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Sample records for glucose suppresses epidermal

  1. A GRHL3-regulated repair pathway suppresses immune-mediated epidermal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, William M.; Zeller, Michael D.; Klein, Rachel H.; Swindell, William R.; Ho, Hsiang; Espetia, Francisco; Gudjonsson, Johann E.; Baldi, Pierre F.; Andersen, Bogi

    2014-01-01

    Dermal infiltration of T cells is an important step in the onset and progression of immune-mediated skin diseases such as psoriasis; however, it is not known whether epidermal factors play a primary role in the development of these diseases. Here, we determined that the prodifferentiation transcription factor grainyhead-like 3 (GRHL3), which is essential during epidermal development, is dispensable for adult skin homeostasis, but required for barrier repair after adult epidermal injury. Consistent with activation of a GRHL3-regulated repair pathway in psoriasis, we found that GRHL3 is upregulated in lesional skin and binds known epidermal differentiation gene targets. Using an imiquimod-induced model of immune-mediated epidermal hyperplasia, we found that mice lacking GRHL3 have an exacerbated epidermal damage response, greater sensitivity to disease induction, delayed resolution of epidermal lesions, and resistance to anti–IL-22 therapy compared with WT animals. ChIP-Seq and gene expression profiling of murine skin revealed that while GRHL3 regulates differentiation pathways both during development and during repair from immune-mediated damage, it targets distinct sets of genes in the 2 processes. In particular, GRHL3 suppressed a number of alarmin and other proinflammatory genes after immune injury. This study identifies a GRHL3-regulated epidermal barrier repair pathway that suppresses disease initiation and helps resolve existing lesions in immune-mediated epidermal hyperplasia. PMID:25347468

  2. Glucose infusion does not suppress increased lipolysis after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Schricker, T; Carli, F; Lattermann, R; Wachter, U; Georgieff, M

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of glucose infusion on lipid metabolism after abdominal surgery. Patients (n = 6) with non-metastasized colorectal carcinoma were investigated on the second day after surgery and healthy volunteers were studied after an overnight fast. The rates of glycerol appearance (R(a) glycerol), i.e., lipolysis rates, were assessed by primed continuous infusion of [1,1,2,3,3,-5H2]glycerol before and after 3 h of glucose infusion (4 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1)). Plasma concentrations of glycerol, free fatty acids, glucose, lactate, insulin, and glucagon were determined. Fasting R(a) glycerol was higher in patients than in volunteers (7.7 +/- 1.8 versus 1.9 +/- 0.3 micromol x kg(-1) x min(-1), P < 0.05). Glucose infusion suppressed the R(a) glycerol in volunteers to 1.0 +/- 0.2 micromol x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P < 0.05), whereas lipolysis was not affected in patients. Plasma concentrations of glycerol and free fatty acids similarly decreased during glucose administration by 50% in both groups (P < 0.05). In contrast to the patients, a significant correlation (r = 0.78, P < 0.05) between the R(a) glycerol and plasma glycerol concentration was observed in normal subjects. The hyperglycemic response to glucose infusion was significantly more pronounced (P < 0.05) in patients (10.7 +/- 0.7 mmol/L) than in volunteers (7.1 +/- 0.4 mmol/L), whereas the plasma insulin increased to the same extent in the two groups (P < 0.001). In conclusion, lipolysis rates are increased after abdominal surgery and glucose administration, most likely due to insulin resistance, and fail to inhibit stimulated whole-body lipolysis. PMID:11240333

  3. Rice (Oryza sativa japonica) Albumin Suppresses the Elevation of Blood Glucose and Plasma Insulin Levels after Oral Glucose Loading.

    PubMed

    Ina, Shigenobu; Ninomiya, Kazumi; Mogi, Takashi; Hase, Ayumu; Ando, Toshiki; Matsukaze, Narumi; Ogihara, Jun; Akao, Makoto; Kumagai, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Hitomi

    2016-06-22

    The suppressive effect of rice albumin (RA) of 16 kDa on elevation of blood glucose level after oral loading of starch or glucose and its possible mechanism were examined. RA suppressed the increase in blood glucose levels in both the oral starch tolerance test and the oral glucose tolerance test. The blood glucose concentrations 15 min after the oral administration of starch were 144 ± 6 mg/dL for control group and 127 ± 4 mg/dL for RA 200 mg/kg BW group, while those after the oral administration of glucose were 157 ± 7 mg/dL for control group and 137 ± 4 mg/dL for RA 200 mg/kg BW group. However, in the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, no significant differences in blood glucose level were observed between RA and the control groups, indicating that RA suppresses the glucose absorption from the small intestine. However, RA did not inhibit the activity of mammalian α-amylase. RA was hydrolyzed to an indigestible high-molecular-weight peptide (HMP) of 14 kDa and low-molecular-weight peptides by pepsin and pancreatin. Furthermore, RA suppressed the glucose diffusion rate through a semipermeable membrane like dietary fibers in vitro. Therefore, the indigestible HMP may adsorb glucose and suppress its absorption from the small intestine. PMID:27228466

  4. [Suppression of glucose absorption by various health teas in rats].

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Toshiki; Yoshikawa, Yukako; Masui, Hironori; Sano, Mitsuaki

    2004-04-01

    The inhibitory effects on the intestinal digestion and absorption of sugar of health teas that claim beneficial dietary and diabetes-controlling effects were compared in rats using portal cannulae. The measured durations were the times during which the elevation of portal glucose levels resulting from continuous intragastric infusion of sucrose or maltose was suppressed by concentrated teas. The teas investigated included salacia oblonga, mulberry, guava, gymunema, taheebo, yacon, and banaba. The duration of the inhibitory effect on the sucrose load of salacia oblonga, mulberry, and guava were 110 min, 20 min, and 10 min, respectively. In contrast, gymunema, taheebo, yacon, and banaba had no significant effect on the continuous infusion of sucrose. These results suggest that there is considerable difference in the efficacy of commercial health teas in influencing glucose absorption. PMID:15067185

  5. Jejunal administration of glucose enhances acyl ghrelin suppression in obese humans.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Robyn A; Sidani, Reem M; Garcia, Anna E; Antoun, Joseph; Isbell, James M; Albaugh, Vance L; Abumrad, Naji N

    2016-07-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates hunger and worsens glucose metabolism. Circulating ghrelin is decreased after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery; however, the mechanism(s) underlying this change is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that jejunal nutrient exposure plays a significant role in ghrelin suppression after RYGB. Feeding tubes were placed in the stomach or jejunum in 13 obese subjects to simulate pre-RYGB or post-RYGB glucose exposure to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, respectively, without the confounding effects of caloric restriction, weight loss, and surgical stress. On separate study days, the plasma glucose curves obtained with either gastric or jejunal administration of glucose were replicated with intravenous (iv) infusions of glucose. These "isoglycemic clamps" enabled us to determine the contribution of the GI tract and postabsorptive plasma glucose to acyl ghrelin suppression. Plasma acyl ghrelin levels were suppressed to a greater degree with jejunal glucose administration compared with gastric glucose administration (P < 0.05). Jejunal administration of glucose also resulted in a greater suppression of acyl ghrelin than the corresponding isoglycemic glucose infusion (P ≤ 0.01). However, gastric and isoglycemic iv glucose infusions resulted in similar degrees of acyl ghrelin suppression (P > 0.05). Direct exposure of the proximal jejunum to glucose increases acyl ghrelin suppression independent of circulating glucose levels. The enhanced suppression of acyl ghrelin after RYGB may be due to a nutrient-initiated signal in the jejunum that regulates ghrelin secretion. PMID:27279247

  6. Oak ellagitannins suppress the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fridrich, Diana; Glabasnia, Arne; Fritz, Jessica; Esselen, Melanie; Pahlke, Gudrun; Hofmann, Thomas; Marko, Doris

    2008-05-14

    The ellagitannins castalagin and vescalagin, and the C-glycosides grandinin and roburin E as well as ellagic acid were found to potently inhibit the growth of human colon carcinoma cells (HT29) in vitro. In a cell-free system these compounds were identified as potent inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with IC 50 values in the low nanomolar range. To address the question of whether the interference with the activity of the isolated EGFR also plays a role within intact cells, effects on the phosphorylation status of the EGFR, as a measure for its activity, were determined in HT29 cells. As exemplified for castalagin and grandinin, both the nonglycosylated and the glycosylated ellagitannins effectively suppressed EGFR phosphorylation, but only at concentrations > or =10 microM, thus, in a concentration range where growth inhibition was observed. These results indicate that the suppression of EGFR-mediated signaling might contribute to the growth inhibitory effects of these compounds present in oak-matured wines and spirits such as whiskey. In contrast, despite substantial growth inhibitory properties, ellagic acid did not significantly affect EGFR phosphorylation in HT29 cells up to 100 microM. PMID:18419129

  7. GSM mobile phone radiation suppresses brain glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Myoung Soo; Vorobyev, Victor; Kännälä, Sami; Laine, Matti; Rinne, Juha O; Toivonen, Tommi; Johansson, Jarkko; Teräs, Mika; Lindholm, Harri; Alanko, Tommi; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mobile phone radiation on cerebral glucose metabolism using high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) with the 18F-deoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. A long half-life (109 minutes) of the 18F isotope allowed a long, natural exposure condition outside the PET scanner. Thirteen young right-handed male subjects were exposed to a pulse-modulated 902.4 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications signal for 33 minutes, while performing a simple visual vigilance task. Temperature was also measured in the head region (forehead, eyes, cheeks, ear canals) during exposure. 18F-deoxyglucose PET images acquired after the exposure showed that relative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was significantly reduced in the temporoparietal junction and anterior temporal lobe of the right hemisphere ipsilateral to the exposure. Temperature rise was also observed on the exposed side of the head, but the magnitude was very small. The exposure did not affect task performance (reaction time, error rate). Our results show that short-term mobile phone exposure can locally suppress brain energy metabolism in humans. PMID:21915135

  8. GSM mobile phone radiation suppresses brain glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Myoung Soo; Vorobyev, Victor; Kännälä, Sami; Laine, Matti; Rinne, Juha O; Toivonen, Tommi; Johansson, Jarkko; Teräs, Mika; Lindholm, Harri; Alanko, Tommi; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the effects of mobile phone radiation on cerebral glucose metabolism using high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) with the (18)F-deoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. A long half-life (109 minutes) of the (18)F isotope allowed a long, natural exposure condition outside the PET scanner. Thirteen young right-handed male subjects were exposed to a pulse-modulated 902.4 MHz Global System for Mobile Communications signal for 33 minutes, while performing a simple visual vigilance task. Temperature was also measured in the head region (forehead, eyes, cheeks, ear canals) during exposure. (18)F-deoxyglucose PET images acquired after the exposure showed that relative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was significantly reduced in the temporoparietal junction and anterior temporal lobe of the right hemisphere ipsilateral to the exposure. Temperature rise was also observed on the exposed side of the head, but the magnitude was very small. The exposure did not affect task performance (reaction time, error rate). Our results show that short-term mobile phone exposure can locally suppress brain energy metabolism in humans. PMID:21915135

  9. Surfactant protein D suppresses lung cancer progression by downregulation of epidermal growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Takahashi, M; Ariki, S; Asakawa, D; Tajiri, M; Wada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Nishitani, C; Takamiya, R; Saito, A; Uehara, Y; Hashimoto, J; Kurimura, Y; Takahashi, H; Kuroki, Y

    2015-02-12

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a member of the collectin family that has an important role in maintaining pulmonary homeostasis. In this study, we demonstrated that SP-D inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that SP-D suppressed epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in A549 cells, H441 human lung adenocarcinoma cells and human EGF receptor (EGFR) stable expression CHO-K1 cells. A binding study using (125)I-EGF demonstrated that SP-D downregulated the binding of EGF to EGFR. A ligand blot indicated that SP-D bound to EGFR, and a lectin blot suggested that EGFR in A549 cells had both high-mannose type and complex type N-glycans. We purified the recombinant extracellular domain of EGFR (soluble EGFR=soluble EGFR (sEGFR)), and demonstrated that SP-D directly bound to sEGFR in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. The binding of SP-D to sEGFR was suppressed by EDTA, mannose or N-glycopeptidase F treatment. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that N-glycans in domain III of EGFR were of a high-mannose type. These data suggest that SP-D reduces EGF binding to EGFR through the interaction between the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D and N-glycans of EGFR, and downregulates EGF signaling. Our finding suggests the novel type of regulation system of EGF signaling involving lectin-to-carbohydrate interaction and downregulation of ligand binding. PMID:24608429

  10. p-Synephrine Suppresses Glucose Production but Not Lipid Accumulation in H4IIE Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhigang; Lee, Youngil; Lee, Youngki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract p-Synephrine, the primary protoalkaloid in the extract of bitter orange and other citrus species, has gained interest due to its lipolytic activity in adipose tissues. We previously found that p-synephrine stimulates glucose consumption via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in L6 skeletal muscle cells. This study investigated the effect of p-synephrine on glucose production and lipid accumulation in H4IIE rat liver cells. Glucose production was increased in H4llE cells that were incubated in glucose-free medium but decreased dose dependently (1–100 μM) with p-synephrine treatment. Protein levels of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) were also decreased by treatment (4 h) with p-synephrine. Antagonists against α- and β-adrenergic receptors (phentolamine and propranolol) and other inhibitors against signaling molecules did not interrupt p-synephrine-induced suppression in glucose production. However, H7 (an inhibitor of serine/threonine kinases PKA, PKC, and PKG) significantly blocked p-synephrine-induced suppression of glucose production and further increased basal glucose production. Unlike the suppressive effect on glucose production, p-synephrine failed to affect palmitic acid-induced cytoplasmic lipid accumulation. Protein levels of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC were not changed by p-synephrine. Altogether, p-synephrine can suppress glucose production but does not affect lipid accumulation in H4IIE liver cells. PMID:25379695

  11. Emodin Suppresses Maintenance of Stemness by Augmenting Proteosomal Degradation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III in Glioma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongyub; Lee, Jong-Seon; Jung, Jieun; Lim, Inhye; Lee, Ji-Yun

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that small subpopulations of cells with stem cell-like characteristics within most solid tumors are responsible for the malignancy of aggressive cancer cells and that targeting these cells might be a good therapeutic strategy to reduce the risk of tumor relapse after therapy. Here, we examined the effects of emodin (1,3,8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthraquinone), an active component of the root and rhizome of Rheum palmatum that has several biological activities, including antitumor effects, on primary cultured glioma stem cells (GSCs). Emodin inhibited the self-renewal activity of GSCs in vitro as evidenced by neurosphere formation, limiting dilution, and soft agar clonogenic assays. Emodin inhibited the maintenance of stemness by suppressing the expression of Notch intracellular domain, nonphosphorylated β-catenin, and phosphorylated STAT3 proteins. In addition, treatment with emodin partially induced apoptosis, reduced cell invasiveness, and sensitized GSCs to ionizing radiation. Intriguingly, emodin induced proteosomal degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII) by interfering with the association of EGFR/EGFRvIII with heat shock protein 90, resulting in the suppression of stemness pathways. Based on these data, we propose that emodin could be considered as a potent therapeutic adjuvant that targets GSCs. PMID:25229646

  12. Quercetin 3-O-glucoside suppresses epidermal growth factor-induced migration by inhibiting EGFR signaling in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwhoi; Han, Song-I; Yun, Jeong-Hun; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most dangerous cancers and is associated with a grave prognosis. Despite increased knowledge of the complex signaling networks responsible for progression of pancreatic cancer, many challenging therapies have fallen short of expectations. In this study, we examined the anti-migratory effect of quercetin 3-O-glucoside in epidermal growth factor-induced cell migration by inhibiting EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling in several human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Treatment with quercetin, quercetin 3-O-glucoside, and quercetin 7-O-glucoside differentially suppressed epidermal growth factor-induced migration activity of human pancreatic cancer cells. In particular, quercetin 3-O-glucoside strongly inhibited the infiltration activity of pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, quercetin 3-O-glucoside exerted the anti-migratory effect even at a relatively low dose compared with other forms of quercetin. The anti-tumor effects of quercetin 3-O-glucoside were mediated by selectively inhibiting the EGFR-mediated FAK, AKT, MEK1/2, and ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Combinatorial treatment with quercetin 3-O-glucoside plus gemcitabine showed the synergistic anti-migratory effect on epidermal growth factor-induced cell migration in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. These results suggest that quercetin 3-O-glucoside has potential for anti-metastatic therapy in human pancreatic cancer. PMID:26109002

  13. Signaling through the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Axis Is Responsible for Aerobic Glycolysis mediated by Glucose Transporter in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-mutated Lung Adenocarcinoma*

    PubMed Central

    Makinoshima, Hideki; Takita, Masahiro; Saruwatari, Koichi; Umemura, Shigeki; Obata, Yuuki; Ishii, Genichiro; Matsumoto, Shingo; Sugiyama, Eri; Ochiai, Atsushi; Abe, Ryo; Goto, Koichi; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling plays an important role in regulating global metabolic pathways, including aerobic glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), and pyrimidine biosynthesis. However, the molecular mechanism by which EGFR signaling regulates cancer cell metabolism is still unclear. To elucidate how EGFR signaling is linked to metabolic activity, we investigated the involvement of the RAS/MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways on metabolic alteration in lung adenocarcinoma (LAD) cell lines with activating EGFR mutations. Although MEK inhibition did not alter lactate production and the extracellular acidification rate, PI3K/mTOR inhibitors significantly suppressed glycolysis in EGFR-mutant LAD cells. Moreover, a comprehensive metabolomics analysis revealed that the levels of glucose 6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate as early metabolites in glycolysis and PPP were decreased after inhibition of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, suggesting a link between PI3K signaling and the proper function of glucose transporters or hexokinases in glycolysis. Indeed, PI3K/mTOR inhibition effectively suppressed membrane localization of facilitative glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), which, instead, accumulated in the cytoplasm. Finally, aerobic glycolysis and cell proliferation were down-regulated when GLUT1 gene expression was suppressed by RNAi. Taken together, these results suggest that PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling is indispensable for the regulation of aerobic glycolysis in EGFR-mutated LAD cells. PMID:26023239

  14. Althaea rosea Cavanil and Plantago major L. suppress neoplastic cell transformation through the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Sun; Cho, Sung-Dae; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Shim, Jung-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    For thousands of years in Asia, Althaea rosea Cavanil (ARC) and Plantago major L. (PML) have been used as powerful non-toxic therapeutic agents that inhibit inflammation. However, the anticancer mechanisms and molecular targets of ARC and PML are poorly understood, particularly in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effects and mechanisms of the methanol extracts from ARC (MARC) and PML (MPML) in EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells using an MTS assay, anchorage-independent cell transformation assay and western blotting. Our results showed that MARC and MPML significantly suppressed neoplastic cell transformation by inhibiting the kinase activity of the EGF receptor (EGFR). The activation of EGFR by EGF was suppressed by MARC and MPML treatment in EGFR(+/+) cells, but not in EGFR(-/-) cells. In addition, MARC and MPML inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation in EGFR-expressing murine embryonic fibroblasts (EGFR(+/+)). These results strongly indicate that EGFR targeting by MARC and MPML may be a good strategy for chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic applications. PMID:22767187

  15. High glucose suppresses embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghua; Shen, Wei-bin; Reece, E Albert; Chen, Xi; Yang, Peixin

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal neurogenesis occurs during embryonic development in human diabetic pregnancies and in animal models of diabetic embryopathy. Our previous studies in a mouse model of diabetic embryopathy have implicated that high glucose of maternal diabetes delays neurogenesis in the developing neuroepithelium leading to neural tube defects. However, the underlying process in high glucose-impaired neurogenesis is uncharacterized. Neurogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a valuable model for understanding the abnormal neural lineage development under high glucose conditions. ES cells are commonly generated and maintained in high glucose (approximately 25 mM glucose). Here, the mouse ES cell line, E14, was gradually adapted to and maintained in low glucose (5 mM), and became a glucose responsive E14 (GR-E14) line. High glucose induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, CHOP, in GR-E14 cells. Under low glucose conditions, the GR-E14 cells retained their pluripotency and capability to differentiate into neural lineage cells. GR-E14 cell differentiation into neural stem cells (Sox1 and nestin positive cells) was inhibited by high glucose. Neuron (Tuj1 positive cells) and glia (GFAP positive cells) differentiation from GR-E14 cells was also suppressed by high glucose. In addition, high glucose delayed GR-E14 differentiation into neural crest cells by decreasing neural crest markers, paired box 3 (Pax3) and paired box 7 (Pax7). Thus, high glucose impairs ES cell differentiation into neural lineage cells. The low glucose adapted and high glucose responsive GR-E14 cell line is a useful in vitro model for assessing the adverse effect of high glucose on the development of the central nervous system. PMID:26940741

  16. Glucose supplement reverses the fasting-induced suppression of cellular immunity in Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Xu, De-Li; Wang, De-Hua

    2011-10-01

    Glucose plays an important role in immunity. Three day fasting will decrease cellular immunity and blood glucose levels in Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that glucose supplement can reverse the fasting-induced suppression in cellular immunity in gerbils. Twenty-eight male gerbils were selected and randomly divided into fed and fasting groups. Half of the gerbils in each group were then provided with either 10% glucose water or pure water. After 66 h, each gerbil was injected with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) solution to challenge cellular immunity. Results showed that glucose supplement restored blood glucose levels in fasted gerbils to those of the fed controls. It also recovered cellular immunity, body fat mass and serum leptin levels in fasted gerbils to the values of the fed controls. Blood glucose levels were positively correlated with body fat mass, leptin levels and cellular immune responses. Thymus and spleen masses, and white blood cells in fasted gerbils were not affected by glucose supplement. In general, our data demonstrate that glucose supplement could reverse fasting-induced suppression of cellular immunity in Mongolian gerbils. PMID:21885265

  17. Influence of Liver Triglycerides on Suppression of Glucose Production by Insulin in Men

    PubMed Central

    Szuszkiewicz-Garcia, Magdalene; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Baxter, Jeannie D.; Abate, Nicola; Malloy, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The ability of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose production is impaired among subjects with increased intrahepatic triglycerides (IHTG). However, little is known about the roles of insulin on the supporting fluxes of glucose production among patients with fatty liver. Objective: To evaluate the effects of insulin on fluxes through the three potential sources of plasma glucose (glycerol, the citric acid cycle, and glycogen) among patients with fatty liver. Design, Settings, Participants, and Intervention: Nineteen men with a range of IHTG (∼0.5% to 23%) were studied after an overnight fast and during hyperinsulinemia using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and stable isotope tracers. Main Outcome Measures: IHTG, gluconeogenesis from glycerol, gluconeogenesis from the citric acid cycle, glycogenolysis, and 13C-labeled glucose produced from the citric acid cycle during hyperinsulinemia were measured. Results: Men with high IHTG had higher fluxes through all pathways contributing to glucose production during hyperinsulinemia, compared to men with low IHTG, but they had similar fluxes after the fast. Consequently, men with fatty liver had impaired insulin efficiency in suppressing total glucose production as well as fluxes through all three biochemical pathways contributing to glucose. The detection of glucose isotopomers with 13C arising from [U-13C3]propionate ingested during hyperinsulinemia demonstrated continuous gluconeogenesis from the citric acid cycle in all subjects. Conclusions: These findings challenge the concept that individual glucose production pathways are selectively dysregulated during hepatic insulin resistance. Overproduction of glucose during hyperinsulinemia in men with fatty liver results from inadequate suppression of all the supporting fluxes of glucose production in response to insulin. PMID:25250633

  18. Feasibility analysis of an epidermal glucose sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katika, Kamal M.; Pilon, Laurent

    2007-06-01

    The goal of this study is to test the feasibility of using an embedded time-resolved fluorescence sensor for monitoring glucose concentration. Skin is modeled as a multilayer medium with each layer having its own optical properties and fluorophore absorption coefficients, lifetimes, and quantum yields obtained from the literature. It is assumed that the two main fluorophores contributing to the fluorescence at these excitation and emission wavelengths are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)H and collagen. The intensity distributions of excitation and fluorescent light in skin are determined by solving the transient radiative transfer equation by using the modified method of characteristics. The fluorophore lifetimes are then recovered from the simulated fluorescence decays and compared with the actual lifetimes used in the simulations. Furthermore, the effect of adding Poissonian noise to the simulated decays on recovering the lifetimes was studied. For all cases, it was found that the fluorescence lifetime of NADH could not be recovered because of its negligible contribution to the overall fluorescence signal. The other lifetimes could be recovered to within 1.3% of input values. Finally, the glucose concentrations within the skin were recovered to within 13.5% of their actual values, indicating a possibility of measuring glucose concentrations by using a time-resolved fluorescence sensor.

  19. Reprogramming the Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Seeds of Oilseed Rape by Suppressing the Orthologs of REDUCED EPIDERMAL FLUORESCENCE11[W

    PubMed Central

    Mittasch, Juliane; Böttcher, Christoph; Frolov, Andrej; Strack, Dieter; Milkowski, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    As a result of the phenylpropanoid pathway, many Brassicaceae produce considerable amounts of soluble hydroxycinnamate conjugates, mainly sinapate esters. From oilseed rape (Brassica napus), we cloned two orthologs of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene REDUCED EPIDERMAL FLUORESCENCE1 (REF1) encoding a coniferaldehyde/sinapaldehyde dehydrogenase. The enzyme is involved in the formation of ferulate and sinapate from the corresponding aldehydes, thereby linking lignin and hydroxycinnamate biosynthesis as a potential branch-point enzyme. We used RNA interference to silence REF1 genes in seeds of oilseed rape. Nontargeted metabolite profiling showed that BnREF1-suppressing seeds produced a novel chemotype characterized by reduced levels of sinapate esters, the appearance of conjugated monolignols, dilignols, and trilignols, altered accumulation patterns of kaempferol glycosides, and changes in minor conjugates of caffeate, ferulate, and 5-hydroxyferulate. BnREF1 suppression affected the level of minor sinapate conjugates more severely than that of the major component sinapine. Mapping of the changed metabolites onto the phenylpropanoid metabolic network revealed partial redirection of metabolic sequences as a major impact of BnREF1 suppression. PMID:23424250

  20. Formation of embryogenic cell clumps from carrot epidermal cells is suppressed by 5-azacytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Hatsumi; Togashi, Takashi; Mori, Yukiko; Kikuchi, Koji; Kuriyama, Kyoko; Tokuji, Yoshihiko

    2005-01-01

    Using a direct somatic embryogenesis system in carrot, we examined the role of DNA methylation in the change of cellular differentiation state, from somatic to embryogenic. 5-Azacytidine (aza-C), an inhibitor of DNA methylation suppressed the formation of embryogenic cell clumps from epidermal carrot cells. Aza-C also downregulated the expression of DcLEC1c, a LEC1-like embryonic gene in carrot, during morphogenesis of embryos. A carrot DNA methyltransferase gene, Met1-5 was expressed transiently after the induction of somatic embryogenesis by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), before the formation of embryogenic cell clumps. These findings suggested the significance of DNA methylation in acquiring the embryogenic competence in somatic cells in carrot. PMID:15700420

  1. Induction of suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity to herpes simplex virus by epidermal cells exposed to UV-irradiated urocanic acid in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.P. )

    1987-01-01

    Urocanic acid (UCA), the putative photoreceptor for ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced suppression, undergoes a UV-dependent trans to cis isomerisation. Epidermal cells from mice painted with UCA, containing a known proportion of the cis-isomer, generate suppression of the delayed type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) when transferred to naive syngeneic recipients at the same time and site as infection with HSV-1. One T suppressor cell subset, of phenotype (Thy1+, L3T4+, Ly2-), is induced by the cis-UCA modified epidermal cell transfer. Flow cytometric analysis of the epidermal cells from skin treated with UV or cis-UCA indicates an overall reduction from normal in the number of cells expressing MHC Class II antigens, but no alteration in the number expressing I-J antigens.

  2. Amphiregulin enhances regulatory T cell-suppressive function via the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Zaiss, Dietmar M W; van Loosdregt, Jorg; Gorlani, Andrea; Bekker, Cornelis P J; Gröne, Andrea; Sibilia, Maria; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Roovers, Rob C; Coffer, Paul J; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2013-02-21

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be critically involved in tissue development and homeostasis as well as in the pathogenesis of cancer. Here we showed that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells express EGFR under inflammatory conditions. Stimulation with the EGF-like growth factor Amphiregulin (AREG) markedly enhanced Treg cell function in vitro, and in a colitis and tumor vaccination model we showed that AREG was critical for efficient Treg cell function in vivo. In addition, mast cell-derived AREG fully restored optimal Treg cell function. These findings reveal EGFR as a component in the regulation of local immune responses and establish a link between mast cells and Treg cells. Targeting of this immune regulatory mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic successes of EGFR-targeting treatments in cancer patients. PMID:23333074

  3. Activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway Antagonizes Metformin Suppression of Hepatic Glucose Production.

    PubMed

    He, Ling; Chang, Evan; Peng, Jinghua; An, Hongying; McMillin, Sara M; Radovick, Sally; Stratakis, Constantine A; Wondisford, Fredric E

    2016-05-13

    Metformin is the most commonly prescribed oral anti-diabetic agent worldwide. Surprisingly, about 35% of diabetic patients either lack or have a delayed response to metformin treatment, and many patients become less responsive to metformin over time. It remains unknown how metformin resistance or insensitivity occurs. Recently, we found that therapeutic metformin concentrations suppressed glucose production in primary hepatocytes through AMPK; activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway negatively regulates AMPK activity by phosphorylating AMPKα subunit at Ser-485, which in turn reduces AMPK activity. In this study, we find that metformin failed to suppress glucose production in primary hepatocytes with constitutively activated PKA and did not improve hyperglycemia in mice with hyperglucagonemia. Expression of the AMPKα1(S485A) mutant, which is unable to be phosphorylated by PKA, increased both AMPKα activation and the suppression of glucose production in primary hepatocytes treated with metformin. Intriguingly, salicylate/aspirin prevents the phosphorylation of AMPKα at Ser-485, blocks cAMP-PKA negative regulation of AMPK, and improves metformin resistance. We propose that aspirin/salicylate may augment metformin's hepatic action to suppress glucose production. PMID:27002150

  4. Insoluble Fiber in Young Barley Leaf Suppresses the Increment of Postprandial Blood Glucose Level by Increasing the Digesta Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Tomozawa, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiori; Tsubata, Masahito; Ikeguchi, Motoya; Takagaki, Kinya; Okushima, Ayaka; Miyata, Yu; Tamaru, Shizuka; Tanaka, Kazunari; Takahashi, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is a well-known cereal plant. Young barley leaf is consumed as a popular green-colored drink, which is named “Aojiru” in Japan. We examined the effects of barley leaf powder (BLP) and insoluble fibers derived from BLP on postprandial blood glucose in rats and healthy Japanese volunteers. BLP and insoluble fibers derived from BLP suppressed the increment of postprandial blood glucose levels in rats (P < 0.01), and increased the viscosity of their digesta. The insoluble fibers present in BLP might play a role in controlling blood glucose level by increasing digesta viscosity. In human, BLP suppressed the increment of postprandial blood glucose level only in those which exhibited higher blood glucose levels after meals (P < 0.01). BLP might suppress the increment of postprandial blood glucose level by increasing digesta viscosity in both of rats and humans who require blood glucose monitoring. PMID:24348688

  5. WT1 suppresses synthesis of the epidermal growth factor receptor and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Englert, C; Hou, X; Maheswaran, S; Bennett, P; Ngwu, C; Re, G G; Garvin, A J; Rosner, M R; Haber, D A

    1995-01-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor gene WT1 encodes a developmentally regulated transcription factor that is mutated in a subset of embryonal tumors. To test its functional properties, we developed osteosarcoma cell lines expressing WT1 under an inducible tetracycline-regulated promoter. Induction of WT1 resulted in programmed cell death. This effect, which was differentially mediated by the alternative splicing variants of WT1, was independent of p53. WT1-mediated apoptosis was associated with reduced synthesis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but not of other postulated WT1-target genes, and it was abrogated by constitutive expression of EGFR. WT1 repressed transcription from the EGFR promoter, binding to two TC-rich repeat sequences. In the developing kidney, EGFR expression in renal precursor cells declined with the onset of WT1 expression. Repression of EGFR and induction of apoptosis by mechanism that may contribute to its critical role in normal kidney development and to the immortalization of tumor cells with inactivated WT1 alleles. Images PMID:7588596

  6. miR-143 suppresses the proliferation of NSCLC cells by inhibiting the epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Bo; Sun, Li-Chao; Ling, Lan; Cong, Lu-Hong; Lian, Rui

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate the proliferation and metastasis of numerous cancer cell types. It was previously reported that miR-143 levels were downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and cell lines, and that the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells was inhibited upon suppression of cell proliferation and colony formation by the upregulation of miR-143. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is a vital factor in the promotion of cancer cell proliferation and has been investigated as a potential focus in cancer therapy, has been reported to be a possible target of miR-143. The present study aimed to investigate the role of miR-143 in NSCLC using NSCLC cell lines and primary cells from NSCLC patients. NSCLC cells were co-transfected with EGFR and miR-143, and the mRNA and protein expression of EGFR were analyzed. Furthermore, the activity of the transfected cancer cells with regard to colony formation, migration, invasion and apoptosis were evaluated. The levels of miR-143 were decreased in the NSCLC cell lines and primary cells from patients with NSCLC compared with the controls. Following transfection with miR-143, the ability of NSCLC cells to proliferate, form colonies, migrate and invade was inhibited. Similarly, knockdown of EGFR led to the suppression of NSCLC cell proliferation. The mRNA and protein expression levels of EGFR were significantly reduced following miR-143 overexpression, and the level of miR-143 was inversely correlated with that of EGFR in NSCLC cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that miR-143 was able to suppress NSCLC cell proliferation and invasion by inhibiting the effects of EGFR, suggesting that EGFR may be considered a potential target for NSCLC therapy. PMID:27602093

  7. Histidine Augments the Suppression of Hepatic Glucose Production by Central Insulin Action

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kumi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Inaba, Yuka; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Kido, Yoshiaki; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Matsuda, Tomokazu; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Maeda, Akifumi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Mukai, Chisato; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Ota, Tsuguhito; Nakabayashi, Hajime; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kasuga, Masato; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Glucose intolerance in type 2 diabetes is related to enhanced hepatic glucose production (HGP) due to the increased expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. Previously, we revealed that hepatic STAT3 decreases the expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes and suppresses HGP. Here, we show that increased plasma histidine results in hepatic STAT3 activation. Intravenous and intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of histidine-activated hepatic STAT3 reduced G6Pase protein and mRNA levels and augmented HGP suppression by insulin. This suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis by histidine was abolished by hepatic STAT3 deficiency or hepatic Kupffer cell depletion. Inhibition of HGP by histidine was also blocked by ICV administration of a histamine H1 receptor antagonist. Therefore, histidine activates hepatic STAT3 and suppresses HGP via central histamine action. Hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation after histidine ICV administration was attenuated in histamine H1 receptor knockout (Hrh1KO) mice but not in neuron-specific insulin receptor knockout (NIRKO) mice. Conversely, hepatic STAT3 phosphorylation after insulin ICV administration was attenuated in NIRKO but not in Hrh1KO mice. These findings suggest that central histidine action is independent of central insulin action, while both have additive effects on HGP suppression. Our results indicate that central histidine/histamine-mediated suppression of HGP is a potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23474485

  8. Importance of peripheral insulin levels for insulin-induced suppression of glucose production in depancreatized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Giacca, A; Fisher, S J; Shi, Z Q; Gupta, R; Lickley, H L; Vranic, M

    1992-01-01

    It is generally believed that glucose production (GP) cannot be adequately suppressed in insulin-treated diabetes because the portal-peripheral insulin gradient is absent. To determine whether suppression of GP in diabetes depends on portal insulin levels, we performed 3-h glucose and specific activity clamps in moderately hyperglycemic (10 mM) depancreatized dogs, using three protocols: (a) 54 pmol.kg-1 bolus + 5.4 pmol.kg-1.min-1 portal insulin infusion (n = 7; peripheral insulin = 170 +/- 51 pM); (b) an equimolar peripheral infusion (n = 7; peripheral insulin = 294 +/- 28 pM, P < 0.001); and (c) a half-dose peripheral infusion (n = 7), which gave comparable (157 +/- 13 pM) insulinemia to that seen in protocol 1. Glucose production, use (GU) and cycling (GC) were measured using HPLC-purified 6-[3H]- and 2-[3H]glucose. Consistent with the higher peripheral insulinemia, peripheral infusion was more effective than equimolar portal infusion in increasing GU. Unexpectedly, it was also more potent in suppressing GP (73 +/- 7 vs. 55 +/- 7% suppression between 120 and 180 min, P < 0.001). At matched peripheral insulinemia (protocols 2 and 3), not only stimulation of GU, but also suppression of GP was the same (55 +/- 7 vs. 63 +/- 4%). In the diabetic dogs at 10 mM glucose, GC was threefold higher than normal but failed to decrease with insulin infusion by either route. Glycerol, alanine, FFA, and glucagon levels decreased proportionally to peripheral insulinemia. However, the decrease in glucagon was not significantly greater in protocol 2 than in 1 or 3. When we combined all protocols, we found a correlation between the decrements in glycerol and FFAs and the decrease in GP (r = 0.6, P < 0.01). In conclusion, when suprabasal insulin levels in the physiological postprandial range are provided to moderately hyperglycemic depancreatized dogs, suppression of GP appears to be more dependent on peripheral than portal insulin concentrations and may be mainly mediated by

  9. L-tryptophan suppresses rise in blood glucose and preserves insulin secretion in type-2 diabetes mellitus rats.

    PubMed

    Inubushi, Tomoko; Kamemura, Norio; Oda, Masataka; Sakurai, Jun; Nakaya, Yutaka; Harada, Nagakatsu; Suenaga, Midori; Matsunaga, Yoichi; Ishidoh, Kazumi; Katunuma, Nobuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Ample evidence indicates that a high-protein/low-carbohydrate diet increases glucose energy expenditure and is beneficial in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study was designed to investigate the effects of L-tryptophan in T2DM. Blood glucose was measured by the glucose dehydrogenase assay and serum insulin was measured with ELISA in both normal and hereditary T2DM rats after oral glucose administration with or without L-D-tryptophan and tryptamine. The effect of tryptophan on glucose absorption was examined in the small intestine of rats using the everted-sac method. Glucose incorporation in adipocytes was assayed with [(3)H]-2-deoxy-D-glucose using a liquid scintillation counter. Indirect computer-regulated respiratory gas-assay calorimetry was applied to assay energy expenditure in rats. L-Tryptophan suppressed both serum glucose and insulin levels after oral glucose administration and inhibited glucose absorption from the intestine. Tryptamine, but not L-tryptophan, enhanced insulin-stimulated [(3)H]-glucose incorporation into differentiated adipocytes. L-Tryptophan increased glucose-associated energy expenditure in rats in vivo. L-Tryptophan-rich chow consumed from a young age preserved the secretion of insulin and delayed the progression of T2DM in hereditary diabetic rats. The results suggested that L-tryptophan suppresses the elevation of blood glucose and lessens the burden associated with insulin secretion from β-cells. PMID:23419400

  10. Geniposide Suppresses Hepatic Glucose Production via AMPK in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lixia; Zheng, Xuxu; Liu, Jianhui; Yin, Zhongyi

    2016-01-01

    Geniposide is one of the main compounds in Gardenia jasminoides ELLIS and has many pharmacological activities, but its anti-hyperglycemic activity has not yet been fully explored. This study was designed to determine, for the first time, how geniposide from G. jasminoides regulates hepatic glucose production, and the underlying mechanisms. During in vitro study, we found the inhibitory effect of geniposide on the hepatic glucose production is partly through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in HepG2 cells. Geniposide significantly inhibited hepatic glucose production in a dose-dependent manner. AMPK, acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACC) and forkhead box class O1 (FoxO1) phosphorylation were stimulated by different concentrations of geniposide. In addition, the enzyme activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) were all significantly suppressed. What is important is that these effects were partly reversed by (1) inhibition of AMPK activity by compound C, a selective AMPK inhibitor, and by (2) suppression of AMPKα expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA). In summary, geniposide potentially ameliorates hyperglycemia through inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis by modulation of the AMPK-FoxO1 signaling pathway. Geniposide or geniposide-containing medicinal plants could represent a promising therapeutic agent to prevent type 2 diabetes on gluconeogenesis. PMID:26830672

  11. Lentiviral vector-mediated shRNA against AIMP2-DX2 suppresses lung cancer cell growth through blocking glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seung-Hee; Chung, Youn-Sun; Hwang, Soon-Kyung; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Kim, Sunghoon; Park, Seung Bum; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2012-06-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases [ARS]-interacting multifunctional protein 2 (AIMP2) has been implicated in the control of cell fate and lung cell differentiation. A variant of AIMP2 lacking exon 2 (AIMP2-DX2) is expressed in different cancer cells. We previously studied the expression level of AIMP2-DX2 in several lung cell lines and reported elevated expression levels of AIMP2-DX2 in NCI-H460 and NCI-H520. Here, we report that the suppression of AIMP2-DX2 by lentivirus mediated short hairpin (sh)RNA (sh-DX2) decreased the rate of glucose uptake and glucose transporters (Gluts) in NCI-H460 cells. Down-regulation of AIMP2-DX2 reduced glycosyltransferase (GnT)-V in the Golgi apparatus, while inducing the GnT-V antagonist GnT-III. Down-regulation of AIMP2-DX2 also suppressed the epidermal growth factor receptor/mitogen activated protein kinase (EGFR/MAPK) signaling pathway, leading to the decrease of the proliferation marker Ki-67 expression in nuclei. Furthermore, dual luciferase activity reduced capdependent protein translation in cells infected with sh-DX2. These results suggest that AIMP2-DX2 may be a relevant therapeutic target for lung cancer, and that the sh-DX2 lentiviral system can be an appropriate method for lung cancer therapy. PMID:22562359

  12. Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to high glucose-induced cell death via Bim induction

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, B R; Vanderkruk, B; Dhillon, J; Dai, D; Verchere, C B; Hoffman, B G

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that results from the body's inability to properly control circulating blood glucose levels. The loss of glucose homoeostasis can arise from a loss of β-cell mass because of immune-cell-mediated attack, as in type 1 diabetes, and/or from dysfunction of individual β-cells (in conjunction with target organ insulin resistance), as in type 2 diabetes. A better understanding of the transcriptional pathways regulating islet-cell survival is of great importance for the development of therapeutic strategies that target β-cells for diabetes. To this end, we previously identified the transcription factor Myt3 as a pro-survival factor in islets following acute suppression of Myt3 in vitro. To determine the effects of Myt3 suppression on islet-cell survival in vivo, we used an adenovirus to express an shRNA targeting Myt3 in syngeneic optimal and marginal mass islet transplants, and demonstrate that suppression of Myt3 impairs the function of marginal mass grafts. Analysis of grafts 5 weeks post-transplant revealed that grafts transduced with the shMyt3 adenovirus contained ~20% the number of transduced cells as grafts transduced with a control adenovirus. In fact, increased apoptosis and significant cell loss in the shMyt3-transduced grafts was evident after only 5 days, suggesting that Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to stresses present in the early post-transplant period. Specifically, we find that Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to high glucose-induced cell death via upregulation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family member Bim. Taken together these data suggest that Myt3 may be an important link between glucotoxic and immune signalling pathways. PMID:27195679

  13. Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to high glucose-induced cell death via Bim induction.

    PubMed

    Tennant, B R; Vanderkruk, B; Dhillon, J; Dai, D; Verchere, C B; Hoffman, B G

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that results from the body's inability to properly control circulating blood glucose levels. The loss of glucose homoeostasis can arise from a loss of β-cell mass because of immune-cell-mediated attack, as in type 1 diabetes, and/or from dysfunction of individual β-cells (in conjunction with target organ insulin resistance), as in type 2 diabetes. A better understanding of the transcriptional pathways regulating islet-cell survival is of great importance for the development of therapeutic strategies that target β-cells for diabetes. To this end, we previously identified the transcription factor Myt3 as a pro-survival factor in islets following acute suppression of Myt3 in vitro. To determine the effects of Myt3 suppression on islet-cell survival in vivo, we used an adenovirus to express an shRNA targeting Myt3 in syngeneic optimal and marginal mass islet transplants, and demonstrate that suppression of Myt3 impairs the function of marginal mass grafts. Analysis of grafts 5 weeks post-transplant revealed that grafts transduced with the shMyt3 adenovirus contained ~20% the number of transduced cells as grafts transduced with a control adenovirus. In fact, increased apoptosis and significant cell loss in the shMyt3-transduced grafts was evident after only 5 days, suggesting that Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to stresses present in the early post-transplant period. Specifically, we find that Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to high glucose-induced cell death via upregulation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family member Bim. Taken together these data suggest that Myt3 may be an important link between glucotoxic and immune signalling pathways. PMID:27195679

  14. Curcumin ameliorates high glucose-induced neural tube defects by suppressing cellular stress and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Fang; Reece, E. Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol present in the roots of the Curcuma longa plant (turmeric), which possesses antioxidant, anti-tumorigenic and anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we test whether curcumin treatment reduces high glucose-induced neural tube defects (NTDs), and if this occurs via blocking cellular stress and caspase activation. Study Design Embryonic day 8.5 mouse embryos were collected for use in whole embryo culture under normal glucose (100 mg/dl glucose) or high glucose (300 mg/dl glucose) conditions, with or without curcumin treatment. After 24 h in culture, protein levels of oxidative stress makers, nitrosative stress makers, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress makers, cleaved caspase 3 and 8 and the level of lipid peroxides (LPO) were determined in the embryos. After 36 h in culture, embryos were examined for evidence of NTD formation. Results Although 10 μM curcumin did not significantly reduce the rate of NTDs caused by high glucose, 20 μM curcumin significantly ameliorated high glucose-induced NTD formation. Curcumin suppressed oxidative stress in embryos cultured under high glucose conditions. Treatment reduced the levels of the lipid peroxidation marker, 4-hydroxynonenal(4-HNE), nitrotyrosine-modified protein, and LPO. Curcumin also blocked ER stress by inhibiting phosphorylated protein kinase ribonucleic acid (RNA)-like ER kinase (p-PERK), phosphorylated inositol-requiring protein-1α (p-IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing. Additionally, curcumin abolished caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage in embryos cultured under high glucose conditions. Conclusions Curcumin reduces high glucose-induced NTD formation by blocking cellular stress and caspase activation, suggesting that curcumin supplements could reduce the negative effects of diabetes on the embryo. Further

  15. 7,3',4'-Trihydroxyisoflavone inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation and transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells by suppressing cyclin-dependent kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Eun; Lee, Ki Won; Song, Nu Ry; Seo, Sang Kwon; Heo, Yong-Seok; Kang, Nam Joo; Bode, Ann M; Lee, Hyong Joo; Dong, Zigang

    2010-07-01

    Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that isoflavones exhibit anti-proliferative activity against epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-positive malignancies of the breast, colon, skin, and prostate. 7,3',4'-Trihydroxyisoflavone (7,3',4'-THIF) is one of the metabolites of daidzein, a well known soy isoflavone, but its chemopreventive activity and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, 7,3',4'-THIF prevented EGF-induced neoplastic transformation and proliferation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells. It significantly blocked cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G(1) phase. As shown by Western blot, 7,3',4'-THIF suppressed the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein at Ser-795 and Ser-807/Ser-811, which are the specific sites of phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4. It also inhibited the expression of G(1) phase-regulatory proteins, including cyclin D1, CDK4, cyclin E, and CDK2. In addition to regulating the expression of cell cycle-regulatory proteins, 7,3',4'-THIF bound to CDK4 and CDK2 and strongly inhibited their kinase activities. It also bound to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), strongly inhibiting its kinase activity and thereby suppressing the Akt/GSK-3beta/AP-1 pathway and subsequently attenuating the expression of cyclin D1. Collectively, these results suggest that CDKs and PI3K are the primary molecular targets of 7,3',4'-THIF in the suppression of EGF-induced cell proliferation. These insights into the biological actions of 7,3',4'-THIF provide a molecular basis for the possible development of new chemoprotective agents. PMID:20444693

  16. High concentrations of glucose suppress etoposide-induced cell death of B-cell lymphoma through BCL-6.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yan; Ling, Chang Chun; Liu, Xu Qing

    2014-07-18

    Glucose is potentially a factor in the resistance to chemotherapy of B-cell lymphomas. In this study we investigated the expression of the glucose induced transcription factor Bcl-6 and the underlying mechanism by which it suppresses B-cell lymphoma cell death. Glucose was found to prevent etoposide-induced tumor cell death. BCL-6 expression was induced by glucose but down-regulated by etoposide. BCL-6 expression was regulated by the interaction of VDUP1 and p53. The molecular mechanism by which glucose prevented etoposide-induced tumor cell death was shown to involve the BCL-6 mediated caspase pathway. Our data suggest that glucose-induced BCL-6 overexpression could abrogate the etoposide chemotherapy effect on tumor cell death. PMID:24878528

  17. Volatile anesthetics suppress glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in MIN6 cells by inhibiting glucose-induced activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kengo; Sato, Yoshifumi; Kai, Shinichi; Nishi, Kenichiro; Adachi, Takehiko; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Proper glycemic control is one of the most important goals in perioperative patient management. Insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells in response to an increased blood glucose concentration plays the most critical role in glycemic control. Several animal and human studies have indicated that volatile anesthetics impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). A convincing GSIS model has been established, in which the activity of ATP-dependent potassium channels (KATP) under the control of intracellular ATP plays a critical role. We previously reported that pimonidazole adduct formation and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were detected in response to glucose stimulation and that MIN6 cells overexpressing HIF-1α were resistant to glucose-induced hypoxia. Genetic ablation of HIF-1α or HIF-1β significantly inhibited GSIS in mice. Moreover, we previously reported that volatile anesthetics suppressed hypoxia-induced HIF activation in vitro and in vivo.To examine the direct effect of volatile anesthetics on GSIS, we used the MIN6 cell line, derived from mouse pancreatic β-cells. We performed a series of experiments to examine the effects of volatile anesthetics (sevoflurane and isoflurane) on GSIS and demonstrated that these compounds inhibited the glucose-induced ATP increase, which is dependent on intracellular hypoxia-induced HIF-1 activity, and suppressed GSIS at a clinically relevant dose in these cells. PMID:26713247

  18. Metformin Promotes Apoptosis but Suppresses Autophagy in Glucose-Deprived H4IIE Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Metformin, a well-known anti-diabetic drug, has gained interest due to its association with the reduction of the prevalence of cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes and the anti-proliferative effect of metformin in several cancer cells. Here, we investigated the anti-proliferative effect of metformin with respect to apoptosis and autophagy in H4IIE hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Methods H4IIE rat cells were treated with metformin in glucose-free medium for 24 hours and were then subjected to experiments examining the onset of apoptosis and/or autophagy as well as the related signaling pathways. Results When H4IIE cells were incubated in glucose-free media for 24 hours, metformin and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) reduced the viability of cells. Inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by compound C significantly blocked cell death induced by metformin or AICAR. Pro-apoptotic events (nuclear condensation, hydrolysis of intact poly ADP ribose polymerase and caspase-3) were stimulated by metformin and then suppressed by compound C. Interestingly, the formation of acidic intracellular vesicles, a marker of autophagy, was stimulated by compound C. Although the deprivation of amino acids in culture media also induced apoptosis, neither metformin nor compound C affected cell viability. The expression levels of all of the autophagy-related proteins examined decreased with metformin, and two proteins (light chain 3 and beclin-1) were sensitive to compound C. Among the tested inhibitors against MAP kinases and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin, SB202190 (against p38MAP kinase) significantly interrupted the effects of metformin. Conclusion Our data suggest that metformin induces apoptosis, but suppresses autophagy, in hepatocellular carcinoma cells via signaling pathways, including AMPK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. PMID:26706918

  19. Resistance training enhances insulin suppression of endogenous glucose production in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Honka, Miikka-Juhani; Bucci, Marco; Andersson, Jonathan; Huovinen, Ville; Guzzardi, Maria Angela; Sandboge, Samuel; Savisto, Nina; Salonen, Minna K; Badeau, Robert M; Parkkola, Riitta; Kullberg, Joel; Iozzo, Patricia; Eriksson, Johan G; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2016-03-15

    An altered prenatal environment during maternal obesity predisposes offspring to insulin resistance, obesity, and their consequent comorbidities, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Telomere shortening and frailty are additional risk factors for these conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of resistance training on hepatic metabolism and ectopic fat accumulation. Thirty-five frail elderly women, whose mothers' body mass index (BMI) was known, participated in a 4-mo resistance training program. Endogenous glucose production (EGP) and hepatic and visceral fat glucose uptake were measured during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia with [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography. Ectopic fat was measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. We found that the training intervention reduced EGP during insulin stimulation [from 5.4 (interquartile range 3.0, 7.0) to 3.9 (-0.4, 6.1) μmol·kg body wt(-1)·min(-1), P = 0.042] in the whole study group. Importantly, the reduction was higher among those whose EGP was more insulin resistant at baseline (higher than the median) [-5.6 (7.1) vs. 0.1 (5.4) μmol·kg body wt(-1)·min(-1), P = 0.015]. Furthermore, the decrease in EGP was associated with telomere elongation (r = -0.620, P = 0.001). The resistance training intervention did not change either hepatic or visceral fat glucose uptake or the amounts of ectopic fat. Maternal obesity did not influence the studied measures. In conclusion, resistance training improves suppression of EGP in elderly women. The finding of improved insulin sensitivity of EGP with associated telomere lengthening implies that elderly women can reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease with resistance training. PMID:26744506

  20. Simultaneous suppression of epidermal growth factor receptor and c-erbB-2 reverses aneuploidy and malignant phenotype of a human ovarian carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Pack, Svetlana D; Alper, Ozgül M; Stromberg, Kurt; Augustus, Meena; Ozdemirli, Metin; Miermont, Anne M; Klus, Greg; Rusin, Marek; Slack, Rebecca; Hacker, Neville F; Ried, Thomas; Szallasi, Zoltan; Alper, Ozge

    2004-02-01

    Coexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and c-erbB-2 in 47-68% of ovarian cancer cells indicate their strong association with tumor formation. We examined the effects of simultaneous antisense- or immunosuppression of EGFR and c-erbB-2 expression on the invasive phenotype, aneuploidy, and genotype of cultured human ovarian carcinoma cells (NIH:OVCAR-8). We report here that suppression of both EGFR and c-erbB-2 results in regression of aneuploidy and genomic imbalances in NIH:OVCAR-8 cells, restores a more normal phenotype, and results in a more normal gene expression profile. Combined with cytogenetic analysis, our data demonstrate that the regression of aneuploidy is due to the selective apoptosis of double antisense transfected cells with highly abnormal karyotype. PMID:14871800

  1. Acid sphingomyelinase regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in hepatocytes through AKT activation and AMP-activated protein kinase suppression

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Yosuke; Seki, Ekihiro; Kodama, Yuzo; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Miura, Kouichi; Adachi, Masayuki; Ito, Hiroyasu; Shiratori, Yoshimune; Banno, Yoshiko; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Nagaki, Masahito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Brenner, David A.; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) regulates the homeostasis of sphingolipids, including ceramides and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Because sphingolipids regulate AKT activation, we investigated the role of ASM in hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism. Initially, we overexpressed ASM in the livers of wild-type and diabetic db/db mice by adenovirus vector (Ad5ASM). In these mice, glucose tolerance was improved, and glycogen and lipid accumulation in the liver were increased. Using primary cultured hepatocytes, we confirmed that ASM increased glucose uptake, glycogen deposition, and lipid accumulation through activation of AKT and glycogen synthase kinase-3β. In addition, ASM induced up-regulation of glucose transporter 2 accompanied by suppression of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. Loss of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) diminished ASM-mediated AKT phosphorylation, but exogenous S1P induced AKT activation in hepatocytes. In contrast, SphK1 deficiency did not affect AMPK activation. These results suggest that the SphK/S1P pathway is required for ASM-mediated AKT activation but not for AMPK inactivation. Finally, we found that treatment with high-dose glucose increased glycogen deposition and lipid accumulation in wild-type hepatocytes but not in ASM−/− cells. This result is consistent with glucose intolerance in ASM−/− mice. In conclusion, ASM modulates AKT activation and AMPK inactivation, thus regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in the liver.—Osawa, Y., Seki, E., Kodama, Y., Suetsugu, A., Miura, K., Adachi, M., Ito, H., Shiratori, Y., Banno, Y., Olefsky, J. M., Nagaki, M., Moriwaki, H., Brenner, D. A., Seishima, M. Acid sphingomyelinase regulates glucose and lipid metabolism in hepatocytes through AKT activation and AMP-activated protein kinase suppression. PMID:21163859

  2. Pycnogenol modulates apoptosis by suppressing oxidative stress and inflammation in high glucose-treated renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, You Jung; Kim, Young Ae; Yokozawa, Takako

    2011-09-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that polyphenolic antioxidants protect against diabetic nephropathy. Pycnogenol is made up of flavonoids, mainly procyanidins and phenolic compounds, and is a known powerful antioxidant. Hyperglycemia is characteristic of diabetic nephropathy and induces renal tubular cell apoptosis. Thus, in this study, we used high glucose-treated renal tubular cells to investigate the protective action of pycnogenol against high glucose-induced apoptosis and diabetic nephropathy. We also sought to further delineate the underlying mechanisms elicited by oxidative stress and inflammation and suppressed by pycnogenol. Results show that pycnogenol significantly suppressed the high glucose-induced morphological changes and the reduction in cell viability associated with cytotoxicity. Bcl2/Bax protein levels indicated pycnogenol's anti-apoptotic effect against high glucose-induced apoptotic cell death. In addition, several key markers of oxidative stress and inflammation were measured for pycnogenol's beneficial effects. Results indicate pycnogenol's anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory efficacy in suppressing lipid peroxidation, total reactive species (RS), superoxide ((·)O(2)), nitric oxide (NO(·)), peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), pro-inflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. Based on these results, we conclude that pycnogenol's anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties underlie its anti-apoptotic effects, suggesting further investigation of pycnogenol as a promising treatment against diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21689714

  3. Suppression of renal fibrosis by galectin-1 in high glucose-treated renal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Kazuhiro Tsuruta, Yuki; Yamashita, Tetsuri; Takano, Mari; Echida, Yoshihisa; Nitta, Kosaku

    2010-11-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease. We investigated the ability of intracellular galectin-1 (Gal-1), a prototype of endogenous lectin, to prevent renal fibrosis by regulating cell signaling under a high glucose (HG) condition. We demonstrated that overexpression of Gal-1 reduces type I collagen (COL1) expression and transcription in human renal epithelial cells under HG conditions and transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) stimulation. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) is stimulated by Gal-1. HG conditions and TGF-{beta}1 treatment augment expression and nuclear translocation of Gal-1. In contrast, targeted inhibition of Gal-1 expression reduces COL1 expression and increases MMP1 expression. The Smad3 signaling pathway is inhibited, whereas two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), are activated by Gal-1, indicating that Gal-1 regulates these signaling pathways in COL1 production. Using specific inhibitors of Smad3, ERK, and p38 MAPK, we showed that ERK MAPK activated by Gal-1 plays an inhibitory role in COL1 transcription and that activation of the p38 MAPK pathway by Gal-1 plays a negative role in MMP1 production. Taken together, two MAPK pathways are stimulated by increasing levels of Gal-1 in the HG condition, leading to suppression of COL1 expression and increase of MMP1 expression.

  4. The Nrf2 Activator Vinylsulfone Reduces High Glucose-Induced Neural Tube Defects by Suppressing Cellular Stress and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway is one of the primary pathways responsible for the cellular defense system against oxidative stress. Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is a causal event in diabetic embryopathy. Thus, the Nrf2 pathway may play an important role in the induction of diabetic embryopathy. In the present study, we investigated the potentially protective effect of the Nrf2 activator, vinylsulfone, on high glucose-induced cellular stress, apoptosis, and neural tube defects (NTDs). Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) whole mouse embryos were cultured in normal (5 mmol/L) or high (16.7 mmol/L) glucose conditions, with or without vinylsulfone. At a concentration of 10 μmol/L, vinylsulfone had an inhibitory effect on high glucose-induced NTD formation, but it was not significant. At a concentration of 20 μmol/L, vinylsulfone significantly reduced high glucose-induced NTDs. In addition, 20 μmol/L vinylsulfone abrogated the high glucose-induced oxidative stress markers lipid hydroperoxide (LPO), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), and nitrotyrosine-modified proteins. The high glucose-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress biomarkers were also suppressed by 20 μmol/L vinylsulfone through the inhibition of phosphorylated protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring protein 1α (IRE1a), eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2a), upregulated C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP), and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) messenger RNA splicing. Furthermore, 20 μmol/L vinylsulfone abolished caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage, markers of apoptosis, in embryos cultured under high glucose conditions. The Nrf2 activator, vinylsulfone, is protective against high glucose-induced cellular stress, caspase activation, and subsequent NTD formation. Our data suggest that vinylsulfone supplementation is a potential therapy for diabetes-associated neurodevelopmental defects. PMID:26802109

  5. Pre-meal video game playing and a glucose preload suppress food intake in normal weight boys.

    PubMed

    Branton, Alyson; Akhavan, Tina; Gladanac, Branka; Pollard, Damion; Welch, Jo; Rossiter, Melissa; Bellissimo, Nick

    2014-12-01

    Increased food intake (FI) during television viewing has been reported in children, but it is unknown if this occurs following pre-meal video game playing (VGP). The objective was to determine the effect of pre-meal VGP for 30 min on subjective appetite and emotions, and FI in normal weight (NW) boys after a glucose or control preload. On four test mornings, NW boys (n = 19) received equally sweetened preloads of a non-caloric sucralose control or 50 g glucose in 250 mL of water, with or without VGP for 30 min. Food intake from an ad libitum pizza meal was measured immediately after. Subjective appetite was measured at 0, 15, 30, and 60 min. Subjective emotions were determined by visual analog scale at baseline and immediately before lunch. Both VGP (p = 0.023) and glucose (p <0.001) suppressed FI. Pre-meal VGP compared with no-VGP, and glucose compared with the non-caloric control, decreased FI by 59 and 170 kcal, respectively. Subjective average appetite increased to 30 min (p = 0.003), but was lower after glucose (p = 0.01) in both the VGP and no-VGP conditions compared with the control. Frustration and aggression scores increased after VGP (p <0.05), but did not correlate with FI. However, baseline and pre-meal happiness and excitement scores were inversely associated with FI. In conclusion, both pre-meal VGP and the glucose preload suppressed FI, supporting the roles of both physiologic and environmental factors in the regulation of short-term FI in 9- to 14-year-old NW boys. PMID:25150911

  6. Down-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor-signaling pathway by binding of GRP78/BiP to the receptor under glucose-starved stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Cai, B; Tomida, A; Mikami, K; Nagata, K; Tsuruo, T

    1998-11-01

    GRP78/BiP, a molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum, is induced under such adverse conditions for cell survival as glucose starvation. Induction of GRP78 has been shown to coincide with G1 cell cycle arrest, which is an important cellular defense system. In this study, we investigated involvement of GRP78 in the mechanism of growth arrest by using human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Under a chemical stress condition with 2-deoxyglucose, GRP78 was induced 3-4-fold. In the stressed cells, an underglycosylated form of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was produced and the mature form was decreased. We found that the molecular chaperone GRP78 in the endoplasmic reticulum formed a stable complex with the underglycosylated EGFR but did not with the mature form. This complex formation occurred specifically under the stress conditions, and the complex was dissociated upon removal of the stress. Treatment of the GRP78-underglycosylated EGFR complex with ATP resulted in a release of the underglycosylated EGFR from GRP78, indicating that the complex could be formed through the chaperone function of GRP78. In accordance with the complex formation with endoplasmic reticulum-resident GRP78, the underglycosylated EGFR could not be translocated to the cell surface. As a result, EGF could not induce expression of cyclin D3, a G1 cyclin, in the stressed cells, whereas it did in non-stressed cells. These results indicated that, in the stressed cells, GRP78 participated in down-regulation of EGF-signaling pathway by forming a stable complex with EGFR and inhibiting EGFR translocation to the cell surface. PMID:9766525

  7. Pretranslational Suppression of an Insulin-Responsive Glucose Transporter in Rats with Diabetes Mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, W. Timothy; Huecksteadt, Thomas P.; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    1989-07-01

    A prominent feature of diabetes mellitus is the inability of insulin to appropriately increase the transport of glucose into target tissues. The contributions of different glucose transport proteins to insulin resistance in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes was evaluated. A glucose transporter messenger RNA and its cognate protein that are exclusively expressed in muscle and adipose tissue were specifically depleted in diabetic animals, and these effects were reversed after insulin therapy; a different glucose transporter and its messenger RNA that exhibit a less restricted tissue distribution were not specifically modulated in this way. Depletion of the muscle- and adipose-specific glucose transporter species correlates with and may account for the major portion of cellular insulin resistance in diabetes in these animals.

  8. Restoration of miR-7 expression suppresses the growth of Lewis lung cancer cells by modulating epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingrong; Zheng, Yijie; Sun, Gengyun; Xiong, Shudao

    2014-12-01

    microRNAs are an abundant class of short endogenous non-coding RNAs that function as important regulators of multiple target genes and participate in diverse biological roles in carcinogenesis. However, the role of miR-7 in lung cancer remains unclear and requires further elucidation. In the present study, we found a reduction of miR-7 expression in Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells originating from mice by real-time RT-PCR. Restoration of miR-7 inhibited 3LL cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis in vitro and reduced tumorigenicity in vivo. We further confirmed that miR-7 downregulated the expression of both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue-1 (RAF-1) oncogenes by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Furthermore, inhibition of EGFR showed similar effects to miR-7 enforcement in 3LL cells. Taken together, these findings revealed that miR-7 acts as an antitumor miRNA in 3LL by targeting and suppressing the expression of both EGFR and RAF-1 oncogenes. This study may provide a rationale for the use of miR-7 in lung cancer target therapy. PMID:25334070

  9. Suppression of Endogenous Glucose Production by Isoleucine and Valine and Impact of Diet Composition.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Su, Ya; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Leucine has been shown to acutely inhibit hepatic glucose production in rodents by a mechanism requiring its metabolism to acetyl-CoA in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). In the early stages, all branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are metabolized by a shared set of enzymes to produce a ketoacid, which is later metabolized to acetyl-CoA. Consequently, isoleucine and valine may also modulate glucose metabolism. To examine this possibility we performed intrahypothalamic infusions of isoleucine or valine in rats and assessed whole body glucose kinetics under basal conditions and during euglycemic pancreatic clamps. Furthermore, because high fat diet (HFD) consumption is known to interfere with central glucoregulation, we also asked whether the action of BCAAs was affected by HFD. We fed rats a lard-rich diet for a short interval and examined their response to central leucine. The results showed that both isoleucine and valine individually lowered blood glucose by decreasing liver glucose production. Furthermore, the action of the BCAA leucine was markedly attenuated by HFD feeding. We conclude that all three BCAAs centrally modulate glucose metabolism in the liver and that their action is disrupted by HFD-induced insulin resistance. PMID:26891318

  10. Suppression of Endogenous Glucose Production by Isoleucine and Valine and Impact of Diet Composition

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Su, Ya; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Leucine has been shown to acutely inhibit hepatic glucose production in rodents by a mechanism requiring its metabolism to acetyl-CoA in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). In the early stages, all branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are metabolized by a shared set of enzymes to produce a ketoacid, which is later metabolized to acetyl-CoA. Consequently, isoleucine and valine may also modulate glucose metabolism. To examine this possibility we performed intrahypothalamic infusions of isoleucine or valine in rats and assessed whole body glucose kinetics under basal conditions and during euglycemic pancreatic clamps. Furthermore, because high fat diet (HFD) consumption is known to interfere with central glucoregulation, we also asked whether the action of BCAAs was affected by HFD. We fed rats a lard-rich diet for a short interval and examined their response to central leucine. The results showed that both isoleucine and valine individually lowered blood glucose by decreasing liver glucose production. Furthermore, the action of the BCAA leucine was markedly attenuated by HFD feeding. We conclude that all three BCAAs centrally modulate glucose metabolism in the liver and that their action is disrupted by HFD-induced insulin resistance. PMID:26891318

  11. Rosmarinic Acid suppressed high glucose-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells by ameliorating the mitochondrial function and activating STAT3.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jiayu; Wei, Jin; Yan, Rui; Liu, Xin; Li, Qing; Lin, Lin; Zhu, Yanhe; Li, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial injury characterized by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation plays a critical role in hyperglycemia-induced myocardium dysfunction. Previous studies have demonstrated that Rosmarinic Acid (RA) treatment and activating Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway have protective effects on mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiomyocyte, but there is little data regarding cardiomyocyte under condition of high-glucose. The present study was undertaken to determine the relationship between RA and STAT3 activation, as well as their effects on high glucose-induced mitochondrial injury and apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyocyte. Our results revealed that RA pretreatment suppressed high glucose-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. Moreover, the effect of RA on apoptosis was related with improved mitochondrial function, which was demonstrated by that RA attenuated high glucose-induced ROS generation, inhibited mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) activation, suppressed cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. In addition, the phosphorylation of STAT3 in H9c2 cells was inhibited under condition of high-glucose, but RA improved STAT3 phosphorylation. Importantly, inhibition of STAT3 expression by using STAT3-siRNA partly suppressed the effect of RA on high glucose-induced apoptosis. Taken together, pretreatment with RA suppressed high glucose-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocyte by ameliorating mitochondrial function and activating STAT3. PMID:27402269

  12. Direct Hepatocyte Insulin Signaling Is Required for Lipogenesis but Is Dispensable for the Suppression of Glucose Production.

