it unresolved whether Pt can natively consume glucose. Results Isotope labeling experiments in which Pt was mixotrophically grown under light on 100% U-13C glucose and naturally abundant (~99% 12C) dissolved inorganic carbon resulted in proteinogenic amino acids with an average 13C-enrichment of 88%, thus providing convincing evidence of glucose uptake and metabolism. The dissolved inorganic carbon was largely incorporated through anaplerotic rather than photosynthetic fixation. Furthermore, an isotope labeling experiment utilizing 1-13C glucose and subsequent metabolic pathway analysis indicated that (i) the alternative Entner-Doudoroff and Phosphoketolase glycolytic pathways are active during glucose metabolism, and (ii) during mixotrophic growth, serine and glycine are largely synthesized from glyoxylate through photorespiratory reactions rather than from 3-phosphoglycerate. We validated the latter result for mixotrophic growth on glycerol by performing a 2-13C glycerol isotope labeling experiment. Additionally, gene expression assays showed that known, native glucose transporters in Pt are largely insensitive to glucose or light, whereas the gene encoding cytosolic fructose bisphosphate aldolase 3, an important glycolytic enzyme, is overexpressed in light but

  19. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  20. Glucose metabolism in obese and lean adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Poomthavorn, Preamrudee; Chaya, Weerapong; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Sukprasert, Matchuporn; Weerakiet, Sawaek

    2013-01-01

    Data on glucose metabolism in Asian adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are limited. Glucose metabolism assessment using an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in obese and lean Thai adolescents with PCOS, and a comparison between the two groups were done. Thirty-one patients (19 obese, 12 lean) were enrolled. Their median (range) age was 14.9 (11.0-21.0) years. Eighteen patients had abnormal glucose metabolism (13 hyperinsulinemia, 4 impaired glucose tolerance, and 1 diabetes). Compared between obese [median (range) BMI Z-score, 1.6 (1.2-2.6)] and lean [median (range) BMI Z-score, 0.1 (-1.4 to 0.6)] patients, the frequencies of each abnormal OGTT category, areas under the curves of glucose and insulin levels, and insulinogenic index were not different; however, insulin resistance was greater in the obese group. In conclusion, a high proportion of our adolescents with PCOS had abnormal glucose metabolism. Therefore, OGTT should be performed in adolescents with PCOS for the early detection of abnormal glucose metabolism. PMID:23314524

  1. Inhibition of GSK-3 induces differentiation and impaired glucose metabolism in renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pal, Krishnendu; Cao, Ying; Gaisina, Irina N; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Dutta, Shamit K; Wang, Enfeng; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Kozikowski, Alan P; Billadeau, Daniel D; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-02-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), a constitutively active serine/threonine kinase, is a key regulator of numerous cellular processes ranging from glycogen metabolism to cell-cycle regulation and proliferation. Consistent with its involvement in many pathways, it has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including type II diabetes, Alzheimer disease, bipolar disorder, inflammation, and cancer. Consequently, it is recognized as an attractive target for the development of new drugs. In the present study, we investigated the effect of both pharmacologic and genetic inhibition of GSK-3 in two different renal cancer cell lines. We have shown potent antiproliferative activity of 9-ING-41, a maleimide-based GSK-3 inhibitor. The antiproliferative activity is most likely caused by G(0)-G(1) and G(2)-M phase arrest as evident from cell-cycle analysis. We have established that inhibition of GSK-3 imparted a differentiated phenotype in renal cancer cells. We have also shown that GSK-3 inhibition induced autophagy, likely as a result of imbalanced energy homeostasis caused by impaired glucose metabolism. In addition, we have demonstrated the antitumor activity of 9-ING-41 in two different subcutaneous xenograft renal cell carcinoma tumor models. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing autophagy induction due to GSK-3 inhibition in renal cancer cells. PMID:24327518

  2. Interethnic variation of CYP2C19 alleles, 'predicted' phenotypes and 'measured' metabolic phenotypes across world populations.

    PubMed

    Fricke-Galindo, I; Céspedes-Garro, C; Rodrigues-Soares, F; Naranjo, M E G; Delgado, Á; de Andrés, F; López-López, M; Peñas-Lledó, E; LLerena, A

    2016-04-01

    The present study evaluates the worldwide frequency distribution of CYP2C19 alleles and CYP2C19 metabolic phenotypes ('predicted' from genotypes and 'measured' with a probe drug) among healthy volunteers from different ethnic groups and geographic regions, as well as the relationship between the 'predicted' and 'measured' CYP2C19 metabolic phenotypes. A total of 52 181 healthy volunteers were studied within 138 selected original research papers. CYP2C19*17 was 42- and 24-fold more frequent in Mediterranean-South Europeans and Middle Easterns than in East Asians (P<0.001, in both cases). Contrarily, CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3 alleles were more frequent in East Asians (30.26% and 6.89%, respectively), and even a twofold higher frequency of these alleles was found in Native populations from Oceania (61.30% and 14.42%, respectively; P<0.001, in all cases), which may be a consequence of genetic drift process in the Pacific Islands. Regarding CYP2C19 metabolic phenotype, poor metabolizers (PMs) were more frequent among Asians than in Europeans, contrarily to the phenomenon reported for CYP2D6. A correlation has been found between the frequencies of CYP2C19 poor metabolism 'predicted' from CYP2C19 genotypes (gPMs) and the poor metabolic phenotype 'measured' with a probe drug (mPMs) when subjects are either classified by ethnicity (r=0.94, P<0.001) or geographic region (r=0.99, P=0.002). Nevertheless, further research is needed in African and Asian populations, which are under-represented, and additional CYP2C19 variants and the 'measured' phenotype should be studied. PMID:26503820

  3. NIBBS-Search for Fast and Accurate Prediction of Phenotype-Biased Metabolic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Kanchana; Shpanskaya, Yekaterina; Banfield, Jill; Scott, Kathleen; Mihelcic, James R.; Samatova, Nagiza F.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of genotype-phenotype associations is important not only for furthering our knowledge on internal cellular processes, but also essential for providing the foundation necessary for genetic engineering of microorganisms for industrial use (e.g., production of bioenergy or biofuels). However, genotype-phenotype associations alone do not provide enough information to alter an organism's genome to either suppress or exhibit a phenotype. It is important to look at the phenotype-related genes in the context of the genome-scale network to understand how the genes interact with other genes in the organism. Identification of metabolic subsystems involved in the expression of the phenotype is one way of placing the phenotype-related genes in the context of the entire network. A metabolic system refers to a metabolic network subgraph; nodes are compounds and edges labels are the enzymes that catalyze the reaction. The metabolic subsystem could be part of a single metabolic pathway or span parts of multiple pathways. Arguably, comparative genome-scale metabolic network analysis is a promising strategy to identify these phenotype-related metabolic subsystems. Network Instance-Based Biased Subgraph Search (NIBBS) is a graph-theoretic method for genome-scale metabolic network comparative analysis that can identify metabolic systems that are statistically biased toward phenotype-expressing organismal networks. We set up experiments with target phenotypes like hydrogen production, TCA expression, and acid-tolerance. We show via extensive literature search that some of the resulting metabolic subsystems are indeed phenotype-related and formulate hypotheses for other systems in terms of their role in phenotype expression. NIBBS is also orders of magnitude faster than MULE, one of the most efficient maximal frequent subgraph mining algorithms that could be adjusted for this problem. Also, the set of phenotype-biased metabolic systems output by NIBBS comes very close to

  4. The RUNX2 Transcription Factor Negatively Regulates SIRT6 Expression to Alter Glucose Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Choe, Moran; Brusgard, Jessica L; Chumsri, Saranya; Bhandary, Lekhana; Zhao, Xianfeng Frank; Lu, Song; Goloubeva, Olga G; Polster, Brian M; Fiskum, Gary M; Girnun, Geoffrey D; Kim, Myoung Sook; Passaniti, Antonino

    2015-10-01

    Activation of genes promoting aerobic glycolysis and suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. The RUNX2 transcription factor mediates breast cancer (BC) metastasis to bone and is regulated by glucose availability. But, the mechanisms by which it regulates glucose metabolism and promotes an oncogenic phenotype are not known. RUNX2 expression in luminal BC cells correlated with lower estrogen receptor-α (ERα) levels, anchorage-independent growth, expression of glycolytic genes, increased glucose uptake, and sensitivity to glucose starvation, but not to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Conversely, RUNX2 knockdown in triple-negative BC cells inhibited mammosphere formation and glucose dependence. RUNX2 knockdown resulted in lower LDHA, HK2, and GLUT1 glycolytic gene expression, but upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase-A1 (PDHA1) mRNA and enzymatic activity, which was consistent with lower glycolytic potential. The NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, SIRT6, a known tumor suppressor, was a critical regulator of these RUNX2-mediated metabolic changes. RUNX2 expression resulted in elevated pAkt, HK2, and PDHK1 glycolytic protein levels that were reduced by ectopic expression of SIRT6. RUNX2 also repressed mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates (OCR), a measure of oxidative phosphorylation (respiration). Overexpression of SIRT6 increased respiration in RUNX2-positive cells, but knockdown of SIRT6 in cells expressing low RUNX2 decreased respiration. RUNX2 repressed SIRT6 expression at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels and endogenous SIRT6 expression was lower in malignant BC tissues or cell lines that expressed high levels of RUNX2. These results support a hypothesis whereby RUNX2-mediated repression of the SIRT6 tumor suppressor regulates metabolic pathways that promote BC progression. PMID:25808624

  5. Characterization of glucose-related metabolic pathways in differentiated rat oligodendrocyte lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Ana I; Hadera, Mussie G; Tavares, Joana M; Kotter, Mark R N; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Although oligodendrocytes constitute a significant proportion of cells in the central nervous system (CNS), little is known about their intermediary metabolism. We have, therefore, characterized metabolic functions of primary oligodendrocyte precursor cell cultures at late stages of differentiation using isotope-labelled metabolites. We report that differentiated oligodendrocyte lineage cells avidly metabolize glucose in the cytosol and pyruvate derived from glucose in the mitochondria. The labelling patterns of metabolites obtained after incubation with [1,2-(13)C]glucose demonstrated that the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is highly active in oligodendrocytes (approximately 10% of glucose is metabolized via the PPP as indicated by labelling patterns in phosphoenolpyruvate). Mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses of metabolites after incubation of cells with [1-(13)C]lactate or [1,2-(13)C]glucose, respectively, demonstrated that anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation, which was thought to be exclusive to astrocytes, is also active in oligodendrocytes. Using [1,2-(13)C]acetate, we show that oligodendrocytes convert acetate into acetyl CoA which is metabolized in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Analysis of labelling patterns of alanine after incubation of cells with [1,2-(13)C]acetate and [1,2-(13)C]glucose showed catabolic oxidation of malate or oxaloacetate. In conclusion, we report that oligodendrocyte lineage cells at late differentiation stages are metabolically highly active cells that are likely to contribute considerably to the metabolic activity of the CNS. PMID:26352325

  6. To Assess the Association between Glucose Metabolism and Ectopic Lipid Content in Different Clinical Classifications of PCOS

    PubMed Central

    Göbl, Christian S.; Ott, Johannes; Bozkurt, Latife; Feichtinger, Michael; Rehmann, Victoria; Cserjan, Anna; Heinisch, Maike; Steinbrecher, Helmut; JustKukurova, Ivica; Tuskova, Radka; Leutner, Michael; Vytiska-Binstorfer, Elisabeth; Kurz, Christine; Weghofer, Andrea; Tura, Andrea; Egarter, Christian; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Aims There are emerging data indicating an association between PCOS (polycystic ovary syndrome) and metabolic derangements with potential impact on its clinical presentation. This study aims to evaluate the pathophysiological processes beyond PCOS with particular focus on carbohydrate metabolism, ectopic lipids and their possible interaction. Differences between the two established classifications of the disease should be additionally evaluated. Methods A metabolic characterization was performed in 53 untreated PCOS patients as well as 20 controls including an extended oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, to assess insulin sensitivity, secretion and ß-cell function) in addition to a detailed examination of ectopic lipid content in muscle and liver by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results Women with PCOS classified by the original NIH 1990 definition showed a more adverse metabolic risk profile compared to women characterized by the additional Rotterdam 2003 phenotypes. Subtle metabolic derangements were observed in both subgroups, including altered shapes of OGTT curves, impaired insulin action and hyperinsulinemia due to increased secretion and attenuated hepatic extraction. No differences were observed for ectopic lipids between the groups. However, particularly hepatocellular lipid content was significantly related to clinical parameters of PCOS like whole body insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia and free androgen index. Conclusions Subtle alterations in carbohydrate metabolism are present in both PCOS classifications, but more profound in subjects meeting the NIH 1990 criteria. Females with PCOS and controls did not differ in ectopic lipids, however, liver fat was tightly related to hyperandrogenism and an adverse metabolic risk profile. PMID:27505055