    PubMed

    Titchenell, Paul M; Quinn, William J; Lu, Mingjian; Chu, Qingwei; Lu, Wenyun; Li, Changhong; Chen, Helen; Monks, Bobby R; Chen, Julia; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-06-14

    During insulin-resistant states such as type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), insulin fails to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP) yet promotes lipid synthesis. This metabolic state has been termed "selective insulin resistance" to indicate a defect in one arm of the insulin-signaling cascade, potentially downstream of Akt. Here we demonstrate that Akt-dependent activation of mTORC1 and inhibition of Foxo1 are required and sufficient for de novo lipogenesis, suggesting that hepatic insulin signaling is likely to be intact in insulin-resistant states. Moreover, cell-nonautonomous suppression of HGP by insulin depends on a reduction of adipocyte lipolysis and serum FFAs but is independent of vagal efferents or glucagon signaling. These data are consistent with a model in which, during T2DM, intact liver insulin signaling drives enhanced lipogenesis while excess circulating FFAs become a dominant inducer of nonsuppressible HGP. PMID:27238637

  13. Sulodexide suppresses inflammation in human endothelial cells and prevents glucose cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ciszewicz, Marta; Polubinska, Alicja; Antoniewicz, Artur; Suminska-Jasinska, Katarzyna; Breborowicz, Andrzej

    2009-03-01

    Sulodexide is a mixture of heparin and dermatan sulfate with antithrombotic and profibrynolytic activity. Individual reports suggest the anti-inflammatory action of sulodexin. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of sulodexide on the release of the inflammatory mediators from endothelium in normal conditions and in cells chronically exposed to glucose. The experiments were performed on in vitro cultured human umbilical endothelial cells kept for 7 days in standard medium or in the same medium but supplemented with glucose 30 mmol/L. Sulodexide was added to the culture medium in concentrations of 0.125 lipase releasing unit (LRU)/mL, 0.25 LRU/mL, and 0.5 LRU/mL Spontaneous generation of oxygen-derived free radicals and the release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) from the studied cells was evaluated. Additionally, the healing of the injured mesothelium was studied in the presence of sulodexide and glucose. Sulodexide caused the inhibition of the intracellular generation of free radicals in a dose-dependent manner (maximally by 32%, P < 0.01), as well as the inhibition of MCP-1 (maximally by 60%, P < 0.001) and IL-6 (maximally by 69%, P < 0.01). Cells cultured in a medium with glucose 30 mmol/L generated more free radicals (+20%, P < 0.05) and released more MCP-1 (+113%, P < 0.001) and IL-6 (+26%, P < 0.05). Cell monolayers treated with glucose had a decreased ability to heal after mechanical injury (-28%, P < 0.001). All these glucose effects were reversed when cells were exposed to sulodexide simultaneously. The results of our study demonstrate a significant anti-inflammatory action of sulodexide in the endothelial cells and a protective effect of that drug against glucose cytotoxicity. PMID:19218094

  14. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-01

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions. PMID:26718467

  15. ZD6474, a Multitargeted Inhibitor for Receptor Tyrosine Kinases, Suppresses Growth of Gliomas Expressing an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutant, EGFRvIII, in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yiin, Jia-Jean; Hu, Bo; Schornack, Paul A.; Sengar, Raghvendra S.; Liu, Kun-wei; Feng, Haizhong; Lieberman, Frank S.; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Wiener, Erik C.; Ma, Hsin-I; Cheng, Shi-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) vIII is a mutated EGFR that is frequently overexpressed in glioblastomas and implicated in response to receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this study, we investigate the effect of ZD6474 (ZACTIMA, vandetanib), a dual inhibitor for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and EGFR on growth and angiogenesis of gliomas expressing EGFRvIII. We used two glioma xenograft models, U87MG cells overexpressing EGFRvIII and short-term cultured primary glioma GBM8 cells with EGFRvIII. ZD6474 inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis and induced cell apoptosis in various brain gliomas. Moreover, significant inhibition of EGFRvIII-expressing U87MG and GBM8 gliomas was observed compared with their controls. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis using the apparent diffusion coefficient and three-dimensional T2*weighed measurements validated ZD6474 inhibition on tumor growth and angiogenesis in EGFRvIII-expressing GBM8 gliomas. Mechanistically, ZD6474 shows better inhibition of cell growth and survival of U87MG/EGFRvIII, GBM6, and GBM8 cells that express EGFRvIII than U87MG or GBM14 cells that have nondetectable EGFRvIII through attenuation of activated phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, Akt, and Bcl-XL expression. Albeit in lesser extent, ZD6474 also displays suppressions of U87MG/EGFR and GBM12 cells that overexpress wild-type EGFR. Additionally, ZD6474 inhibits activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in both types of cells, and expression of a constitutively active phosphoinositide 3-kinases partially rescued ZD6474 inhibition in U87MG/EGFRvIII cells. Taken together, these data show that ZD6474 significantly inhibited growth and angiogenesis of gliomas expressing EGFRvIII by specifically blocking EGFRvIII-activated signaling mediators, suggesting a potential application of ZD6474 in treatments for glioblastomas that overexpress EGFRvIII. PMID:20371720

  16. MiR-126 Suppresses the Glucose-Stimulated Proliferation via IRS-2 in INS-1 β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Man; Zhang, Shao-ping; Wang, Chun-hui; Yuan, Wen-jun; Sun, Tao; He, Lan-jie; Hu, Qi-kuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that miR-126 participates in the glucose homeostasis through its target molecules. Although bioinformatics analysis predicts that miR-126 can bind with the insulin receptor substrate-2(IRS-2) mRNA at the “seed sequence”, but there are still no definitely reports to support it. In this study, we provided evidences that IRS-2 was one of the target genes of miR-126. And miR-126 has a proliferation inhibiting effects in INS-1 β cells, mainly through the suppression of IRS-2. Methods The 3’-UTR of IRS-2 regulated by miR-126 was analyzed by the luciferase assay and western blot. Furthermore, proliferation of INS-1 β cells stimulated by glucose was tested, and the association between IRS-2 and miR-126 were analyzed. Results We found that mutation of only three of the 6 “seed sequences” can eliminate the inhibition effect of miR-126. In INS-1 β cells, administration of miR-126 suppresses the proliferation, together with the unbalanced down-regulation of IRS-2 and IRS-1. Over-expression of IRS-2 can reverse the proliferation effect of miR-126, while not of IRS-1. These results suggested that miR-126 inhibited the β-cell proliferation via the inhibition of IRS-2 instead of IRS-1.Additionally, we also found that high glucose and insulin could stimulate the rapid production of endogenous miR-126 within 6 hours, together with the short term suppression of IRS-1 and IRS-2 expression, and intensify the unbalanced expression of IRS-1 and IRS-2. Conclusions IRS-2 was one of the targets of miR-126. MiR-126 inhibited the β-cell proliferation through IRS-2 instead of IRS-1. MiR-126 may take part in the glucose homeostasis both through its target IRS-2 and IRS-1. The unbalance between IRS-1 and IRS-2 caused by miR-126 may play an important role in type 2 diabetes. PMID:26919700

  17. Multicopy Fzf1 (Sul1) Suppresses the Sulfite Sensitivity but Not the Glucose Derepression or Aberrant Cell Morphology of a Grr1 Mutant of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Avram, D.; Bakalinsky, A. T.

    1996-01-01

    An ssu2 mutation in Sacccharomyces cerevisiae, previously shown to cause sulfite sensitivity, was found to be allelic to GRR1, a gene previously implicated in glucose repression. The suppressor rgt1, which suppresses the growth defects of grr1 strains on glucose, did not fully suppress the sensitivity on glucose or nonglucose carbon sources, indicating that it is not strictly linked to a defect in glucose metabolism. Because the Cln1 protein was previously shown to be elevated in grr1 mutants, the effect of CLN1 overexpression on sulfite sensitivity was investigated. Overexpression in GRR1 cells resulted in sulfite sensitivity, suggesting a connection between CLN1 and sulfite metabolism. Multicopy FZF1, a putative transcription factor, was found to suppress the sulfite sensitive phenotype of grr1 strains, but not the glucose derepression or aberrant cell morphology. Multicopy FZF1 was also found to suppress the sensitivity of a number of other unrelated sulfite-sensitive mutants, but not that of ssu1 or met20, implying that FZF1 may act through Ssu1p and Met20p. Disruption of FZF1 resulted in sulfite sensitivity when the construct was introduced in single copy at the FZF1 locus in a GRR1 strain, providing evidence that FZF1 is involved in sulfite metabolism. PMID:8889516

  18. Tofogliflozin, A Highly Selective Inhibitor of SGLT2 Blocks Proinflammatory and Proapoptotic Effects of Glucose Overload on Proximal Tubular Cells Partly by Suppressing Oxidative Stress Generation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Matsui, T; Yamagishi, S

    2016-03-01

    Ninety percent of glucose filtered by the glomerulus is reabsorbed by a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2), which is mainly expressed on S1 and S2 segment of renal proximal tubules. Since SGLT-2-mediated glucose reabsorption is increased under diabetic conditions, selective inhibition of SGLT2 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes. We have recently shown that an inhibitor of SGLT2 has anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects on experimental diabetic nephropathy partly by suppressing advanced glycation end products formation and oxidative stress generation in the kidney. However, the direct effects of SGLT2 inhibitor on tubular cell damage remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of tofogliflozin, a highly selective inhibitor of SGLT2 on oxidative stress generation, inflammatory and proapoptotic reactions in cultured human proximal tubular cells exposed to high glucose. Tofogliflozin dose-dependently suppressed glucose entry into tubular cells. High glucose exposure (30 mM) for 4 and 24 h significantly increased oxidative stress generation in tubular cells, which were suppressed by the treatment of tofogliflozin or an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) gene expression and apoptotic cell death were induced by 4 h- and 8 day-exposure to high glucose, respectively, both of which were also blocked by tofogliflozin or NAC. The present study suggests that SGLT2-mediated glucose entry into tubular cells could stimulate oxidative stress and evoke inflammatory and proapoptotic reactions in this cell type. Blockade of glucose reabsorption in tubular cells by SGLT2 inhibitor might exert beneficial effects on tubulointerstitial damage in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26158396

  19. Inhibition of microRNA-155 sensitizes lung cancer cells to irradiation via suppression of HK2-modulated glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xin; Yao, Li; Zhang, Jianli; Han, Ping; Li, Cuiyun

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding regulatory RNAs, which are involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. miRNA (miR)-155, which has previously been reported to be overexpressed in lung cancer, is correlated with poor patient prognosis. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of miR‑155 on the radiosensitivity of human non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. To explore the roles of miRNAs in the regulation of irradiation sensitivity of human lung cancer cells, the expressions of miR‑155 in response to irradiation, have been studied by RT‑qPCR, and the putative direct target of miR‑155 was identified by western blot and luciferase assays. The results of the present study revealed that the expression of miR‑155 was induced by irradiation, thus suggesting a positive correlation between miR‑155 and radiosensitivity. Furthermore, overexpression of miR‑155 rendered lung cancer cells resistant to irradiation. In addition, hexokinase 2 (HK2) was identified as an indirect target of miR‑155; exogenous overexpression of miR‑155 upregulated the expression of HK2, whereas inhibition of miR‑155 by antisense miRNA suppressed HK2 expression. In addition, HK2‑modulated glucose metabolism was significantly upregulated by overexpression of miR‑155. Notably, inhibition of miR‑155 sensitized lung cancer cells to irradiation via suppression of glucose metabolism. In conclusion, the present study reported a novel function for miR‑155 in the regulation of NSCLC cell radiosensitivity, thus suggesting that miR‑155 may be considered a therapeutic target for the development of anticancer drugs. PMID:27315591

  20. Acetylation of glucokinase regulatory protein decreases glucose metabolism by suppressing glucokinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo-Man; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Jo, Seong-Ho; Kim, Mi-Young; Ahn, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK), mainly expressed in the liver and pancreatic β-cells, is critical for maintaining glucose homeostasis. GK expression and kinase activity, respectively, are both modulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. Post-translationally, GK is regulated by binding the glucokinase regulatory protein (GKRP), resulting in GK retention in the nucleus and its inability to participate in cytosolic glycolysis. Although hepatic GKRP is known to be regulated by allosteric mechanisms, the precise details of modulation of GKRP activity, by post-translational modification, are not well known. Here, we demonstrate that GKRP is acetylated at Lys5 by the acetyltransferase p300. Acetylated GKRP is resistant to degradation by the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway, suggesting that acetylation increases GKRP stability and binding to GK, further inhibiting GK nuclear export. Deacetylation of GKRP is effected by the NAD+-dependent, class III histone deacetylase SIRT2, which is inhibited by nicotinamide. Moreover, the livers of db/db obese, diabetic mice also show elevated GKRP acetylation, suggesting a broader, critical role in regulating blood glucose. Given that acetylated GKRP may affiliate with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), understanding the mechanism of GKRP acetylation in the liver could reveal novel targets within the GK-GKRP pathway, for treating T2DM and other metabolic pathologies. PMID:26620281

  1. Metformin inhibits hepatocellular glucose, lipid and cholesterol biosynthetic pathways by transcriptionally suppressing steroid receptor coactivator 2 (SRC-2)

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Andre; Bozickovic, Olivera; Bjune, Jan-Inge; Mellgren, Gunnar; Sagen, Jørn V.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the anti-diabetic drug metformin to inhibit anabolic processes including gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis is partly attributable to activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway. The p160 steroid receptor coactivator 2 (SRC-2) is a key regulator of cellular metabolism and drives expression of the gluconeogenic enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc). Here, we uncovered a role for SRC-2 in the metabolic reprogramming imposed by metformin. In FaO cells, metformin dose-dependently reduced mRNA expression of SRC-2. Microarray analysis of metformin-treated cells revealed an overrepresentation of downregulated genes involved in biosynthesis of lipids and cholesterol. Several metformin-regulated genes including fatty acid synthase (FASN) were validated as transcriptional targets of SRC-2 with promoters characterized by sterol regulatory element (SRE) binding protein (SREBP) recognition sequences. Transactivation assays of the FASN promoter confirmed that SRC-2 is a coactivator of SREBP-1. By suppressing SRC-2 at the transcriptional level, metformin impeded recruitment of SRC-2 and RNA polymerase II to the G6Pc promoter and to SREs of mutual SRC-2/SREBP-1 target gene promoters. Hepatocellular fat accretion was reduced by metformin or knock-down of both SRC-2 and SREBP-1. Accordingly we propose that metformin inhibits glucose and lipid biosynthesis partly by downregulating SRC-2 gene expression. PMID:26548416

  2. Suppressed intrinsic catalytic activity of GLUT1 glucose transporters in insulin-sensitive 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S.A.; Buxton, J.M.; Czech, M.P. )

    1991-09-01

    Previous studies indicated that the erythroid-type (GLUT1) glucose transporter isoform contributes to basal but not insulin-stimulated hexose transport in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In the present studies it was found that basal hexose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes was about 50% lower than that in 3T3-L1 or CHO-K1 fibroblasts. Intrinsic catalytic activities of GLUT1 transporters in CHO-K1 and 3T3-L1 cells were compared by normalizing these hexose transport rates to GLUT1 content on the cell surface, as measured by two independent methods. Cell surface GLUT1 levels in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and adipocytes were about 10- and 25-fold higher, respectively, than in CHO-K1 fibroblasts, as assessed with an anti-GLUT1 exofacial domain antiserum, delta. The large excess of cell surface GLUT1 transporters in 3T3-L1 adipocytes relative to CHO-K1 fibroblasts was confirmed by GLUT1 protein immunoblot analysis and by photoaffinity labeling (with 3-({sup 125}I)iodo-4-azidophenethylamido-7-O-succinyldeacetylforskolin) of glucose transporters in isolated plasma membranes. Thus, GLUT1 intrinsic activity is markedly reduced in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts compared with the CHO-K1 fibroblasts, and further reduction occurs upon differentiation to adipocytes. The authors conclude that a mechanism that markedly suppresses basal hexose transport catalyzed by GLUT1 is a major contributor to the dramatic insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  3. Glucose-regulated protein 94 deficiency induces squamous cell metaplasia and suppresses PTEN-null driven endometrial epithelial tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jieli; Yao, Lijing; Lin, Yvonne G.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.; Dubeau, Louis; Lee, Amy S.

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most prevalent gynecologic cancer in the United States. The tumor suppressor gene Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog) is commonly mutated in the more common type 1 (endometrioid) subtype. The glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) is emerging as a novel regulator for cancer development. Here we report that expression profiles from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) showed significantly increased Grp94 mRNA levels in endometrial tumor versus normal tissues, correlating with highly elevated GRP94 protein expression in patient samples and the requirement of GRP94 for maintaining viability of human endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EAC) cell lines. Through generation of uterus-specific knockout mouse models with deletion of Grp94 alone (c94f/f) or in combination with Pten (cPf/f94f/f), we discovered that c94f/f uteri induced squamous cell metaplasia (SCM) and reduced active nuclear β-catenin. The cPf/f94f/f uteri showed accelerated SCM and suppression of PTEN-null driven EAC, with reduced cellular proliferation, attenuated β-catenin signaling and decreased AKT/S6 activation in the SCM. In contrast to single PTEN knockout uteri (cPf/f), cPf/f94f/f uteri showed no decrease in E-cadherin level and no invasive lesion. Collectively, our study implies that GRP94 downregulation induces SCM in EAC and suppresses AKT/S6 signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppressing EAC progression. PMID:26910913

  4. Glucose-regulated protein 94 deficiency induces squamous cell metaplasia and suppresses PTEN-null driven endometrial epithelial tumor development.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jieli; Yao, Lijing; Lin, Yvonne G; DeMayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P; Dubeau, Louis; Lee, Amy S

    2016-03-22

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most prevalent gynecologic cancer in the United States. The tumor suppressor gene Pten (phosphatase and tensin homolog) is commonly mutated in the more common type 1 (endometrioid) subtype. The glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) is emerging as a novel regulator for cancer development. Here we report that expression profiles from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) showed significantly increased Grp94 mRNA levels in endometrial tumor versus normal tissues, correlating with highly elevated GRP94 protein expression in patient samples and the requirement of GRP94 for maintaining viability of human endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EAC) cell lines. Through generation of uterus-specific knockout mouse models with deletion of Grp94 alone (c94f/f) or in combination with Pten (cPf/f94f/f), we discovered that c94f/f uteri induced squamous cell metaplasia (SCM) and reduced active nuclear β-catenin. The cPf/f94f/f uteri showed accelerated SCM and suppression of PTEN-null driven EAC, with reduced cellular proliferation, attenuated β-catenin signaling and decreased AKT/S6 activation in the SCM. In contrast to single PTEN knockout uteri (cPf/f), cPf/f94f/f uteri showed no decrease in E-cadherin level and no invasive lesion. Collectively, our study implies that GRP94 downregulation induces SCM in EAC and suppresses AKT/S6 signaling, providing a novel mechanism for suppressing EAC progression. PMID:26910913

  5. Cyclosporine A Suppressed Glucose Oxidase Induced P53 Mitochondrial Translocation and Hepatic Cell Apoptosis through Blocking Mitochondrial Permeability Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaodi; Liu, Jiangzheng; Wang, Xin; Li, Shuang; Liu, Rui; Liao, Nai; Zhang, Tao; Hai, Chunxu

    2016-01-01

    P53 is known as a transcription factor to control apoptotic cell death through regulating a series of target genes in nucleus. There is accumulating evidences show that p53 can directly induce cell apoptosis through transcription independent way at mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which p53 translocation into mitochondria in response to oxidative stress remains unclear. Here, glucose oxidase (GOX) was used to induce ROS generation in HepG2 cells and liver tissues of mice. The results showed that p53 was stabilized and translocated to mitochondria in a time and dose dependent manner after GOX exposure. Interestingly, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition, cyclosporine A (CsA) was able to effectively reduce GOX mediated mitochondrial p53 distribution without influencing on the expression of p53 target genes including Bcl-2 and Bax. These indicated that CsA could just block p53 entering into mitochondria, but not affect p53-dependent transcription. Meanwhile, CsA failed to inhibit the ROS generation induced by GOX, which indicated that CsA had no antioxidant function. Moreover, GOX induced typical apoptosis characteristics including, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of Bax and release of cytochrome C in mitochondria, accompanied with activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. These processions were suppressed after pretreatment with CsA and pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ, a specific inhibitor of p53 mitochondrial translocation). In vivo, CsA was able to attenuate p53 mitochondrial distribution and protect mice liver against from GOX mediated apoptotic cell death. Taken together, these suggested that CsA could suppress ROS-mediated p53 mitochondrial distribution and cell apoptosis depended on its inhibition effect to mitochondrial permeability transition. It might be used to rescue the hepatic cell apoptosis in the patients with acute liver injury. PMID:26884717

  6. Cyclosporine A Suppressed Glucose Oxidase Induced P53 Mitochondrial Translocation and Hepatic Cell Apoptosis through Blocking Mitochondrial Permeability Transition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaodi; Liu, Jiangzheng; Wang, Xin; Li, Shuang; Liu, Rui; Liao, Nai; Zhang, Tao; Hai, Chunxu

    2016-01-01

    P53 is known as a transcription factor to control apoptotic cell death through regulating a series of target genes in nucleus. There is accumulating evidences show that p53 can directly induce cell apoptosis through transcription independent way at mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which p53 translocation into mitochondria in response to oxidative stress remains unclear. Here, glucose oxidase (GOX) was used to induce ROS generation in HepG2 cells and liver tissues of mice. The results showed that p53 was stabilized and translocated to mitochondria in a time and dose dependent manner after GOX exposure. Interestingly, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition, cyclosporine A (CsA) was able to effectively reduce GOX mediated mitochondrial p53 distribution without influencing on the expression of p53 target genes including Bcl-2 and Bax. These indicated that CsA could just block p53 entering into mitochondria, but not affect p53-dependent transcription. Meanwhile, CsA failed to inhibit the ROS generation induced by GOX, which indicated that CsA had no antioxidant function. Moreover, GOX induced typical apoptosis characteristics including, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of Bax and release of cytochrome C in mitochondria, accompanied with activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. These processions were suppressed after pretreatment with CsA and pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ, a specific inhibitor of p53 mitochondrial translocation). In vivo, CsA was able to attenuate p53 mitochondrial distribution and protect mice liver against from GOX mediated apoptotic cell death. Taken together, these suggested that CsA could suppress ROS-mediated p53 mitochondrial distribution and cell apoptosis depended on its inhibition effect to mitochondrial permeability transition. It might be used to rescue the hepatic cell apoptosis in the patients with acute liver injury. PMID:26884717

  7. BAG-1 enhances cell-cell adhesion, reduces proliferation and induces chaperone-independent suppression of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epidermal keratinocyte migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hinitt, C.A.M.; Wood, J.; Lee, S.S.; Williams, A.C.; Howarth, J.L.; Glover, C.P.; Uney, J.B.; Hague, A.

    2010-08-01

    Cell motility is important in maintaining tissue homeostasis, facilitating epithelial wound repair and in tumour formation and progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether BAG-1 isoforms regulate epidermal cell migration in in vitro models of wound healing. In the human epidermal cell line HaCaT, endogenous BAG-1 is primarily nuclear and increases with confluence. Both transient and stable p36-Bag-1 overexpression resulted in increased cellular cohesion. Stable transfection of either of the three human BAG-1 isoforms p36-Bag-1 (BAG-1S), p46-Bag-1 (BAG-1M) and p50-Bag-1 (BAG-1L) inhibited growth and wound closure in serum-containing medium. However, in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in serum-free medium, BAG-1S/M reduced communal motility and colony scattering, but BAG-1L did not. In the presence of HGF, p36-Bag-1 transfectants retained proliferative response to HGF with no change in ERK1/2 activation. However, the cells retained E-cadherin localisation at cell-cell junctions and exhibited pronounced cortical actin. Point mutations in the BAG domain showed that BAG-1 inhibition of motility is independent of its function as a chaperone regulator. These findings are the first to suggest that BAG-1 plays a role in regulating cell-cell adhesion and suggest an important function in epidermal cohesion.

  8. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG improves glucose tolerance through alleviating ER stress and suppressing macrophage activation in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Kun-Young; Kim, Bobae; Hyun, Chang-Kee

    2015-05-01

    Although recent studies have reported that Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), the most extensively studied probiotic strain, exerts an anti-hyperglycemic effect on several rodent models, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, twenty male C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db/db) mice were divided into 2 groups, LGG-treated and control group, which received a daily dose of LGG (1 × 10(8) CFU per mouse) and PBS orally for 4 weeks, respectively. We observed that glucose tolerance was significantly improved in LGG-treated db/db mice. Insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and GLUT4 translocation were higher in skeletal muscle of LGG-treated mice relative to their controls. It was also observed that LGG treatment caused significant reductions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in skeletal muscle and M1-like macrophage activation in white adipose tissues. Our results indicate that the anti-diabetic effect of LGG in db/db mice is associated with alleviated ER stress and suppressed macrophage activation, resulting in enhanced insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of probiotics for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26060355

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG improves glucose tolerance through alleviating ER stress and suppressing macrophage activation in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kun-Young; Kim, Bobae; Hyun, Chang-Kee

    2015-01-01

    Although recent studies have reported that Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), the most extensively studied probiotic strain, exerts an anti-hyperglycemic effect on several rodent models, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, twenty male C57BL/KsJ-db/db (db/db) mice were divided into 2 groups, LGG-treated and control group, which received a daily dose of LGG (1 × 108 CFU per mouse) and PBS orally for 4 weeks, respectively. We observed that glucose tolerance was significantly improved in LGG-treated db/db mice. Insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and GLUT4 translocation were higher in skeletal muscle of LGG-treated mice relative to their controls. It was also observed that LGG treatment caused significant reductions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in skeletal muscle and M1-like macrophage activation in white adipose tissues. Our results indicate that the anti-diabetic effect of LGG in db/db mice is associated with alleviated ER stress and suppressed macrophage activation, resulting in enhanced insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of probiotics for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26060355

  10. NR2B-dependent cyclophilin D translocation suppresses the recovery of synaptic transmission after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihua; Wang, Yongfu; Yan, Shijun; Du, Fang; Yan, Shirley Shidu

    2015-10-01

    N-methyl d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) subunit 2B (NR2B)-containing NMDA receptors and mitochondrial protein cyclophilin D (CypD) are well characterized in mediating neuronal death after ischemia, respectively. However, whether and how NR2B and CypD work together in mediating synaptic injury after ischemia remains elusive. Using an ex vivo ischemia model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in hippocampal slices, we identified a NR2B-dependent mechanism for CypD translocation onto the mitochondrial inner membrane. CypD depletion (CypD null mice) prevented OGD-induced impairment in synaptic transmission recovery. Overexpression of neuronal CypD mice (CypD+) exacerbated OGD-induced loss of synaptic transmission. Inhibition of CypD-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening by cyclosporine A (CSA) attenuated ischemia-induced synaptic perturbation in CypD+ and non-transgenic (non-Tg) mice. The treatment of antioxidant EUK134 to suppress mitochondrial oxidative stress rescued CypD-mediated synaptic dysfunction following OGD in CypD+ slices. Furthermore, OGD provoked the interaction of CypD with P53, which was enhanced in slices overexpressing CypD but was diminished in CypD-null slices. Inhibition of p53 using a specific inhibitor of p53 (pifithrin-μ) attenuated the CypD/p53 interaction following OGD, along with a restored synaptic transmission in both non-Tg and CypD+ hippocampal slices. Our results indicate that OGD-induced CypD translocation potentiates CypD/P53 interaction in a NR2B dependent manner, promoting oxidative stress and loss of synaptic transmission. We also evaluate a new ex vivo chronic OGD-induced ischemia model for studying the effect of oxidative stress on synaptic damage. PMID:26232180

  11. FDP-E induces adipocyte inflammation and suppresses insulin-stimulated glucose disposal: effect of inflammation and obesity on fibrinogen Bβ mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minsung; Vaughan, Roger A; Paton, Chad M

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is associated with increased fibrinogen production and fibrin formation, which produces fibrin degradation products (FDP-E and FDP-D). Fibrin and FDPs both contribute to inflammation, which would be expected to suppress glucose uptake and insulin signaling in adipose tissue, yet the effect of FDP-E and FDP-D on adipocyte function and glucose disposal is completely unknown. We tested the effects of FDPs on inflammation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary macrophages and adipocyte glucose uptake in vitro. High-fat-fed mice increased hepatic fibrinogen mRNA expression ninefold over chow-fed mice, with concomitant increases in plasma fibrinogen protein levels. Obese mice also displayed increased fibrinogen content of epididymal fat pads. We treated cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary macrophages with FDP-E, FDP-D, or fibrinogen degradation products (FgnDP-E). FDP-D and FgnDP-E had no effect on inflammation or glucose uptake. Cytokine mRNA expression in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells and 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with FDP-E induced inflammation with maximal effects at 100 nM and 6 h. Insulin-stimulated 2-deoxy-d-[(3)H]glucose uptake was reduced by 71% in adipocytes treated with FDP-E. FDP-E, but not FDP-D or FgnDP-E, induces inflammation in macrophages and adipocytes and decreases glucose uptake in vitro. FDP-E may contribute toward obesity-associated acute inflammation and glucose intolerance, although its chronic role in obesity remains to be elucidated. PMID:26447203

  12. Suppressive response of confections containing the extractive from leaves of Morus Alba on postprandial blood glucose and insulin in healthy human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Mariko; Nakamura, Sadako; Oku, Tsuneyuki

    2009-01-01

    Background The first aim of this study was to clarify the effective ratio of extractive from leaves of Morus Alba (ELM) to sucrose so as to apply this knowledge to the preparation of confections that could effectively suppress the elevation of postprandial blood glucose and insulin. The second aim was to identify the efficacy of confections prepared with the optimally effective ratio determined from the first study, using healthy human subjects. Methods Ten healthy females (22.3 years, BMI 21.4 kg/m2) participated in this within-subject, repeated measures study. For the first aim of this study, the test solutions containing 30 g of sucrose and 1.2 or 3.0 g of ELM were repeatedly and randomly given to each subject. To identify the practically suppressive effects on postprandial blood glucose and insulin, some confections with added ELM were prepared as follows: Mizu-yokan, 30 g of sucrose with the addition of 1.5 or 3.0 g ELM; Daifuku-mochi, 9.0 g of starch in addition to 30 g of sucrose and 1.5 or 3.0 g ELM; Chiffon-cake, 24 g of sucrose, starch, and 3.0 or 6.0 g of ELM, and were ingested by each subject. Blood and end-expiration were collected at selected periods after test food ingestion. Results When 30 g of sucrose with 1.2 or 3.0 g of ELM were ingested by subjects, the elevations of postprandial blood glucose and insulin were effectively suppressed (p < 0.01), and the most effective ratio of ELM to sucrose was evaluated to be 1:10. AUC (area under the curve) of breath hydrogen excretion for 6 h after the ingestion of an added 3 g of ELM significantly increased (p < 0.01). When AUCs-3h of incremental blood glucose of confections without ELM was 100, that of Mizu-yokan and Daifuku-mochi with the ratio (1:10) of ELM to sucrose was decreased to 53.4 and 58.2, respectively. Chiffon-cake added one-fourth ELM was 29.0. Conclusion ELM-containing confections for which the ratio of ELM and sucrose is one-tenth effectively suppress the postprandial blood glucose and

  13. Correlation between the Suppression of Glucose and Phosphate Uptake and the Release of Protein from Viable Carrot Root Cells Treated with Monovalent Cations

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, R. H.; Willis, Catherine

    1971-01-01

    Treating carrot (Daucus carota L.) discs with ice-cold NaCl solutions for 30 minutes caused three effects that appear to be functionally related: the exchange of tissue Ca2+ and Mg2+ for Na+, the release of protein, and the suppression of active uptake of glucose and orthophosphate. Cyclosis continued apparently unabated after treatment with NaCl at concentrations of up to 0.25 m, so the cells remained viable and energetically competent. The correlation between the release of Ca2+ and Mg2+ and release of protein, and between these effects and the suppression of glucose and orthophosphate uptake, supports the hypothesis that divalent cations maintain, and monovalent cations disrupt, linkages between the outer cell surface and proteins required for active solute uptake. Calcium preserved uptake activity only when it was added in time to prevent the release of protein. Cells gradually recovered some glucose uptake activity after it had been completely inactivated by treatment with 0.25 m NaCl. This recovery occurred in the absence of added Ca2+. It was inhibited by puromycin and so appears to require some protein synthesis. Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) discs were more resistant than carrot discs to treatment with NaCl solutions, thus reflecting the difference in tolerance of the two species to sodicity. PMID:16657783

  14. Soy Leaf Extract Containing Kaempferol Glycosides and Pheophorbides Improves Glucose Homeostasis by Enhancing Pancreatic β-Cell Function and Suppressing Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Ji, Hyeon-Seon; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Dong-Ha; Park, Ho-Yong; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, In-Kyung; Yun, Bong-Sik; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2015-08-19

    This study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the antidiabetic effect of an ethanol extract of soy leaves (ESL) in db/db mice. Control groups (db/+ and db/db) were fed a normal diet (ND), whereas the db/db-ESL group was fed ND with 1% ESL for 8 weeks. Dietary ESL improved glucose tolerance and lowered plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin, HOMA-IR, and triglyceride levels. The pancreatic insulin content of the db/db-ESL group was significantly greater than that of the db/db group. ESL supplementation altered pancreatic IRS1, IRS2, Pdx1, Ngn3, Pax4, Ins1, Ins2, and FoxO1 expression. Furthermore, ESL suppressed lipid accumulation and increased glucokinase activity in the liver. ESL primarily contained kaempferol glycosides and pheophorbides. Kaempferol, an aglycone of kaempferol glycosides, improved β-cell proliferation through IRS2-related FoxO1 signaling, whereas pheophorbide a, a product of chlorophyll breakdown, improved insulin secretion and β-cell proliferation through IRS1-related signaling with protein kinase A in MIN6 cells. ESL effectively regulates glucose homeostasis by enhancing IRS-mediated β-cell insulin signaling and suppressing SREBP-1-mediated hepatic lipid accumulation in db/db mice. PMID:26211813

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antisense transfection reduces the expression of EGFR and suppresses the malignant phenotype of a human ovarian cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Brader, K R; Wolf, J K; Chakrabarty, S; Price, J E

    1998-01-01

    An EGFR-expressing clone of the human ovarian cancer line 2774 was transfected with an antisense construct of EGFR to test how suppression of this gene modulates the malignant phenotype. Transfected clones were screened for EGFR expression by Western blot and FACS analysis. Anchorage-independent growth was used to assess the effect of reduced EGFR on the malignant behavior of the cells. Several transfected clones with decreased EGFR (40-50% reduction) were identified. A correlation was noted between reduced EGFR and decreased anchorage-independent growth, with the transfected clones losing the ability to grow in agarose and responsiveness to exogenous EGF. These results suggest that EGFR may be an important factor in the malignant behavior of this ovarian cancer cell line. PMID:9683849

  16. Intragastric injection of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota suppressed spleen sympathetic activation by central corticotrophin-releasing factor or peripheral 2-deoxy-d-glucose in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Mamoru; Takada, Mai; Kato-Kataoka, Akito; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Miyazaki, Kouji; Shibamoto, Toshishige

    2016-04-21

    Intragastric (IG) administration of probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) decreases the sympathetic nerve outflow of anesthetized rats in a tissue-specific manner. In the present study, we examined the effects of IG administration of LcS on sympathetic activation induced by an intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and an intravenous (IV) injection of 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG) or interleukin (IL)-1β in urethane-anesthetized rats. The IG administration of LcS differently affected the stimulatory responses of sympathetic nerve outflow to CRF. LcS suppressed the increase in splenic sympathetic nerve activity (Spleen-SNA), induced by central CRF, in a dose-dependent manner; however, it did not alter adrenal sympathetic nervous activity (ASNA). In contrast, LcS did not affect spleen-SNA and ASNA following an IV injection of IL-1β. On the other hand, IG administration of LcS suppressed the activation of ASNA following an IV injection of 2DG. These findings suggest that the suppression of central CRF-induced sympathetic activation by LcS is tissue-specific. Moreover, it can suppress the 2DG-induced sympathetic activation. Furthermore, we found that stomach-specific vagotomy attenuates the suppressive effect of LcS on CRF-mediated spleen-SNA activation. Thus, the present study suggests that LcS administered to the stomach may act on the afferent vagal nerve and send afferent signals to the brain to regulate efferent SNA induced by sympathetic stimulators. PMID:26971699

  17. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase increases p53 levels in alloreactive human T cells, and both indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and p53 suppress glucose uptake, glycolysis and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Spanoulis, Aginor; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) suppresses adaptive immunity by inhibiting T-cell proliferation and altering glucose metabolism. The tumor suppressor p53 also alters these cellular processes with similar results. The effect of IDO on p53 and on glucose metabolism was evaluated in alloreactive T cells. Mixed-lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) were performed in the presence or not of the IDO inhibitor, 1-dl-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) and/or the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α (PFT). Cell proliferation, glucose consumption and lactate production were assessed. 1-MT increased cell proliferation, glucose influx and lactate production, whereas PFT enhanced cell proliferation and glucose influx, leaving lactate production unaffected. In MLR-derived T cells, protein analysis revealed that IDO activated general control non-derepressible 2 kinase and induced p53, p-p53 (p53 phosphorylated at serine 15) and p21. In addition, both IDO and p53 decreased glucose transporter 1 and TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator and increased synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2. IDO also reduced lactate dehydrogenase-A and glutaminase 2 levels, whereas p53 left them unaffected. Neither 1-MT nor PFT affected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. In conclusion, in alloreactive T cells, IDO increases p53 levels, and both IDO and p53 inhibit cell proliferation, glucose consumption and glycolysis. Lactate production and glutaminolysis are also suppressed by IDO, but not by p53. PMID:25064493

  18. Sunscreens and T4N5 liposomes differ in their ability to protect against ultraviolet-induced sunburn cell formation, alterations of dendritic epidermal cells, and local suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wolf, P; Cox, P; Yarosh, D B; Kripke, M L

    1995-02-01

    Exposure of skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation can lead to diverse biologic effects, including inflammation, sunburn cell formation, alterations of cutaneous immune cells, and impaired induction of contact hypersensitivity responses. The molecular mechanisms of these UV-induced effects are not completely understood. We investigated the ability of sunscreens and liposomes containing the DNA excision repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V to prevent these effects of UV radiation. The use of T4N5 liposomes, which increase the repair of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, provides an approach for assessing the role of DNA damage in the effects of UV radiation on the skin. Exposing C3H mice to 500 mJ/cm2 UVB radiation from FS40 sunlamps resulted in skin edema, sunburn cell formation, and morphologic alterations and decreased numbers of Langerhans cells and Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal T cells. In addition, the induction of contact hypersensitivity after application of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene on UV-irradiated skin was diminished by 80%. Applying sunscreens containing octyl-N-dimethyl-p-aminobenzoate, 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate, or benzophenone-3 before this dose of UV irradiation gave nearly complete protection against all of these effects of UV irradiation. In contrast, topical application of T4N5 liposomes after UV irradiation had no effect on UV-induced skin edema and only partially protected against sunburn cell formation and local suppression of contact hypersensitivity, although its ability to protect against alterations in dendritic immune cells was comparable to that of the sunscreens. These results suggest that DNA damage is involved in only some of the local effects of UV radiation on the skin. In addition, T4N5 liposomes may be a useful adjunct to sunscreens because they can reduce some of the deleterious effects of UV radiation on skin even after a sunburn has been initiated. PMID:7829886

  19. Activation of AMP-activated kinase modulates sensitivity of glioma cells against epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hartel, Ines; Ronellenfitsch, Michael; Wanka, Christina; Wolking, Stefan; Steinbach, Joachim P; Rieger, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGFR) pathway is frequently activated in glioblastoma but the clinical efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in malignant glioma has been disappointing. The reasons for the failure of the mechanisms of resistance of these inhibitors are unclear, but may involve factors of the tumor microenvironment such as limited glucose availability and hypoxia. It was therefore examined whether glucose and oxygen influenced the response of glioma cells to EGFR inhibition. Decreased levels of glucose and oxygen led to resistance against the EGFR inhibitor PD153035, whereas high glucose amounts and normoxia sensitised glioma cells towards the inhibitor. Low levels of glucose and oxygen stimulated AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in glioma cells. 2DG, an inhibitor of glycolysis, and the AMPK activator A769662 reduced glucose consumption, induced phosphorylation of AMPK and mimicked the effects of low glucose availability on the toxicity of PD153035. Similarly, 2DG reduced toxicity of imatinib in K562 leukemia cells. In contrast, inhibition of AMPK by compound C or by short-hairpin (sh)-mediated gene suppression increased cell death induced by the EGFR inhibitor and reverted the protective effects of 2DG and A769662. In conclusion, cytotoxicity of EGFR inhibition can be diminished by AMPK activation in glioma cells. These results may provide one explanation for the low activity of EGFR inhibitors in clinical trials and suggest antagonism of AMPK or of AMPK-regulated metabolic alterations as a promising approach to enhance their therapeutic efficacy. PMID:27121290

  20. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: epidermal nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... primarily of a specific cell type called a keratinocyte. One group of epidermal nevi, called keratinocytic or nonorganoid epidermal nevi, includes nevi that involve only keratinocytes. Keratinocytic epidermal nevi are typically found on the ...

  2. 2-Deoxy-d-Glucose Can Complement Doxorubicin and Sorafenib to Suppress the Growth of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo-Yu; Wei, Yau-Huei; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Lin, Li-Ling; Cheng, Shih-Ping; Wang, Pei-Wen; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells display a shift in energy metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. A subset of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is refractory to surgery and radioactive iodine ablation. Doxorubicin and sorafenib are the drugs of choice for treating advanced thyroid cancer but both induce adverse effects. In this study, we assessed the anti-cancer activity of 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) alone and in combination with doxorubicin or sorafenib in PTC cell lines with (BCPAP) and without (CG3) the BRAFV600E mutation. BCPAP cells were more glycolytic than CG3 cells, as evidenced by their higher extracellular l-lactate production, lower intracellular ATP level, lower oxygen consumption rate (OCR), and lower ratio of OCR/extracellular acidification rate. However, dose-dependent reduction in cell viability, intracellular ATP depletion, and extracellular l-lactate production were observed after 2-DG treatment. Regression analysis showed that cell growth in both cell lines was dependent on ATP generation. 2-DG increased the chemosensitivity of BCPAP and CG3 cell lines to doxorubicin and sorafenib. These results demonstrate that the therapeutic effects of low combined doses of 2-DG and doxorubicin or sorafenib are similar to those of high doses of doxorubicin or sorafenib alone in PTC cell lines regardless of the BRAFV600E mutation. PMID:26134286

  3. Simulated Microgravity Reduces TNF-Alpha Activity, Suppresses Glucose Uptake and Enhances Arginine Flux in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.; Hashemi, Brian B.; Smith, Scott M.; Sams, Clarence F.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine effects of microgravity upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF - alpha) activity and indices of insulin and fuel homeostasis of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Islets (1726+/-117,150 u IEU) from Wistar Furth rats were treated as: 1) HARV (High Aspect Ratio Vessel cell culture) , 2) HARV plus LPS 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). We observed a greater glucose concentration and increased disappearance of arginine in islets cultured in HARVs. While nitrogenous compound analysis indicated a ubiquitous reliance upon glutamine in all experimental groups, arginine was converted to ornithine at a two-fold greater rate in the islets cultured in the HARV microgravity paradigm (p<0.05). These studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF activity in the HARV paradigm. These alterations in fuel homeostasis may be promulgated by gravity averaged cell culture methods or by three dimensional cell assembly.

  4. Suppression subtractive hybridization identifies genes induced in response to UV-B irradiation in apple skin: isolation of a putative UDP-glucose 4-epimerase.

    PubMed

    Ban, Yusuke; Honda, Chikako; Bessho, Hideo; Pang, Xiao-Ming; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2007-01-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) successfully identified 11 cDNAs in apple skin with highly induced expression as a result of ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation. Apart from three putative flavonoid biosynthetic genes, chalcone synthase (CHS; A5C), flavanone-3-hydroxylase (F3H; B5F), and flavonol synthase (FLS; D1F), five clones (A1H, A10E, B11G, D5F, and D11H) were induced by low temperature (17 degrees C) as well, which is also known to induce anthocyanin accumulation in apple skin. Moreover, four clones (A1H, A10E, B11G, and D11H), showing higher expression levels in the skin, accumulated higher anthocyanin concentrations than their counterparts. Of the four clones, only A10E, a putative UDP-glucose 4-epimerase (UGE), was deemed to play an important role in anthocyanin accumulation in apple skin based on the facts that: (i) its transcription level was higher in the deep red cultivar, 'Jonathan', than in the pale red cultivar, 'Tsugaru'; and (ii) it could reversibly catalyse UDP-glucose to UDP-galactose, and the latter molecule is a major sugar donor for cyanidin-glycoside in apple. Therefore, the full-length cDNA of A10E was isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and designated as MdUGE1. Further analysis demonstrated that UGE enzymatic activity was positively correlated with anthocyanin accumulation in apple skin. Thus, MdUGE1 isolated by SSH could play an important role in anthocyanin biosynthesis in apple skin in concert with other flavonoid biosynthetic genes. PMID:17404384

  5. Penile epidermal inclusion cyst.

    PubMed

    Saini, Pradeep; Mansoor, M N; Jalali, Sanjay; Sharma, Abhishek

    2010-07-01

    We report a case of epidermal inclusion cyst of penis in a five-year-old boy, who had presented to the outpatient department of our hospital. Epidermal inclusion cysts are benign lesions that can develop in any part of the body. However, the finding of an epidermal inclusion cyst in the penis is rare. The child was operated and discharged uneventfully. The objective of reporting this case is to highlight the rare possibility of an inclusion cyst arising from penis as a late complication of circumcision. PMID:20589475

  6. Epidermal nevi with aberrant epidermal structure in keratinocytes and melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Oiso, Naoki; Sugawara, Koji; Yonamine, Ayano; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Kawada, Akira

    2015-04-01

    Epidermal nevi are congenital cutaneous hamartomas caused by embryonic somatic mutations. Ultrastructural features of adult epidermal nevi have rarely been investigated. Herein, we report a case involving a Japanese adult who had epidermal nevi with right congenital blindness and a right accessory nipple. The histopathologic and ultrastructural studies showed divergent abnormal epidermal structures in both melanocytes and keratinocytes. Our case indicates the need to further investigate histopathologic, ultrastructural, and genetic associations in adult epidermal nevi. PMID:25657059

  7. Hepatitis B virus enhances cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity via a mechanism involving suppression of glucose-regulated protein of 78 Kda.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Rui; Yang, HuiOu; Xiang, Qian; Jiang, Qing; He, Qi; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Huifen; Wang, Qiang; Ning, Qin; Li, Yiwu; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2016-07-25

    Cisplatin is a classical platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug used in the treatment of many cancer types, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The application of cisplatin is significantly limited by its toxicity, which may be affected by various biological factors. Persistence of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection leads to HCC development and may be associated with higher incidence of severe hepatitis during chemotherapy. However, whether HBV alters the susceptibility of hepatocytes to cisplatin remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that HBV transfection enhanced cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity via a mechanism involving suppression of glucose-regulated protein of 78 KDa (Grp78), a major stress-induced chaperone that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Silencing Grp78 gene increased the susceptibility of HepG2 to cisplatin by activating caspase-3. Grp78 expression was down-regulated by HBV infection both in vitro and in liver tissues of patients. We compared the cisplatin sensitivity of hepatoma cells either expressing (HepG2.2.15 cells) or not expressing the entire Hepatitis B Virus genome (HepG2). HepG2.2.15 cells showed increased sensitivity to cisplatin and a higher apoptosis rate. Overexpression of Grp78 counteracted the increase of sensitivity of HepG2.215 cells to cisplatin. Furthermore, we found that HBV disrupted Grp78 synthesis in response to cisplatin stimulation, which may trigger severe and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that can induce cellular apoptosis. Our findings provide new information into the effect of HBV in the modulation of Grp78 expression, and, consequently on cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity during viral infection. PMID:27234046

  8. Epidermal skin grafting.

    PubMed

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Hughes, Olivia B; Macquhae, Flor; Rakosi, Adele; Kirsner, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Autologous skin grafts, such as full- and split-thickness, have long been part of the reconstructive ladder as an option to close skin defects. Although they are effective in providing coverage, they require the need for a trained surgeon, use of anaesthesia and operating room and creation of a wound at the donor site. These drawbacks can be overcome with the use of epidermal skin grafts (ESGs), which can be harvested without the use of anaesthesia in an office setting and with minimal to no scarring at the donor site. ESGs consist only of the epidermal layer and have emerged as an appealing alternative to other autologous grafts for the treatment of acute and chronic wounds. In this article, we provide an overview of epidermal grafting and its role in wound management. PMID:27547964

  9. The mitosis-differentiation checkpoint, another guardian of the epidermal genome.

    PubMed

    Gandarillas, Alberto; Molinuevo, Rut; Freije, Ana; Alonso-Lecue, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The role of p53, the original "guardian of the genome", in skin has remained elusive. We have explored p53 function in human epidermal cells and demonstrated the importance of a mitosis-differentiation checkpoint to suppress potentially precancerous cells. This model places epidermal endoreplication as an antioncogenic mechanism in the face of irreparable genetic alterations. PMID:27308487

  10. The mitosis-differentiation checkpoint, another guardian of the epidermal genome

    PubMed Central

    Gandarillas, Alberto; Molinuevo, Rut; Freije, Ana; Alonso-Lecue, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The role of p53, the original “guardian of the genome”, in skin has remained elusive. We have explored p53 function in human epidermal cells and demonstrated the importance of a mitosis-differentiation checkpoint to suppress potentially precancerous cells. This model places epidermal endoreplication as an antioncogenic mechanism in the face of irreparable genetic alterations.

  11. D-Xylose as a sugar complement regulates blood glucose levels by suppressing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats and by enhancing glucose uptake in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunju; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Kim, Kyung-Mi; Jung, Sangwon; Yoo, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more frequently diagnosed and is characterized by hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. D-Xylose, a sucrase inhibitor, may be useful as a functional sugar complement to inhibit increases in blood glucose levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-diabetic effects of D-xylose both in vitro and stretpozotocin (STZ)-nicotinamide (NA)-induced models in vivo. MATERIALS/METHODS Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: (i) normal control; (ii) diabetic control; (iii) diabetic rats supplemented with a diet where 5% of the total sucrose content in the diet was replaced with D-xylose; and (iv) diabetic rats supplemented with a diet where 10% of the total sucrose content in the diet was replaced with D-xylose. These groups were maintained for two weeks. The effects of D-xylose on blood glucose levels were examined using oral glucose tolerance test, insulin secretion assays, histology of liver and pancreas tissues, and analysis of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) expression in liver tissues of a STZ-NA-induced experimental rat model. Levels of glucose uptake and insulin secretion by differentiated C2C12 muscle cells and INS-1 pancreatic β-cells were analyzed. RESULTS In vivo, D-xylose supplementation significantly reduced fasting serum glucose levels (P < 0.05), it slightly reduced the area under the glucose curve, and increased insulin levels compared to the diabetic controls. D-Xylose supplementation enhanced the regeneration of pancreas tissue and improved the arrangement of hepatocytes compared to the diabetic controls. Lower levels of PEPCK were detected in the liver tissues of D-xylose-supplemented rats (P < 0.05). In vitro, both 2-NBDG uptake by C2C12 cells and insulin secretion by INS-1 cells were increased with D-xylose supplementation in a dose-dependent manner compared to treatment with glucose alone. CONCLUSIONS In this study, D-xylose exerted anti-diabetic effects in vivo by

  12. Astragaloside IV facilitates glucose transport in C2C12 myotubes through the IRS1/AKT pathway and suppresses the palmitate-induced activation of the IKK/IκBα pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rongfeng; Zheng, Jianjun; Chen, Lizhen; Gu, Bin; Huang, Shengli

    2016-06-01

    Astragaloside IV is a monomer isolated from Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bunge, which is one of the most widely used plant-derived drugs in traditional Chinese medicine for diabetes therapy. In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of astragaloside IV on glucose in C2C12 myotubes and the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects. Four-day differentiated C2C12 myotubes were exposed to palmitate for 16 h in order to establish a model of insulin resistance and 3H glucose uptake, using 2-Deoxy‑D‑[1,2-3H(N)]-glucose (radiolabeled 2-DG), was detected. Astragaloside IV was added 2 h prior to palmitate exposure. The translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) was evaluated by subcellular fractionation, and the expression of insulin signaling molecules such as insulin receptor β (IRβ), insulin receptor substrate (IRS)1/protein kinase B (AKT) and inhibitory κB kinase (IKK)/inhibitor-κBα (IκBα), which are associated with insulin signal transduction, were assessed in the basal or the insulin‑stimulated state using western blot analysis or RT-PCR. We also examined the mRNA expression of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and Toll‑like receptor 4 (TLR4). Taken together, these findings demonstrated that astragaloside IV facilitates glucose transport in C2C12 myotubes through a mechanism involving the IRS1/AKT pathway, and suppresses the palmitate-induced activation of the IKK/IκBα pathway. PMID:27082050

  13. [Toxic epidermal necrolysis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Elizondo-Argueta, Sandra; Sánchez-Zúñiga, Martín de Jesús; Visoso-Palacios, Porfirio; Cedillo-Torres, Héctor; Carrillo-Córdova, Jorge Raúl

    2006-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis is the prototype of a proapoptotic disease characterized by system CD95 dysrregulation. Drugs constitute the main antigenic triggers. Hystopatologically it is characterized by epidermis detachment and necrosis with apoptotic keratinocytes. Clinical presentation includes erithematous-ampullous lesions in the skin and mucous membranes. It is associated with serious complications such as severe sepsis and septic shock. The management in the intensive care unit includes support treatment and specific treatment with immunoglobulins that alter disease course. Recombinant activated Factor VII is effective to control the associated microvascular haemorraghe. PMID:17022310

  14. Glucose sensing in human epidermis using mid-infrared photoacoustic detection

    PubMed Central

    Kottmann, Jonas; Rey, Julien M.; Luginbühl, Joachim; Reichmann, Ernst; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-01-01

    No reliable non-invasive glucose monitoring devices are currently available. We implemented a mid-infrared (MIR) photoacoustic (PA) setup to track glucose in vitro in deep epidermal layers, which represents a significant step towards non-invasive in vivo glucose measurements using MIR light. An external-cavity quantum-cascade laser (1010–1095 cm−1) and a PA cell of only 78 mm3 volume were employed to monitor glucose in epidermal skin. Skin samples are characterized by a high water content. Such samples investigated with an open-ended PA cell lead to varying conditions in the PA chamber (i.e., change of light absorption or relative humidity) and cause unstable signals. To circumvent variations in relative humidity and possible water condensation, the PA chamber was constantly ventilated by a 10 sccm N2 flow. By bringing the epidermal skin samples in contact with aqueous glucose solutions with different concentrations (i.e., 0.1–10 g/dl), the glucose concentration in the skin sample was varied through passive diffusion. The achieved detection limit for glucose in epidermal skin is 100 mg/dl (SNR=1). Although this lies within the human physiological range (30–500 mg/dl) further improvements are necessary to non-invasively monitor glucose levels of diabetes patients. Furthermore spectra of epidermal tissue with and without glucose content have been recorded with the tunable quantum-cascade laser, indicating that epidermal constituents do not impair glucose detection. PMID:22574256

  15. The antioxidant edaravone prevents cardiac dysfunction by suppressing oxidative stress in type 1 diabetic rats and in high-glucose-induced injured H9c2 cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lei; Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Ying; Chang, Wenguang; Gong, Junli; Wei, Shengnan; Li, Xudong; Qin, Ling

    2016-09-01

    Edaravone, a radical scavenger, has been recognized as a potential protective agent for cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about the effect of edaravone in cardiac complications associated with diabetes. Here, we have demonstrated that edaravone prevents cardiac dysfunction and apoptosis in the streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rat heart. Mechanistic studies revealed that edaravone treatment improved cardiac function and restored superoxide dismutase levels. In addition, treatment of diabetic animals by edaravone increased protein expressions of sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator α (PGC-1α), nuclear factor like-2 (NRF-2), and B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and reduced protein expressions of Bax and Caspase-3 compared to the control group. High glucose incubation resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death. Treatment of high-glucose-incubated H9c2 cells by edaravone reduced ROS production and cell death. In addition, the treatment of high-glucose-incubated H9c2 cells by edaravone increased the activity of antioxidative stress by increasing SIRT-1, PGC-1α, and NRF-2, and this treatment also reduced apoptosis by increasing Bcl-2 expression and reducing Bax and Caspase-3 expressions. Knockdown SIRT-1 with small interferer RNA abolished the effects of edaravone. Overall, our data demonstrated that edaravone may be an effective agent against the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27376621

  16. Toxic epidermal necrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Mehra, Tarun; Saulite, Ieva; Glatz, Martin; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Guenova, Emmanuella; Cozzio, Antonio; French, Lars E.

    2016-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare, life-threatening drug-induced skin disease with a mortality rate of approximately 30%. The clinical hallmark of TEN is a marked skin detachment caused by extensive keratinocyte cell death associated with mucosal involvement. The exact pathogenic mechanism of TEN is still uncertain. Recent advances in this field have led to the identification of several factors that might contribute to the induction of excessive apoptosis of keratinocytes. In addition, specific human leukocyte antigen types seem to be associated with certain drugs and the development of TEN. As well-controlled studies are lacking, patients are treated with various immunomodulators (e.g. intravenous immunoglobulin) in addition to the best supportive care. PMID:27239294

  17. Amelioration of Hyperglycemia with a Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitor Prevents Macrophage-Driven Atherosclerosis through Macrophage Foam Cell Formation Suppression in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Michishige; Hiromura, Munenori; Mori, Yusaku; Kohashi, Kyoko; Nagashima, Masaharu; Kushima, Hideki; Watanabe, Takuya; Hirano, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Direct associations between hyperglycemia and atherosclerosis remain unclear. We investigated the association between the amelioration of glycemia by sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2is) and macrophage-driven atherosclerosis in diabetic mice. We administered dapagliflozin or ipragliflozin (1.0 mg/kg/day) for 4-weeks to apolipoprotein E-null (Apoe−/−) mice, streptozotocin-induced diabetic Apoe−/− mice, and diabetic db/db mice. We then determined aortic atherosclerosis, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-induced foam cell formation, and related gene expression in exudate peritoneal macrophages. Dapagliflozin substantially decreased glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose tolerance without affecting body weight, blood pressure, plasma insulin, and lipids in diabetic Apoe−/− mice. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions, atheromatous plaque size, and macrophage infiltration in the aortic root increased in diabetic Apoe−/− mice; dapagliflozin attenuated these changes by 33%, 27%, and 20%, respectively. Atherosclerotic lesions or foam cell formation highly correlated with HbA1c. Dapagliflozin did not affect atherosclerosis or plasma parameters in non-diabetic Apoe−/− mice. In db/db mice, foam cell formation increased by 4-fold compared with C57/BL6 mice, whereas ipragliflozin decreased it by 31%. Foam cell formation exhibited a strong correlation with HbA1c. Gene expression of lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 and acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 was upregulated, whereas that of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 was downregulated in the peritoneal macrophages of both types of diabetic mice. SGLT2i normalized these gene expressions. Our study is the first to demonstrate that SGLT2i exerts anti-atherogenic effects by pure glucose lowering independent of insulin action in diabetic mice through suppressing macrophage foam cell formation, suggesting that foam cell formation is highly sensitive to glycemia ex vivo. PMID:26606676

  18. Amelioration of Hyperglycemia with a Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitor Prevents Macrophage-Driven Atherosclerosis through Macrophage Foam Cell Formation Suppression in Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Michishige; Hiromura, Munenori; Mori, Yusaku; Kohashi, Kyoko; Nagashima, Masaharu; Kushima, Hideki; Watanabe, Takuya; Hirano, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Direct associations between hyperglycemia and atherosclerosis remain unclear. We investigated the association between the amelioration of glycemia by sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2is) and macrophage-driven atherosclerosis in diabetic mice. We administered dapagliflozin or ipragliflozin (1.0 mg/kg/day) for 4-weeks to apolipoprotein E-null (Apoe-/-) mice, streptozotocin-induced diabetic Apoe-/- mice, and diabetic db/db mice. We then determined aortic atherosclerosis, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-induced foam cell formation, and related gene expression in exudate peritoneal macrophages. Dapagliflozin substantially decreased glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose tolerance without affecting body weight, blood pressure, plasma insulin, and lipids in diabetic Apoe-/- mice. Aortic atherosclerotic lesions, atheromatous plaque size, and macrophage infiltration in the aortic root increased in diabetic Apoe-/- mice; dapagliflozin attenuated these changes by 33%, 27%, and 20%, respectively. Atherosclerotic lesions or foam cell formation highly correlated with HbA1c. Dapagliflozin did not affect atherosclerosis or plasma parameters in non-diabetic Apoe-/- mice. In db/db mice, foam cell formation increased by 4-fold compared with C57/BL6 mice, whereas ipragliflozin decreased it by 31%. Foam cell formation exhibited a strong correlation with HbA1c. Gene expression of lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 and acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 was upregulated, whereas that of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 was downregulated in the peritoneal macrophages of both types of diabetic mice. SGLT2i normalized these gene expressions. Our study is the first to demonstrate that SGLT2i exerts anti-atherogenic effects by pure glucose lowering independent of insulin action in diabetic mice through suppressing macrophage foam cell formation, suggesting that foam cell formation is highly sensitive to glycemia ex vivo. PMID:26606676

  19. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: Involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu; Sun, Guifan; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} In 3T3-L1 adipocytes iAs{sup 3+} decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} attenuates insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT S473. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} decreases expression of adipogenic genes and GLUT4. -- Abstract: There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 {mu}M) inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs{sup 3+} exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs{sup 3+} exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4

  20. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Castelain, Florence; Humbert, Phillip

    2013-02-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a severe mucocutaneous drug-induced syndrome that causes massive keratinocyte apoptosis and therefore hydro-electrolytic disorders and systemic infection. TEN approximately affects one to two cases per million per year. Mortality rate may reach thirty percent of cases. Thus, TEN constitute a therapeutic emergency at diagnosis. Typically, clinical examination shows a mucocutaneous detachment involving more than thirty percent of body area. Definitive diagnosis is made on cutaneous biopsy with histological exam that shows the blister of necrotic keratinocytes. Main differential diagnosis are acute staphylococcus epidermis, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, paraneoplastic pemphigus, bullous fixed pigmented erythema, acute lupus erythematosus. In the early days, SCORTEN gives a good estimation and is now widely used as prognostic score. Drugs are generally considered as the main etiology of TEN but in some cases bacterial or viral infections could be involved. Physiopathology remains unclear even if recent advances have reported the possible implication of immune pathways based on activation of T and NK cells. Treatment of TEN requires to be instituted as soon as the diagnosis is made and the patient is preferentially referred to a specialized unit. Supportive care consist in covering areas of cutaneous detachment. No other therapy have demonstrated its efficiency, but high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin might improve the prognosis. PMID:23373551

  1. Toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Castelain, Florence; Humbert, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a severe mucocutaneous drug-induced syndrome that causes massive keratinocyte apoptosis and therefore hydro-electrolytic disorders and systemic infection. TEN approximately affects one to two cases per million per year. Mortality rate may reach thirty percent of cases. Thus, TEN constitutes a therapeutic emergency at diagnosis. Typically, clinical examination shows a mucocutaneous detachment involving more than thirty percent of body area. Definitive diagnosis is made on cutaneous biopsy with histological exam that shows the blister of necrotic keratinocytes. Main differential diagnosis are acute staphylococcus epidermis, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, paraneoplastic pemphigus, bullous fixed pigmented erythema, acute lupus erythematosus. In the early days, SCORTEN gives a good estimation and is now widely used as prognostic score. Drugs are generally considered as the main etiology of TEN but in some cases bacterial or viral infections could be involved. Physiopathology remains unclear even if recent advances have reported the possible implication of immune pathways based on activation of T and NK cells. Treatment of TEN requires to be instituted as soon as the diagnosis is made and the patient is preferentially referred to a specialized unit. Supportive care consist of covering areas of cutaneous detachment. No other therapy has demonstrated its efficiency, but high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin might improve the prognosis. PMID:23441982

  2. Sulfation of estradiol in human epidermal keratinocyte.

    PubMed

    Kushida, Akira; Hattori, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Date, Akira; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2011-01-01

    Epidermis is one of the well-known estrogen target tissues. Information regarding estrogen metabolism in epidermis is still very limited compared to that of estrogen action. In the breast cancer tissue, 17β-estradiol (E(2)) is inactivated by sulfation and the expression level of estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1) is inversely correlated with its malignancy. However, there is little datum about inactivation of estradiol in skin. In order to detect and measure E(2) and its metabolites simultaneously, we established an assay method with radio HPLC. A majority of [(3)H] labeled E(2) was converted to E(2) sulfate in normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK) cells. The estimated activity of sulfotransferase toward E(2) at 20 nM was 0.11±0.01 (pmol/min/mg protein). Significant induction of estrogen sulfotransferase activity was observed in calcium-differentiated NHEK cells (0.58±0.07 (pmol/min/mg protein)). The gene expression of SULT1E1 was fifteen-fold higher in differentiated keratinocyte than in proliferating keratinocyte, whereas that of steroid sulfatase was reduced. These results suggest that E(2) inactivation is primarily mediated by SULT1E1 in keratinocyte and E(2) action is likely suppressed in epidermal differentiation. PMID:21720030

  3. Isoquercetin protects cortical neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation-reperfusion induced injury via suppression of TLR4-NF-кB signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai-Ping; Li, Jian-Long; Zhang, Lu-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Chuan; Yu, Shu; Liang, Xin-Miao; Ding, Fei; Wang, Zhi-Wei

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reperfusion (OGD/R), an in vitro model of ischemia, was used to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of isoquercetin in primary culture of rat cortical neuronal cells. It was found that isoquercetin administered prior to the insult could prevent OGD/R-induced intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) increase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and cell viability decrease. For the first time, isoquercetin is described as a neuroprotective agent that potentially explains the alleviation and prevention from OGD/R-induced injury in neurons. Mechanistic studies showed that the neuroprotective effect of isoquercetin was carried out by anti-inflammatory signaling pathway of inhibiting protein expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-6, accompanied by the anti-apoptotic signaling pathway of deactivation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), Jun kinase (JNK) and p38, and inhibition of activity of caspase-3. Therefore, these studies highlighted the confirmation of isoquercetin, a flavonoid compound, as an anti-inflammation and anti-apoptosis factor which might be used as a therapeutic strategy for the ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) brain injury and related diseases. PMID:24099731

  4. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  5. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kayikci, Ömur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression on yeast carbon metabolism with a focus on roles of the Snf3/Rgt2 glucose-sensing pathway and Snf1 signal transduction in establishment and relief of glucose repression. PMID:26205245

  6. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), but not high glucose, inhibit the osteoblastic differentiation of mouse stromal ST2 cells through the suppression of osterix expression, and inhibit cell growth and increasing cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Kyoko; Yamaguchi, Toru; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Notsu, Masakazu; Ogawa, Noriko; Yano, Shozo; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2012-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to be associated with osteoporotic fractures through a decrease in osteoblastic bone formation rather than an increase in osteoclastic bone resorption. However, its precise mechanism is unknown, and we examined whether or not high glucose or advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which play key roles in the pathogenesis and complications of diabetes, would affect the osteoblastic differentiation, growth, and apoptosis of mouse stromal ST2 cells. Ten to 200 μg/mL AGE2 or AGE3 alone dose-dependently inhibited the mineralization. AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly inhibited alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities as well as the mineralization of the cells (p < 0.01). In contrast, 22 mM glucose alone or in combination with 200 μg/mL AGE2 or AGE3 did not affect these cellular phenotypes. Real-time PCR showed that AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly decreased mRNA expressions of osteocalcin as well as osterix on day 14 (p < 0.01). Western blot analysis showed that AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) also decreased the levels of Runx2 and osterix protein expressions on days 7 and 14. AGE2 or AGE3 significantly suppressed cell growth and increased apoptotic cell death in time- and dose-dependent manners (p < 0.01). Moreover, AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly increased mRNA expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) on days 2 and 3 (p < 0.01). These results suggest that AGE2 and AGE3, but not high glucose, may inhibit the osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells by decreasing osterix expression and partly by increasing RAGE expression, as well as inhibiting cell growth and increasing cell apoptosis. PMID:22903508

  7. Photoacoustic measurement of epidermal melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viator, John A.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Aguilar, Guillermo; Choi, Bernard; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2003-06-01

    Most dermatologic laser procedures must consider epidermal melanin, as it is a broadband optical absorber which affects subsurface fluence, effectively limiting the amount of light reaching the dermis and targeted chromophores. An accurate method for quantifying epidermal melanin content would aid clinicians in determining proper light dosage for therapeutic laser procedures. While epidermal melanin content has been quantified non-invasively using optical methods, there is currently no way to determine the melanin distribution in the epidermis. We have developed a photoacoustic probe that uses a Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 532nm to generate acoustic pulses in skin in vivo. The probe contained a piezoelectric element that detected photoacoustic waves which were then analyzed for epidermal melanin content, using a photoacoustic melanin index (PAMI). We tested 15 human subjects with skin types I--VI using the photoacoustic probe. We also present photoacoustic data for a human subject with vitiligo. Photoacoustic measurement showed melanin in the vitiligo subject was almost completely absent.

  8. Epidermal and urethroid penile cyst.

    PubMed

    Claudy, A L; Dutoit, M; Boucheron, S

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe a 74-year-old man who presented with a 2-cm nodule on the ventral face of the penis, showing histologically a cyst lined by both epidermal and urethroid epithelium. The authors discuss the various histological forms of raphe median cysts of the penis. PMID:1676220

  9. Epidermal cyst of median raphe.

    PubMed

    LaNasa, J A

    1976-10-01

    Cysts of the penis are rare and references to them in standard textbooks are sketchy. A case report of a congenital epidermal cyst of the median raphe of the penis is presented; therapy involved excision of the mass. Review of the literature is given. PMID:973298

  10. Evolution of dinosaur epidermal structures.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Paul M; Evans, David C; Campione, Nicolás E

    2015-06-01

    Spectacularly preserved non-avian dinosaurs with integumentary filaments/feathers have revolutionized dinosaur studies and fostered the suggestion that the dinosaur common ancestor possessed complex integumentary structures homologous to feathers. This hypothesis has major implications for interpreting dinosaur biology, but has not been tested rigorously. Using a comprehensive database of dinosaur skin traces, we apply maximum-likelihood methods to reconstruct the phylogenetic distribution of epidermal structures and interpret their evolutionary history. Most of these analyses find no compelling evidence for the appearance of protofeathers in the dinosaur common ancestor and scales are usually recovered as the plesiomorphic state, but results are sensitive to the outgroup condition in pterosaurs. Rare occurrences of ornithischian filamentous integument might represent independent acquisitions of novel epidermal structures that are not homologous with theropod feathers. PMID:26041865

  11. Evolution of dinosaur epidermal structures

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Paul M.; Evans, David C.; Campione, Nicolás E.