  7. Drug-Induced Diabetes Mellitus: Evidence for Statins and Other Drugs Affecting Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anyanwagu, U; Idris, I; Donnelly, R

    2016-04-01

    Abnormalities of glucose metabolism and glucose tolerance, either because of a reduction in tissue sensitivity to insulin (e.g., in liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissues) and/or a reduction in pancreatic insulin secretion, are associated with a number of unwanted health outcomes. Even small increases in circulating glucose levels (often described as dysglycemia or prediabetes) may confer an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease and progression to overt type 2 diabetes. A number of drug therapies, many of them used long term in chronic disease management, have adverse effects on glucose metabolism, diabetes risk, and glycemic control among patients with preexisting diabetes. In this study, we review the evidence, underlying mechanisms, and the clinical significance of drug-related adverse effects on glucose metabolism. PMID:26440603

  8. Glucose homeostasis and the enteroinsular axis in the horse: a possible role in equine metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Graaf-Roelfsema, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    One of the principal components of equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is hyperinsulinaemia combined with insulin resistance. It has long been known that hyperinsulinaemia occurs after the development of insulin resistance. But it is also known that hyperinsulinaemia itself can induce insulin resistance and obesity and might play a key role in the development of metabolic syndrome. This review focuses on the physiology of glucose and insulin metabolism and the pathophysiological mechanisms in glucose homeostasis in the horse (compared with what is already known in humans) in order to gain insight into the pathophysiological principles underlying EMS. The review summarizes new insights on the oral uptake of glucose by the gut and the enteroinsular axis, the role of diet in incretin hormone and postprandial insulin responses, the handling of glucose by the liver, muscle and fat tissue, and the production and secretion of insulin by the pancreas under healthy and disrupted glucose homeostatic conditions in horses. PMID:24287206

  9. The metabolically-modulated stem cell niche: a dynamic scenario regulating cancer cell phenotype and resistance to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rovida, Elisabetta; Peppicelli, Silvia; Bono, Silvia; Bianchini, Francesca; Tusa, Ignazia; Cheloni, Giulia; Marzi, Ilaria; Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Calorini, Lido; Sbarba, Persio Dello

    2014-01-01

    This Perspective addresses the interactions of cancer stem cells (CSC) with environment which result in the modulation of CSC metabolism, and thereby of CSC phenotype and resistance to therapy. We considered first as a model disease chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which is triggered by a well-identified oncogenetic protein (BCR/Abl) and brilliantly treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKi). However, TKi are extremely effective in inducing remission of disease, but unable, in most cases, to prevent relapse. We demonstrated that the interference with cell metabolism (oxygen/glucose shortage) enriches cells exhibiting the leukemia stem cell (LSC) phenotype and, at the same time, suppresses BCR/Abl protein expression. These LSC are therefore refractory to the TKi Imatinib-mesylate, pointing to cell metabolism as an important factor controlling the onset of TKi-resistant minimal residual disease (MRD) of CML and the related relapse. Studies of solid neoplasias brought another player into the control of MRD, low tissue pH, which often parallels cancer growth and progression. Thus, a 3-party scenario emerged for the regulation of CSC/LSC maintenance, MRD induction and disease relapse: the “hypoxic” versus the “ischemic” vs. the “acidic” environment. As these environments are unlikely constrained within rigid borders, we named this model the “metabolically-modulated stem cell niche.” PMID:25485495

  10. Per-Arnt-Sim Kinase (PASK): An Emerging Regulator of Mammalian Glucose and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan-dan; Zhang, Ji-gang; Wang, Yu-zhu; Liu, Ying; Liu, Gao-lin; Li, Xiao-yu

    2015-01-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim Kinase (PASK) is an evolutionarily-conserved nutrient-responsive protein kinase that regulates lipid and glucose metabolism, mitochondrial respiration, phosphorylation, and gene expression. Recent data suggests that mammalian PAS kinase is involved in glucose metabolism and acts on pancreatic islet α/β cells and glycogen synthase (GS), affecting insulin secretion and blood glucose levels. In addition, PASK knockout mice (PASK-/-) are protected from obesity, liver triglyceride accumulation, and insulin resistance when fed a high-fat diet, implying that PASK may be a new target for metabolic syndrome (MetS) treatment as well as the cellular nutrients and energy sensors—adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the targets of rapamycin (m-TOR). In this review, we will briefly summarize the regulation of PASK on mammalian glucose and lipid metabolism and its possible mechanism, and further explore the potential targets for MetS therapy. PMID:26371032

  11. Assessment of regional glucose metabolism in aging brain and dementia with positron-emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.; Ferris, S.; Christman, D.; Fowler, J.; MacGregor, R.; Farkas, T.; Greenberg, J.; Dann, R.; Wolf, A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper explores the alterations in regional glucose metabolism that occur in elderly subjects and those with senile dementia compared to normal young volunteers. Results showed a tendency for the frontal regions to have a lower metabolic rate in patients with dementia although this did not reach the level of significance when compared to the elderly control subjects. The changes in glucose metabolism were symmetrical in both the left and right hemispheres. There was a lack of correlation between the mean cortical metabolic rates for glucose and the global mental function in the patients with senile dementia. This is at variance with most of the regional cerebral blood flow data that has been collected. This may be partly related to the use of substrates other than glucose by the brain in elderly and demented subjects. (PSB)

  12. Roles of Chlorogenic Acid on Regulating Glucose and Lipids Metabolism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shengxi; Cao, Jianmei; Feng, Qin; Peng, Jinghua; Hu, Yiyang

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular glucose and lipid metabolic homeostasis is vital for maintaining basic life activities of a cell or an organism. Glucose and lipid metabolic disorders are closely related with the occurrence and progression of diabetes, obesity, hepatic steatosis, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet, is a group of phenolic secondary metabolites produced by certain plant species and is an important component of coffee. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that CGA exerts many biological properties, including antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic activities. Recently, the roles and applications of CGA, particularly in relation to glucose and lipid metabolism, have been highlighted. This review addresses current studies investigating the roles of CGA in glucose and lipid metabolism. PMID:24062792

  13. Glut1 deficiency (G1D): Epilepsy and metabolic dysfunction in a mouse model of the most common human phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Good, Levi B.; Ma, Qian; Duarte, Joao; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Sinton, Christopher M.; Heilig, Charles W.; Pascual, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    Brain glucose supplies most of the carbon required for acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) generation (an important step for myelin synthesis) and for neurotransmitter production via further metabolism of acetyl-CoA in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. However, it is not known whether reduced brain glucose transporter type I (GLUT-1) activity, the hallmark of the GLUT-1 deficiency (G1D) syndrome, leads to acetyl-CoA, TCA or neurotransmitter depletion. This question is relevant because, in its most common form in man, G1D is associated with cerebral hypomyelination (manifested as microcephaly) and epilepsy, suggestive of acetyl-CoA depletion and neurotransmitter dysfunction, respectively. Yet, brain metabolism in G1D remains underexplored both theoretically and experimentally, partly because computational models of limited brain glucose transport are subordinate to metabolic assumptions and partly because current hemizygous G1D mouse models manifest a mild phenotype not easily amenable to investigation. In contrast, adult antisense G1D mice replicate the human phenotype of spontaneous epilepsy associated with robust thalamocortical electrical oscillations. Additionally, and in consonance with human metabolic imaging observations, thalamus and cerebral cortex display the lowest GLUT-1 expression and glucose uptake in the mutant mouse. This depletion of brain glucose is associated with diminished plasma fatty acids and elevated ketone body levels, and with decreased brain acetyl-CoA and fatty acid contents, consistent with brain ketone body consumption and with stimulation of brain beta-oxidation and/or diminished cerebral lipid synthesis. In contrast with other epilepsies, astrocyte glutamine synthetase expression, cerebral TCA cycle intermediates, amino acid and amine neurotransmitter contents are also intact in G1D. The data suggest that the TCA cycle is preserved in G1D because reduced glycolysis and acetyl-CoA formation can be balanced by enhanced ketone body

  14. Afamin promotes glucose metabolism in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen-Tian; Wei, Wei-Jun; Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Song, Hong-Jun; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2016-10-15

    Circulating afamin (AFM) concentrations have been investigated as a tumor biomarker in various types of carcinomas. However, suitable cell lines expressing human afamin have not yet been reported and current knowledge of the functions of afamin, particularly at the mechanistic molecular level, is very limited. In the current study, thyroid cancer cell lines 8505c and K1 were used to investigate the potential functions of afamin. AFM over-expression models and vector controls of 8505c (8505c + AFM and 8505c + NC) and K1 (K1 + AFM and K1 + NC) were successfully established by Lenti-LV5-AFM and Lenti-LV5-NC transfection. The change of gene expression was detected by qRT-PCR and western blotting analysis. (18)F-FDG imaging in xenografts model was performed using a micro PET/CT. We found that protein level of GAPDH, GLUT1, HK2, p-AKT, AKT, p-mTOR and PARP1 were up-regulated in K1 + AFM cells when compared to K1 and K1 + NC. While in 8505c, 8505c + NC and 8505c cells, the expression level of these genes were not significantly changed. (18)F-FDG uptake was much higher in K1 + AFM cells when compared to K1 and K1 + NC in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, afamin could promote glycometabolism by up-regulating the glucose metabolism key enzymes in papillary thyroid carcinoma. These findings reveal new clues of the molecular function of AFM. PMID:27329154

  15. Effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on glucose metabolism in isolated hepatocytes from Zucker rats

    SciTech Connect

    Finan, A.; Cleary, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    DHEA has been shown to competitively inhibit the pentose phosphate shunt (PPS) enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) when added in vitro to supernatants or homogenates prepared from mammalian tissues. However, no consistent effect on G6PD activity has been determined in tissue removed from DHEA-treated rats. To explore the effects of DHEA on PPS, glucose utilization was measured in hepatocytes from lean and obese male Zucker rats (8 wks of age) following 1 wk of DHEA treatment (0.6% in diet). Incubation of isolated hepatocytes from treated lean Zucker rats with either (1-/sup 14/C) glucose or (6-/sup 14/C) glucose resulted in significant decreases in CO/sub 2/ production and total glucose utilization. DHEA-lean rats also had lowered fat pad weights. In obese rats, there was no effect of 1 wk of treatment on either glucose metabolism or fat pad weight. The calculated percent contribution of the PPS to glucose metabolism in hepatocytes was not changed for either DHEA-lean or obese rats when compared to control rats. In conclusion, 1 wk of DHEA treatment lowered overall glucose metabolism in hepatocytes of lean Zucker rats, but did not selectively affect the PPS. The lack of an effect of short-term treatment in obese rats may be due to differences in their metabolism or storage/release of DHEA in tissues in comparison to lean rats.