    2015-01-01

    Spectacularly preserved non-avian dinosaurs with integumentary filaments/feathers have revolutionized dinosaur studies and fostered the suggestion that the dinosaur common ancestor possessed complex integumentary structures homologous to feathers. This hypothesis has major implications for interpreting dinosaur biology, but has not been tested rigorously. Using a comprehensive database of dinosaur skin traces, we apply maximum-likelihood methods to reconstruct the phylogenetic distribution of epidermal structures and interpret their evolutionary history. Most of these analyses find no compelling evidence for the appearance of protofeathers in the dinosaur common ancestor and scales are usually recovered as the plesiomorphic state, but results are sensitive to the outgroup condition in pterosaurs. Rare occurrences of ornithischian filamentous integument might represent independent acquisitions of novel epidermal structures that are not homologous with theropod feathers. PMID:26041865

  12. Dexamethasone increases glucose cycling, but not glucose production, in healthy subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wajngot, A.; Khan, A.; Giacca, A.; Vranic, M.; Efendic, S. )

    1990-11-01

    We established that measurement of glucose fluxes through glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase; hepatic total glucose output, HTGO), glucose cycling (GC), and glucose production (HGP), reveals early diabetogenic changes in liver metabolism. To elucidate the mechanism of the diabetogenic effect of glucocorticoids, we treated eight healthy subjects with oral dexamethasone (DEX; 15 mg over 48 h) and measured HTGO with (2-3H)glucose and HGP with (6-3H)glucose postabsorptively and during a 2-h glucose infusion (11.1 mumol.kg-1.min-1). (2-3H)- minus (6-3H)glucose equals GC. DEX significantly increased plasma glucose, insulin, C peptide, and HTGO, while HGP was unchanged. In controls and DEX, glucose infusion suppressed HTGO (82 vs. 78%) and HGP (87 vs. 91%). DEX increased GC postabsorptively (three-fold) P less than 0.005 and during glucose infusion (P less than 0.05) but decreased metabolic clearance and glucose uptake (Rd), which eventually normalized, however. Because DEX increased HTGO (G-6-Pase) and not HGP (glycogenolysis + gluconeogenesis), we assume that DEX increases HTGO and GC in humans by activating G-6-Pase directly, rather than by expanding the glucose 6-phosphate pool. Hyperglycemia caused by peripheral effects of DEX can also contribute to an increase in GC by activating glucokinase. Therefore, measurement of glucose fluxes through G-6-Pase and GC revealed significant early effects of DEX on hepatic glucose metabolism, which are not yet reflected in HGP.

  13. Does therapeutic intervention in atopic dermatitis normalize epidermal Notch deficiency?

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2014-10-01

    This viewpoint presents a unifying concept for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) that is based on the improvement of deficient Notch signalling, which appears to represent the fundamental epithelial defect of AD resulting in epidermal and immunological barrier dysfunction. One study of AD patients demonstrated a marked epidermal deficiency of Notch receptors and several mouse models with genetically suppressed Notch signalling exhibit dry skin, signs of scratching, skin barrier abnormalities, increased transepidermal water loss and Th2 cell-mediated immunological changes closely resembling human AD. Notch signalling is critically involved in the differentiation of regulatory T cells, in the feedback inhibition of activated innate immunity, in the repression of activating protein-1 (AP-1), the regulation of late epidermal differentiation associated with filaggrin- and stratum corneum barrier lipid processing, in aquaporin 3- and claudin-1 expression and in keratinocyte-mediated release of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), which promotes Th2-driven immune responses with TSLP- and IL-31-mediated stimulation of cutaneous sensory neurons involved in the induction of itch. Translational evidence will be provided that all major therapeutic regimens employed for the treatment of AD such as glucocorticoids, calcineurin inhibitors and UV radiation may converge in the upregulation of impaired Notch signalling, the proposed pathogenic defect of AD. PMID:24889007

  14. 25 YEARS OF EPIDERMAL STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Ghadially, Ruby

    2012-01-01

    This is a chronicle of concepts in the field of epidermal stem cell biology and a historic look at their development over time. The last 25 years have seen the evolution of epidermal stem cell science, from first fundamental studies to a sophisticated science. The study of epithelial stem cell biology was aided by the ability to visualize the distribution of stem cells and their progeny through lineage analysis studies. The excellent progress we have made in understanding epidermal stem cell biology is discussed in this article. The challenges we still face in understanding epidermal stem cell include defining molecular markers for stem and progenitor subpopulations, determining the locations and contributions of the different stem cell niches, and mapping regulatory pathways of epidermal stem cell proliferation and differentiation. However, our rapidly evolving understanding of epidermal stem cells has many potential uses that promise to translate into improved patient therapy. PMID:22205306

  15. Penile Epidermal Cyst: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kumaraguru, Veerapandian; Prabhu, Ravi; Kannan, Narayanasamy Subbaraju

    2016-05-01

    Epidermal cysts also known as epidermoid cysts, is one of the common benign tumours presenting anywhere in the body. However, epidermal cyst in the penis is very rare. This condition in children is usually congenital due to abnormal embryologic closure of the median raphe; hence, it is termed as median raphe cysts (MRCs). Penile epidermal cysts may occur in adults following trauma or surgery due to epidermal elements being trapped within closed space. During wound healing, trapped squamous epithelium, undergoing keratinisation leads to cyst formation. Here, we report a rare case of patient with a penile epidermoid cyst whose main complaints was discomfort during coitus. PMID:27437298

  16. Penile Epidermal Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumaraguru, Veerapandian; Prabhu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal cysts also known as epidermoid cysts, is one of the common benign tumours presenting anywhere in the body. However, epidermal cyst in the penis is very rare. This condition in children is usually congenital due to abnormal embryologic closure of the median raphe; hence, it is termed as median raphe cysts (MRCs). Penile epidermal cysts may occur in adults following trauma or surgery due to epidermal elements being trapped within closed space. During wound healing, trapped squamous epithelium, undergoing keratinisation leads to cyst formation. Here, we report a rare case of patient with a penile epidermoid cyst whose main complaints was discomfort during coitus. PMID:27437298

  17. Epidermal p65/NF-κB signalling is essential for skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chun; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway exhibits both tumour-promoting and tumour-suppressing functions in different tissues and models of carcinogenesis. In particular in epidermal keratinocytes, NF-κB signalling was reported to exert primarily growth inhibitory and tumour-suppressing functions. Here, we show that mice with keratinocyte-restricted p65/RelA deficiency were resistant to 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-/12-O-tetra decanoylphorbol-13 acetate (TPA)-induced skin carcinogenesis. p65 deficiency sensitized epidermal keratinocytes to DNA damage-induced death in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that inhibition of p65-dependent prosurvival functions prevented tumour initiation by facilitating the elimination of cells carrying damaged DNA. In addition, lack of p65 strongly inhibited TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and skin inflammation by suppressing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by epidermal keratinocytes. Therefore, p65-dependent NF-κB signalling in keratinocytes promotes DMBA-/TPA-induced skin carcinogenesis by protecting keratinocytes from DNA damage-induced death and facilitating the establishment of a tumour-nurturing proinflammatory microenvironment. PMID:24952939

  18. Epidermal changes in human skin following irradiation with either UVB or UVA

    SciTech Connect

    Pearse, A.D.; Gaskell, S.A.; Marks, R.

    1987-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that following UVB irradiation to normal volunteers there is an increase in epidermal and stratum corneum thickness and an increase in the thymidine autoradiographic labeling index. These changes are coupled with alterations in epidermal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and succinic dehydrogenase activities, despite the absence of erythema clinically. The use of a sunscreen did not completely prevent these changes. In this study, we have examined the effects of repeated irradiation of human skin with either UVB or UVA alone in order to compare the changes produced in the epidermis and to ascertain whether UVA irradiation could cause these. Irradiation with either UVB or UVA alone was found to increase the mean epidermal thickness, the mean stratum corneum thickness, and mean keratinocyte height significantly. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased throughout the epidermis, and succinic dehydrogenase activity was significantly decreased. The autoradiographic labeling index was significantly increased following UVB irradiation but not following UVA irradiation. These results demonstrate that UVA alone can have a direct effect on epidermal morphology and metabolism, suggesting that protection of skin from UV radiation should include adequate protection from UVA.

  19. [Staphylococcal epidermal exfoliation (Ritter's disease)].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Maldonado, R; Tamayo, L; Vazquez, V; Dominguez, J

    1976-01-01

    According to the authors the best designation of Ritter's disease would be "staphilococcic epidermal exfoliation" SEE. The physiopathological and agnoslogical basis for this denomination could be the following: 1st The "S. aureus" is the ehtiological agent of the SSE in man. The Koch postulates necessary to confirm this hypothesis have been accomplished. 2nd "Staphylococcus aureus" produces a thermostable toxin that is active indepently of the staphilococcus and gives rise to the separation of the cells of the stratum granulosus of the epidermis and eventually exfoliation in suckling babies and in the newborn mouse. 3rd The "Staphylococcus aureus" may be present on the skin or in other localisations such as the bowel or pharinx. 4th The viable "S. aureus" when administered subcutaneously to the adult mice gives rise to lesions clinically and histologically similar to the impetigo observed in children. 5th The "S. aureus" killed by means of autoclave (that is, the staphylococcic toxine by itself does not give rise to any lesion when administered to the healthy adult mouse). Neijther has the SEE been observed in healthy adult man. The authors reach the conclusion that the SSE and the toxic epidermal necrolysis are basically different according to the histopathology therapeutic response and prognosis and they must be considered as independant entities. PMID:138775

  20. Glucose control.

    PubMed

    Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Stress-related hyperglycemia is a common finding in acutely ill patients, and is related to the severity and outcome of the critical illness. The pathophysiology of stress hyperglycemia includes hormonal and neural signals, leading to increased production of glucose by the liver and peripheral insulin resistance mediated by the translocation of transmembrane glucose transporters. In one pioneering study, tight glycemic control by intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients was associated with improved survival. However, this major finding was not confirmed in several other prospective randomized controlled trials. The reasons underlying the discrepancy between the first and the subsequent studies could include nutritional strategy (amount of calories provided, use of parenteral nutrition), case-mix, potential differences in the optimal blood glucose level (BG) in different types of patients, hypoglycemia and its correction, and the magnitude of glucose variability. Therefore, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of glycemic regulation during acute illness is needed. Safe and effective glucose control will need improvement in the definition of optimal BG and in the measurement techniques, perhaps including continuous monitoring of insulin algorithms and closed-loop systems. PMID:23075589

  1. Epidermal Stem Cells in Orthopaedic Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Zhen, Gehua; Tsai, Shin-Yi; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, great advances have been made in epidermal stem cell studies at the cellular and molecular level. These studies reported various subpopulations and differentiations existing in the epidermal stem cell. Although controversies and unknown issues remain, epidermal stem cells possess an immune-privileged property in transplantation together with easy accessibility, which is favorable for future clinical application. In this review, we will summarize the biological characteristics of epidermal stem cells, and their potential in orthopedic regenerative medicine. Epidermal stem cells play a critical role via cell replacement, and demonstrate significant translational potential in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases, including treatment for wound healing, peripheral nerve and spinal cord injury, and even muscle and bone remodeling. PMID:23727934

  2. Glucose Variability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proposed contribution of glucose variability to the development of the complications of diabetes beyond that of glycemic exposure is supported by reports that oxidative stress, the putative mediator of such complications, is greater for intermittent as opposed to sustained hyperglycemia. Variability of glycemia in ambulatory conditions defined as the deviation from steady state is a phenomenon of normal physiology. Comprehensive recording of glycemia is required for the generation of any measurement of glucose variability. To avoid distortion of variability to that of glycemic exposure, its calculation should be devoid of a time component. PMID:23613565

  3. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina L; Hylwa, Sara A; Sajic, Dusan; Wagner, John E; Tolar, Jakub; Hook, Kristen P

    2016-06-01

    A 3-year-old child with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa treated with bone marrow transplantation subsequently developed body-wide epidermal detachment distinct from his epidermolysis bullosa. Toxic epidermal necrolysis was diagnosed by examination and skin biopsy. Although graft-vs-host disease was considered, he had no features of this diagnosis by laboratory studies or skin biopsy, and he improved without addition of further immune suppressants. Throughout the episode, the patient was maintained on cyclosporine A, a component of his transplant regimen, and also a reported therapy for toxic epidermal necrolysis. He had full recovery. Re-epithelialization occurred in a unique folliculocentric pattern, which we postulate was related to the patient's mesenchymal stem cell infusion, received as an adjunct to his marrow transplantation. PMID:26976809

  4. SCF/c-kit signaling is required in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced migration and differentiation of hair follicle melanocytes for epidermal pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weiming; Yang, Ke; Lei, Mingxing; Yan, Hongtao; Tang, Hui; Bai, Xiufeng; Yang, Guihong; Lian, Xiaohua; Wu, Jinjin

    2015-05-01

    Hair follicle melanocyte stem cells (McSCs) are responsible for hair pigmentation and also function as a major melanocyte reservoir for epidermal pigmentation. However, the molecular mechanism promoting McSCs for epidermal pigmentation remains elusive. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) mimics key signaling involved in melanocyte growth, migration and differentiation. We therefore investigated the molecular basis for the contribution of hair follicle McSCs to epidermal pigmentation using the TPA induction model. We found that repetitive TPA treatment of female C57BL/6 mouse dorsal skin induced epidermal pigmentation by increasing the number of epidermal melanocytes. Particularly, TPA treatment induced McSCs to initiate proliferation, exit the stem cell niche and differentiate. We also demonstrated that TPA promotes melanoblast migration and differentiation in vitro. At the molecular level, TPA treatment induced robust expression of stem cell factor (SCF) in keratinocytes and c-kit in melanoblasts and melanocytes. Administration of ACK2, a neutralizing antibody against the Kit receptor, suppressed mouse epidermal pigmentation, decreased the number of epidermal melanocytes, and inhibited melanoblast migration. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TPA promotes the expansion, migration and differentiation of hair follicle McSCs for mouse epidermal pigmentation. SCF/c-kit signaling was required for TPA-induced migration and differentiation of hair follicle melanocytes. Our findings may provide an excellent model to investigate the signaling mechanisms regulating epidermal pigmentation from mouse hair follicle McSCs, and a potential therapeutic option for skin pigmentation disorders. PMID:25727244

  5. In vivo ultraviolet-exposed human epidermal cells activate T suppressor cell pathways that involve CD4+CD45RA+ suppressor-inducer T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baadsgaard, O.; Salvo, B.; Mannie, A.; Dass, B.; Fox, D.A.; Cooper, K.D. )

    1990-11-01

    In vivo UV exposure of human epidermis abrogates the function of CD1+DR+ Langerhans cells and induces the appearance of CD1-DR+ Ag-presenting macrophages. Epidermal cells from UV-exposed skin, in contrast to epidermal cells from normal skin, potently activate autologous CD4+ T cells, and, in particular, the CD45RA+ (2H4+) (suppressor-inducer) subset. We therefore determined whether UV-exposure in humans leads to a T cell response in which suppression dominates. Autologous blood T cells were incubated with epidermal cell suspensions from in vivo UV-irradiated skin. After activation, repurified T cells were transferred in graded numbers to autologous mononuclear cells (MNC) stimulated with PWM and the resultant IgG production analyzed by ELISA. Relative to T cells activated by unirradiated control epidermal cells, T cells activated by UV-exposed epidermal cells demonstrated enhanced capacity to suppress IgG production (n = 6; p less than or equal to 0.03). Within the T cell population, CD8+ cells stimulated by UV-exposed epidermal cells could be directly activated to suppress PWM-stimulated MNC Ig production if IL-2 was provided in the reaction mixture. The suppressive activity was also transferable with purified CD4+ T cells stimulated by UV-exposed epidermal cells (n = 10; p less than or equal to 0.01), and was radiosensitive. Suppression was decreased when PWM-stimulated MNC were depleted of CD8+ T cells before mixing with CD4+ T cells activated by UV-exposed epidermal cells, suggesting indirect induction of CD8+ Ts cells contained within the responding MNC populations. Indeed, physical depletion of CD45RA+ cells resulted in total abrogation of the suppressor function contained in the CD4+ T cells. Activation of suppressor function was critically dependent on DR+ APC contained in UV-exposed epidermis.

  6. Coping with an exogenous glucose overload: glucose kinetics of rainbow trout during graded swimming.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kevin; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2016-03-15

    This study examines how chronically hyperglycemic rainbow trout modulate glucose kinetics in response to graded exercise up to critical swimming speed (Ucrit), with or without exogenous glucose supply. Our goals were 1) to quantify the rates of hepatic glucose production (Ra glucose) and disposal (Rd glucose) during graded swimming, 2) to determine how exogenous glucose affects the changes in glucose fluxes caused by exercise, and 3) to establish whether exogenous glucose modifies Ucrit or the cost of transport. Results show that graded swimming causes no change in Ra and Rd glucose at speeds below 2.5 body lengths per second (BL/s), but that glucose fluxes may be stimulated at the highest speeds. Excellent glucoregulation is also achieved at all exercise intensities. When exogenous glucose is supplied during exercise, trout suppress hepatic production from 16.4 ± 1.6 to 4.1 ± 1.7 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) and boost glucose disposal to 40.1 ± 13 μmol·kg(-1)·min(-1). These responses limit the effects of exogenous glucose to a 2.5-fold increase in glycemia, whereas fish showing no modulation of fluxes would reach dangerous levels of 114 mM of blood glucose. Exogenous glucose reduces metabolic rate by 16% and, therefore, causes total cost of transport to decrease accordingly. High glucose availability does not improve Ucrit because the fish are unable to take advantage of this extra fuel during maximal exercise and rely on tissue glycogen instead. In conclusion, trout have a remarkable ability to adjust glucose fluxes that allows them to cope with the cumulative stresses of a glucose overload and graded exercise. PMID:26719305

  7. Calcium, Orai1 and Epidermal Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bikle, DD; Mauro, T

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ influx controls essential epidermal functions, including proliferation, differentiation, cell migration, itch, and barrier homeostasis. The Orai1 ion channel allows capacitive Ca2+ influx after Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, and it has now been shown to modulate epidermal atrophy. These findings reveal new interactions among various Ca2+ signaling pathways and uncover novel functions for Ca2+ signaling via the Orai1 channel. PMID:24825060

  8. Mechanotransduction in epidermal Merkel cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Masashi; Maksimovic, Srdjan; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular and molecular basis of vertebrate touch reception remains least understood among the traditional five senses. Somatosensory afferents that innervate the skin encode distinct tactile qualities, such as flutter, slip and pressure. Gentle touch is thought to be transduced by somatosensory afferents whose tactile end organs selectively filter mechanical stimuli. These tactile end organs comprise afferent terminals in association with non-neuronal cell types such as Merkel cells, keratinocytes and Schwann cells. An open question is whether these non-neuronal cells serve primarily as passive mechanical filters or whether they actively participate in mechanosensory transduction. This question has been most extensively studied in Merkel cells, which are epidermal cells that complex with sensory afferents in regions of high tactile acuity such as fingertips, whisker follicles, and touch domes. Merkel cell-neurite complexes mediate slowly adapting type I (SAI) responses, which encode sustained pressure and represent object features with high fidelity. How Merkel cells contribute to unique SAI firing patterns has been debated for decades; however, three recent studies in rodent models provide some direct answers. First, whole-cell recordings demonstrate that Merkel cells are touch-sensitive cells with fast, mechanically activated currents that require Piezo2. Second, optogenetics and intact recordings show that Merkel cells mediate sustained SAI firing. Finally, loss-of-function studies in transgenic mouse models reveal that SAI afferents are also touch sensitive. Together, these studies identify molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in Merkel cells, reveal unexpected functions for these cells in touch and support a revised, two-receptor site model of mechanosensory transduction. PMID:25053537

  9. Regenerative and reparative effects of human chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium on photo-aged epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiankun; Chen, Yan; Ma, Kui; Zhao, Along; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-04-17

    Epidermal cells are an important regenerative source for skin wound healing. Aged epidermal cells have a low ability to renew themselves and repair skin injury. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly UVB, can cause photo-aging of the skin by suppressing the viability of human epidermal cells. A chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium (CDSC-CNM) is thought to have regenerative properties. This study aimed to determine the regenerative effects of CDSC-CNM on UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells. Epidermal cells were passaged four times and irradiated with quantitative UVB, and non-irradiated cells served as a control group. Cells were then treated with different concentrations of CDSC-CNM. Compared to the non-irradiated group, the proliferation rates and migration rates of UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with increasing intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA damage. After treatment with CDSC-CNM, photo-aged epidermal cells significantly improved their viability, and their ROS generation and DNA damage decreased. The secretory factors in CDSC-CNM, including epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 and the related signaling pathway protein levels, increased compared to the control medium (CM). The potential regenerative and reparative effects of CDSC-CNM indicate that it may be a candidate material for the treatment of prematurely aged skin. The functions of the secretory factors and the mechanisms of CDSC-CNM therapy deserve further attention. PMID:27097375

  10. Irradiation of protoporphyric mice induces down-regulation of epidermal eicosanoid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    He, D.; Lim, H.W. )

    1991-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of radiation on clinical and histologic changes, and on cutaneous eicosanoid metabolism, in Skh:HR-1 hairless albino mice rendered protoporphyric by the administration of collidine. At 0.1-18 h after exposure to 12 kJ/m2 of 396-406 nm irradiation, thicknesses of back skin and ears were measured, and histologic changes were evaluated by using hematoxylin and eosin (H-E) and Giemsa's stains. Activities of eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes in epidermal and dermal homogenates were assessed by incubating the tissue homogenates with 3H-AA, followed by quantitation of the eicosanoids generated by radio-TLC. In irradiated protoporphyric mice, an increase of back-skin thickness was noted at 0.1 h, reaching a peak at 18 h, whereas maximal increase in ear thickness was observed at 12 h. Histologic changes included dermal edema, increased mast cell degranulation, and mononuclear cells in the dermis. In these irradiated protoporphyric animals, generations of 6 keto-PGF1a, PGF2a, PGE2, PGD2, and HETE by epidermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes were markedly suppressed at all the timepoints studied. Dermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes of irradiated protoporphyric mice generated increased amounts of PGE2 and HETE at 18 h, probably reflecting the presence of dermal cellular infiltrates. The suppression of the activities of epidermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes was prevented by intraperitoneal injection of WR-2721, a sulfhydryl group generator, prior to irradiation, suggesting that the suppression was secondary to photo-oxidative damage of the enzymes during the in vivo phototoxic response. These results suggest that the effect of protoporphyrin and radiation on cutaneous eicosanoid metabolism in this animal model in vivo is that of a down regulation of the activities of epidermal eicosanoid-metabolizing enzymes.

  11. Prevention of UVB Radiation-induced Epidermal Damage by Expression of Heat Shock Protein 70*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Minoru; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Maji, Daisuke; Sato, Keizo; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Ihn, Hironobu; Funasaka, Yoko; Mizushima, Tohru

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation with UV light, especially UVB, causes epidermal damage via the induction of apoptosis, inflammatory responses, and DNA damage. Various stressors, including UV light, induce heat shock proteins (HSPs) and the induction, particularly that of HSP70, provides cellular resistance to such stressors. The anti-inflammatory activity of HSP70, such as its inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), was recently revealed. These in vitro results suggest that HSP70 protects against UVB-induced epidermal damage. Here we tested this idea by using transgenic mice expressing HSP70 and cultured keratinocytes. Irradiation of wild-type mice with UVB caused epidermal damage such as induction of apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. UVB-induced apoptosis in cultured keratinocytes was suppressed by overexpression of HSP70. Irradiation of wild-type mice with UVB decreased the cutaneous level of IκB-α (an inhibitor of NF-κB) and increased the infiltration of leukocytes and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the epidermis. These inflammatory responses were suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. In vitro, the overexpression of HSP70 suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and increased the level of IκB-α in keratinocytes irradiated with UVB. UVB induced an increase in cutaneous levels of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, both of which were suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. This study provides genetic evidence that HSP70 protects the epidermis from UVB-induced radiation damage. The findings here also suggest that the protective action of HSP70 is mediated by anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-DNA damage effects. PMID:20018843

  12. Epidermal melanin absorption in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    The principle of laser induced selective photothermolysis is to induced thermal damage to specific targets in such a manner that the temperature of the surrounding tissue is maintained below the threshold for thermal damage. The selectivity is obtained by selection of a proper wavelength and pulse duration. The technique is presently being used in the clinic for removal of port-wine stains. The presence of melanin in the epidermal layer can represent a limitation to the selectivity. Melanin absorption drops off significantly with increasing wavelength, but is significant in the entire wavelength region where the blood absorption is high. Treatment of port-wine stain in patients with high skin pigmentation may therefore give overheating of the epidermis, resulting in epidermal necrosis. Melanosomal heating is dependent on the energy and duration of the laser pulse. The heating mechanism for time scales less than typically 1 microsecond(s) corresponds to a transient local heating of the individual melanosomes. For larger time scales, heat diffusion out of the melanosomes become of increased importance, and the temperature distribution will reach a local steady state condition after typically 10 microsecond(s) . For even longer pulse duration, heat diffusing from neighboring melanosomes becomes important, and the temperature rise in a time scale from 100 - 500 microsecond(s) is dominated by this mechanism. The epidermal heating during the typical 450 microsecond(s) pulse used for therapy is thus dependent on the average epidermal melanin content rather than on the absorption coefficient of the individual melanosomes. This study will present in vivo measurements of the epidermal melanin absorption of human skin when exposed to short laser pulses (< 0.1 microsecond(s) ) from a Q-switched ruby laser and with long laser pulses (approximately 500 microsecond(s) ) from a free-running ruby laser or a long pulse length flashlamp pumped dye laser. The epidermal melanin

  13. Glucose test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... person with diabetes constantly manages their blood's sugar (glucose) levels. After a blood sample is taken and tested, it is determined whether the glucose levels are low or high. If glucose levels ...

  14. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low ... actions can also help prevent hypoglycemia: Check blood glucose levels Knowing your blood glucose level can help ...

  15. Glucose uptake saturation explains glucose kinetics profiles measured by different tests.

    PubMed

    Bizzotto, Roberto; Natali, Andrea; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Muscelli, Elza; Krssak, Martin; Brehm, Attila; Roden, Michael; Ferrannini, Ele; Mari, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    It is known that for a given insulin level glucose clearance depends on glucose concentration. However, a quantitative representation of the concomitant effects of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia on glucose clearance, necessary to describe heterogeneous tests such as euglycemic and hyperglycemic clamps and oral tests, is lacking. Data from five studies (123 subjects) using a glucose tracer and including all the above tests in normal and diabetic subjects were collected. A mathematical model was developed in which glucose utilization was represented as a Michaelis-Menten function of glucose with constant Km and insulin-controlled Vmax, consistently with the basic notions of glucose transport. Individual values for the model parameters were estimated using a population approach. Tracer data were accurately fitted in all tests. The estimated Km was 3.88 (2.83-5.32) mmol/l [median (interquartile range)]. Median model-derived glucose clearance at 600 pmol/l insulin was reduced from 246 to 158 ml·min(-1)·m(-2) when glucose was raised from 5 to 10 mmol/l. The model reproduced the characteristic lack of increase in glucose clearance when moderate hyperinsulinemia was accompanied by hyperglycemia. In all tests, insulin sensitivity was inversely correlated with BMI, as expected (R(2) = 0.234, P = 0.0001). In conclusion, glucose clearance in euglycemic and hyperglycemic clamps and oral tests can be described with a unifying model, consistent with the notions of glucose transport and able to reproduce the suppression of glucose clearance due to hyperglycemia observed in previous studies. The model may be important for the design of reliable glucose homeostasis simulators. PMID:27245333

  16. Penile Epidermal Cyst in a Patient With Augmentation Penoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Hung; Eom, Minseob; Arkoncel, Francis Raymond P.; Sung, Yun Hsien; Kim, Won; Byun, Hyun Keun; Joo, Jung Min; Kim, Kwang Jin

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old male patient who had undergone augmentation penoplasty 20 years previously presented with a slowly growing penoscrotal mass. The penile mass was excised totally and the pathologic diagnosis was an epidermal cyst. Epidermal cysts are benign disorders that can occur in any part of the body. However, an epidermal cyst as a late complication of augmentation penoplasty is extremely rare. We report this case of a penile epidermal cyst that developed after augmentation penoplasty. PMID:23524950

  17. [Verrucous epidermal nevus of the face].

    PubMed

    Larroque, G; Cantaloube, D; Ndiaye, B; Jouen, F; Combemale, P

    1991-01-01

    The authors report a case of extensive verrucous epidermal naevus of the face in a 15 year old Senegalese boy. This is the second reported case in Western Africa following the case presented to the French Language African Medical Society in 1984 (B. Ndiaye). The skin lesion in the form of a naevus of variable dimensions is an essential manifestation of the epidermal naevus syndrome described by Solomon, Fretzin and Dewald in 1968. This syndrome consists of a variable but inconstant association of dysembryoplastic abnormalities affecting the central nervous system (epilepsy, mental retardation, hydrocephalus, localized central deficits), the eye (fibrous conjunctival tumours, corneal opacities, colobomas) and the bones (spine, clavicle, pelvis, limb bones). The bones may be affected by malformations or hypoplasia. The epidermal naevus generally has a linear verrucous appearance, but it is not exceptional to find Jadassohn's sebaceous naevus or even localized erythroderma ichthyosiformis. Mucosal lesions, especially oral, well described in 1960 by Brown and Gorlin, correspond to a particular localization of epidermal naevus and must be differentiated histologically from white sponge naevus, which has a fairly similar clinical appearance. This non-hereditary disease must be systematically investigated looking for visceral abnormalities which are very common. Lastly, in terms of therapy, surgery may be justified when the facial lesions are unsightly, extensive or disabling. Various techniques may be applied depending on the extent and the site of these naevi. PMID:1718208

  18. Constitutive Autophagy and Nucleophagy during Epidermal Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Akinduro, Olufolake; Sully, Katherine; Patel, Ankit; Robinson, Deborah J; Chikh, Anissa; McPhail, Graham; Braun, Kristin M; Philpott, Michael P; Harwood, Catherine A; Byrne, Carolyn; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Bergamaschi, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes migrate through the epidermis up to the granular layer where, on terminal differentiation, they progressively lose organelles and convert into anucleate cells or corneocytes. Our report explores the role of autophagy in ensuring epidermal function providing the first comprehensive profile of autophagy marker expression in developing epidermis. We show that autophagy is constitutively active in the epidermal granular layer where by electron microscopy we identified double-membrane autophagosomes. We demonstrate that differentiating keratinocytes undergo a selective form of nucleophagy characterized by accumulation of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3/lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2/p62 positive autolysosomes. These perinuclear vesicles displayed positivity for histone interacting protein, heterochromatin protein 1α, and localize in proximity with Lamin A and B1 accumulation, whereas in newborn mice and adult human skin, we report LC3 puncta coincident with misshaped nuclei within the granular layer. This process relies on autophagy integrity as confirmed by lack of nucleophagy in differentiating keratinocytes depleted from WD repeat domain phosphoinositide interacting 1 or Unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1. Final validation into a skin disease model showed that impaired autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Lack of LC3 expression in psoriatic skin lesions correlates with parakeratosis and deregulated expression or location of most of the autophagic markers. Our findings may have implications and improve treatment options for patients with epidermal barrier defects. PMID:27021405

  19. Epidermal Basement Membrane in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Has, Cristina; Nyström, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Skin, as the organ protecting the individual from environmental aggressions, constantly meets external insults and is dependent on mechanical toughness for its preserved function. Accordingly, the epidermal basement membrane (BM) zone has adapted to enforce tissue integrity. It harbors anchoring structures created through unique organization of common BM components and expression of proteins exclusive to the epidermal BM zone. Evidence for the importance of its correct assembly and the nonredundancy of its components for skin integrity is apparent from the multiple skin blistering disorders caused by mutations in genes coding for proteins associated with the epidermal BM and from autoimmune disorders in which autoantibodies target these molecules. However, it has become clear that these proteins not only provide mechanical support but are also critically involved in tissue homeostasis, repair, and regeneration. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the unique organization and components of the epidermal BM. A special focus will be given to its function during regeneration, and in inherited and acquired diseases. PMID:26610913

  20. Development of atopic dermatitis-like skin disease from the chronic loss of epidermal caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Li, Christopher; Lasse, Samuel; Lee, Pedro; Nakasaki, Manando; Chen, Shih-Wei; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Gallo, Richard L; Jamora, Colin

    2010-12-21

    Atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease that affects approximately 20% of children worldwide. Left untreated, the barrier function of the skin is compromised, increasing susceptibility to dehydration and infection. Despite its prevalence, its multifactorial nature has complicated the unraveling of its etiology. We found that chronic loss of epidermal caspase-8 recapitulates many aspects of atopic dermatitis, including a spongiotic phenotype whereby intercellular adhesion between epidermal keratinocytes is disrupted, adversely affecting tissue architecture and function. Although spongiosis is generally thought to be secondary to edema, we found that suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity is sufficient to abrogate this defect. p38 MAPK induces matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression to cleave E-cadherin, which mediates keratinocyte cohesion in the epidermis. Thus, the conditional loss of caspase-8, which we previously found to mimic a wound response, can be used to gain insights into how these same wound-healing processes are commandeered in inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:21135236

  1. Blood Test: Glucose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Glucose Print A A A Text Size What's in ... de sangre: glucosa What It Is A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose (the main ...

  2. Role of Pin1 in UVA-induced cell proliferation and malignant transformation in epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Chang Yeob; Hien, Tran Thi; Lim, Sung Chul; Kang, Keon Wook

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Pin1 expression is enhanced by low energy UVA irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. {yields} UVA irradiation increases activator protein-1 activity and cyclin D1 in a Pin1-dependent manner. {yields} UVA potentiates EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth of epidermal cells, and this is suppressed by Pin1 inhibition or by anti-oxidant. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation ({lambda} = 320-400 nm) is considered a major cause of human skin cancer. Pin1, a peptidyl prolyl isomerase, is overexpressed in most types of cancer tissues and plays an important role in cell proliferation and transformation. Here, we demonstrated that Pin1 expression was enhanced by low energy UVA (300-900 mJ/cm{sup 2}) irradiation in both skin tissues of hairless mice and JB6 C141 epidermal cells. Exposure of epidermal cells to UVA radiation increased cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression, and these changes were blocked by Pin1 inhibition. UVA irradiation also increased activator protein-1 (AP-1) minimal reporter activity and nuclear levels of c-Jun, but not c-Fos, in a Pin1-dependent manner. The increases in Pin1 expression and in AP-1 reporter activity in response to UVA were abolished by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment. Finally, we found that pre-exposure of JB6 C141 cells to UVA potentiated EGF-inducible, anchorage-independent growth, and this effect was significantly suppressed by Pin1inhibition or by NAC.

  3. Skin Metabolite, Farnesyl Pyrophosphate, Regulates Epidermal Response to Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Migration.

    PubMed

    Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Sawaya, Andrew P; Stone, Rivka C; Lindley, Linsey E; Ojeh, Nkemcho; Vukelic, Sasa; Samuels, Herbert H; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-11-01

    Skin produces cholesterol and a wide array of sterols and non-sterol mevalonate metabolites, including isoprenoid derivative farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). To characterize FPP action in epidermis, we generated transcriptional profiles of primary human keratinocytes treated with zaragozic acid (ZGA), a squalene synthase inhibitor that blocks conversion of FPP to squalene resulting in endogenous accumulation of FPP. The elevated levels of intracellular FPP resulted in regulation of epidermal differentiation and adherens junction signaling, insulin growth factor (IGF) signaling, oxidative stress response and interferon (IFN) signaling. Immunosuppressive properties of FPP were evidenced by STAT-1 downregulation and prominent suppression of its nuclear translocation by IFNγ. Furthermore, FPP profoundly downregulated genes involved in epidermal differentiation of keratinocytes in vitro and in human skin ex vivo. Elevated levels of FPP resulted in induction of cytoprotective transcriptional factor Nrf2 and its target genes. We have previously shown that FPP functions as ligand for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), one of the major regulator of epidermal homeostasis. Comparative microarray analyses show significant but not complete overlap between FPP and glucocorticoid regulated genes, suggesting that FPP may have wider transcriptional impact. This was further supported by co-transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments where we show that upon binding to GR, FPP recruits β-catenin and, unlike glucocorticoids, recruits co-repressor GRIP1 to suppress keratin 6 gene. These findings have many clinical implications related to epidermal lipid metabolism, response to glucocorticoid therapy as well as pleiotropic effects of cholesterol lowering therapeutics, statins. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2452-2463, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26916741

  4. Ultraviolet-irradiated urocanic acid suppresses delayed-type hypersensitivity to herpes simplex virus in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.; Simpson, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is known to induce a transient defect in epidermal antigen presentation which leads to the generation of antigen-specific suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. The putative receptor in skin for the primary event in UV-suppression is urocanic acid (UCA) which may then interact locally, or systemically, with antigen presenting cells or initiate a cascade of events resulting in suppression. We present the first direct evidence that UCA, when irradiated with a dose (96 mJ/cm2) of UVB radiation known to suppress the DTH response to herpes simplex virus, type 1 (HSV-1) in mice, can induce suppression following epidermal application or s.c. injection of the irradiated substance. This suppression is transferable with nylon wool-passed spleen cells.

  5. Inner epidermis of onion bulb scale: As natural support for immobilization of glucose oxidase and its application in dissolved oxygen based biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; D'Souza, S F

    2009-02-15

    Inner epidermal membrane of the onion bulb scales was studied as a natural polymer support for immobilization of the glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme for biosensor application. Onion epidermal membrane was used for immobilization of glucose oxidase and was associated with dissolved oxygen (DO) probe for biosensor reading. Glucose was detected on the basis of depletion of oxygen, when immobilized GOD oxidizes glucose into gluconolactone. A wide detection range between 22.5 and 450 mg/dl was estimated from calibration plot. A single membrane was reused for 127 reactions with retention of approximately 90% of its initial enzyme activity. Membrane was stable for 45 days ( approximately 90% activity) when stored in buffer at 4 degrees C. Surface structure studies of the immobilized membranes were carried under SEM. To our knowledge, this is the first report on employing inner epidermal membrane of onion bulb scales as the solid support for immobilization of enzyme. PMID:18838267

  6. Saccharin and Cyclamate Inhibit Binding of Epidermal Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L. S.

    1981-02-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to 18 cell lines, including HeLa (human carcinoma), MDCK (dog kidney cells), HTC (rat hepatoma), K22 (rat liver), HF (human foreskin), GM17 (human skin fibroblasts), XP (human xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts), and 3T3-L1 (mouse fibroblasts), was inhibited by saccharin and cyclamate. The human cells were more sensitive to inhibition by these sweeteners than mouse or rat cells. EGF at doses far above the physiological levels reversed the inhibition in rodent cells but not in HeLa cells. In HeLa cells, the doses of saccharin and cyclamate needed for 50% inhibition were 3.5 and 9.3 mg/ml, respectively. Glucose, 2-deoxyglucose, sucrose, and xylitol did not inhibit EGF binding. Previous studies have shown that phorbol esters, strongly potent tumor promoters, also inhibit EGF binding to tissue culture cells. To explain the EGF binding inhibition by such greatly dissimilar molecules as phorbol esters, saccharin, and cyclamate, it is suggested that they operate through the activation of a hormone response control unit.

  7. Glucose utilization rates regulate intake levels of artificial sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Luis A; Ren, Xueying; Han, Wenfei; Medina, Sara; Ferreira, Jozélia G; Yeckel, Catherine W; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that animals including humans attribute greater reinforcing value to glucose-containing sugars compared to their non-caloric counterparts, generally termed ‘artificial sweeteners’. However, much remains to be determined regarding the physiological signals and brain systems mediating the attribution of greater reinforcing value to sweet solutions that contain glucose. Here we show that disruption of glucose utilization in mice produces an enduring inhibitory effect on artificial sweetener intake, an effect that did not depend on sweetness perception or aversion. Indeed, such an effect was not observed in mice presented with a less palatable, yet caloric, glucose solution. Consistently, hungry mice shifted their preferences away from artificial sweeteners and in favour of glucose after experiencing glucose in a hungry state. Glucose intake was found to produce significantly greater levels of dopamine efflux compared to artificial sweetener in dorsal striatum, whereas disrupting glucose oxidation suppressed dorsal striatum dopamine efflux. Conversely, inhibiting striatal dopamine receptor signalling during glucose intake in sweet-naïve animals resulted in reduced, artificial sweetener-like intake of glucose during subsequent gluco-deprivation. Our results demonstrate that glucose oxidation controls intake levels of sweet tastants by modulating extracellular dopamine levels in dorsal striatum, and suggest that glucose utilization is one critical physiological signal involved in the control of goal-directed sweetener intake. PMID:24060992

  8. Glucose utilization rates regulate intake levels of artificial sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Luis A; Ren, Xueying; Han, Wenfei; Medina, Sara; Ferreira, Jozélia G; Yeckel, Catherine W; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-11-15

    It is well established that animals including humans attribute greater reinforcing value to glucose-containing sugars compared to their non-caloric counterparts, generally termed 'artificial sweeteners'. However, much remains to be determined regarding the physiological signals and brain systems mediating the attribution of greater reinforcing value to sweet solutions that contain glucose. Here we show that disruption of glucose utilization in mice produces an enduring inhibitory effect on artificial sweetener intake, an effect that did not depend on sweetness perception or aversion. Indeed, such an effect was not observed in mice presented with a less palatable, yet caloric, glucose solution. Consistently, hungry mice shifted their preferences away from artificial sweeteners and in favour of glucose after experiencing glucose in a hungry state. Glucose intake was found to produce significantly greater levels of dopamine efflux compared to artificial sweetener in dorsal striatum, whereas disrupting glucose oxidation suppressed dorsal striatum dopamine efflux. Conversely, inhibiting striatal dopamine receptor signalling during glucose intake in sweet-naïve animals resulted in reduced, artificial sweetener-like intake of glucose during subsequent gluco-deprivation. Our results demonstrate that glucose oxidation controls intake levels of sweet tastants by modulating extracellular dopamine levels in dorsal striatum, and suggest that glucose utilization is one critical physiological signal involved in the control of goal-directed sweetener intake. PMID:24060992

  9. Synthetic Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing Multiple Telemeric TTAGGG Motifs Suppress Inflammasome Activity in Macrophages Subjected to Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation and Reduce Ischemic Brain Injury in Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bernstock, Joshua D.; Klimanis, Dace; Wang, Sixian; Spatz, Maria; Maric, Dragan; Johnson, Kory; Klinman, Dennis M.; Li, Xiaohong; Li, Xinhui; Hallenbeck, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a fundamental role in both the development and pathobiology of stroke. Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that have come to be recognized as critical players in the inflammation that ultimately contributes to stroke severity. Inflammasomes recognize microbial and host-derived danger signals and activate caspase-1, which in turn controls the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. We have shown that A151, a synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide containing multiple telemeric TTAGGG motifs, reduces IL-1β production by activated bone marrow derived macrophages that have been subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation and LPS stimulation. Further, we demonstrate that A151 reduces the maturation of caspase-1 and IL-1β, the levels of both the iNOS and NLRP3 proteins, and the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential within such cells. In addition, we have demonstrated that A151 reduces ischemic brain damage and NLRP3 mRNA levels in SHR-SP rats that have undergone permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. These findings clearly suggest that the modulation of inflammasome activity via A151 may contribute to a reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages subjected to conditions that model brain ischemia and modulate ischemic brain damage in an animal model of stroke. Therefore, modulation of ischemic pathobiology by A151 may have a role in the development of novel stroke prevention and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26473731

  10. Synthetic Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing Multiple Telemeric TTAGGG Motifs Suppress Inflammasome Activity in Macrophages Subjected to Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation and Reduce Ischemic Brain Injury in Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Mou, Yongshan; Bernstock, Joshua D; Klimanis, Dace; Wang, Sixian; Spatz, Maria; Maric, Dragan; Johnson, Kory; Klinman, Dennis M; Li, Xiaohong; Li, Xinhui; Hallenbeck, John M

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a fundamental role in both the development and pathobiology of stroke. Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that have come to be recognized as critical players in the inflammation that ultimately contributes to stroke severity. Inflammasomes recognize microbial and host-derived danger signals and activate caspase-1, which in turn controls the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. We have shown that A151, a synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide containing multiple telemeric TTAGGG motifs, reduces IL-1β production by activated bone marrow derived macrophages that have been subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation and LPS stimulation. Further, we demonstrate that A151 reduces the maturation of caspase-1 and IL-1β, the levels of both the iNOS and NLRP3 proteins, and the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential within such cells. In addition, we have demonstrated that A151 reduces ischemic brain damage and NLRP3 mRNA levels in SHR-SP rats that have undergone permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. These findings clearly suggest that the modulation of inflammasome activity via A151 may contribute to a reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages subjected to conditions that model brain ischemia and modulate ischemic brain damage in an animal model of stroke. Therefore, modulation of ischemic pathobiology by A151 may have a role in the development of novel stroke prevention and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26473731

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng; Fang, Rejun

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  13. Endogenous glucose production and glucose effectiveness in type 2 diabetic subjects derived from stable-labeled minimal model approach.

    PubMed

    Nagasaka, S; Tokuyama, K; Kusaka, I; Hayashi, H; Rokkaku, K; Nakamura, T; Kawakami, A; Higashiyama, M; Ishikawa, S; Saito, T

    1999-05-01

    Insulin sensitivity, glucose effectiveness, and endogenous glucose production (EGP) during stable-labeled, frequently sampled insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT) were evaluated by a single-and two-compartment minimal model combined with nonparametric deconvolution in eleven nonobese Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Four patients were treated with sulfonylureas, and the remaining seven with diet therapy alone. None had diabetic retinopathy and microalbuminuria. Their fasting glucose level was 117+/-7 mg/dl (mean +/- SE), and HbA1c was 6.6+/-0.3%. Age-, sex-, and BMI-matched subjects with normal glucose tolerance served as control subjects. Plasma insulin response to the stimuli and insulin sensitivity indexes (S(I), S(I)*, and S(I)2* were derived from a minimal model and single- and two-compartment-labeled minimal models) were impaired in the type 2 diabetic patients. The combined ability of glucose, per se, to increase its own uptake and suppress EGP (glucose effectiveness [SG]), which was derived from kinetic analysis of plasma glucose by a minimal model, was significantly lower in the type 2 diabetic patients (0.0132+/-0.0015 vs. 0.0203+/-0.0022; P<0.05). However, the ability of glucose, per se, to stimulate glucose uptake, assessed as S(G)* and S(G)2* from the kinetic analysis of labeled glucose by single- and two-compartment minimal model, was not impaired in those patients. EGP of the type 2 diabetic patients as a whole was suppressed to the level similar to that of the control subjects despite a higher plasma glucose level throughout FSIGT. When EGP in the diabetic subjects was analyzed, considering their recent glycemic control, the initial suppression was blunted in the patients with higher HbA1c levels. In conclusion, glucose mass action to stimulate glucose uptake remains near-normal in the lean Japanese type 2 diabetic patients of this study, whereas ability of glucose to suppress EGP is impaired in the patients with recent

  14. Neurological involvement in the epidermal naevus syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, D L; Isenberg, D A; Gooddy, W

    1978-01-01

    The case of a left handed girl aged 18 years suffering from the "epidermal maevus syndrome" is described. She presented with dysphasia, transient left hemiparesis, and sensory symptoms due to an occlusion of the right internal carotid artery. Arterial occlusion, abnormal retinal vessels, and Raynaud's phenomenon have not been previously documented. The neurological complications of this syndrome are discussed. It is suggested that the arterial occlusion may have been caused by a dysplastic artery. Images PMID:660212

  15. Conditional epidermal expression of TGFβ1 blocks neonatal lethality but causes a reversible hyperplasia and alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Alexander, Valarie; Vijayachandra, Kinnimulki; Bhogte, Ervind; Diamond, Ilysa; Glick, Adam

    2001-01-01

    To study the role of transforming growth factor type β1 (TGFβ1) in epidermal growth control and disease, we have generated a conditional expression system by using the bovine keratin 5 promoter to drive expression of the tetracycline-regulated transactivators tTA and rTA, and a constitutively active mutant of TGFβ1 linked to the tetO target sequence for the transactivator. This model allows for induction or suppression of exogenous TGFβ1 with oral doxycycline. Maximal expression of TGFβ1 during gestation caused embryonic lethality, whereas partial suppression allowed full-term development with neonatal lethality characterized by runting, epidermal hypoproliferation, and blocked hair follicle growth. With complete suppression, phenotypically normal double transgenic (DT) mice were born. Acute induction of TGFβ1 in the epidermis of adult mice inhibited basal and follicular keratinocyte proliferation and reentry of telogen hair follicles into anagen. However, chronic expression of TGFβ1 in adult DTs caused severe alopecia characterized by epidermal and follicular hyperproliferation, apoptosis, as well as dermal fibrosis and inflammation. Readministration of doxycycline to tTA DT mice caused hair regrowth within 14 days. The mRNA and protein for Smad7, an inhibitor of TGFβ signaling, were up-regulated in the epidermis and hair follicles of alopecic skin and rapidly induced in rTA mice in parallel with the TGFβ1 transgene, suggesting that the hyperproliferative phenotype may result in part from development of a sustained negative feedback loop. Thus, this conditional expression system provides an important model for understanding the role of TGFβ1 during development, in normal skin biology, and in disease. PMID:11481479

  16. Epidermal RAF prevents allergic skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Raguz, Josipa; Jeric, Ines; Niault, Theodora; Nowacka, Joanna Daniela; Kuzet, Sanya Eduarda; Rupp, Christian; Fischer, Irmgard; Biggi, Silvia; Borsello, Tiziana; Baccarini, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The RAS pathway is central to epidermal homeostasis, and its activation in tumors or in Rasopathies correlates with hyperproliferation. Downstream of RAS, RAF kinases are actionable targets regulating keratinocyte turnover; however, chemical RAF inhibitors paradoxically activate the pathway, promoting epidermal proliferation. We generated mice with compound epidermis-restricted BRAF/RAF1 ablation. In these animals, transient barrier defects and production of chemokines and Th2-type cytokines by keratinocytes cause a disease akin to human atopic dermatitis, characterized by IgE responses and local and systemic inflammation. Mechanistically, BRAF and RAF1 operate independently to balance MAPK signaling: BRAF promotes ERK activation, while RAF1 dims stress kinase activation. In vivo, JNK inhibition prevents disease onset, while MEK/ERK inhibition in mice lacking epidermal RAF1 phenocopies it. These results support a primary role of keratinocytes in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, and the animals lacking BRAF and RAF1 in the epidermis represent a useful model for this disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14012.001 PMID:27431613

  17. Prebiotic Fiber Increases Hepatic Acetyl CoA Carboxylase Phosphorylation and Suppresses Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Secretion More Effectively When Used with Metformin in Obese Rats1,2

    PubMed Central

    Pyra, Kim A.; Saha, Dolan C.; Reimer, Raylene A.

    2013-01-01

    Independently, metformin (MET) and the prebiotic, oligofructose (OFS), have been shown to increase glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) secretion. Our objective was to determine whether using OFS as an adjunct with MET augments GLP-1 secretion in obese rats. Male, diet-induced obese Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to: 1) high-fat/-sucrose diet [HFHS; control (C); 20% fat, 50% sucrose wt:wt]; 2) HFHS+10% OFS (OFS); 3) HFHS + MET [300 mg/kg/d (MET)]; 4) HFHS+10% OFS+MET (OFS +MET). Body composition, glycemia, satiety hormones, and mechanisms related to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) activity in plasma, hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK; Western blots), and gut microbiota (qPCR) were examined. Direct effects of MET and SCFA were examined in human enteroendocrine cells. The interaction between OFS and MET affected fat mass, hepatic TG, secretion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and leptin, and AMPKα2 mRNA and phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase (pACC) levels (P < 0.05). Combined, OFS and MET reduced GIP secretion to a greater extent than either treatment alone (P < 0.05). The hepatic pACC level was increased by OFS+MET by at least 50% above all other treatments, which did not differ from each other (P < 0.05). OFS decreased plasma DPP4 activity (P < 0.001). Cecal Bifidobacteria (P < 0.001) were markedly increased and C. leptum decreased (P < 0.001) with OFS consumption. In human enteroendocrine cells, the interaction between MET and SCFA affected GLP-1 secretion (P < 0.04) but was not associated with higher GLP-1 than the highest individual doses. In conclusion, the combined actions of OFS and MET were associated with important interaction effects that have the potential to improve metabolic outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:22223580

  18. Effects of Telomerase and Telomere Length on Epidermal Stem Cell Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Ignacio; Cayuela, María L.; Blasco, María A.

    2005-08-01

    A key process in organ homeostasis is the mobilization of stem cells out of their niches. We show through analysis of mouse models that telomere length, as well as the catalytic component of telomerase, Tert, are critical determinants in the mobilization of epidermal stem cells. Telomere shortening inhibited mobilization of stem cells out of their niche, impaired hair growth, and resulted in suppression of stem cell proliferative capacity in vitro. In contrast, Tert overexpression in the absence of changes in telomere length promoted stem cell mobilization, hair growth, and stem cell proliferation in vitro. The effects of telomeres and telomerase on stem cell biology anticipate their role in cancer and aging.

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  20. Your Glucose Meter

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Your Glucose Meter Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Español Basic Facts 7 Tips for Testing Your Blood Sugar and Caring for Your Meter Glucose meters test ...

  1. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... catalog. Additional Links ​ Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin Children and Diabetes Glucose Meters Juvenile Diabetes (Teens and Diabetes ) Know Your Blood Glucose Numbers Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 Contact Us Health Information Center ...

  2. On the possibility of noninvasive polarimetric determination of glucose content in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravdin, A. B.; Spivak, V. A.; Yakovlev, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Based on real structure and optical properties of the dermis, we analyzed the possibility of polarimetric measurement of glucose content in the skin. It was shown that, at physiological concentrations of glucose in the interstitial fluid, the optical activity of glucose is not manifested in the polarization and optical properties of the tissue, since the optical activity of glucose is almost completely suppressed by the linear birefringence of the dermis.

  3. TLR2/NFκB signalling regulates endogenous IL-6 release from marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells to suppress the apoptosis of PC12 cells injured by oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xia; Liu, Jingjing; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Yun; Li, Tingyu; Chen, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Two previous studies published by our group identified that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) conferred neuroprotection in a rat model of hypoxic-ischaemic brain damage (HIBD), and that MSCs secreted abundant interleukin-6 (IL‑6) when co‑cultured with oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)‑injured PC12 cells. The present study has further investigated the role of IL‑6, and explored potential signalling pathways in vitro. In vitro models were established by co‑culturing OGD‑injured PC12 cells with MSCs. Subsequently, the expression levels of the signalling molecules, Toll‑like receptor 2 (TLR2)/nuclear factor κB (NFκB), and IL‑6 were altered separately in this in vitro model by treatment with an agonist, antagonist, siRNA or overexpression adenovirus. The expression levels of B cell lymphoma‑associated X (Bax), TLR2, NFκB and IL‑6 were detected by western blot analysis, real‑time polymerase chain reaction or ELISA. The resting membrane potential (RMP) of the PC12 cells was analysed by whole‑cell patch‑clamp recordings. Compared with controls or the PC12 co‑culture group, the MSC co‑cultured group induced less expression of Bax, but more IL‑6 secretion. Up- or down-regulation of the TLR2/NFκB signalling pathway resulted in a corresponding increase or decrease in the IL‑6 expression level in the MSCs. Co‑culture with siIL‑6‑MSCs increased the expression levels of Bax and increased the RMP in the OGD PC12 cells. In conclusion, the release of IL‑6 from MSCs was regulated via the TLR2/NFκB signalling pathway. Endogenous IL‑6 reduced apoptosis and protected OGD‑injured PC12 cells when they were co‑cultured with MSCs. The present study has reported a novel immunomodulatory effect of the microenvironment of neural damage during MSC cytotherapy. PMID:27108485

  4. CSF glucose test

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose test - CSF; Cerebrospinal fluid glucose test ... The glucose level in the CSF should be 50 to 80 mg/100 mL (or greater than 2/3 of the blood sugar level). Note: Normal value ranges may vary slightly ...

  5. Late Onset Epidermal Nevus with Hypertrichosis and Facial Hemihypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Saritha, M; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Ramesh, A; Basu, Debdatta

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal nevus syndromes are rare conditions, characterized by different types of keratinocytic or organoid epidermal nevi in association with ocular, neurological, and skeletal manifestations. We present a case of late onset epidermal nevus with hypertrichosis and hemihypertrophy of face. Genetic analysis did not reveal presence of FGFR3 or PIK3CA mutations. The patient has features that cannot be categorized into the present well-known syndromes. PMID:24700959

  6. [Biology of epidermal stem cells: impact on medicine].

    PubMed

    Pikuła, Michał; Trzonkowski, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    The epidermis is a self-renewing tissue which regenerates constantly. It consists mainly of keratinocytes of various degree of differentiation, from the proliferative basal layer to the terminally differentiated horny layer. Keratinocytes are specialized cells responsible for cohesion, barrier functions, and immunological reactions. The maintenance of homeostasis in the epidermis is possible via the self-renewing ability of the epidermal stem-cell population, which gives rise to differentiated keratinocytes. It is believed that epidermal stem cells play an important role in cellular regeneration, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of skin cancers. Epidermal stem cells reside in the basal layer of the epidermis, the bulge region of the hair follicle, and the germinal hair follicle matrix. Epidermal stem cells are relatively quiescent, slow-cycling cells defined by their great proliferative potential and unlimited capacity for self-renewal. Adult human epidermal stem cells can be activated and expanded in vitro under appropriate conditions. Cultured human keratinocytes and epidermal stem cells may be then transplanted as a biological dressing in burn injuries, chronic wounds, and various skin diseases. Additionally, epidermal stem cells have become a target for gene therapy and drug testing. In this review the fundamental characteristics of epidermal stem cells and the signaling pathways involved in the regulation of their proliferation and differentiation are discussed. The possibilities of using epidermal stem cells in medicine are also presented. PMID:19837987

  7. Okara ameliorates glucose tolerance in GK rats

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Masaya; Katsukawa, Michiko; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Hitomi; Okuno, Sonomi; Tsuda, Kinsuke; Iritani, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    Okara, a food by-product from the production of tofu and soy milk, is rich in three beneficial components: insoluble dietary fiber, β-conglycinin, and isoflavones. Although isoflavones and β-conglycinin have recently been shown to improve glucose tolerance, the effects of okara have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, we herein investigated the effects of okara on glucose tolerance in Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a representative animal model of Japanese type 2 diabetes. Male GK rats were fed a 10% lard diet with or without 5% dry okara powder for 2 weeks and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Rats were then fed each diet for another week and sacrificed. The expression of genes that are the master regulators of glucose metabolism in adipose tissue was subsequently examined. No significant differences were observed in body weight gain or food intake between the two groups of GK rats. In the oral glucose tolerance test, increases in plasma glucose levels were suppressed by the okara diet. The mRNA expression levels of PPARγ, adiponectin, and GLUT4, which up-regulate the effects of insulin, were increased in epididymal adipose tissue by the okara diet. These results suggest that okara provides a useful means for treating type 2 diabetes. PMID:27257347

  8. Okara ameliorates glucose tolerance in GK rats.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Masaya; Katsukawa, Michiko; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Hitomi; Okuno, Sonomi; Tsuda, Kinsuke; Iritani, Nobuko

    2016-05-01

    Okara, a food by-product from the production of tofu and soy milk, is rich in three beneficial components: insoluble dietary fiber, β-conglycinin, and isoflavones. Although isoflavones and β-conglycinin have recently been shown to improve glucose tolerance, the effects of okara have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, we herein investigated the effects of okara on glucose tolerance in Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, a representative animal model of Japanese type 2 diabetes. Male GK rats were fed a 10% lard diet with or without 5% dry okara powder for 2 weeks and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Rats were then fed each diet for another week and sacrificed. The expression of genes that are the master regulators of glucose metabolism in adipose tissue was subsequently examined. No significant differences were observed in body weight gain or food intake between the two groups of GK rats. In the oral glucose tolerance test, increases in plasma glucose levels were suppressed by the okara diet. The mRNA expression levels of PPARγ, adiponectin, and GLUT4, which up-regulate the effects of insulin, were increased in epididymal adipose tissue by the okara diet. These results suggest that okara provides a useful means for treating type 2 diabetes. PMID:27257347

  9. [Bilateral segmental neurofibromatosis simulating epidermal nevus].

    PubMed

    Gambichler, T; Küster, W; Wolter, M; Rapp, S; Altmeyer, P; Hoffmann, K

    2000-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis is a neuroectodermal systemic disease. A rare variant of this condition is bilateral segmental neurofibromatosis. A 29-year-old man presented with bilateral papillomatous plaques in the lumbar dermatomes. Clinically, the lesions were very similar to an epidermal nevus but histologic examination revealed superficial neurofibromas. Family history, ophthalmologic and neurologic investigations were unremarkable. The unusual morphologic presentation of bilateral segmental neurofibromas in this case points to the wide clinical spectrum of the disease and the significance of histologic examination in systematic nevoid lesions. PMID:11116852

  10. [Glucose Metabolism: Stress Hyperglycemia and Glucose Control].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-05-01

    It is important for the anesthesiologists to understand pathophysiology of perioperative stress hyperglycemia, because it offers strategies for treatment of stress hyperglycemia. The effect of glucose tolerance is different in the choice of the anesthetic agent used in daily clinical setting. Specifically, the volatile anesthetics inhibit insulin secretion after glucose load and affects glucose tolerance. During minor surgery by the remifentanil anesthesia, the stress reaction is hard to be induced, suggesting that we should consider low-dose glucose load. Finally it is necessary to perform the glycemic control of the patients who fell into stress hyperglycemia depending on the individual patient. However, there are a lot of questions to be answered in the future. The prognosis of the perioperative patients is more likely to be greatly improved if we can control stress hyperglycemia. PMID:27319094

  11. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  12. Protective role of p53 in skin cancer: Carcinogenesis studies in mice lacking epidermal p53.

    PubMed

    Page, Angustias; Navarro, Manuel; Suarez-Cabrera, Cristian; Alameda, Josefa P; Casanova, M Llanos; Paramio, Jesús M; Bravo, Ana; Ramirez, Angel

    2016-04-12

    p53 is a protein that causes cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence, being crucial in the process of tumor suppression in several cell types. Different in vitro and animal models have been designed for the study of p53 role in skin cancer. These models have revealed opposing results, as in some experimental settings it appears that p53 protects against skin cancer, but in others, the opposite conclusion emerges. We have generated cohorts of mice with efficient p53 deletion restricted to stratified epithelia and control littermates expressing wild type p53 and studied their sensitivity to both chemically-induced and spontaneous tumoral transformation, as well as the tumor types originated in each experimental group. Our results indicate that the absence of p53 in stratified epithelia leads to the appearance, in two-stage skin carcinogenesis experiments, of a higher number of tumors that grow faster and become malignant more frequently than tumors arisen in mice with wild type p53 genotype. In addition, the histological diversity of the tumor type is greater in mice with epidermal p53 loss, indicating the tumor suppressive role of p53 in different epidermal cell types. Aging mice with p53 inactivation in stratified epithelia developed spontaneous carcinomas in skin and other epithelia. Overall, these results highlight the truly protective nature of p53 functions in the development of cancer in skin and in other stratified epithelia. PMID:26959115

  13. Protective role of p53 in skin cancer: Carcinogenesis studies in mice lacking epidermal p53

    PubMed Central

    Page, Angustias; Navarro, Manuel; Suarez-Cabrera, Cristian; Alameda, Josefa P.; Casanova, M. Llanos; Paramio, Jesús M.; Bravo, Ana; Ramirez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    p53 is a protein that causes cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence, being crucial in the process of tumor suppression in several cell types. Different in vitro and animal models have been designed for the study of p53 role in skin cancer. These models have revealed opposing results, as in some experimental settings it appears that p53 protects against skin cancer, but in others, the opposite conclusion emerges. We have generated cohorts of mice with efficient p53 deletion restricted to stratified epithelia and control littermates expressing wild type p53 and studied their sensitivity to both chemically-induced and spontaneous tumoral transformation, as well as the tumor types originated in each experimental group. Our results indicate that the absence of p53 in stratified epithelia leads to the appearance, in two-stage skin carcinogenesis experiments, of a higher number of tumors that grow faster and become malignant more frequently than tumors arisen in mice with wild type p53 genotype. In addition, the histological diversity of the tumor type is greater in mice with epidermal p53 loss, indicating the tumor suppressive role of p53 in different epidermal cell types. Aging mice with p53 inactivation in stratified epithelia developed spontaneous carcinomas in skin and other epithelia. Overall, these results highlight the truly protective nature of p53 functions in the development of cancer in skin and in other stratified epithelia. PMID:26959115

  14. Photocrosslinkable Gelatin Hydrogel for Epidermal Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Lang, Qi; Yildirimer, Lara; Lin, Zhi Yuan; Cui, Wenguo; Annabi, Nasim; Ng, Kee Woei; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Natural hydrogels are promising scaffolds to engineer epidermis. Currently, natural hydrogels used to support epidermal regeneration are mainly collagen- or gelatin-based, which mimic the natural dermal extracellular matrix but often suffer from insufficient and uncontrollable mechanical and degradation properties. In this study, a photocrosslinkable gelatin (i.e., gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA)) with tunable mechanical, degradation, and biological properties is used to engineer the epidermis for skin tissue engineering applications. The results reveal that the mechanical and degradation properties of the developed hydrogels can be readily modified by varying the hydrogel concentration, with elastic and compressive moduli tuned from a few kPa to a few hundred kPa, and the degradation times varied from a few days to several months. Additionally, hydrogels of all concentrations displayed excellent cell viability (>90%) with increasing cell adhesion and proliferation corresponding to increases in hydrogel concentrations. Furthermore, the hydrogels are found to support keratinocyte growth, differentiation, and stratification into a reconstructed multilayered epidermis with adequate barrier functions. The robust and tunable properties of GelMA hydrogels suggest that the keratinocyte laden hydrogels can be used as epidermal substitutes, wound dressings, or substrates to construct various in vitro skin models. PMID:25880725

  15. Hyperosmolarity in the small intestine contributes to postprandial ghrelin suppression

    PubMed Central

    Overduin, Joost; Tylee, Tracy S.; Frayo, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Plasma levels of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin are suppressed by meals with an efficacy dependent on their macronutrient composition. We hypothesized that heterogeneity in osmolarity among macronutrient classes contributes to these differences. In three studies, the impact of small intestinal hyperosmolarity was examined in Sprague-Dawley rats. In study 1, isotonic, 2.5×, and 5× hypertonic solutions of several agents with diverse absorption and metabolism properties were infused duodenally at a physiological rate (3 ml/10 min). Jugular vein blood was sampled before and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, and 300 min after infusion. Plasma ghrelin was suppressed dose dependently and most strongly by glucose. Hyperosmolar infusions of lactulose, which transits the small intestine unabsorbed, and 3-O-methylglucose (3-O-MG), which is absorbed like glucose but remains unmetabolized, also suppressed ghrelin. Glucose, but not lactulose or 3-O-MG, infusions increased plasma insulin. In study 2, intestinal infusions of hyperosmolar NaCl suppressed ghrelin, a response that was not attenuated by coinfusion with the neural blocker lidocaine. In study 3, we reconfirmed that the low-osmolar lipid emulsion Intralipid suppresses ghrelin more weakly than isocaloric (but hypertonic) glucose. Importantly, raising Intralipid's osmolarity to that of the glucose solution by nonabsorbable lactulose supplementation enhanced ghrelin suppression to that seen after glucose. Hyperosmolar ghrelin occurred particularly during the initial 3 postinfusion hours. We conclude that small intestinal hyperosmolarity 1) is sufficient to suppress ghrelin, 2) may combine with other postprandial mechanisms to suppress ghrelin, 3) might contribute to altered ghrelin regulation after gastric bypass surgery, and 4) may inform dietary modifications for metabolic health. PMID:24789208

  16. Assessment of cryotherapy for the treatment of verrucous epidermal naevi.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulos, Antonios; Chasapi, Vasiliki; Nikolaou, Vasiliki; Stavropoulos, Panagiotis G; Kafouros, Kyriockos; Petridis, Athanasios; Katsambas, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal naevi are hamartomas that are characterized by hyperplasia of the epidermis and adnexal structures and may be associated with serious disfiguration. Management of epidermal naevi is challenging. We present here our experience with cryosurgery in the treatment of verrucous epidermal naevi. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of cryosurgery for the treatment of epidermal naevi. Nine patients with verrucous epidermal naevi and two with extensive unilateral epidermal naevus were treated with cryosurgery. Two cycles of open spray technique were used, 10-15 sec each, depending on the size and extent of the naevus. Ten patients had their naevi treated successfully in 2-5 sessions with two cycles of therapy, and the cosmetic result was excellent with no scarring. One patient showed a relapse within 8 months after the treatment. One patient with phototype IV developed hypochromic scarring, but repigmentation occurred after 6 months. Postoperative healing time was 10-20 days. Cryosurgery is an extremely effective therapeutic modality for the treatment of epidermal naevi. The low cost, the simplicity of the technique and the good cosmetic result makes cryosurgery an excellent therapeutic modality for the treatment of epidermal naevus. PMID:19479129

  17. Carbon Dioxide Metabolism in Leaf Epidermal Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Willmer, C. M.; Pallas, J. E.; Black, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    A number of plant species were surveyed to obtain pure leaf epidermal tissue in quantity. Commelina communis L. and Tulipa gesnariana L. (tulip) were chosen for further work. Chlorophyll a/b ratios of epidermal tissues were 2.41 and 2.45 for C. communis and tulip, respectively. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase, malic enzyme, and NAD+ and NADP+ malate dehydrogenases were assayed with epidermal tissue and leaf tissue minus epidermal tissue. In both species, there was less ribulose 1,5-diphosphate than phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity in epidermal tissue whether expressed on a protein or chlorophyll basis whereas the reverse was true for leaf tissue minus epidermal tissue. In both species, malic enzyme activities were higher in epidermal tissue than in the remaining leaf tissue when expressed on a protein or chlorophyll basis. In both species, NAD+ and NADP+ malate dehydrogenase activities were higher in the epidermal tissue when expressed on a chlorophyll basis; however, on a protein basis, the converse was true. Microautoradiography of C. communis epidermis and histochemical tests for keto acids suggested that CO2 fixation occurred predominantly in the guard cells. The significance and possible location of the enzymes are discussed in relation to guard cell metabolism. Images PMID:16658581

  18. [Verrucose epidermal nevus with belated grow and pregnancy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Aguilera Martínez, Verónica; Cervantes Villarreal, Gustavo Enrique; Ramos Garibay, Alberto; Ruiz Mondragón, María Eugenia

    2007-10-01

    Verrucose epidermal nevus is a benign and congenital hyperplasia of the superficial epidermis and annexes. It expresses itself during the firs year of life, grows during childhood and in adolescence reaches its largest size. It can appear everywhere in skin surface. We present a case of late verrucose epidermal nevus with genital onset. Differential diagnosis was done with acuminated condylomas. PMID:18800583

  19. Mediation of glucose-induced anorexia by central nervous system interleukin 1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tooru M; Lew, Pei San; Spirkina, Alexandra; Xu, Yang

    2013-11-01

    Hypothalamic glucose sensing plays a critical role in the regulation of food intake and metabolism. Glucose injection, either centrally or peripherally suppresses food intake. However, the mechanism of glucose-induced feeding suppression is not fully understood. It has been demonstrated that hypothalamic interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) mRNA levels are altered by metabolic states and IL-1 signaling participates in the regulation of food intake. Therefore, we hypothesized that hypothalamic IL-1 gene expression is regulated by glucose and glucose-induced feeding suppression is mediated via hypothalamic IL-1 signaling. To address this hypothesis, we examined the effect of glucose on IL-1α and IL-1β mRNA expression in the hypothalamus. We also examined the effect of intraperitoneal injection of glucose on food intake in wild-type and type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RI)-deficient mice. Levels of IL-1α and IL-1β mRNA in the hypothalamus were increased in response to feeding and intraperitoneal injection of glucose, and were positively correlated with blood glucose levels in mice. Exposure of hypothalamic explants to high glucose (10 mM) media increased IL-1α and IL-1β mRNA levels compared to low glucose (1 mM) media. Intraperitoneal glucose administration reduced food intake in wild-type mice, while the feeding-suppressing effect of glucose was attenuated in IL-1RI-deficient mice. These findings support the role for hypothalamic IL-1 signaling in the mediation of the anorectic effect of glucose. PMID:24013028

  20. Gluconeogenesis is not acutely regulated by either plasma glucose or plasma insulin concentration in parenterally fed ELBW infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parenterally fed ELBW infants often exhibit erratic regulation of plasma glucose levels in response to changes in glucose infusion rate. This apparent dysregulation could be the result of an inappropriate insulin secretory response, incomplete suppression of glucose production, or an inadequate chan...

  1. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:25961580

  2. FOXN3 Regulates Hepatic Glucose Utilization.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Santhosh; Zinkhan, Erin K; Hill, Jonathon T; Yost, H Joseph; Schlegel, Amnon

    2016-06-21

    A SNP (rs8004664) in the first intron of the FOXN3 gene is associated with human fasting blood glucose. We find that carriers of the risk allele have higher hepatic expression of the transcriptional repressor FOXN3. Rat Foxn3 protein and zebrafish foxn3 transcripts are downregulated during fasting, a process recapitulated in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. Transgenic overexpression of zebrafish foxn3 or human FOXN3 increases zebrafish hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression, whole-larval free glucose, and adult fasting blood glucose and also decreases expression of glycolytic genes. Hepatic FOXN3 overexpression suppresses expression of mycb, whose ortholog MYC is known to directly stimulate expression of glucose-utilization enzymes. Carriers of the rs8004664 risk allele have decreased MYC transcript abundance. Human FOXN3 binds DNA sequences in the human MYC and zebrafish mycb loci. We conclude that the rs8004664 risk allele drives excessive expression of FOXN3 during fasting and that FOXN3 regulates fasting blood glucose. PMID:27292639

  3. FOXN3 regulates hepatic glucose utilization

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Santhosh; Zinkhan, Erin K.; Hill, Jonathon T.; Yost, H. Joseph; Schlegel, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY A SNP (rs8004664) in the first intron of the FOXN3 gene is associated with human fasting blood glucose. We find that carriers of the risk allele have higher hepatic expression of the transcriptional repressor FOXN3. Rat Foxn3 protein and zebrafish foxn3 transcripts are downregulated during fasting, a process recapitulated in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. Transgenic overexpression of zebrafish foxn3 or human FOXN3 increases zebrafish hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression, whole-larval free glucose, and adult fasting blood glucose, and also decreases expression of glycolytic genes. Hepatic FOXN3 overexpression suppresses expression of mycb, whose ortholog MYC is known to directly stimulate expression of glucose-utilization enzymes. Carriers of the rs8004664 risk allele have decreased MYC transcript abundance. Human FOXN3 binds DNA sequences in the human FOXN3 and zebrafish mycb loci. We conclude that the rs8004664 risk allele drives excessive expression of FOXN3 during fasting and that FOXN3 regulates fasting blood glucose. PMID:27292639

  4. Suppressors Reveal Two Classes of Glucose Repression Genes in the Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, J. R.; Johnston, M.

    1994-01-01

    We selected and analyzed extragenic suppressors of mutations in four genes-GRR1, REG1, GAL82 and GAL83-required for glucose repression of the GAL genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The suppressors restore normal or nearly normal glucose repression of GAL1 expression in these glucose repression mutants. Tests of the ability of each suppressor to cross-suppress mutations in the other glucose repression genes revealed two groups of mutually cross-suppressed genes: (1) REG1, GAL82 and GAL83 and (2) GRR1. Mutations of a single gene, SRG1, were found as suppressors of reg1, GAL83-2000 and GAL82-1, suggesting that these three gene products act at a similar point in the glucose repression pathway. Mutations in SRG1 do not cross-suppress grr1 or hxk2 mutations. Conversely, suppressors of grr1 (rgt1) do not cross-suppress any other glucose repression mutation tested. These results, together with what was previously known about these genes, lead us to propose a model for glucose repression in which Grr1p acts early in the glucose repression pathway, perhaps affecting the generation of the signal for glucose repression. We suggest that Reg1p, Gal82p and Gal83p act after the step(s) executed by Grr1p, possibly transmitting the signal for repression to the Snf1p protein kinase. PMID:8013904

  5. Acantholytic dyskeratosis occurring within an epidermal nevus.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Shilpi; Tarbox, Michelle; Tuthill, Ralph J; Vidimos, Allison

    2013-08-01

    A 25-year-old woman presented with a large area of flesh-colored verrucous plaques following the lines of Blaschko on the left side of the body that had been present since 6 months of age. The plaques had been stable and grew proportionately with the patient's body until she reached 20 years of age when they began to thicken and enlarge. Her medical and family history was unremarkable. A shave biopsy revealed a papillomatous epidermis with 3 discrete foci of acantholytic dyskeratosis, with corps ronds and grains that were similar to the histologic findings of Darier disease (DD). Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis was not identified. Our patient's lack of a family history of DD, early-onset disease, and linear presentation along the lines of Blaschko all favored a diagnosis of acantholytic dyskeratotic epidermal nevi (ADEN) versus localized DD. PMID:24087780

  6. Update on the epidermal differentiation complex.

    PubMed

    Henry, Julie; Toulza, Eve; Hsu, Chiung-Yueh; Pellerin, Laurence; Balica, Stefana; Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Paul, Carle; Serre, Guy; Jonca, Nathalie; Simon, Michel

    2012-01-01

    On human chromosome 1q21, a 2-Mb region called the epidermal differentiation complex comprises many genes encoding structural and regulatory proteins that are of crucial importance for keratinocyte differentiation and stratum corneum properties. Apart from those for involucrin and loricrin, most of the genes are organized in four families: the genes encoding EF-hand calcium-binding proteins of the S100A family, the genes encoding the small proline rich proteins (SPRRs) and the late cornified envelope (LCE) proteins, two families of cornified cell envelope components, and the genes encoding the S100-fused type proteins (SFTPs). This review focuses on the SPRRs, LCE proteins and SFTPs. It describes their structures, their specific functions and, when known, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of their expression. It also highlights their possible involvement in skin diseases. PMID:22201818

  7. Psychological stress and epidermal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Orion, Edith; Wolf, Ronni

    2012-01-01

    The skin is the organ that acts as a barrier between the outer and inner environments of the body. It is thus exposed not only to a wide variety of physical, chemical, and thermal insults from the outside world but also to inner endogenous stimuli. Stress, once an abstract psychologic phenomenon, has taken research's center stage in recent years. The "mind-body connection" is now less of an obscure New Age term and more of an elaborate physiologic pathway by which bilateral communication occurs between body and brain. Dermatologists and dermatologic patients have long acknowledged the effect of stress on the skin and its capability to initiate, maintain, or exacerbate several skin diseases. Because disruption of epidermal barrier integrity may be important in the development of some common skin diseases, it is crucial to understand its vulnerability to psychologic stress. PMID:22507042

  8. Cell motion predicts human epidermal stemness

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Fujio; Tate, Sota; Imai, Matome; Matsushita, Natsuki; Shiraishi, Ken; Sayama, Koji; Toki, Hiroshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Image-based identification of cultured stem cells and noninvasive evaluation of their proliferative capacity advance cell therapy and stem cell research. Here we demonstrate that human keratinocyte stem cells can be identified in situ by analyzing cell motion during their cultivation. Modeling experiments suggested that the clonal type of cultured human clonogenic keratinocytes can be efficiently determined by analysis of early cell movement. Image analysis experiments demonstrated that keratinocyte stem cells indeed display a unique rotational movement that can be identified as early as the two-cell stage colony. We also demonstrate that α6 integrin is required for both rotational and collective cell motion. Our experiments provide, for the first time, strong evidence that cell motion and epidermal stemness are linked. We conclude that early identification of human keratinocyte stem cells by image analysis of cell movement is a valid parameter for quality control of cultured keratinocytes for transplantation. PMID:25897083

  9. Sex steroids and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Allan, Carolyn A

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone levels are lower in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and also predict the onset of these adverse metabolic states. Body composition (body mass index, waist circumference) is an important mediator of this relationship. Sex hormone binding globulin is also inversely associated with insulin resistance and T2DM but the data regarding estrogen are inconsistent. Clinical models of androgen deficiency including Klinefelter's syndrome and androgen deprivation therapy in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer confirm the association between androgens and glucose status. Experimental manipulation of the insulin/glucose milieu and suppression of endogenous testicular function suggests the relationship between androgens and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional. Androgen therapy in men without diabetes is not able to differentiate the effect on insulin resistance from that on fat mass, in particular visceral adiposity. Similarly, several small clinical studies have examined the efficacy of exogenous testosterone in men with T2DM, however, the role of androgens, independent of body composition, in modifying insulin resistance is uncertain. PMID:24457840

  10. Assessment of epidermal growth factor receptor status in glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui-Jun; Ogawa, Mikako; Magata, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Masahiko; Ohmomo, Yoshiro; Namba, Hiroki; Sakahara, Harumi

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Our previous study showed that a newly designed tracer radioiodinated 6-(3-morpholinopropoxy)-7-ethoxy-4-(3’-iodophenoxy)quinazoline ([125I]PYK) is promising for the evaluation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) status and prediction of gefitinib treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. EGFR is over-expressed and mutated also in glioblastoma. In the present study, the expressions and mutation of EGFR were tested with [125I] PYK in glioblastoma in vitro and in vivo to determine whether this could be used to predict the sensitivity of glioblastoma to gefitinib treatment. Methods: Glioblastoma cell lines with different expression of EGFR were tested. Growth inhibition of cell lines by gefitinib was assessed by the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. Uptake levels of [125I]PYK were evaluated in cell lines in vitro. Tumor targeting of [125I]PYK was examined by a biodistribution study and imaging by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Results: High concentrations of gefitinib were needed to suppress EGFR-mediated proliferation. The uptake of [125I] PYK in cell lines in vitro was low, and showed no correlation with EGFR expression or mutation status. Biodistribution study and SPECT imaging with [125I]PYK for xenografts showed no [125I]PYK uptake. Conclusion: The results showed prediction of gefitinib effectiveness was difficult in glioblastoma by [125I]PYK, which might be due to the complicated expression of EGFR status in glioblastoma. Thus, new tracers for sites downstream of the mutant EGFR should be investigated in further studies.

  11. Polymeric membranes modulate human keratinocyte differentiation in specific epidermal layers.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Simona; Morelli, Sabrina; Giordano, Francesca; Gordano, Amalia; Bartolo, Loredana De

    2016-10-01

    In vitro models of human bioengineered skin substitutes are an alternative to animal experimentation for testing the effects and toxicity of drugs, cosmetics and pollutants. For the first time specific and distinct human epidermal strata were engineered by using membranes and keratinocytes. To this purpose, biodegradable membranes of chitosan (CHT), polycaprolactone (PCL) and a polymeric blend of CHT-PCL were prepared by phase-inversion technique and characterized in order to evaluate their morphological, physico-chemical and mechanical properties. The capability of membranes to modulate keratinocyte differentiation inducing specific interactions in epidermal membrane systems was investigated. The overall results demonstrated that the membrane properties strongly influence the cell morpho-functional behaviour of human keratinocytes, modulating their terminal differentiation, with the creation of specific epidermal strata or a fully proliferative epidermal multilayer system. In particular, human keratinocytes adhered on CHT and CHT-PCL membranes, forming the structure of the epidermal top layers, such as the corneum and granulosum strata, characterized by withdrawal or reduction from the cell cycle and cell proliferation. On the PCL membrane, keratinocytes developed an epidermal basal lamina, with high proliferating cells that stratified and migrated over time to form a complete differentiating epidermal multilayer system. PMID:27371895

  12. Spatiotemporal Expression of p63 in Mouse Epidermal Commitment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Huishan; Li, Na; Wang, Xinyue; Cao, Yujing; Ning, Lina; Duan, Enkui; Xia, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic surface ectoderm is a simple flat epithelium consisting of cells that express the cytokeratins K8/K18. Before stratification, K5/K14 expression substitutes K8/K18 expression, marking the event called epidermal commitment. Previous studies show that the transcription factor p63 plays an essential role in epidermal commitment. However, detailed expression information of p63 during early epidermal development in mice is still unclear. We systematically studied the expression pattern of p63 in mouse epidermal commitment, together with K8 and K5. We show that p63 expression could be detected as early as E8.5 in mouse embryos preceding epidermal commitment. p63 expression first appears near the newly formed somites and the posterior part of the embryo, further expanding to the whole embryonic surface with particular enrichment in the first branchial arches and the limb buds. ΔNp63 is the major class of isoforms expressed in this period. Relative expression intensity of p63 depends on the embryonic position. In summary, there is a sequential and regular expression pattern of K8, p63 and K5 in mouse epidermal commitment. Our study not only contributes to understanding the early events during epidermal development but also provides a basal tool to study the function of p63 in mammals. PMID:26690418

  13. Glucose: detection and analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucose is an aldosic monosaccharide that is centrally entrenched in the processes of photosynthesis and respiration, serving as an energy reserve and metabolic fuel in most organisms. As both a monomer and as part of more complex structures such as polysaccharides and glucosides, glucose also pla...

  14. Monitor blood glucose - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100220.htm Monitoring blood glucose - Series—Monitoring blood glucose: Using a self-test meter To use the ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Blood Sugar A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  15. Glucose monitoring during Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Abdul

    2015-05-01

    In patients with diabetes who intend to fast during Ramadan, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is an important tool. During this month, a long established treatment regimen, including medications, physical activity and diet plan, is changed to achieve concordance with the rules of fasting. Without proper glucose monitoring, it is not possible to achieve good glycaemic control. PMID:26013788

  16. Linear Epidermal Nevus of the Oral Cavity: A Rare Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana Dutra de Cássia Ferreira; Duarte, Alexandre Scalli Mathias; Carvalho, Guilherme Machado; Guimarães, Alexandre Caixeta; Zappelini, Carlos Eduardo Monteiro; Coelho Dal Rio, Ana Cristina; Corrêa, Maria Elvira Pizzigatti; Milani Altemani, Albina Messias de Almeida; Danielli Nicola, Ester Maria

    2012-01-01

    Linear epidermal nevus is an uncommon diagnosis of benign lesions of the oral cavity. It is characterized by a congenital malformation arising from the ectoderm cells, which are arranged according to a typical linear configuration known as Blaschko's lines. We report a case of linear epidermal nevus of oral cavity in a 51-year-old lady or woman. The linear epidermal nevus of the oral cavity, although rare, can be considered a differential diagnosis of oral papillomatosis (OP). The histopathological studies and detailed description are the center of the diagnostic and clinical evolution. PMID:22811716

  17. Low glucokinase activity and high rates of gluconeogenesis contribute to hyperglycemia in barn owls (Tyto alba) after a glucose challenge.

    PubMed

    Myers, M R; Klasing, K C

    1999-10-01

    Barn owls (Tyto alba) and leghorn chickens were fed a low protein high glucose (33.44% protein, 23.67% glucose) or a high protein low glucose (55.35% protein, 1.5% glucose) diet. After an intravenous glucose infusion, the peak in plasma glucose was not affected by diet in either species and was 22.6 and 39.4 mmol/L in chickens and barn owls, respectively. Glucose levels returned to normal within 30 min in chickens, but remained elevated for 3.5 h in barn owls. An oral glucose challenge also resulted in greater and longer hyperglycemia in barn owls than in chickens. The activities of hepatic glucokinase, malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase of barn owls were 16, 35, and 333% of the levels in chickens. Malic enzyme (P = 0.024) was less affected by dietary glucose level in barn owls than in chickens. Cultured hepatocytes from chickens produced 43% more glucose from lactate than hepatocytes from barn owls and, conversely, barn owl hepatocytes produced 87% more glucose from threonine than chickens (P = 0.001). Gluconeogenesis from lactate was greatly suppressed by high media glucose in chicken hepatocytes but not in those of barn owls (P = 0.0001 for species by glucose level interaction). When threonine was the substrate, gluconeogenesis was suppressed by increased glucose in both species but to a greater relative extent in chickens (P = 0.007 for species by glucose level interaction). Owls were glucose intolerant at least in part because of low hepatic glucokinase activity and an inadequate suppression of gluconeogenesis in the presence of exogenous glucose, apparently because they evolved with large excesses of amino acids and limited glucose in their normal diet. PMID:10498765

  18. Effect of Storage Temperature on Cultured Epidermal Cell Sheets Stored in Xenobiotic-Free Medium

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Catherine; Aabel, Peder; Eidet, Jon R.; Messelt, Edward B.; Lyberg, Torstein; von Unge, Magnus; Utheim, Tor P.

    2014-01-01

    Cultured epidermal cell sheets (CECS) are used in regenerative medicine in patients with burns, and have potential to treat limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), as demonstrated in animal models. Despite widespread use, short-term storage options for CECS are limited. Advantages of storage include: flexibility in scheduling surgery, reserve sheets for repeat operations, more opportunity for quality control, and improved transportation to allow wider distribution. Studies on storage of CECS have thus far focused on cryopreservation, whereas refrigeration is a convenient method commonly used for whole skin graft storage in burns clinics. It has been shown that preservation of viable cells using these methods is variable. This study evaluated the effect of different temperatures spanning 4°C to 37°C, on the cell viability, morphology, proliferation and metabolic status of CECS stored over a two week period in a xenobiotic–free system. Compared to non-stored control, best cell viability was obtained at 24°C (95.2±9.9%); reduced cell viability, at approximately 60%, was demonstrated at several of the temperatures (12°C, 28°C, 32°C and 37°C). Metabolic activity was significantly higher between 24°C and 37°C, where glucose, lactate, lactate/glucose ratios, and oxygen tension indicated increased activation of the glycolytic pathway under aerobic conditions. Preservation of morphology as shown by phase contrast and scanning electron micrographs was best at 12°C and 16°C. PCNA immunocytochemistry indicated that only 12°C and 20°C allowed maintenance of proliferative function at a similar level to non-stored control. In conclusion, results indicate that 12°C and 24°C merit further investigation as the prospective optimum temperature for short-term storage of cultured epidermal cell sheets. PMID:25170754

  19. UVB-induced epidermal hyperproliferation is modified by a single, topical treatment with a mitosis inhibitory epidermal pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, W.M.; Elgjo, K. )

    1990-01-01

    A single application of a water-miscible cream base containing the recently identified mitosis inhibitory epidermal pentapeptide pyroGlu-Glu-Asp-Ser-GlyOH (EPP) to hairless mouse skin is followed by a long-lasting period of reduced epidermal cell proliferation. To examine if a similar growth inhibition could be achieved in stimulated and rapidly proliferating epidermis, EPP was applied at two different concentrations, 0.005 or 0.02%, to hairless mouse skin immediately after exposure of the left flank to an erythemic dose of ultraviolet B light (UVB). This dose of UVB alone induces a sustained period of rapid epidermal cell proliferation, starting at about 18 h after the irradiation. Epidermal cell proliferation was followed from 18 to 54 h (0.005% cream) or from 18 to 30 h (0.02% cream) after the treatment by estimating the rate of G2-M cell flux (the mitotic rate) by means of Colcemid, and epidermal DNA synthesis by counting labeled cells after pulse-labeling with 3H-thymidine. The unirradiated side of the mice was used as reference. The results showed that topical treatment with a 0.02% EPP cream partially inhibited UVB-induced epidermal hyperproliferation, while the 0.005% EPP cream inhibited as well as stimulated the UVB-induced hyperproliferation. Thus, EPP is effective even in rapidly proliferating epidermal cell populations, but the outcome is obviously dose-dependent in this test system.

  20. The Role of Glucose Metabolism and Glucose-Associated Signalling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Rainer; Coy, Johannes F.

    2007-01-01

    Aggressive carcinomas ferment glucose to lactate even in the presence of oxygen. This particular metabolism, termed aerobic glycolysis, the glycolytic phenotype, or the Warburg effect, was discovered by Nobel laureate Otto Warburg in the 1920s. Since these times, controversial discussions about the relevance of the fermentation of glucose by tumours took place; however, a majority of cancer researchers considered the Warburg effect as a non-causative epiphenomenon. Recent research demonstrated, that several common oncogenic events favour the expression of the glycolytic phenotype. Moreover, a suppression of the phenotypic features by either substrate limitation, pharmacological intervention, or genetic manipulation was found to mediate potent tumour-suppressive effects. The discovery of the transketolase-like 1 (TKTL1) enzyme in aggressive cancers may deliver a missing link in the interpretation of the Warburg effect. TKTL1-activity could be the basis for a rapid fermentation of glucose in aggressive carcinoma cells via the pentose phosphate pathway, which leads to matrix acidification, invasive growth, and ultimately metastasis. TKTL1 expression in certain non-cancerous tissues correlates with aerobic formation of lactate and rapid fermentation of glucose, which may be required for the prevention of advanced glycation end products and the suppression of reactive oxygen species. There is evidence, that the activity of this enzyme and the Warburg effect can be both protective or destructive for the organism. These results place glucose metabolism to the centre of pathogenesis of several civilisation related diseases and raise concerns about the high glycaemic index of various food components commonly consumed in western diets. PMID:19812737

  1. Suprabasin, a novel epidermal differentiation marker and potential cornified envelope precursor.

    PubMed

    Park, Geon Tae; Lim, Susan E; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Morasso, Maria I

    2002-11-22

    The suprabasin gene is a novel gene expressed in mouse and human differentiating keratinocytes. We identified a partial cDNA encoding suprabasin using a suppression subtractive hybridization method between the proliferative basal and differentiating suprabasal populations of the mouse epidermis. A 3' gene-specific probe hybridized to transcripts of 0.7- and 2.2-kb pairs on Northern blots with specific detection in differentiated keratinocytes of stratified epithelia. The mouse gene was mapped to chromosome 7 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. This region is syntenic to human chromosome band 19q13.1, which contained the only region in the data bases with homology to the mouse suprabasin sequence. During embryonic mouse development, suprabasin mRNA was detected at day 15.5, coinciding with epidermal stratification. Suprabasin was detected in the suprabasal layers of the epithelia in the tongue, stomach, and epidermis. Differentiation of cultured primary epidermal keratinocytes with 0.12 mm Ca(2+) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment resulted in the induction of suprabasin. The 2.2-kb cDNA transcript encodes a protein of 72 kDa with a predicted isoelectric point of 6.85. The translated sequence has an amino-terminal domain, a central domain composed of repeats rich in glycine and alanine, and a carboxyl-terminal domain. The alternatively spliced 0.7-kb transcript encodes a smaller protein that shares the NH(2)- and COOH-terminal regions but lacks the repeat domain region. Cross-linking experiments indicate that suprabasin is a substrate for transglutaminase 2 and 3 activity. Altogether, these results indicate that the suprabasin protein potentially plays a role in the process of epidermal differentiation. PMID:12228223

  2. Epidermal and dermal integumentary structures of ankylosaurian dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Arbour, Victoria M; Burns, Michael E; Bell, Phil R; Currie, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosaurian dinosaurs are most notable for their abundant and morphologically diverse osteoderms, which would have given them a spiky appearance in life. Isolated osteoderms are relatively common and provide important information about the structure of the ankylosaur dermis, but fossilized impressions of the soft-tissue epidermis of ankylosaurs are rare. Nevertheless, well-preserved integument exists on several ankylosaur fossils that shows osteoderms were covered by a single epidermal scale, but one or many millimeter-sized ossicles may be present under polygonal, basement epidermal scales. Evidence for the taxonomic utility of ankylosaurid epidermal scale architecture is presented for the first time. This study builds on previous osteological work that argues for a greater diversity of ankylosaurids in the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta than has been traditionally recognized and adds to the hypothesis that epidermal skin impressions are taxonomically relevant across diverse dinosaur clades. PMID:24105904

  3. Lowered Humidity Produces Human Epidermal Equivalents with Enhanced Barrier Properties

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Richard; Celli, Anna; Crumrine, Debra; Hupe, Melanie; Adame, Lillian C.; Pennypacker, Sally D.; Park, Kyungho; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Elias, Peter M.; Ilic, Dusko

    2015-01-01

    Multilayered human keratinocyte cultures increasingly are used to model human epidermis. Until now, studies utilizing human epidermal equivalents (HEEs) have been limited because previous preparations do not establish a normal epidermal permeability barrier. In this report, we show that reducing environmental humidity to 50% relative humidity yields HEEs that closely match human postnatal epidermis and have enhanced repair of the permeability barrier. These cultures display low transepidermal water loss and possess a calcium and pH gradient that resembles those seen in human epidermis. These cultures upregulate glucosylceramide synthase and make normal-appearing lipid lamellar bilayers. The epidermal permeability barrier of these cultures can be perturbed, using the identical tools previously described for human skin, and recover in the same time course seen during in vivo barrier recovery. These cultures will be useful for basic and applied studies on epidermal barrier function. PMID:24803151

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Ecklonia cava Extract on High Glucose-Induced Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yokogawa, Kumiko; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Tamura, Akiko; Terada, Masaki; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a disease closely associated with obesity and diabetes. A prevalence of type 2 diabetes and a high body mass index in cryptogenic cirrhosis may imply that obesity leads to cirrhosis. Here, we examined the effects of an extract of Ecklonia cava, a brown algae, on the activation of high glucose-induced hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), key players in hepatic fibrosis. Isolated HSCs were incubated with or without a high glucose concentration. Ecklonia cava extract (ECE) was added to the culture simultaneously with the high glucose. Treatment with high glucose stimulated expression of type I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin, which are markers of activation in HSCs, in a dose-dependent manner. The activation of high glucose-treated HSCs was suppressed by the ECE. An increase in the formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a decrease in intracellular glutathione levels were observed soon after treatment with high glucose, and these changes were suppressed by the simultaneous addition of ECE. High glucose levels stimulated the secretion of bioactive transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) from the cells, and the stimulation was also suppressed by treating the HSCs with ECE. These results suggest that the suppression of high glucose-induced HSC activation by ECE is mediated through the inhibition of ROS and/or GSH and the downregulation of TGF-β secretion. ECE is useful for preventing the development of diabetic liver fibrosis. PMID:22363250

  5. Fluconazole induced toxic epidermal necrolysis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Drug induced toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens Johnson syndrome are more commonly associated with medications such as sulfonamides, penicillin, anticonvulsants, oxicam non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and corticosteroids. Isolated instances secondary to drugs outside of the aforementioned classes have also been reported. We report a case of probable toxic epidermal necrolysis induced by fluconazole in a 52 year old woman. PMID:20062708

  6. Epidermal closure regulates histolysis during mammalian (Mus) digit regeneration.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Jennifer; Sammarco, Mimi C; Dawson, Lindsay A; Tucker, Catherine; Taylor, Louis J; Van Meter, Keith; Muneoka, Ken

    2015-06-01

    Mammalian digit regeneration progresses through consistent stages: histolysis, inflammation, epidermal closure, blastema formation, and finally redifferentiation. What we do not yet know is how each stage can affect others. Questions of stage timing, tissue interactions, and microenvironmental states are becoming increasingly important as we look toward solutions for whole limb regeneration. This study focuses on the timing of epidermal closure which, in mammals, is delayed compared to more regenerative animals like the axolotl. We use a standard wound closure device, Dermabond (2-octyl cyanoacrylate), to induce earlier epidermal closure, and we evaluate the effect of fast epidermal closure on histolysis, blastema formation, and redifferentiation. We find that fast epidermal closure is reliant upon a hypoxic microenvironment. Additionally, early epidermal closure eliminates the histolysis stage and results in a regenerate that more closely replicates the amputated structure. We show that tools like Dermabond and oxygen are able to independently influence the various stages of regeneration enabling us to uncouple histolysis, wound closure, and other regenerative events. With this study, we start to understand how each stage of mammalian digit regeneration is controlled. PMID:27499872

  7. Epidermal differentiation gene regulatory networks controlled by MAF and MAFB.

    PubMed

    Labott, Andrew T; Lopez-Pajares, Vanessa

    2016-06-01

    Numerous regulatory factors in epidermal differentiation and their role in regulating different cell states have been identified in recent years. However, the genetic interactions between these regulators over the dynamic course of differentiation have not been studied. In this Extra-View article, we review recent work by Lopez-Pajares et al. that explores a new regulatory network in epidermal differentiation. They analyze the changing transcriptome throughout epidermal regeneration to identify 3 separate gene sets enriched in the progenitor, early and late differentiation states. Using expression module mapping, MAF along with MAFB, are identified as transcription factors essential for epidermal differentiation. Through double knock-down of MAF:MAFB using siRNA and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout, epidermal differentiation was shown to be impaired both in-vitro and in-vivo, confirming MAF:MAFB's role to activate genes that drive differentiation. Lopez-Pajares and collaborators integrated 42 published regulator gene sets and the MAF:MAFB gene set into the dynamic differentiation gene expression landscape and found that lncRNAs TINCR and ANCR act as upstream regulators of MAF:MAFB. Furthermore, ChIP-seq analysis of MAF:MAFB identified key transcription factor genes linked to epidermal differentiation as downstream effectors. Combined, these findings illustrate a dynamically regulated network with MAF:MAFB as a crucial link for progenitor gene repression and differentiation gene activation. PMID:27097296

  8. Tight junction regulates epidermal calcium ion gradient and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurasawa, Masumi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Oba, Ai; Yamamoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We disrupted epidermal tight junction barrier in reconstructed epidermis. {yields} It altered Ca{sup 2+} distribution and consequentially differentiation state as well. {yields} Tight junction should affect epidermal homeostasis by maintaining Ca{sup 2+} gradient. -- Abstract: It is well known that calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}) induce keratinocyte differentiation. Ca{sup 2+} distributes to form a vertical gradient that peaks at the stratum granulosum. It is thought that the stratum corneum (SC) forms the Ca{sup 2+} gradient since it is considered the only permeability barrier in the skin. However, the epidermal tight junction (TJ) in the granulosum has recently been suggested to restrict molecular movement to assist the SC as a secondary barrier. The objective of this study was to clarify the contribution of the TJ to Ca{sup 2+} gradient and epidermal differentiation in reconstructed human epidermis. When the epidermal TJ barrier was disrupted by sodium caprate treatment, Ca{sup 2+} flux increased and the gradient changed in ion-capture cytochemistry images. Alterations of ultrastructures and proliferation/differentiation markers revealed that both hyperproliferation and precocious differentiation occurred regionally in the epidermis. These results suggest that the TJ plays a crucial role in maintaining epidermal homeostasis by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} gradient.

  9. Specification of epidermal cell fate in plant shoots.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinobu; Iida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved a single layer of epidermal cells, which are characterized by mostly anticlinal cell division patterns, formation of a waterproof coat called cuticle, and unique cell types such as stomatal guard cells and trichomes. The shoot epidermis plays important roles not only to protect plants from dehydration and pathogens but also to ensure their proper organogenesis and growth control. Extensive molecular genetic studies in Arabidopsis and maize have identified a number of genes that are required for epidermal cell differentiation. However, the mechanism that specifies shoot epidermal cell fate during plant organogenesis remains largely unknown. Particularly, little is known regarding positional information that should restrict epidermal cell fate to the outermost cell layer of the developing organs. Recent studies suggested that certain members of the HD-ZIP class IV homeobox genes are possible master regulators of shoot epidermal cell fate. Here, we summarize the roles of the regulatory genes that are involved in epidermal cell fate specification and discuss the possible mechanisms that limit the expression and/or activity of the master transcriptional regulators to the outermost cell layer in plant shoots. PMID:24616724

  10. Epidermal closure regulates histolysis during mammalian (Mus) digit regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Jennifer; Sammarco, Mimi C.; Dawson, Lindsay A.; Tucker, Catherine; Taylor, Louis J.; Van Meter, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian digit regeneration progresses through consistent stages: histolysis, inflammation, epidermal closure, blastema formation, and finally redifferentiation. What we do not yet know is how each stage can affect others. Questions of stage timing, tissue interactions, and microenvironmental states are becoming increasingly important as we look toward solutions for whole limb regeneration. This study focuses on the timing of epidermal closure which, in mammals, is delayed compared to more regenerative animals like the axolotl. We use a standard wound closure device, Dermabond (2‐octyl cyanoacrylate), to induce earlier epidermal closure, and we evaluate the effect of fast epidermal closure on histolysis, blastema formation, and redifferentiation. We find that fast epidermal closure is reliant upon a hypoxic microenvironment. Additionally, early epidermal closure eliminates the histolysis stage and results in a regenerate that more closely replicates the amputated structure. We show that tools like Dermabond and oxygen are able to independently influence the various stages of regeneration enabling us to uncouple histolysis, wound closure, and other regenerative events. With this study, we start to understand how each stage of mammalian digit regeneration is controlled. PMID:27499872

  11. [Epidermal growth factor, innovation and safety].

    PubMed

    Esquirol Caussa, Jordi; Herrero Vila, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Bioidentical recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) is available in concentrations and purity suitable for therapeutic use in long time stable formulations. Beneficial effects in several skin pathologies and lesions have been reported (traumatic and surgical wound healing, laser induced wounds, abnormal scars, keloids, radiation or chemotherapy induced dermatitis, post inflammatory hyperpigmentation or for skin aging damage repairing) and also may be considered for the treatment of several oropharingeal and high gastroesophageal tract mucosa diseases (mouth sores, pharyngeal fistulas, ulcers), and several corneal or conjunctive mucosa lesions. rhEGF has not shown any important side or collateral effects in humans or in laboratory experimentation animals, showing optimal tolerability and safety with continuous use for months. Compounding gives advantages of versatility, individualization, personalization, molecular stability, safety and effectiveness in ideal conditions, showing good tissue penetration, both on intact skin and skin lesions that expose the lower planes to the surface. rhEGF compounds can be considered for prevention or as a treatment of diverse skin and mucosa diseases and conditions through compounding preparations. PMID:25433777

  12. Characterization of microfluidic human epidermal keratinocyte culture

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Adrian T.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2008-01-01

    Human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) are skin cells of primary importance in maintaining the body’s defensive barrier and are used in vitro to assess the irritation potential and toxicity of chemical compounds. Microfluidic systems hold promise for high throughput irritant and toxicity assays, but HEK growth kinetics have yet to be characterized within microscale culture chambers. This research demonstrates HEK patterning on microscale patches of Type I collagen within microfluidic channels and maintenance of these cells under constant medium perfusion for 72 h. HEK were shown to maintain 93.0%–99.6% viability at 72 h under medium perfusion ranging from 0.025–0.4 μl min−1. HEK maintained this viability while ∼100% confluent—a level not possible in 96 well plates. Microscale HEK cultures offer the ability to precisely examine the morphology, behavior and viability of individual cells which may open the door to new discoveries in toxicological screening methods and wound healing techniques. PMID:19002858

  13. Linking Mechanics and Statistics in Epidermal Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangwoo; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-03-01

    Disordered cellular structures, such as foams, polycrystals, or living tissues, can be characterized by quantitative measurements of domain size and topology. In recent work, we showed that correlations between size and topology in 2D systems are sensitive to the shape (eccentricity) of the individual domains: From a local model of neighbor relations, we derived an analytical justification for the famous empirical Lewis law, confirming the theory with experimental data from cucumber epidermal tissue. Here, we go beyond this purely geometrical model and identify mechanical properties of the tissue as the root cause for the domain eccentricity and thus the statistics of tissue structure. The simple model approach is based on the minimization of an interfacial energy functional. Simulations with Surface Evolver show that the domain statistics depend on a single mechanical parameter, while parameter fluctuations from cell to cell play an important role in simultaneously explaining the shape distribution of cells. The simulations are in excellent agreement with experiments and analytical theory, and establish a general link between the mechanical properties of a tissue and its structure. The model is relevant to diagnostic applications in a variety of animal and plant tissues.

  14. Metabolic profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Berit; Zöller, Daniela; Erban, Alexander; Fehrle, Ines; Hartmann, Jürgen; Niehl, Annette; Kopka, Joachim; Fisahn, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic phenotyping at cellular resolution may be considered one of the challenges in current plant physiology. A method is described which enables the cell type-specific metabolic analysis of epidermal cell types in Arabidopsis thaliana pavement, basal, and trichome cells. To achieve the required high spatial resolution, single cell sampling using microcapillaries was combined with routine gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) based metabolite profiling. The identification and relative quantification of 117 mostly primary metabolites has been demonstrated. The majority, namely 90 compounds, were accessible without analytical background correction. Analyses were performed using cell type-specific pools of 200 microsampled individual cells. Moreover, among these identified metabolites, 38 exhibited differential pool sizes in trichomes, basal or pavement cells. The application of an independent component analysis confirmed the cell type-specific metabolic phenotypes. Significant pool size changes between individual cells were detectable within several classes of metabolites, namely amino acids, fatty acids and alcohols, alkanes, lipids, N-compounds, organic acids and polyhydroxy acids, polyols, sugars, sugar conjugates and phenylpropanoids. It is demonstrated here that the combination of microsampling and GC-MS based metabolite profiling provides a method to investigate the cellular metabolism of fully differentiated plant cell types in vivo. PMID:20150518

  15. Epiprofin orchestrates epidermal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takashi; Yoshitomi, Yasuo; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Patel, Vyomesh; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The basal layer of the epidermis contains stem cells and transit amplifying cells that rapidly proliferate and differentiate further into the upper layers of the epidermis. A number of molecules have been identified as regulators of this process, including p63 (also known as tumor protein 63) and Notch1. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the transitions from stem cell to proliferating or differentiating transit amplifying cell. Here, we demonstrate that epiprofin (Epfn, also known as Sp6) plays crucial distinct roles in these transition stages as a cell cycle regulator and a transcription factor. Epfn knockout mice have a thickened epidermis, in which p63-expressing basal cells form multiple layers owing to the accumulation of premature transit amplifying cells with reduced proliferation and a reduction in the number of differentiating keratinocytes expressing Notch1. We found that low levels of Epfn expression increased the proliferation of human immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells by increasing EGF responsiveness and superphosphorylation of Rb. By contrast, high levels of Epfn expression promoted cell cycle exit and differentiation, by reducing E2F transactivation and inducing Notch1 expression. Our findings identify multiple novel functions of Epfn in epidermal development. PMID:25344255

  16. Epiprofin orchestrates epidermal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Yoshitomi, Yasuo; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Patel, Vyomesh; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2014-12-15

    The basal layer of the epidermis contains stem cells and transit amplifying cells that rapidly proliferate and differentiate further into the upper layers of the epidermis. A number of molecules have been identified as regulators of this process, including p63 (also known as tumor protein 63) and Notch1. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the transitions from stem cell to proliferating or differentiating transit amplifying cell. Here, we demonstrate that epiprofin (Epfn, also known as Sp6) plays crucial distinct roles in these transition stages as a cell cycle regulator and a transcription factor. Epfn knockout mice have a thickened epidermis, in which p63-expressing basal cells form multiple layers owing to the accumulation of premature transit amplifying cells with reduced proliferation and a reduction in the number of differentiating keratinocytes expressing Notch1. We found that low levels of Epfn expression increased the proliferation of human immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells by increasing EGF responsiveness and superphosphorylation of Rb. By contrast, high levels of Epfn expression promoted cell cycle exit and differentiation, by reducing E2F transactivation and inducing Notch1 expression. Our findings identify multiple novel functions of Epfn in epidermal development. PMID:25344255

  17. A modelling approach towards epidermal homoeostasis control.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Gernot; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2007-08-01

    In order to grasp the features arising from cellular discreteness and individuality, in large parts of cell tissue modelling agent-based models are favoured. The subclass of off-lattice models allows for a physical motivation of the intercellular interaction rules. We apply an improved version of a previously introduced off-lattice agent-based model to the steady-state flow equilibrium of skin. The dynamics of cells is determined by conservative and drag forces, supplemented with delta-correlated random forces. Cellular adjacency is detected by a weighted Delaunay triangulation. The cell cycle time of keratinocytes is controlled by a diffusible substance provided by the dermis. Its concentration is calculated from a diffusion equation with time-dependent boundary conditions and varying diffusion coefficients. The dynamics of a nutrient is also taken into account by a reaction-diffusion equation. It turns out that the analysed control mechanism suffices to explain several characteristics of epidermal homoeostasis formation. In addition, we examine the question of how in silico melanoma with decreased basal adhesion manage to persist within the steady-state flow equilibrium of the skin. Interestingly, even for melanocyte cell cycle times being substantially shorter than for keratinocytes, tiny stochastic effects can lead to completely different outcomes. The results demonstrate that the understanding of initial states of tumour growth can profit significantly from the application of off-lattice agent-based models in computer simulations. PMID:17466340

  18. Epidermal growth factor signaling in transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB) family play a critical role in normal cell growth and development. However, many ErbB family members, especially EGFR, are aberrantly expressed or deregulated in tumors and are thought to play crucial roles in cancer development and metastatic progression. In this chapter, we provide an overview of key mechanisms contributing to aberrant EGFR/ErbB signaling in transformed cells which results in many phenotypic changes associated with the earliest stages of tumor formation, including several hallmarks of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These changes often occur through interaction with other major signaling pathways important to tumor progression resulting in a multitude of transcriptional changes that ultimately impact cell morphology, proliferation and adhesion, all of which are crucial for tumor progression. The resulting mesh of signaling networks will need to be taken into account as new regimens are designed for targeting EGFR for therapeutic intervention. As new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the cross-talk of EGFR signaling with other signaling pathways and their role in therapeutic resistance to anti-EGFR therapies are gained a continual reassessment of clinical therapeutic regimes and strategies will be required. Understanding the consequences and complexity of EGF signaling and how it relates to tumor progression is critical for the development of clinical compounds and establishing clinical protocols for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25619714

  19. Segmental overgrowth, lipomatosis, arteriovenous malformation and epidermal nevus (SOLAMEN) syndrome is related to mosaic PTEN nullizygosity.

    PubMed

    Caux, Frédéric; Plauchu, Henri; Chibon, Frédéric; Faivre, Laurence; Fain, Olivier; Vabres, Pierre; Bonnet, Françoise; Selma, Zied Ben; Laroche, Liliane; Gérard, Marion; Longy, Michel

    2007-07-01

    We describe two patients from distinct Cowden disease families with specific germline PTEN mutations whose disease differs from the usual appearance of Cowden disease. Their phenotype associates classical manifestations of Cowden disease and congenital dysmorphisms including segmental overgrowth, arteriovenous and lymphatic vascular malformations, lipomatosis and linear epidermal nevus reminiscent of the diagnosis of Proteus syndrome. We provide evidence in one of the two patients of a secondary molecular event: a loss of the PTEN wild-type allele, restricted to the atypical lesions that may explain an overgrowth of the affected tissues and the atypical phenotype. These data provide a new demonstration of the Happle hypothesis to explain some segmental exacerbation of autosomal-dominant disorders. They also show that a bi-allelic inactivation of PTEN can lead to developmental anomalies instead of malignant transformation, thus raising the question of the limitations of the tumor suppressive function in this gene. Finally, we suggest using the term 'SOLAMEN syndrome' (Segmental Overgrowth, Lipomatosis, Arteriovenous Malformation and Epidermal Nevus) in these peculiar situations to help the difficult distinction between the phenotype of our patients and Proteus syndrome. PMID:17392703

  20. Dusky-like is required for epidermal pigmentation and metamorphosis in Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjun; Yun, Xiaopei; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Dusky-like (Dyl) is associated with the morphogenesis of embryonic denticle, adult sensory bristle and wing hair in Drosophila melanogaster. And whether Dyl involved in insect post-embryonic development and its signal transduction are poorly understood. Here, phylogenetic analysis revealed that dyl displayed one-to-one orthologous relationship among insects. In Tribolium castaneum, dyl is abundantly expressed at the late embryonic stage. Tissue-specific expression analysis at the late adult stage illustrated high expression of dyl in the fat body and ovary. Knockdown of dyl resulted in the defects in larval epidermal pigmentation and completely blocked the transitions from larval to pupal and pupal to adult stages of T. castaneum. We further discovered that dyl RNAi phenotypes were phenocopied by blimp-1 or shavenbaby (svb) silencing, and dyl was positively regulated by blimp-1 through svb in T. castaneum. These results suggest that Dyl functions downstream of Blimp-1 through Svb for larval epidermal pigmentation and metamorphosis. Moreover, ftz-f1 was down-regulated after RNA interference (RNAi) suppressing any of those three genes, indicating that Ftz-f1 works downstream of Dyl to mediate the effects of Blimp-1, Svb and Dyl on metamorphosis in T. castaneum. This study provides valuable insights into functions and signaling pathway of insect Dyl. PMID:26829909

  1. Dusky-like is required for epidermal pigmentation and metamorphosis in Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengjun; Yun, Xiaopei; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Dusky-like (Dyl) is associated with the morphogenesis of embryonic denticle, adult sensory bristle and wing hair in Drosophila melanogaster. And whether Dyl involved in insect post-embryonic development and its signal transduction are poorly understood. Here, phylogenetic analysis revealed that dyl displayed one-to-one orthologous relationship among insects. In Tribolium castaneum, dyl is abundantly expressed at the late embryonic stage. Tissue-specific expression analysis at the late adult stage illustrated high expression of dyl in the fat body and ovary. Knockdown of dyl resulted in the defects in larval epidermal pigmentation and completely blocked the transitions from larval to pupal and pupal to adult stages of T. castaneum. We further discovered that dyl RNAi phenotypes were phenocopied by blimp-1 or shavenbaby (svb) silencing, and dyl was positively regulated by blimp-1 through svb in T. castaneum. These results suggest that Dyl functions downstream of Blimp-1 through Svb for larval epidermal pigmentation and metamorphosis. Moreover, ftz-f1 was down-regulated after RNA interference (RNAi) suppressing any of those three genes, indicating that Ftz-f1 works downstream of Dyl to mediate the effects of Blimp-1, Svb and Dyl on metamorphosis in T. castaneum. This study provides valuable insights into functions and signaling pathway of insect Dyl. PMID:26829909

  2. Sculpting skin appendages out of epidermal layers via temporally and spatially regulated apoptotic events.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsing; Yu, Mingke; Wu, Ping; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Yu, Hsin-Su; Widelitz, Randall B; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2004-06-01

    Complex skin appendages are built from the epidermal cells through various cell events. Here we used TUNEL and caspase-3 immuno-localization to examine apoptosis in feather morphogenesis. We deduced three modes. In Mode 1A, apoptosis occurs within the localized growth zone (LoGZ) to regulate growth (feather buds). In Mode 1B, morphogen secreting cells are present adjacent to LoGZ and apoptosis may work to remove such signaling centers (barb ridges). In Mode 2, keratinocytes apoptosed before terminal differentiation and left spaces between branches (marginal plate). In Mode 3A, keratinocytes cornified and flaked off to free skin appendages (feather sheath, pulp epithelium). In Mode 3B, keratinized apoptosed epithelial cells became permanent structures (rachis, ramus, barbules). Thus, different apoptotic modes can have different impacts on morphogenesis. We further tested effects of imbalanced Shh on apoptosis. Shh suppression reduced marginal plate apoptosis and caused abnormal differentiation of barbule plates. Shh over-expression enhanced proliferation in barb ridges. Expression of Patched in the barbule plate epithelia implies a paracrine mechanism. The current work complements our recent work on LoGZ to show how adding and removing cell masses in temporally and spatially specific ways are coordinated to sculpt skin appendages from epidermal layers. PMID:15175023

  3. Arsenite and insulin exhibit opposing effects on epidermal growth factor receptor and keratinocyte proliferative potential

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2007-05-15

    Previous work has suggested that arsenic exposure contributes to skin carcinogenesis by preserving the proliferative potential of human epidermal keratinocytes, thereby slowing the exit of putative target stem cells into the differentiation pathway. To find a molecular basis for this action, present work has explored the influence of arsenite on keratinocyte responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF). The ability of cultured keratinocytes to found colonies upon passaging several days after confluence was preserved by arsenite and EGF in an additive fashion, but neither was effective when the receptor tyrosine kinase activity was inhibited. Arsenite prevented the loss of EGF receptor protein and phosphorylation of tyrosine 1173, preserving its capability to signal. The level of nuclear {beta}-catenin was higher in cells treated with arsenite and EGF in parallel to elevated colony forming ability, and expression of a dominant negative {beta}-catenin suppressed the increase in both colony forming ability and yield of putative stem cells induced by arsenite and EGF. As judged by expression of three genes regulated by {beta}-catenin, this transcription factor had substantially higher activity in the arsenite/EGF-treated cells. Trivalent antimony exhibited the same effects as arsenite. A novel finding is that insulin in the medium induced the loss of EGF receptor protein, which was largely prevented by arsenite exposure.

  4. Vascular Glucose Sensor Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jeffrey I; Torjman, Marc C.; Strasma, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability have been associated with increased morbidity, mortality, length of stay, and cost in a variety of critical care and non–critical care patient populations in the hospital. The results from prospective randomized clinical trials designed to determine the risks and benefits of intensive insulin therapy and tight glycemic control have been confusing; and at times conflicting. The limitations of point-of-care blood glucose (BG) monitoring in the hospital highlight the great clinical need for an automated real-time continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) that can accurately measure the concentration of glucose every few minutes. Automation and standardization of the glucose measurement process have the potential to significantly improve BG control, clinical outcome, safety and cost. PMID:26078254

  5. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  6. All about Blood Glucose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Glucose Before meals: 80 to 130 mg/dl My Usual Results My Goals ______ to ______ ______ to ______ 2 ... the start of a meal: below 180 mg/dl below ______ below ______ What’s the best way to keep ...

  7. Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glucose NIH Medline Plus - Diabetes Spotlight FDA permits marketing of first system of mobile medical apps for ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  8. Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis by GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Prashant; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Holz, George G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(7–36)amide (GLP-1) is a secreted peptide that acts as a key determinant of blood glucose homeostasis by virtue of its abilities to slow gastric emptying, to enhance pancreatic insulin secretion, and to suppress pancreatic glucagon secretion. GLP-1 is secreted from L cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa in response to a meal, and the blood glucose-lowering action of GLP-1 is terminated due to its enzymatic degradation by dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Released GLP-1 activates enteric and autonomic reflexes while also circulating as an incretin hormone to control endocrine pancreas function. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated directly or indirectly by blood glucose-lowering agents currently in use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These therapeutic agents include GLP-1R agonists (exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, and langlenatide) and DPP-IV inhibitors (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin). Investigational agents for use in the treatment of T2DM include GPR119 and GPR40 receptor agonists that stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells. Summarized here is the role of GLP-1 to control blood glucose homeo-stasis, with special emphasis on the advantages and limitations of GLP-1-based therapeutics. PMID:24373234

  9. Abnormal transient rise in hepatic glucose production after oral glucose in non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Thorburn, A; Litchfield, A; Fabris, S; Proietto, J

    1995-05-01

    A transient rise in hepatic glucose production (HGP) after an oral glucosa load has been reported in some insulin-resistant states such as in obese fa/fa Zucker rats. The aim of this study was to determine whether this rise in HGP also occurs in subjects with established non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Glucose kinetics were measured basally and during a double-label oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 12 NIDDM subjects and 12 non-diabetic 'control' subjects. Twenty minutes after the glucose load, HGP had increased 73% above basal in the NIDDM subjects (7.29 +/- 0.52 to 12.58 +/- 1.86 mumol/kg/min, P < 0.02). A transient rise in glucagon (12 pg/ml above basal, P < 0.004) occurred at a similar time. In contrast, the control subjects showed no rise in HGP or plasma glucagon. HGP began to suppress 40-50 min after the OGTT in both the NIDDM and control subjects. A 27% increase in the rate of gut-derived glucose absorption was also observed in the NIDDM group, which could be the result of increased gut glucose absorption or decreased first pass extraction of glucose by the liver. Therefore, in agreement with data in animal models of NIDDM, a transient rise in HGP partly contributes to the hyperglycemia observed after an oral glucose load in NIDDM subjects. PMID:7587920

  10. Nexus between epidermolysis bullosa and transcriptional regulation by thyroid hormone in epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Lee, Brian; Walsh, Rebecca; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone, T3, through the interaction of its receptor with the recognition sequences in the DNA, regulates gene expression. This regulation includes the promoter activity of keratin genes. The receptor shares co-regulators with other members of the nuclear receptor family, including RXR. Intending to define the transcriptional effects of thyroid hormones in keratinocytes, we used Affymetrix microarrays to comprehensively compare the genes expressed in T3 treated and untreated human epidermal keratinocytes. The transcriptomes were compared at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 hrs. Surprisingly, T3 induced only 9 and suppressed 28 genes, much fewer than expected. Significantly, genes associated with Epidermolysis bullosa, a set of inherited blistering skin diseases, were found statistically highly over-represented among the suppressed genes. These genes include Integrin β4, Plectin, Collagen XVII, MMP1, MMP3 and MMP14. The data imply that in keratinocytes T3 could suppresses the remodeling by, attachment to, and production of extracellular matrix. The results suggest that topical treatment with T3 may be effective for alleviation of symptoms in patients with Epidermolysis bullosa. PMID:20443817

  11. Development of an Amperometric-Based Glucose Biosensor to Measure the Glucose Content of Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Lee Fung; Por, Lip Yee; Yam, Mun Fei

    2015-01-01

    An amperometric enzyme-electrode was introduced where glucose oxidase (GOD) was immobilized on chitosan membrane via crosslinking, and then fastened on a platinum working electrode. The immobilized enzyme showed relatively high retention activity. The activity of the immobilized enzyme was influenced by its loading, being suppressed when more than 0.6 mg enzyme was used in the immobilization. The biosensor showing the highest response to glucose utilized 0.21 ml/cm2 thick chitosan membrane. The optimum experimental conditions for the biosensors in analysing glucose dissolved in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) were found to be 35°C and 0.6 V applied potential. The introduced biosensor reached a steady-state current at 60 s. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (KMapp) of the biosensor was 14.2350 mM, and its detection limit was 0.05 mM at s/n > 3, determined experimentally. The RSD of repeatability and reproducibility of the biosensor were 2.30% and 3.70%, respectively. The biosensor was showed good stability; it retained ~36% of initial activity after two months of investigation. The performance of the biosensors was evaluated by determining the glucose content in fruit homogenates. Their accuracy was compared to that of a commercial glucose assay kit. There was no significance different between two methods, indicating the introduced biosensor is reliable. PMID:25789757

  12. Development of an amperometric-based glucose biosensor to measure the glucose content of fruit.

    PubMed

    Ang, Lee Fung; Por, Lip Yee; Yam, Mun Fei

    2015-01-01

    An amperometric enzyme-electrode was introduced where glucose oxidase (GOD) was immobilized on chitosan membrane via crosslinking, and then fastened on a platinum working electrode. The immobilized enzyme showed relatively high retention activity. The activity of the immobilized enzyme was influenced by its loading, being suppressed when more than 0.6 mg enzyme was used in the immobilization. The biosensor showing the highest response to glucose utilized 0.21 ml/cm2 thick chitosan membrane. The optimum experimental conditions for the biosensors in analysing glucose dissolved in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) were found to be 35°C and 0.6 V applied potential. The introduced biosensor reached a steady-state current at 60 s. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant ([Formula: see text]) of the biosensor was 14.2350 mM, and its detection limit was 0.05 mM at s/n > 3, determined experimentally. The RSD of repeatability and reproducibility of the biosensor were 2.30% and 3.70%, respectively. The biosensor was showed good stability; it retained ~36% of initial activity after two months of investigation. The performance of the biosensors was evaluated by determining the glucose content in fruit homogenates. Their accuracy was compared to that of a commercial glucose assay kit. There was no significance different between two methods, indicating the introduced biosensor is reliable. PMID:25789757

  13. Hdac1 and Hdac2 act redundantly to control p63 and p53 functions in epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    LeBoeuf, Matthew; Terrell, Anne; Trivedi, Sohum; Sinha, Satrajit; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Olson, Eric N.; Morrisey, Edward E.; Millar, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Epidermal and hair follicle development from surface ectodermal progenitor cells require coordinated changes in gene expression. Histone deacetylases alter gene expression programs through modification of chromatin and transcription factors. We find that deletion of ectodermal Hdac1 and Hdac2 results in dramatic failure of hair follicle specification and epidermal proliferation and stratification, phenocopying loss of the key ectodermal transcription factor p63. While expression of p63 and its positively regulated basal cell targets is maintained in Hdac1/2 deficient ectoderm, targets of p63-mediated repression, including p21, 14-3-3σ and p16/INK4a, are ectopically expressed, and HDACs bind and are active at their promoter regions in normal undifferentiated keratinocytes. Mutant embryos display increased levels of acetylated p53, which opposes p63 functions, and p53 is required for HDAC inhibitor-mediated p21 expression in keratinocytes. Our data identify critical requirements for HDAC1/2 in epidermal development, and indicate that HDAC1/2 directly mediate repressive functions of p63, and suppress p53 activity. PMID:21093383

  14. Thermoinactivation Mechanism of Glucose Isomerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Leng Hong; Saville, Bradley A.

    In this article, the mechanisms of thermoinactivation of glucose isomerase (GI) from Streptomyces rubiginosus (in soluble and immobilized forms) were investigated, particularly the contributions of thiol oxidation of the enzyme's cysteine residue and a "Maillard-like" reaction between the enzyme and sugars in high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). Soluble GI (SGI) was successfully immobilized on silica gel (13.5 μm particle size), with an activity yield between 20 and 40%. The immobilized GI (IGI) has high enzyme retention on the support during the glucose isomerization process. In batch reactors, SGI (half-life =145 h) was more stable than IGI (half-life=27 h) at 60°C in HFCS, whereas at 80°C, IGI (half-life=12 h) was more stable than SGI (half-life=5.2 h). IGI was subject to thiol oxidation at 60°C, which contributed to the enzyme's deactivation. IGI was subject to thiol oxidation at 80°C, but this did not contribute to the deactivation of the enzyme. SGI did not undergo thiol oxidation at 60°C, but at 80°C SGI underwent severe precipitation and thiol oxidation, which caused the enzyme to deactivate. Experimental results show that immobilization suppresses the destablizing effect of thiol oxidation on GI. A "Maillard-like" reaction between SGI and the sugars also caused SGI thermoinactivation at 60, 70, and 80°C, but had minimal effect on IGI. At 60 and 80°C, IGI had higher thermostability in continuous reactors than in batch reactors, possibily because of reduced contact with deleterious compounds in HFCS.

  15. Epidermal growth factor and growth in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) causes a dose-dependent thickening of the epidermis in suckling mice. The cellular mechanisms underlying this thickening were analyzed by measuring the effect of EGF on the cell-cycle. Neonatal mice were given daily injections of either 2ug EGF/g body weight/day or an equivalent volume of saline, and on the seventh day received a single injection of /sup 3/H-thymidine. At various times the mice were perfused with fixative; 1um sections of skin were stained with a modification of Harris' hematoxylin and were autoradiographed. The sections were analyzed using three methods based on the dependence on time after injection of /sup 3/H-thymidine of: frequency of labelled mitoses, labelling index, and reciprocal grains/nucleus. It was found that EGF caused a two-fold increase in the cell production rate. The effect of exogenous EGF on the morphology of gastric mucosa and incisors of suckling mice was also studied. The gastric mucosa appeared thicker in EGF-treated animals, but the effect was not statistically significant. In contrast to its effect on epidermis and gastric mucosa, EGF caused a significant, dose-dependent decrease in the size of the incisors. Because the mouse submandibular salivary gland is the major source of EGF the effect of sialoadenectomy on female reproductive functions was examined. Ablation of the submandibular gland had no effect on: length of estrus cycle, ability of the female to produce litters, length of the gestation period, litter size, and weight of the litter at birth. There was also no effect on survival of the offspring or on age at which the eyelids separated.

  16. Fluorescence lifetime to image epidermal ionic concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behne, Martin J.; Barry, Nicholas P.; Moll, Ingrid; Gratton, Enrico; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2004-09-01

    Measurements of ionic concentrations in skin have traditionally been performed with an array of methods which either did not reveal detailed localization information, or only provided qualitative, not quantitative information. FLIM combines a number of advantages into a method ideally suited to visualize concentrations of ions such as H+ in intact, unperturbed epidermis and stratum corneum (SC). Fluorescence lifetime is dye concentration-independent, the method requires only low light intensities and is therefore not prone to photobleaching or phototoxic artifacts, and because multiphoton lasers of IR wavelength are used, light penetrates deep into intact tissue. The standard method to measure SC pH is the flat pH electrode, which provides reliable information only about surface pH changes, without further vertical or subcellular spatial resolution; i.e., specific microdomains such as the corneocyte interstices are not resolved, and the deeper SC is inaccessible without resorting to inherently disruptive stripping methods. Furthermore, the concept of a gradient of pH through the SC stems from such stripping experiments, but other confirmation for this concept is lacking. Our investigations into the SC pH distribution so far have revealed the crucial role of the Sodium/Hydrogen Antiporter NHE1 in generation of SC acidity, the colocalization of enzymatic lipid processing activity in the SC with acidic domains of the SC, and the timing and localization of emerging acidity in the SC of newborns. Together, these results have led to an improved understanding of the SC pH, its distribution, origin, and regulation. Future uses for this method include measurements of other ions important for epidermal processes, such as Ca2+, and a quantitative approach to topical drug penetration.

  17. Non-enzymatic glucose sensing by enhanced Raman spectroscopy on flexible 'as-grown' CVD graphene.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Surojit; Li, Mau-Shiun; Kumar Roy, Pradip; Wu, C T

    2015-06-21

    Unmodified, as-grown few layered graphene on copper substrates have been used for glucose sensing using Raman spectroscopy. Graphene with a stronger 2D band is a better Raman enhancer with significant fluorescence suppression and finer line widths of the Raman signals. The origin of the graphene enhanced Raman spectroscopy (GERS) signal of glucose is attributed to a fractional charge transfer (calculated to be 0.006 using electrochemical parameters) between glucose and graphene aided by a possible π-π interaction. Physiological concentrations of glucose (10-500 mg dl(-1)) in PBS have been used for the study. For each glucose concentration, the spectral reproducibility is within 5-25% as calculated by the relative standard deviation of several measurements. The intensity ratio of the 1122 cm(-1) peak of glucose and the 2D peak of graphene varied linearly with the glucose concentration and can be used as a calibration curve for unknown sample measurements. PMID:25939991

  18. Hybrid CARS for Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Pestov, Dmitry; Zhang, Aihua; Murawski, Robert; Sokolov, Alexei; Welch, George; Laane, Jaan; Scully, Marlan

    2007-10-01

    We develop a spectroscopy technique that combines the advantages of both the frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and the time-resolved CARS. We use broadband preparation pulses to get an instantaneous coherent excitation of multiplex molecular vibration levels and subsequent optically shaped time-delayed narrowband probing pulse to detect these vibrations. This technique can suppress the nonresonant background and retrieve the molecular fingerprint signal efficiently and rapidly. We employ this technique to glucose detection, the final goal of which is accurate, non-invasive (i.e. painless) and continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration in the Diabetes diagnosis to replace the current glucose measurement process, which requires painful fingerpricks and therefore cannot be performed more than a few times a day. We have gotten the CARS spectra of glucose aqueous solution down to 2 mM.

  19. Glucose homoeostasis following injury.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    Metabolic changes following injury have been observed for many years, and John Hunter discussed such changes in 1794. Changes in carbohydrate metabolism have been observed for a similar length of time, and glycosuria and hyperglycaemia have been reported by a number of observers. This paper records and quantitates the extent of hyperglycaemia in patients undergoing surgery of different degrees of severity and relates them to changes in blood insulin, growth hormone, cortisol, and catecholamine concentrations. Further animal studies were performed which suggested that a fall in intracellular glucose utilisation may be a contributory factor. The use of isotope labelling of glucose in man has enabled further studies to be done to clarify changes in exchangeable glucose mass, replacement rate, and space both in the normal situation and in the presence of infusions of glucagon, noradrenaline, glucose, and amino-acids. The hyperglycaemia is clearly the result of a complex interaction of changes in the availability and activity of hormones which control glucose metabolism both within and outside the cell. PMID:496234

  20. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    Dexamethasone suppression test measures whether adrenocorticotrophic hormone ( ACTH ) secretion by the pituitary can be suppressed. ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong ... your blood is drawn so that the cortisol level in your blood ...