  16. Mitochondrial phenotype of marsupial torpor: Fuel metabolic switch in the Chilean mouse-opossum Thylamys elegans.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Pablo Andres; Bacigalupe, Leonardo Daniel; Mondaca, Fredy; Desrosiers, Véronique; Blier, Pierre U

    2016-01-01

    Torpor is a phenotype characterized by a controlled decline of metabolic rate and body temperature. During arousal from torpor, organs undergo rapid metabolic reactivation and rewarming to near normal levels. As torpor progress, animals show a preference for fatty acids over glucose as primary source of energy. Here, we analyzed for first time the changes in the maximal activity of key enzymes related to fatty acid (Carnitine palmitoyltransferase and β-Hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase) and carbohydrate (Pyruvate kinase, Phosphofructokinase and Lactate dehydrogenase) catabolism, as well as mitochondrial oxidative capacity (Citrate synthase), in six organs of torpid, arousing and euthermic Chilean mouse-opossums (Thylamys elegans). Our results showed that activity of enzymes related to fatty acid and carbohydrate catabolism were different among torpor phases and the pattern of variation differs among tissues. In terms of lipid utilization, maximal enzymatic activities differ in tissues with high oxidative capacity such as heart, kidney, and liver. In terms of carbohydrate use, lower enzymatic activities were observed during torpor in brain and liver. Interestingly, citrate synthase activity did not differ thought torpor-arousal cycle in any tissues analyzed, suggesting no modulation of mitochondrial content in T. elegans. Overall results provide an indication that modulation of enzymes associated with carbohydrate and fatty-acid pathways is mainly oriented to limit energy expensive processes and sustain energy metabolism during transition from torpor to euthermy. Future studies are required to elucidate if physiological events observed for T. elegans are unique from other marsupials, or represents a general response in marsupials. J. Exp. Zool. 325A:41-51, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26553608

  17. Decoding Alzheimer's disease from perturbed cerebral glucose metabolism: implications for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhichun; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2013-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related devastating neurodegenerative disorder, which severely impacts on the global economic development and healthcare system. Though AD has been studied for more than 100 years since 1906, the exact cause(s) and pathogenic mechanism(s) remain to be clarified. Also, the efficient disease-modifying treatment and ideal diagnostic method for AD are unavailable. Perturbed cerebral glucose metabolism, an invariant pathophysiological feature of AD, may be a critical contributor to the pathogenesis of this disease. In this review, we firstly discussed the features of cerebral glucose metabolism in physiological and pathological conditions. Then, we further reviewed the contribution of glucose transportation abnormality and intracellular glucose catabolism dysfunction in AD pathophysiology, and proposed a hypothesis that multiple pathogenic cascades induced by impaired cerebral glucose metabolism could result in neuronal degeneration and consequently cognitive deficits in AD patients. Among these pathogenic processes, altered functional status of thiamine metabolism and brain insulin resistance are highly emphasized and characterized as major pathogenic mechanisms. Finally, considering the fact that AD patients exhibit cerebral glucose hypometabolism possibly due to impairments of insulin signaling and altered thiamine metabolism, we also discuss some potential possibilities to uncover diagnostic biomarkers for AD from abnormal glucose metabolism and to develop drugs targeting at repairing insulin signaling impairment and correcting thiamine metabolism abnormality. We conclude that glucose metabolism abnormality plays a critical role in AD pathophysiological alterations through the induction of multiple pathogenic factors such as oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and so forth. To clarify the causes, pathogeneses and consequences of cerebral hypometabolism in AD will help break the bottleneck of current AD study in finding

  18. Glucose transport and glucose transporter GLUT4 are regulated by product(s) of intermediary metabolism in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Y; Böttcher, U; Eblenkamp, M; Thomas, J; Jüngling, E; Rösen, P; Kammermeier, H

    1997-01-01

    Alternative substrates of energy metabolism are thought to contribute to the impairment of heart and muscle glucose utilization in insulin-resistant states. We have investigated the acute effects of substrates in isolated rat cardiomyocytes. Exposure to lactate, pyruvate, propionate, acetate, palmitate, beta-hydroxybutyrate or alpha-oxoglutarate led to the depression of glucose transport by up to 50%, with lactate, pyruvate and propionate being the most potent agents. The percentage inhibition was greater in cardiomyocytes in which glucose transport was stimulated with the alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine or with a submaximal insulin concentration than in basal or fully insulin-stimulated cells. Cardiomyocytes from fasted or diabetic rats displayed a similar sensitivity to substrates as did cells from control animals. On the other hand, the amination product of pyruvate (alanine), as well as valine and the aminotransferase inhibitors cycloserine and amino-oxyacetate, stimulated glucose transport about 2-fold. In addition, the effect of pyruvate was counteracted by cycloserine. Since reversible transamination reactions are known to affect the pool size of the citrate cycle, the influence of substrates, amino acids and aminotransferase inhibitors on citrate, malate and glutamate content was examined. A significant negative correlation was found between alterations in glucose transport and the levels of citrate (P < 0.01) or malate (P < 0.01), and there was a positive correlation between glucose transport and glutamate levels (P < 0.05). In contrast, there was no correlation with changes in [1-(14)C]pyruvate oxidation or in glucose-6-phosphate levels. Finally, pyruvate decreased the abundance of GLUT4 glucose transporters at the surface of phenylephrine- or insulin-stimulated cells by 34% and 27 % respectively, as determined by using the selective photoaffinity label [3H]ATB-BMPA [[3H]2-N-[4-(1-azi-2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzoyl]-1,3-bis-(D-man nos-4-yloxy

  19. Upregulation of glucose metabolism by granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, A.; Spolarics, Z.; Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Nelson, S.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Alterations of glucose metabolism were investigated for 6 hours following an intraarterial injection of murine recombinant granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF resulted in a transient elevation of plasma glucose. The rate of whole body glucose appearance, as measured by infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)glucose, was increased by about 10% between 0.5 and 3 hours following GM-CSF injection. In vivo glucose utilization of individual tissues was investigated by the tracer 2-deoxyglucose technique. At 30 min, GM-CSF increased glucose utilization by 80-90% in liver and lung, and 50-60% in skin and spleen. At 3 and 6 hours, glucose utilization by these tissues returned toward control levels except for lung. There was a 40-50% increase in glucose utilization by skeletal muscle 30 min after GM-CSF which was sustained for 6 hours. Glucose utilization of testis, ileum and kidney did not change significantly. Plasma concentrations of insulin, glucagon and tumor necrosis factor were not altered in response to GM-CSF. These findings indicate that some of the acute metabolic effects of a short-term administration of GM-CSF are observed in macrophage-rich tissues, and suggest that GM-CSF may be involved in the metabolic upregulation of immunologically active tissues.

  20. Immune system and glucose metabolism interaction in schizophrenia: a chicken-egg dilemma.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Johann; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Schiltz, Kolja; Müller, Ulf J; Westphal, Sabine; Drexhage, Hemmo A; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Impaired glucose metabolism and the development of metabolic syndrome contribute to a reduction in the average life expectancy of individuals with schizophrenia. It is unclear whether this association simply reflects an unhealthy lifestyle or whether weight gain and impaired glucose tolerance in patients with schizophrenia are directly attributable to the side effects of atypical antipsychotic medications or disease-inherent derangements. In addition, numerous previous studies have highlighted alterations in the immune system of patients with schizophrenia. Increased concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) appear to be state markers, whereas IL-12, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R) appear to be trait markers of schizophrenia. Moreover, the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) and microglial activation are involved in the early course of the disease. This review illustrates a "chicken-egg dilemma", as it is currently unclear whether impaired cerebral glucose utilization leads to secondary disturbances in peripheral glucose metabolism, an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, and accompanying pro-inflammatory changes in patients with schizophrenia or whether immune mechanisms may be involved in the initial pathogenesis of schizophrenia, which leads to disturbances in glucose metabolism such as metabolic syndrome. Alternatively, shared underlying factors may be responsible for the co-occurrence of immune system and glucose metabolism disturbances in schizophrenia. PMID:23085507

  1. Effects of Treatment for Tobacco Dependence on Resting Cerebral Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Matthew R; Mandelkern, Mark A; Shoptaw, Stephen; Shulenberger, Stephanie; Baker, Stephanie K; Abrams, Anna L; Xia, Catherine; London, Edythe D; Brody, Arthur L

    2010-01-01

    While bupropion HCl and practical group counseling (PGC) are commonly used treatments for tobacco dependence, the effects of these treatments on brain function are not well established. For this study, 54 tobacco-dependent cigarette smokers underwent resting 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose–positron emission tomography (FDG–PET) scanning before and after 8 weeks of treatment with bupropion HCl, PGC, or pill placebo. Using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 2), changes in cerebral glucose metabolism from before to after treatment were compared between treatment groups and correlations were determined between amount of daily cigarette usage and cerebral glucose metabolism. Compared with placebo, the two active treatments (bupropion HCl and PGC) had reductions in glucose metabolism in the posterior cingulate gyrus. Further analysis suggested that PGC had a greater effect than bupropion HCl on glucose metabolism in this region. We also found positive correlations between daily cigarette use and glucose metabolism in the left occipital gyrus and parietal–temporal junction. There were no significant negative correlations between daily cigarette use and glucose metabolism. Our findings suggest that bupropion HCl and PGC reduce neural activity much as the performance of a goal-oriented task does in the default mode network of the brain, including the posterior cingulate gyrus. Thus, this study supports the theory that active treatments for tobacco dependence move the brain into a more goal-oriented state. PMID:19865076

  2. Fasting and postabsorptive hepatic glucose and insulin metabolism in hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Raboudi, N; Arem, R; Jones, R H; Chap, Z; Pena, J; Chou, J; Field, J B

    1989-01-01

    The effect of thyroid hormone excess on hepatic glucose balances and fractional hepatic extraction of insulin and glucagon was examined in six conscious dogs with catheters in the portal vein, hepatic vein, and femoral artery and Doppler flow probes on the portal vein and hepatic artery. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed before and after the animals were made hyperthyroid by intramuscular thyroxine administration (100 micrograms.kg-1.day-1) for 10 days. In the basal state and after oral glucose, insulin and glucagon levels in the three vessels and the basal fractional hepatic extraction of insulin and glucagon were not significantly modified by thyroid hormone. These results suggest that in short-term thyrotoxicosis insulin secretion is not impaired, and the rise in fasting plasma glucose and increased hepatic glucose production could reflect hepatic insulin resistance, increased availability of precursors for gluconeogenesis, or increased glycogenolysis. Hyperthyroidism significantly increased basal flows in the portal vein (14.7 +/- 0.6 vs. 12.9 +/- 0.5 ml.kg-1.min-1), the hepatic artery (4.8 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.9 +/- 0.2 ml.kg-1.min-1) and vein (19.6 +/- 0.7 vs. 16.9 +/- 0.4 ml.kg-1.min-1), the fasting plasma glucose concentration (104 +/- 3 vs. 92 +/- 2 mg/dl), and basal hepatic glucose output (2.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.2 mg.kg-1.min-1). It did not alter the nonhepatic splanchnic uptake of glucose, the percent of orally administered glucose that appeared in the portal vein (47 +/- 2 vs. 45 +/- 11%), the percent of hepatic uptake of glucose (59 +/- 11 vs. 74 +/- 22%), or the shape of the glucose tolerance test. PMID:2643338

  3. Cerebral glucose metabolism in childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Swedo, S.E.; Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.L.; Cheslow, D.L.; Leonard, H.L.; Kumar, A.; Friedland, R.; Rapoport, S.I.; Rapoport, J.L.

    1989-06-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in 18 adults with childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and in age- and sex-matched controls using positron emission tomography and fludeoxyglucose F 18. Both groups were scanned during rest, with reduced auditory and visual stimulation. The group with OCD showed an increased glucose metabolism in the left orbital frontal, right sensorimotor, and bilateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate regions as compared with controls. Ratios of regional activity to mean cortical gray matter metabolism were increased for the right prefrontal and left anterior cingulate regions in the group with OCD as a whole. Correlations between glucose metabolism and clinical assessment measures showed a significant relationship between metabolic activity and both state and trait measurements of OCD and anxiety as well as the response to clomipramine hydrochloride therapy. These results are consistent with the suggestion that OCD may result from a functional disturbance in the frontal-limbic-basal ganglia system.

  4. The Role of Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in Growth and Survival of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Brault, Charlene; Schulze, Almut

    2016-01-01

    One of the prerequisites for cell growth and proliferation is the synthesis of macromolecules, including proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Cells have to alter their metabolism to allow the production of metabolic intermediates that are the precursors for biomass production. It is now evident that oncogenic signalling pathways target metabolic processes on several levels and metabolic reprogramming has emerged as a hallmark of cancer. The increased metabolic demand of cancer cells also produces selective dependencies that could be targeted for therapeutic intervention. Understanding the role of glucose and lipid metabolism in supporting cancer cell growth and survival is crucial to identify essential processes that could provide therapeutic windows for cancer therapy. PMID:27557532

  5. SCAP links glucose to lipid metabolism in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    We recently uncovered that glucose is a critical activator of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). Glucose promotes SREBP-cleavage activating protein (SCAP)/SREBP complex trafficking from the ER to the Golgi and subsequent SREBP activation via N-glycosylation of SCAP. Our study also demonstrated that SCAP plays a critical role in tumor growth. PMID:27065222

  6. Direct effect of incretin hormones on glucose and glycerol metabolism and hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Karstoft, Kristian; Mortensen, Stefan P; Knudsen, Sine H; Solomon, Thomas P J

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the insulin-independent effects of incretin hormones on glucose and glycerol metabolism and hemodynamics under euglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions. Young, healthy men (n=10) underwent three trials in a randomized, controlled, crossover study. Each trial consisted of a two-stage (euglycemia and hyperglycemia) pancreatic clamp (using somatostatin to prevent endogenous insulin secretion). Glucose and lipid metabolism was measured via infusion of stable glucose and glycerol isotopic tracers. Hemodynamic variables (femoral, brachial, and common carotid artery blood flow and flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery) were also measured. The three trials differed as follows: 1) saline [control (CON)], 2) glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1, 0.5 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)), and 3) glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP, 1.5 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1)). No between-trial differences in glucose infusion rates (GIR) or glucose or glycerol kinetics were seen during euglycemia, whereas hyperglycemia resulted in increased GIR and glucose rate of disappearance during GLP-1 compared with CON and GIP (P<0.01 for all). However, when normalized to insulin levels, no differences between trials were seen for GIR or glucose rate of disappearance. Besides a higher femoral blood flow during hyperglycemia with GIP (vs. CON and GLP-1, P<0.001), no between-trial differences were seen for the hemodynamic variables. In conclusion, GLP-1 and GIP have no direct effect on whole body glucose metabolism or hemodynamics during euglycemia. On the contrary, during hyperglycemia, GIP increases femoral artery blood flow with no effect on glucose metabolism, whereas GLP-1 increases glucose disposal, potentially due to increased insulin levels. PMID:25564476

  7. Comparison of clinical types of Wilson's disease and glucose metabolism in extrapyramidal motor brain regions.

    PubMed

    Hermann, W; Barthel, H; Hesse, S; Grahmann, F; Kühn, H-J; Wagner, A; Villmann, T

    2002-07-01

    In Wilson's disease a disturbed glucose metabolism especially in striatal and cerebellar areas has been reported. This is correlated with the severity of extrapyramidal motor symptoms (EPS). These findings are only based on a small number of patients. Up to now it is unknown whether EPS are caused by various patterns of disturbed basal ganglia glucose metabolism. We investigated 37 patients and 9 normal volunteers to characterize the disturbed glucose metabolism in Wilson's disease more precisely. The glucose metabolism was determined in 5 cerebellar and cerebral areas (putamen, caput nuclei caudati, cerebellum, midbrain and thalamic area) by using (18)F-Fluorodesoxyglucose-Positron-Emission-Tomography ( [(18)F]FDG-PET). The database was evaluated by a cluster analysis. Additionally, the severity extrapyramidal motor symptoms were judged by a clinical score system. Three characteristic patterns of glucose metabolism in basal ganglia were obtained. Two of them may be assigned to patients with neurological symptoms whereas the third cluster corresponds to most patients without EPS or normal volunteers. The clusters can be identified by characteristic consumption rates in this 5 brain areas. The severity of EPS can not clearly be assigned to one of the clusters with disturbed glucose metabolism. However, the most severe cases are characterized by the lowest consumption in the striatal area. When there is marked improvement of EPS impaired glucose consumption reveals a persistent brain lesion. Finally, the neurological symptoms in Wilson's disease are caused by (at least) two different patterns of disturbed glucose metabolism in basal ganglia and cerebellum. The severity of EPS seems to be determined by a disturbed consumption in the striatal area. PMID:12140675

  8. The use of /sup 11/C-glucose and positron emission tomography to measure brain glucose metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Mintun, M.A.; Raichle, M.E.; Welch, M.J.; Kilbourn, M.R.

    1985-05-01

    To measure regional cerebral metabolism of glucose (CMRGlu) with positron emission tomography (PET), but avoid the potential problems inherent in the use of /sup 18/F-fluoro-deoxyglucose, (e.g. regional variation in regional rate constants and instability of the ''lumped constant''), the authors have developed a method using uniformly labeled /sup 11/C-glucose. The method employs a 4-compartment model that accounts for vascular tracer, transport of tracer in and out of the extravascular space, metabolism of tracer, and the production of labeled carbon dioxide, which is free to leave the tissue with blood flow. The differential equations for this model, when solved for CMRGlu, yield CMRGlu=k/sub 1/ . k/sub 3/ . CBF . C/sub B//(k/sub 1/ . k/sub 3/+CBF/CBV . (k/sub 2/+k/sub 3/)) where CBF and CBV are cerebral blood flow and volume, C/sub B/ is unlabeled blood glucose content, k/sub 1/ and k/sub 2/ are transport rate constants and k/sub 3/ is the metabolism rate constant. The authors have begun implementing this technique in baboons and human subjects by first measuring regional CBV and CBF with extant PET methods, then after injection of 20-40mCi of U-/sup 11/C-glucose, estimating the rate constants from 40 sequential PET scans taken over 20 minutes. Resulting white-to-gray matter range in CMRGlu for one typical human subject was 2.9 to 6.3 mg/(min . 100 mg). Oxygen metabolism (CMRO/sub 2/) was also measured at the same sitting with PET and the molar ratio of CMRO/sub 2//CMRGlu ranged from 5.8 to 6.4 as would be expected. These results demonstrate that it may be feasible to avoid the difficulties of an analogue tracer in the measurement of CMRGlu by using /sup 11/C-glucose.

  9. Histochemical research on metabolic pathways of glucose in some species of Mollusca Gastropoda.

    PubMed

    Bolognani Fantin, A M; Bolognani, L; Ottaviani, E; Franchini, A

    1987-01-01

    The metabolic pathways of glucose were studied by histochemical reactions in some species of gastropods living in different habitats. The glycolytic pathway is histochemically indicated by positive results for glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, fructose-1,6-biphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and D-lactate dehydrogenase. The enzymes of the Krebs cycle gave different responses: isocitrate dehydrogenase and L-malate dehydrogenase were positive, whilst succinate dehydrogenase was constantly negative. Malate synthetase activity was also demonstrated. Despite L-glutamate dehydrogenase is undetectable, the presence of transaminase indicates the gluconeogenetic route. Phosphoglucomutase and glucose-6-phosphate phosphatase appear also positive. The metabolic meaning of our results were discussed. PMID:3111150

  10. Maternal transmission of Alzheimer's disease: Prodromal metabolic phenotype and the search for genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    After advanced age, having a parent affected with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most significant risk factor for developing AD among cognitively normal (NL) individuals. Although rare genetic mutations have been identified among the early-onset forms of familial AD (EOFAD), the genetics of the more common forms of late-onset AD (LOAD) remain elusive. While some LOAD cases appear to be sporadic in nature, genetically mediated risk is evident from the familial aggregation of many LOAD cases. The patterns of transmission and biological mechanisms through which a family history of LOAD confers risk to the offspring are not known. Brain imaging studies using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) have shown that NL individuals with a maternal history of LOAD, but not with a paternal family history, express a phenotype characterised by a pattern of progressive reductions of brain glucose metabolism, similar to that in AD patients. As maternally inherited AD may be associated with as many as 20 per cent of the total LOAD population, understanding the causes and mechanisms of expression of this form of AD is of great relevance. This paper reviews known genetic mutations implicated in EOFAD and their effects on brain chemistry, structure and function; epidemiology and clinical research findings in LOAD, including in vivo imaging findings showing selective patterns of hypometabolism in maternally inherited AD; possible genetic mechanisms involved in maternal transmission of AD, including chromosome X mutations, mitochondrial DNA and imprinting; and genetic mechanisms involved in other neurological disorders with known or suspected maternal inheritance. The review concludes with a discussion of the potential role of brain imaging for identifying endophenotypes in NL individuals at risk for AD, and for directing investigation of potential susceptibility genes for AD. PMID:20368139

  11. Decreased Expression of Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase Associates with Glucose Metabolism and Tumor Progression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hidenari; Sugimachi, Keishi; Komatsu, Hisateru; Ueda, Masami; Masuda, Takaaki; Uchi, Ryutaro; Sakimura, Shotaro; Nambara, Sho; Saito, Tomoko; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Iguchi, Tomohiro; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Ito, Shuhei; Terashima, Kotaro; Sakamoto, Katsumi; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Honda, Hiroshi; Mimori, Koshi

    2016-06-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBP1), the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis, is reduced in expression in certain cancers where it has been hypothesized to act as a tumor suppressor, including in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we report functional evidence supporting this hypothesis, providing a preclinical rationale to develop FBP1 as a therapeutic target for HCC treatment. Three independent cohorts totaling 594 cases of HCC were analyzed to address clinical significance. Lower FBP1 expression associated with advanced tumor stage, poor overall survival, and higher tumor recurrence rates. In HCC cell lines, where endogenous FBP1 expression is low, engineering its ectopic overexpression inhibited tumor growth and intracellular glucose uptake by reducing aerobic glycolysis. In patient specimens, promoter methylation and copy-number loss of FBP1 were independently associated with decreased FBP1 expression. Similarly, FBP1 downregulation in HCC cell lines was also associated with copy-number loss. HCC specimens exhibiting low expression of FBP1 had a highly malignant phenotype, including large tumor size, poor differentiation, impaired gluconeogenesis, and enhanced aerobic glycolysis. The effects of FBP1 expression on prognosis and glucose metabolism were confirmed by gene set enrichment analysis. Overall, our findings established that FBP1 downregulation in HCC contributed to tumor progression and poor prognosis by altering glucose metabolism, and they rationalize further study of FBP1 as a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target in HCC patients. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3265-76. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197151

  12. Remodeling of Glucose Metabolism Precedes Pressure Overload -Induced Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Review of a Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Bijoy K.; Zhong, Min; Sen, Shiraj; Davogustto, Giovanni; Keller, Susanna R.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    When subjected to pressure overload, the ventricular myocardium shifts from fatty acids to glucose as its main source for energy provision and frequently increases its mass. Here, we review the evidence in support of the concept that metabolic remodeling, measured as increased myocardial glucose uptake using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose analogue 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG), precedes the onset of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and heart failure. Consistent with this, early intervention with propranolol, which attenuates glucose uptake, prevents the maladaptive metabolic response and preserves cardiac function in vivo. We also review ex vivo studies suggesting a link between dysregulated myocardial glucose metabolism, intracellular accumulation of glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) and contractile dysfunction of the heart. G6P levels correlate with activation of mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) and endoplasmic reticulum stress. This sequence of events could be prevented by pre-treatment with rapamycin (mTOR inhibition) or metformin (enzyme 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase activation ). In conclusion, we propose that metabolic imaging with FDG PET may provide a novel approach to guide the treatment of patients with hypertension-induced LVH. PMID:25791172

  13. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John Douglas R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-01-01

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using 2-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyze the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identifies the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging. PMID:25904018

  14. Relationship of impaired brain glucose metabolism to learning deficit in the senescence-accelerated mouse.

    PubMed

    Ohta, H; Nishikawa, H; Hirai, K; Kato, K; Miyamoto, M

    1996-10-11

    The relationship between brain glucose metabolism and learning deficit was examined in the senescence-accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) 8, which has been proven to be a useful murine model of age-related behavioral disorders. SAMP8, 7 months old, exhibited marked learning impairment in the passive avoidance task, as compared with the control strain, senescence-accelerated-resistant mice (SAMR) 1. SAMP8 also exhibited a reduction in brain glucose metabolism, as indicated by a reduction in [14C]2-deoxyglucose accumulation in the brain following the intravenous injection impaired glucose metabolism correlated significantly with the learning impairment in all brain regions in SAMR1 and SAMP8. In the SAMP8, a significant correlation was observed in the posterior half of the cerebral cortex. These results suggest that the SAMP8 strain is a useful model of not only age-related behavioral disorders, but also glucose hypometabolism observed in aging and dementias. PMID:8905734

  15. Comparison of cerebral glucose metabolic rates measured with fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose labeled in the 1, 2, 3-4, and 6 positions using double label quantitative digital autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, J.L.; Ackermann, R.F.