  1. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  2. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  3. Effect of Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test on Bone Turnover Markers in Adults with Normal Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Shou-Kui; Wan, Jing-Bo; Jiang, Xiao-Hong; Zhu, Yong-Hua; Ma, Jin-Hong; Hua, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background It is well known that enteral nutrients result in acute suppression of bone turnover markers (BTMs), and incretin hormones are believed to play a significant role in this physiological skeletal response. However, there is limited research exploring the impact of parenteral nutrients on BTMs. Our aim was to assess the influence of intravenous glucose on BTMs in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). Material/Methods We conducted 1-h intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) in 24 subjects with NGT. Blood samples were collected before and 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60 min after administration of glucose, then serum levels of bone formation marker procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and resorption marker C-terminal cross-linking telopeptides of collagen type I (CTX) were measured. Results During IVGTT, the fasting CTX level fell gradually and reached a nadir of 80.4% of the basal value at 60 min. Conversely, the fasting P1NP level decreased mildly and reached a nadir of 90.6% of the basal value at 15 min, then gradually increased and reached 96.6% at 60 min. The CTX-to-P1NP ratio increased slightly and reached a peak of 104.3% of the basal value at 10 min, then fell gradually and reached a nadir of 83% at 60 min. Conclusions Our study indicates that intravenous glucose results in an acute suppression of BTMs in the absence of incretin hormones. The mechanism responsible for this needs further investigation. PMID:27447783

  4. Effect of Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test on Bone Turnover Markers in Adults with Normal Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Shou-Kui; Wan, Jing-Bo; Jiang, Xiao-Hong; Zhu, Yong-Hua; Ma, Jin-Hong; Hua, Fei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is well known that enteral nutrients result in acute suppression of bone turnover markers (BTMs), and incretin hormones are believed to play a significant role in this physiological skeletal response. However, there is limited research exploring the impact of parenteral nutrients on BTMs. Our aim was to assess the influence of intravenous glucose on BTMs in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted 1-h intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) in 24 subjects with NGT. Blood samples were collected before and 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60 min after administration of glucose, then serum levels of bone formation marker procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and resorption marker C-terminal cross-linking telopeptides of collagen type I (CTX) were measured. RESULTS During IVGTT, the fasting CTX level fell gradually and reached a nadir of 80.4% of the basal value at 60 min. Conversely, the fasting P1NP level decreased mildly and reached a nadir of 90.6% of the basal value at 15 min, then gradually increased and reached 96.6% at 60 min. The CTX-to-P1NP ratio increased slightly and reached a peak of 104.3% of the basal value at 10 min, then fell gradually and reached a nadir of 83% at 60 min. CONCLUSIONS Our study indicates that intravenous glucose results in an acute suppression of BTMs in the absence of incretin hormones. The mechanism responsible for this needs further investigation. PMID:27447783

  5. Effects of preoperative and intraoperative glucose administration on glucose use and fat catabolism during laparotomy under sevoflurane anesthesia in fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshiteru; Kitamura, Takayuki; Kawamura, Gaku; Sato, Kanako; Sato, Rui; Araki, Yuko; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2015-11-01

    Preoperative fasting as well as surgical stress significantly modifies metabolisms. Recent studies reported the possible advantageous effects of glucose administration on perioperative metabolisms; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Rats were allocated to three groups. During the fasting period, groups A and B were administered water, but group C was administered glucose. During laparotomy and the insulin tolerance test (ITT) under sevoflurane anesthesia, group A was administered saline, but groups B and C were administered glucose. During laparotomy, group C showed higher glucose levels and lower β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) levels than group A, and group B showed more decreases in β-OHB levels than group A without differences in changes in glucose levels. Insulin levels and insulin sensitivity during laparotomy were similar among the three groups. No significant difference in insulin sensitivity was also confirmed in ITT. In conclusion, perioperative glucose administration suppresses lipolysis without affecting insulin secretion and sensitivity. PMID:26280893

  6. Leukemia inhibitory factor increases glucose uptake in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Nina; O'Neill, Hayley M; Kleinert, Maximilian; Schjerling, Peter; Vernet, Erik; Steinberg, Gregory R; Richter, Erik A; Jørgensen, Sebastian B

    2015-07-15

    Members of the IL-6 family, IL-6 and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), have been shown to increase glucose uptake and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. However, the metabolic effects of another family member, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), are not well characterized. Effects of LIF on skeletal muscle glucose uptake and palmitate oxidation and signaling were investigated in ex vivo incubated mouse soleus and EDL muscles from muscle-specific AMPKα2 kinase-dead, muscle-specific SOCS3 knockout, and lean and high-fat-fed mice. Inhibitors were used to investigate involvement of specific signaling pathways. LIF increased muscle glucose uptake in dose (50-5,000 pM/l) and time-dependent manners with maximal effects at the 30-min time point. LIF increased Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation (P) in soleus and EDL, whereas AMPK Thr(172) P was unaffected. Incubation with parthenolide abolished LIF-induced glucose uptake and STAT3 Tyr(705) P, whereas incubation with LY-294002 and wortmannin suppressed both basal and LIF-induced glucose uptake and Akt Ser(473) P, indicating that JAK and PI 3-kinase signaling is required for LIF-stimulated glucose uptake. Incubation with rapamycin and AZD8055 indicated that mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)2, but not mTORC1, also is required for LIF-stimulated glucose uptake. In contrast to CNTF, LIF stimulation did not alter palmitate oxidation. LIF-stimulated glucose uptake was maintained in EDL from obese insulin-resistant mice, whereas soleus developed LIF resistance. Lack of SOCS3 and AMPKα2 did not affect LIF-stimulated glucose uptake. In conclusion, LIF acutely increased muscle glucose uptake by a mechanism potentially involving the PI 3-kinase/mTORC2/Akt pathway and is not impaired in EDL muscle from obese insulin-resistant mice. PMID:25968579

  7. Do epidermal lens cells facilitate the absorptance of diffuse light?

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Craig R; Vogelmann, Thomas C

    2007-07-01

    Many understory plants rely on diffuse light for photosynthesis because direct light is usually scattered by upper canopy layers before it strikes the forest floor. There is a considerable gap in the literature concerning the interaction of direct and diffuse light with leaves. Some understory plants have well-developed lens-shaped epidermal cells, which have long been thought to increase the absorption of diffuse light. To assess the role of epidermal cell shape in capturing direct vs. diffuse light, we measured leaf reflectance and transmittance with an integrating sphere system using leaves with flat (Begonia erythrophylla, Citrus reticulata, and Ficus benjamina) and lens-shaped epidermal cells (B. bowerae, Colocasia esculenta, and Impatiens velvetea). In all species examined, more light was absorbed when leaves were irradiated with direct as opposed to diffuse light. When leaves were irradiated with diffuse light, more light was transmitted and more was reflected in both leaf types, resulting in absorptance values 2-3% lower than in leaves irradiated with direct light. These data suggest that lens-shaped epidermal cells do not aid the capture of diffuse light. Palisade and mesophyll cell anatomy and leaf thickness appear to have more influence in the capture and absorption of light than does epidermal cell shape. PMID:21636475

  8. Epidermal skin grafting in vitiligo: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Janowska, Agata; Dini, Valentina; Panduri, Salvatore; Macchia, Michela; Oranges, Teresa; Romanelli, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Vitiligo is a multifactorial acquired dermatosis characterised by achromic or hypochromic macules and by the absence of functioning melanocytes. Treatment depends on the extent of the affected areas and on disease activity. Surgical techniques have proven to be effective in stable cases but can be time-consuming and, in some cases, aesthetically unsatisfying or painful for the patients. The aim of the study was to assess the clinical safety and effectiveness of a new automatic epidermal skin harvesting device in patients with stable localised vitiligo over a minimum 12-month period. This new system (CELLUTOME™ Epidermal Harvesting System, KCI, an ACELITY Company, San Antonio, TX) is a commercially available epidermal skin harvesting system that can be used without local anaesthesia or other pre-treatments and has been shown to have low rates of donor site morbidity. Epidermal skin grafts can used in patients with acute and hard to heal chronic wounds, burns and stable vitiligo. The use of advanced therapies may improve the quality of life, have cost benefits and accelerate re-pigmentation of patients with vitiligo. In our preliminary study, this system was seen to be a safe and efficacious means of harvesting epidermal micrografts containing melanocytes for use in patients with stable vitiligo unresponsive to standard therapies. PMID:27547963

  9. Influence of Continuous Physiologic Hyperinsulinemia on Glucose Kinetics and Counterregulatory Hormones in Normal and Diabetic Humans

    PubMed Central

    Saccà, Luigi; Sherwin, Robert; Hendler, Rosa; Felig, Philip

    1979-01-01

    suppression of glucose output, which showed a twofold greater decline (60±6%) than in controls (27±5%, P <0.01) and remained suppressed throughout the insulin infusion. In contrast, the late stabilization in plasma glucose was a result of a fall in glucose uptake to values 50% below basal (P < 0.001) and 39% below that observed in controls at termination of the insulin infusion (P < 0.01). Plasma norepinephrine and glucagon failed to rise during the insulin infusion, whereas plasma epinephrine, cortisol, and growth hormone rose to values comparable to controls receiving the same insulin dose. It is concluded that (a) in normal and diabetic subjects, physiologic hyperinsulinemia results in an initial decline followed by stabilization of plasma glucose despite ongoing infusion of insulin; (b) in the normal subjects, a rebound increase in glucose output is the initial or principal mechanism counteracting the fall in plasma glucose and occurs (with an insulin dose of 0.25 mU/kg per min) in the absence of a rise in circulating counterregulatory hormones; (c) in diabetics, although the changes in plasma glucose are comparable to controls, the initial decline is a result of an exaggerated suppression of glucose output, whereas the stabilization of plasma glucose occurs primarily as a consequence of an exaggerated fall in glucose uptake; and (d) failure of plasma norepinephrine as well as glucagon to rise in the diabetics may contribute to the exaggerated suppression of glucose output. PMID:447832

  10. How to monitor blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Trisha

    2016-01-27

    Rationale and key points Capillary blood glucose monitoring is an essential component of diabetes care. Blood glucose tests provide important information about how the body is controlling blood glucose metabolism, and the effect of glucose-lowering medicines, illness and stress. ▶ The nurse should consider the rationale for testing blood glucose each time they perform a test, and reflect on the result, taking into consideration the patient's blood glucose target range and recommended care guidelines. ▶ Blood glucose testing times and testing frequency should be planned to suit the glucose-lowering medicine regimen and the clinical situation. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. What you have gained from this article. 2. How this article will influence your practice when monitoring blood glucose. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26967884

  11. Epidermal Choristoma of the Tongue Mimicking a Congenital Melanotic Macule.

    PubMed

    Curto-Barredo, Laia; Vicente, Asunción; Rovira, Carlota; García-Diez, Eloy; Pujol, Ramón M; González-Enseñat, Maria Antonia

    2015-01-01

    We report the fifth case of epidermal choristoma of the oral cavity in a Caucasian newborn with a congenital melanotic macule on the dorsum of the tongue. Epidermal choristoma is an exceedingly rare and benign condition probably caused by a developmental abnormality. It is identified according to the presence of normal skin in an abnormal location. Histologically it is identified according to areas of stratified epithelium and hyperpigmentation of the basal layer along with cutaneous adnexal structures (hair follicles, sebaceous or sweat glands). The clinical presentation is variable, but most of the cases described presented with a congenital lingual pigmented macule. These lesions should be included within the differential diagnosis of congenital lingual macules and distinguished from other entities such as congenital lingual melanotic macules and melanocytic lesions. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. Epidermal choristoma is a benign condition that probably is underdiagnosed because it is a new and rare entity, and dermatologists should be aware of it. PMID:25529319

  12. A Ruptured Digital Epidermal Inclusion Cyst: A Sinister Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Phillip; Ragg, Amanda; Vane, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal inclusion cysts are benign cutaneous lesions caused by dermal or subdermal implantation and proliferation of epidermal squamous epithelium as a result of trauma or surgery. They are typically located on the scalp, face, trunk, neck, or back; however they can be found anywhere on the body. Lesions are asymptomatic unless complicated by rupture, malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma, or infection at which point they can clinically appear as more sinister pathologies. We present the case of a 45-year-old laborer with a ruptured epidermal inclusion cyst, manifesting clinically and radiographically as a malignancy. Following MRI, definitive surgical management may appear to be a logical progression in management of the patient. This case however is a good example of why meticulously following surgical protocol when evaluating an unknown soft tissue mass is imperative. By following protocol, an alternate diagnosis was made and the patient has since gone on to a make a full recovery without life transforming surgery. PMID:27418992

  13. A Ruptured Digital Epidermal Inclusion Cyst: A Sinister Presentation.

    PubMed

    Bohler, Iain; Fletcher, Phillip; Ragg, Amanda; Vane, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal inclusion cysts are benign cutaneous lesions caused by dermal or subdermal implantation and proliferation of epidermal squamous epithelium as a result of trauma or surgery. They are typically located on the scalp, face, trunk, neck, or back; however they can be found anywhere on the body. Lesions are asymptomatic unless complicated by rupture, malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma, or infection at which point they can clinically appear as more sinister pathologies. We present the case of a 45-year-old laborer with a ruptured epidermal inclusion cyst, manifesting clinically and radiographically as a malignancy. Following MRI, definitive surgical management may appear to be a logical progression in management of the patient. This case however is a good example of why meticulously following surgical protocol when evaluating an unknown soft tissue mass is imperative. By following protocol, an alternate diagnosis was made and the patient has since gone on to a make a full recovery without life transforming surgery. PMID:27418992

  14. Cutaneous adverse reactions specific to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, I; Voiculescu, VM; Bacalbasa, N; Prie, BE; Cojocaru, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2015-01-01

    Classical antineoplastic therapy is encumbered by extensively studied adverse reactions, most often of systemic nature. The emergence of new generations of anticancer treatments, including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, besides improving the response to treatment and the survival rate, is accompanied by the occurrence of new specific side effects, incompletely studied. These side effects are most often cutaneous (hand foot syndrome, acneiform reactions), and in some cases are extremely severe, requiring dose reduction or drug discontinuation. The prevention of the cutaneous adverse effects and their treatment require a close collaboration between the oncologist and the dermatologist. The occurrence of some of these skin adverse effects may be a favorable prognostic factor for the response to the cancer treatment and the overall survival. Abbreviations: EGFR = epidermal growth factor receptors; EGFRI = epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors PMID:26361513

  15. Dermal and epidermal chromatophores of the Antarctic teleost Trematomus bernacchii.

    PubMed

    Obika, M; Meyer-Rochow, V B

    1990-01-01

    The physiological response and ultrastructure of the pigment cells of Trematomus bernacchii, an Antarctic teleost that lives under the sea ice north of the Ross Ice Shelf, were studied. In the integument, two types of epidermal chromatophores, melanophores and xanthophores, were found; in the dermis, typically three types of chromatophores--melanophores, xanthophores, and iridophores--were observed. The occurrence of epidermal xanthophore is reported for the first time in fish. Dermal melanophores and xanthophores have well-developed arrays of cytoplasmic microtubules. They responded rapidly to epinephrine and teleost melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) with pigment aggregation and to theophylline with pigment dispersion. Total darkness elicited pigment aggregation in the majority of dermal xanthophores of isolated scales, whereas melanophores remained dispersed under both light and dark conditions. Pigment organelles of epidermal and dermal xanthophores that translocate during the pigmentary responses are carotenoid droplets of relatively large size. Dermal iridophores containing large reflecting platelets appeared to be immobile. PMID:2377579

  16. High-glucose environment increased thrombospondin-1 expression in keratinocytes via DNA hypomethylation.

    PubMed

    Lan, Cheng-Che E; Huang, Shu-Mei; Wu, Ching-Shuang; Wu, Chin-Han; Chen, Gwo-Shing

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes is an important health issue because of its increasing prevalence and association with impaired wound healing. Epidermal keratinocytes with overexpressed antiangiogenic molecule thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) have been shown to impair proper wound healing. This study examined the potential involvement of keratinocyte-derived TSP1 on diabetic wound healing. Cultured human keratinocytes and diabetic rat model were used to evaluate the effect of high-glucose environment on TSP1 expression in epidermal keratinocytes, and the molecular mechanisms involved in the process were also studied. We demonstrated that high-glucose environment increased TSP1 expression in keratinocytes. In addition, increased oxidative stress induced DNA hypomethylation at the TSP1 promoter region in keratinocytes exposed to high-glucose environment. Similar findings were found in our diabetic rat model. Early antioxidant administration normalized TSP1 expression and global DNA methylation status in diabetic rat skin and improved wound healing in vivo. Because oxidative stress contributed to TSP1 DNA hypomethylation, early recognition of diabetic condition and timely administration of antioxidant are logical approaches to reduce complications associated with diabetes as alterations in epigenome may not be reversible by controlling glucose levels during the later stages of disease course. PMID:26678678

  17. Role of epidermal γδ T-cell-derived interleukin 13 in the skin-whitening effect of Ginsenoside F1.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiyeon; Lee, Eunkyung; Kim, EunJoo; Yeom, Myung Hun; Kwon, Ohsang; Yoon, Tae Hong; Lee, Tae Ryong; Kim, Kwangmi

    2014-11-01

    Ginsenoside F1 (GF1) is a metabolite of ginsenoside Rg1. Although GF1 has several benefits for skin physiology, the effect of GF1 on skin pigmentation has not been reported. We found that a cream containing 0.1% GF1 showed a significant whitening effect on artificially tanned human skin after 8 weeks of application. However, GF1 did not inhibit mRNA expression of tyrosinase or dopachrome tautomerase (DCT) in normal human epidermal melanocytes (NHEMs) or cocultured NHEMs/normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Interestingly, GF1 enhanced production of interleukin 13 (IL-13) from human epidermal γδ T cells. IL-13 significantly reduced the mRNA expression and protein amount of both tyrosinase and DCT and reduced melanin synthesis activities in NHEMs, resulting in visible brightening of NHEM pellet. These results suggest that enhancement of IL-13 production by GF1 from epidermal γδ T cells might play a role in the skin-whitening effect of GF1 via the suppression of tyrosinase and DCT. PMID:25091975

  18. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate attenuates the AIM2-induced secretion of IL-1β in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Yun, Mihee; Seo, Gimoon; Lee, Ji-Young; Chae, Gue Tae; Lee, Seong-Beom

    2015-11-27

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Keratinocytes are a major source of IL-1β and express absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2). AIM2 recognizes a double-stranded DNA and initiates the IL-1β-processing of inflammasome. The AIM2 inflammasome is a cytosolic multiprotein complex composed of AIM2, an apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), and pro-caspase-1. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenolic component of green tea, has anti-inflammatory properties. In the current study, we investigated the issue of whether or how EGCG suppresses AIM2 inflammasome in human epidermal keratinocytes, neonatal (HEKn). Treatment with EGCG, before or after IFN-γ priming, attenuated poly(dA:dT)-induced IL-1β secretion in HEKn cells. Pre-treatment with EGCG reduced the level of IFN-γ-induced priming signal via the down-regulation of pro-IL-1β and pro-capspase-1 in HEKn cells. Furthermore, treatment with EGCG attenuated poly(dA:dT)-induced ASC oligomerization and caspase-1 activation in IFN-γ-primed HEKn cells. These results suggest that EGCG attenuates AIM2-induced IL-1β secretion by suppressing both IFN-γ-mediated priming and poly(dA:dT)-induced ASC oligomerization of inflammasomes in human epidermal keratinocytes. PMID:26494301

  19. Deconstructing the skin: cytoarchitectural determinants of epidermal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Cory L.; Patel, Dipal M.; Green, Kathleen J.

    2012-01-01

    To provide a stable environmental barrier, the epidermis requires an integrated network of cytoskeletal elements and cellular junctions. Nevertheless, the epidermis ranks among the body’s most dynamic tissues, continually regenerating itself and responding to cutaneous insults. As keratinocytes journey from the basal compartment towards the cornified layers, they completely reorganize their adhesive junctions and cytoskeleton. These architectural components are more than just rivets and scaffolds — they are active participants in epidermal morphogenesis that regulate epidermal polarization, signalling and barrier formation. PMID:21860392

  20. Epidermal Inclusion Cyst Presenting as a Palpable Scrotal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Andres F.; Gayed, Bishoy A.; Tublin, Mitchell E.; Parwani, Anil V.; Gingrich, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    We report a scrotal epidermal inclusion cyst located outside the median raphe which a rare entity in the absence of trauma and few cases have been reported. 47 year old male presents with a complaint of right sided testicular swelling and discomfort. On examination a 3 cm mass was palpated between the scrotum and the medial thigh on the subcutaneous tissue with a positive slip sign. Complete surgical excision of the cyst was performed. Histopathology confirmed epidermal inclusion cyst with no evidence of malignancy. PMID:23094187

  1. Bilateral Systematized Epidermolytic Verrucous Epidermal Nevus: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vivek; Saha, Abanti; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Das, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Verrucous epidermal nevi are congenital, noninflammatory cutaneous hamartomas composed of keratinocytes. They follow the lines of Blaschko and show hyperkeratosis without cellular atypia. The routine histology shows variable amount of hyperkeratosis, acanthosis and papillomatosis and rarely epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. We saw a 3-year-old boy with bilaterally symmetrical, systematized verrucous plaques along the lines of Blaschko extensively involving the trunk and extremities but sparing the face and palmoplantar skin. Histopathology showed features of epidermal nevi with prominent epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. We report here the case for the rarity of this entity. PMID:26288413

  2. Blood glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Davey, Sarah

    2014-06-10

    I found the CPD article on blood glucose monitoring and management in acute stroke care interesting and informative. As I am a mental health nursing student, my knowledge of chronic physical conditions is limited, so I learned a lot. PMID:24894257

  3. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  4. Glucose urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a color-sensitive pad. The color the dipstick changes to tells the provider the level of glucose in your urine. If needed, your provider may ask you to collect your urine at home over 24 hours . Your provider will tell you how to do ...

  5. Renal Glucose Handling

    PubMed Central

    Ferrannini, Ele; Veltkamp, Stephan A.; Smulders, Ronald A.; Kadokura, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ipragliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, stimulates glycosuria and lowers glycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The objective of this study was to assess the pharmacodynamics of ipragliflozin in T2DM patients with impaired renal function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Glycosuria was measured before and after a single ipragliflozin dose in 8 nondiabetic subjects and 57 T2DM patients (age 62 ± 9 years, fasting glucose 133 ± 39 mg/dL, mean ± SD) with normal renal function (assessed as the estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR]) (eGFR1 ≥90 mL · min–1 · 1.73 m−2), mild (eGFR2 ≥60 to <90), moderate (eGFR3 ≥30 to <60), or severe reduction in eGFR (eGFR4 ≤15 to <30). RESULTS Ipragliflozin significantly increased urinary glucose excretion in each eGFR class (P < 0.0001). However, ipragliflozin-induced glycosuria declined (median [IQR]) across eGFR class (from 46 mg/min [33] in eGFR1 to 8 mg/min [7] in eGFR4, P < 0.001). Ipragliflozin-induced fractional glucose excretion (excretion/filtration) was 39% [27] in the T2DM patients (pooled data), similar to that of the nondiabetic subjects (37% [17], P = ns). In bivariate analysis of the pooled data, ipragliflozin-induced glycosuria was directly related to eGFR and fasting glucose (P < 0.0001 for both, r2 = 0.55), predicting a decrement in 24-h glycosuria of 15 g for each 20 mL/min decline in eGFR and an increase of 7 g for each 10 mg/dL increase in glucose above fasting normoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS In T2DM patients, ipragliflozin increases glycosuria in direct, linear proportion to GFR and degree of hyperglycemia, such that its amount can be reliably predicted in the individual patient. Although absolute glycosuria decreases with declining GFR, the efficiency of ipragliflozin action (fractional glucose excretion) is maintained in patients with severe renal impairment. PMID:23359360

  6. Contribution of abnormal muscle and liver glucose metabolism to postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrakou, A.; Kelley, D.; Veneman, T.; Jenssen, T.; Pangburn, T.; Reilly, J.; Gerich, J. )

    1990-11-01

    To assess the role of muscle and liver in the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), we administered an oral glucose load enriched with (14C)glucose to 10 NIDDM subjects and 10 age- and weight-matched nondiabetic volunteers and compared muscle glucose disposal by measuring forearm balance of glucose, lactate, alanine, O2, and CO2. In addition, we used the dual-lable isotope method to compare overall rates of glucose appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd), suppression of endogenous glucose output, and splanchnic glucose sequestration. During the initial 1-1.5 h after glucose ingestion, plasma glucose increased by approximately 8 mM in NIDDM vs. approximately 3 mM in nondiabetic subjects (P less than 0.01); overall glucose Ra was nearly 11 g greater in NIDDM than nondiabetic subjects, but glucose Rd was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects. The greater overall glucose Ra of NIDDM subjects was due to 6.8 g greater endogenous glucose output (13.7 +/- 1.1 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.0 g, P less than 0.01) and 3.8 g less oral glucose splanchnic sequestration of the oral load (31.4 +/- 1.5 vs. 27.5 +/- 0.9 g, P less than 0.05). Although glucose taken up by muscle was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects (39.3 +/- 3.5 vs. 41.0 +/- 2.5 g/5 h), a greater amount of the glucose taken up by muscle in NIDDM was released as lactate and alanine (11.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 5.2 +/- 0.3 g in nondiabetic subjects, P less than 0.01), and less was stored (11.7 +/- 1.3 vs. 16.9 +/- 1.5 g, P less than 0.05). We conclude that increased systemic glucose delivery, due primarily to reduced suppression of endogenous hepatic glucose output and, to a lesser extent, reduced splanchnic glucose sequestration, is the predominant factor responsible for postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM.

  7. A link between hepatic glucose production and peripheral energy metabolism via hepatokines

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Wahed, Aya; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Casteras, Sylvie; Soty, Maud; Roussel, Damien; Romestaing, Caroline; Guillou, Hervé; Tourette, Jean-André; Pleche, Nicolas; Zitoun, Carine; Gri, Blandine; Sardella, Anne; Rajas, Fabienne; Mithieux, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a deterioration of glucose tolerance, which associates insulin resistance of glucose uptake by peripheral tissues and increased endogenous glucose production. Here we report that the specific suppression of hepatic glucose production positively modulates whole-body glucose and energy metabolism. We used mice deficient in liver glucose-6 phosphatase that is mandatory for endogenous glucose production. When they were fed a high fat/high sucrose diet, they resisted the development of diabetes and obesity due to the activation of peripheral glucose metabolism and thermogenesis. This was linked to the secretion of hepatic hormones like fibroblast growth factor 21 and angiopoietin-like factor 6. Interestingly, the deletion of hepatic glucose-6 phosphatase in previously obese and insulin-resistant mice resulted in the rapid restoration of glucose and body weight controls. Therefore, hepatic glucose production is an essential lever for the control of whole-body energy metabolism during the development of obesity and diabetes. PMID:25061558

  8. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effect of the feed contaminant deoxynivalenol on glucose absorption in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Awad, W A; Ghareeb, K; Zentek, J

    2014-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a major contaminant of cereals and grains, is of public health concern worldwide and has been shown to reduce the electrogenic transport of glucose. However, the full effects of Fusarium mycotoxins on nutrient absorption are still not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether decreased nutrient absorption was due to specific effects on transporter trafficking in the intestine and whether inhibition of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI-3-kinase) affected the electrogenic jejunal transport of glucose. Jejunal mucosa of 6-week-old broiler chickens were mounted in Ussing chambers and treated with DON, wortmannin (a specific inhibitor of PI-3-kinase), DON + wortmannin, phlorizin and cytochalasin B. DON was found to decrease the short-circuit current (Isc) after glucose addition. A similar decline in Isc after glucose addition was observed following pre-application of wortmannin, or phlorizin (Na(+)/glucose co-transporter, SGLT1 inhibitor). The results indicate that DON decreased glucose absorption in the absence of wortmannin or phlorizin but had no additional effect on glucose absorption in their presence. Glucose transport was not affected by cytochalasin B (facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT2 inhibitor). The study provides evidence that the suppressive effect of DON on the electrogenic transport of glucose may be due to an inhibitory activity of the PI3 kinase pathway and intestinal SGLT1. Furthermore, the effect of cytochalasin B on glucose transport in chicken tissues differs from that in mammals. PMID:25011710

  9. Epidermal nevus syndrome associated with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, CNS lipoma, and aplasia cutis.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Miguel; Aneiros, Angel; Monteagudo, Benigno; Santos-García, Diego; Suárez-Amor, Oscar; Ramírez-Santos, Aquilina

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal nevus syndrome is a rare congenital sporadic neurocutaneous disorder characterized by an epidermal nevus and various developmental abnormalities of the skin, eyes, nervous, cardiovascular and urogenital systems. We describe a patient with an extensive epidermal nevus associated with various organ abnormalities, particularly polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, central nervous system lipoma, and aplasia cutis. Our patient demonstrates the polymorphic spectrum of involvement in epidermal nevus syndrome. PMID:19951625

  10. Anti-epidermal-cell-surface pemphigus antibody detaches viable epidermal cells from culture plates by activation of proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Farb, R M; Dykes, R; Lazarus, G S

    1978-01-01

    Immunoglobulin from pemphigus patients binds to the surface of mouse epidermal cells in culture. Cells incubated with the pemphigus antibody are easily detached from culture plates whereas cells incubated with serum from normal patients remain on the plate. Pemphigus antibody-mediated cell detachment is blocked by the addition of the proteinase inhibitors soybean trypsin inhibitor and alpha2-macroglobulin to the culture media. Detachable cells are viable, and activation of the complement cascade is not necessary for cell detachment. The anti-cell-surface antibody of pemphigus appears to disrupt adhesion between viable epidermal cells by activation of proteinase. Images PMID:272663

  11. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Increases Cytokine Production and Cutaneous Inflammation in Response to Ultraviolet Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    El-Abaseri, Taghrid Bahig; Repertinger, Susan K.; Hansen, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is activated in cutaneous keratinocytes upon ultraviolet (UV) exposure and has been implicated in ultraviolet-(UV-)induced inflammation and skin tumorigenesis. Egfr mutant mice and EGFR inhibitors were used to investigate the hypothesis that EGFR activation augments inflammation following UV irradiation. Topical treatment of mouse skin with the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 before UV exposure suppressed UV-induced erythema, edema, mast cell infiltration, and neutrophil infiltration. Genetic ablation of Egfr and EGFR inhibition by AG1478 also suppressed the increase in the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α, KC (murine IL-8), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) after UV exposure of cultured keratinocytes. Finally, genetic ablation of inhibition of EGFR in cultured keratinocytes decreased p38 activation after UV, while inhibition of p38 kinase reduced COX-2 expression after UV. These data demonstrate that EGFR regulates multiple aspects of UV-induced inflammation and suggest activation of p38 kinase leading to increased COX-2 and cytokine expression as one mechanism through which it acts. PMID:23878744

  12. Glucose Metabolism in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Stephen A.; Stein, Stefanie; Hines, James

    1974-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose was examined in several clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Radiorespirometric studies revealed that growing cells metabolized glucose by a combination on the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways. A portion of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate formed via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway was recycled by conversion to glucose-6-phosphate. Subsequent catabolism of this glucose-6-phosphate by either the Entner-Doudoroff or pentose phosphate pathways yielded CO2 from the original C6 of glucose. Enzyme analyses confirmed the presence of all enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff, pentose phosphate, and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathways. There was always a high specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) relative to that of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.44). The glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase utilized either nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as electron acceptor. Acetate was the only detectable nongaseous end product of glucose metabolism. Following the disappearance of glucose, acetate was metabolized by the tricarboxylic acid cycle as evidenced by the preferential oxidation of [1-14C]acetate over that of [2-14C]acetate. When an aerobically grown log-phase culture was subjected to anaerobic conditions, lactate and acetate were formed from glucose. Radiorespirometric studies showed that under these conditions, glucose was dissimilated entirely by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Further studies determined that this anaerobic dissimilation of glucose was not growth dependent. PMID:4156358

  13. Evaluation of Epidermal Conductance as a Potential Drought Tolerant Trait of Peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidermal conductance (ge) is the loss of water vapor from leaves when stomata are closed. An experiment was conducted to compare epidermal conductance values of peanut genotypes with varied levels of field resistance to drought to assess ge as a potential drought response trait in peanut. Epidermal...

  14. Fate by Chance, not by Choice: Epidermal Stem Cells Go Live.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Celeiro, Meryem; Zhang, Bing; Hsu, Ya-Chieh

    2016-07-01

    The skin epidermis is constantly renewed by epidermal stem cells. In a recent Science paper, Rompolas et al. utilize live imaging to track epidermal stem cells over their lifetimes. Their findings provide new insights into epidermal stem cell behaviors and unravel how newly generated cells are integrated into pre-existing tissues. PMID:27392221

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis Enable Javascript to view ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) is a ...

  16. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  17. Fatal case of cephalexin-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Gerard R; Dreskin, Stephen C; Lindberg, Gordon K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a case of toxic epidermal necrolysis likely caused by cephalexin with a review of the literature. Case: An 80-year-old male with a known allergy to cephalosporins, residing at a long-term acute care hospital, received cephalexin for a urinary tract infection. And 1 day after starting therapy, the patient developed an extensive erythematous rash accompanied by skin sloughing; 4 days after receiving cephalexin, the patient was directly admitted to the burn intensive care unit and was diagnosed with toxic epidermal necrolysis involving 56% of the total body surface area. Progressive deterioration to multisystem organ failure ensued, and the patient died 5 days following his admission to the burn intensive care unit. At the time of death, ulcerations were noted over approximately 80% of his body. Summary: The temporal association of the patient’s ingestion of cephalexin for a urinary tract infection to his onset of toxic epidermal necrolysis suggests that this 80-year-old man developed toxic epidermal necrolysis following the administration of cephalexin for a urinary tract infection. PMID:27489646

  18. The "caveolae brake hypothesis" and the epidermal barrier.

    PubMed

    Roelandt, Truus; Giddelo, Christina; Heughebaert, Carol; Denecker, Geertrui; Hupe, Melanie; Crumrine, Debra; Kusuma, Andy; Haftek, Marek; Roseeuw, Diane; Declercq, Wim; Feingold, Kenneth R; Elias, Peter M; Hachem, Jean-Pierre

    2009-04-01

    Epidermal permeability barrier formation depends upon lamellar body (LB) secretion/fusion with the apical plasma membrane (APM) of outermost stratum granulosum (SG) cell, creating cholesterol/glycosphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts-like domains. We found that the dimensions of these domains are comparable to lipid raft in other cell types; and that acute barrier disruption regulates their size and dynamics. To assess the function of these LB-derived raft-like domains, we assessed APM dynamics and barrier recovery in methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD)-treated hairless mice and caveolin-1 knockouts (cav-1(-/-)). MbetaCD treatment impaired APM raft-like domain formation and barrier recovery. Accelerated barrier recovery is observed in cav-1(-/-) in parallel with expansion of raft-like domains. Barrier abrogation of normal epidermis resulted in translocation of cav-1 from the cytoplasm to raft-like membrane domains, restricting further raft-like domain formation and initiating terminal differentiation. Inhibition of LB secretion by monensin and absence of cav-1 delayed terminal differentiation. Furthermore, cav-1(-/-) mice exhibited an increased propensity to develop experimentally induced epidermal hyperplasia correlating with lipid raft persistence. Finally, the epidermal hyperplasia in psoriasis and Netherton syndrome is paralleled by increased lipid raft formation. These studies demonstrate that cav-1 delivery to the APM by LB trafficking to APM "brakes" further LB secretion, signals terminal differentiation, and regulates epidermal hyperproliferation. PMID:19005485

  19. Epidermal electronics for electromyography: An application to swallowing therapy.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Gabriela; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Li, Xinda; Scott, Dylan K; Jang, Kyung-In; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Rogers, John A; Rieger, Jana

    2016-08-01

    Head and neck cancer treatment alters the anatomy and physiology of patients. Resulting swallowing difficulties can lead to serious health concerns. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is used as an adjuvant to swallowing therapy exercises. sEMG signal collected from the area under the chin provides visual biofeedback from muscle contractions and is used to help patients perform exercises correctly. However, conventional sEMG adhesive pads are relatively thick and difficult to effectively adhere to a patient's altered chin anatomy, potentially leading to poor signal acquisition in this population. Here, the emerging technology of epidermal electronics is introduced, where ultra-thin geometry allows for close contouring of the chin. The two objectives of this study were to (1) assess the potential of epidermal electronics technology for use with swallowing therapy and (2) assess the significance of the reference electrode placement. This study showed comparative signals between the new epidermal sEMG patch and the conventional adhesive patches used by clinicians. Furthermore, an integrated reference yielded optimal signal for clinical use; this configuration was more robust to head movements than when an external reference was used. Improvements for future iterations of epidermal sEMG patches specific to day-to-day clinical use are suggested. PMID:27255865

  20. Epidermal Differentiation in Barrier Maintenance and Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Wikramanayake, Tongyu Cao; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-03-01

    Significance: The epidermal barrier prevents water loss and serves as the body's first line of defense against toxins, chemicals, and infectious microbes. Disruption of the barrier, either through congenital disorders of barrier formation or through wounds, puts the individual at risk for dehydration, hypersensitivity, infection, and prolonged inflammation. Epidermal barrier disorders affect millions of patients in the United States, causing loss of productivity and diminished quality of life for patients and their families, and represent a burden to the health-care system and society. Recent Advances: The genetic basis of many congenital barrier disorders has been identified in recent years, and great advances have been made in the molecular mechanisms of the formation and homeostasis of epidermal barrier, as well as acute and chronic wound healing. Progress in stem cell (SC) biology, particularly in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), has opened new doors for cell-based therapy of chronic wounds. Critical Issues: Understanding of the molecular mechanisms of barrier homeostasis in health and disease, as well as contributions of iPSCs and allogeneic MSCs to wound healing, will lead to the identification of novel targets for developing therapeutics for congenital barrier and wound healing disorders. Future Directions: Future studies should focus on better understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to disrupted homeostasis of epidermal barrier to identify potential therapeutic targets to combat its associated diseases. PMID:24669361

  1. Quantitative proteogenomic profiling of epidermal barrier formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Winget, Jason M.; Watts, Julian D.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; DiColandrea, Teresa; Robinson, Michael K.; Huggins, Tom; Bascom, Charles C.; Isfort, Robert J.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The barrier function of the epidermis is integral to personal well-being, and defects in the skin barrier are associated with several widespread diseases. Currently there is a limited understanding of system-level proteomic changes during epidermal stratification and barrier establishment. Objective Here we report the quantitative proteogenomic profile of an in vitro reconstituted epidermis at three time points of development in order to characterize protein changes during stratification. Methods The proteome was measured using data-dependent “shotgun” mass spectrometry and quantified with statistically validated label-free proteomic methods for 20 replicates at each of three time points during the course of epidermal development. Results Over 3600 proteins were identified in the reconstituted epidermis, with more than 1200 of these changing in abundance over the time course. We also collected and discuss matched transcriptomic data for the three time points, allowing alignment of this new dataset with previously published characterization of the reconstituted epidermis system. Conclusion These results represent the most comprehensive epidermal-specific proteome to date, and therefore reveal several aspects of barrier formation and skin composition. The limited correlation between transcript and protein abundance underscores the importance of proteomic analysis in developing a full understanding of epidermal maturation. PMID:25862149

  2. Glucose and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2008-04-01

    When a human's enzymes attach glucose to proteins they do so at specific sites on a specific molecule for a specific purpose that also can include ascorbic acid (AA) at a high level such as 1 gram per hour during exposure. In an AA synthesizing animal the manifold increase of AA produced in response to illness is automatic. In contrast, the human non-enzymatic process adds glucose haphazardly to any number of sites along available peptide chains. As Cerami clarified decades ago, extensive crosslinking of proteins contributes to loss of elasticity in aging tissues. Ascorbic acid reduces the random non-enyzmatic glycation of proteins. Moreover, AA is a cofactor for hydroxylase enzymes that are necessary for the production and replacement of collagen and other structural proteins. We will discuss the relevance of ``aging is scurvy'' to the biochemistry of human aging.

  3. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of adipocyte hormone-sensitive lipase by glucose.

    PubMed

    Smih, Fatima; Rouet, Philippe; Lucas, Stéphanie; Mairal, Aline; Sengenes, Coralie; Lafontan, Max; Vaulont, Sophie; Casado, Marta; Langin, Dominique

    2002-02-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue, thus determining the supply of energy substrates in the body. HSL mRNA was positively regulated by glucose in human adipocytes. Pools of stably transfected 3T3-F442A adipocytes were generated with human adipocyte HSL promoter fragments from -2,400/+38 to -31/+38 bp linked to the luciferase gene. A glucose-responsive region was mapped within the proximal promoter (-137 bp). Electromobility shift assays showed that upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1 and USF2 and Sp1 and Sp3 bound to a consensus E-box and two GC-boxes in the -137-bp region. Cotransfection of the -137/+38 construct with USF1 and USF2 expression vectors produced enhanced luciferase activity. Moreover, HSL mRNA levels were decreased in USF1- and USF2-deficient mice. Site-directed mutagenesis of the HSL promoter showed that the GC-boxes, although contributing to basal promoter activity, were dispensable for glucose responsiveness. Mutation of the E-box led to decreased promoter activity and suppression of the glucose response. Analogs and metabolites were used to determine the signal metabolite of the glucose response. The signal is generated downstream of glucose-6-phosphate in the glycolytic pathway before the triose phosphate step. PMID:11812735

  5. Reduced epidermal thickness, nerve degeneration and increased pain-related behavior in rats with diabetes type 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Boric, Matija; Skopljanac, Ivan; Ferhatovic, Lejla; Jelicic Kadic, Antonia; Banozic, Adriana; Puljak, Livia

    2013-11-01

    To examine the mechanisms contributing to pain genesis in diabetic neuropathy, we investigated epidermal thickness and number of intraepidermal nerve fibers in rat foot pad of the animal model of diabetes type 1 and type 2 in relation to pain-related behavior. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Diabetes type 1 was induced with intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) and diabetes type 2 was induced with a combination of STZ and high-fat diet. Control group for diabetes type 1 was fed with regular laboratory chow, while control group for diabetes type 2 received high-fat diet. Body weights and blood glucose levels were monitored to confirm induction of diabetes. Pain-related behavior was analyzed using thermal (hot, cold) and mechanical stimuli (von Frey fibers, number of hyperalgesic responses). Two months after induction of diabetes, glabrous skin samples from plantar surface of the both hind paws were collected. Epidermal thickness was evaluated with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Intraepidermal nerve fibers quantification was performed after staining skin with polyclonal antiserum against protein gene product 9.5. We found that induction of diabetes type 1 and type 2 causes significant epidermal thinning and loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers in a rat model, and both changes were more pronounced in diabetes type 1 model. Significant increase of pain-related behavior two months after induction of diabetes was observed only in a model of diabetes type 1. In conclusion, animal models of diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 could be used in pharmacological studies, where cutaneous changes could be used as outcome measures for predegenerative markers of neuropathies. PMID:24126225

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Achari, A; Marshall, S E; Muirhead, H; Palmieri, R H; Noltmann, E A

    1981-06-26

    Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) is a dimeric enzyme of molecular mass 132000 which catalyses the interconversion of D-glucose-6-phosphate and D-fructose-6-phosphate. The crystal structure of the enzyme from pig muscle has been determined at a nominal resolution of 2.6 A. The structure is of the alpha/beta type. Each subunit consists of two domains and the active site is in both the domain interface and the subunit interface (P.J. Shaw & H. Muirhead (1976), FEBS Lett. 65, 50-55). Each subunit contains 13 methionine residues so that cyanogen bromide cleavage will produce 14 fragments, most of which have been identified and at least partly purified. Sequence information is given for about one-third of the molecule from 5 cyanogen bromide fragments. One of the sequences includes a modified lysine residue. Modification of this residue leads to a parallel loss of enzymatic activity. A tentative fit of two of the peptides to the electron density map has been made. It seems possible that glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, triose phosphate isomerase and pyruvate kinase all contain a histidine and a glutamate residue at the active site. PMID:6115414

  7. Epidermal growth factor receptor is required for estradiol-stimulated bovine satellite cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Reiter, B C; Kamanga-Sollo, E; Pampusch, M S; White, M E; Dayton, W R

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the role of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in estradiol-17β (E2)-stimulated proliferation of cultured bovine satellite cells (BSCs). Treatment of BSC cultures with AG1478 (a specific inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity) suppresses E2-stimulated BSC proliferation (P < 0.05). In addition, E2-stimulated proliferation is completely suppressed (P < 0.05) in BSCs in which EGFR expression is silenced by treatment with EGFR small interfering RNA (siRNA). These results indicate that EGFR is required for E2 to stimulate proliferation in BSC cultures. Both AG1478 treatment and EGFR silencing also suppress proliferation stimulated by LR3-IGF-1 (an IGF1 analogue that binds normally to the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR)-1 but has little or no affinity for IGF binding proteins) in cultured BSCs (P < 0.05). Even though EGFR siRNA treatment has no effect on IGFR-1β mRNA expression in cultured BSCs, IGFR-1β protein level is substantially reduced in BSCs treated with EGFR siRNA. These data suggest that EGFR silencing results in post-transcriptional modifications that result in decreased IGFR-1β protein levels. Although it is clear that functional EGFR is necessary for E2-stimulated proliferation of BSCs, the role of EGFR is not clear. Transactivation of EGFR may directly stimulate proliferation, or EGFR may function to maintain the level of IGFR-1β which is necessary for E2-stimulated proliferation. It also is possible that the role of EGFR in E2-stimulated BSC proliferation may involve both of these mechanisms. PMID:24906928

  8. Inhibition of jet fuel aliphatic hydrocarbon induced toxicity in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Inman, A O; Monteiro-Riviere, N A; Riviere, J E

    2008-05-01

    Jet propellant (JP)-8, the primary jet fuel used by the U.S. military, consists of hydrocarbon-rich kerosene base commercial jet fuel (Jet-A) plus additives DC1-4A, Stadis 450 and diethylene glycol monomethyl ether. Human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) were exposed to JP-8, aliphatic hydrocarbon (HC) fuel S-8 and aliphatic HC pentadecane (penta), tetradecane (tetra), tridecane (tri) and undecane (un) for 5 min. Additional studies were conducted with signal transduction pathway blockers parthenolide (P; 3.0 microm), isohelenin (I; 3.0 microm), SB 203580 (SB; 13.3 microm), substance P (SP; 3.0 microm) and recombinant human IL-10 (rHIL-10; 10 ng ml(-1)). In the absence of inhibitors, JP-8 and to a lesser extent un and S-8, had the greatest toxic effect on cell viability and inflammation suggesting, as least in vitro, that synthetic S-8 fuel is less irritating than the currently used JP-8. Each inhibitor significantly (P < 0.05) decreased HEK viability. DMSO, the vehicle for P, I and SB, had a minimal effect on viability. Overall, IL-8 production was suppressed at least 30% after treatment with each inhibitor. Normalizing data relative to control indicate which inhibitors suppress HC-mediated IL-8 to control levels. P was the most effective inhibitor of IL-8 release; IL-8 was significantly decreased after exposure to un, tri, tetra and penta but significantly increased after JP-8 exposure compared with controls. Inhibitors were not effective in suppressing IL-8 release in JP-8 exposures to control levels. This study shows that inhibiting NF-kappa B, which appears to play a role in cytokine production in HC-exposed HEK in vitro, may reduce the inflammatory effect of HC in vivo. PMID:17966119

  9. Continuous Glucose Monitoring after Islet Transplantation in Type 1 Diabetes: An Excellent Graft Function (β-Score Greater Than 7) Is Required to Abrogate Hyperglycemia, Whereas a Minimal Function Is Necessary to Suppress Severe Hypoglycemia (β-Score Greater Than 3)

    PubMed Central

    Raverdy, Violeta; Balavoine, Anne-Sophie; Defrance, Frédérique; Caiazzo, Robert; Arnalsteen, Laurent; Gmyr, Valéry; Hazzan, Marc; Noël, Christian; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Pattou, Francois

    2012-01-01

    Context: For the last 10 yr, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has brought up new insights into the accuracy of blood glucose analysis. Objective: Our objective was to determine how islet graft function was able to influence the various components of dysglycemia after islet transplantation (IT). Design and Setting: We conducted a single-arm open-labeled study with a 3-yr follow-up in a referral center (ClinicalTrial.gov identifiers NCT00446264 and NCT01123187). Patients: Twenty-three consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes (14 islet alone, nine islet after kidney) received IT within 3 months using the Edmonton protocol. Intervention: Intervention included 72-h CGM before and 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, and 36 months after transplantation. Main Outcome Measure: Graft function was estimated via β-score, a previously validated index (range 0–8) based on treatment requirements, C-peptide, blood glucose, and glycated hemoglobin. Results: At the 3-yr visit, graft function persisted in 19 patients (82%), and 10 (43%) remained insulin independent. Glycated hemoglobin decreased in the whole cohort from 8.3% (7.3–9.0%) at baseline to 6.7% (5.9–7.7%) at 3 yr [median (interquartile range), P < 0.01]. Mean glucose, glucose sd, and time spent with glycemia above 10 mmol/liter (hyperglycemia) and below 3 mmol/liter (hypoglycemia) were significantly lower after IT (P < 0.05 vs. baseline). The four CGM outcomes were related to β-score (P < 0.001). However, partial function (β-score >3) was sufficient to abrogate hypoglycemia; suboptimal function (β-score >5) was necessary to significantly improve mean glucose, glucose sd, and hyperglycemia; and optimal function (β score >7) was necessary to normalize them. Conclusion: The four components of dysglycemia were not equally affected by the degree of islet graft function, which could have important implications for future development of β-cell replacement. A β-score above 3 dramatically reduced the occurrence of hypoglycemia. PMID

  10. Sensitivity of central chemoreceptors controlling blood glucose and body temperature during glucose deprivation.

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, A; Müller, E E

    1975-01-01

    1. The rise in blood glucose and the fall in body temperature which follows the injection of a glucose analogue, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) into the lateral cerebral ventricle (I.C.V) of unanaesthetized rats were studied and found to be dose-dependent. These 2-DG induced responses are elicited by the impairment of glucose metabolism within central "glucoreceptors'. 2. 2DG induced hyperglycaemia and hypothermia were completely prevented and even the converse effects occurred when fivefold equimolar amounts of D-fructose were simultaneously injected I.C.V.; fructose, at equimolar doses, did not modify the effects of 2-DG. 3. D-xylose and D-ribose, even at high doses, did not influence 2-DG hyperglycaemia, but increased slightly the 2-DG induced hypothermia. This suggests that the pentose phosphate pathway is unable to support the metabolism within the glucoreceptors. 4. Pyruvate suppressed the 2-DG induced hyperglycaemia with a marked delay, while acetate (as ethyl ester) and a mixture of malate plus oxaloacetate did not prevent 2-DG induced effects. These results may be accounted for by the low dosage used. 5. Acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate did not prevent 2-DG hypothermia and hyperglycaemia. 6. An effective prevention of the 2-DG induced hyperglycaemia and hypothermia was achieved with fumarate and glutamate, indicating that the stimulation of the Krebs cycle within "glucoreceptors' removes the glucoprivic effects. 7. The results indicate that prevention of 2-DG induced effects occurred only with alternate source of metabolic fuel which can support high respiratory rates in brain tissue. It is concluded that central chemoreceptors are not specifically responsive to glucose, or hexoses, but to the rate of oxidative metabolism. PMID:1151783

  11. Investigating the effect of glucose on aortic pulse wave velocity using pancreatic clamping methodology.

    PubMed

    Puzantian, Houry; Teff, Karen; Townsend, Raymond R

    2015-05-01

    Aortic stiffness, determined by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), independently predicts cardiovascular outcomes. Recent studies suggest that glucose levels influence arterial stiffness indices. It is not clear, however, whether glucose affects cfPWV independently of glucoregulatory hormones. The aim of this study was to utilize a pancreatic clamping approach to determine whether plasma glucose independently predicts cfPWV. Healthy participants (N = 10) underwent pancreatic clamping to control glucose at varying concentrations using a 20% dextrose infusion while suppressing endogenous glucagon, insulin, and growth hormone by octreotide and replacing the hormones intravenously to achieve basal concentrations. Tonometric cfPWV, blood pressure, heart rate, plasma glucose, glucagon, insulin, growth hormone, and vasoactive biomarkers were measured. Plasma glucose levels of 150 mg/dl at 1 hr and 200 mg/dl at 2 hr postbaseline were achieved. There were no significant changes in cfPWV (5.8 m/s at 0 hr, 5.9 m/s at 1 hr, and 5.9 m/s at 2 hr) with increased glucose levels. There were small increases in insulin secretion. A definitive role for glucose in cfPWV modulation was not determined; there is a potential role for insulin as a cfPWV modulator. Continued efforts in clarifying the independent roles of glucose and insulin can elucidate novel vessel-related targets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management in patients with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. PMID:25802385

  12. Glucose and urea kinetics in patients with early and advanced gastrointestinal cancer: the response to glucose infusion, parenteral feeding, and surgical resection

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.H.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-02-01

    We isotopically determined rates of glucose turnover, urea turnover, and glucose oxidation in normal volunteers (n = 16), patients with early gastrointestinal (EGI) cancer (n = 6), and patients with advanced gastrointestinal (AGI) cancer (n = 10). Studies were performed in the basal state, during glucose infusion (4 mg/kg/min), and during total parenteral feeding (patients with AGI cancer only). Patients with early stages of the disease were also studied 2 to 3 months after resection of the cancer. Basal rates of glucose turnover were similar in volunteers and in patients with EGI cancer (13.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/kg/min and 13.3 +/- 0.2 mumol/kg/min, respectively) but were significantly higher in patients with AGI cancer (17.6 +/- 1.4 mumol/kg/min). Glucose infusion resulted in significantly less suppression of endogenous production in both patient groups than that seen in the volunteers (76% +/- 6% for EGI group, 69% +/- 7% for AGI group, and 94% +/- 4% for volunteers). The rate of glucose oxidation increased progressively in proportion to the tumor bulk. In the volunteers the percent of VCO2 from glucose oxidation was 23.9% +/- 0.7%, and in EGI and AGI groups the values were 32.8% +/- 2.0% and 43.0% +/- 3.0%, respectively. After curative resection of the cancer, glucose utilization decreased significantly (p less than 0.05). The rate of urea turnover was significantly higher in the AGI group (8.4 +/- 1.0 mumol/kg/min) in comparison with the volunteer group value of 5.9 +/- 0.6 mumol/kg/min (p less than 0.03). Glucose infusion resulted in a significant suppression of urea turnover in the volunteers (p less than 0.02), but in the AGI group glucose infusion did not induce a statistically significant decrease.

  13. Epidermal growth factor gene is a newly identified candidate gene for gout.

    PubMed

    Han, Lin; Cao, Chunwei; Jia, Zhaotong; Liu, Shiguo; Liu, Zhen; Xin, Ruosai; Wang, Can; Li, Xinde; Ren, Wei; Wang, Xuefeng; Li, Changgui

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 4q25 has been identified as a genomic region associated with gout. However, the associations of gout with the genes in this region have not yet been confirmed. Here, we performed two-stage analysis to determine whether variations in candidate genes in the 4q25 region are associated with gout in a male Chinese Han population. We first evaluated 96 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight inflammatory/immune pathway- or glucose/lipid metabolism-related genes in the 4q25 region in 480 male gout patients and 480 controls. The SNP rs12504538, located in the elongation of very-long-chain-fatty-acid-like family member 6 gene (Elovl6), was found to be associated with gout susceptibility (Padjusted = 0.00595). In the second stage of analysis, we performed fine mapping analysis of 93 tag SNPs in Elovl6 and in the epidermal growth factor gene (EGF) and its flanking regions in 1017 male patients gout and 1897 healthy male controls. We observed a significant association between the T allele of EGF rs2298999 and gout (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval = 0.67-0.88, Padjusted = 6.42 × 10(-3)). These results provide the first evidence for an association between the EGF rs2298999 C/T polymorphism and gout. Our findings should be validated in additional populations. PMID:27506295

  14. Epidermal growth factor gene is a newly identified candidate gene for gout

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin; Cao, Chunwei; Jia, Zhaotong; Liu, Shiguo; Liu, Zhen; Xin, Ruosai; Wang, Can; Li, Xinde; Ren, Wei; Wang, Xuefeng; Li, Changgui

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 4q25 has been identified as a genomic region associated with gout. However, the associations of gout with the genes in this region have not yet been confirmed. Here, we performed two-stage analysis to determine whether variations in candidate genes in the 4q25 region are associated with gout in a male Chinese Han population. We first evaluated 96 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight inflammatory/immune pathway- or glucose/lipid metabolism-related genes in the 4q25 region in 480 male gout patients and 480 controls. The SNP rs12504538, located in the elongation of very-long-chain-fatty-acid-like family member 6 gene (Elovl6), was found to be associated with gout susceptibility (Padjusted = 0.00595). In the second stage of analysis, we performed fine mapping analysis of 93 tag SNPs in Elovl6 and in the epidermal growth factor gene (EGF) and its flanking regions in 1017 male patients gout and 1897 healthy male controls. We observed a significant association between the T allele of EGF rs2298999 and gout (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval = 0.67–0.88, Padjusted = 6.42 × 10−3). These results provide the first evidence for an association between the EGF rs2298999 C/T polymorphism and gout. Our findings should be validated in additional populations. PMID:27506295

  15. Delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Seung Eun; Jo, Hye Jun; Kim, Yong-Woon; Cho, Young-Je; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Park, So-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the effect of delphinidin on high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis in mesangial cells. Glucose dose-dependently (5.6-25 mM) increased cell proliferation and collagen I and IV mRNA levels, whereas pretreatment with delphinidin (50 μM) prevented cell proliferation and the increased collagen mRNA levels induced by high glucose (25 mM). High glucose increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and this was suppressed by pretreating delphinidin or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. NADPH oxidase (NOX) 1 was upregulated by high glucose, but pretreatment with delphinidin abrogated this upregulation. Increased mitochondrial superoxide by 25 mM glucose was also suppressed by delphinidin. The NOX inhibitor apocynin and mitochondria-targeted antioxidant Mito TEMPO inhibited ROS generation and cell proliferation induced by high glucose. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 was increased by high glucose, which was suppressed by delphinidin, apocynin or Mito TEMPO. Furthermore, PD98059 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) prevented the high glucose-induced cell proliferation and increased collagen mRNA levels. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β protein levels were elevated by high glucose, and pretreatment with delphinidin or PD98059 prevented this augmentation. These results suggest that delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells. PMID:27103328

  16. Epidermal Micrografts Produced via an Automated and Minimally Invasive Tool Form at the Dermal/Epidermal Junction and Contain Proliferative Cells That Secrete Wound Healing Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Sandra N.; Schmidt, Marisa A.; Derrick, Kathleen; Harper, John R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The aim of this scientific study was to assess epidermal micrografts for formation at the dermal-epidermal (DE) junction, cellular outgrowth, and growth factor secretion. Epidermal harvesting is an autologous option that removes only the superficial epidermal layer of the skin, considerably limiting donor site damage and scarring. Use of epidermal grafting in wound healing has been limited because of tedious, time-consuming, and inconsistent methodologies. Recently, a simplified, automated epidermal harvesting tool (CelluTome Epidermal Harvesting System; Kinetic Concepts Inc, San Antonio, Texas) that applies heat and suction concurrently to produce epidermal micrografts has become commercially available. The new technique of epidermal harvesting was shown to create viable micrografts with minimal patient discomfort and no donor-site scarring. DESIGN: This study was a prospective institutional review board–approved healthy human study. SETTING: This study was conducted at the multispecialty research facility, Clinical Trials of Texas, Inc, in San Antonio, Texas. PATIENTS: The participants were 15 healthy human volunteers. RESULTS: Epidermal micrografts formed at the DE junction, and migratory basal layer keratinocytes and melanocytes were proliferative in culture. Basement membrane–specific collagen type IV was also found to be present in the grafts, suggesting that the combination of heat and vacuum might cause partial delamination of the basement membrane. Viable basal cells actively secreted key growth factors important for modulating wound healing responses, including vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and transforming growth factor α. CONCLUSIONS: Harvested epidermal micrografts retained their original keratinocyte structure, which is critical for potential re-epithelialization and repigmentation of a wound environment. PMID:26258460

  17. Molecular Cloning of a Xylosyltransferase That Transfers the Second Xylose to O-Glucosylated Epidermal Growth Factor Repeats of Notch*

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Maya K.; Buettner, Falk F. R.; Ashikov, Angel; Krylov, Vadim B.; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Nifantiev, Nikolay E.; Haltiwanger, Robert S.; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Bakker, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular domain of Notch contains epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeats that are extensively modified with different O-linked glycans. O-Fucosylation is essential for receptor function, and elongation with N-acetylglucosamine, catalyzed by members of the Fringe family, modulates Notch activity. Only recently, genes encoding enzymes involved in the O-glucosylation pathway have been cloned. In the Drosophila mutant rumi, characterized by a mutation in the protein O-glucosyltransferase, Notch signaling is impaired in a temperature-dependent manner, and a mouse knock-out leads to embryonic lethality. We have previously identified two human genes, GXYLT1 and GXYLT2, encoding glucoside xylosyltransferases responsible for the transfer of xylose to O-linked glucose. The identity of the enzyme further elongating the glycan to generate the final trisaccharide xylose-xylose-glucose, however, remained unknown. Here, we describe that the human gene C3ORF21 encodes a UDP-xylose:α-xyloside α1,3-xylosyltransferase, acting on xylose-α1,3-glucoseβ1-containing acceptor structures. We have, therefore, renamed it XXYLT1 (xyloside xylosyltransferase 1). XXYLT1 cannot act on a synthetic acceptor containing an α-linked xylose alone, but requires the presence of the underlying glucose. Activity on Notch EGF repeats was proven by in vitro xylosylation of a mouse Notch1 fragment recombinantly produced in Sf9 insect cells, a bacterially expressed EGF repeat from mouse Notch2 modified in vitro by Rumi and Gxylt2 and in vivo by co-expression of the enzyme with the Notch1 fragment. The enzyme was shown to be a typical type II membrane-bound glycosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:22117070

  18. Neoplastic transformation of immortalized human epidermal keratinocytes by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thraves, P.; Salehi, Z.; Dritschilo, A.; Rhim, J.S. )

    1990-02-01

    Efforts to investigate the progression of events that cause human cells to become neoplastic in response to ionizing radiation have been aided by the development of tissue culture systems of epithelial cells. In the present study, nontumorigenic human epidermal keratinocytes immortalized by adenovirus type 12 and simian virus 40 have been transformed by exposure to x-ray irradiation. Such transformants showed morphological alterations, formed colonies in soft agar, and induced carcinomas when transplanted into nude mice, whereas primary human epidermal keratinocytes exposed to radiation in this manner failed to show any evidence of transformation. These findings demonstrate the malignant transformation of human primary epithelial cells in culture by the combined action of a DNA tumor virus and radiation, indicating a multistep process for radiation-induced neoplastic conversion. This in vitro system may be useful as a tool for dissecting the process of radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of human epithelial cells and for detecting previously unreported human oncogenes.

  19. The biology of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, S; Penuel, E; Sliwkowski, M X

    1999-09-01

    Our understanding of the normal signaling mechanisms and functions of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and other members of the HER family, namely epidermal growth factor receptor, HER3, and HER4, is growing rapidly. Activation of these receptors results in a diverse array of signals through the formation of homodimeric and heterodimeric receptor complexes; HER2 is the preferred dimerization partner for the other HERs. These oligomeric receptor complexes activate distinct signaling pathways, such as the Ras-MAPK and PI3-kinase pathways. These, in turn, affect various cellular processes. Recent gene deletion experiments in mice point to an important role for HER2 in cardiac and neural development, and evidence from other studies indicates that HER2 is involved in normal breast growth and development. Thus, HER2 is a key component of a complex signaling network that plays a critical role in the regulation of tissue development, growth, and differentiation. PMID:11122793

  20. Estimating the Size of Onion Epidermal Cells from Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Jeffrey R.

    2012-10-01

    Bioscience and premedical profession students are a major demographic served by introductory physics courses at many colleges and universities. Exposing these students to biological applications of physical principles will help them to appreciate physics as a useful tool for their future professions. Here I describe an experiment suitable for introductory physics where principles of wave optics are applied to probe the size of onion epidermal cells. The epidermis tissue is composed of cells of relatively uniform size and shape (Fig. 1) so the tissue acts like a one-dimensional transmission diffraction grating. The diffraction patterns generated when a laser beam passes through the tissue (Fig. 2) are analyzed and an estimate of the average width of individual onion epidermal cells is calculated. The results are compared to direct measurements taken using a light microscope. The use of microscopes and plant-cell tissue slides creates opportunities for cross-discipline collaboration between physics and biology instructors.

  1. Ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient with toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Downey, Douglas M; O'Bryan, Meghan C; Burdette, Steve D; Michael, Johnson R; Saxe, Jonathan M

    2007-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome are a spectrum of disease characterized by a delayed hypersensitivity reaction that involves the skin and mucous membranes and typically is associated with either recent upper respiratory infection or with certain medications. Ecthyma gangrenosum is a rare necrotizing vasculitis that most commonly affects immunocompromised and burn patients and is often a sequela of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia. The cutaneous lesions of ecthyma gangrenosum are characterized by an erythematous halo surrounding a dark gray or black nodule. P. aeruginosa preferentially invades the venules, resulting in secondary thrombosis of the arterioles, tissue edema, and separation of the epidermis. Management of ecthyma gangrenosum includes systemic treatment with antipseudomonal antibiotics and débridment of the lesions, as well as improving the patient's immune status if possible. We present a case of a patient admitted to the burn unit for toxic epidermal necrolysis who developed pseudomonal bacteremia with ecthyma gangrenosum. PMID:17211226

  2. Optoelectronic Apparatus Measures Glucose Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Rovati, Luigi L.

    2003-01-01

    An optoelectronic apparatus has been invented as a noninvasive means of measuring the concentration of glucose in the human body. The apparatus performs polarimetric and interferometric measurements of the human eye to acquire data from which the concentration of glucose in the aqueous humor can be computed. Because of the importance of the concentration of glucose in human health, there could be a large potential market for instruments based on this apparatus.

  3. Optical monitoring of glucose concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, I. N.; Mbanu, A.

    1985-02-01

    A device for the monitoring of blood glucose levels is investigated. It measures the sugar concentration using the effect of the glucose on the optical refractive index. Light is transmitted along an optical fibre, and, as most of the internal rays are incident at the fibre surface at an angle less than the critical angle, the refractive index of the surrounding liquid can be calculated. The device can measure glucose concentrations with a sensitivity of better than 0.1%.

  4. An in vivo invertebrate evaluation system for identifying substances that suppress sucrose-induced postprandial hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Masaki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose is a major sweetener added to various foods and beverages. Excessive intake of sucrose leads to increases in blood glucose levels, which can result in the development and exacerbation of lifestyle-related diseases such as obesity and diabetes. In this study, we established an in vivo evaluation system using silkworms to explore substances that suppress the increase in blood glucose levels caused by dietary intake of sucrose. Silkworm hemolymph glucose levels rapidly increased after intake of a sucrose-containing diet. Addition of acarbose or voglibose, α-glycosidase inhibitors clinically used for diabetic patients, suppressed the dietary sucrose-induced increase in the silkworm hemolymph glucose levels. Screening performed using the sucrose-induced postprandial hyperglycemic silkworm model allowed us to identify some lactic acid bacteria that inhibit the increase in silkworm hemolymph glucose levels caused by dietary intake of sucrose. The inhibitory effects of the Lactococcus lactis #Ll-1 bacterial strain were significantly greater than those of different strains of lactic acid bacteria. No effect of the Lactococcus lactis #Ll-1 strain was observed in silkworms fed a glucose diet. These results suggest that the sucrose diet-induced postprandial hyperglycemic silkworm is a useful model for evaluating chemicals and lactic acid bacteria that suppress increases in blood glucose levels. PMID:27194587

  5. An in vivo invertebrate evaluation system for identifying substances that suppress sucrose-induced postprandial hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Masaki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose is a major sweetener added to various foods and beverages. Excessive intake of sucrose leads to increases in blood glucose levels, which can result in the development and exacerbation of lifestyle-related diseases such as obesity and diabetes. In this study, we established an in vivo evaluation system using silkworms to explore substances that suppress the increase in blood glucose levels caused by dietary intake of sucrose. Silkworm hemolymph glucose levels rapidly increased after intake of a sucrose-containing diet. Addition of acarbose or voglibose, α-glycosidase inhibitors clinically used for diabetic patients, suppressed the dietary sucrose-induced increase in the silkworm hemolymph glucose levels. Screening performed using the sucrose-induced postprandial hyperglycemic silkworm model allowed us to identify some lactic acid bacteria that inhibit the increase in silkworm hemolymph glucose levels caused by dietary intake of sucrose. The inhibitory effects of the Lactococcus lactis #Ll-1 bacterial strain were significantly greater than those of different strains of lactic acid bacteria. No effect of the Lactococcus lactis #Ll-1 strain was observed in silkworms fed a glucose diet. These results suggest that the sucrose diet-induced postprandial hyperglycemic silkworm is a useful model for evaluating chemicals and lactic acid bacteria that suppress increases in blood glucose levels. PMID:27194587

  6. sPLA2 and the epidermal barrier

    PubMed Central

    Ilic, Dusko; Bollinger, James M.; Gelb, Michael; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian epidermis provides both an interface and a protective barrier between the organism and its environment. Lipid, processed into water-impermeable bilayers between the outermost layers of the epidermal cells, forms the major barrier that prevents water from exiting the organism, and also prevents toxins and infectious agents from entering. The secretory phospholipase 2 (sPLA2) enzymes control important processes in skin and other organs, including inflammation and differentiation. sPLA2 activity contributes to epidermal barrier formation and homeostasis by generating free fatty acids, which are required both for formation of lamellar membranes and also for acidification of the stratum corneum (SC). sPLA2 is especially important in controlling SC acidification and establishment of an optimum epidermal barrier during the first postnatal week. Several sPLA2 isoforms are present in the epidermis. We find that two of these isoforms, sPLA2 IIA and sPLA2 IIF, localize to the upper stratum granulosum and increase in response to experimental barrier perturbation. sPLA2F−/− mice also demonstrate a more neutral SC pH than do their normal littermates, and their initial recovery from barrier perturbation is delayed. These findings confirm that sPLA2 enzymes perform important roles in epidermal development, and suggest that the sPLA2IIF isoform may be central to SC acidification and barrier function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias. PMID:24269828

  7. Epidermal differentiation: the role of proteases and their inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zeeuwen, Patrick L J M

    2004-12-01

    Dermatological diseases range from minor cosmetic problems to life-threatening conditions, as seen in some severe disorders of keratinization and cornification. These disorders are commonly due to abnormal epidermal differentiation processes, which result in disturbed barrier function of human skin. Elucidation of the cellular differentiation programs that regulate the formation and homeostasis of the epidermis is therefore of great importance for the understanding and therapy of these disorders. Much of the barrier function of human epidermis against the environment is provided by the cornified cell envelope (CE), which is assembled by transglutaminase (TGase)-mediated cross-linking of several structural proteins and lipids during the terminal stages of normal keratinocyte differentiation. The major constituents of the stratum corneum and the current knowledge on the formation of the stratum corneum will be briefly reviewed here. The discovery of mutations that underlie several human diseases caused by genetic defects in the protein or lipid components of the CE, and recent analyses of mouse mutants with defects in the structural components of the CE, catalyzing enzymes, and lipid processing, have highlighted their essential function in establishing the epidermal barrier. In addition, recent findings have provided evidence that a disturbed protease-antiprotease balance could cause faulty differentiation processes in the epidermis and hair follicle. The importance of regulated proteolysis in epithelia is well demonstrated by the recent identification of the SPINK5 serine proteinase inhibitor as the defective gene in Netherton syndrome, cathepsin C mutations in Papillon-Lefevre syndrome, cathepsin L deficiency infurless mice, targeted ablation of the serine protease Matriptase/MTSP1, targeted ablation of the aspartate protease cathepsin D, and the phenotype of targeted epidermal overexpression of stratum corneum chymotryptic enzyme in mice. Notably, our recent

  8. Epidermal EGFR controls cutaneous host defense and prevents inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberger, Beate M; Gerber, Peter A; Holcmann, Martin; Buhren, Bettina A; Amberg, Nicole; Smolle, Viktoria; Schrumpf, Holger; Boelke, Edwin; Ansari, Parinaz; Mackenzie, Colin; Wollenberg, Andreas; Kislat, Andreas; Fischer, Jens W; Röck, Katharina; Harder, Jürgen; Schröder, Jens M; Homey, Bernhard; Sibilia, Maria

    2013-08-21

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in tissue homeostasis and tumor progression. However, cancer patients treated with EGFR inhibitors (EGFRIs) frequently develop acneiform skin toxicities, which are a strong predictor of a patient's treatment response. We show that the early inflammatory infiltrate of the skin rash induced by EGFRI is dominated by dendritic cells, macrophages, granulocytes, mast cells, and T cells. EGFRIs induce the expression of chemokines (CCL2, CCL5, CCL27, and CXCL14) in epidermal keratinocytes and impair the production of antimicrobial peptides and skin barrier proteins. Correspondingly, EGFRI-treated keratinocytes facilitate lymphocyte recruitment but show a considerably reduced cytotoxic activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Mice lacking epidermal EGFR (EGFR(Δep)) show a similar phenotype, which is accompanied by chemokine-driven skin inflammation, hair follicle degeneration, decreased host defense, and deficient skin barrier function, as well as early lethality. Skin toxicities were not ameliorated in a Rag2-, MyD88-, and CCL2-deficient background or in mice lacking epidermal Langerhans cells. The skin phenotype was also not rescued in a hairless (hr/hr) background, demonstrating that skin inflammation is not induced by hair follicle degeneration. Treatment with mast cell inhibitors reduced the immigration of T cells, suggesting that mast cells play a role in the EGFRI-mediated skin pathology. Our findings demonstrate that EGFR signaling in keratinocytes regulates key factors involved in skin inflammation, barrier function, and innate host defense, providing insights into the mechanisms underlying EGFRI-induced skin pathologies. PMID:23966300

  9. Rejuvenating Hydrator: Restoring Epidermal Hyaluronic Acid Homeostasis With Instant Benefits.

    PubMed

    Narurkar, Vic A; Fabi, Sabrina G; Bucay, Vivian W; Tedaldi, Ruth; Downie, Jeanine B; Zeichner, Joshua A; Butterwick, Kimberly; Taub, Amy; Kadoya, Kuniko; Makino, Elizabeth T; Mehta, Rahul C; Vega, Virginia L

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging is a combination of multifactorial mechanisms that are not fully understood. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors modulate skin aging, activating distinctive processes that share similar molecular pathways. One of the main characteristics of youthful skin is its large capacity to retain water, and this decreases significantly as we age. A key molecule involved in maintaining skin hydration is hyaluronic acid (HA). Concentration of HA in the skin is determined by the complex balance between its synthesis, deposition, association with cellular structures, and degradation. HA bio-equivalency and bio-compatibility have been fundamental in keeping this macromolecule as the favorite of the skincare industry for decades. Scientific evidence now shows that topically applied HA is unable to penetrate the skin and is rapidly degraded on the skin surface. SkinMedica's HA5 Rejuvenating Hydrator (SkinMedica Inc., an Allergan company, Irvine, CA) promotes restoration of endogenous epidermal HA homeostasis and provides instant smoothing and hydration of the skin. These dual benefits are accomplished through the combination of 2 breakthrough technologies: 1) a unique blend of actives powered by SkinMedica proprietary flower-derived stem cell extract that restores the endogenous production of HA; and 2) a proprietary mix of 5 HA forms that plump the skin, decreasing the appearance of fine lines/wrinkles. Pre-clinical studies demonstrated that HA5 induces expression of key epidermal differentiation and barrier markers as well as epidermal HA synthases. A decrease expression of hyaluronidases was also observed upon HA5 application. Initial clinical studies showed that within 15 minutes of application, HA5 instantly improves the appearance of fine lines/wrinkles and skin hydration. Subjects that continue using HA5 (for 8 weeks) demonstrated significant improvements in fine lines/wrinkles, tactile roughness, and skin hydration. In summary, the blend of these 2 key technologies

  10. Thermoresponsive amperometric glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Pinyou, Piyanut; Ruff, Adrian; Pöller, Sascha; Barwe, Stefan; Nebel, Michaela; Alburquerque, Natalia Guerrero; Wischerhoff, Erik; Laschewsky, André; Schmaderer, Sebastian; Szeponik, Jan; Plumeré, Nicolas; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    The authors report on the fabrication of a thermoresponsive biosensor for the amperometric detection of glucose. Screen printed electrodes with heatable gold working electrodes were modified by a thermoresponsive statistical copolymer [polymer I: poly(ω-ethoxytriethylenglycol methacrylate-co-3-(N,N-dimethyl-N-2-methacryloyloxyethyl ammonio) propanesulfonate-co-ω-butoxydiethylenglycol methacrylate-co-2-(4-benzoyl-phenoxy)ethyl methacrylate)] with a lower critical solution temperature of around 28 °C in aqueous solution via electrochemically induced codeposition with a pH-responsive redox-polymer [polymer II: poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-allyl methacrylate-co-poly(ethylene glycol)methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate-co-2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-[Os(bpy)2(4-(((2-(2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethoxy)ethyl)amino)methyl)-N,N-dimethylpicolinamide)](2+)] and pyrroloquinoline quinone-soluble glucose dehydrogenase acting as biological recognition element. Polymer II bears covalently bound Os-complexes that act as redox mediators for shuttling electrons between the enzyme and the electrode surface. Polymer I acts as a temperature triggered immobilization matrix. Probing the catalytic current as a function of the working electrode temperature shows that the activity of the biosensor is dramatically reduced above the phase transition temperature of polymer I. Thus, the local modulation of the temperature at the interphase between the electrode and the bioactive layer allows switching the biosensor from an on- to an off-state without heating of the surrounding analyte solution. PMID:26702635

  11. Coregulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) Levels and Locations: Quantitative Analysis of HER2 Overexpression Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriks, Bart S.; Opresko, Lee; Wiley, H. S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2003-03-01

    Elevated expression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is know to alter cell signalilng and behavioral responses implicated in tumor progression. However, multiple diverse mechanisms may be involved in these overall effects, including signaling by HER2 itself, modulation of signalilng by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and modification of trafficking dynamics for both EGFR and HER2. Continued....