    1988-08-01

    We compared local cerebral glucose metabolic rates (LCMRglu) that were determined with (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and (/sup 14/C)glucose labeled in the 1, 2, 3-4, and 6 positions. Double label digital autoradiography was used with published kinetic models to determine LCMRglu for FDG and glucose in the same animals. Glucose showed metabolic rate dependent underestimation of LCMRglu compared to FDG, which worsened with increasing experimental times. The least underestimation occurred with glucose labeled in the 6 position at 6 min, reaching 10% in areas of high metabolism. Labeling in the 1 position, the 2 position and the 3-4 position caused progressively worse underestimation at all times. In addition, some structures showed differences not directly related to metabolic rate, indicating regional variations in relationships between individual kinetic constants of FDG and glucose.

  16. Regulation of glucose and glycogen metabolism during and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas E; Richter, Erik A

    2012-03-01

    Utilization of carbohydrate in the form of intramuscular glycogen stores and glucose delivered from plasma becomes an increasingly important energy substrate to the working muscle with increasing exercise intensity. This review gives an update on the molecular signals by which glucose transport is increased in the contracting muscle followed by a discussion of glycogen mobilization and synthesis by the action of glycogen phosphorylase and glycogen synthase, respectively. Finally, this review deals with the signalling relaying the well-described increased sensitivity of glucose transport to insulin in the post-exercise period which can result in an overshoot of intramuscular glycogen resynthesis post exercise (glycogen supercompensation). PMID:22199166

  17. Regulation of glucose and glycogen metabolism during and after exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas E; Richter, Erik A

    2012-01-01

    Utilization of carbohydrate in the form of intramuscular glycogen stores and glucose delivered from plasma becomes an increasingly important energy substrate to the working muscle with increasing exercise intensity. This review gives an update on the molecular signals by which glucose transport is increased in the contracting muscle followed by a discussion of glycogen mobilization and synthesis by the action of glycogen phosphorylase and glycogen synthase, respectively. Finally, this review deals with the signalling relaying the well-described increased sensitivity of glucose transport to insulin in the post-exercise period which can result in an overshoot of intramuscular glycogen resynthesis post exercise (glycogen supercompensation). PMID:22199166

  18. The role of osteocalcin in human glucose metabolism: marker or mediator?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing evidence supports an association between the skeleton and energy metabolism. These interactions are mediated by a variety of hormones, cytokines, and nutrients. Here, the evidence for a role of osteocalcin in the regulation of glucose metabolism in humans is reviewed. Osteocalcin is a bon...

  19. Cardiovascular Risks in Relation to Daidzein Metabolizing Phenotypes among Chinese Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao-min; Ho, Suzanne C.; Chen, Yu-ming; Liu, Jun; Woo, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggested that the inter-individual differences in metabolizing isoflavone daidzein to equol or O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA) might explain the inconsistency of the soy/isoflavones efficacy on cardiovascular health. Objectives The study aims to evaluate the relationship between equol and ODMA phenotypes and cardiovascular risks with habitual isoflavone consumption in Chinese postmenopausal women. Methods This is a cross-sectional study among 726 prehypertensive postmenopal women who were screened for a randomized controlled trial. 648 women returned a daidzein-challenged urine samples for determination of equol and O-DMA production. 595 attended clinic visits for assessment of cardiovascular risks including body composition, blood pressure (BP), serum lipids, uric acid, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), fasting glucose and free fatty acid (FFA). Results The prevalences of equol and O-DMA producers were 53.2% and 60.9% respectively. Equol producers had higher fat free mass (p = 0.001), lower systolic (p = 0.01) and diastolic (p = 0.01) BP, serum triglyceride (p = 0.023), hs-CRP (p = 0.015) and FFA (p = 0.001) than non-producers. O-DMA producers had lower body fat% (p = 0.032), SBP (p = 0.02), total cholesterol (p = 0.002) than non-producers. The significant differences remained after further adjustment for potential confounders. The habitual soy isoflavones intake had little relation to cardiovascular risk factors in either equol/O-DMA producer phenotypes. Conclusion Equol/O-DMA producers had more favorable cardiovascular risk profiles than non-producers in prehypertensive postmenopausal women. PMID:24533060

  20. Lean and obese dietary phenotypes: differences in energy and substrate metabolism and appetite.

    PubMed

    Clamp, Louise; Hehir, Anthony P J; Lambert, Estelle V; Beglinger, Christoph; Goedecke, Julia H

    2015-11-28

    This study aimed to characterise lean and obese phenotypes according to diet and body composition, and to compare fasting and postprandial appetite and metabolic profiles following a high-fat test meal. A total of ten lean (BMI40 and 30 kg/m2) high-fat consumers (OHF; >40 % energy from fat) were recruited. Before and following the test meal (4727 kJ (1130 kcal), 77 % fat, 20 % carbohydrate (CHO) and 3 % protein), fasting plasma glucose, insulin, leptin, ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), RER, RMR and subjective appetite ratings (AR) were measured for 6 h. Thereafter, subjects consumed a self-selected portion of a standardised post-test meal (40 % fat, 45 % CHO and 15 % protein) and reported AR. Fasting (P=0·01) and postprandial (P<0·001) fat oxidation was significantly higher in LHF than in LLF but was not different between LHF and OHF. Although similar between the lean groups, fasting and postprandial energy expenditures were significantly higher in OHF compared with LHF (P<0·01). Despite similar AR across groups, LLF consumed a relatively greater quantity of the post-test meal than did LHF (7·87 (sd 2·96) v. 7·23 (sd 2·67) g/kg, P=0·013). The lean groups showed appropriate changes in plasma ghrelin and PYY following the test meal, whereas the OHF group showed a blunted response. In conclusion, the LHF phenotype had a greater capacity for fat oxidation, which may be protective against weight gain. OHF individuals had a blunted appetite hormone response to the high-fat test meal, which may subsequently increase energy intake, driving further weight gain. PMID:26382929

  1. Impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in ageing aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Biljes, Daniel; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Kadow, Stephanie; Diel, Patrick; Weigt, Carmen; Burkart, Volker; Esser, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Disturbed homeostasis of glucose and lipid metabolism are dominant features of the so-called metabolic syndrome (MetS) and can increase the risk for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), a severe metabolic disease. T2D prevalence increases with age. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a sensor of small molecules including dietary components. AHR has been identified as potential regulator of glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Epidemiologically, exposure to xenobiotic AHR ligands such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is linked to T2D. We assess here the potential role of the AHR in disturbances of glucose and lipid metabolism in young (age 2-5 months) and old (age > 1,5 years) AHR-deficient (AHR KO) mice. Fasted young wildtype (WT) and AHR-KO mice displayed similar blood glucose kinetics after challenge with intra-peritoneal glucose injection. However, old AHR-KO mice showed lower tolerance than WT to i.p. administered glucose, i.e. glucose levels rose higher and returned more slowly to normal levels. Old mice had overall higher insulin levels than young mice, and old AHR-KO had a somewhat disturbed insulin kinetic in the serum after glucose challenge. Surprisingly, young AHR-KO mice had significantly lower triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein values than WT, i.e., a dyslipidemic profile. With ageing, AHR-KO and WT mice did not differ in these lipid levels, except for slightly reduced levels of triglycerides and cholesterol. In conclusion, our findings in AHR KO mice suggest that AHR expression is relevant for the maintenance of glucose and lipid homeostasis in old mice. PMID:26664351

  2. Heritability of metabolic response to the intravenous glucose tolerance test in German Holstein Friesian bulls.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Laura; Staufenbiel, Rudolf; Christ, Jana; Panicke, Lothar; Müller, Uwe; Brockmann, Gudrun A

    2016-09-01

    Selection for improved health and welfare in farm animals is of increasing interest worldwide. Peripartum energy balance is a key factor for pathogenesis of diseases in dairy cows. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (ivGTT) can be used to study the metabolic response to a glucose stimulus. The aim of this study was to estimate heritability of ivGTT traits in German Holstein bulls. A total of 541 Holstein bulls aged 7 to 17 mo from 2 breeding stations were subjected to the ivGTT. Serum glucose concentrations were measured at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56, and 63 min relative to glucose infusion. The maximum increase in blood glucose concentration, glucose area equivalent, and blood glucose half-life period were calculated. Heritabilities were estimated using a univariate animal model including station-year-season and age as fixed effects, and animal additive genetic and residual as random effects. The estimated heritabilities were 0.19 for fasting glucose concentration, 0.43 for glucose area equivalent, 0.40 for glucose half-life period, 0.14 for the peak glucose concentration, and 0.12 for the maximum increase of blood glucose concentration. Correlations between ivGTT traits and breeding values for milk yield and composition were not found. The results indicate that heritability for response to glucose is high, which warrants further investigation of this trait for genetic improvement of metabolic disorders. Research is necessary to determine the target levels of ivGTT traits and potential associations between ivGTT traits in breeding bulls and periparturient diseases in their offspring. PMID:27394937

  3. Differential control of glucoregulatory hormone response and glucose metabolism by NMDA and kainate.

    PubMed

    Yousef, K A; Tepper, P G; Molina, P E; Abumrad, N N; Lang, C H

    1994-01-14

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effect of kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), two different excitatory amino acid (EAA) agonists, on glucoregulatory hormone production and whole body glucose metabolism. Rates of hepatic glucose production (HGP) and peripheral glucose utilization (GU) were assessed in overnight fasted, catheterized, conscious rats using [3-3H]glucose. At the highest dose of kainate examined (16 mg/kg), glucose levels increased 97% after 1 h; thereafter, glucose fell towards basal values but was still elevated 25% at the end of the 3 h experiment. This hyperglycemia resulted from a rapid increase in HGP that exceeded an increased rate of GU. Both HGP and GU were elevated 86% throughout the final 2 h of the experiment. NMDA induced changes in glucose flux that were qualitatively similar, yet of smaller magnitude and of shorter duration, than those produced by kainate. Kainate-induced increases in glucose metabolism were associated with an early transient hyperinsulinemia followed by a period of insulinopenia, and sustained increases in the plasma concentrations of glucagon, corticosterone, epinephrine and norepinephrine. In contrast, sustained increases in glucagon and catecholamines, as well as the late hypoinsulinemia were not detected in NMDA-treated rats. Adrenergic blockade attenuated the kainate- but not the NMDA-induced increase in glucose metabolism. These results indicate that EAA agonists that bind preferentially to different receptor subtypes produce qualitatively similar changes in glucose metabolism. Whereas the increased HGP in kainate-injected rats was associated with sustained elevations in glucagon, catecholamines and corticosterone, NMDA only transiently elevated circulating glucocorticoid levels, suggesting a different mechanism of action. These data, support the involvement of EAA in various aspects of glucoregulation. PMID:8156383

  4. Age-related metabolic fatigue during low glucose conditions in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Galeffi, Francesca; Shetty, Pavan K.; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Turner, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that with aging, intrinsic brain tissue changes in cellular bioenergetics may hamper the brain’s ability to cope with metabolic stress. Therefore, we analyzed the effects of age on neuronal sensitivity to glucose deprivation by monitoring changes in field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), tissue Po2, and NADH fluorescence imaging in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices obtained from F344 rats (1–2, 3–6, 12–20, and >22 months). Forty minutes of moderate low glucose (2.5 mM) led to approximately 80% decrease of fEPSP amplitudes and NADH decline in all 4 ages that reversed after reintroduction of 10 mM glucose. However, tissue slices from 12 to 20 months and >22-month-old rats were more vulnerable to low glucose: fEPSPs decreased by 50% on average 8 minutes faster compared with younger slices. Tissue oxygen utilization increased after onset of 2.5 mM glucose in all ages of tissue slices, which persisted for 40 minutes in younger tissue slices. But, in older tissue slices the increased oxygen utilization slowly faded and tissue Po2 levels increased toward baseline values after approximately 25 minutes of glucose deprivation. In addition, with age the ability to regenerate NADH after oxidation was diminished. The NAD+/NADH ratio remained relatively oxidized after low glucose, even during recovery. In young slices, glycogen levels were stable throughout the exposure to low glucose. In contrast, with aging utilization of glycogen stores was increased during low glucose, particularly in hippocampal slices from >22 months old rats, indicating both inefficient metabolism and increased demand for glucose. Lactate addition (20 mM) improved oxidative metabolism by directly supplementing the mitochondrial NADH pool and maintained fEPSPs in young as well as aged tissue slices, indicating that inefficient metabolism in the aging tissue can be improved by directly enhancing NADH regeneration. PMID:25443286

  5. Subcellular Localization of Hexokinases I and II Directs the Metabolic Fate of Glucose

    PubMed Central

    John, Scott; Weiss, James N.; Ribalet, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Background The first step in glucose metabolism is conversion of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P) by hexokinases (HKs), a family with 4 isoforms. The two most common isoforms, HKI and HKII, have overlapping tissue expression, but different subcellular distributions, with HKI associated mainly with mitochondria and HKII associated with both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic compartments. Here we tested the hypothesis that these different subcellular distributions are associated with different metabolic roles, with mitochondrially-bound HK's channeling G-6-P towards glycolysis (catabolic use), and cytoplasmic HKII regulating glycogen formation (anabolic use). Methodology/Principal Findings To study subcellular translocation of HKs in living cells, we expressed HKI and HKII linked to YFP in CHO cells. We concomitantly recorded the effects on glucose handling using the FRET based intracellular glucose biosensor, FLIPglu-600 mM, and glycogen formation using a glycogen-associated protein, PTG, tagged with GFP. Our results demonstrate that HKI remains strongly bound to mitochondria, whereas HKII translocates between mitochondria and the cytosol in response to glucose, G-6-P and Akt, but not ATP. Metabolic measurements suggest that HKI exclusively promotes glycolysis, whereas HKII has a more complex role, promoting glycolysis when bound to mitochondria and glycogen synthesis when located in the cytosol. Glycogen breakdown upon glucose removal leads to HKII inhibition and dissociation from mitochondria, probably mediated by increases in glycogen-derived G-6-P. Conclusions/Significance These findings show that the catabolic versus anabolic fate of glucose is dynamically regulated by extracellular glucose via signaling molecules such as intracellular glucose, G-6-P and Akt through regulation and subcellular translocation of HKII. In contrast, HKI, which activity and regulation is much less sensitive to these factors, is mainly committed to glycolysis. This may be an

  6. Cerebral glucose metabolism in corticobasal degeneration comparison with progressive supranuclear palsy using statistical mapping analysis.

    PubMed

    Juh, Rahyeong; Pae, Chi-Un; Kim, Tae-Suk; Lee, Chang-Uk; Choe, Boyoung; Suh, Taesuk

    This study measured the cerebral glucose metabolism in patients suffering from corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The aim was to determine if there is a different metabolic pattern using (18)F-labeled 2-deoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). The regional cerebral glucose metabolism was examined in 8 patients diagnosed clinically with CBD (mean age 69.6 +/- 7.8 years; male/female: 5/3), 8 patients with probable PSP (mean age 67.8 +/- 4.5 years; male/female: 4/4) and 22 healthy controls. The regional cerebral glucose metabolism between the three groups was compared using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) with a voxel-by-voxel approach (p < 0.001, 200-voxel level). Compared with the normal controls, asymmetry in the regional glucose metabolism was observed in the parietal, frontal and cingulate in the CBD patients. In the PSP patients, the glucose metabolism was lower in the orbitofrontal, middle frontal, cingulate, thalamus and mid-brain than their age matched normal controls. A comparison of the two patient groups demonstrated relative hypometabolism in the thalamus, the mid-brain in the PSP patients and the parietal lobe in CBD patients. These results suggest that when making a differential diagnosis of CBD and PSP, voxel-based analysis of the (18)F-FDG PET images using a SPM might be a useful tool in clinical examinations. PMID:15936506

  7. Polychlorinated biphenyl 126 exposure in L6 myotubes alters glucose metabolism: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Jean-François; Nadeau, Lucien; Caron, Audrey; Chapados, Natalie Ann; Aguer, Céline

    2016-04-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are increasingly recognized as metabolic disruptors. Due to its mass, skeletal muscle is the major site of glucose disposal. While muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been shown to play a central role in metabolic disease development, no studies to date have investigated the effect of PCB exposure on muscle energy metabolism and oxidative stress. In this pilot study, we tested the effect of exposure to PCB126 in L6 myotubes (from 1 to 2500 nM for 24 h) on mitochondrial function, glucose metabolism, and oxidative stress. Exposure to PCB126 had no apparent effect on resting, maximal, and proton leak-dependent oxygen consumption rate in intact L6 myotubes. However, basal glucose uptake and glycolysis were inhibited by 20-30 % in L6 myotubes exposed to PCB126. Exposure to PCB126 did not appear to alter skeletal muscle anti-oxidant defense or oxidative stress. In conclusion, our study shows for the first time that exposure to a dioxin-like PCB adversely affects skeletal muscle glucose metabolism. Given the importance of skeletal muscle in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis, PCB126 could play an important role in the development of metabolic disorders. PMID:26936477

  8. Age differences in intercorrelations between regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, B.; Duara, R.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1986-01-01

    Patterns of cerebral metabolic intercorrelations were compared in the resting state in 15 healthy young men (ages 20 to 32 years) and 15 healthy elderly men (ages 64 to 83 years). Controlling for whole-brain glucose metabolism, partial correlation coefficients were determined between pairs of regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose determined by positron emission tomography using (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose and obtained in 59 brain regions. Compared with the young men, the elderly men had fewer statistically significant correlations, with the most notable reductions observed between the parietal lobe regions, and between the parietal and frontal lobe regions. These results suggest that cerebral functional interactions are reduced in healthy elderly men.

  9. Comparison of glucose and lipid metabolic gene expressions between fat and lean lines of rainbow trout after a glucose load.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junyan; Médale, Françoise; Kamalam, Biju Sam; Aguirre, Peyo; Véron, Vincent; Panserat, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Two experimental rainbow trout lines developed through divergent selection for low (Lean 'L' line) or high (Fat 'F' line) muscle fat content were used as models to study the genetic determinism of fat depots. Previous nutritional studies suggested that the F line had a better capability to use glucose than the L line during feeding trials. Based on that, we put forward the hypothesis that F line has a greater metabolic ability to clear a glucose load effectively, compared to L line. In order to test this hypothesis, 250 mg/kg glucose was intraperitoneally injected to the two rainbow trout lines fasted for 48 h. Hyperglycemia was observed after glucose treatment in both lines without affecting the phosphorylation of AMPK (cellular energy sensor) and Akt-TOR (insulin signaling) components. Liver glucokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase expression levels were increased by glucose, whereas mRNA levels of β-oxidation enzymes (CPT1a, CPT1b, HOAD and ACO) were down-regulated in the white skeletal muscle of both lines. Regarding the genotype effect, concordant with normoglycemia at 12 h after glucose treatment, higher muscle glycogen was found in F line compared to L line which exhibited hyperglycemia. Moreover, mRNA levels of hepatic glycolytic enzymes (GK, 6PFK and PK), gluconeogenic enzyme PEPCK and muscle fatty acid oxidation enzymes (CPT1a, CPT1b and HOAD) were concurrently higher in the F line. Overall, these findings suggest that F line may have a better ability to maintain glucose homeostasis than L line. PMID:25141351

  10. TAp63 is a master transcriptional regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaohua; Gi, Young Jin; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Chan, Io Long; Zhang, Aijun; Xia, Xuefeng; Tsai, Kenneth Y; Flores, Elsa R

    2012-10-01

    TAp63 prevents premature aging, suggesting a link to genes that regulate longevity. Further characterization of TAp63-/- mice revealed that these mice develop obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance similar to those seen in mice lacking two key metabolic regulators, Silent information regulator T1 (Sirt1) and AMPK. While the roles of Sirt1 and AMPK in metabolism have been well studied, their upstream regulators are not well understood. We found that TAp63 is important in regulating energy metabolism by accumulating in response to metabolic stress and transcriptionally activating Sirt1, AMPKα2, and LKB1, resulting in increased fatty acid synthesis and decreased fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, we found that TAp63 lowers blood glucose levels in response to metformin. Restoration of Sirt1, AMPKα2, and LKB1 in TAp63-/- mice rescued some of the metabolic defects of the TAp63-/- mice. Our study defines a role for TAp63 in metabolism and weight control. PMID:23040072

  11. Quantitative PET imaging of bone marrow glucose metabolic response to hematopoietic cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, W.J.; Hoh, C.K.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1995-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of hematopoietic cytokines on bone marrow glucose metabolism noninvasively, the authors studied serial quantitative FDG-PET images in 18 patients with metastic melanoma and normal bone marrow who were undergoing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) administration as an adjunct to chemotherapy. All patients received 14 days of cytokine therapy in three groups; four patients were treated with GMCSF (5 {mu}g/kg/d SQ), eight patients were treated with GMCSF (5 {mu}g/kg/d SQ) and monoclonal antibody (MAbR24) and six patients were treated with MCSF (80 {mu}g/kg/d IVCI) and MAbR24. Dynamic FDG-PET imaging was performed over the lower thoracic or upper lumbar spine at four time points in each patient. Baseline glucose metabolic rates in the bone marrow of these three groups of patients were similar (5.2 {plus_minus} 0.7, 4.4 {plus_minus} 0.8 and 4.8 {plus_minus} 1.2 {mu}g/min/g as mean value and standard deviations, respectively). In both GMCSF and GMCSF + R24 groups, rapid increases in bone marrow glucose metabolic rates were observed during therapy. After GMCSF was stopped, bone marrow glucose metabolic rates rapdily decreased in both groups. The glucose metabolic response in these two groups was not significantly different by pooled t-statistics (p = 0.105). In the MCSF + R24 group, the increase of glucose metabolic rate on Days 3 and 10 was 35% and 31% above baseline on the average, but was not significant. The results support the use of parametric FDG-PET imaging for noninvasive quantitation of bone marrow glucose metabolic changes to hematopoietic cytokines in vivo. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.; Rapoport, J.L.; Margolin, R.A.; Rapoport, S.I.; Cutler, N.R.

    1985-05-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic rates (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.

  13. Program for PET image alignment: Effects on calculated differences in cerebral metabolic rates for glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.L.; London, E.D.; Links, J.M.; Cascella, N.G. )

    1990-12-01

    A program was developed to align positron emission tomography images from multiple studies on the same subject. The program allowed alignment of two images with a fineness of one-tenth the width of a pixel. The indications and effects of misalignment were assessed in eight subjects from a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover study on the effects of cocaine on regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose. Visual examination of a difference image provided a sensitive and accurate tool for assessing image alignment. Image alignment within 2.8 mm was essential to reduce variability of measured cerebral metabolic rates for glucose. Misalignment by this amount introduced errors on the order of 20% in the computed metabolic rate for glucose. These errors propagate to the difference between metabolic rates for a subject measured in basal versus perturbed states.