  12. Epidermal growth in the bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, B.D.; St. Aubin, D.J.; Geraci, J.R.; Brown, W.R.

    1985-07-01

    Epidermal growth in two mature female bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, was investigated by following the movement of a cohort of tritiated thymidine-labeled epidermal cells for 59 days. The majority of the cells migrated in a cluster which was estimated to reach the skin surface in 73 days. The authors calculate that the outermost cell layer is sloughed 12 times per day. Turnover time and sloughing rate are estimated to be 1.7 times longer and 8.5 times faster than the respective values for epidermal cell kinetics in humans. This apparent inconsistency of slow transit time and rapid sloughing rate is reconciled by the convoluted structure of the stratum germinativum in the dolphin which results in a ratio of germinatival to superficial cells of 876:1. The stratum germinativum of dolphin epidermis appears to lack morphologically distinct, spatially segregated subpopulations of anchoring and stem cells. Dolphin epidermis has a large capacity for cell population, relatively long turnover time, and rapid sloughing rate. The adaptive advantages of these characteristics are discussed.

  13. Epidermal cyst in an unusual site: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Pehlivan, Mustafa; Özbay, Pelin Özün; Temur, Muzaffer; Yılmaz, Özgür; Gümüş, Zekeriya; Güzel, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Epidermoid cysts can occur in a variety of locations including face, trunk, neck, extremities and scalp. Up to now, those vulvar epidermal cysts reported in the literature were localized on the labia majora and the clitoris. This is the first case of epidermal cyst reported on the labia minora. Presentation of case A 47-year-old, multiparous woman presented with a history of a palpable vulvar mass, without pain but causing difficulty in walking. The large mass was 6 cm in diameter and located in the left labium minus. The labial mass was surgically removed. The final pathologic diagnosis was a vulvar epidermoid cyst. The patient was discharged from hospital without any complications. Discussion Total surgical excision of the mass is more appropriate for definitive histopathological diagnosis and for the prevention of future development of complications. MRI is very important in the localization of the mass and relationship with other tissues regarding treatment planning of larger vulvar masses. Conclusion Epidermal cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a vulvar mass. PMID:25658206

  14. Nrf2 links epidermal barrier function with antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Matthias; Farwanah, Hany; Willrodt, Ann-Helen; Huebner, Aaron J; Sandhoff, Konrad; Roop, Dennis; Hohl, Daniel; Bloch, Wilhelm; Werner, Sabine

    2012-05-01

    The skin provides an efficient permeability barrier and protects from microbial invasion and oxidative stress. Here, we show that these essential functions are linked through the Nrf2 transcription factor. To test the hypothesis that activation of Nrf2 provides skin protection under stress conditions, we determined the consequences of pharmacological or genetic activation of Nrf2 in keratinocytes. Surprisingly, mice with enhanced Nrf2 activity in keratinocytes developed epidermal thickening, hyperkeratosis and inflammation resembling lamellar ichthyosis. This resulted from upregulation of the cornified envelope proteins small proline-rich proteins (Sprr) 2d and 2h and of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor (Slpi), which we identified as novel Nrf2 targets in keratinocytes. Since Sprrs are potent scavengers of reactive oxygen species and since Slpi has antimicrobial activities, their upregulation contributes to Nrf2's protective function. However, it also caused corneocyte fragility and impaired desquamation, followed by alterations in the epidermal lipid barrier, inflammation and overexpression of mitogens that induced keratinocyte hyperproliferation. These results identify an unexpected role of Nrf2 in epidermal barrier function, which needs to be considered for pharmacological use of Nrf2 activators. PMID:22383093

  15. The Role of Impaired Epidermal Barrier Function in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Jurakić Tončić, Ružica; Marinović, Branka

    2016-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, inflammatory, pruritic skin disease with increasing prevalence. The etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis is multifactorial and involves a complex interplay of environmental and genetic factors that induce derangements in the structure and function of the epidermal barrier and immune system. Due to great heterogeneity of etiopathogenesis, there is also great variability of clinical presentation, and diagnosis can sometimes be challenging and difficult. Diagnosis mostly relies on clinical features and laboratory tests, but morphology alone cannot reliably establish the diagnosis, so the spectrum of features associated with AD must be considered. Traditionally, patients with AD have been separated into two different subgroups, i.e. intrinsic and extrinsic. Today, most of authors prefer the outside to inside and back to outside hypothesis, suggesting that the primary disorder lies in epidermal structure and function, resulting in inflammation and immunological downstream activation which further provokes secondary barrier abnormalities. In this review, we discuss the structure and function of the epidermal barrier and the role of impaired barrier function in etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. PMID:27477169

  16. Eph/ephrin signaling in epidermal differentiation and disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Samantha; Wang, Bingcheng; Getsios, Spiro

    2012-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases mediate cell–cell communication by interacting with ephrin ligands residing on adjacent cell surfaces. In doing so, these juxtamembrane signaling complexes provide important contextual information about the cellular microenvironment that helps orchestrate tissue morphogenesis and maintain homeostasis. Eph/ephrin signaling has been implicated in various aspects of mammalian skin physiology, with several members of this large family of receptor tyrosine kinases and their ligands present in the epidermis, hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and underlying dermis. This review focuses on the emerging role of Eph receptors and ephrins in epidermal keratinocytes where they can modulate proliferation, migration, differentiation, and death. The activation of Eph receptors by ephrins at sites of cell–cell contact also appears to play a key role in the maturation of intercellular junctional complexes as keratinocytes move out of the basal layer and differentiate in the suprabasal layers of this stratified, squamous epithelium. Furthermore, alterations in the epidermal Eph/ephrin axis have been associated with cutaneous malignancy, wound healing defects and inflammatory skin conditions. These collective observations suggest that the Eph/ephrin cell–cell communication pathway may be amenable to therapeutic intervention for the purpose of restoring epidermal tissue homeostasis and integrity in dermatological disorders. PMID:22040910

  17. Optimal allocation of leaf epidermal area for gas exchange.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Hugo J; Price, Charles A; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Dekker, Stefan C; Franks, Peter J; Veneklaas, Erik J

    2016-06-01

    A long-standing research focus in phytology has been to understand how plants allocate leaf epidermal space to stomata in order to achieve an economic balance between the plant's carbon needs and water use. Here, we present a quantitative theoretical framework to predict allometric relationships between morphological stomatal traits in relation to leaf gas exchange and the required allocation of epidermal area to stomata. Our theoretical framework was derived from first principles of diffusion and geometry based on the hypothesis that selection for higher anatomical maximum stomatal conductance (gsmax ) involves a trade-off to minimize the fraction of the epidermis that is allocated to stomata. Predicted allometric relationships between stomatal traits were tested with a comprehensive compilation of published and unpublished data on 1057 species from all major clades. In support of our theoretical framework, stomatal traits of this phylogenetically diverse sample reflect spatially optimal allometry that minimizes investment in the allocation of epidermal area when plants evolve towards higher gsmax . Our results specifically highlight that the stomatal morphology of angiosperms evolved along spatially optimal allometric relationships. We propose that the resulting wide range of viable stomatal trait combinations equips angiosperms with developmental and evolutionary flexibility in leaf gas exchange unrivalled by gymnosperms and pteridophytes. PMID:26991124

  18. Epidermal Wound Healing in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Healing of epidermal wounds is a fundamentally conserved process found in essentially all multicellular organisms. Studies of anatomically simple and genetically tractable model invertebrates can illuminate the roles of key genes and mechanisms in wound healing. Recent Advances: The nematode skin is composed of a simple epithelium, the epidermis (also known as hypodermis), and an associated extracellular cuticle. Nematodes likely have a robust capacity for epidermal repair; yet until recently, relatively few studies have directly analyzed wound healing. Here we review epidermal wound responses and repair in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Critical Issues: Wounding the epidermis triggers a cutaneous innate immune response and wound closure. The innate immune response involves upregulation of a suite of antimicrobial peptides. Wound closure involves a Ca2+-triggered rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. These processes appear to be initiated independently, yet, their coordinated activity allows the animal to survive otherwise fatal skin wounds. Future Directions: Unanswered questions include the nature of the damage-associated molecular patterns sensed by the epidermis, the signaling pathways relaying Ca2+ to the cytoskeleton, and the mechanisms of permeability barrier repair. PMID:25945288

  19. TEMPRANILLO Reveals the Mesophyll as Crucial for Epidermal Trichome Formation.

    PubMed

    Matías-Hernández, Luis; Aguilar-Jaramillo, Andrea E; Osnato, Michela; Weinstain, Roy; Shani, Eilon; Suárez-López, Paula; Pelaz, Soraya

    2016-03-01

    Plant trichomes are defensive specialized epidermal cells. In all accepted models, the epidermis is the layer involved in trichome formation, a process controlled by gibberellins (GAs) in Arabidopsis rosette leaves. Indeed, GA activates a genetic cascade in the epidermis for trichome initiation. Here we report that TEMPRANILLO (TEM) genes negatively control trichome initiation not only from the epidermis but also from the leaf layer underneath the epidermis, the mesophyll. Plants over-expressing or reducing TEM specifically in the mesophyll, display lower or higher trichome numbers, respectively. We surprisingly found that fluorescently labeled GA3 accumulates exclusively in the mesophyll of leaves, but not in the epidermis, and that TEM reduces its accumulation and the expression of several newly identified GA transporters. This strongly suggests that TEM plays an essential role, not only in GA biosynthesis, but also in regulating GA distribution in the mesophyll, which in turn directs epidermal trichome formation. Moreover, we show that TEM also acts as a link between GA and cytokinin signaling in the epidermis by negatively regulating downstream genes of both trichome formation pathways. Overall, these results call for a re-evaluation of the present theories of trichome formation as they reveal mesophyll essential during epidermal trichome initiation. PMID:26802039

  20. Why do so many petals have conical epidermal cells?

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Heather M.; Bennett, K. M. Veronica; Dorling, Matthew; Sandbach, Lucy; Prince, David; Chittka, Lars; Glover, Beverley J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The conical epidermal cells found on the petals of most Angiosperm species are so widespread that they have been used as markers of petal identity, but their function has only been analysed in recent years. This review brings together diverse data on the role of these cells in pollination biology. Scope The published effects of conical cells on petal colour, petal reflexing, scent production, petal wettability and pollinator grip on the flower surface are considered. Of these factors, pollinator grip has been shown to be of most significance in the well-studied Antirrhinum majus/bumble-bee system. Published data on the relationship between epidermal cell morphology and floral temperature were limited, so an analysis of the effects of cell shape on floral temperature in Antirrhinum is presented here. Statistically significant warming by conical cells was not detected, although insignificant trends towards faster warming at dawn were found, and it was also found that flat-celled flowers could be warmer on warm days. The warming observed is less significant than that achieved by varying pigment content. However, the possibility that the effect of conical cells on temperature might be biologically significant in certain specific instances such as marginal habitats or weather conditions cannot be ruled out. Conclusions Conical epidermal cells can influence a diverse set of petal properties. The fitness benefits they provide to plants are likely to vary with pollinator and habitat, and models are now required to understand how these different factors interact. PMID:21470973

  1. Pyrroloquinoline quinone protects mouse brain endothelial cells from high glucose-induced damage in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong; Chen, Guo-qiang; Yu, Gui-ping; Liu, Chang-jian

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), an oxidoreductase cofactor, on high glucose-induced mouse endothelial cell damage in vitro. Methods: Mouse brain microvascular endothelial bEND.3 cells were exposed to different glucose concentrations (5.56, 25 and 40 mmol/L) for 24 or 48 h. The cell viability was examined using MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the apoptosis and ROS levels in the cells. MitoTracker Green staining was used to examine the mitochondria numbers in the cells. Western blot analysis was used to analyze the expression of HIF-1α and the proteins in JNK pathway. Results: Treatment of bEND.3 cells with high glucose significantly decreased the cell viability, while addition of PQQ (1 and 10 μmol/L) reversed the high glucose-induced cell damage in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, PQQ (100 μmol/L) significantly suppressed the high glucose-induced apoptosis and ROS production in the cells. PQQ significantly reversed the high glucose-induced reduction in both the mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondria number in the cells. The high glucose treatment significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and JNK phosphorylation in the cells, and addition of PQQ led to a further increase of HIF-1α level and a decrease of JNK phosphorylation. Addition of JNK inhibitor SP600125 (10 μmol/L) also significantly suppressed high glucose-induced apoptosis and JNK phosphorylation in bEND.3 cells. Conclusion: PQQ protects mouse brain endothelial cells from high glucose damage in vitro by suppressing intracellular ROS and apoptosis via inhibiting JNK signaling pathway. PMID:25283505

  2. Cough suppression disorders spectrum.

    PubMed

    Reich, Jerome M

    2014-02-01

    Volitional cough suppression, identified exclusively in females, is an unusual causal mechanism for instances of lobar atalectasis and bronchiectasis. It is a postulated mechanism for the genesis of Lady Windermere Syndrome. PMID:24462261

  3. Epidermal control of floral organ identity by class B homeotic genes in Antirrhinum and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Efremova, N; Perbal, M C; Yephremov, A; Hofmann, W A; Saedler, H; Schwarz-Sommer, Z

    2001-07-01

    To assess the contribution of the epidermis to the control of petal and stamen organ identity, we have used transgenic Antirrhinum and Arabidopsis plants that expressed the Antirrhinum class B homeotic transcription factors DEFICIENS (DEF) and GLOBOSA (GLO) in the epidermis. Transgene expression was controlled by the ANTIRRHINUM FIDDLEHEAD (AFI) promoter, which directs gene expression to the L1 meristematic layer and, later, to the epidermis of differentiating organs. Transgenic epidermal DEF and GLO chimeras display similar phenotypes, suggesting similar epidermal contributions by the two class B genes in ANTIRRHINUM: Epidermal B function autonomously controls the differentiation of Antirrhinum petal epidermal cell types, but cannot fully control the pattern of cell divisions and the specification of sub-epidermal petal cell-identity by epidermal signalling. This non-autonomous control is enhanced if the endogenous class B genes can be activated from the epidermis. The developmental influence of epidermal B function in Antirrhinum stamen development is very limited. In contrast, epidermal B function in Arabidopsis can control most if not all epidermal and sub-epidermal differentiation events in petals and stamens, without any contribution from the endogenous class B genes. Possible reasons for differences in the efficacy of B-function-mediated cell communication between the two species are discussed. Interestingly, our experiments uncovered partial incompatibility between class B functional homologues. Although the DEFICIENS/PISTILLATA heterodimer is functional in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, the APETALA3/GLOBOSA heterodimer is not. PMID:11526073

  4. Hyaluronan Participates in the Epidermal Response to Disruption of the Permeability Barrier in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Maytin, Edward V.; Chung, Helen H.; Seetharaman, V. Mani

    2004-01-01

    Hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid, HA) is a glycosaminoglycan in the extracellular matrix of tissues that plays a role in cellular migration, proliferation and differentiation. Injury to the stratum corneum elicits an epidermal hyperproliferative response, a pathogenic feature in many cutaneous diseases including eczema and psoriasis. Because HA is abundant in the matrix between keratinocytes, we asked whether the presence of HA is required for epidermal hyperplasia to occur in response to barrier injury. Disruption of the stratum corneum, by acetone application on the skin of hairless mice, led to a marked accumulation of HA in the matrix between epidermal basal and spinous keratinocytes, and also within keratinocytes of the upper epidermis. To test whether HA may have a functional role in epidermal hyperplasia, we used Streptomyces hyaluronidase (StrepH), delivered topically, to degrade epidermal HA and blunt the accumulation of epidermal HA after acetone. StrepH signficantly reduced epidermal HA levels, and also significantly inhibited the development of epidermal hyperplasia. This reduction in epidermal thickness was not attributable to any decrease in keratinocyte proliferation, but rather to an apparent acceleration in terminal differentiation (ie, increased keratin 10 and filaggrin expression). Overall, the data show that HA is a significant participant in the epidermal response to barrier injury. PMID:15466397

  5. Photoprotective effects of oxyresveratrol and Kuwanon O on DNA damage induced by UVA in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuting; Chen, Feng; Wang, Mingfu

    2015-03-16

    Ultraviolet A not only plays a major part in photoaging and skin tanning but also induces genetic damage and mutation in the epidermal basal layer of human skin. The photoprotective effect of oxyresveratrol and kuwanon O, two phenolic compounds from the root extract of Morus australis, in human primary epidermal keratinocytes was investigated in this study. Both of them were nontoxic to cells at a concentration less than 10 and 0.5 μM, respectively. After pretreatment at the concentrations of 5 and 10 μM, oxyresveratrol increased cell viability, exhibited significant suppressions on UVA- or H2O2-induced cellular ROS. UVA-enhanced nitrotyrosine was also reduced by post-treatment with oxyresveratrol at theses concentrations. Kuwanon O presented similar inhibitions on cellular ROS and nitrotyrosine with lower concentrations (0.25 and 0.5 μM), but there is no significant protection on cell survival after UVA irradiation. Their photoprotective effects also involved the enhanced repair of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) as mediated by the augment of p53 expression after UVA radiation. PMID:25588103

  6. FBXO11 promotes ubiquitination of the Snail family of transcription factors in cancer progression and epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yue; Shenoy, Anitha K; Doernberg, Samuel; Chen, Hao; Luo, Huacheng; Shen, Huangxuan; Lin, Tong; Tarrash, Miriam; Cai, Qingsong; Hu, Xin; Fiske, Ryan; Chen, Ting; Wu, Lizi; Mohammed, Kamal A; Rottiers, Veerle; Lee, Siu Sylvia; Lu, Jianrong

    2015-06-28

    The Snail family of transcription factors are core inducers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we show that the F-box protein FBXO11 recognizes and promotes ubiquitin-mediated degradation of multiple Snail family members including Scratch. The association between FBXO11 and Snai1 in vitro is independent of Snai1 phosphorylation. Overexpression of FBXO11 in mesenchymal cells reduces Snail protein abundance and cellular invasiveness. Conversely, depletion of endogenous FBXO11 in epithelial cancer cells causes Snail protein accumulation, EMT, and tumor invasion, as well as loss of estrogen receptor expression in breast cancer cells. Expression of FBXO11 is downregulated by EMT-inducing signals TGFβ and nickel. In human cancer, high FBXO11 levels correlate with expression of epithelial markers and favorable prognosis. The results suggest that FBXO11 sustains the epithelial state and inhibits cancer progression. Inactivation of FBXO11 in mice leads to neonatal lethality, epidermal thickening, and increased Snail protein levels in epidermis, validating that FBXO11 is a physiological ubiquitin ligase of Snail. Moreover, in C. elegans, the FBXO11 mutant phenotype is attributed to the Snail factors as it is suppressed by inactivation/depletion of Snail homologs. Collectively, these findings suggest that the FBXO11-Snail regulatory axis is evolutionarily conserved and critically governs carcinoma progression and mammalian epidermal development. PMID:25827072

  7. Stomatal Spacing Safeguards Stomatal Dynamics by Facilitating Guard Cell Ion Transport Independent of the Epidermal Solute Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Papanatsiou, Maria; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Stomata enable gaseous exchange between the interior of the leaf and the atmosphere through the stomatal pore. Control of the pore aperture depends on osmotic solute accumulation by, and its loss from the guard cells surrounding the pore. Stomata in most plants are separated by at least one epidermal cell, and this spacing is thought to enhance stomatal function, although there are several genera that exhibit stomata in clusters. We made use of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stomatal patterning mutants to explore the impact of clustering on guard cell dynamics, gas exchange, and ion transport of guard cells. These studies showed that stomatal clustering in the Arabidopsis too many mouths (tmm1) mutant suppressed stomatal movements and affected CO2 assimilation and transpiration differentially between dark and light conditions and were associated with alterations in K(+) channel gating. These changes were consistent with the impaired dynamics of tmm1 stomata and were accompanied by a reduced accumulation of K(+) ions in the guard cells. Our findings underline the significance of spacing for stomatal dynamics. While stomatal spacing may be important as a reservoir for K(+) and other ions to facilitate stomatal movements, the effects on channel gating, and by inference on K(+) accumulation, cannot be explained on the basis of a reduced number of epidermal cells facilitating ion supply to the guard cells. PMID:27406168

  8. FBXO11 promotes ubiquitination of the Snail family of transcription factors in cancer progression and epidermal development

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yue; Shenoy, Anitha K.; Doernberg, Samuel; Chen, Hao; Luo, Huacheng; Shen, Huangxuan; Lin, Tong; Tarrash, Miriam; Cai, Qingsong; Hu, Xin; Fiske, Ryan; Chen, Ting; Wu, Lizi; Mohammed, Kamal A.; Rottiers, Veerle; Lee, Siu Sylvia; Lu, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The Snail family of transcription factors are core inducers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we show that the F-box protein FBXO11 recognizes and promotes ubiquitin-mediated degradation of multiple Snail family members including Scratch. The association between FBXO11 and Snai1 in vitro is independent of Snai1 phosphorylation. Overexpression of FBXO11 in mesenchymal cells reduces Snail protein abundance and cellular invasiveness. Conversely, depletion of endogenous FBXO11 in epithelial cancer cells causes Snail protein accumulation, EMT, and tumor invasion, as well as loss of estrogen receptor expression in breast cancer cells. Expression of FBXO11 is downregulated by EMT-inducing signals TGFβ and nickel. In human cancer, high FBXO11 levels correlate with expression of epithelial markers and favorable prognosis. The results suggest that FBXO11 sustains the epithelial state and inhibits cancer progression. Inactivation of FBXO11 in mice leads to neonatal lethality, epidermal thickening, and increased Snail protein levels in epidermis, validating that FBXO11 is a physiological ubiquitin ligase of Snail. Moreover, in C. elegans, the FBXO11 mutant phenotype is attributed to the Snail factors as it is suppressed by inactivation/depletion of Snail homologs. Collectively, these findings suggest that the FBXO11-Snail regulatory axis is evolutionarily conserved and critically governs carcinoma progression and mammalian epidermal development. PMID:25827072

  9. UV Radiation Induces the Epidermal Recruitment of Dendritic Cells that Compensate for the Depletion of Langerhans Cells in Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Achachi, Amine; Vocanson, Marc; Bastien, Philippe; Péguet-Navarro, Josette; Grande, Sophie; Goujon, Catherine; Breton, Lionel; Castiel-Higounenc, Isabelle; Nicolas, Jean-François; Gueniche, Audrey

    2015-08-01

    UVR causes skin injury and inflammation, resulting in impaired immune function and increased skin cancer risk. Langerhans cells (LCs), the immune sentinels of the epidermis, are depleted for several days following a single UVR exposure and can be reconstituted from circulating monocytes. However, the differentiation pathways leading to the recovery of a normal pool of LCs is still unclear. To study the dynamic changes in human skin with UV injury, we exposed a cohort of 29 healthy human volunteers to a clinically relevant dose of UVR and analyzed sequential epidermal biopsies for changes in leukocyte and dendritic cell (DC) subsets. UV-induced depletion of CD1a(high) LC was compensated by sequential appearance of various epidermal leukocytes. CD14(+) monocytes were recruited as early as D1 post exposure, followed by recruitment of two inflammatory DC subsets that may represent precursors of LCs. These CD1a(low) CD207(-) and the heretofore unknown CD1a(low) CD207(+) DCs appeared at day 1 and day 4 post UVR, respectively, and were endowed with T-cell-activating properties similar to those of LCs. We conclude that recruitment of monocytes and inflammatory DCs appear as a physiological response of the epidermis in order to repair UVR-induced LC depletion associated with immune suppression. PMID:25806853

  10. Dietary fructose and glucose differentially affect lipid and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Absorbed glucose and fructose differ in that glucose largely escapes first pass removal by the liver, whereas fructose does not, resulting in different metabolic effects of these two monosaccharides. In short-term controlled feeding studies, dietary fructose significantly increases postprandial trig...

  11. Dietary fructose and glucose differentially affect lipid and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Absorbed glucose and fructose differ in that glucose largely escapes first-pass removal by the liver, whereas fructose does not, resulting in different metabolic effects of these 2 monosaccharides. In short-term controlled feeding studies, dietary fructose significantly increases postprandial trigly...

  12. Lipolytic response to glucose infusion in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, R.R.; Peters, E.J.

    1987-02-01

    The authors have determined the effect of various rates of glucose infusion on the rates of release of glycerol (R/sub a/ glycerol), free fatty acids (R/sub a/ FFA), and on energy metabolism in normal human volunteers. Plasma kinetics were determined with use of the stable isotopic tracers D-5-glycerol and (1- TC)palmitate, and energy metabolism was determined by indirect calorimetry. The effect of glucose infusion on R/sub a/ glycerol and R/sub a/ FFA was dose-dependent. At 4 mg x kg x min , both R/sub a/ glycerol and R/sub a/ FFA were suppressed; at 8 mg x kg x min , R/sub a/ FFA was even more depressed, but R/sub a/ glycerol was similar to the value during the 4 mg x kg x min infusion. At all infusion rates tested, the amount of potential energy available from the sum of the glucose infusion and endogenously mobilized fat was always greater than when no glucose was infused. Glucose decreased fat mobilization by both inhibiting lipolysis and stimulating reesterification, thus causing a significant increase in triglyceride-fatty acid substrate cycling within the adipose tissue. Plasma insulin was determined by radioimmunoassay.

  13. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  14. Deoxyandrographolide promotes glucose uptake through glucose transporter-4 translocation to plasma membrane in L6 myotubes and exerts antihyperglycemic effect in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arha, Deepti; Pandeti, Sukanya; Mishra, Akansha; Srivastava, Swayam Prakash; Srivastava, Arvind Kumar; Narender, Tadigoppula; Tamrakar, Akhilesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle is the principal site for postprandial glucose utilization and augmenting the rate of glucose utilization in this tissue may help to control hyperglycemia associated with diabetes mellitus. Here, we explored the effect of Deoxyandrographolide (DeoAn) isolated from the Andrographis paniculata Nees on glucose utilization in skeletal muscle and investigated its antihyperglycemic effect in vivo in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and genetically diabetic db/db mice. In L6 myotubes, DeoAn dose-dependently stimulated glucose uptake by enhancing the translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) to cell surface, without affecting the total cellular GLUT4 and GLUT1 content. These effects of DeoAn were additive to insulin. Further analysis revealed that DeoAn activated PI-3-K- and AMPK-dependent signaling pathways, account for the augmented glucose transport in L6 myotubes. Furthermore, DeoAn lowered postprandial blood glucose levels in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and also suppressed the rises in the fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, triglycerides and LDL-Cholesterol levels of db/db mice. These findings suggest the therapeutic efficacy of the DeoAn for type 2 diabetes mellitus and can be potential phytochemical for its management. PMID:26528798

  15. Leaf epidermal appendages of desert plant: an ecological perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yubing; Li, Xinrong; Li, Mengmeng

    2014-05-01

    Desert plant often have few, tiny or no leaves, which reduces transpiration. The epidermis of their leaves is often ornamented outgrowths called trichomes or hairs and a thick waxy cuticle. Hairs on the leaf surface trap humidity in dry climates and waxy leaf surfaces reduce water loss. Our present study is to investigate the characteristics of trichomes and waxy cuticle in leaf surface of desert plant, which in the long term acclimation in semi-humid, semi-arid and arid ecosystems of Northern China, from east (Zhangwu county, Liaoning province) to west (Korla city, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region), passing through several provinces including the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, Shanxi province, the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region and Gansu province. 68 shrubs and 7 trees were selected in the natural habitats which were artificial sand fixing vegetation and the adjacent natural vegetation in sandy areas. The leaf epidermis was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the cuticle thickness was calculated in the leaf cross-section by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated that the epidermis of selected materials was divided into five categories: (1) Trichomes with different forms covered completely on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces of leaf, and any other epidermal appendages could not been observed. (2) Epicuticular wax crystals with different forms almost completely covered in the epistomatal chambers as well as on the surrounding epidermis, and there were no other appendages on the leaf surface. (3) A lot of warty hairs arranged neatly on the surface and the stomatal index was too low. (4) Several or even dozens of papillary epidermal cells covered with waxy crystals enclosed a sunken stomata chamber, therefore the stomatal density is very low. (5) Like ordinary terrestrial plants, epidermal cells and cell outline are clear, with epidermal hairs or not, and the stomata and waxy crystals are visible. TEM showed that desert plants

  16. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John Douglas R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-01-01

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using 2-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyze the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identifies the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging. PMID:25904018

  17. Altered Brain Response to Drinking Glucose and Fructose in Obese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jastreboff, Ania M; Sinha, Rajita; Arora, Jagriti; Giannini, Cosimo; Kubat, Jessica; Malik, Saima; Van Name, Michelle A; Santoro, Nicola; Savoye, Mary; Duran, Elvira J; Pierpont, Bridget; Cline, Gary; Constable, R Todd; Sherwin, Robert S; Caprio, Sonia

    2016-07-01

    Increased sugar-sweetened beverage consumption has been linked to higher rates of obesity. Using functional MRI, we assessed brain perfusion responses to drinking two commonly consumed monosaccharides, glucose and fructose, in obese and lean adolescents. Marked differences were observed. In response to drinking glucose, obese adolescents exhibited decreased brain perfusion in brain regions involved in executive function (prefrontal cortex [PFC]) and increased perfusion in homeostatic appetite regions of the brain (hypothalamus). Conversely, in response to drinking glucose, lean adolescents demonstrated increased PFC brain perfusion and no change in perfusion in the hypothalamus. In addition, obese adolescents demonstrated attenuated suppression of serum acyl-ghrelin and increased circulating insulin level after glucose ingestion; furthermore, the change in acyl-ghrelin and insulin levels after both glucose and fructose ingestion was associated with increased hypothalamic, thalamic, and hippocampal blood flow in obese relative to lean adolescents. Additionally, in all subjects there was greater perfusion in the ventral striatum with fructose relative to glucose ingestion. Finally, reduced connectivity between executive, homeostatic, and hedonic brain regions was observed in obese adolescents. These data demonstrate that obese adolescents have impaired prefrontal executive control responses to drinking glucose and fructose, while their homeostatic and hedonic responses appear to be heightened. Thus, obesity-related brain adaptations to glucose and fructose consumption in obese adolescents may contribute to excessive consumption of glucose and fructose, thereby promoting further weight gain. PMID:27207544

  18. Cacao liquor procyanidin extract improves glucose tolerance by enhancing GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yoko; Okabe, Masaaki; Natsume, Midori; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance are associated with the increased risk of the metabolic syndrome and other severe health problems. The insulin-sensitive GLUT4 regulates glucose homoeostasis in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. In this study, we investigated whether cacao liquor procyanidin (CLPr) extract, which contains epicatechin, catechin and other procyanidins, improves glucose tolerance by promoting GLUT4 translocation and enhances glucose uptake in muscle cells. Our results demonstrated that CLPr increased glucose uptake in a dose-dependent manner and promoted GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane of L6 myotubes. Oral administration of a single dose of CLPr suppressed the hyperglycaemic response after carbohydrate ingestion, which was accompanied by enhanced GLUT4 translocation in ICR mice. These effects of CLPr were independent of α-glucosidase inhibition in the small intestine. CLPr also promoted GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle of C57BL/6 mice fed a CLPr-supplemented diet for 7 d. These results indicate that CLPr is a beneficial food material for improvement of glucose tolerance by promoting GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane of skeletal muscle. PMID:25191549

  19. Oat β-glucan depresses SGLT1- and GLUT2-mediated glucose transport in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6).

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Nazanin N; Purslow, Peter P; Tosh, Susan M; Bakovic, Marica

    2016-06-01

    Oat β-glucan consumption is linked to reduced risk factors associated with diabetes and obesity by lowering glycemic response and serum level of low-density lipoproteins. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism of action of oat β-glucan at the interface between the gut wall and the lumen responsible for attenuating glucose levels. We proposed that viscous oat β-glucan acts as a physical barrier to glucose uptake in normally absorptive gut epithelial cells IEC-6 by affecting the expression of intestinal glucose transporters. Concentration and time-dependent changes in glucose uptake were established by using a nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose. The effectiveness of nutrient transport in IEC-6 cells was shown by significant differences in glucose uptake and corresponding transporter expression. The expressions of glucose transporters sodium-glucose-linked transport protein 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) increased with time (0-60 minutes) and glucose levels (5-25 mmol/L). The suppression of glucose uptake and SGLT1 and GLUT2 expression by increasing concentrations (4-8 mg/mL) of oat β-glucan demonstrated a direct effect of the physical properties of oat β-glucan on glucose transport. These results affirmed oat β-glucan as a dietary agent for minimizing postprandial glucose and showed that modulating the activity of the key intestinal glucose transporters with oat β-glucan could be an effective way of lowering blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. PMID:27188900

  20. Response to glucose and lipid infusions in sepsis: a kinetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.H.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1985-05-01

    The kinetics and oxidation of glucose and free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism were assessed in control and Escherichia coli septicemic dogs by using primed, constant infusions of U-/sup 14/C-glucose and 1,2, /sup 13/C-palmitic acid. In the controls, the infusion of glucose suppressed endogenous glucose production completely, whereas, in the septic dogs, only a 30% suppression of glucose production occurred. The ability of the septic dogs to oxidize endogenous or exogenous glucose was decreased significantly. The basal rate of appearance of FFA was significantly higher in the septic dogs, but their ability to oxidize FFA was comparable to that of the control dogs; therefore, the basal rate of FFA oxidation was higher in the septic dogs. These studies indicate that septic dogs have a decreased capacity to oxidize glucose, but that they retain their ability to oxidize long-chain fatty acids. Because the rate of lipolysis was increased in sepsis, lipid was the predominate energy substrate in this septic model.

  1. Tattoo-based noninvasive glucose monitoring: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Bandodkar, Amay J; Jia, Wenzhao; Yardımcı, Ceren; Wang, Xuan; Ramirez, Julian; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    We present a proof-of-concept demonstration of an all-printed temporary tattoo-based glucose sensor for noninvasive glycemic monitoring. The sensor represents the first example of an easy-to-wear flexible tattoo-based epidermal diagnostic device combining reverse iontophoretic extraction of interstitial glucose and an enzyme-based amperometric biosensor. In-vitro studies reveal the tattoo sensor's linear response toward physiologically relevant glucose levels with negligible interferences from common coexisting electroactive species. The iontophoretic-biosensing tattoo platform is reduced to practice by applying the device on human subjects and monitoring variations in glycemic levels due to food consumption. Correlation of the sensor response with that of a commercial glucose meter underscores the promise of the tattoo sensor to detect glucose levels in a noninvasive fashion. Control on-body experiments demonstrate the importance of the reverse iontophoresis operation and validate the sensor specificity. This preliminary investigation indicates that the tattoo-based iontophoresis-sensor platform holds considerable promise for efficient diabetes management and can be extended toward noninvasive monitoring of other physiologically relevant analytes present in the interstitial fluid. PMID:25496376

  2. Alginate cryogel based glucose biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatoni, Amin; Windy Dwiasi, Dian; Hermawan, Dadan

    2016-02-01

    Cryogel is macroporous structure provides a large surface area for biomolecule immobilization. In this work, an alginate cryogel based biosensor was developed to detect glucose. The cryogel was prepared using alginate cross-linked by calcium chloride under sub-zero temperature. This porous structure was growth in a 100 μL micropipette tip with a glucose oxidase enzyme entrapped inside the cryogel. The glucose detection was based on the colour change of redox indicator, potassium permanganate, by the hydrogen peroxide resulted from the conversion of glucose. The result showed a porous structure of alginate cryogel with pores diameter of 20-50 μm. The developed glucose biosensor was showed a linear response in the glucose detection from 1.0 to 5.0 mM with a regression of y = 0.01x+0.02 and R2 of 0.994. Furthermore, the glucose biosensor was showed a high operational stability up to 10 times of uninterrupted glucose detections.

  3. Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rizos, Christos V; Elisaf, Moses S

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension plays a major role in the development and progression of micro- and macrovascular disease. Moreover, increased blood pressure often coexists with additional cardiovascular risk factors such as insulin resistance. As a result the need for a comprehensive management of hypertensive patients is critical. However, the various antihypertensive drug categories have different effects on glucose metabolism. Indeed, angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have an overall neutral effect on glucose metabolism. However, some members of the CCBs class such as azelnidipine and manidipine have been shown to have advantageous effects on glucose homeostasis. On the other hand, diuretics and β-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism. Of note, carvedilol as well as nebivolol seem to differentiate themselves from the rest of the β-blockers class, being more attractive options regarding their effect on glucose homeostasis. The adverse effects of some blood pressure lowering drugs on glucose metabolism may, to an extent, compromise their cardiovascular protective role. As a result the effects on glucose homeostasis of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment, especially in patients which are at high risk for developing diabetes. PMID:25068013

  4. Adrenocortical suppression in cats given megestrol acetate.

    PubMed

    Chastain, C B; Graham, C L; Nichols, C E

    1981-12-01

    Megestrol acetate was given orally to 8 cats at a dose of 2.5 mg every other day for 2 weeks and to 8 cats at a dose of 5.0 mg every day for 2 weeks. Four cats were designated nontreated controls. Pre-ACTH-stimulated plasma concentrations of cortisol (hydrocortisone) and ACTH-stimulated cortisol and tolerance to large-dose glucose infusion (IV) were determined on each of the 20 cats given megestrol acetate. Cats were restrained with acepromazine maleate and ketamine hydrochloride during blood sample collection and large-dose glucose infusion. Adrenocortical function and tolerance to large-dose glucose infusion were reevaluated for 4 weeks--after 1st and 2nd weeks of megestrol acetate treatment of the treated groups, and after 1st and 2nd weeks when treatment was stopped (ie, experiment weeks 3 and 4). Each week a cat from the control group and 2 cats from the 2 treated groups were selected to determine the changes occurring during the experiment for that week; after collection of plasma samples, each week's 5 selected cats were euthanatized and necropsied. Significant impairment of adrenocortical function and alteration of adrenocortical morphology occurred with both treated groups. The most severe adrenocortical alterations occurred in the cats 1 week after megestrol acetate was no longer given (ie, experiment week 3). Megestrol acetate-induced adrenocortical suppression contributed to the death of 1 cat. It was concluded that if stress occurs to cats on treatment or soon after treatment with megestrol acetate, glucocorticoids should be supplemented. The effects of megestrol acetate on glucose tolerance were overshadowed by the unforeseen intolerance caused by chemical restraint with acepromazine maleate and ketamine hydrochloride. PMID:6280517

  5. Inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus syndrome with its polymorphic presentation - A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, C. Anand; Yeluri, Garima; Raghav, Namita

    2012-01-01

    Epidermal nevi are hamartomatous lesions that are typically present at birth, but can occur anytime during childhood and may rarely appear in adulthood. An estimated one-third of individuals with epidermal nevi have involvement of other organ systems; hence, this condition is considered to be an epidermal nevus syndrome. There are four distinct epidermal nevus syndromes recognizable by the different types of associated epithelial nevi: linear sebaceous nevi, linear nevus comedonicus, linear epidermal nevus, and inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus (ILVEN). Each type may be regarded as a part of a syndrome with other systemic manifestations. We report a rare case of ILVEN syndrome in a 23-year-old female patient with a wide spectrum of mucosal, cutaneous, and skeletal abnormalities, demonstrating the polymorphic presentation of this condition. PMID:22557913

  6. Esterase Activity and Intracellular Localization in Reconstructed Human Epidermal Cultured Skin Models

    PubMed Central

    Katayanagi, Mishina; Hashimoto, Fumie

    2015-01-01

    Background Reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models have been developed for cosmetic and pharmaceutical research. Objective This study evaluated the total and carboxyl esterase activities (i.e., Km and Vmax, respectively) and localization in two reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models (LabCyte EPI-MODEL [Japan Tissue Engineering] and EpiDerm [MatTek/Kurabo]). The usefulness of the reconstruction cultured epidermis was also verified by comparison with human and rat epidermis. Methods Homogenized epidermal samples were fractioned by centrifugation. p-nitrophenyl acetate and 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate were used as substrates of total esterase and carboxyl esterase, respectively. Results Total and carboxyl esterase activities were present in the reconstructed human epidermal culture skin models and were localized in the cytosol. Moreover, the activities and localization were the same as those in human and rat epidermis. Conclusion LabCyte EPI-MODEL and EpiDerm are potentially useful for esterase activity prediction in human epidermis. PMID:26082583

  7. Cadmium induces autophagy through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling in skin epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang Xin; Hitron, John Andrew; Zhang Zhuo; Cheng Senping; Budhraja, Amit; Ding Songze; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi Xianglin

    2011-09-15

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal which is environmentally and occupationally relevant. The mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced autophagy are not yet completely understood. The present study shows that cadmium induces autophagy, as demonstrated by the increase of LC3-II formation and the GFP-LC3 puncta cells. The induction of autophagosomes was directly visualized by electron microscopy in cadmium-exposed skin epidermal cells. Blockage of LKB1 or AMPK by siRNA transfection suppressed cadmium-induced autophagy. Cadmium-induced autophagy was inhibited in dominant-negative AMPK-transfected cells, whereas it was accelerated in cells transfected with the constitutively active form of AMPK. mTOR signaling, a negative regulator of autophagy, was downregulated in cadmium-exposed cells. In addition, cadmium generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) at relatively low levels, and caused poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) activation and ATP depletion. Inhibition of PARP by pharmacological inhibitors or its siRNA transfection suppressed ATP reduction and autophagy in cadmium-exposed cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced autophagy signaling was attenuated by either exogenous addition of catalase and superoxide dismutase, or by overexpression of these enzymes. Consequently, these results suggest that cadmium-mediated ROS generation causes PARP activation and energy depletion, and eventually induces autophagy through the activation of LKB1-AMPK signaling and the down-regulation of mTOR in skin epidermal cells. - Highlights: > Cadmium, a toxic heavy metal, induces autophagic cell death through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling. > Cadmium generates intracellular ROS at low levels and this leads to severe DNA damage and PARP activation, resulting in ATP depletion, which are the upstream events of LKB1-AMPK-mediated autophagy. > This novel finding may contribute to further understanding of cadmium-mediated diseases.

  8. Polyethylene glycol-mediated colorectal cancer chemoprevention: roles of epidermal growth factor receptor and Snail.

    PubMed

    Wali, Ramesh K; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Koetsier, Jennifer L; Bissonnette, Marc; Roy, Hemant K

    2008-09-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a clinically widely used agent with profound chemopreventive properties in experimental colon carcinogenesis. We reported previously that Snail/beta-catenin signaling may mediate the suppression of epithelial proliferation by PEG, although the upstream events remain unclear. We report herein the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a known mediator of Snail and overexpressed in approximately 80% of human colorectal cancers, on PEG-mediated antiproliferative and hence antineoplastic effects in azoxymethane (AOM) rats and HT-29 colon cancer cells. AOM rats were randomized to either standard diet or one with 10% PEG-3350 and euthanized 8 weeks later. The colonic samples were subjected to immunohistochemical or Western blot analyses. PEG decreased mucosal EGFR by 60% (P < 0.001). Similar PEG effects were obtained in HT-29 cells. PEG suppressed EGFR protein via lysosmal degradation with no change in mRNA levels. To show that EGFR antagonism per se was responsible for the antiproliferative effect, we inhibited EGFR by either pretreating cells with gefitinib or stably transfecting with EGFR-short hairpin RNA and measured the effect of PEG on proliferation. In either case, PEG effect was blunted, suggesting a vital role of EGFR. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that EGFR-short hairpin RNA cells, besides having reduced membrane EGFR, also expressed low Snail levels (40%), corroborating a strong association. Furthermore, in EGFR silenced cells, PEG effect on EGFR or Snail was muted, similar to that on proliferation. In conclusion, we show that EGFR is the proximate membrane signaling molecule through which PEG initiates antiproliferative activity with Snail/beta-catenin pathway playing the central intermediary function. PMID:18790788

  9. Inhibition of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Improves Myelination and Attenuates Tissue Damage of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si; Ju, Peijun; Tjandra, Editha; Yeap, Yeeshan; Owlanj, Hamed; Feng, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    Preventing demyelination and promoting remyelination of denuded axons are promising therapeutic strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition was reported to benefit the neural functional recovery and the axon regeneration after SCI. However, its role in de- and remyelination of axons in injured spinal cord is unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of EGFR inhibitor, PD168393 (PD), on the myelination in mouse contusive SCI model. We found that expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the injured spinal cords of PD treated mice was remarkably elevated. The density of glial precursor cells and oligodendrocytes (OLs) was increased and the cell apoptosis in lesions was attenuated after PD168393 treatment. Moreover, PD168393 treatment reduced both the numbers of OX42 + microglial cells and glial fibrillary acidic protein + astrocytes in damaged area of spinal cords. We thus conclude that the therapeutic effects of EGFR inhibition after SCI involves facilitating remyelination of the injured spinal cord, increasing of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and OLs, as well as suppressing the activation of astrocytes and microglia/macrophages. PMID:26883518

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in combination with expression of MIG6 alters gefitinib sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, metastasis, and invasion in various tumors. Earlier studies showed that the EGFR is frequently overexpressed in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and EGFR mutations at specific amino acid residues in the kinase domain induce altered responsiveness to gefitinib, a small molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, the mechanism underlying the drug response modulated by EGFR mutation is still largely unknown. To elucidate drug response in EGFR signal transduction pathway in which complex dynamics of multiple molecules involved, a systematic approach is necessary. In this paper, we performed experimental and computational analyses to clarify the underlying mechanism of EGFR signaling and cell-specific gefitinib responsiveness in three H1299-derived NSCLC cell lines; H1299 wild type (H1299WT), H1299 with an overexpressed wild type EGFR (H1299EGFR-WT), and H1299 with an overexpressed mutant EGFR L858R (H1299L858R; gefitinib sensitive mutant). Results We predicted and experimentally verified that Mig6, which is a known negative regulator of EGFR and specifically expressed in H1299L858R cells, synergized with gefitinib to suppress cellular growth. Computational analyses indicated that this inhibitory effect is amplified at the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation steps of MEK and ERK. Conclusions Thus, we showed that L858R receptor mutation in combination with expression of its negative regulator, Mig6, alters signaling outcomes and results in variable drug sensitivity. PMID:21333004

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor protects against abdominal aortic aneurysm in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Obama, Takashi; Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Tomonori; Fukuda, Yamato; Takayanagi, Takehiko; Taro, Yoshinori; Kawai, Tatsuo; Forrester, Steven J; Elliott, Katherine J; Choi, Eric; Daugherty, Alan; Rizzo, Victor; Eguchi, Satoru

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been implicated in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), Ang II activates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediating growth promotion. We hypothesized that inhibition of EGFR prevents Ang II-dependent AAA. C57BL/6 mice were co-treated with Ang II and β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) to induce AAA with or without treatment with EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib. Without erlotinib, 64.3% of mice were dead due to aortic rupture. All surviving mice had AAA associated with EGFR activation. Erlotinib-treated mice did not die and developed far fewer AAA. The maximum diameters of abdominal aortas were significantly shorter with erlotinib treatment. In contrast, both erlotinib-treated and non-treated mice developed hypertension. The erlotinib treatment of abdominal aorta was associated with lack of EGFR activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress, interleukin-6 induction and matrix deposition. EGFR activation in AAA was also observed in humans. In conclusion, EGFR inhibition appears to protect mice from AAA formation induced by Ang II plus BAPN. The mechanism seems to involve suppression of vascular EGFR and ER stress. PMID:25531554

  12. Dysregulated function of normal human epidermal keratinocytes in the absence of filaggrin

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Ningning; Ma, Xiaoli; Meng, Xianguang; An, Liguo; Pang, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of filaggrin knockdown on the function of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs). Filaggrin expression levels in NHEKs were knocked down by lentivirus (LV) encoding small hairpin RNA (shRNA), with control cells infected with nonsense shRNA or not infected. Cell migration and invasion were assayed using Transwell inserts, cell adhesion and proliferation by the Cell Counting kit-8 assay, and apoptosis and cell cycle progression by flow cytometry. shRNA efficiently suppressed expression of filaggrin protein. The LV group had significantly decreased cell migration, adhesion and proliferation, and increased apoptosis compared with the control groups (P=0.027). In addition, the proportion of cells in G1 and G2 phases were significantly increased in the LV group compared with control groups (P=0.018). The results of the present study demonstrate that filaggrin knockdown inhibits NHEK migration, adhesion and proliferation, promotes apoptosis and disturbs cell cycle progression. PMID:27485743

  13. Role for the epidermal growth factor receptor in chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Bichsel, Kyle J; Gogia, Navdeep; Malouff, Timothy; Pena, Zachary; Forney, Eric; Hammiller, Brianna; Watson, Patrice; Hansen, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of cancer patients with chemotherapeutics like cyclophosphamide often causes alopecia as a result of premature and aberrant catagen. Because the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signals anagen hair follicles to enter catagen, we hypothesized that EGFR signaling may be involved in cyclophosphamide-induced alopecia. To test this hypothesis, skin-targeted Egfr mutant mice were generated by crossing floxed Egfr and Keratin 14 promoter-driven Cre recombinase mice. Cyclophosphamide treatment of control mice resulted in alopecia while Egfr mutant skin was resistant to cyclophosphamide-induced alopecia. Egfr mutant skin entered catagen normally, as indicated by dermal papilla condensation and decreased follicular proliferation, but did not progress to telogen as did Egfr wild type follicles. Egfr mutant follicles responded with less proliferation, apoptosis, and fewer p53-positive cells after cyclophosphamide. Treatment of control mice with the EGFR inhibitors erlotinib or gefitinib similarly suppressed alopecia and catagen progression by cyclophosphamide. Secondary analysis of clinical trials utilizing EGFR-targeted therapies and alopecia-inducing chemotherapy also revealed evidence for involvement of EGFR in chemotherapy-induced alopecia. Taken together, our results demonstrated the involvement of EGFR signaling in chemotherapy-induced alopecia, which will help in the design of novel therapeutic regimens to minimize chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:23894460

  14. Regulation of epidermal cell interleukin-6 production by UV light and corticosteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Kirnbauer, R.; Koeck, A.N.; Neuner, P.; Foerster, E.K.; Krutmann, J.; Urbanski, A.; Schauer, E.; Ansel, J.C.; Schwarz, T.; Luger, T.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Epidermal cells (EC) are well known as a source of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-6. In the present study, we investigated whether ultraviolet (UV) light and corticosteroids (CS) affect IL-6 production by normal (HNK) or malignant (KB) human keratinocytes. Supernatants derived from UVB (100 J/m2)- but not from UVA (100-1500 kJ/m2)-exposed EC (HNK and KB) contained significantly increased levels of IL-6 activity. This was also confirmed by Western blot analysis, resulting in specific bands at 23 kD and 27 kD. Northern blot analysis revealed an enhanced IL-6 mRNA expression after UVB exposure. Addition of hydrocortisone, prednisolone, or dexamethasone immediately after UVB irradiation significantly blocked UVB or IL-1-induced IL-6 mRNA expression and production by EC. The suppressive effect was observed at doses in the physiologic (10(-7)-10(-9) M) as well as pharmacologic (10(-5)-10(-7) M) range. In contrast, the nonactive steroid prednisone did not affect EC IL-6 mRNA expression. These findings indicate that increased IL-6 production by EC after UVB irradiation may mediate local and systemic inflammatory reactions following extensive sun exposure. Thus, the therapeutic effect of corticosteroids observed in various inflammatory diseases may be partly due to their downregulating capacity of IL-6 production.

  15. Epidermal growth factor promotes proliferation of dermal papilla cells via Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Nan, Weixiao; Wang, Shiyong; Zhang, Tietao; Si, Huazhe; Wang, Datao; Yang, Fuhe; Li, Guangyu

    2016-08-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the development and growth of hair follicle is controversial. In the present study, 2-20 ng/ml EGF promoted the growth of mink hair follicles in vitro, whereas 200 ng/ml EGF inhibited follicle growth. Further, dermal papilla (DP) cells, a group of mesenchymal cells that govern hair follicle development and growth, were isolated and cultured in vitro. Treatment with or forced expression of EGF accelerated proliferation and induced G1/S transition in DP cells. Moreover, EGF upregulated the expression of DP mesenchymal genes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), as well as the Notch pathway molecules including Notch1, Jagged1, Hes1 and Hes5. In addition, inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by DAPT significantly reduced the basal and EGF-enhanced proliferation rate, and also suppressed cell cycle progression. We also show that the expression of several follicle-regulatory genes, such as Survivin and Msx2, were upregulated by EGF, and was inhibited by DAPT. In summary, our study demonstrates that the concentration of EGF is critical for the switch between hair follicle growth and inhibition, and EGF promotes DP cell proliferation via Notch signaling pathway. PMID:27109378

  16. Dysregulated function of normal human epidermal keratinocytes in the absence of filaggrin.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ningning; Ma, Xiaoli; Meng, Xianguang; An, Liguo; Pang, Shuguang

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of filaggrin knockdown on the function of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs). Filaggrin expression levels in NHEKs were knocked down by lentivirus (LV) encoding small hairpin RNA (shRNA), with control cells infected with nonsense shRNA or not infected. Cell migration and invasion were assayed using Transwell inserts, cell adhesion and proliferation by the Cell Counting kit‑8 assay, and apoptosis and cell cycle progression by flow cytometry. shRNA efficiently suppressed expression of filaggrin protein. The LV group had significantly decreased cell migration, adhesion and proliferation, and increased apoptosis compared with the control groups (P=0.027). In addition, the proportion of cells in G1 and G2 phases were significantly increased in the LV group compared with control groups (P=0.018). The results of the present study demonstrate that filaggrin knockdown inhibits NHEK migration, adhesion and proliferation, promotes apoptosis and disturbs cell cycle progression. PMID:27485743

  17. An in vitro skin irritation test (SIT) using the EpiDerm reconstructed human epidermal (RHE) model.

    PubMed

    Kandárová, Helena; Hayden, Patrick; Klausner, Mitchell; Kubilus, Joseph; Sheasgreen, John

    2009-01-01

    The EpiDerm Skin Irritation test (EpiDerm SIT) was developed and validated for in vitro skin irritation testing of chemicals, including cosmetic and pharmaceutical ingredients. The EpiDerm SIT utilizes the 3D in vitro reconstructed human epidermal (RHE) model EpiDerm. The procedure described in this protocol allows for discrimination between irritants of GHS category 2 and non-irritants. The test is performed over the course of a 4 day time period, consisting of pre-incubation, 60 minute exposure, 42 hour post-incubation and MTT viability assay. After tissue receipt and overnight pre-incubation (Day 0), tissues are topically exposed to the test chemicals (Day 1), which can be liquid, semisolid, solid or waxy. Three tissues are used for each test chemical, as well as for the positive control (5% aq. SDS solution), and a negative control (DPBS). Chemical exposure lasts for 60 minutes, 35 min of which the tissues are kept in an incubator at 37 degrees C. The test substances are then removed from the tissue surface by an extensive washing procedure. The tissue inserts are blotted and transferred to fresh medium. After a 24 hr incubation period (Day 2), the medium is exchanged. The medium can be saved for further analysis of cytokines or other endpoints of interest. After the medium exchange, tissues are incubated for an additional 18 hours. At the end of the entire 42 h post-incubation (day 3), the tissues are transferred into yellow MTT solution and incubated for 3 hours. The resultant purple-blue formazan salt, formed mainly by mitochondrial metabolism, is extracted for 2 hours using isopropanol. The optical density of the extracted formazan is determined using a spectrophotometer. A chemical is classified as an irritant if the tissue viability relative to the negative control treated tissues is reduced below 50%. This procedure can be used as full replacement of the in vivo rabbit skin irritation test for hazard identification and labeling of chemicals in line with

  18. Glucose oxidase-magnetite nanoparticle bioconjugate for glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Liane M; Quach, Ashley D; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2004-10-01

    Immobilization of bioactive molecules on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles is of great interest, because the magnetic properties of these bioconjugates promise to greatly improve the delivery and recovery of biomolecules in biomedical applications. Here we present the preparation and functionalization of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles 20 nm in diameter and the successful covalent conjugation of the enzyme glucose oxidase to the amino-modified nanoparticle surface. Functionalization of the magnetic nanoparticle surface with amino groups greatly increased the amount and activity of the immobilized enzyme compared with immobilization procedures involving physical adsorption. The enzymatic activity of the glucose oxidase-coated magnetic nanoparticles was investigated by monitoring oxygen consumption during the enzymatic oxidation of glucose using a ruthenium phenanthroline fluorescent complex for oxygen sensing. The glucose oxidase-coated magnetite nanoparticles could function as nanometric glucose sensors in glucose solutions of concentrations up to 20 mmol L(-1). Immobilization of glucose oxidase on the nanoparticles also increased the stability of the enzyme. When stored at 4 degrees C the nanoparticle suspensions maintained their bioactivity for up to 3 months. PMID:15448967

  19. Glucose-stat, a glucose-controlled continuous culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kleman, G L; Chalmers, J J; Luli, G W; Strohl, W R

    1991-01-01

    A predictive and feedback proportional control algorithm, developed for fed-batch fermentations and described in a companion paper (G. L. Kleman, J. J. Chalmers, G. W. Luli, and W. R. Strohl, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:910-917, 1991), was used in this work to control a continuous culture on the basis of the soluble-glucose concentration (called the glucose-stat). This glucose-controlled continuous-culture system was found to reach and maintain steady state for 11 to 24 residence times when four different background glucose concentrations (0.27, 0.50, 0.7, and 1.5 g/liter) were used. The predictive-plus-feedback control system yielded very tight control of the continuous nutristat cultures; glucose concentrations were maintained at the set points with less than 0.003 standard error. Acetate production by Escherichia coli B in glucose-stats was found not to be correlated with the level of steady-state soluble-glucose concentration. PMID:2059050

  20. Glucose-stat, a glucose-controlled continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Kleman, G L; Chalmers, J J; Luli, G W; Strohl, W R

    1991-04-01

    A predictive and feedback proportional control algorithm, developed for fed-batch fermentations and described in a companion paper (G. L. Kleman, J. J. Chalmers, G. W. Luli, and W. R. Strohl, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:910-917, 1991), was used in this work to control a continuous culture on the basis of the soluble-glucose concentration (called the glucose-stat). This glucose-controlled continuous-culture system was found to reach and maintain steady state for 11 to 24 residence times when four different background glucose concentrations (0.27, 0.50, 0.7, and 1.5 g/liter) were used. The predictive-plus-feedback control system yielded very tight control of the continuous nutristat cultures; glucose concentrations were maintained at the set points with less than 0.003 standard error. Acetate production by Escherichia coli B in glucose-stats was found not to be correlated with the level of steady-state soluble-glucose concentration. PMID:2059050

  1. Human corpus luteum: presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and binding characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyagari, R.R.; Khan-Dawood, F.S.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors are present in many reproductive tissues but have not been demonstrated in the human corpus luteum. To determine the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and its binding characteristics, we carried out studies on the plasma cell membrane fraction of seven human corpora lutea (days 16 to 25) of the menstrual cycle. Specific epidermal growth factor receptors were present in human corpus luteum. Insulin, nerve growth factor, and human chorionic gonadotropin did not competitively displace epidermal growth factor binding. The optimal conditions for corpus luteum-epidermal growth factor receptor binding were found to be incubation for 2 hours at 4 degrees C with 500 micrograms plasma membrane protein and 140 femtomol /sup 125/I-epidermal growth factor per incubate. The number (mean +/- SEM) of epidermal growth factor binding sites was 12.34 +/- 2.99 X 10(-19) mol/micrograms protein; the dissociation constant was 2.26 +/- 0.56 X 10(-9) mol/L; the association constant was 0.59 +/- 0.12 X 10(9) L/mol. In two regressing corpora lutea obtained on days 2 and 3 of the menstrual cycle, there was no detectable specific epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity. Similarly no epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity could be detected in ovarian stromal tissue. Our findings demonstrate that specific receptors for epidermal growth factor are present in the human corpus luteum. The physiologic significance of epidermal growth factor receptors in human corpus luteum is unknown, but epidermal growth factor may be involved in intragonadal regulation of luteal function.

  2. Glucose screening and tolerance tests during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy (OGTT); Glucose challenge test - pregnancy ... For the glucose screening test: You do not need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a ...