  14. Letm1, the mitochondrial Ca2+/H+ antiporter, is essential for normal glucose metabolism and alters brain function in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dawei; Zhao, Linlin; Clish, Clary B; Clapham, David E

    2013-06-11

    Mitochondrial metabolism, respiration, and ATP production necessitate ion transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Leucine zipper-EF-hand containing transmembrane protein 1 (Letm1), one of the genes deleted in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, encodes a putative mitochondrial Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter. Cellular Letm1 knockdown reduced Ca(2+)mito uptake, H(+)mito extrusion and impaired mitochondrial ATP generation capacity. Homozygous deletion of Letm1 in mice resulted in embryonic lethality before day 6.5 of embryogenesis and ~50% of the heterozygotes died before day 13.5 of embryogenesis. The surviving heterozygous mice exhibited altered glucose metabolism, impaired control of brain ATP levels, and increased seizure activity. We conclude that loss of Letm1 contributes to the pathology of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome in humans and may contribute to seizure phenotypes by reducing glucose oxidation and other specific metabolic alterations. PMID:23716663

  15. The phenotype of a knockout mouse identifies flavin-containing monooxygenase 5 (FMO5) as a regulator of metabolic ageing

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez Malagon, Sandra G.; Melidoni, Anna N.; Hernandez, Diana; Omar, Bilal A.; Houseman, Lyndsey; Veeravalli, Sunil; Scott, Flora; Varshavi, Dorsa; Everett, Jeremy; Tsuchiya, Yugo; Timms, John F.; Phillips, Ian R.; Shephard, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the production and metabolic phenotype of a mouse line in which the Fmo5 gene is disrupted. In comparison with wild-type (WT) mice, Fmo5−/− mice exhibit a lean phenotype, which is age-related, becoming apparent after 20 weeks of age. Despite greater food intake, Fmo5−/− mice weigh less, store less fat in white adipose tissue (WAT), have lower plasma glucose and cholesterol concentrations and enhanced whole-body energy expenditure, due mostly to increased resting energy expenditure, with no increase in physical activity. An increase in respiratory exchange ratio during the dark phase, the period in which the mice are active, indicates a switch from fat to carbohydrate oxidation. In comparison with WT mice, the rate of fatty acid oxidation in Fmo5−/− mice is higher in WAT, which would contribute to depletion of lipid stores in this tissue, and lower in skeletal muscle. Five proteins were down regulated in the liver of Fmo5−/− mice: aldolase B, ketohexokinase and cytosolic glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1) are involved in glucose or fructose metabolism and GPD1 also in production of glycerol 3-phosphate, a precursor of triglyceride biosynthesis; HMG-CoA synthase 1 is involved in cholesterol biosynthesis; and malic enzyme 1 catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of malate to pyruvate, in the process producing NADPH for use in lipid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Down regulation of these proteins provides a potential explanation for the reduced fat deposits and lower plasma cholesterol characteristic of Fmo5−/− mice. Our results indicate that disruption of the Fmo5 gene slows metabolic ageing via pleiotropic effects. PMID:26049045

  16. Glucose metabolism in different regions of the rat brain under hypokinetic stress influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konitzer, K.; Voigt, S.

    1980-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in rats kept under long term hypokinetic stress was studied in 7 brain regions. Determination was made of the regional levels of glucose, lactate, glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, gamma-aminobutyrate and the incorporation of C-14 from plasma glucose into these metabolites, in glycogen and protein. From the content and activity data the regional glucose flux was approximated quantitatively. Under normal conditions the activity gradient cortex and frontal pole cerebellum, thalamus and mesencephalon, hypothalamus and pons and medulla is identical with that of the regional blood supply (measured with I131 serum albumin as the blood marker). Within the first days of immobilization a functional hypoxia occurred in all brain regions and the utilization of cycle amino acids for protein synthesis was strongly diminished. After the first week of stress the capillary volumes of all regions increased, aerobic glucose metabolism was enhanced (factors 1.3 - 2.0) and the incorporation of glucose C-14 via cycle amino acids into protein was considerably potentiated. The metabolic parameters normalized between the 7th and 11th week of stress. Blood supply and metabolic rate increased most in the hypothalamus.

  17. Glucose consumption of inflammatory cells masks metabolic deficits in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Heiko; Walberer, Maureen; Ladwig, Anne; Rueger, Maria A.; Neumaier, Bernd; Endepols, Heike; Hoehn, Mathias; Fink, Gereon R.; Schroeter, Michael; Graf, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory cells such as microglia need energy to exert their functions and to maintain their cellular integrity and membrane potential. Subsequent to cerebral ischemia, inflammatory cells infiltrate tissue with limited blood flow where neurons and astrocytes died due to insufficient supply with oxygen and glucose. Using dual tracer positron emission tomography (PET), we found that concomitant with the presence of inflammatory cells, transport and consumption of glucose increased up to normal levels but returned to pathological levels as soon as inflammatory cells disappeared. Thus, inflammatory cells established sufficient glucose supply to satisfy their energy demands even in regions with insufficient supply for neurons and astrocytes to survive. Our data suggest that neurons and astrocytes died from oxygen deficiency and inflammatory cells metabolized glucose non-oxidatively in regions with residual availability. As a consequence, glucose metabolism of inflammatory cells can mask metabolic deficits in neurodegenerative diseases. We further found that the PET tracer did not bind to inflammatory cells in severely hypoperfused regions and thus only a part of the inflammation was detected. We conclude that glucose consumption of inflammatory cells should be taken into account when analyzing disease-related alterations of local cerebral metabolism. PMID:26747749

  18. Glucose consumption of inflammatory cells masks metabolic deficits in the brain.

    PubMed

    Backes, Heiko; Walberer, Maureen; Ladwig, Anne; Rueger, Maria A; Neumaier, Bernd; Endepols, Heike; Hoehn, Mathias; Fink, Gereon R; Schroeter, Michael; Graf, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory cells such as microglia need energy to exert their functions and to maintain their cellular integrity and membrane potential. Subsequent to cerebral ischemia, inflammatory cells infiltrate tissue with limited blood flow where neurons and astrocytes died due to insufficient supply with oxygen and glucose. Using dual tracer positron emission tomography (PET), we found that concomitant with the presence of inflammatory cells, transport and consumption of glucose increased up to normal levels but returned to pathological levels as soon as inflammatory cells disappeared. Thus, inflammatory cells established sufficient glucose supply to satisfy their energy demands even in regions with insufficient supply for neurons and astrocytes to survive. Our data suggest that neurons and astrocytes died from oxygen deficiency and inflammatory cells metabolized glucose non-oxidatively in regions with residual availability. As a consequence, glucose metabolism of inflammatory cells can mask metabolic deficits in neurodegenerative diseases. We further found that the PET tracer did not bind to inflammatory cells in severely hypoperfused regions and thus only a part of the inflammation was detected. We conclude that glucose consumption of inflammatory cells should be taken into account when analyzing disease-related alterations of local cerebral metabolism. PMID:26747749

  19. Retinal lipid and glucose metabolism dictates angiogenesis through lipid sensor Ffar1

    PubMed Central

    Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Sun, Ye; Gantner, Marin L.; Shao, Zhuo; Evans, Lucy P.; Saba, Nicholas; Fredrick, Thomas; Burnim, Samuel; Kim, Jin Sung; Patel, Gauri; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Hatton, Colman J.; Cui, Zhenghao; Pierce, Kerry A.; Bherer, Patrick; Aguilar, Edith; Powner, Michael B.; Vevis, Kristis; Boisvert, Michel; Fu, Zhongjie; Levy, Emile; Fruttiger, Marcus; Packard, Alan; Rezende, Flavio A.; Maranda, Bruno; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Chen, Jing; Friedlander, Martin; Clish, Clary B.; Smith, Lois E.H.

    2016-01-01

    Tissues with high metabolic rates often use lipid as well as glucose for energy, conferring a survival advantage during feast and famine.1 Current dogma suggests that high-energy consuming photoreceptors depend on glucose.2,3 Here we show that retina also uses fatty acids (FA) β-oxidation for energy. Moreover, we identify a lipid sensor Ffar1 that curbs glucose uptake when FA are available. Very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), expressed in tissues with a high metabolic rate, facilitates the uptake of triglyceride-derived FA.4,5 Vldlr is present in photoreceptors.6 In Vldlr−/− retinas, Ffar1, sensing high circulating lipid levels despite decreased FA uptake5, suppresses glucose transporter Glut1. This impaired glucose entry into photoreceptors results in a dual lipid/glucose fuel shortage and reduction in the Krebs cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (KG). Low α-KG levels promote hypoxia-induced factor-1α (Hif1a) stabilization and vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegfa) secretion by starved Vldlr−/− photoreceptors, attracting neovessels to supply fuel. These aberrant vessels invading normally avascular photoreceptors in Vldlr−/− retinas are reminiscent of retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP), a subset of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)7, associated with high vitreous VEGF levels in humans. Dysregulated lipid and glucose photoreceptor energy metabolism may therefore be a driving force in neovascular AMD and other retinal diseases. PMID:26974308

  20. Diurnal variation in glucose and leucine metabolism in non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Umpleby, A M; Scobie, I N; Boroujerdi, M A; Carson, E R; Sonksen, P H

    1990-04-01

    Glucose and leucine metabolism were investigated in 5 poorly controlled non-insulin-dependent diabetics (NIDDM) following an i.v. injection of 3-[3H]glucose and 1-[14C]leucine in the morning and evening. In the morning glucose concentration (11.2 +/- 0.8 mmol/l) (mean +/- SEM) and production rate (14.2 +/- 1.3 mumol/min/kg) were significantly greater (P less than 0.001, P less than 0.05) and glucose metabolic clearance rate (MCR) (1.3 +/- 0.2 ml/min/kg) significantly lower (P less than 0.05) than in a group of control subjects. Glucose concentration was lower in the evening (P less than 0.05) as a result of a decrease in glucose production rate (P less than 0.05). Leucine concentration and production rate were not significantly different from normal but leucine oxidation rate was increased (P less than 0.05). There was no diurnal variation in leucine metabolism. Since leucine production is a measure of protein breakdown, the higher morning glucose production rate was not due to an increased supply of gluconeogenic precursors from protein catabolism. PMID:2190784

  1. Microbial Regulation of Glucose Metabolism and Cell-Cycle Progression in Mammalian Colonocytes

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Dallas R.; Wali, Aminah; Brylawski, Bruna P.; Bultman, Scott J.

    2012-01-01

    A prodigious number of microbes inhabit the human body, especially in the lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, yet our knowledge of how they regulate metabolic pathways within our cells is rather limited. To investigate the role of microbiota in host energy metabolism, we analyzed ATP levels and AMPK phosphorylation in tissues isolated from germfree and conventionally-raised C57BL/6 mice. These experiments demonstrated that microbiota are required for energy homeostasis in the proximal colon to a greater extent than other segments of the GI tract that also harbor high densities of bacteria. This tissue-specific effect is consistent with colonocytes utilizing bacterially-produced butyrate as their primary energy source, whereas most other cell types utilize glucose. However, it was surprising that glucose did not compensate for butyrate deficiency. We measured a 3.5-fold increase in glucose uptake in germfree colonocytes. However, 13C-glucose metabolic-flux experiments and biochemical assays demonstrated that they shifted their glucose metabolism away from mitochondrial oxidation/CO2 production and toward increased glycolysis/lactate production, which does not yield enough ATPs to compensate. The mechanism responsible for this metabolic shift is diminished pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) levels and activity. Consistent with perturbed PDH function, the addition of butyrate, but not glucose, to germfree colonocytes ex vivo stimulated oxidative metabolism. As a result of this energetic defect, germfree colonocytes exhibited a partial block in the G1-to-S-phase transition that was rescued by a butyrate-fortified diet. These data reveal a mechanism by which microbiota regulate glucose utilization to influence energy homeostasis and cell-cycle progression of mammalian host cells. PMID:23029553

  2. Plant Oils Were Associated with Low Prevalence of Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Japanese Workers

    PubMed Central

    Kurotani, Kayo; Kochi, Takeshi; Nanri, Akiko; Tsuruoka, Hiroko; Kuwahara, Keisuke; Pham, Ngoc Minh; Kabe, Isamu; Mizoue, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid has been suggested to be involved in development of diabetes. However, its association is unclear among Japanese populations, which consume large amounts of fish rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The present cross-sectional study examined the association of individual dietary fatty acids and dietary fatty acid patterns with abnormal glucose metabolism among 1065 Japanese employees, aged 18–69 years. Impaired glucose metabolism is defined if a person has a history of diabetes, current use of anti-diabetic drug, fasting plasma glucose of 110 mg/dl (≥6.1 mmol/L) or greater, or hemoglobin A1C of 6.0% (≥42 mmol/mol) or greater. Dietary intake was assessed with a self-administered diet history questionnaire. Dietary fatty acid patterns were extracted by principal component analysis. Odds ratios of impaired glucose metabolism according to tertile categories of each fatty acids and dietary fatty acid patterns were estimated using logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounding variables. A higher intake of polyunsaturated fatty acid, n-6 fatty acid, linoleic acid, and oleic acid were significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism (P for trend = 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively). Alpha-linolenic acid was marginally significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism (P for trend = 0.12). Of three fatty acid patterns identified, a higher plant oil pattern score, which characterized by high intake of alpha-linolenic acid, linoleic acid, and oleic acid, was associated with a decreased prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism (P for trend = 0.03). No association was observed for other patterns. In conclusion, plant source fatty acids might be protectively associated with development of diabetes in Japanese adults. PMID:23741386

  3. Plant oils were associated with low prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism in Japanese workers.

    PubMed

    Kurotani, Kayo; Kochi, Takeshi; Nanri, Akiko; Tsuruoka, Hiroko; Kuwahara, Keisuke; Pham, Ngoc Minh; Kabe, Isamu; Mizoue, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid has been suggested to be involved in development of diabetes. However, its association is unclear among Japanese populations, which consume large amounts of fish rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The present cross-sectional study examined the association of individual dietary fatty acids and dietary fatty acid patterns with abnormal glucose metabolism among 1065 Japanese employees, aged 18-69 years. Impaired glucose metabolism is defined if a person has a history of diabetes, current use of anti-diabetic drug, fasting plasma glucose of 110 mg/dl (≥6.1 mmol/L) or greater, or hemoglobin A1C of 6.0% (≥42 mmol/mol) or greater. Dietary intake was assessed with a self-administered diet history questionnaire. Dietary fatty acid patterns were extracted by principal component analysis. Odds ratios of impaired glucose metabolism according to tertile categories of each fatty acids and dietary fatty acid patterns were estimated using logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounding variables. A higher intake of polyunsaturated fatty acid, n-6 fatty acid, linoleic acid, and oleic acid were significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism (P for trend = 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively). Alpha-linolenic acid was marginally significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism (P for trend = 0.12). Of three fatty acid patterns identified, a higher plant oil pattern score, which characterized by high intake of alpha-linolenic acid, linoleic acid, and oleic acid, was associated with a decreased prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism (P for trend = 0.03). No association was observed for other patterns. In conclusion, plant source fatty acids might be protectively associated with development of diabetes in Japanese adults. PMID:23741386

  4. The effect of vagal nerve blockade using electrical impulses on glucose metabolism in nondiabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sathananthan, Matheni; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Swain, James M; Shah, Meera; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Cobelli, Claudio; Rizza, Robert A; Camilleri, Michael; Vella, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Vagal interruption causes weight loss in humans and decreases endogenous glucose production in animals. However, it is unknown if this is due to a direct effect on glucose metabolism. We sought to determine if vagal blockade using electrical impulses alters glucose metabolism in humans. Patients and methods We utilized a randomized, cross-over study design where participants were studied after 2 weeks of activation or inactivation of vagal nerve blockade (VNB). Seven obese subjects with impaired fasting glucose previously enrolled in a long-term study to examine the effect of VNB on weight took part. We used a standardized triple-tracer mixed meal to enable measurement of the rate of meal appearance, endogenous glucose production, and glucose disappearance. The 550 kcal meal was also labeled with 111In-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) to measure gastrointestinal transit. Insulin action and β-cell responsivity indices were estimated using the minimal model. Results Integrated glucose, insulin, and glucagon concentrations did not differ between study days. This was also reflected in a lack of effect on β-cell responsivity and insulin action. Furthermore, fasting and postprandial endogenous glucose production, integrated meal appearance, and glucose disposal did not differ in the presence or absence of VNB. Similarly, gastric emptying and colonic transit were unchanged by VNB. Conclusion In this pilot study in nondiabetic humans, electrical vagal blockade had no acute effects on glucose metabolism, insulin secretion and action, or gastric emptying. It remains to be determined if more pronounced effects would be observed in diabetic subjects. PMID:25050073

  5. Simultaneous utilization of glucose and gluconate in Penicillium chrysogenum during overflow metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Katja; Peter, Vivien; Meinert, Sabine; Kornfeld, Georg; Hardiman, Timo; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Noack, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is one of the most important production organism for β-lactam antibiotics, especially penicillin. A specific feature of P. chrysogenum is the formation of gluconate as the primary overflow metabolite under non-limiting growth on glucose. Gluconate can be formed extracellularly by the enzyme glucose oxidase (GOD) that shows high activities under glucose excess conditions. Currently, it is assumed that under these conditions glucose is the preferred carbon substrate for P. chrysogenum and gluconate consumption first starts after glucose becomes limiting. Here, we specifically address this hypothesis by combining batch cultivation experiments on defined glucose media, time-dependent GOD activity measurements, and (13)C-tracer studies. Our data prove that both substrates are metabolized simultaneously independent from the actual glucose concentration and therefore suggest that no distinct mechanism of carbon catabolite repression exists for gluconate in P. chrysogenum. Moreover, gluconate consumption does not interfere with penicillin V production by repression of the penicillin genes. Finally, by following a model-driven approach the specific uptake rates for glucose and gluconate were quantified and found to be significantly higher for gluconate. In summary, our results show that P. chrysogenum metabolizes gluconate directly and at high rates making it an interesting alternative carbon source for production purposes. PMID:23775209

  6. Fuel metabolism in Canada geese: effects of glucagon on glucose kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    During prolonged fasting, birds must rely on glucose mobilization to maintain normoglycemia. Glucagon is known to modulate avian energy metabolism during prolonged fasting, but the metabolic effects of this hormone on long-distance migrant birds have never been investigated. Our goal was to determine whether glucagon regulates the mobilization of the main lipid and carbohydrate fuels in migrant birds. Using the Canada goose (Branta canadensis) as a model species, we looked for evidence of fuel mobilization via changes in metabolite concentrations. No changes could be found for any lipid fraction, but glucagon elicited a strong increase in glucose concentration. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the effects of this hormone on glucose kinetics using continuous infusion of 6-[3H]-d-glucose. Glucagon was found to cause a 50% increase in glucose mobilization (from 22.2 ± 2.4 μmol·kg−1·min−1 to 33.5 ± 3.3 μmol·kg−1·min−1) and, together with an unchanged rate of carbohydrate oxidation, led to a 90% increase in plasma glucose concentration. This hormone also led to a twofold increase in plasma lactate concentration. No changes in plasma lipid concentration or composition were observed. This study is the first to demonstrate how glucagon modulates glucose kinetics in a long-distance migrant bird and to quantify its rates of glucose mobilization. PMID:26108869

  7. Overexpression of glucose transporters in rat mesangial cells cultured in a normal glucose milieu mimics the diabetic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Heilig, C W; Concepcion, L A; Riser, B L; Freytag, S O; Zhu, M; Cortes, P

    1995-10-01

    An environment of high glucose concentration stimulates the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) in mesangial cell (MC) cultures. This may result from a similar increase in intracellular glucose concentration. We theorized that increased uptake, rather than glucose concentration per se is the major determinant of exaggerated ECM formation. To test this, we compared the effects of 35 mM glucose on ECM synthesis in normal MCs with those of 8 mM glucose in the same cells overexpressing the glucose transporter GLUT1 (MCGT1). Increasing medium glucose from 8 to 35 mM caused normal MCs to increase total collagen synthesis and catabolism, with a net 81-90% increase in accumulation. MCs transduced with the human GLUT1 gene (MCGT1) grown in 8 mM glucose had a 10-fold greater GLUT1 protein expression and a 1.9, 2.1, and 2.5-fold increase in cell myo-inositol, lactate production, and cell sorbitol content, respectively, as compared to control MCs transduced with bacterial beta-galactosidase (MCLacZ). MCGT1 also demonstrated increased glucose uptake (5-fold) and increased net utilization (43-fold), and greater synthesis of individual ECM components than MCLacZ. In addition, total collagen synthesis and catabolism were also enhanced with a net collagen accumulation 111-118% greater than controls. Thus, glucose transport activity is an important modulator of ECM formation by MCs; the presence of high extracellular glucose concentrations is not necessarily required for the stimulation of matrix synthesis. PMID:7560072

  8. Causes and consequences of increased glucose metabolism of cancers.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Robert J; Robey, Ian; Gatenby, Robert A

    2008-06-01

    In this review we examine the mechanisms (causes) underlying the increased glucose consumption observed in tumors within a teleological context (consequences). In other words, we will ask not only "How do cancers have high glycolysis?" but also, "Why?" We believe that the insights gained from answering the latter question support the conclusion that elevated glucose consumption is a necessary component of carcinogenesis. Specifically we propose that glycolysis is elevated because it produces acid, which provides an evolutionary advantage to cancer cells vis-à-vis normal parenchyma into which they invade. PMID:18523064

  9. The progression from a lower to a higher invasive stage of bladder cancer is associated with severe alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Vanessa R.; Oliveira, Pedro F.; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Pereira, José A.; Alves, Marco G.; Silva, Branca M.

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells present a particular metabolic behavior. We hypothesized that the progression of bladder cancer could be accompanied by changes in cells glycolytic profile. We studied two human bladder cancer cells, RT4 and TCCSUP, in which the latter represents a more invasive stage. The levels of glucose, pyruvate, alanine and lactate in the extracellular media were measured by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The protein expression levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1), glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. Our data showed that glucose consumption and GLUT3 levels were similar in both cell lines, but TCCSUP cells displayed lower levels of GLUT1 and PFK expression. An increase in pyruvate consumption, concordant with the higher levels of lactate and alanine production, was also detected in TCCSUP cells. Moreover, TCCSUP cells presented lower protein expression levels of GPT and LDH. These results illustrate that bladder cancer progression is associated with alterations in cells glycolytic profile, namely the switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption in the more aggressive stage. This may be useful to develop new therapies and to identify biomarkers for cancer progression. - Highlights: • Metabolic phenotype of less and high invasive bladder cancer cells was studied. • Bladder cancer progression involves alterations in cells glycolytic profile. • More invasive bladder cancer cells switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption. • Our results may help to identify metabolic biomarkers of bladder cancer progression.

  10. HexR Controls Glucose-Responsive Genes and Central Carbon Metabolism in Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Ana; Golfieri, Giacomo; Ferlicca, Francesca; Giuliani, Marzia M.; Scarlato, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neisseria meningitidis, an exclusively human pathogen and the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, must adapt to different host niches during human infection. N. meningitidis can utilize a restricted range of carbon sources, including lactate, glucose, and pyruvate, whose concentrations vary in host niches. Microarray analysis of N. meningitidis grown in a chemically defined medium in the presence or absence of glucose allowed us to identify genes regulated by carbon source availability. Most such genes are implicated in energy metabolism and transport, and some are implicated in virulence. In particular, genes involved in glucose catabolism were upregulated, whereas genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were downregulated. Several genes encoding surface-exposed proteins, including the MafA adhesins and Neisseria surface protein A, were upregulated in the presence of glucose. Our microarray analysis led to the identification of a glucose-responsive hexR-like transcriptional regulator that controls genes of the central carbon metabolism of N. meningitidis in response to glucose. We characterized the HexR regulon and showed that the hexR gene is accountable for some of the glucose-responsive regulation; in vitro assays with the purified protein showed that HexR binds to the promoters of the central metabolic operons of the bacterium. Based on DNA sequence alignment of the target sites, we propose a 17-bp pseudopalindromic consensus HexR binding motif. Furthermore, N. meningitidis strains lacking hexR expression were deficient in establishing successful bacteremia in an infant rat model of infection, indicating the importance of this regulator for the survival of this pathogen in vivo. IMPORTANCE Neisseria meningitidis grows on a limited range of nutrients during infection. We analyzed the gene expression of N. meningitidis in response to glucose, the main energy source available in human blood, and we found that glucose regulates many genes