  3. Venlafaxine and atenolol disrupt epinephrine-stimulated glucose production in rainbow trout hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ings, J S; George, N; Peter, M C S; Servos, M R; Vijayan, M M

    2012-01-15

    The beta-blocker atenolol (ATEN), and the selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine (VEN) are found in municipal wastewater effluents, but little is known about the effect of these pharmaceuticals on aquatic animals. We tested the hypothesis that VEN and ATEN disrupt acute stress mediated glucose production in fish liver. To this end, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes were exposed in vitro to different concentrations (0, 0.1, 10, 1000 nM) of VEN or ATEN and glucose production in response to either cortisol or epinephrine (two key stress hormones) was ascertained. Both VEN and ATEN did not affect either the unstimulated or cortisol (100 ng/mL)-stimulated glucose release over a 24 h period. The acute (3 h) unstimulated glucose production by isolated hepatocytes in suspension was also not modified by ATEN, while VEN (100 and 1000 nM) reduced basal glucose release. However, ATEN, even at concentration as low as 0.01 nM completely abolished epinephrine (1 μM)-induced glucose production in trout hepatocytes. Interestingly, VEN also suppressed epinephrine-induced glucose production but only at higher concentrations (100 and 1000 nM). Neither VEN nor ATEN significantly impacted the glucose production in response to either 8-bromo-cAMP (cAMP analogue) or glucagon (a metabolic hormone that increases glucose production) stimulation. ATEN but not VEN attenuated the epinephrine-induced increase in glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) mRNA abundance in trout hepatocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that the impact of ATEN and VEN on glucose production involves inhibition of β-adrenoceptor signaling in trout hepatocytes. Overall, VEN and ATEN are beta-blockers and may disrupt the adaptive acute glucose response to a secondary stressor in rainbow trout. PMID:22057255

  4. The effect of Psoroptes ovis infestation on ovine epidermal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sheep scab is an intensively pruritic, exudative and allergic dermatitis of sheep caused by the ectoparasitic mite Psoroptes ovis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of P. ovis infestation on different components of the ovine epidermal barrier within the first 24 hours post-infestation (hpi). To achieve this, the expression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) genes and epidermal barrier proteins, the nature and severity of epidermal pathology and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were evaluated. By 1 hpi a significant dermal polymorphonuclear infiltrate and a significant increase in TEWL with maximal mean TEWL (598.67 g/m2h) were observed. Epidermal pathology involving intra-epidermal pustulation, loss of epidermal architecture and damage to the basement membrane was seen by 3 hpi. Filaggrin and loricrin protein levels in the stratum corneum declined significantly in the first 24 hpi and qPCR validation confirmed the decrease in expression of the key EDC genes involucrin, filaggrin and loricrin observed by microarray analysis, with 5.8-fold, 4.5-fold and 80-fold decreases, respectively by 24 hpi. The present study has demonstrated that early P. ovis infestation disrupts the ovine epidermal barrier causing significant alterations in the expression of critical barrier components, epidermal pathology, and TEWL. Many of these features have also been documented in human and canine atopic dermatitis suggesting that sheep scab may provide a model for the elucidation of events occurring in the early phases of atopic sensitisation. PMID:23398847

  5. Dual Roles of O-Glucose Glycans Redundant with Monosaccharide O-Fucose on Notch in Notch Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiroo; Ayukawa, Tomonori; Ishio, Akira; Sasamura, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Tomoko; Matsuno, Kenji

    2016-06-24

    Notch is a transmembrane receptor that mediates cell-cell interactions and controls various cell-fate specifications in metazoans. The extracellular domain of Notch contains multiple epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats. At least five different glycans are found in distinct sites within these EGF-like repeats. The function of these individual glycans in Notch signaling has been investigated, primarily by disrupting their individual glycosyltransferases. However, we are just beginning to understand the potential functional interactions between these glycans. Monosaccharide O-fucose and O-glucose trisaccharide (O-glucose-xylose-xylose) are added to many of the Notch EGF-like repeats. In Drosophila, Shams adds a xylose specifically to the monosaccharide O-glucose. We found that loss of the terminal dixylose of O-glucose-linked saccharides had little effect on Notch signaling. However, our analyses of double mutants of shams and other genes required for glycan modifications revealed that both the monosaccharide O-glucose and the terminal dixylose of O-glucose-linked saccharides function redundantly with the monosaccharide O-fucose in Notch activation and trafficking. The terminal dixylose of O-glucose-linked saccharides and the monosaccharide O-glucose were required in distinct Notch trafficking processes: Notch transport from the apical plasma membrane to adherens junctions, and Notch export from the endoplasmic reticulum, respectively. Therefore, the monosaccharide O-glucose and terminal dixylose of O-glucose-linked saccharides have distinct activities in Notch trafficking, although a loss of these activities is compensated for by the presence of monosaccharide O-fucose. Given that various glycans attached to a protein motif may have redundant functions, our results suggest that these potential redundancies may lead to a serious underestimation of glycan functions. PMID:27129198

  6. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  7. N-Indolylglycosides bearing modifications at the glucose C6-position as sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kuang-Feng; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Song, Jen-Shin; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Yeh, Teng-Kuang; Hsieh, Tsung-Chih; Huang, Chung-Yu; Wang, Min-Hsien; Wu, Szu-Huei; Chang, Wei-En; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Lee, Jinq-Chyi

    2016-05-15

    Suppression of glucose reabsorption through the inhibition of sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. To investigate the effect of C6-substitution on inhibition of SGLT2 by N-indolylglucosides, a small library of 6-triazole, 6-amide, 6-urea, and 6-thiourea N-indolylglycosides were synthesized and tested. A detailed structure-activity relationship (SAR) study culminated in the identification of 6-amide derivatives 6a and 6o as potent SGLT2 inhibitors, which were further tested for inhibitory activity against SGLT1. The data obtained indicated that 6a and 6o are mildly to moderately selective for SGLT2 over SGLT1. Both compounds were also evaluated in a urinary glucose excretion test and pharmacokinetic study; 6a was found capable of inducing urinary glucose excretion in normal SD rats. PMID:27075813

  8. In vitro human epidermal penetration of 1-bromopropane.

    PubMed

    Frasch, H Frederick; Dotson, G Scott; Barbero, Ana M

    2011-01-01

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP; CAS number 106-94-5), also known as n-propyl bromide, is a halogenated short-chain alkane used as an organic solvent with numerous commercial and industrial applications, including garment dry cleaning and vapor degreasing of metals. The purpose of this study was to determine the dermal absorption characteristics and corrosivity of 1-BP. Heat-separated human epidermal membranes were mounted on static diffusion cells. Different exposure scenarios were studied (infinite dose, finite dose, and transient exposure) using neat 1-BP and saturated aqueous solution as donor. Steady-state fluxes for infinite-dose neat 1-BP exposure averaged 625 to 960 μg cm(-2) h(-1). The finite-dose (10 μl/cm(2) = 13.5 mg/cm(2)) unoccluded donor resulted in penetration of <0.2% of the applied dose (22 μg/cm(2)). A 10-min transient exposure to infinite dose resulted in total penetration of 179 μg/cm(2). Steady-state 1-BP fluxes from neat application of a commercial dry cleaning solvent were similar (441 to 722 μg cm(-2) h(-1)). The permeability coefficient of 1-BP in water vehicle was 0.257 ± 0.141 cm/h. The absorption potential of 1-BP following dermal exposure is dependent upon the type and duration of exposure. Donor losses due to evaporation were approximately 500-fold greater than dermal absorption flux; evaporation flux was 420 mg cm(-2) h(-1). 1-BP is cytotoxic but not corrosive, based on results from a cultured reconstructed human epidermal model (EpiDerm Skin Corrosivity Test). PMID:21830855

  9. The glucose-6-phosphatase system.

    PubMed Central

    van Schaftingen, Emile; Gerin, Isabelle

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), an enzyme found mainly in the liver and the kidneys, plays the important role of providing glucose during starvation. Unlike most phosphatases acting on water-soluble compounds, it is a membrane-bound enzyme, being associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. In 1975, W. Arion and co-workers proposed a model according to which G6Pase was thought to be a rather unspecific phosphatase, with its catalytic site oriented towards the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum [Arion, Wallin, Lange and Ballas (1975) Mol. Cell. Biochem. 6, 75--83]. Substrate would be provided to this enzyme by a translocase that is specific for glucose 6-phosphate, thereby accounting for the specificity of the phosphatase for glucose 6-phosphate in intact microsomes. Distinct transporters would allow inorganic phosphate and glucose to leave the vesicles. At variance with this substrate-transport model, other models propose that conformational changes play an important role in the properties of G6Pase. The last 10 years have witnessed important progress in our knowledge of the glucose 6-phosphate hydrolysis system. The genes encoding G6Pase and the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been cloned and shown to be mutated in glycogen storage disease type Ia and type Ib respectively. The gene encoding a G6Pase-related protein, expressed specifically in pancreatic islets, has also been cloned. Specific potent inhibitors of G6Pase and of the glucose 6-phosphate translocase have been synthesized or isolated from micro-organisms. These as well as other findings support the model initially proposed by Arion. Much progress has also been made with regard to the regulation of the expression of G6Pase by insulin, glucocorticoids, cAMP and glucose. PMID:11879177

  10. Dermal exposure to jet fuel suppresses delayed-type hypersensitivity: a critical role for aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gerardo; Limon-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2007-12-01

    Dermal exposure to military (JP-8) and/or commercial (Jet-A) jet fuel suppresses cell-mediated immune reactions. Immune regulatory cytokines and biological modifiers, including platelet activating factor (PAF), prostaglandin E(2), and interleukin-10, have been implicated in the pathway of events leading to immune suppression. It is estimated that approximately 260 different hydrocarbons are found in jet fuel, and the exact identity of the active immunotoxic agent(s) is unknown. The recent availability of synthetic jet fuel (S-8), which is refined from natural gas, and is devoid of aromatic hydrocarbons, made it feasible to design experiments to address this problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that the aromatic hydrocarbons present in jet fuel are responsible for immune suppression. We report that applying S-8 to the skin of mice does not upregulate the expression of epidermal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) nor does it induce immune suppression. Adding back a cocktail of seven of the most prevalent aromatic hydrocarbons found in jet fuel (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, 1,2,4-trimethlybenzene, cyclohexylbenzene, and dimethylnaphthalene) to S-8 upregulated epidermal COX-2 expression and suppressed a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction. Injecting PAF receptor antagonists, or a selective cycloozygenase-2 inhibitor into mice treated with S-8 supplemented with the aromatic cocktail, blocked suppression of DTH, similar to data previously reported using JP-8. These findings identify the aromatic hydrocarbons found in jet fuel as the agents responsible for suppressing DTH, in part by the upregulation of COX-2, and the production of immune regulatory factors and cytokines. PMID:17890764

  11. Heterogeneity of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling networks in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Frank B.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Cavenee, Webster K.; Mischel, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    As tumours evolve, the daughter cells of the initiating cell often become molecularly heterogeneous and develop different functional properties and therapeutic vulnerabilities. In glioblastoma (GBM), a lethal form of brain cancer, the heterogeneous expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) poses a substantial challenge for the effective use of EGFR-targeted therapies. Understanding the mechanisms that cause EGFR heterogeneity in GBM should provide better insights into how they, and possibly other amplified receptor tyrosine kinases, affect cellular signalling, metabolism and drug resistance. PMID:25855404

  12. Mathematical model for calcium-assisted epidermal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuaki; Sawabu, Yusuke; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Denda, Mitsuhiro; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2016-05-21

    Using a mathematical model of the epidermis, we propose a mechanism of epidermal homeostasis mediated by calcium dynamics. We show that calcium dynamics beneath the stratum corneum can reduce spatio-temporal fluctuations of the layered structure of the epidermis. We also demonstrate that our model can reproduce experimental results that the recovery from a barrier disruption is faster when the disrupted site is exposed to air. In particular, simulation results indicate that the recovery speed depends on the size of barrier disruption. PMID:26953648

  13. Angiotensin-(1-7) inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saghir; Yousif, Mariam HM; Dhaunsi, Gursev S; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Al-Farsi, Omama; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The transactivation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor appears to be an important central transduction mechanism in mediating diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] via its Mas receptor can prevent the development of hyperglycaemia-induced cardiovascular complications. Here, we investigated whether Ang-(1-7) can inhibit hyperglycaemia-induced EGF receptor transactivation and its classical signalling via ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in vivo and in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were chronically treated with Ang-(1-7) or AG1478, a selective EGF receptor inhibitor, for 4 weeks and mechanistic studies performed in the isolated mesenteric vasculature bed as well as in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). KEY RESULTS Diabetes significantly enhanced phosphorylation of EGF receptor at tyrosine residues Y992, Y1068, Y1086, Y1148, as well as ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in the mesenteric vasculature bed whereas these changes were significantly attenuated upon Ang-(1–7) or AG1478 treatment. In VSMCs grown in conditions of high glucose (25 mM), an Src-dependent elevation in EGF receptor phosphorylation was observed. Ang-(1-7) inhibited both Ang II- and glucose-induced transactivation of EGF receptor. The inhibition of high glucose-mediated Src-dependant transactivation of EGF receptor by Ang-(1-7) could be prevented by a selective Mas receptor antagonist, D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results show for the first time that Ang-(1-7) inhibits EGF receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor/Src-dependent pathway and might represent a novel general mechanism by which Ang-(1-7) exerts its beneficial effects in many disease states including diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. PMID:21806601

  14. Conversion of glucose to sorbose

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Mark E.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-02-09

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing sorbose from glucose, said method comprising: (a) contacting the glucose with a silica-containing structure comprising a zeolite having a topology of a 12 membered-ring or larger, an ordered mesoporous silica material, or an amorphous silica, said structure containing Lewis acidic Ti.sup.4+ or Zr.sup.4+ or both Ti.sup.4+ and Zr.sup.4+ framework centers, said contacting conducted under reaction conditions sufficient to isomerize the glucose to sorbose. The sorbose may be (b) separated or isolated; or (c) converted to ascorbic acid.

  15. Photoimmune suppression and photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stephen E

    2002-03-01

    The primary cause of non-melanoma skin cancer, the most prevalent form of human neoplasia, is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. Exposing mice to UV radiation induces skin cancers that are highly antigenic. Upon transfer of an UV-induced skin cancer to a normal syngeneic mouse, the tumor cells are recognized and rapidly destroyed by the immune system of the recipient. This raises the question of how these cancers avoided immune destruction during their development in the UV-irradiated host. This question was answered when it was discovered that in addition to being carcinogenic, UV radiation was also immunosuppressive. Studies with immune suppressed transplantation recipients, and biopsy proven skin cancer patients have confirmed that UV-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for skin cancer development in humans. It is of great importance, therefore, to understand the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression. The focus of this manuscript will be to use some examples from the more recent scientific literature to review the mechanisms by which UV radiation suppresses the immune response and allows for the progressive outgrowth of antigenic skin tumors. PMID:11861222

  16. Parasitic suppressing circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. T.; Raposa, F. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A circuit for suppressing parasitic oscillations across an inductor operating in a resonant mode is described. The circuit includes a switch means and resistive means connected serially across the inductor. A unidirectional resistive-capacitive network is also connected across the inductor and to the switch means to automatically render the switch means conducting when inductive current through the inductor ceases to flow.

  17. The role of ghrelin in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Bader N; Shin, Kyungsoo; Chappe, Valerie; Anini, Younes

    2016-04-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid (aa) stomach-derived peptide discovered in 1999 as the endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin-producing cells constitute a distinct group of endocrine cells dispersed throughout the gastric mucosa and to a lesser extent in the small intestine and the endocrine pancreas. Ghrelin plasma levels rise during fasting and chronic caloric restriction to stimulate food intake and fat storage and to prevent life-threatening falls in blood glucose. Plasma ghrelin levels decrease after a meal is consumed and in conditions of energy surplus (such as obesity). Ghrelin has emerged as a key player in the regulation of appetite and energy homeostasis. Ghrelin achieves these functions through binding the ghrelin receptor GHS-R in appetite-regulating neurons and in peripheral metabolic organs including the endocrine pancreas. Ghrelin levels are negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance. In addition, ghrelin secretion is impaired in obesity and insulin resistance. Several studies highlight an important role for ghrelin in glucose homeostasis. Genetic, immunological, and pharmacological blockade of ghrelin signaling resulted in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, exogenous ghrelin administration was shown to decrease glucose-induced insulin release and increase glucose level in both humans and rodents. GHS-R was shown to be expressed in pancreatic β-cells and ghrelin suppressed insulin release via a Ca2+-mediated pathway. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in the field that focuses on the role of insulin and insulin resistance in the regulation of ghrelin secretion and on the role of ghrelin in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). PMID:27235674

  18. [Contribution of the kidney to glucose homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Segura, Julián; Ruilope, Luis Miguel

    2013-09-01

    The kidney is involved in glucose homeostasis through three major mechanisms: renal gluconeogenesis, renal glucose consumption, and glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubule. Glucose reabsorption is one of the most important physiological functions of the kidney, allowing full recovery of filtered glucose, elimination of glucose from the urine, and prevention of calorie loss. Approximately 90% of the glucose is reabsorbed in the S1 segment of the proximal tubule, where glucose transporter-2 (GLUT2) and sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2) are located, while the remaining 10% is reabsorbed in the S3 segment by SGLT1 and GLUT1 transporters. In patients with hyperglycemia, the kidney continues to reabsorb glucose, thus maintaining hyperglycemia. Most of the renal glucose reabsorption is mediated by SGLT2. Several experimental and clinical studies suggest that pharmacological blockade of this transporter might be beneficial in the management of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24444521

  19. Ethanol impairs glucose uptake by human astrocytes and neurons: protective effects of acetyl-L-carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, P M Abdul; Alikunju, Saleena; Szlachetka, Adam M; Mercer, Aaron J; Haorah, James

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol consumption causes neurocognitive deficits, neuronal injury, and neurodegeneration. At the cellular level, alcohol abuse causes oxidative damage to mitochondria and cellular proteins and interlink with the progression of neuroinflammation and neurological disorders. We previously reported that alcohol inhibits glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), leading to BBB dysfunction and neurodegeneration. In this study, we hypothesized that ethanol (EtOH)-mediated disruption in glucose uptake would deprive energy for human astrocytes and neurons inducing neurotoxicity and neuronal degeneration. EtOH may also have a direct effect on glucose uptake in neurons and astrocytes, which has not been previously described. Our results indicate that ethanol exposure decreases the uptake of D-(2-3H)-glucose by human astrocytes and neurons. Inhibition of glucose uptake correlates with a reduction in glucose transporter protein expression (GLUT1 in astrocytes and GLUT3 in neurons). Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), a neuroprotective agent, suppresses the effects of alcohol on glucose uptake and GLUT levels, thus reducing neurotoxicity and neuronal degeneration. These findings suggest that deprivation of glucose in brain cells contributes to neurotoxicity in alcohol abusers, and highlights ALC as a potential therapeutic agent to prevent the deleterious health conditions caused by alcohol abuse. PMID:21258656

  20. Dapagliflozin stimulates glucagon secretion at high glucose: experiments and mathematical simulations of human A-cells.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Ahlstedt, Ingela; El Hachmane, Mickaël F; Göpel, Sven O

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon is one of the main regulators of blood glucose levels and dysfunctional stimulus secretion coupling in pancreatic A-cells is believed to be an important factor during development of diabetes. However, regulation of glucagon secretion is poorly understood. Recently it has been shown that Na(+)/glucose co-transporter (SGLT) inhibitors used for the treatment of diabetes increase glucagon levels in man. Here, we show experimentally that the SGLT2 inhibitor dapagliflozin increases glucagon secretion at high glucose levels both in human and mouse islets, but has little effect at low glucose concentrations. Because glucagon secretion is regulated by electrical activity we developed a mathematical model of A-cell electrical activity based on published data from human A-cells. With operating SGLT2, simulated glucose application leads to cell depolarization and inactivation of the voltage-gated ion channels carrying the action potential, and hence to reduce action potential height. According to our model, inhibition of SGLT2 reduces glucose-induced depolarization via electrical mechanisms. We suggest that blocking SGLTs partly relieves glucose suppression of glucagon secretion by allowing full-scale action potentials to develop. Based on our simulations we propose that SGLT2 is a glucose sensor and actively contributes to regulation of glucagon levels in humans which has clinical implications. PMID:27535321

  1. Dapagliflozin stimulates glucagon secretion at high glucose: experiments and mathematical simulations of human A-cells

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Morten Gram; Ahlstedt, Ingela; El Hachmane, Mickaël F.; Göpel, Sven O.

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon is one of the main regulators of blood glucose levels and dysfunctional stimulus secretion coupling in pancreatic A-cells is believed to be an important factor during development of diabetes. However, regulation of glucagon secretion is poorly understood. Recently it has been shown that Na+/glucose co-transporter (SGLT) inhibitors used for the treatment of diabetes increase glucagon levels in man. Here, we show experimentally that the SGLT2 inhibitor dapagliflozin increases glucagon secretion at high glucose levels both in human and mouse islets, but has little effect at low glucose concentrations. Because glucagon secretion is regulated by electrical activity we developed a mathematical model of A-cell electrical activity based on published data from human A-cells. With operating SGLT2, simulated glucose application leads to cell depolarization and inactivation of the voltage-gated ion channels carrying the action potential, and hence to reduce action potential height. According to our model, inhibition of SGLT2 reduces glucose-induced depolarization via electrical mechanisms. We suggest that blocking SGLTs partly relieves glucose suppression of glucagon secretion by allowing full-scale action potentials to develop. Based on our simulations we propose that SGLT2 is a glucose sensor and actively contributes to regulation of glucagon levels in humans which has clinical implications. PMID:27535321

  2. Reactive oxygen species promotes cellular senescence in normal human epidermal keratinocytes through epigenetic regulation of p16(INK4a.).

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Mina; Kajiya, Hiroshi; Ozeki, Satoru; Okabe, Koji; Ikebe, Tetsuro

    2014-09-26

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can cause severe damage to DNA, proteins and lipids in normal cells, contributing to carcinogenesis and various pathological conditions. While cellular senescence arrests the early phase of cell cycle without any detectable telomere loss or dysfunction. ROS is reported to contribute to induction of cellular senescence, as evidence by its premature onset upon treatment with antioxidants or inhibitors of cellular oxidant scavengers. Although cellular senescence is known to be implicated in tumor suppression, it remains unknown whether ROS initially contributed to be cellular senescence in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) and their malignant counterparts. To clarify whether ROS induce cellular senescence in NHEKs, we examined the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the expression of cellular senescence-associated molecules in NHEKs, compared to in squamous carcinoma cells (SCCs). Hydrogen peroxide increased the number of cells positive in senescence associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity in NHEKs, but not SCCs. The expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, especially p16(INK4a) was upregulated in NHEKs treated with H2O2. Interestingly, H2O2 suppressed the methylation of p16(INK4a), promoter region in NHEKs, but not in SCCs. Hydrogen peroxide also suppressed the expression of phosphorylated Rb and CDK4, resulting in arrest in G0/G1 phase in NHEKs, but not SCCs. Our results indicate that the ROS-induced cellular senescence in NHEKs was caused by the upregulation p16(INK4a) through demethylation in its promoter region, which is not detected in SCCs, suggesting that ROS-induced cellular senescence contributes to tumor suppression of NHEKs. PMID:25181340

  3. Differential expression of SKALP/Elafin in human epidermal tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Alkemade, H. A.; Molhuizen, H. O.; van Vlijmen-Willems, I. M.; van Haelst, U. J.; Schalkwijk, J.

    1993-01-01

    Recently we described a new epidermal serine proteinase inhibitor, skin-derived antileukoproteinase (SKALP), also known as elafin. SKALP/elafin was found to be absent in normal human epidermis, but can be induced in vitro and in vivo under hyperproliferative conditions. Here we studied the expression of SKALP/elafin in several types of epidermal tumors (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, actinic keratosis, and keratoacanthoma). Using immunohistochemical staining SKALP/elafin appeared to be differentially expressed in these tumors. Functional measurements of anti-proteinase activity, and Western blotting of tumor extracts confirmed our findings at the histological level. In well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, SKALP/elafin messenger RNA was demonstrated by non-radioactive in situ hybridization. We conclude that SKALP/elafin is a marker for abnormal or disturbed squamous differentiation. A possible role of SKALP/elafin in the control of tumor cell invasion is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8256855

  4. Epidermal cooling during pulsed laser treatment of selected dermatoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J. Stuart; Anvari, Bahman; Tanenbaum, B. S.; Milner, Thomas E.; Kimel, Sol; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    The clinical objective in laser treatment of selected dermatoses such as port wine stain (PWS), hemangioma and telangiectasia is to maximize thermal damage to the blood vessels, while at the same time minimizing nonspecific injury to the normal overlying epidermis. 'Dynamic' cooling of skin, whereby a cryogen is sprayed onto the surface for an appropriately short period of time (on the order of tens of milliseconds), may offer an effective method for eliminating epidermal thermal injury during laser treatment. We present theoretical and experimental investigations of the thermal response of skin to dynamic cooling in conjunction with pulsed laser irradiation at 585 nm. Computed temperature distributions indicate that cooling the skin immediately prior to pulsed laser irradiation with a cryogen spurt of tetrafluoroethane is an effective method for eliminating epidermal thermal injury during laser treatment of PWS. Experimental results show rapid reduction of skin surface temperature is obtained when using tetrafluoroethane spurts of 20 - 100 ms duration. Successful blanching of PWS without thermal injury to the overlying epidermis is accomplished.

  5. Mathematical morphologic analysis of aging-related epidermal changes.

    PubMed

    Moragas, A; Castells, C; Sans, M

    1993-04-01

    Fractographic techniques based on mathematical morphology were used to study aging-related epidermal changes in abdominal skin samples obtained from 96 autopsy cases. Three linear roughness indices were evaluated for the rete peg profile and the shrinkage effect on the basal layer and interface between the granular and horny layers. Elderly subjects had a 36.3% decrease in rete peg-related roughness index when compared with younger subjects. This roughness index has been corrected, with shrinkage due to skin elasticity taken into account. For females, fitting of a logistic decay function yielded a curve with right and left asymptotes and a steeper descent between 40 and 60 years. Half value time--i.e., the time when half rete peg profile flattening occurred--was 46.8 years. In contrast, males showed almost monotonical decay. Epidermal thickness measured between rete pegs showed the same exponential decline for both sexes, with values from 22.6 to 11.4 microns. Skin shrinkage in elderly subjects decreased 22% in superficial layers and only 6% in the lower epidermis. In both cases shrinkage had a linear relation with age, and no sex differences were found. PMID:8318130

  6. Upregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor 4 in oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Kenichi; Gotoh, Akito; Eguchi, Takanori; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the expression profile of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, which comprises EGFR/ErbB1, HER2/ErbB2, HER3/ErbB3 and HER4/ErbB4 in oral leukoplakia (LP). The expression of four epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family genes and their ligands were measured in LP tissues from 14 patients and compared with levels in 10 patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) and normal oral mucosa (NOM) from 14 healthy donors by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Synchronous mRNA coexpression of ErbB1, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 was detected in LP lesions. Out of the receptors, only ErbB4 mRNA and protein was more highly expressed in LP compared with NOM tissues. These were strongly expressed by epithelial keratinocytes in LP lesions, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Regarding the ligands, the mRNA of Neuregulin2 and 4 were more highly expressed in OLP compared with NOM tissues. Therefore, enhanced ErbB4 on the keratinocytes and synchronous modulation of EGFR family genes may contribute to the pathogenesis and carcinogenesis of LP. PMID:23492901

  7. Hybrid Enhanced Epidermal SpaceSuit Design Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessup, Joseph M.

    A Space suit that does not rely on gas pressurization is a multi-faceted problem that requires major stability controls to be incorporated during design and construction. The concept of Hybrid Epidermal Enhancement space suit integrates evolved human anthropomorphic and physiological adaptations into its functionality, using commercially available bio-medical technologies to address shortcomings of conventional gas pressure suits, and the impracticalities of MCP suits. The prototype HEE Space Suit explored integumentary homeostasis, thermal control and mobility using advanced bio-medical materials technology and construction concepts. The goal was a space suit that functions as an enhanced, multi-functional bio-mimic of the human epidermal layer that works in attunement with the wearer rather than as a separate system. In addressing human physiological requirements for design and construction of the HEE suit, testing regimes were devised and integrated into the prototype which was then subject to a series of detailed tests using both anatomical reproduction methods and human subject.

  8. Production of human epidermal growth factor using adenoviral based system

    PubMed Central

    Negahdari, Babak; Shahosseini, Zahra; Baniasadi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a growth factor involved in cell growth and differentiation, is a small polypeptide with molecular weight of approximately 6 kDa known to be present in a number of different mammalian species. Experimental studies in animals and humans have demonstrated that the topical application of EGF accelerates the rate of epidermal regeneration of partial-thickness wounds and second-degree burns. Due to its commercial applications, Human EGF (hEGF) has been cloned in several forms. In the present study, adenoviral based expression system was used to produce biologically active recombinant hEGF. The presence of secreted recombinant hEGF was confirmed by a dot blot and its expression level was determined by enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. Moreover, biological activity of secreted hEGF was evaluated by a proliferation assay performed on A549 cells. For production of hEGF in a secretory form, a chimeric gene coding for the hEGF fused to the signal peptide was expressed using adenoviral based method. This method enables the production of hEGF at the site of interest and moreover it could be used for cell proliferation and differentiation assays in tissue engineering research experiments instead of using commercially available EGF. PMID:27051431

  9. Intranasal epidermal growth factor treatment rescues neonatal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Scafidi, Joseph; Hammond, Timothy R.; Scafidi, Susanna; Ritter, Jonathan; Jablonska, Beata; Roncal, Maria; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Coman, Daniel; Huang, Yuegao; McCarter, Robert J.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Horvath, Tamas L.; Gallo, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    There are no clinically relevant treatments available that improve function in the growing population of very preterm infants (<32 weeks gestation) with neonatal brain injury. Diffuse white matter injury (DWMI) is a common finding in these children and results in chronic neurodevelopmental impairments1,2. As shown recently, failure in oligodendrocyte progenitor cell maturation contributes to DWMI3. In a previous study, we demonstrated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in oligodendrocyte development4. Here, we examine whether enhanced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling stimulates the endogenous response of EGFR-expressing progenitor cells during a critical period after brain injury, and promotes cellular and behavioral recovery in the developing brain. Using an established model of very preterm brain injury, we demonstrate that selective overexpression of human (h)EGFR in oligodendrocyte lineage cells or the administration of intranasal heparin binding EGF immediately after injury decreases oligodendroglia death, enhances generation of new oligodendrocytes from progenitor cells (OPCs) and promotes functional recovery. Furthermore, these interventions diminish ultrastructural abnormalities and alleviate behavioral deficits on white matter-specific paradigms. Inhibition of EGFR signaling with a molecularly targeted agent used for cancer therapy demonstrates that EGFR activation is an important contributor to oligodendrocyte regeneration and functional recovery after DWMI. Thus, our study provides direct evidence that targeting EGFR in OPCs at a specific time after injury is clinically feasible and applicable for the treatment of premature children with white matter injury. PMID:24390343

  10. Microtubules CLASP to Adherens Junctions in epidermal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion at Adherens Junctions (AJs) and its dynamic connections with the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton are important regulators of cellular architecture. However, the functional relevance of these interactions and the molecular players involved in different cellular contexts and cellular compartments are still not completely understood. Here, we comment on our recent findings showing that the MT plus-end binding protein CLASP2 interacts with the AJ component p120-catenin (p120) specifically in progenitor epidermal cells. Absence of either protein leads to alterations in MT dynamics and AJ functionality. These findings represent a novel mechanism of MT targeting to AJs that may be relevant for the maintenance of proper epidermal progenitor cell homeostasis. We also discuss the potential implication of other MT binding proteins previously associated to AJs in the wider context of epithelial tissues. We hypothesize the existence of adaptation mechanisms that regulate the formation and stability of AJs in different cellular contexts to allow the dynamic behavior of these complexes during tissue homeostasis and remodeling. PMID:24522006

  11. Microtubules CLASP to Adherens Junctions in epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Marta N; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion at Adherens Junctions (AJs) and its dynamic connections with the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton are important regulators of cellular architecture. However, the functional relevance of these interactions and the molecular players involved in different cellular contexts and cellular compartments are still not completely understood. Here, we comment on our recent findings showing that the MT plus-end binding protein CLASP2 interacts with the AJ component p120-catenin (p120) specifically in progenitor epidermal cells. Absence of either protein leads to alterations in MT dynamics and AJ functionality. These findings represent a novel mechanism of MT targeting to AJs that may be relevant for the maintenance of proper epidermal progenitor cell homeostasis. We also discuss the potential implication of other MT binding proteins previously associated to AJs in the wider context of epithelial tissues. We hypothesize the existence of adaptation mechanisms that regulate the formation and stability of AJs in different cellular contexts to allow the dynamic behavior of these complexes during tissue homeostasis and remodeling. PMID:24522006

  12. Galectin-7 in the Control of Epidermal Homeostasis after Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gendronneau, Gaëlle; Sidhu, Sukhvinder S.; Delacour, Delphine; Dang, Tien; Calonne, Chloé; Houzelstein, Denis; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Galectins, a family of β-galactoside binding lectins, have recently emerged as novel regulators of tissue homeostasis. Galectin-7 is predominantly expressed in stratified epithelia, especially in epidermis. We report here the generation of galectin-7–deficient mice that are viable and do not display phenotypical abnormalities in skin structure or expression of epidermal markers. However, these mice show unique defects in the maintenance of epidermal homeostasis in response to environmental challenges. First, after UVB irradiation in vivo, the apoptotic response is prematurely triggered and lasts longer in the mutant epidermis. This result contrasts with the proapoptotic role that had been proposed for galectin-7. Second, wound-healing experiments in vivo revealed that galectin-7–deficient mice displayed a reduced reepithelialization potential compared with wild-type littermates. This effect could be attributed to a defect in cell migration. Because galectin-7 is located in the podosomes of keratinocytes migrating out of skin explants in culture, we propose that this glycan-binding protein may directly influence cell/extracellular matrix interactions. Finally, we also detected an unexpected intense hyperproliferative reaction consecutive to both types of stress in galectin-7–deficient mice. Together, these studies provide the first genetic evidence showing that galectin-7 can modulate keratinocyte apoptosis, proliferation, and migration during skin repair. PMID:18829868

  13. Transcription Factor MafB Coordinates Epidermal Keratinocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Miyai, Masashi; Hamada, Michito; Moriguchi, Takashi; Hiruma, Junichiro; Kamitani-Kawamoto, Akiyo; Watanabe, Hajime; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko; Takahashi, Kenzo; Takahashi, Satoru; Kataoka, Kohsuke

    2016-09-01

    Mammalian epidermis is a stratified epithelium composed of distinct layers of keratinocytes. The outermost cornified layer is a primary barrier that consists of a cornified envelope, an insoluble structure assembled by cross-linked scaffold proteins, and a surrounding mixture of lipids. Skin keratinocytes undergo a multistep differentiation process, but the mechanism underlying this process is not fully understood. We demonstrate that the transcription factor MafB is expressed in differentiating keratinocytes in mice and is transcriptionally upregulated upon human keratinocyte differentiation in vitro. In MafB-deficient mice, epidermal differentiation was partially impaired and the cornified layer was thinner than in wild-type mice. On the basis of transcriptional profiling, we detected reduced expression levels of a subset of cornified envelope genes, for example, filaggrin and repetin, in the MafB(-/-) epidermis. By contrast, the expression levels of lipid metabolism-related genes, such as Alox12e and Smpd3, increased. The upregulated genes in the MafB(-/-) epidermis were enriched for putative target genes of the transcription factors Gata3, Grhl3, and Klf4. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin biopsy samples revealed that the expression levels of filaggrin and MafB were significantly reduced in patients with human atopic dermatitis and psoriasis vulgaris. Our results indicate that MafB is a component of the gene expression program that regulates epidermal keratinocyte differentiation. PMID:27208706

  14. EFFECT OF PARACETAMOL ON MELANIZATION PROCESS IN HUMAN EPIDERMAL MELANOCYTES.

    PubMed

    Wrześniok, Dorota; Oprzondek, Martyna; Hechmann, Anna; Beberok, Artur; Otreba, Michał; Buszman, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is commonly used as a drug of choice for treatment of pain and fever. Unlike non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) it does not cause gastrointestinal damage or untoward cardiorenal effects, however cutaneous adverse effects have been reported. It is known that paracetamol binds to melanin biopolymers, but the relation between the affinity of this drug to melanin and its toxicity is not documented. The aim of this work was to examine the impact of paracetamol on melanogenesis in cultured human normal epidermal melanocytes (HEMn-DP). The effect of paracetamol on cell viability was determined by WST-1 assay, melanin content and tyrosinase activity were measured spectrophotometrically. It has been demonstrated that paracetamol induced concentration-dependent loss in melanocytes viability. The value of EC50 was found to be - 20.0 mM. The analyzed drug inhibited melanin biosynthesis in a concentration-dependent manner by decreasing the melanin content as well as the tyrosinase activity. The demonstrated inhibitory effect of paracetamol on melanization process in normal epidermal melanocytes in vitro may explain the potential role of melanin biopolymer in the mechanisms of undesirable side effects of this drug in vivo, as a result of its accumulation in pigmented tissues. PMID:27476283

  15. A Novel Role of RASSF9 in Maintaining Epidermal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chiou-Mei; Yang, Polung; Chen, Lih-Chyang; Chen, Chia-Chun; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Cheng, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2011-01-01

    The physiological role of RASSF9, a member of the Ras-association domain family (RASSF), is currently unclear. Here, we report a mouse line in which an Epstein-Barr virus Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) transgene insertion has created a 7.2-kb chromosomal deletion, which abolished RASSF9 gene expression. The RASSF9-null mice exhibited interesting phenotypes that resembled human ageing, including growth retardation, short lifespan, less subcutaneous adipose layer and alopecia. In the wild-type mice, RASSF9 is predominantly expressed in the epidermal keratinocytes of skin, as determined by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization. In contrast, RASSF9−/− mice presented a dramatic change in epithelial organization of skin with increased proliferation and aberrant differentiation as detected by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays and immunofluorescence analyses. Furthermore, characteristic functions of RASSF9−/− versus wild type (WT) mouse primary keratinocytes showed significant proliferation linked to a reduction of p21Cip1 expression under growth or early differentiation conditions. Additionally, in RASSF9−/− keratinocytes there was a drastic down-modulation of terminal differentiation markers, which could be rescued by infection with a recombinant adenovirus, Adv/HA-RASSF9. Our results indicate a novel and significant role of RASSF9 in epidermal homeostasis. PMID:21445300

  16. A novel role of RASSF9 in maintaining epidermal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiou-Mei; Yang, Polung; Chen, Lih-Chyang; Chen, Chia-Chun; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Cheng, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2011-01-01

    The physiological role of RASSF9, a member of the Ras-association domain family (RASSF), is currently unclear. Here, we report a mouse line in which an Epstein-Barr virus Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) transgene insertion has created a 7.2-kb chromosomal deletion, which abolished RASSF9 gene expression. The RASSF9-null mice exhibited interesting phenotypes that resembled human ageing, including growth retardation, short lifespan, less subcutaneous adipose layer and alopecia. In the wild-type mice, RASSF9 is predominantly expressed in the epidermal keratinocytes of skin, as determined by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization. In contrast, RASSF9-/- mice presented a dramatic change in epithelial organization of skin with increased proliferation and aberrant differentiation as detected by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays and immunofluorescence analyses. Furthermore, characteristic functions of RASSF9-/- versus wild type (WT) mouse primary keratinocytes showed significant proliferation linked to a reduction of p21Cip1 expression under growth or early differentiation conditions. Additionally, in RASSF9-/- keratinocytes there was a drastic down-modulation of terminal differentiation markers, which could be rescued by infection with a recombinant adenovirus, Adv/HA-RASSF9. Our results indicate a novel and significant role of RASSF9 in epidermal homeostasis. PMID:21445300

  17. Epidermal inclusion cyst of the breast: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    PALIOTTA, ANNALISA; SAPIENZA, PAOLO; D'ERMO, GIUSEPPE; CERONE, GENNARO; PEDULLÀ, GIUSEPPE; CROCETTI, DANIELE; DE GORI, ANTONIETTA; DE TOMA, GIORGIO

    2016-01-01

    An epidermal inclusion cyst (EIC) of the breast is a rare, benign condition that may potentially be malignant. The present study conducted a systematic review of the literature in order to identify pathological hypotheses, clinical characteristics, and diagnostic and treatment options. A search for relevant studies was conducted through the Scopus, Embase and Medline databases during September 2014. The search term employed was ῾epidermal inclusion cyst breast᾽. Studies were selected if they contained adequate information regarding symptoms at presentation, diagnostic tools, pathology, characteristics, type of procedure performed and follow-up routines. A total of 35 papers describing 91 patients affected by EIC of the breast were identified. Following this, a total of 82 patients, including an additional case supplied from the present study, were selected for further analysis. EIC of the breast typically occurs during the fifth decade of life. A palpable mass of the breast was present in 65 (79%) patients. Ultrasonographic imaging was consistently utilized as a diagnostic tool in all the cases analyzed, whereas fine-needle aspiration cytology was used in 70% of the cases and mammography in 65%. No tumor recurrence was reported at a mean follow-up time of 53 months. The present study demonstrated that elliptical excision is the preferred treatment for EIC of the breast, with pathological analysis required to exclude malignancy. PMID:26870262

  18. Flexible pH-Sensing Hydrogel Fibers for Epidermal Applications.

    PubMed

    Tamayol, Ali; Akbari, Mohsen; Zilberman, Yael; Comotto, Mattia; Lesha, Emal; Serex, Ludovic; Bagherifard, Sara; Chen, Yu; Fu, Guoqing; Ameri, Shideh Kabiri; Ruan, Weitong; Miller, Eric L; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Sonkusale, Sameer; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Epidermal pH is an indication of the skin's physiological condition. For example, pH of wound can be correlated to angiogenesis, protease activity, bacterial infection, etc. Chronic nonhealing wounds are known to have an elevated alkaline environment, while healing process occurs more readily in an acidic environment. Thus, dermal patches capable of continuous pH measurement can be used as point-of-care systems for monitoring skin disorder and the wound healing process. Here, pH-responsive hydrogel fibers are presented that can be used for long-term monitoring of epidermal wound condition. pH-responsive dyes are loaded into mesoporous microparticles and incorporated into hydrogel fibers using a microfluidic spinning system. The fabricated pH-responsive microfibers are flexible and can create conformal contact with skin. The response of pH-sensitive fibers with different compositions and thicknesses are characterized. The suggested technique is scalable and can be used to fabricate hydrogel-based wound dressings with clinically relevant dimensions. Images of the pH-sensing fibers during real-time pH measurement can be captured with a smart phone camera for convenient readout on-site. Through image processing, a quantitative pH map of the hydrogel fibers and the underlying tissue can be extracted. The developed skin dressing can act as a point-of-care device for monitoring the wound healing process. PMID:26799457

  19. Epidermal growth factor receptor family in lung cancer and premalignancy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Wilbur A; Veve, Robert; Hirsch, Fred R; Helfrich, Barbara A; Bunn, Paul A

    2002-02-01

    Lung cancer, like many other epithelial malignancies, is thought to be the outcome of genetic and epigenetic changes that result in a constellation of phenotypic abnormalities in bronchial epithelium. These include morphologic epithelial dysplasia, angiogenesis, increased proliferative rate, and changes in expression of cell surface proteins, particularly overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family proteins. The EFGR family is a group of four structurally similar tyrosine kinases (EGFR, HER2/neu, ErbB-3, and ErbB-4) that dimerize on binding with a number of ligands, including EGF and transforming growth factor alpha. Epidermal growth factor receptor overexpression is pronounced in virtually all squamous carcinomas and is also found in > or = 65% of large cell and adenocarcinomas. It is not expressed in situ by small cell lung carcinoma. Overexpression of EGFR is one of the earliest and most consistent abnormalities in bronchial epithelium of high-risk smokers. It is present at the stage of basal cell hyperplasia and persists through squamous metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. Recent studies of the effect of inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases suggest that patterns of coexpression of multiple members of the EGFR family could be important in determining response. Intermediate endpoints of such trials could include monitoring of phosphorylation levels in signal transduction molecules downstream of the receptor dimers. These trials represent a new targeted approach to lung cancer treatment and chemoprevention that will require greater attention to molecular endpoints than required in past trials. PMID:11894009

  20. Epidermal cell proliferation in guinea pigs with experimental dermatophytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tagami, H.

    1985-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the self-healing process of experimental dermatophytosis produced in guinea pigs by an occlusive method with Trichophyton mentagrophytes, epidermal proliferative activity was evaluated by the in vivo tritiated thymidine-labeling technique performed at various intervals after the first and second infections. Determination of labeling indices disclosed that an increased epidermal proliferation correlated well with the severity of inflammatory changes, i.e., a peak activity was noted after 10 days in primary infection and at 2 days in reinfection, respectively, and was followed by subsequent spontaneous lesion clearance after 10 days. Application of a heat-killed spore suspension produced inflammatory changes with enhanced epidermopoiesis, similar to those induced by reinoculation of living spores, only in immune animals. The present results indicate that the dermatitic changes occurring in experimental dermatophytosis increase epidermopoiesis which facilitates elimination of the fungus from the stratum corneum and that host immune activity, particularly contact sensitivity to fungal antigen, exerts a crucial role to induce these changes.

  1. Growth of melanocytes in human epidermal cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Hefton, J.M.; Amadeo, C.; Pagan-Charry, I.; Madden, M.R.; Cardon-Cardo, C. )

    1990-08-01

    Epidermal cell cultures were grown in keratinocyte-conditioned medium for use as burn wound grafts; the melanocyte composition of the grafts was studied under a variety of conditions. Melanocytes were identified by immunohistochemistry based on a monoclonal antibody (MEL-5) that has previously been shown to react specifically with melanocytes. During the first 7 days of growth in primary culture, the total number of melanocytes in the epidermal cultures decreased to 10% of the number present in normal skin. Beginning on day 2 of culture, bipolar melanocytes were present at a mean cell density of 116 +/- 2/mm2; the keratinocyte to melanocyte ratio was preserved during further primary culture and through three subpassages. Moreover, exposure of cultures to mild UVB irradiation stimulated the melanocytes to proliferate, suggesting that the melanocytes growing in culture maintained their responsiveness to external stimuli. When the sheets of cultured cells were enzymatically detached from the plastic culture flasks before grafting, melanocytes remained in the basal layer of cells as part of the graft applied to the patient.

  2. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  3. The multiple roles of epidermal growth factor repeat O-glycans in animal development.

    PubMed

    Haltom, Amanda R; Jafar-Nejad, Hamed

    2015-10-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeat is a common, evolutionarily conserved motif found in secreted proteins and the extracellular domain of transmembrane proteins. EGF repeats harbor six cysteine residues which form three disulfide bonds and help generate the three-dimensional structure of the EGF repeat. A subset of EGF repeats harbor consensus sequences for the addition of one or more specific O-glycans, which are initiated by O-glucose, O-fucose or O-N-acetylglucosamine. These glycans are relatively rare compared to mucin-type O-glycans. However, genetic experiments in model organisms and cell-based assays indicate that at least some of the glycosyltransferases involved in the addition of O-glycans to EGF repeats play important roles in animal development. These studies, combined with state-of-the-art biochemical and structural biology experiments have started to provide an in-depth picture of how these glycans regulate the function of the proteins to which they are linked. In this review, we will discuss the biological roles assigned to EGF repeat O-glycans and the corresponding glycosyltransferases. Since Notch receptors are the best studied proteins with biologically-relevant O-glycans on EGF repeats, a significant part of this review is devoted to the role of these glycans in the regulation of the Notch signaling pathway. We also discuss recently identified proteins other than Notch which depend on EGF repeat glycans to function properly. Several glycosyltransferases involved in the addition or elongation of O-glycans on EGF repeats are mutated in human diseases. Therefore, mechanistic understanding of the functional roles of these carbohydrate modifications is of interest from both basic science and translational perspectives. PMID:26175457

  4. Effects of sleep restriction on glucose control and insulin secretion during diet-induced weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Nedeltcheva, A. V.; Imperial, J. G.; Penev, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Insufficient sleep is associated with changes in glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and insulin action. Despite widespread use of weight-loss diets for metabolic risk reduction, the effects of insufficient sleep on glucose regulation in overweight dieters are not known. To examine the consequences of recurrent sleep restriction on 24-hour blood glucose control during diet-induced weight loss, 10 overweight and obese adults (3F/7M; mean [SD] age 41 [5] y; BMI 27.4 [2.0] kg/m2) completed two 14-day treatments with hypocaloric diet and 8.5 or 5.5-h nighttime sleep opportunity in random order 7 [3] months apart. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) data, fasting lipids and free-fatty acids (FFA), and 24-hour blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and counter-regulatory hormone measurements were collected after each treatment. Participants had comparable weight loss (1.0 [0.3] BMI units) during each treatment. Bedtime restriction reduced sleep by 131 [30] min/day. Recurrent sleep curtailment decreased 24-hour serum insulin concentrations (i.e. enhanced 24-hour insulin economy) without changes in oral glucose tolerance and 24-hour glucose control. This was accompanied by a decline in fasting blood glucose, increased fasting FFA which suppressed normally following glucose ingestion, and lower total and LDL cholesterol concentrations. Sleep-loss-related changes in counter-regulatory hormone secretion during the IVGTT limited the utility of the test in this study. In conclusion, sleep restriction enhanced 24-hour insulin economy without compromising glucose homeostasis in overweight individuals placed on a balanced hypocaloric diet. The changes in fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid and FFA concentrations in sleep-restricted dieters resembled the pattern of human metabolic adaptation to reduced carbohydrate availability. PMID:22513492

  5. Glucose regulation of glucagon secretion.

    PubMed

    Gylfe, Erik; Gilon, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon secreted by pancreatic α-cells is the major hyperglycemic hormone correcting acute hypoglycaemia (glucose counterregulation). In diabetes the glucagon response to hypoglycaemia becomes compromised and chronic hyperglucagonemia appears. There is increasing awareness that glucagon excess may underlie important manifestations of diabetes. However opinions differ widely how glucose controls glucagon secretion. The autonomous nervous system plays an important role in the glucagon response to hypoglycaemia. But it is clear that glucose controls glucagon secretion also by mechanisms involving direct effects on α-cells or indirect effects via paracrine factors released from non-α-cells within the pancreatic islets. The present review discusses these mechanisms and argues that different regulatory processes are involved in a glucose concentration-dependent manner. Direct glucose effects on the α-cell and autocrine mechanisms are probably most significant for the glucagon response to hypoglycaemia. During hyperglycaemia, when secretion from β- and δ-cells is stimulated, paracrine inhibitory factors generate pulsatile glucagon release in opposite phase to pulsatile release of insulin and somatostatin. High concentrations of glucose have also stimulatory effects on glucagon secretion that tend to balance and even exceed the inhibitory influence. The latter actions might underlie the paradoxical hyperglucagonemia that aggravates hyperglycaemia in persons with diabetes. PMID:24367972

  6. In vitro transformation of Syrian hamster epidermal cells by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, N.C.; Sun, C.R.Y.; Chao, L.; Fung, W.P.; Tennant, R.W.; Hsie, A.W.

    1981-05-01

    The selection of Syrian hamster epidermal cells which do not terminally differentiate has provided a quantitative focus assay for in vitro chemical transformation. One-day-old Syrian hamster epidermal cells plated at 5 x 10/sup 6//100-mm dish were treated for 5 hr with various concentrations of N-methyl-N-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanidine. After 4 weeks, the normal epidermal cells began to terminally differentiate to keratinized squamous cells and died, but transformed epidermal colonies grew to higher cell densities and appeared as darker areas against a lightly stained normal cell background. Transformed epidermal foci were isolated and subcultured for at least 15 passages, whereas normal epidermal cells could not be subcultured under the same conditions. The transformed cells assumed the typical cobblestone-like morphology of epithelial cells, retained desmosomes and tonofilaments, and were able to use citrulline in place of arginine. Argininosuccinate synthetase (EC 6.3.4.5) activity was significantly higher in the epidermal cells than in fibroblasts. The injection of 5 x 10/sup 6/ cells of two transformed epidermal cell lines into athymic nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors which were identified as keratinizing squamous carcinomas.

  7. An Automated and Minimally Invasive Tool for Generating Autologous Viable Epidermal Micrografts

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Sandra N.; Schmidt, Marisa A.; Harper, John R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: A new epidermal harvesting tool (CelluTome; Kinetic Concepts, Inc, San Antonio, Texas) created epidermal micrografts with minimal donor site damage, increased expansion ratios, and did not require the use of an operating room. The tool, which applies both heat and suction concurrently to normal skin, was used to produce epidermal micrografts that were assessed for uniform viability, donor-site healing, and discomfort during and after the epidermal harvesting procedure. DESIGN: This study was a prospective, noncomparative institutional review board–approved healthy human study to assess epidermal graft viability, donor-site morbidity, and patient experience. SETTING: These studies were conducted at the multispecialty research facility, Clinical Trials of Texas, Inc, San Antonio. PATIENTS: The participants were 15 healthy human volunteers. RESULTS: The average viability of epidermal micrografts was 99.5%. Skin assessment determined that 76% to 100% of the area of all donor sites was the same in appearance as the surrounding skin within 14 days after epidermal harvest. A mean pain of 1.3 (on a scale of 1 to 5) was reported throughout the harvesting process. CONCLUSIONS: Use of this automated, minimally invasive harvesting system provided a simple, low-cost method of producing uniformly viable autologous epidermal micrografts with minimal patient discomfort and superficial donor-site wound healing within 2 weeks. PMID:26765157

  8. Epidermal Cyst of Parotid Gland: A Rarity and a Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Anuradha; Nandakumar, Gautham Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal cysts are common skin lesions but they occur very rarely in the oral cavity, especially in the salivary glands. Very few cases have been reported in the literature and, here, we present one such rare case of epidermal cyst in the right parotid gland in a 62-year-old female patient. PMID:25628900

  9. Glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - non-pregnant; OGTT - non-pregnant; Diabetes - glucose tolerance test ... The most common glucose tolerance test is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Before the test begins, a sample of blood will be taken. You will then ...

  10. Effects of Wnt3a on proliferation and differentiation of human epidermal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Liwei; Zhou Jiaxi; Peng Sha; Li Juxue; Cao Yujing; Duan Enkui

    2008-04-11

    Epidermal stem cells maintain development and homeostasis of mammalian epidermis throughout life. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the proliferation and differentiation of epidermal stem cells are far from clear. In this study, we investigated the effects of Wnt3a and Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling on proliferation and differentiation of human fetal epidermal stem cells. We found both Wnt3a and active {beta}-catenin, two key members of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling, were expressed in human fetal epidermis and epidermal stem cells. In addition, Wnt3a protein can promote proliferation and inhibit differentiation of epidermal stem cells in vitro culture. Our results suggest that Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling plays important roles in human fetal skin development and homeostasis, which also provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis in human epidermis.

  11. Nifedipine prevents sodium caprate-induced barrier dysfunction in human epidermal keratinocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Junichi; Watanabe, Takuya; Hamabashiri, Masato; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Kimura, Ikuya; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) of the epidermis play an important role in maintaining the epidermal barrier. TJ breakdown is associated with skin problems, such as wrinkles and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Clinical studies have reported that topical nifedipine is effective in reducing the depth of wrinkles and improving TEWL. However, it remains unknown whether nifedipine influences the TJ function in the epidermis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of nifedipine on epidermal barrier dysfunction in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) treated with sodium caprate (C10), a TJ inhibitor. Nifedipine reversed the C10-decreased transepithelial electrical resistance values as a measure of disruption of the epidermal barrier. Immunocytochemical observations revealed that nifedipine improved the C10-induced irregular arrangement of claudin-1, a key protein in TJs. Taken together, these findings suggest that nifedipine prevents epidermal barrier dysfunction, at least in part, by reconstituting the irregular claudin-1 localization at TJs in C10-treated NHEKs. PMID:26027835

  12. Vertebrate epidermal cells are broad-specificity phagocytes that clear sensory axon debris.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Jeffrey P; Sack, Georgeann S; Martin, Seanna M; Sagasti, Alvaro

    2015-01-14

    Cellular debris created by developmental processes or injury must be cleared by phagocytic cells to maintain and repair tissues. Cutaneous injuries damage not only epidermal cells but also the axonal endings of somatosensory (touch-sensing) neurons, which must be repaired to restore the sensory function of the skin. Phagocytosis of neuronal debris is usually performed by macrophages or other blood-derived professional phagocytes, but we have found that epidermal cells phagocytose somatosensory axon debris in zebrafish. Live imaging revealed that epidermal cells rapidly internalize debris into dynamic phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate-positive phagosomes that mature into phagolysosomes using a pathway similar to that of professional phagocytes. Epidermal cells phagocytosed not only somatosensory axon debris but also debris created by injury to other peripheral axons that were mislocalized to the skin, neighboring skin cells, and macrophages. Together, these results identify vertebrate epidermal cells as broad-specificity phagocytes that likely contribute to neural repair and wound healing. PMID:25589751

  13. Epidermal cell growth-dependent arylhydrocarbon-hydroxylase (AHH) activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Thiele, B; Merk, H F; Bonnekoh, B; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1987-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450-dependent arylhydrocarbon-hydroxylase (AHH) activity and inducibility by benzanthracene (BA) was measured in cultured guinea pig and human epidermal cells. Basal AHH-activity (AHHb) in guinea pig epidermal cells was much higher than in human epidermal cells. AHHb in guinea pig epidermal cells was directly related to the labeling index and decreased to the original level between the 5th and 7th day of cell culturing. On the other hand, the induction-ratio of AHH reached its maximum level when the number of cells began to rise (proliferation phase) and remained high at day 7 of the cell culture. These results suggest a cell growth dependent activity and inducibility of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes, such as AHH, in isolated epidermal cells. PMID:3435181

  14. Epidermal Growth Factor and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor: The Yin and Yang in the Treatment of Cutaneous Wounds and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGF receptor (EGFR) play an essential role in wound healing through stimulating epidermal and dermal regeneration. The development of new therapies for enhancing wound healing has included the use of EGF. In addition, EGFR inhibitors (EGFRis) have become a therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer. Thus, therapies targeting EGF/EGFR are useful for the treatment of both cutaneous wounds and cancer. Recent Advances Identification of EGFR as a regulator of normal and pathological cell function has allowed for the development of EGFRis for the treatment of cancer and topical administration of EGF to enhance wound healing. Critical Issues The use of EGFRi has emerged as an option for metastatic cancers. These drugs induce dermatological toxicity, a papulopustular rash that is pruritic and painful; chronic use may negatively impact wound healing. Currently, there is no standard therapy to alleviate the side effects caused by EGFRi administration except to reduce or eliminate EGFRi usage. Therefore, side effects from these drugs should be taken into consideration on patients prone to develop chronic wounds and with cutaneous injuries. Future Directions There is a need for adjunctive treatment to eliminate dermatological toxicity from EGFRi use. The development of new downstream targets of EGFR may be a rational strategy to reduce potential cutaneous side effects and provide a better strategy for the treatment of cancer. Until then, the topical use of EGF could be used to ameliorate dermatological lesions caused by EGFRi. PMID:24527320

  15. Nighttime Administration of Nicotine Improves Hepatic Glucose Metabolism via the Hypothalamic Orexin System in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Nagata, Takashi; Fujita, Mikio; Kon, Kanta; Wu, Naizhen; Takatsuki, Mayumi; Yamaguchi, Kaoru; Wada, Tsutomu; Nishijo, Hisao; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine is known to affect the metabolism of glucose; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Therefore, we here investigated whether nicotine promoted the central regulation of glucose metabolism, which is closely linked to the circadian system. The oral intake of nicotine in drinking water, which mainly occurred during the nighttime active period, enhanced daily hypothalamic prepro-orexin gene expression and reduced hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetic db/db mice without affecting body weight, body fat content, and serum levels of insulin. Nicotine administered at the active period appears to be responsible for the effect on blood glucose, because nighttime but not daytime injections of nicotine lowered blood glucose levels in db/db mice. The chronic oral treatment with nicotine suppressed the mRNA levels of glucose-6-phosphatase, the rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis, in the liver of db/db and wild-type control mice. In the pyruvate tolerance test to evaluate hepatic gluconeogenic activity, the oral nicotine treatment moderately suppressed glucose elevations in normal mice and mice lacking dopamine receptors, whereas this effect was abolished in orexin-deficient mice and hepatic parasympathectomized mice. Under high-fat diet conditions, the oral intake of nicotine lowered blood glucose levels at the daytime resting period in wild-type, but not orexin-deficient, mice. These results indicated that the chronic daily administration of nicotine suppressed hepatic gluconeogenesis via the hypothalamic orexin-parasympathetic nervous system. Thus, the results of the present study may provide an insight into novel chronotherapy for type 2 diabetes that targets the central cholinergic and orexinergic systems. PMID:26492471

  16. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  17. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  18. Effect of oral administration of Lactobacillus plantarum HY7714 on epidermal hydration in ultraviolet B-irradiated hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Ra, Jehyeon; Lee, Dong Eun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Jeong, Ji-Woong; Ku, Hyung Keun; Kim, Tae-Youl; Choi, Il-Dong; Jeung, Woonhee; Sim, Jae-Hun; Ahn, Young-Tae

    2014-12-28

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of Lactobacillus plantarum HY7714 on skin hydration in human dermal fibroblasts and in hairless mice. In Hs68 cells, L. plantarum HY7714 not only increased the serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) mRNA level, but also decreased the ceramidase mRNA level. In order to confirm the hydrating effects of L. plantarum HY7714 in vivo, we orally administered vehicle or L. plantarum HY7714 at a dose of 1 × 10(9) CFU/day to hairless mice for 8 weeks. In hairless mice, L. plantarum HY7714 decreased UVB-induced epidermal thickness. In addition, we found that L. plantarum HY7714 administration suppressed the increase in transepidermal water loss and decrease in skin hydration, which reflects barrier function fluctuations following UV irradiation. In particular, L. plantarum HY7714 administration increased the ceramide level compared with that in the UVB group. In the experiment on SPT and ceramidase mRNA expressions, L. plantarum HY7714 administration improved the reduction in SPT mRNA levels and suppressed the increase in ceramidase mRNA levels caused by UVB in the hairless mice skins. Collectively, these results suggest that L. plantarum HY7714 can be a potential candidate for preserving skin hydration levels against UV irradiation. PMID:25179898

  19. Menstrual suppression: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Paula Adams

    2014-01-01

    Menstrual suppression to provide relief of menstrual-related symptoms or to manage medical conditions associated with menstrual morbidity or menstrual exacerbation has been used clinically since the development of steroid hormonal therapies. Options range from the extended or continuous use of combined hormonal oral contraceptives, to the use of combined hormonal patches and rings, progestins given in a variety of formulations from intramuscular injection to oral therapies to intrauterine devices, and other agents such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists. The agents used for menstrual suppression have variable rates of success in inducing amenorrhea, but typically have increasing rates of amenorrhea over time. Therapy may be limited by side effects, most commonly irregular, unscheduled bleeding. These therapies can benefit women’s quality of life, and by stabilizing the hormonal milieu, potentially improve the course of underlying medical conditions such as diabetes or a seizure disorder. This review addresses situations in which menstrual suppression may be of benefit, and lists options which have been successful in inducing medical amenorrhea. PMID:25018654

  20. Vibrotactile suppression of tinnitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhardt, Martin L.

    2002-05-01

    At the Society's 142nd meeting, the efficacy of high frequency bone conducted stimulation in suppressing tinnitus was presented. The hypothesized mechanism was the reprogramming of frequency tuning of auditory neurons in the central nervous system, secondarily to peripheral hearing loss. This mechanism is unlikely in cases of tinnitus in the presence of normal audiometric sensitivity. There is the possibility that hearing loss above 10 kHz can play a role in tinnitus, an association not thoroughly explored. Somatomotor stimulation influencing the quality of tinnitus has been reported, as have interconnections of the auditory and somatosensory systems. There would appear to be an evolutionary advantage of linking the sensorimotor organization of the external ear and the auditory function of the brainstem in sound localization. Thus, stimulation of the pinna and post auricular area may be a means of suppressing tinnitus. To that end a thin aluminum ceramic bimorph was constructed to fit on the inner surface of the pinna. When driven by low (<100 Hz) and high (>10 kHz) frequencies multiplied by MHz carriers, demodulation in the skin resulted in vibrotactile stimulation. Tactile stimulation was an adjunct to the high frequencies resulting in a multimodal suppressive effect in a small pilot study.

  1. Microdegree porlarimetry for glucose concentrations detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Wei, Yunlong; Zhou, Qi; Liu, Shenping; Chui, Jianguo

    2005-07-01

    Optical glucose measurement is an attractive research topic for years. One of the goals is to develop a noninvasive monitoring of long term, instantaneous blood glucose for diabetics. The principle of porlarimetry for glucose detection is introduced and several techniques of microdegree porlarimetry for glucose detection are summarized and the facts that effect measurement are discussed. Current and future research is focusing on the elimination of confounding factors such as other optically active substances for precise glucose detection.

  2. Rco-3, a Gene Involved in Glucose Transport and Conidiation in Neurospora Crassa

    PubMed Central

    Madi, L.; McBride, S. A.; Bailey, L. A.; Ebbole, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Macroconidiation in Neurospora crassa is influenced by a number of environmental cues, including the nutritional status of the growing organism. Conidia formation is normally observed when the fungus is exposed to air. However, carbon limitation can induce conidiation in mycelia submerged in an aerated liquid medium. A mutant was previously isolated that could conidiate in submerged culture without imposing nutrient limitation and the gene responsible for this phenotype (rco-3) has now been cloned. RCO3 exhibits sequence similarity to members of the sugar transporter gene superfamily, with greatest similarity to glucose transporters of yeast. Consistent with this structural similarity, we find that glucose transport activity is altered in the mutant. However, growth of the mutant in media containing alternate carbon sources does not suppress conidiation in submerged culture. The properties of the mutant suggest that RCO3 is required for expression of glucose transport activity, glucose regulation of gene expression, and general carbon repression of development. PMID:9178001

  3. Dietary Fatty Acids Differentially Associate with Fasting Versus 2-Hour Glucose Homeostasis: Implications for The Management of Subtypes of Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Nicola; Perreault, Leigh; Kerege, Anna; Strauss, Allison; Bergman, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Over-nutrition has fuelled the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, but the role of individual macronutrients to the diabetogenic process is not well delineated. We aimed to examine the impact of dietary fatty acid intake on fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose concentrations, as well as tissue-specific insulin action governing each. Normoglycemic controls (n = 15), athletes (n = 14), and obese (n = 23), as well as people with prediabetes (n = 10) and type 2 diabetes (n = 11), were queried about their habitual diet using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. All subjects were screened by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and studied using the hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp with infusion of 6,62H2-glucose. Multiple regression was performed to examine relationships between dietary fat intake and 1) fasting plasma glucose, 2) % suppression of endogenous glucose production, 3) 2-hour post-OGTT plasma glucose, and 4) skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (glucose rate of disappearance (Rd) and non-oxidative glucose disposal (NOGD)). The %kcal from saturated fat (SFA) was positively associated with fasting (β = 0.303, P = 0.018) and 2-hour plasma glucose (β = 0.415, P<0.001), and negatively related to % suppression of hepatic glucose production (β = -0.245, P = 0.049), clamp Rd (β = -0.256, P = 0.001) and NOGD (β = -0.257, P = 0.001). The %kcal from trans fat was also negatively related to clamp Rd (β = -0.209, P = 0.008) and NOGD (β = -0.210, P = 0.008). In contrast, the %kcal from polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) was negatively associated with 2-hour glucose levels (β = -0.383, P = 0.001), and positively related to Rd (β = 0.253, P = 0.007) and NOGD (β = 0.246, P = 0.008). Dietary advice to prevent diabetes should consider the underlying pathophysiology of the prediabetic state. PMID:26999667

  4. Dietary Fatty Acids Differentially Associate with Fasting Versus 2-Hour Glucose Homeostasis: Implications for The Management of Subtypes of Prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Guess, Nicola; Perreault, Leigh; Kerege, Anna; Strauss, Allison; Bergman, Bryan C

    2016-01-01

    Over-nutrition has fuelled the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, but the role of individual macronutrients to the diabetogenic process is not well delineated. We aimed to examine the impact of dietary fatty acid intake on fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose concentrations, as well as tissue-specific insulin action governing each. Normoglycemic controls (n = 15), athletes (n = 14), and obese (n = 23), as well as people with prediabetes (n = 10) and type 2 diabetes (n = 11), were queried about their habitual diet using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. All subjects were screened by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and studied using the hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp with infusion of 6,62H2-glucose. Multiple regression was performed to examine relationships between dietary fat intake and 1) fasting plasma glucose, 2) % suppression of endogenous glucose production, 3) 2-hour post-OGTT plasma glucose, and 4) skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (glucose rate of disappearance (Rd) and non-oxidative glucose disposal (NOGD)). The %kcal from saturated fat (SFA) was positively associated with fasting (β = 0.303, P = 0.018) and 2-hour plasma glucose (β = 0.415, P<0.001), and negatively related to % suppression of hepatic glucose production (β = -0.245, P = 0.049), clamp Rd (β = -0.256, P = 0.001) and NOGD (β = -0.257, P = 0.001). The %kcal from trans fat was also negatively related to clamp Rd (β = -0.209, P = 0.008) and NOGD (β = -0.210, P = 0.008). In contrast, the %kcal from polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) was negatively associated with 2-hour glucose levels (β = -0.383, P = 0.001), and positively related to Rd (β = 0.253, P = 0.007) and NOGD (β = 0.246, P = 0.008). Dietary advice to prevent diabetes should consider the underlying pathophysiology of the prediabetic state. PMID:26999667

  5. Abnormal oral glucose tolerance and glucose malabsorption after vagotomy and pyloroplasty. A tracer method for measuring glucose absorption rates

    SciTech Connect

    Radziuk, J.; Bondy, D.C.

    1982-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the abnormal glucose tolerance in patients who had undergone vagotomy and pyloroplasty were investigated by measuring the rates of absorption of ingested glucose and the clearance rate of glucose using tracer methods. These methods are based on labeling a 100-g oral glucose load with (1-/sup 14/C)glucose and measuring glucose clearance using plasma levels of infused (3-/sup 3/H)glucose. The rate of appearance of both ingested and total glucose is then calculated continuously using a two-compartment model of glucose kinetics. It was found that about 30% of the ingested glucose (100 g) failed to appear in the systemic circulation. That this was due to malabsorption was confirmed using breath-hydrogen analysis. The absorption period is short (101 +/- 11 min) compared with normal values but the clearance of glucose is identical to that in control subjects, and it peaks 132 +/- 7 min after glucose loading. The peak plasma insulin values were more than four times higher in patients than in normal subjects, and this may afford an explanation of rates of glucose clearance that are inappropriate for the short absorption period. The combination of glucose malabsorption and this clearance pattern could yield the hypoglycemia that may be observed in patients after gastric surgery.

  6. Breakfast, blood glucose, and cognition.

    PubMed

    Benton, D; Parker, P Y

    1998-04-01

    This article compares the findings of three studies that explored the role of increased blood glucose in improving memory function for subjects who ate breakfast. An initial improvement in memory function for these subjects was found to correlate with blood glucose concentrations. In subsequent studies, morning fasting was found to adversely affect the ability to recall a word list and a story read aloud, as well as recall items while counting backwards. Failure to eat breakfast did not affect performance on an intelligence test. It was concluded that breakfast consumption preferentially influences tasks requiring aspects of memory. In the case of both word list recall and memory while counting backwards, the decline in performance associated with not eating breakfast was reversed by the consumption of a glucose-supplemented drink. Although a morning fast also affected the ability to recall a story read aloud, the glucose drink did not reverse this decline. It appears that breakfast consumption influences cognition via several mechanisms, including an increase in blood glucose. PMID:9537627

  7. Glucose metabolism and cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Tian, Rong

    2011-01-01

    The most notable change in the metabolic profile of hypertrophied hearts is an increased reliance on glucose with an overall reduced oxidative metabolism, i.e. a reappearance of the foetal metabolic pattern. In animal models, this change is attributed to the down-regulation of the transcriptional cascades promoting gene expression for fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in adult hearts. Impaired myocardial energetics in cardiac hypertrophy also triggers AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to increased glucose uptake and glycolysis. Aside from increased reliance on glucose as an energy source, changes in other glucose metabolism pathways, e.g. the pentose phosphate pathway, the glucosamine biosynthesis pathway, and anaplerosis, are also noted in the hypertrophied hearts. Studies using transgenic mouse models and pharmacological compounds to mimic or counter the switch of substrate preference in cardiac hypertrophy have demonstrated that increased glucose metabolism in adult heart is not harmful and can be beneficial when it provides sufficient fuel for oxidative metabolism. However, improvement in the oxidative capacity and efficiency rather than the selection of the substrate is likely the ultimate goal for metabolic therapies. PMID:21502371

  8. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Heppner, David E; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  9. Epidermal Nerve Fiber Quantification in the Assessment of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Beiswenger, Kristina K.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Mizisin, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Assessment of cutaneous innervation in skin biopsies is emerging as a valuable means of both diagnosing and staging diabetic neuropathy. Immunolabeling, using antibodies to neuronal proteins such as protein gene product 9.5, allows for the visualization and quantification of intraepidermal nerve fibers. Multiple studies have shown reductions in intraepidermal nerve fiber density in skin biopsies from patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. More recent studies have focused on correlating these changes with other measures of diabetic neuropathy. A loss of epidermal innervation similar to that observed in diabetic patients has been observed in rodent models of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes and several therapeutics have been reported to prevent reductions in intraepidermal nerve fiber density in these models. This review discusses the current literature describing diabetes-induced changes in cutaneous innervation in both human and animal models of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:18384843

  10. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Heppner, David E.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs) that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway. PMID:26722841

  11. Epidermal growth factor, from gene organization to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fenghua; Harris, Raymond C.

    2014-01-01

    In 1962, epidermal growth factor (EGF) was discovered by Dr. Stanley Cohen while studying nerve growth factor (NGF). It was soon recognized that EGF is the prototypical member of a family of peptide growth factors that activate the EGF receptors, and that the EGF/EGF receptor signaling pathway plays important roles in proliferation, differentiation and migration of a variety of cell types, especially in epithelial cells. After the basic characterization of EGF function in the first decade or so after its discovery, the studies related to EGF and its signaling pathway have extended to a broad range of investigations concerning its biological and pathophysiological roles in development and in human diseases. In this review, we briefly describe the gene organization and tissue distribution of EGF, with emphasis on its biological and pathological roles in human diseases. PMID:24513230

  12. Toxic epidermal necrolysis due to lamotrigine in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Barvaliya, Manish J.; Patel, Mahendra K.; Patel, Tejas K.; Tripathi, C. B.

    2012-01-01

    A 12-year-male child developed toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) probably due to lamotrigine. The patient was on antiepileptic therapy (sodium valproate and clonazepam) since 6–7 months, and lamotrigine was added in the regimen 1–2 months back. A serious cutaneous reaction is more likely to occur during the first 2 months of starting lamotrigine. The use of lamotrigine as an add-on to valproate may have precipitated the reaction. Other drugs were ruled out based on the incubation period of TEN. Drug interactions should be kept in mind with multiple antiepileptic therapies. The patient died because of the severity of reactions and delay in starting the treatment with steroids. One must be vigilant in early detection of the reaction. PMID:23326109

  13. A case report on toxic epidermal necrolysis with etoricoxib

    PubMed Central

    Kameshwari, J. S.; Devde, Raju

    2015-01-01

    Etoricoxib is a selective cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2) enzyme inhibitor and is exploited for its analgesic activity in various disease conditions like osteoarthritis, gouty arthritis, acute pain including postoperative dental pain and primary dysmenorrhea, etc. Although highly efficacious in pain management the safety profile of this COX-2 inhibitor is yet to be established in a broader sense. Short-term clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance have shown a very rare incidence of very serious skin reactions like Steven Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). In this case report, we summarize regarding a patient who developed TEN after treatment with etoricoxib for osteoarthritis that later resolved in 15 days after withdrawal and symptomatic treatment. PMID:25878388

  14. Spatiotemporal coordination of stem cell commitment during epidermal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Mesa, Kailin R; Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Park, Sangbum; Gonzalez, David; Brown, Samara; Boucher, Jonathan; Klein, Allon M; Greco, Valentina

    2016-06-17

    Adult tissues replace lost cells via pools of stem cells. However, the mechanisms of cell self-renewal, commitment, and functional integration into the tissue remain unsolved. Using imaging techniques in live mice, we captured the lifetime of individual cells in the ear and paw epidermis. Our data suggest that epidermal stem cells have equal potential to either divide or directly differentiate. Tracking stem cells over multiple generations reveals that cell behavior is not coordinated between generations. However, sibling cell fate and lifetimes are coupled. We did not observe regulated asymmetric cell divisions. Lastly, we demonstrated that differentiating stem cells integrate into preexisting ordered spatial units of the epidermis. This study elucidates how a tissue is maintained by both temporal and spatial coordination of stem cell behaviors. PMID:27229141

  15. Spatiotemporal coordination of stem cell commitment during epidermal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rompolas, Panteleimon; Mesa, Kailin R.; Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Park, Sangbum; Gonzalez, David; Brown, Samara; Boucher, Jonathan; Klein, Allon M.; Greco, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Adult tissues replace lost cells via pools of stem cells. However, the mechanisms of cell self-renewal, commitment, and functional integration into the tissue remain unsolved. Using imaging techniques in live mice, we captured the lifetime of individual cells in the ear and paw epidermis. Our data suggest that epidermal stem cells have equal potential to either divide or directly differentiate. Tracking stem cells over multiple generations reveals that cell behavior is not coordinated between generations. However, sibling cell fate and lifetimes are coupled. We did not observe regulated asymmetric cell divisions. Lastly, we demonstrated that differentiating stem cells integrate into preexisting ordered spatial units of the epidermis. This study elucidates how a tissue is maintained by both temporal and spatial coordination of stem cell behaviors. PMID:27229141

  16. The Phytotherapeutic Fenugreek as Trigger of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bentele-Jaberg, Nicoletta; Guenova, Emmanuella; Mehra, Tarun; Nägeli, Mirjam; Chang, Yung-Tsan; Cozzio, Antonio; French, Lars E; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 32-year-old woman who presented to the hospital with generalized painful exanthema, blisters and erosions 1 month after giving birth to a healthy girl. The patient's medical history was inconspicuous for comorbidities; however, it included the incidental intake of pain killers and a herbal preparation (fenugreek), which she took regularly over the last 4 weeks to improve lactation. Based on the clinical characteristics, we suspected toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), a severe cutaneous adverse drug reaction, which was confirmed by skin biopsy. The patient was treated with high-dose intravenous human immunoglobulins and was discharged 2 weeks after hospital admission in good condition. The allergological workup identified fenugreek as the most likely causative agent. Given the increased self-medication of freely available phytotherapeutics by patients in industrialized countries, herbal mixtures should be taken into consideration in the diagnostic workup of TEN. PMID:26138328

  17. Loss of desmocollin 3 in mice leads to epidermal blistering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangli; Den, Zhining; Koch, Peter J

    2008-09-01

    Desmocollin 3 (DSC3) belongs to a subfamily of cadherins and is a major component of desmosomes in keratinocytes of stratified epithelia, such as the epidermis. Based on its amino acid sequence homology to classical cadherins, such as E-cadherin, it has been postulated that DSC3 functions as a cell-adhesion molecule. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the function of DSC3 in the development and maintenance of stratified epithelia, in particular the epidermis and hair follicles. Using a conditional null allele, we show that loss of Dsc3 function in the epidermis causes impaired cell-cell adhesion, leading to intra-epidermal blistering and telogen hair loss. Furthermore, the lesions in Dsc3-null skin resemble those observed in individuals with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), indicating that impaired Dsc3 function could be a potential cause of PV-like inherited or acquired skin blistering diseases. PMID:18682494

  18. [Wound treatment with autogenous epidermal cell expansion culture].

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, B; Müller, R P; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1988-11-11

    Sheets of autologous epidermal cells grown by expansion culture were used to cover small skin defects in seven patients with postoperative necroses, necroses due to temporal arteritis, varicose ulcers or after tangential excision of tattoos. Several transplantation techniques were used: backing of the cultured epithelia with vaseline gauze, Surfasoft, Adaptic, Silastic foil, culturing directly from Petriperm-foil. Meshed Silastic-foil proved to give the best support. Optimal take of the in-vitro epithelia (more than 80% of their surface area) was achieved only for fresh dermal wound-beds. The take was only moderate on chronic granulation tissue, but the transplants reduced the formation of fibrinous-necrotic material and favoured the formation of fresh granulation tissue. PMID:3181024

  19. Metolazone Associated Stevens Johnson Syndrome-Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ajay; Charaniya, Riyaz; Ghosh, Anindya; Tandon, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN) are severe mucocutaneous disease with high mortality rate. It is characterised by severe necrosis and detachment of the epidermis. Drugs are the most common triggering agent for SJS/TEN. These are commonly reported with the use of aromatic antiepileptics, antiretrovirals, allopurinol, NSAID’S and sulfonamide antibiotics. Non antibiotic sulfonamides rarely cause SJS/TEN. Metolazone is a well known diuretic and is extensively used by clinicians. Although this drug is in market for last several decades, no case of SJS/TEN has been reported till date. We report a rare case of metolazone induced SJS/TEN overlap in a 55-year-old lady. PMID:27134890

  20. Interdependent epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sylwia; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2014-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) signalling regulates diverse cellular functions, promoting cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, cell growth and survival. EGFR signalling is critical during embryogenesis, in particular in epithelial development, and disruption of the EGFR gene results in epithelial immaturity and perinatal death. EGFR signalling also functions during wound healing responses through accelerating wound re-epithelialisation, inducing cell migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. Upregulation of EGFR signalling is often observed in carcinomas and has been shown to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation and metastasis. Therefore aberrant EGFR signalling is a common target for anticancer therapies. Various reports indicate that EGFR signalling primarily occurs at the plasma membrane and EGFR degradation following endocytosis greatly attenuates signalling. Other studies argue that EGFR internalisation is essential for complete activation of downstream signalling cascades and that endosomes can serve as signalling platforms. The aim of this review is to discuss current understanding of intersection between EGFR signalling and trafficking. PMID:24681003

  1. Effects of microgravity on epidermal development in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoath, Steven B.

    1995-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to investigate the effects of prolonged weightlessness on the development of the skin in the fetal and newborn rat. Specifically, we used the NASA microgravitational rat model to test the following hypotheses: (1) Exposure of the pregnant rat to microscopy during late gestation will diminish the transport of calcium across the placenta from the mother to the fetus leading to decreases in total epidermal and dermal calcium content; (2) Microgravity will lead to slowing of body growth and diminish the rate of formation of the outermost layer of the epidermis and the stratum corneum; and (3) Microgravity will lead to formation of a stratum corneum with decreased DC electrical resistance and increased permeability to tritiated water.

  2. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  3. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  4. Punicalagin exerts protective effect against high glucose-induced cellular stress and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianxiang; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects remain a significant health problem. Studying the effect of natural compounds with antioxidant properties and minimal toxicities on diabetic embryopathy may lead to the development of new and safe dietary supplements. Punicalagin is a primary polyphenol found in pomegranate juice, which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic properties, suggesting a protective effect of punicalagin on diabetic embryopathy. Here, we examined whether punicalagin could reduce high glucose-induced neural tube defects (NTDs), and if this rescue occurs through blockage of cellular stress and caspase activation. Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) mouse embryos were cultured for 24 or 36 h with normal (5 mM) glucose or high glucose (16.7 mM), in presence or absence of 10 or 20 μM punicalagin. 10 μM punicalagin slightly reduced NTD formation under high glucose conditions; however, 20 μM punicalagin significantly inhibited high glucose-induced NTD formation. Punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced lipid peroxidation marker 4-hydroxynonenal, nitrotyrosine-modified proteins, and lipid peroxides. Moreover, punicalagin abrogated endoplasmic reticulum stress by inhibiting phosphorylated protein kinase ribonucleic acid (RNA)-like ER kinase (p-PERK), phosphorylated inositol-requiring protein-1α (p-IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing. Additionally, punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage. Punicalagin reduces high glucose-induced NTD formation by blocking cellular stress and caspase activation. These observations suggest punicalagin supplements could mitigate the teratogenic effects of hyperglycemia in the developing embryo, and possibly prevent diabetes-induced NTDs. PMID:26453010

  5. Blockade of chronic high glucose-induced endothelial apoptosis by Sasa borealis bamboo extract.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yean-Jung; Lim, Hyeon-Sook; Choi, Jung-Suk; Shin, Seung-Yong; Bae, Ji-Young; Kang, Sang-Wook; Kang, Il-Jun; Kang, Young-Hee

    2008-05-01

    Hyperglycemia is a causal factor in the development of diabetic vascular complications including impaired vascular smooth muscle contractility and increased cell proliferation. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Sasa borealis water-extract (SBwE) on chronic hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were cultured in 5.5 mM low glucose, 5.5 mM glucose plus 27.5 mM mannitol as an osmotic control, or 33 mM high glucose for 5 days in the absence and presence of 1-30 microg/ ml SBwE. Caspase-3 activation and Annexin V staining revealed chronic high glucose-induced endothelial apoptotic toxicity with a generation of oxidants detected by DCF-fluorescence, and these effects were reversed by SBwE at > or =1 microg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. Cytoprotective SBwE substantially reduced the sustained high glucose-induced expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and attenuated the formation of peroxynitrite radicals. The suppressive effects of SBwE were most likely mediated through blunting activation of PKC beta 2 and NADPH oxidase promoted by high glucose. In addition, this bamboo extract modulated the high glucose-triggered mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent upregulation of heat-shock proteins. Our results suggest that SBwE suppressed these detrimental effects caused by PKC-dependent peroxynitrite formation via activation of NADPH oxidase and induction of nitric oxide synthase and heat-shock protein family that may be essential mechanisms responsible for increased apoptotic oxidative stress in diabetic vascular complications. Moreover, the blockade of high glucose-elicited heat-shock protein induction appeared to be responsible for SBwE-alleviated endothelial apoptosis. Therefore, SBwE may be a therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of diabetic endothelial dysfunction and related complications. PMID:18375828

  6. Evolutionary origin and diversification of epidermal barrier proteins in amniotes.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Bettina; Mlitz, Veronika; Hermann, Marcela; Rice, Robert H; Eigenheer, Richard A; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of amniotes has involved major molecular innovations in the epidermis. In particular, distinct structural proteins that undergo covalent cross-linking during cornification of keratinocytes facilitate the formation of mechanically resilient superficial cell layers and help to limit water loss to the environment. Special modes of cornification generate amniote-specific skin appendages such as claws, feathers, and hair. In mammals, many protein substrates of cornification are encoded by a cluster of genes, termed the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC). To provide a basis for hypotheses about the evolution of cornification proteins, we screened for homologs of the EDC in non-mammalian vertebrates. By comparative genomics, de novo gene prediction and gene expression analyses, we show that, in contrast to fish and amphibians, the chicken and the green anole lizard have EDC homologs comprising genes that are specifically expressed in the epidermis and in skin appendages. Our data suggest that an important component of the cornified protein envelope of mammalian keratinocytes, that is, loricrin, has originated in a common ancestor of modern amniotes, perhaps during the acquisition of a fully terrestrial lifestyle. Moreover, we provide evidence that the sauropsid-specific beta-keratins have evolved as a subclass of EDC genes. Based on the comprehensive characterization of the arrangement, exon-intron structures and conserved sequence elements of EDC genes, we propose new scenarios for the evolutionary origin of epidermal barrier proteins via fusion of neighboring S100A and peptidoglycan recognition protein genes, subsequent loss of exons and highly divergent sequence evolution. PMID:25169930

  7. Targeting epidermal lipids for treatment of Mendelian disorders of cornification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inherited ichthyoses or Mendelian disorders of cornification (MeDOC) are clinically heterogeneous disorders with high unmet therapeutic needs, which are characterized by skin hyperkeratosis and scaling. Some MeDOC types are associated with defects of the epidermal lipid metabolism, resulting in perturbed barrier permeability and subsequent epidermal hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis and inflammation. An example is the CHILD (congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform nevus and limb defects) syndrome, an X-linked dominant multisystem MeDOC caused by mutations in the NSDHL (NAD(P)H steroid dehydrogenase-like protein) gene, which is involved in the distal cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. The skin manifestations of the CHILD syndrome have been attributed to two major mechanisms: deficiency of cholesterol, probably influencing the proper corneocyte membrane formation, and toxic accumulation of aberrant steroid precursors. Methods Here we addressed the efficacy of an ointment containing cholesterol and simvastatin, an agent inhibiting endogenous cholesterol synthesis in a compassionate-use treatment of three patients with CHILD syndrome. To test the specificity of this therapeutic approach, we applied the same topical treatment to two patients with other types of MeDOC with disturbed skin lipid metabolism. Results The therapy with simvastatin and cholesterol was highly effective and well-tolerated by the CHILD syndrome patients; only lesions in the body folds represented a therapeutic challenge. No improvement was noted in the patients with other types of MeDOC. Conclusions This therapy is inexpensive and accessible to every patient with CHILD syndrome, because both simvastatin and cholesterol are available worldwide. Our data provide initial evidence of the specificity of the therapeutic effect of the simvastatin-cholesterol ointment in CHILD syndrome in comparison to other types of MeDOC. PMID:24607067

  8. Mechanism of interleukin-1α transcriptional regulation of S100A9 in a human epidermal keratinocyte cell line

    PubMed Central

    Bando, Mika; Zou, Xianqiong; Hiroshima, Yuka; Kataoka, Masatoshi; Ross, Karen F; Shinohara, Yasuo; Nagata, Toshihiko; Herzberg, Mark C; Kido, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    S100A9 is a calcium-binding protein and subunit of antimicrobial calprotectin complex (S100A8/A9). Produced by neutrophils, monocytes/ macrophages and keratinocytes, S100A9 expression increases in response to inflammation. For example, IL-1α produced by epithelial cells acts autonomously on the same cells to induce expression of S100A8/A9 and cellular differentiation. Whereas it is well known that IL-1α and members of the IL-10 family of cytokines upregulate S100A8 and S100A9 in several cell lineages, the pathway and mechanism of IL-1α-dependent transcriptional control of S100A9 in epithelial cells is not established. Modeled using human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), IL-1α stimulated phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and induced S100A9 expression, which was blocked by IL-1 receptor antagonist, RNAi suppression of p38, or a p38 MAPK inhibitor. Transcription of S100A9 in HaCaT cells depended on nucleotides -94 to -53 in the upstream promoter region, based upon use of deletion constructs and luciferase reporter activity. Within the responsive promoter region, IL-1α increased the binding activity of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ). Mutated C/EBPβ binding sequences or C/EBPβ-specific siRNA inhibited the S100A9 transcriptional response. Hence, IL-1α is strongly suggested to increase S100A9 expression in a human epidermal keratinocyte cell line by signaling through the IL-1 receptor and p38 MAPK, increasing C/EBPβ-dependent transcriptional activity. PMID:23563247

  9. The carboxy-terminus of p63 links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Sahu, Raju; Leu, N. Adrian; Senoo, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 (Trp63) plays a key role in homeostasis and regeneration of the skin. The p63 gene is transcribed from dual promoters, generating TAp63 isoforms with growth suppressive functions and dominant-negative ΔNp63 isoforms with opposing properties. p63 also encodes multiple carboxy (C)-terminal variants. Although mutations of C-terminal variants have been linked to the pathogenesis of p63-associated ectodermal disorders, the physiological role of the p63 C-terminus is poorly understood. We report here that deletion of the p63 C-terminus in mice leads to ectodermal malformation and hypoplasia, accompanied by a reduced proliferative capacity of epidermal progenitor cells. Notably, unlike the p63-null condition, we find that p63 C-terminus deficiency promotes expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 (Cdkn1a), a factor associated with reduced proliferative capacity of both hematopoietic and neuronal stem cells. These data suggest that the p63 C-terminus plays a key role in the cell cycle progression required to maintain the proliferative potential of stem cells of many different lineages. Mechanistically, we show that loss of Cα, the predominant C-terminal p63 variant in epithelia, promotes the transcriptional activity of TAp63 and also impairs the dominant-negative activity of ΔNp63, thereby controlling p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. We propose that the p63 C-terminus links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells via mechanisms that equilibrate TAp63 and ΔNp63 isoform function. PMID:25503409

  10. The role of epidermal growth factor receptor in chordoma pathogenesis: a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Asem; Presneau, Nadège; Ye, Hongtao; Halai, Dina; Berisha, Fitim; Idowu, Bernadine; Leithner, Andreas; Liegl, Bernadette; Briggs, Timothy R W; Bacsi, Krisztian; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Athanasou, Nicholas; Amary, Maria Fernanda; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Tirabosco, Roberto; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2011-02-01

    Chordoma, the molecular hallmark of which is T (brachyury), is a rare malignant bone tumour with a high risk of local recurrence and a tumour from which metastatic disease is a common late event. Currently, there is no effective drug therapy for treating chordomas, although there is evidence that some patients respond to the empirical use of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonists. The aim of this study was to determine the role of EGFR in the pathogenesis of chordoma. Paraffin-embedded material from 173 chordomas from 160 patients [sacro-coccygeal (n = 94), skull-based (n = 50), and mobile spine (n = 16)] was analysed by immunohistochemistry and revealed total EGFR expression in 69% of cases analysed. Of 147 informative chordomas analysed by FISH, 38% revealed high-level EGFR polysomy, 4% high-level polysomy with focal amplification, 18% low-level polysomy, and 39% disomy. Phospho-receptor tyrosine kinase array membranes showed EGFR activation in the chordoma cell line U-CH1 and all of the three chordomas analysed. Direct sequencing of EGFR (exons 18-21), KRAS, NRAS, HRAS (exons 2, 3), and BRAF (exons 11, 15) using DNA from 62 chordomas failed to reveal mutations. PTEN expression was absent by immunohistochemistry in 19 of 147 (13%) analysed chordomas, only one of which revealed high-level polysomy of EGFR. The EGFR inhibitor tyrphostin (AG 1478) markedly inhibited proliferation of the chordoma cell line U-CH1 in vitro and diminished EGFR phosphorylation in a dose-dependant manner, a finding supported by inhibition of phosphorylated Erk1/2. p-Akt was suppressed to a much lesser degree in these experiments. There was no reduction of T as assessed by western blotting. These data implicate aberrant EGFR signalling in the pathogenesis of chordoma. This study provides a strategy for patient stratification for treatment with EGFR antagonists. PMID:21171079

  11. The epidermal growth factor receptor decreases Stathmin 1 and triggers catagen entry in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bichsel, Kyle J; Hammiller, Brianna; Trempus, Carol S; Li, Yanhua; Hansen, Laura A

    2016-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is necessary for normal involution of hair follicles after the growth phase of anagen, although the mechanisms through which it acts are not well understood. In this report, we used transcriptional profiling of microdissected hair follicles from mice with skin-targeted deletion of Egfr to investigate how EGFR activation triggers catagen. Immunofluorescence for phospho-EGFR in mouse skin revealed increased activation of EGFR in follicular keratinocytes at catagen onset. Consistent with other models of EGFR deficiency, mice with skin-targeted deletion of Egfr (Krt14-Cre(+) /Egfr(fl/fl) ) exhibited a delayed and asynchronous catagen entry. Transcriptional profiling at the time of normal catagen onset at post-natal day (P) 17 revealed increased expression of the mitotic regulator Rcc2 in hair follicles lacking EGFR. Rcc2 protein was strongly immunopositive in the nuclei of control follicular keratinocytes at P16 then rapidly decreased until it was undetectable between P18 and 21. In contrast, Rcc2 expression continued in Egfr mutant follicles throughout this period. Proliferation, measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, was also significantly increased in Egfr mutant follicular keratinocytes compared to controls at P18-21. Similarly, Rcc2-regulated mitotic regulator Stathmin 1 was strikingly reduced in control but not Egfr mutant follicles between P17 and P19. Deletion of Stmn1, in turn, accelerated catagen entry associated with premature cessation of proliferation in the hair follicles. These data reveal EGFR suppression of mitotic regulators including Rcc2 and Stathmin 1 as a mechanism for catagen induction in mouse skin. PMID:26661905

  12. Rapidly activated epidermal growth factor receptor mediates lipopolysaccharide-triggered migration of microglia.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Jun-Li; Li, Chun-Yu; Li, Xiao; Xie, Min-Jie; Wang, Wei; Tian, Dai-Shi

    2015-11-01

    Previous reports have suggested that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is involved in microglia activation characterized by cell morphology changes, cytokine production and cell migration; and the biochemical regulation of the microglia migration is a potential therapeutic target following CNS inflammatory damages. However, the role of EGFR in microglia motility after inflammatory stimulation remains unknown. In the present study, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was found to trigger rapid EGFR phosphorylation within 10 min, which was sustained during long-term stimulation in both primary microglial cells and the cultured BV2 microglial cells, furthermore, blocking EGFR phosphorylation by AG1478 significantly attenuated the LPS-induced chemotactic and chemokinetic migration of microglia. In addition, LPS could initiate calcium oscillation in microglia during live-cell recording, however, an intracellular calcium chelator and a selective inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, but not an extracellular calcium chelator, remarkably suppressed the LPS-induced EGFR phosphorylation in BV2 microglia cells. As EGFR is not a traditional receptor for LPS, these findings suggest that the rapid phosphorylation of EGFR is attributed to the LPS-triggered intracellular calcium mobilization. By examining the downstream signals of EGFR, we further proved that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is essential for EGFR-mediated microglia migration, because ERK inhibition attenuated the chemotactic and chemokinetic migration of microglia that had been induced by either LPS or EGF. Collectively, these results suggest that LPS could trigger the rapid phosphorylation of EGFR and subsequent ERK activation through mobilizing calcium activity, which underlies the microglia migration in an inflammatory condition. PMID:26209152

  13. Retinal lipid and glucose metabolism dictates angiogenesis through lipid sensor Ffar1

    PubMed Central

    Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Sun, Ye; Gantner, Marin L.; Shao, Zhuo; Evans, Lucy P.; Saba, Nicholas; Fredrick, Thomas; Burnim, Samuel; Kim, Jin Sung; Patel, Gauri; Juan, Aimee M.; Hurst, Christian G.; Hatton, Colman J.; Cui, Zhenghao; Pierce, Kerry A.; Bherer, Patrick; Aguilar, Edith; Powner, Michael B.; Vevis, Kristis; Boisvert, Michel; Fu, Zhongjie; Levy, Emile; Fruttiger, Marcus; Packard, Alan; Rezende, Flavio A.; Maranda, Bruno; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Chen, Jing; Friedlander, Martin; Clish, Clary B.; Smith, Lois E.H.

    2016-01-01

    Tissues with high metabolic rates often use lipid as well as glucose for energy, conferring a survival advantage during feast and famine.1 Current dogma suggests that high-energy consuming photoreceptors depend on glucose.2,3 Here we show that retina also uses fatty acids (FA) β-oxidation for energy. Moreover, we identify a lipid sensor Ffar1 that curbs glucose uptake when FA are available. Very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), expressed in tissues with a high metabolic rate, facilitates the uptake of triglyceride-derived FA.4,5 Vldlr is present in photoreceptors.6 In Vldlr−/− retinas, Ffar1, sensing high circulating lipid levels despite decreased FA uptake5, suppresses glucose transporter Glut1. This impaired glucose entry into photoreceptors results in a dual lipid/glucose fuel shortage and reduction in the Krebs cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (KG). Low α-KG levels promote hypoxia-induced factor-1α (Hif1a) stabilization and vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegfa) secretion by starved Vldlr−/− photoreceptors, attracting neovessels to supply fuel. These aberrant vessels invading normally avascular photoreceptors in Vldlr−/− retinas are reminiscent of retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP), a subset of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)7, associated with high vitreous VEGF levels in humans. Dysregulated lipid and glucose photoreceptor energy metabolism may therefore be a driving force in neovascular AMD and other retinal diseases. PMID:26974308

  14. Wavelength-modulated differential laser photothermal radiometry for blood glucose measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Mandelis, A.; Matvienko, A.; Sivagurunathan, K.; Zinman, B.

    2010-03-01

    A Wavelength-Modulated Differential Laser Photothermal Radiometer (WM-DPTR) technique was used for non-invasive blood glucose monitoring in the mid-IR range, where the prominent absorption peak is glucose specific and isolated from other interfering peaks in human blood. The WM-DPTR method consists of the out-of-phase modulated excitation at two discrete wavelengths 9.5 μm and 10.4 μm (near the peak and the baseline of glucose absorption), generated from two quantum cascade lasers (QCL) and the differential emission detection through a thermal-wave upconversion process via a HgCdZnTe (MCZT) detector (2-5 μm). The differential method suppresses the background signal and reduces source-detection interference, thus enhancing glucose detection sensitivity. The results from aqueous glucose phantom (0-440 mg/dl) measurements demonstrate that both amplitude and phase of the WM-DPTR signal can be used for glucose detection. The dynamic range and the sensitivity of the glucose detection are influenced greatly by the laser intensity ratio and modulation frequency. The optimal intensity ratio for high sensitivity is ~1. Other laser intensity ratios increase dynamic range but reduce sensitivity. Sensitivity increases with frequency.

  15. Dexamethasone rapidly inhibits glucose uptake via non-genomic mechanisms in contracting myotubes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hong; Liu, Lei; Ni, Chen-Xu; Zhang, Yi; Su, Wen-Jun; Lian, Yong-Jie; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Jun-Ping; Jiang, Chun-Lei

    2016-08-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are a class of steroid hormones that regulate multiple aspects of glucose homeostasis. In skeletal muscle, it is well established that prolonged GC excess inhibits glucose uptake and utilization through glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated transcriptional changes. However, it remains obscure that whether the rapid non-genomic effects of GC on glucose uptake are involved in acute exercise stress. Therefore, we used electric pulse stimulation (EPS)-evoked contracting myotubes to determine whether the non-genomic actions of GC were involved and its underlying mechanism(s). Pretreatment with dexamethasone (Dex, 10 μM) significantly prevented contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) translocation within 20 min in C2C12 myotubes. Neither GC nuclear receptor antagonist (RU486) nor protein synthesis inhibitor (cycloheximide, Chx) affected the rapid inhibition effects of Dex. AMPK and CaMKII-dependent signaling pathways were associated with the non-genomic effects of Dex. These results provide evidence that GC rapidly suppresses glucose uptake in contracting myotubes via GR-independent non-genomic mechanisms. AMPK and CaMKII-mediated Glut4 translocation may play a critical role in GC-induced rapid inhibition of glucose uptake. PMID:27246478

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits glucose intolerance after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Yongsheng; Xu, Han; Kang, Kai; Cai, Donglian

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is associated with the insulin signaling pathway and glucose tabolism. We hypothesized that expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor may be involved in glucose intolerance following ischemic stress. To verify this hypothesis, this study aimed to observe the changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine kinase B receptor expression in glucose metabolism-associated regions following cerebral ischemic stress in mice. At day 1 after middle cerebral artery occlusion, the expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor were significantly decreased in the ischemic cortex, hypothalamus, liver, skeletal muscle, and pancreas. The expression levels of tyrosine kinase B receptor were decreased in the hypothalamus and liver, and increased in the skeletal muscle and pancreas, but remained unchanged in the cortex. Intrahypothalamic administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (40 ng) suppressed the decrease in insulin receptor and tyrosine-phosphorylated insulin receptor expression in the liver and skeletal muscle, and inhibited the overexpression of gluconeogenesis-associated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase in the liver of cerebral ischemic mice. However, serum insulin levels remained unchanged. Our experimental findings indicate that brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote glucose metabolism, reduce gluconeogenesis, and decrease blood glucose levels after cerebral ischemic stress. The low expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor following cerebral ischemia may be involved in the development of glucose intolerance. PMID:25206547

  17. REG1 binds to protein phosphatase type 1 and regulates glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, J; Carlson, M

    1995-01-01

    Protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1) is encoded by GLC7, an essential gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The GLC7 phosphatase is required for glucose repression and appears to function antagonistically to the SNF1 protein kinase. Previously, we characterized a mutation, glc7-T152K, that relieves glucose repression but does not interfere with the function of GLC7 in glycogen metabolism. We proposed that the mutant GLC7T152K phosphatase is defective in its interaction with a regulatory subunit that directs participation of PP1 in the glucose repression mechanism. Here, we present evidence that REG1, a protein required for glucose repression, is one such regulatory subunit. We show that REG1 is physically associated with GLC7. REG1 interacts with GLC7 strongly and specifically in the two-hybrid system, and REG1 and GLC7 fusion proteins co-immunoprecipitate from cell extracts. Moreover, overexpression of a REG1 fusion protein suppresses the glc7-T152K mutant defect in glucose repression. This and other genetic evidence indicate that the two proteins function together in regulating glucose repression. These results suggest that REG1 is a regulatory subunit of PP1 that targets its activity to proteins in the glucose repression regulatory pathway. Images PMID:8846786

  18. Protective action of Citrullus colocynthis seed extracts against the deleterious effect of streptozotocin on both in vitro glucose-stimulated insulin release from rat pancreatic islets and in vivo glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Benariba, Nabila; Bellakdhar, Wafaa; Djaziri, Rabeh; Hupkens, Emeline; Louchami, Karim; Malaisse, Willy J

    2013-01-01

    Citrullus colocynthis extracts improve glucose homeostasis in alloxan- or streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Little is known, however, regarding the protective effect of these extracts against the β-cytotoxic action of STZ. In the present study, an H2O-methanol extract was found to suppress the inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by STZ in rat-isolated pancreatic islets. Similarly, when an aqueous extract from Citrullus colocynthis seeds was injected daily for 21 days prior to STZ administration, the perturbation of glucose homeostasis otherwise generated by the β-cytotoxic agent was minimized in rats. PMID:24648906

  19. Ultraviolet B-induced alterations of the skin barrier and epidermal calcium gradient.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shao Jun; Chu, Ai Wu; Lu, Zhen Feng; Pan, Min Hong; Che, Dun Fa; Zhou, Xiao Jun

    2007-12-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation induces a variety of cutaneous changes, including epidermal permeability barrier disruption. In the present study, we assessed the effects of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation in epidermal barrier function and calcium distribution in murine epidermis. Adult hairless mice were exposed to a single dose of UVB (0.15 J/cm(2)). Barrier function was evaluated by transepidermal water loss (TEWL), lanthanum perfusion. The morphological alterations were examined by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy using ruthenium tetroxide (RuO(4)) postfixation. For evaluation of the effect on epidermal calcium distribution, the ion-capture cytochemistry was employed. UVB irradiation caused a significant increase in TEWL, which peaked at day 4. In parallel, the increased number of sunburn cells and the changes in epidermal hyperplasia and proliferation were observed. Electron microscopic observation demonstrated that the water-soluble lanthanum tracer was present in the extracellular stratum corneum domains, and the increased intercellular permeability was correlated with defective organization of the extracellular lipid lamellar bilayers of the stratum corneum. Moreover, UVB irradiation also caused an appearance of calcium precipitates in the stratum corneum and transitional cell layers as well as the increased cytosolic calcium in the lower epidermis, reflecting the alterations of the epidermal calcium gradient. These results suggest that the changes of the epidermal calcium distribution pattern may correlate with the perturbation of the epidermal barrier induced by UVB irradiation. PMID:18031457

  20. Layer-by-layer assembly of epidermal growth factors on polyurethane films for wound closure.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Abhilash; Diehl-Jones, William; Ghanbar, Sadegh; Liu, Song

    2014-02-13

    To facilitate the healing of chronic wounds, growth factors such as epidermal growth factor need to be safely encapsulated for their sustained and effective delivery to the wound bed. Using a layer-by-layer assembly technique, epidermal growth factor is successfully encapsulated on the surface of poly(acrylic acid)-modified polyurethane film. The amount of encapsulated epidermal growth factor is controlled by adjusting the number of chitosan/epidermal growth factor bilayers. A controlled release of epidermal growth factor from the surface of polyurethane film for a period of five days is achieved with well-retained bioactivity (over 90%) as evidenced by a cell proliferation assay. In an in vitro cellular wounding assay, the cell gap covered with the epidermal growth factor-loaded polyurethane film closes at a rate more than twice as fast as that covered with a control polyurethane film. Fluorescent staining of F-actin reveals that the released epidermal growth factor induces differences in cytoskeletal organization, suggesting that stimulated cell migration also contributes to the close of the cell gap. PMID:24525716

  1. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  2. Next generation fire suppressants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral band microprocessor controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  3. Suppression of flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An active aerodynamic control system to control flutter over a large range of oscillatory frequencies is described. The system is not affected by mass, stiffness, elastic axis, or center of gravity location of the system, mode of vibration, or Mach number. The system consists of one or more pairs of leading edge and trailing edge hinged or deformable control surfaces, each pair operated in concert by a stability augmentation system. Torsion and bending motions are sensed and converted by the stability augmentation system into leading and trailing edge control surface deflections which produce lift forces and pitching moments to suppress flutter.

  4. Diphtheria Toxin-Epidermal Growth Factor Fusion Protein DAB389EGF for the treatment of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoping; Kessler, Elizabeth; Su, Lih-Jen; Thorburn, Andrew; Frankel, Arthur E.; Li, Yuan; La Rosa, Francisco G.; Shen, Jingping; Li, Chuan-Yuan; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Glodé, L. Michael; Flaig, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The novel fusion protein, DAB389EGF, is comprised of both the catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin that are fused to the human epidermal growth factor, providing a targeting and a toxicity component. We tested DAB389EGF for anti-tumor activity in both in vitro and in vivo urinary bladder cancer models. Experimental Design Human bladder cancer lines were treated with DAB389EGF and assessed for growth inhibition and clonogenic suppression. Using 6–8 week old female athymic nude mice implanted orthotopically with HTB9 cells, DAB389EGF was administered intravesically twice weekly for two weeks. The response of the luciferase expressing HTB9 cells was monitored via bioluminescence as the primary endpoint.. Results Treatment response with DAB389EGF was specific and robust, with an IC50 ranging from 0.5 to 15ng/ml in 8 tested bladder cancer cell lines, but greater than 50ng/ml in the EGFR-negative H520 control cell line. Simulating short duration intravesical therapy used clinically, a 2 hour treatment exposure of DAB389EGF (10ng/ml) produced clonogenic suppression in three selected bladder cancer cell lines. In vivo, luciferase activity was suppressed in 5 of 6 mice treated with DAB389EGF (70 μl (1ng/μL) per mouse), as compared to only 1 of 6 mice treated with a control DT fusion protein. Histologic assessment of tumor clearance correlated with the bioluminescent changes observed with DAB389EGF treatment. Immunocompetent mice treated with intravesical DAB389EGF did not demonstrate any non-specific systemic toxicity. Conclusions The intravesical delivery of targeted-toxin fusion proteins is a novel treatment approach for non-muscle-invasive urinary bladder cancer. With appropriate targeting, the treatments are effective and well tolerated in vivo. PMID:23172881

  5. Inhibitory effects of tetrandrine on epidermal growth factor-induced invasion and migration in HT29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Lee, Chiu-Fang; Chiang, Ni-Na; Chen, Fu-An

    2016-01-01

    Tetrandrine has been shown to reduce cancer cell proliferation and to inhibit metastatic effects in multiple cancer models in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of tetrandrine on the underlying mechanism of HT29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was focused on tetrandrine‑treated HT29 cells following epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment, and Transwell, gelatin zymography, gene expression and immunoblotting assays were performed to investigate metastatic effects in vitro. Tetrandrine was observed to dose‑dependently inhibit EGF‑induced HT29 cell invasion and migration, however, no effect on cell viability occurred following exposure to tetradrine between 0.5 and 2 µM. Tetrandrine treatment inhibited the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 in a concentration‑dependent manner. The present study also found a reduction in the mRNA expression levels of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9 in the tetrandrine‑treated HT29 cells. Tetrandrine also suppressed the phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and its downstream pathway, including phosphoinositide‑dependent kinase 1, phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase and phosphorylated AKT, suppressing the gene expression of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9. Furthermore, tetrandrine triggered mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling through the suppressing the activation of phosphorylated extracellular signal‑regulated protein kinase. These data suggested that targeting EGFR signaling and its downstream molecules contributed to the inhibition of EGF‑induced HT29 cell metastasis caused by tetrandrine, eventually leading to a reduction in the mRNA and gelatinase activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively. PMID:26648313

  6. Gloss, colour and grip: multifunctional epidermal cell shapes in bee- and bird-pollinated flowers.

    PubMed

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower

  7. Gloss, Colour and Grip: Multifunctional Epidermal Cell Shapes in Bee- and Bird-Pollinated Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R.; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in Brazilian lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, Carlos E.; Ciol, Heloísa; Queiroga, Eduardo M.; Benine, Lucimara C.; Silva, Luciana H.; Ojopi, Elida B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in the pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer and has recently emerged as an important target for molecular therapeutics. The KRAS oncogene also plays an important role in the development of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in a population of Brazilian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS: A total of 207 specimens from Brazilian patients with non-small cell lung cancer were analyzed for activating epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS somatic mutations, and their associations with clinicopathological characteristics (including age, gender, ethnicity, smoking habits, and histological subtype) were examined. RESULTS: We identified 63 cases (30.4%) with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and 30 cases (14.6%) with KRAS mutations. The most frequent epidermal growth factor receptor mutation we detected was a deletion in exon 19 (60.3%, 38 patients), followed by an L858R amino acid substitution in exon 21 (27%, 17 patients). The most common types of KRAS mutations were found in codon 12. There were no significant differences in epidermal growth factor receptor or KRAS mutations by gender or primary versus metastatic lung cancer. There was a higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in the non-Asian patients. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations were more prevalent in adenocarcinomas than in non-adenocarcinoma histological types. Being a non-smoker was significantly associated with the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations, but the prevalence of KRAS mutations was significantly associated with smoking. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to examine the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in a Brazilian population sample with non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:22666783

  9. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in bladder cancer and their relationship to epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, J. K.; Cook, S.; Chambers, P.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in neoplastic and non-neoplastic bladder tissue using a standard radioimmunoassay technique. Tumour samples had much higher TGF-alpha levels compared with EGF and TGF-alpha levels in malignant tissue were significantly higher than in benign bladder samples. There was, in addition, a difference in mean EGF levels from 'normal' bladder samples from non-tumour bearing areas of bladder in patients with bladder cancer compared with 'normal' bladder tissue obtained at the time of organ retrieval surgery. Levels of EGF and TGF-alpha did not correlate with levels of EGF receptor (EGFR) as determined by a radioligand binding method but levels of TGF-alpha > 10 ng gm-1 of tumour tissue did correlate with EGFR positivity defined using immunohistochemistry. These data suggest that TGF-alpha is the likely ligand for EGFR in bladder tumours. PMID:8605103

  10. Differential suppression of epidermal antimicrobial protein expression in atopic dermatitis and in EFAD mice by pimecrolimus compared to corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jens-Michael; Ahrens, Kerstin; Meingassner, Josef; Scherer, Andreas; Bräutigam, Matthias; Stütz, Anton; Schwarz, Thomas; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Harder, Jürgen; Gläser, Regine; Proksch, Ehrhardt

    2011-10-01

    It has been suggested that the increased rate of bacterial infection in atopic dermatitis (AD) may be caused by reduced antimicrobial protein (AMP) expression. We were interested whether common treatments in AD affect antimicrobial defense. We investigated the effects of topically applied corticosteroids betamethasone valerate (BV) and triamacinolone acetonide (TA) and those of the calcineurin inhibitor pimecrolimus for 3 weeks on AMP expression in AD. BV and TA treatment in AD led to a significant reduction in AMP expression; protein expression of human beta-defensins (hBD)-2 and hBD-3, psoriasin, RNase 7 and cathelicidin LL-37 was below the level in skin of healthy controls. After pimecrolimus treatment, AMP expression was also reduced but less compared to BV and TA; the expression levels of hBD-2, psoriasin and RNase 7 still remained above the control levels. In essential fatty acid-deficient (EFAD) mice, a model of chronic skin barrier disease with inflammation, expression of the mouse beta-defensins mBD-1, mBD-3 and mBD-14 (orthologues for hBD-1, hBD-2 and hBD-3, respectively), was reduced by both treatments, again more pronounced by BV compared to pimecrolimus. In summary, we found that treatment for AD with corticosteroids in human skin and EFAD mice caused a strong reduction in AMPs; reduction was less with pimecrolimus. This result may explain the clinical observation that prolonged treatment with topical corticosteroids sometimes leads to bacterial infection. PMID:21707760

  11. Basophil-derived amphiregulin is essential for UVB irradiation-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroeks, Chantal; van Weelden, Huib; Schwartz, Christian; Voehringer, David; Redegeld, Frank A M; Rutten, Victor P M G; Willemse, Ton; Sijts, Alice J A M; Zaiss, Dietmar M W

    2015-01-01

    UVB irradiation (290-320 nm) is used to treat skin diseases like psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, and is known to suppress contact hypersensitivity (CHS) reactions in mouse models. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have been shown to be responsible for this UVB-induced suppression of CHS. The epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factor amphiregulin (AREG) engages EGFR on Treg cells and, in different disease models, it was shown that mast cell-derived AREG is essential for optimal Treg cell function in vivo. Here we determined whether AREG has a role in UVB-induced, Treg cell-mediated suppression of CHS reactions in the skin. Our data show that AREG is essential for UVB-induced CHS suppression. In contrast to the general assumption, however, mast cells were dispensable for UVB-induced immune suppression, whereas basophil-derived AREG was essential. These data reveal, to our knowledge, a previously unreported function for basophils in the homeostasis of immune responses in the skin. Basophils thus fulfill a dual function: they contribute to the initiation of effective type 2 immune responses and, by enhancing the suppressive capacity of local Treg cell populations, also to local immune regulation in the skin. PMID:25089660

  12. A novel glucose biosensor based on immobilization of glucose oxidase into multiwall carbon nanotubes-polyelectrolyte-loaded electrospun nanofibrous membrane.

    PubMed

    Manesh, K M; Kim, Hyun Tae; Santhosh, P; Gopalan, A I; Lee, Kwang-Pill

    2008-01-18

    Nanofibrous glucose electrodes were fabricated by the immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) into an electrospun composite membrane consisting of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) dispersed with multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) wrapped by a cationic polymer (poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)) and this nanofibrous electrode (NFE) is abbreviated as PMMA-MWCNT(PDDA)/GOx-NFE. The NFE was characterized for morphology and electroactivity by using electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry, respectively. Field emission transmission electron microscopy (FETEM) image reveals the dispersion of MWCNT(PDDA) within the matrix of PMMA. Cyclic voltammetry informs that NFE is suitable for performing surface-confined electrochemical reactions. PMMA-MWCNT(PDDA)/GOx-NFE exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) with a pronounced oxidation current at +100 mV. Glucose is amperometrically detected at +100 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) in 0.1M phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 7). The linear response for glucose detection is in the range of 20 microM to 15 mM with a detection limit of 1 microM and a shorter response time of approximately 4 s. The superior performance of PMMA-MWCNT(PDDA)/GOx-NFE is due to the wrapping of PDDA over MWCNTs that binds GOx through electrostatic interactions. As a result, an effective electron mediation is achieved. A layer of nafion is made over PMMA-MWCNT(PDDA)/GOx-NFE that significantly suppressed the electrochemical interference from ascorbic acid or uric acid. In all, PMMA-MWCNT(PDDA)/GOx-nafion-NFE has exhibited excellent properties for the sensitive determination of glucose like high selectivity, good reproducibility, remarkable stability and without interference from other co-existing electroactive species. PMID:17905578

  13. Developing a 'thick skin': a paradoxical role for mechanical tension in maintaining epidermal integrity?

    PubMed

    Galletti, Roberta; Verger, Stéphane; Hamant, Olivier; Ingram, Gwyneth C

    2016-09-15

    Plant aerial epidermal tissues, like animal epithelia, act as load-bearing layers and hence play pivotal roles in development. The presence of tension in the epidermis has morphogenetic implications for organ shapes but it also constantly threatens the integrity of this tissue. Here, we explore the multi-scale relationship between tension and cell adhesion in the plant epidermis, and we examine how tensile stress perception may act as a regulatory input to preserve epidermal tissue integrity and thus normal morphogenesis. From this, we identify parallels between plant epidermal and animal epithelial tissues and highlight a list of unexplored questions for future research. PMID:27624830

  14. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Duchnik, Ewa; Maleszka, Romuald; Marchlewicz, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part – stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transepidermal water loss and sebum excretion. The knowledge of biophysical skin processes may be useful for the implementation of prophylactic actions whose aim is to restore the barrier function. PMID:26985171

  15. Epidermal growth factor and kidney disease: a long-lasting story.

    PubMed

    Klein, Julie; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Buffin-Meyer, Bénédicte; Schanstra, Joost P

    2016-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor has been previously associated with kidney disease. In this issue of Kidney International, Betz et al. (2016) link urinary epidermal growth factor abundance with an increased risk of the development of diabetic nephropathy in a novel animal model of diabetic nephropathy and in a large cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. Although the clinical value of these observations needs to be confirmed in further studies, these observations further strengthen the tight link between epidermal growth factor and kidney disease. PMID:27083276

  16. Vulvar Epidermal Inclusion Cyst as a Long-term Complication of Female Genital Mutilation.

    PubMed

    Victoria-Martínez, Ana Mercedes; Cubells-Sánchez, Laura; Martínez-Leborans, Lorena; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luis; de Miquel, Víctor Alegre

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of a patient with epidermal inclusion cyst as a late complication of female genital mutilation (FGM). We describe the management of the patient, and a review of the literature. We report the clinical and pathological findings in a 37-year-old female patient from Nigeria, with a clitoral mass of 1 year duration. She declared to have an FGM since she was 5 years. The lesion was excised successfully with good cosmetic results. Histological examination revealed epidermal cyst with the presence of granular layer. An epidermal inclusion cyst can develop as a long-term consequence of FGM. PMID:26955127

  17. Vulvar Epidermal Inclusion Cyst as a Long-term Complication of Female Genital Mutilation

    PubMed Central

    Victoria-Martínez, Ana Mercedes; Cubells-Sánchez, Laura; Martínez-Leborans, Lorena; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luis; de Miquel, Víctor Alegre

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of a patient with epidermal inclusion cyst as a late complication of female genital mutilation (FGM). We describe the management of the patient, and a review of the literature. We report the clinical and pathological findings in a 37-year-old female patient from Nigeria, with a clitoral mass of 1 year duration. She declared to have an FGM since she was 5 years. The lesion was excised successfully with good cosmetic results. Histological examination revealed epidermal cyst with the presence of granular layer. An epidermal inclusion cyst can develop as a long-term consequence of FGM. PMID:26955127

  18. Calmodulin 4 is dispensable for epidermal barrier formation and wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Juliane C; Kalinin, Alexandr; Bible, Paul W; Morasso, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-mediated signals play important roles in epidermal barrier formation, skin homoeostasis and wound repair. Calmodulin 4 (Calm4) is a small, Ca2+ -binding protein with strong expression in suprabasal keratinocytes. In mice, Calm4 first appears in the skin at the time of barrier formation, and its expression increases in response to epidermal barrier challenges. In this study, we report the generation of Calm4 knockout mice and provide evidence that Calm4 is dispensable for epidermal barrier formation, maintenance and repair. PMID:25316000

  19. A Case of Digital Myxoid Cyst Coexisting with Epidermal Inclusion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Soo; Jwa, Seung Wook; Suh, Sung Won; Kim, Sung Jun; Oh, Chang-Keun; Kwon, Kyung Sool

    2008-01-01

    A 62-year-old male developed a solitary asymptomatic nodule on the lateral aspect of the distal interphalangeal joint of the right great toe. Histopathologic findings demonstrated a myxoid cyst with a concomitant epidermal inclusion cyst. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of concurrent occurrence of digital myxoid cyst and epidermal inclusion cyst. Although the exact mechanism for developing a digital myxoid cyst and an epidermal inclusion cyst simultaneously at the same site is not explained, trauma might be a possible cause.

  20. Reengineered glucose oxidase for amperometric glucose determination in diabetes analytics.

    PubMed

    Arango Gutierrez, Erik; Mundhada, Hemanshu; Meier, Thomas; Duefel, Hartmut; Bocola, Marco; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-12-15

    Glucose oxidase is an oxidoreductase exhibiting a high β-D-glucose specificity and high stability which renders glucose oxidase well-suited for applications in diabetes care. Nevertheless, GOx activity is highly oxygen dependent which can lead to inaccuracies in amperometric β-D-glucose determinations. Therefore a directed evolution campaign with two rounds of random mutagenesis (SeSaM followed by epPCR), site saturation mutagenesis studies on individual positions, and one simultaneous site saturation library (OmniChange; 4 positions) was performed. A diabetes care well suited mediator (quinone diimine) was selected and the GOx variant (T30V I94V) served as starting point. For directed GOx evolution a microtiter plate detection system based on the quinone diimine mediator was developed and the well-known ABTS-assay was applied in microtiter plate format to validate oxygen independency of improved GOx variants. Two iterative rounds of random diversity generation and screening yielded to two subsets of amino acid positions which mainly improved activity (A173, A332) and oxygen independency (F414, V560). Simultaneous site saturation of all four positions with a reduced subset of amino acids using the OmniChange method yielded finally variant V7 with a 37-fold decreased oxygen dependency (mediator activity: 7.4 U/mg WT, 47.5 U/mg V7; oxygen activity: 172.3 U/mg WT, 30.1 U/mg V7). V7 is still highly β-D-glucose specific, highly active with the quinone diimine mediator and thermal resistance is retained (prerequisite for GOx coating of diabetes test stripes). The latter properties and V7's oxygen insensitivity make V7 a very promising candidate to replace standard GOx in diabetes care applications. PMID:23835222

  1. Planck-suppressed operators

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; McAllister, Liam E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    We show that the recent Planck limits on primordial non-Gaussianity impose strong constraints on light hidden sector fields coupled to the inflaton via operators suppressed by a high mass scale Λ. We study a simple effective field theory in which a hidden sector field is coupled to a shift-symmetric inflaton via arbitrary operators up to dimension five. Self-interactions in the hidden sector lead to non-Gaussianity in the curvature perturbations. To be consistent with the Planck limit on local non-Gaussianity, the coupling to any hidden sector with light fields and natural cubic couplings must be suppressed by a very high scale Λ > 10{sup 5}H. Even if the hidden sector has Gaussian correlations, nonlinearities in the mixing with the inflaton still lead to non-Gaussian curvature perturbations. In this case, the non-Gaussianity is of the equilateral or orthogonal type, and the Planck data requires Λ > 10{sup 2}H.

  2. Glucose- and mannose-induced stomatal closure is mediated by ROS production, Ca(2+) and water channel in Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Xu, ShanShan; Gao, Jing; Pan, Sha; Wang, GenXuan

    2016-03-01

    Sugars act as vital signaling molecules that regulate plant growth, development and stress responses. However, the effects of sugars on stomatal movement have been unclear. In our study, we explored the effects of monosaccharides such as glucose and mannose on stomatal aperture. Here, we demonstrate that glucose and mannose trigger stomatal closure in a dose- and time-dependent manner in epidermal peels of broad bean (Vicia faba). Pharmacological studies revealed that glucose- and mannose-induced stomatal closure was almost completely inhibited by two reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers, catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH), was significantly abolished by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI), whereas they were hardly affected by a peroxidase inhibitor, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM). Furthermore, glucose- and mannose-induced stomatal closure was strongly inhibited by a Ca(2+) channel blocker, LaCl3 , a Ca(2+) chelator, ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and two water channel blockers, HgCl2 and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO); whereas the inhibitory effects of the water channel blockers were essentially abolished by the reversing agent β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME). These results suggest that ROS production mainly via NADPH oxidases, Ca(2+) and water channels are involved in glucose- and mannose-induced stomatal closure. PMID:26046775

  3. FoxO1 Protein Cooperates with ATF4 Protein in Osteoblasts to Control Glucose Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Kode, Aruna; Mosialou, Ioanna; Silva, Barbara C.; Joshi, Sneha; Ferron, Mathieu; Rached, Marie Therese; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2012-01-01

    The Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 inhibits through its expression in osteoblasts β-cell proliferation, insulin secretion, and sensitivity. At least part of the FoxO1 metabolic functions result from its ability to suppress the activity of osteocalcin, an osteoblast-derived hormone favoring glucose metabolism and energy expenditure. In searching for mechanisms mediating the metabolic actions of FoxO1, we focused on ATF4, because this transcription factor also affects glucose metabolism through its expression in osteoblasts. We show here that FoxO1 co-localizes with ATF4 in the osteoblast nucleus, and physically interacts with and promotes the transcriptional activity of ATF4. Genetic experiments demonstrate that FoxO1 and ATF4 cooperate to increase glucose levels and decrease glucose tolerance. These effects result from a synergistic effect of the two transcription factors to suppress the activity of osteocalcin through up-regulating expression of the phosphatase catalyzing osteocalcin inactivation. As a result, insulin production by β-cells and insulin signaling in the muscle, liver and white adipose tissue are compromised and fat weight increases by the FoxO1/ATF4 interaction. Taken together these observations demonstrate that FoxO1 and ATF4 cooperate in osteoblasts to regulate glucose homeostasis. PMID:22298775

  4. Loss of BRCA1 leads to an increase in epidermal growth factor receptor expression in mammary epithelial cells, and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition prevents estrogen receptor-negative cancers in BRCA1-mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Women who carry a BRCA1 mutation typically develop "triple-negative" breast cancers (TNBC), defined by the absence of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor and Her2/neu. In contrast to ER-positive tumors, TNBCs frequently express high levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Previously, we found a disproportionate fraction of progenitor cells in BRCA1 mutation carriers with EGFR overexpression. Here we examine the role of EGFR in mammary epithelial cells (MECs) in the emergence of BRCA1-related tumors and as a potential target for the prevention of TNBC. Methods Cultures of MECs were used to examine EGFR protein levels and promoter activity in response to BRCA1 suppression with inhibitory RNA. EGFR was assessed by immunoblot and immunofluorescence analysis, real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to subpopulations of MECs was examined by Scatchard analysis. The responsiveness of MECs to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib was assessed in vitro in three-dimensional cultures and in vivo. Mouse mammary tumor virus-Cre recombinase (MMTV-Cre) BRCA1flox/flox p53+/- mice were treated daily with erlotinib or vehicle control, and breast cancer-free survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Inhibition of BRCA1 in MECs led to upregulation of EGFR with an inverse correlation of BRCA1 with cellular EGFR protein levels (r2 = 0.87) and to an increase in cell surface-expressed EGFR. EGFR upregulation in response to BRCA1 suppression was mediated by transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1)-positive MECs expressed higher levels of EGFR than ALDH1-negative MECs and were expanded two- to threefold in the BRCA1-inhibited MEC population. All MECs were exquisitely sensitive to EGFR inhibition with erlotinib in vitro. EGFR inhibition in MMTV-Cre BRCA1flox/flox p53+/- female mice starting at age 3 months increased

  5. Central Regulation of Glucose Production May Be Impaired in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Esterson, Yonah B; Carey, Michelle; Boucai, Laura; Goyal, Akankasha; Raghavan, Pooja; Zhang, Kehao; Mehta, Deeksha; Feng, Daorong; Wu, Licheng; Kehlenbrink, Sylvia; Koppaka, Sudha; Kishore, Preeti; Hawkins, Meredith

    2016-09-01

    The challenges of achieving optimal glycemic control in type 2 diabetes highlight the need for new therapies. Inappropriately elevated endogenous glucose production (EGP) is the main source of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. Because activation of central ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels suppresses EGP in nondiabetic rodents and humans, this study examined whether type 2 diabetic humans and rodents retain central regulation of EGP. The KATP channel activator diazoxide was administered in a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover design to eight type 2 diabetic subjects and seven age- and BMI-matched healthy control subjects. Comprehensive measures of glucose turnover and insulin sensitivity were performed during euglycemic pancreatic clamp studies following diazoxide and placebo administration. Complementary rodent clamp studies were performed in Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. In type 2 diabetic subjects, extrapancreatic KATP channel activation with diazoxide under fixed hormonal conditions failed to suppress EGP, whereas matched control subjects demonstrated a 27% reduction in EGP (P = 0.002) with diazoxide. Diazoxide also failed to suppress EGP in diabetic rats. These results suggest that suppression of EGP by central KATP channel activation may be lost in type 2 diabetes. Restoration of central regulation of glucose metabolism could be a promising therapeutic target to reduce hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. PMID:27207526

  6. βIII-Tubulin alters glucose metabolism and stress response signaling to promote cell survival and proliferation in glucose-starved non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Amelia L; Turner, Nigel; McCarroll, Joshua A; Kavallaris, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) survival rates are dismal and high βIII-tubulin expression is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance and tumor aggressiveness in this disease. Mounting evidence supports a role for βIII-tubulin in promoting cell survival in the harsh tumor microenvironment, which is characterized by poor nutrient supply. This study aimed to investigate the role of βIII-tubulin in glucose stress response signaling and the survival and proliferation of NSCLC cells. This study revealed that βIII-tubulin regulates cellular metabolism and glucose stress response signaling in NSCLC cells to promote cell survival and proliferation in glucose starvation. βIII-Tubulin decreases the reliance of cells on glycolytic metabolism, priming them to cope with variable nutrient supply present within the tumor microenvironment. βIII-Tubulin protects cells from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reduces both basal and glucose starvation-induced autophagy to maintain cell survival and proliferation. βIII-Tubulin enables rapid Akt activation in response to glucose starvation and co-immunoprecipitates with the master regulator of the ER stress response GRP78. Furthermore, suppression of βIII-tubulin delays the association of GRP78 with Akt in response to glucose starvation with the potential to influence Akt activation and ER homeostasis under these conditions. Together these results identify that βIII-tubulin regulates glucose metabolism and alters glucose starvation stress signaling to promote cell proliferation and survival in NSCLC cells. This elucidates a hitherto unknown role for this microtubule protein and provides insight into correlations between high βIII-tubulin expression and poor patient outcome in this disease. PMID:27207668

  7. Management of hyperglycemia from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting T790M-mediated resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Jennifer L.; Fong, Mei Ka; Sirianno, Lindsey; Story, Ellen S.

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are associated with sensitivity to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as erlotinib, gefitinib, and afatinib. Although studies show an increased progression free survival (PFS) with use of EGFR TKIs in the first-line setting, most patients will develop resistance to therapy after the first 8-16 months. T790M is an acquired resistance mutation reported in 60-70% of patients who initially responded to a prior EGFR TKI. Recently, EGFR TKIs targeting T790M have been developed to overcome resistance with positive results in PFS and objective response rate in patients who have had disease progression on at least one TKI. Two EGFR TKIs targeting T790M, AZD9291 and rociletinib, are new active treatment options for NSCLC but differ in adverse effect profiles. Dose-limiting hyperglycemia has been reported with rociletinib and has required dose reduction, an oral antihyperglycemic, or both, without discontinuation of therapy. This suggests that patients may be effectively treated chronically for hyperglycemia associated with EGFR TKIs targeting T790M, however, guidelines for treatment of hyperglycemia in this setting have not been published. We discuss mechanisms of hyperglycemia associated with TKIs and initial management of hyperglycemia, including benefits and limitations of oral antihyperglycemic options, adjustment of therapy based on grade of hyperglycemia, and recommendations for follow-up glucose monitoring. PMID:26629426

  8. Management of hyperglycemia from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting T790M-mediated resistance.

    PubMed

    Villadolid, Jeryl; Ersek, Jennifer L; Fong, Mei Ka; Sirianno, Lindsey; Story, Ellen S

    2015-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are associated with sensitivity to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as erlotinib, gefitinib, and afatinib. Although studies show an increased progression free survival (PFS) with use of EGFR TKIs in the first-line setting, most patients will develop resistance to therapy after the first 8-16 months. T790M is an acquired resistance mutation reported in 60-70% of patients who initially responded to a prior EGFR TKI. Recently, EGFR TKIs targeting T790M have been developed to overcome resistance with positive results in PFS and objective response rate in patients who have had disease progression on at least one TKI. Two EGFR TKIs targeting T790M, AZD9291 and rociletinib, are new active treatment options for NSCLC but differ in adverse effect profiles. Dose-limiting hyperglycemia has been reported with rociletinib and has required dose reduction, an oral antihyperglycemic, or both, without discontinuation of therapy. This suggests that patients may be effectively treated chronically for hyperglycemia associated with EGFR TKIs targeting T790M, however, guidelines for treatment of hyperglycemia in this setting have not been published. We discuss mechanisms of hyperglycemia associated with TKIs and initial management of hyperglycemia, including benefits and limitations of oral antihyperglycemic options, adjustment of therapy based on grade of hyperglycemia, and recommendations for follow-up glucose monitoring. PMID:26629426

  9. Microwave-Based Biosensor for Glucose Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, N. S. M.; Khalid, K.; Yusof, N. A.

    2010-07-01

    In this project, microwave-based biosensor for glucose detection has been studied. The study is based on the dielectric properties changes at microwave frequency for glucose-enzyme reaction. Glucose interaction with glucose oxidase (GOD) produced gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide. The reaction of the glucose solutions with an enzyme was carried out in 1:3 of glucose and enzyme respectively. The measurements were done using the Open Ended Coaxial Probe (OECP) coupled with computer controlled software automated network analyzer (ANA) with frequency range from 200MHz to 20GHz at room temperature (25 °C). The differences of enzyme and glucose-enzyme reaction were calculated and plotted. In the microwave interaction with the glucose-enzyme reaction, ionic conduction and dipole molecules was detected at 0.99GHz and 16.44GHz respectively based on changes of dielectric loss factor.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions GPI deficiency glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) deficiency is an inherited disorder ...

  11. Glucose Effect in the Acute Porphyrias

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home Diet and Nutrition The glucose effect in acute porphyrias The disorders Acute Intermittent ... are treated initially with the administration of carbohydrate/glucose. This therapy has its basis in the ability ...

  12. Glucose sensing by means of silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstaele, Ronny; Ryckeboer, Eva; Hattasan, Nannicha; De Koninck, Yannick; Muneeb, Muhammad; Verstuyft, Steven; Delbeke, Danaë; Bogaerts, Wim; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes is a fast growing metabolic disease, where the patients suffer from disordered glucose blood levels. Monitoring the blood glucose values in combination with extra insulin injection is currently the only therapy to keep the glucose concentration in diabetic patients under control, minimizing the long-term effects of elevated glucose concentrations and improving quality of life of the diabetic patients. Implantable sensors allow continuous glucose monitoring, offering the most reliable data to control the glucose levels. Infrared absorption spectrometers offer a non-chemical measurement method to determine the small glucose concentrations in blood serum. In this work, a spectrometer platform based on silicon photonics is presented, allowing the realization of very small glucose sensors suitable for building implantable sensors. A proof-of-concept of a spectrometer with integrated evanescent sample interface is presented, and the route towards a fully implantable spectrometer is discussed.

  13. Muscle mTORC1 suppression by IL-6 during cancer cachexia: a role for AMPK.

    PubMed

    White, James P; Puppa, Melissa J; Gao, Song; Sato, Shuichi; Welle, Stephen L; Carson, James A

    2013-05-15

    Although catabolic signaling has a well-established role in muscle wasting during cancer cachexia, the suppression of anabolic signaling also warrants further investigation. In cachectic tumor-bearing mice, circulating IL-6 levels are associated with suppressed muscle protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling. We have found AMPK and IGF-I/insulin signaling, two well-known regulators of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), are altered with the progression of cachexia. How IL-6 can induce suppression of mTORC1 signaling remains to be established. The purpose of this study was to examine mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activation and regulation by IL-6 during cancer cachexia. IL-6 effects on mTOR activation were examined in Apc(Min/+) mouse skeletal muscle and C2C12 myotubes. Systemic IL-6 overexpression in Apc(Min/+) mice produced a dose-dependent suppression of mTOR signaling that corresponded to induction of STAT3 and AMPK phosphorylation. This result was also evident in IL-6-treated myotubes. Basal mTOR activation and mTOR responsiveness to glucose administration were suppressed in cachectic skeletal muscle. However, insulin induction of mTOR activity was maintained in IL-6-treated myotubes. Whereas IL-6 suppression of myotube mTOR activity was rescued by AMPK inhibition, inhibition of STAT3 signaling was not sufficient to rescue IL-6 suppression of mTOR activity. Last, treadmill exercise training was able to prevent IL-6-induced inhibition of mTOR signaling in Apc(Min/+) mice independently of activated STAT. In conclusion, we report dose-dependent suppression of mTOR activity by IL-6 and suppressed mTOR responsiveness to glucose administration in Apc(Min/+) mice. IL-6 suppression of mTOR activity was dependent on AMPK activation and independent of STAT signaling in myotubes. PMID:23531613

  14. [Amelioration of glucose tolerance and correction of reactive hypoglycemias induced by intravenous calcium infusion cannot be explained by modifications in blood glucagon levels].

    PubMed

    Vexiau, P; Cathelineau, G; Luyckx, A; Lefebvre, P

    1986-08-01

    Glucagon is not involved in intravenous calcium-induced improvement in glucose tolerance nor in correction of reactive hypoglycemia. Recent investigations have shown that intravenous (IV) calcium infusion improved blood glucose values in patients with moderately impaired glucose tolerance, and suppressed hypoglycemia in patients with isolated reactive hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility that these changes were secondary to calcium induced alterations in glucagon (IRG) secretion. Four groups of subjects were studied: group 1: normal controls (n = 7); group 2: patients with isolated hypoglycemia (n = 9); group 3: patients with impaired glucose tolerance without reactive hypoglycemia (n = 9) and group 4: patients with impaired glucose tolerance and reactive hypoglycemia (n = 10). All patients were submitted in randomized order to two 5 hour oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT, 75 g glucose), during a simultaneous infusion, either of saline or of calcium (calcium gluconate 36.3 mEq/5 h.), starting 30 minutes before the OGTT. In none of the groups did calcium infusion influence basal plasma IRG. In group 1 and 3, oral glucose significantly suppressed IRG, and during IV calcium infusion this suppression disappeared. In group 2, glucose ingestion resulted in a paradoxical increase in IRG both during saline and during calcium infusion. In group 4, oral glucose induced a significant drop in plasma IRG and a rebound rise during hypoglycemia, results which were unaffected by IV calcium infusion. These data suggest that glucagon is not involved in the alterations of blood glucose profiles during OGTT observed during intravenous calcium infusion. PMID:3770273

  15. Effects of soap-water wash on human epidermal penetration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hanjiang; Jung, Eui-Chang; Phuong, Christina; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Skin decontamination is a primary interventional method used to decrease dermal absorption of hazardous contaminants, including chemical warfare agents, pesticides and industrial pollutants. Soap and water wash, the most common and readily available decontamination system, may enhance percutaneous absorption through the "wash-in effect." To understand better the effect of soap-water wash on percutaneous penetration, and provide insight to improving skin decontamination methods, in vitro human epidermal penetration rates of four C(14) -labeled model chemicals (hydroquinone, clonidine, benzoic acid and paraoxon) were assayed using flow-through diffusion cells. Stratum corneum (SC) absorption rates of these chemicals at various hydration levels (0-295% of the dry SC weights) were determined and compared with the results of the epidermal penetration study to clarify the effect of SC hydration on skin permeability. Results showed accelerated penetration curves of benzoic acid and paraoxon after surface wash at 30 min postdosing. Thirty minutes after washing (60 min postdosing), penetration rates of hydroquinone and benzoic acid decreased due to reduced amounts of chemical on the skin surface and in the SC. At the end of the experiment (90 min postdosing), a soap-water wash resulted in lower hydroquinone penetration, greater paraoxon penetration and similar levels of benzoic acid and clonidine penetration compared to penetration levels in the non-wash groups. The observed wash-in effect agrees with the enhancement effect of SC hydration on the SC chemical absorption rate. These results suggest SC hydration derived from surface wash to be one cause of the wash-in effect. Further, the occurrence of a wash-in effect is dependent on chemical identity and elapsed time between exposure and onset of decontamination. By reducing chemical residue quantity on skin surface and in the SC reservoir, the soap-water wash may decrease the total quantity of chemical absorbed in the

  16. Water Relations of Leaf Epidermal Cells of Tradescantia virginiana12

    PubMed Central

    Tomos, Alun Deri; Steudle, Ernst; Zimmermann, Ulrich; Schulze, Ernst-Detlev

    1981-01-01

    Water-relation parameters (cell turgor pressure [P], volumetric elastic modulus [ε] and hydraulic conductivity [Lp]) of individual leaf epidermal cells of Tradescantia virginiana have been determined with the pressure-probe technique. Turgor was 4.5 ± 2.1 [41] bar (mean ± sd; in brackets the number of cells) and ranged from 0.9 to 9.6 bar. By vacuum infiltration with nutrient solution, it was raised to 7.5 ± 1.5 [5] bar (range: 5.3-8.8 bar). There was a large variability in the absolute value of ε of individual cells. ε ranged from 40 to 360 bar; mean ± sd: 135 ± 83 bar; n = 50 cells. ε values of individual cells seemed to be rather independent of changes in cell turgor. A critical assessment of the errors incurred in determining ε by the technique is included. The half-times of water exchange of individual cells ranged from 1 to 35 seconds, which gave values of 0.2 to 11 × 10−6 centimeters per second per bar for Lp (mean ± sd: 3.1 ± 2.3 × 10−6 centimeters per second per bar; n = 39 cells). The large range in Lp and ε is believed to be due to the difficulties in determining the effective surface area of water exchange of the cells. Lp is not influenced by active salt pumping driven by respiration energy inasmuch as it was not altered by 0.1 millimolar KCN. The temperature dependence of Lp (T½) was measured for the first time in individual higher-plant cells. Lp increased by a factor of 2 to 4, when the temperature was increased by 10 C. The activation energy of water exchange was found to be between 50 and 186 kilojoules per mole. Within the large range of variation it was found that T½, Lp, and ε did not change under various experimental conditions (intact and excised tissue, water content and turgidity, age, etc.). Similar results were obtained for the epidermal cells of Tradescantia andersoniana. The measurements suggest that the entire epidermis would respond very rapidly (i.e. with a half-time of 1 to 30 s) to a demand for water from the

  17. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  18. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments i