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Sample records for glutamate receptor activation

  1. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  2. Activation Requirements for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Viaene, Angela N.; Petrof, Iraklis; Sherman, S. Murray

    2013-01-01

    It has been common experimentally to use high frequency, tetanic, stimulation to activate metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in cortex and thalamus. To determine what type of stimulation is actually necessary to activate mGluRs we examined the effects of varying stimulation duration and intensity on activating mGluR responses. We used a thalamocortical and an intracortical slice preparation from mice and performed whole cell recordings from neurons in the ventral posterior medial nucleus or in layer 4 of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) while electrically stimulating in layer 6 of S1. Extracellular ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and GABAA receptor antagonists were used to isolate Group I or Group II mGluR responses. We observed that high frequency stimulation is not necessary for the activation of either Group I or Group II mGluRs. Either could be activated with as few as 2-3 pulses at stimulation frequencies around 15-20Hz. Additionally, increasing the number of pulses, intensity of stimulation, or stimulation frequency increased amplitude and duration of the mGluR response. PMID:23416319

  3. Structural mechanism of glutamate receptor activation and desensitization.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Joel R; Kumar, Janesh; Chittori, Sagar; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Mayer, Mark L; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2014-10-16

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the vertebrate brain. To gain a better understanding of how structural changes gate ion flux across the membrane, we trapped rat AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid) and kainate receptor subtypes in their major functional states and analysed the resulting structures using cryo-electron microscopy. We show that transition to the active state involves a 'corkscrew' motion of the receptor assembly, driven by closure of the ligand-binding domain. Desensitization is accompanied by disruption of the amino-terminal domain tetramer in AMPA, but not kainate, receptors with a two-fold to four-fold symmetry transition in the ligand-binding domains in both subtypes. The 7.6 Å structure of a desensitized kainate receptor shows how these changes accommodate channel closing. These findings integrate previous physiological, biochemical and structural analyses of glutamate receptors and provide a molecular explanation for key steps in receptor gating. PMID:25119039

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptors inhibit microglial glutamate release

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, Stephen M; Phanavanh, Bounleut; Guo Li, Gary; Barger, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory stimuli evoke an export of glutamate from microglia that is sufficient to contribute to excitotoxicity in neighbouring neurons. Since microglia also express various glutamate receptors themselves, we were interested in the potential feedback of glutamate on this system. Several agonists of mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors) were applied to primary rat microglia, and the export of glutamate into their culture medium was evoked by LPS (lipopolysaccharide). Agonists of group-II and -III mGluR ACPD [(1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid] and L-AP4 [L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid] were both capable of completely blocking the glutamate export without interfering with the production of NO (nitric oxide); the group-I agonist tADA (trans-azetidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid) was ineffective. Consistent with the possibility of feedback, inhibition of mGluR by MSPG [(R,S)-α-2-methyl-4sulfonophenylglycine] potentiated glutamate export. As the group-II and -III mGluR are coupled to Gαi-containing G-proteins and the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, we explored the role of cAMP in this effect. Inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase [also known as protein kinase A (PKA)] by H89 mimicked the effect of ACPD, and the mGluR agonist had its actions reversed by artificially sustaining cAMP through the PDE (phosphodiesterase) inhibitor IBMX (isobutylmethylxanthine) or the cAMP mimetic dbcAMP (dibutyryl cAMP). These data indicate that mGluR activation attenuates a potentially neurotoxic export of glutamate from activated microglia and implicate cAMP as a contributor to this aspect of microglial action. PMID:22770428

  5. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, James; Franks, Christopher J.; Murray, Caitriona; Edwards, Richard J.; Calahorro, Fernando; Ishihara, Takeshi; Katsura, Isao; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission is evolutionarily conserved across animal phyla. A major class of glutamate receptors consists of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). In C. elegans, three mGluR genes, mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3, are organized into three subgroups, similar to their mammalian counterparts. Cellular reporters identified expression of the mgls in the nervous system of C. elegans and overlapping expression in the pharyngeal microcircuit that controls pharyngeal muscle activity and feeding behavior. The overlapping expression of mgls within this circuit allowed the investigation of receptor signaling per se and in the context of receptor interactions within a neural network that regulates feeding. We utilized the pharmacological manipulation of neuronally regulated pumping of the pharyngeal muscle in the wild-type and mutants to investigate MGL function. This defined a net mgl-1-dependent inhibition of pharyngeal pumping that is modulated by mgl-3 excitation. Optogenetic activation of the pharyngeal glutamatergic inputs combined with electrophysiological recordings from the isolated pharyngeal preparations provided further evidence for a presynaptic mgl-1-dependent regulation of pharyngeal activity. Analysis of mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3 mutant feeding behavior in the intact organism after acute food removal identified a significant role for mgl-1 in the regulation of an adaptive feeding response. Our data describe the molecular and cellular organization of mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3. Pharmacological analysis identified that, in these paradigms, mgl-1 and mgl-3, but not mgl-2, can modulate the pharyngeal microcircuit. Behavioral analysis identified mgl-1 as a significant determinant of the glutamate-dependent modulation of feeding, further highlighting the significance of mGluRs in complex C. elegans behavior. PMID:25869139

  6. Extrasynaptic Glutamate Receptor Activation as Cellular Bases for Dynamic Range Compression in Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Short, Shaina M.; Rich, Matthew T.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive synaptic stimulation overcomes the ability of astrocytic processes to clear glutamate from the extracellular space, allowing some dendritic segments to become submerged in a pool of glutamate, for a brief period of time. This dynamic arrangement activates extrasynaptic NMDA receptors located on dendritic shafts. We used voltage-sensitive and calcium-sensitive dyes to probe dendritic function in this glutamate-rich location. An excess of glutamate in the extrasynaptic space was achieved either by repetitive synaptic stimulation or by glutamate iontophoresis onto the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Two successive activations of synaptic inputs produced a typical NMDA spike, whereas five successive synaptic inputs produced characteristic plateau potentials, reminiscent of cortical UP states. While NMDA spikes were coupled with brief calcium transients highly restricted to the glutamate input site, the dendritic plateau potentials were accompanied by calcium influx along the entire dendritic branch. Once initiated, the glutamate-mediated dendritic plateau potentials could not be interrupted by negative voltage pulses. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cellular compartments void of spines is sufficient to initiate and support plateau potentials. The only requirement for sustained depolarizing events is a surplus of free glutamate near a group of extrasynaptic receptors. Highly non-linear dendritic spikes (plateau potentials) are summed in a highly sublinear fashion at the soma, revealing the cellular bases of signal compression in cortical circuits. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors provide pyramidal neurons with a function analogous to a dynamic range compression in audio engineering. They limit or reduce the volume of “loud sounds” (i.e., strong glutamatergic inputs) and amplify “quiet sounds” (i.e., glutamatergic inputs that barely cross the dendritic threshold for local spike initiation). Our data also explain why consecutive cortical UP

  7. Modeling of slow glutamate diffusion and AMPA receptor activation in the cerebellar glomerulus.

    PubMed

    Saftenku, E E

    2005-06-01

    Synaptic conductances are influenced markedly by the geometry of the space surrounding the synapse since the transient glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft is determined by this geometry. Our paper is an attempt to understand the reasons for slow glutamate diffusion in the cerebellar glomerulus, a structure situated around the enlarged mossy fiber terminal in the cerebellum and surrounded by a glial sheath. For this purpose, analytical expressions for glutamate diffusion in the glomerulus were considered in models with two-, three-, and fractional two-three-dimensional (2D-3D) geometry with an absorbing boundary. The time course of average glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft of the mossy fiber-granule cell connection was calculated for both direct release of glutamate from the same synaptic unit, and for cumulative spillover of glutamate from neighboring release sites. Several kinetic schemes were examined, and the parameters of the diffusion models were estimated by identifying theoretical activation of AMPA receptors with direct release and spillover components of published experimental AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs. For model selection, the correspondence of simulated paired-pulse ratio and EPSC increase after prevention of desensitization to experimental values were also taken into consideration. Our results suggest at least a 7- to 10-fold lower apparent diffusion coefficient of glutamate in the porous medium of the glomerulus than in water. The modeling of glutamate diffusion in the 2D-3D geometry gives the best fit of experimental EPSCs. We show that it could be only partly explained by normal diffusion of glutamate in the complex geometry of the glomerulus. We assume that anomalous diffusion of glutamate occurs in the glomerulus. A good match of experimental estimations and theoretical parameters, obtained in the simulations that use an approximation of anomalous diffusion by a solution for fractional Brownian motion, confirms our

  8. Enhancement of CA3 hippocampal network activity by activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ster, Jeanne; Mateos, José María; Grewe, Benjamin Friedrich; Coiret, Guyllaume; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Helmchen, Fritjof; Gerber, Urs

    2011-01-01

    Impaired function or expression of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRIIs) is observed in brain disorders such as schizophrenia. This class of receptor is thought to modulate activity of neuronal circuits primarily by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Here, we characterize a postsynaptic excitatory response mediated by somato-dendritic mGluRIIs in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and in stratum oriens interneurons. The specific mGluRII agonists DCG-IV or LCCG-1 induced an inward current blocked by the mGluRII antagonist LY341495. Experiments with transgenic mice revealed a significant reduction of the inward current in mGluR3−/− but not in mGluR2−/− mice. The excitatory response was associated with periods of synchronized activity at theta frequency. Furthermore, cholinergically induced network oscillations exhibited decreased frequency when mGluRIIs were blocked. Thus, our data indicate that hippocampal responses are modulated not only by presynaptic mGluRIIs that reduce glutamate release but also by postsynaptic mGluRIIs that depolarize neurons and enhance CA3 network activity. PMID:21628565

  9. CPG2 Recruits Endophilin B2 to the Cytoskeleton for Activity-Dependent Endocytosis of Synaptic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Loebrich, Sven; Benoit, Marc Robert; Konopka, Jaclyn Aleksandra; Cottrell, Jeffrey Richard; Gibson, Joanne; Nedivi, Elly

    2016-02-01

    Internalization of glutamate receptors at the postsynaptic membrane via clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is a key mechanism for regulating synaptic strength. A role for the F-actin cytoskeleton in CME is well established, and recently, PKA-dependent association of candidate plasticity gene 2 (CPG2) with the spine-cytoskeleton has been shown to mediate synaptic glutamate receptor internalization. Yet, how the endocytic machinery is physically coupled to the actin cytoskeleton to facilitate glutamate receptor internalization has not been demonstrated. Moreover, there has been no distinction of endocytic-machinery components that are specific to activity-dependent versus constitutive glutamate receptor internalization. Here, we show that CPG2, through a direct physical interaction, recruits endophilin B2 (EndoB2) to F-actin, thus anchoring the endocytic machinery to the spine cytoskeleton and facilitating glutamate receptor internalization. Regulation of CPG2 binding to the actin cytoskeleton by protein kinase A directly impacts recruitment of EndoB2 and clathrin. Specific disruption of EndoB2 or the CPG2-EndoB2 interaction impairs activity-dependent, but not constitutive, internalization of both NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptors. These results demonstrate that, through direct interactions with F-actin and EndoB2, CPG2 physically bridges the spine cytoskeleton and the endocytic machinery, and this tripartite association is critical specifically for activity-dependent CME of synaptic glutamate receptors. PMID:26776730

  10. Modes of glutamate receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriela K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The time course of excitatory synaptic currents, the major means of fast communication between neurons of the central nervous system, is encoded in the dynamic behaviour of post-synaptic glutamate-activated channels. First-pass attempts to explain the glutamate-elicited currents with mathematical models produced reaction mechanisms that included only the most basic functionally defined states: resting vs. liganded, closed vs. open, responsive vs. desensitized. In contrast, single-molecule observations afforded by the patch-clamp technique revealed an unanticipated kinetic multiplicity of transitions: from microseconds-lasting flickers to minutes-long modes. How these kinetically defined events impact the shape of the synaptic response, how they relate to rearrangements in receptor structure, and whether and how they are physiologically controlled represent currently active research directions. Modal gating, which refers to the slowest, least frequently observed ion-channel transitions, has been demonstrated for representatives of all ion channel families. However, reaction schemes have been largely confined to the short- and medium-range time scales. For glutamate receptors as well, modal gating has only recently come under rigorous scrutiny. This article reviews the evidence for modal gating of glutamate receptors and the still developing hypotheses about the mechanism(s) by which modal shifts occur and the ways in which they may impact the time course of synaptic transmission. PMID:22106181

  11. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5, but not 1, modulates NMDA receptor-mediated activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-03-01

    In cerebellar neurons in culture, activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) prevents glutamate and NMDA-induced neuronal death, indicating that it interferes with the excitotoxic mechanisms leading to death. However, it is not known which step of these mechanisms is affected by mGluRs. The aims of this work were to assess: (a) whether activation of group I mGluRs (mGluR1 or mGluR5) impairs NMDA-induced activation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway; (b) which mGluR (1 or 5) is responsible for this impairment and (c) whether impairment of the pathway occurs at the level of activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by nitric oxide or of activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by NMDA. It is shown that activation of mGluR1 enhances the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by increasing activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by nitric oxide. In contrast, mGluR5 activation inhibits the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by reducing NMDA-induced activation of nNOS. This is due to reduced NMDA-induced increase in cAMP, reduced activation of Akt by cAMP and of nNOS by Akt. The impairment of activation of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway by activation of mGluR5 would contribute to its neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in cerebellar neurons in culture. PMID:20043967

  12. Activation of type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors attenuates deficits in cognitive flexibility induced by NMDA receptor blockade

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Mark R.; Moghaddam, Bita

    2010-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors provide a mechanism by which the function of NMDA glutamate receptors can be modulated. As NMDA receptor hypofunction is implicated in the etiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, the pharmacological regulation of mGlu receptor activity represents a promising therapeutic approach. We examined the effects of the positive allosteric mGlu5 receptor modulator 3- cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide (CDPPB), alone and in combination with the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801, on a task measuring cognitive set-shifting ability. This task measures NMDA receptor-dependent cognitive abilities analogous to those impaired in schizophrenia. Systemic administration of CDPPB (10 & 30 mg/kg i.p) blocked MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced impairments in set-shifting ability. The effect on learning was dose-dependent, with the 30 mg/kg dose having a greater effect than the 10 mg/kg dose across all trials. This ameliorative effect of CDPPB reflected a reduction in MK-801-induced perseverative responding. These results add to the evidence that mGlu5 receptors interact functionally with NMDA receptors to regulate behavior, and suggest that positive modulators of mGlu5 receptors may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of disorders, like schizophrenia, characterized by impairments in cognitive flexibility and memory. PMID:20371234

  13. Brainstem metabotropic glutamate receptors reduce food intake and activate dorsal pontine and medullar structures after peripheral bacterial lipopolysaccharide administration.

    PubMed

    Chaskiel, Léa; Paul, Flora; Gerstberger, Rüdiger; Hübschle, Thomas; Konsman, Jan Pieter

    2016-08-01

    During infection-induced inflammation food intake is reduced. Vagal and brainstem pathways are important both in feeding regulation and immune-to-brain communication. Glutamate is released by vagal afferent terminals in the nucleus of the solitary tract and by its neurons projecting to the parabrachial nuclei. We therefore studied the role of brainstem glutamate receptors in spontaneous food intake of healthy animals and during sickness-associated hypophagia after peripheral administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharides or interleukin-1beta. Brainstem group I and II metabotropic, but not ionotropic, glutamate receptor antagonism increased food intake both in saline- and lipopolysaccharide-treated rats. In these animals, expression of the cellular activation marker c-Fos in the lateral parabrachial nuclei and lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of the nucleus of the solitary tract rostral to the area postrema were suppressed. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors did not colocalize with c-Fos or neurons regulating gastric function in these structures. Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were, however, found on raphé magnus neurons that were part of the brainstem circuit innervating the stomach and on trigeminal and hypoglossal motor neurons. In conclusion, our findings show that brainstem metabotropic glutamate receptors reduce food intake and activate the lateral parabrachial nuclei as well as the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract after peripheral bacterial lipopolysaccharide administration. They also provide insight into potential group I metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent brainstem circuits mediating these effects. PMID:27016016

  14. Identification of a new site in the S1 ligand binding region of the NMDA receptor NR2A subunit involved in receptor activation by glutamate.

    PubMed

    Lummis, Sarah C R; Fletcher, Elizabeth J; Green, Tim

    2002-03-01

    Activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors requires the binding of both glutamate and glycine to independent sites on the receptor. These ligands bind to NR2 and NR1 subunits respectively. Ligand binding residues are located in two non-contiguous domains, S1 and S2, which have been implicated in glutamate binding in other ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits. To further define the amino acids through which glutamate activates the receptor, we generated single-site mutations to the NR2A subunit, and expressed them with wild type NR1 in HEK 293 cells. Using calcium imaging and whole cell patch clamp we determined glutamate and glycine potencies. Of the eight residues mutated we identified five (E413, K484, A508, G685 and G688), whose mutation leads to a large reduction (from 4- to 1000-fold) in glutamate potency, consistent with a role for these residues in receptor activation by glutamate. The potency of glycine was largely unchanged by these mutations. Thus our results extend the knowledge base of residues involved in NMDA receptor function and identifies a new site in S1, in the region of A508, that has a role in receptor activation by glutamate. PMID:11955515

  15. Glutamate Receptor Dynamics in Dendritic Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Newpher, Thomas M.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Among diverse factors regulating excitatory synaptic transmission, the abundance of postsynaptic glutamate receptors figures prominently in molecular memory and learning-related synaptic plasticity. To allow for both long-term maintenance of synaptic transmission and acute changes in synaptic strength, the relative rates of glutamate receptor insertion and removal must be tightly regulated. Interactions with scaffolding proteins control the targeting and signaling properties of glutamate receptors within the postsynaptic membrane. In addition, extrasynaptic receptor populations control the equilibrium of receptor exchange at synapses and activate distinct signaling pathways involved in plasticity. Here, we review recent findings that have shaped our current understanding of receptor mobility between synaptic and extrasynaptic compartments at glutamatergic synapses, focusing on AMPA and NMDA receptors. We also examine the cooperative relationship between intracellular trafficking and surface diffusion of glutamate receptors that underlies the expression of learning-related synaptic plasticity. PMID:18498731

  16. Desensitization and internalization of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a following activation of heterologous Gq/11-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Pula, Giordano; McIlhinney, R A Jeffrey; Roberts, Peter J; Kelly, Eamonn

    2004-06-15

    In this study we characterized the heterologous desensitization and internalization of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) splice variants mGluR1a and mGluR1b following activation of endogenous G(q/11)-coupled receptors in HEK293 cells. Agonist activation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine or P2Y1 purinergic receptors triggered the PKC- and CaMKII-dependent internalization of mGluR1a. In co-immunoprecipitation studies, both glutamate and carbachol increased the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. Co-addition of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X and the Ca(2+) calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 blocked the ability of glutamate and carbachol to increase the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. Glutamate also increased the association of GRK2 with mGluR1b, whereas carbachol did not. However, unlike mGluR1a, glutamate-stimulated association of GRK2 with mGluR1b was not reduced by PKC/CaMKII inhibition. Pretreatment of cells expressing mGluR1a or mGluR1b with carbachol rapidly desensitized subsequent glutamate-stimulated inositol phosphate accumulation. The carbachol-induced heterologous desensitization and internalization of mGluR1a was blocked by LY367385, an mGluR1a antagonist with inverse agonist activity. Furthermore, LY367385 blocked the ability of carbachol to increase the association of GRK2 with mGluR1a. On the other hand, LY367385 had no effect on the carbachol-induced desensitization and internalization of the nonconstitutively active mGluR1b splice variant. These results demonstrate that the internalization of mGluR1a, triggered homologously by glutamate or heterologously by carbachol, is PKC/CaMKII-, GRK2-, arrestin-, and clathrin-dependent and that PKC/CaMKII activation appears to be necessary for GRK2 to associate with mGluR1a. Furthermore, the heterologous desensitization of mGluR1a is dependent upon the splice variant being in an active conformation. PMID:15182196

  17. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory syn-aptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  18. Activation of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors is neuroprotective in cortical cultures.

    PubMed

    Bruno, V; Copani, A; Bonanno, L; Knoepfel, T; Kuhn, R; Roberts, P J; Nicoletti, F

    1996-08-22

    (RS)-alpha-Methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) and (S)-alpha-methyl-3-carboxyphenylalanine (M3CPA), two novel preferential antagonists of group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors, antagonized the neuroprotective activity of L-2-amino-4-phosphono-butanoate (L-AP4) or L-serine-O-phosphate in mice cultured cortical cells exposed to a toxic pulse of N-methyl-D-aspartate. In contrast, MPPG did not influence the neuroprotective activity of the selective group II mGlu receptor agonist, (2S,1'R,2'R,3'R)-2-(2,3-dicarboxy-cyclopropyl) glycine (DCG-IV). These results indicate that activation of group III mGu receptors exerts neuroprotective activity against excitotoxic neuronal death. At least one of the two major group III mGlu receptor subtypes, i.e. mGlu4 receptor, is expressed by cultured cortical neurons, as shown by immunocytochemical analysis with specific polyclonal antibodies. PMID:8880068

  19. Inhibition of mammillary body neurons by direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    The mammillary body is an important neural component of limbic circuitry implicated in learning and memory. Excitatory and inhibitory inputs, primarily mediated by glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), respectively, converge and integrate in this region, before sending information to the thalamus. One potentially overlooked mechanism for inhibition of mammillary body neurons is through direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Here, whole-cell patch clamp recordings of in vitro slice preparations containing the mammillary body nuclei of the mouse were employed to record responses to bath application of pharmacological agents to isolate the direct effect of activating Group II mGluRs. Application of the Group II mGluR specific agonist, APDC, resulted in a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential in mammillary body neurons, likely resulting from the opening of a potassium conductance. These data suggest that glutamatergic inputs to the mammillary body may be attenuated via Group II mGluRs and implicates a functional role for these receptors in memory-related circuits and broadly throughout the central nervous system. PMID:27390777

  20. Overexpression of α-synuclein simultaneously increases glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation and reduces glucocerebrosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junfeng; Hertz, Ellen; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Leinartaité, Lina; Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Li, Jie; Svenningsson, Per

    2016-01-12

    Progressive accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn)-containing protein aggregates throughout the nervous system is a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The mechanisms whereby α-syn exerts neurodegeneration remain to be fully understood. Here we show that overexpression of α-syn in transgenic mice leads to increased phosphorylation of glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits NR1 and NR2B in substantia nigra and striatum as well as reduced glucocerebrosidase (GCase) levels. Similarly, molecular studies performed in mouse N2A cells stably overexpressing human α-syn ((α-syn)N2A) showed that phosphorylation states of the same NMDAR subunits were increased, whereas GCase levels and lysosomal GCase activity were reduced. (α-syn)N2A cells showed an increased sensitivity to neurotoxicity towards 6-hydroxydopamine and NMDA. However, wildtype N2A, but not (α-syn)N2A cells, showed a further reduction in viability when co-incubated with 6-hydroxydopamine and the lysosomal inhibitors NH4Cl and leupeptin, suggesting that α-syn per se perturbs lysosomal functions. NMDA treatment reduced lysosomal GCase activity to the same extent in (α-syn)N2A cells as in wildtype N2A cells, indicating that the α-syn-dependent difference in NMDA neurotoxicity is unrelated to an altered GCase activity. Nevertheless, these data provide molecular evidence that overexpression of α-syn simultaneously induces two potential neurotoxic hits by increasing glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation, consistent with increased NMDA receptors functionality, and reducing GCase activity. PMID:26610904

  1. Glutamate Stimulates Local Protein Synthesis in the Axons of Rat Cortical Neurons by Activating α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptors and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Chung, Hui-Wen; Wu, Chih-Yueh; Wu, Huei-Ing; Lee, Yu-Tao; Chen, En-Chan; Fang, Weilun; Chang, Yen-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. By analyzing the metabolic incorporation of azidohomoalanine, a methionine analogue, in newly synthesized proteins, we find that glutamate treatments up-regulate protein translation not only in intact rat cortical neurons in culture but also in the axons emitting from cortical neurons before making synapses with target cells. The process by which glutamate stimulates local translation in axons begins with the binding of glutamate to the ionotropic AMPA receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 and members of group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptors on the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and the rise in Ca2+, resulting from Ca2+ influxes through calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, and transient receptor potential canonical channels, in axons stimulate the local translation machinery. For comparison, the enhancement effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the local protein synthesis in cortical axons were also studied. The results indicate that Ca2+ influxes via transient receptor potential canonical channels and activated the mTOR pathway in axons also mediate BDNF stimulation to local protein synthesis. However, glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of translation in axons exhibit different kinetics. Moreover, Ca2+ and mTOR signaling appear to play roles carrying different weights, respectively, in transducing glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of axonal translation. Thus, our results indicate that exposure to transient increases of glutamate and more lasting increases of BDNF would stimulate local protein synthesis in migrating axons en route to their targets in the developing brain. PMID:26134564

  2. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia. PMID:26946972

  3. Estrogen Receptor β Activation Rapidly Modulates Male Sexual Motivation through the Transactivation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1a.

    PubMed

    Seredynski, Aurore L; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F; Cornil, Charlotte A

    2015-09-23

    In addition to the transcriptional activity of their liganded nuclear receptors, estrogens, such as estradiol (E2), modulate cell functions, and consequently physiology and behavior, within minutes through membrane-initiated events. The membrane-associated receptors (mERs) underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. We determined here, by acute intracerebroventricular injections of specific agonists and antagonists, the type(s) of mERs that modulate rapid effects of brain-derived estrogens on sexual motivation in male Japanese quail. Brain aromatase blockade acutely inhibited sexual motivation. Diarylpropionitrile (DPN), an estrogen receptor β (ERβ)-specific agonist, and to a lesser extent 17α-estradiol, possibly acting through ER-X, prevented this effect. In contrast, drugs targeting ERα (PPT and MPP), GPR30 (G1 and G15), and the Gq-mER (STX) did not affect sexual motivation. The mGluR1a antagonist LY367385 significantly inhibited sexual motivation but mGluR2/3 and mGluR5 antagonists were ineffective. LY367385 also blocked the behavioral restoration induced by E2 or DPN, providing functional evidence that ERβ interacts with metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a (mGluR1a) signaling to acutely regulate male sexual motivation. Together these results show that ERβ plays a key role in sexual behavior regulation and the recently uncovered cooperation between mERs and mGluRs is functional in males where it mediates the acute effects of estrogens produced centrally in response to social stimuli. The presence of an ER-mGluR interaction in birds suggests that this mechanism emerged relatively early in vertebrate history and is well conserved. Significance statement: The membrane-associated receptors underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females, where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. Using acute

  4. Estrogen Receptor β Activation Rapidly Modulates Male Sexual Motivation through the Transactivation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1a

    PubMed Central

    Seredynski, Aurore L.; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the transcriptional activity of their liganded nuclear receptors, estrogens, such as estradiol (E2), modulate cell functions, and consequently physiology and behavior, within minutes through membrane-initiated events. The membrane-associated receptors (mERs) underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. We determined here, by acute intracerebroventricular injections of specific agonists and antagonists, the type(s) of mERs that modulate rapid effects of brain-derived estrogens on sexual motivation in male Japanese quail. Brain aromatase blockade acutely inhibited sexual motivation. Diarylpropionitrile (DPN), an estrogen receptor β (ERβ)-specific agonist, and to a lesser extent 17α-estradiol, possibly acting through ER-X, prevented this effect. In contrast, drugs targeting ERα (PPT and MPP), GPR30 (G1 and G15), and the Gq-mER (STX) did not affect sexual motivation. The mGluR1a antagonist LY367385 significantly inhibited sexual motivation but mGluR2/3 and mGluR5 antagonists were ineffective. LY367385 also blocked the behavioral restoration induced by E2 or DPN, providing functional evidence that ERβ interacts with metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a (mGluR1a) signaling to acutely regulate male sexual motivation. Together these results show that ERβ plays a key role in sexual behavior regulation and the recently uncovered cooperation between mERs and mGluRs is functional in males where it mediates the acute effects of estrogens produced centrally in response to social stimuli. The presence of an ER–mGluR interaction in birds suggests that this mechanism emerged relatively early in vertebrate history and is well conserved. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The membrane-associated receptors underlying the acute effects of estrogens on behavior have mostly been documented in females, where active estrogens are thought to be of ovarian origin. Using acute

  5. Alleviating pain hypersensitivity through activation of type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Bruno; Busserolles, Jérôme; Ling, Bing; Laffray, Sophie; Ulmann, Lauriane; Malhaire, Fanny; Chapuy, Eric; Aissouni, Youssef; Etienne, Monique; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Acher, Francine; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Eschalier, Alain; Goudet, Cyril

    2013-11-27

    Hyperactivity of the glutamatergic system is involved in the development of central sensitization in the pain neuraxis, associated with allodynia and hyperalgesia observed in patients with chronic pain. Herein we study the ability of type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu4) to regulate spinal glutamate signaling and alleviate chronic pain. We show that mGlu4 are located both on unmyelinated C-fibers and spinal neurons terminals in the inner lamina II of the spinal cord where they inhibit glutamatergic transmission through coupling to Cav2.2 channels. Genetic deletion of mGlu4 in mice alters sensitivity to strong noxious mechanical compression and accelerates the onset of the nociceptive behavior in the inflammatory phase of the formalin test. However, responses to punctate mechanical stimulation and nocifensive responses to thermal noxious stimuli are not modified. Accordingly, pharmacological activation of mGlu4 inhibits mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models of inflammatory or neuropathic pain while leaving acute mechanical perception unchanged in naive animals. Together, these results reveal that mGlu4 is a promising new target for the treatment of chronic pain. PMID:24285900

  6. Induction of an Olfactory Memory by the Activation of a Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaba, Hideto; Hayashi, Yasunori; Higuchi, Takashi; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    1994-07-01

    Female mice form an olfactory memory of male pheromones at mating; exposure to the pheromones of a strange male after that mating will block pregnancy. The formation of this memory is mediated by the accessory olfactory system, in which an increase in norepinephrine after mating reduces inhibitory transmission of γ-aminobutyric acid from the granule cells to the mitral cells. This study shows that the activation of mGluR2, a metabotropic glutamate receptor that suppresses the γ-aminobutyric acid inhibition of the mitral cells, permits the formation of a specific olfactory memory without the occurrence of mating by infusion of mGluR2 agonists into the female's accessory olfactory bulb. This memory faithfully reflects the memory formed at mating.

  7. Activation of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Induces Depotentiation in Amygdala Slices and Reduces Fear-Potentiated Startle in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Ho; Lee, Chia-Ching; Huang, Ya-Chun; Wang, Su-Jane; Gean, Po-Wu

    2005-01-01

    There is a close correlation between long-term potentiation (LTP) in the synapses of lateral amygdala (LA) and fear conditioning in animals. We predict that reversal of LTP (depotentiation) in this area of the brain may ameliorate conditioned fear. Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) with DCG-IV induces…

  8. Allosteric modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 activates IDO1-dependent, immunoregulatory signaling in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Claudia; Mondanelli, Giada; Pallotta, Maria T.; Vacca, Carmine; Iacono, Alberta; Gargaro, Marco; Albini, Elisa; Bianchi, Roberta; Belladonna, Maria L.; Celanire, Sylvain; Mordant, Céline; Heroux, Madeleine; Royer-Urios, Isabelle; Schneider, Manfred; Vitte, Pierre-Alain; Cacquevel, Mathias; Galibert, Laurent; Poli, Sonia-Maria; Solari, Aldo; Bicciato, Silvio; Calvitti, Mario; Antognelli, Cinzia; Puccetti, Paolo; Orabona, Ciriana; Fallarino, Francesca; Grohmann, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGluR4) possesses immune modulatory properties in vivo, such that a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of the receptor confers protection on mice with relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (RR-EAE). ADX88178 is a newly-developed, one such mGluR4 modulator with high selectivity, potency, and optimized pharmacokinetics. Here we found that application of ADX88178 in the RR-EAE model system converted disease into a form of mild—yet chronic—neuroinflammation that remained stable for over two months after discontinuing drug treatment. In vitro, ADX88178 modulated the cytokine secretion profile of dendritic cells (DCs), increasing production of tolerogenic IL-10 and TGF-β. The in vitro effects required activation of a Gi-independent, alternative signaling pathway that involved phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), Src kinase, and the signaling activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1). A PI3K inhibitor as well as small interfering RNA targeting Ido1—but not pertussis toxin, which affects Gi protein-dependent responses—abrogated the tolerogenic effects of ADX88178-conditioned DCs in vivo. Thus our data indicate that, in DCs, highly selective and potent mGluR4 PAMs such as ADX88178 may activate a Gi-independent, long-lived regulatory pathway that could be therapeutically exploited in chronic autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26522434

  9. Preferential binding of allosteric modulators to active and inactive conformational states of metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Tirupula, Kalyan C; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G protein coupled receptors that play important roles in synaptic plasticity and other neuro-physiological and pathological processes. Allosteric mGluR ligands are particularly promising drug targets because of their modulatory effects – enhancing or suppressing the response of mGluRs to glutamate. The mechanism by which this modulation occurs is not known. Here, we propose the hypothesis that positive and negative modulators will differentially stabilize the active and inactive conformations of the receptors, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have generated computational models of the transmembrane regions of different mGluR subtypes in two different conformations. The inactive conformation was modeled using the crystal structure of the inactive, dark state of rhodopsin as template and the active conformation was created based on a recent model of the light-activated state of rhodopsin. Ligands for which the nature of their allosteric effects on mGluRs is experimentally known were docked to the modeled mGluR structures using ArgusLab and Autodock softwares. We find that the allosteric ligand binding pockets of mGluRs are overlapping with the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, and that ligands have strong preferences for the active and inactive states depending on their modulatory nature. In 8 out of 14 cases (57%), the negative modulators bound the inactive conformations with significant preference using both docking programs, and 6 out of 9 cases (67%), the positive modulators bound the active conformations. Considering results by the individual programs only, even higher correlations were observed: 12/14 (86%) and 8/9 (89%) for ArgusLab and 10/14 (71%) and 7/9 (78%) for AutoDock. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that mGluR allosteric modulation occurs via stabilization of different conformations analogous to those identified in rhodopsin where they are induced by photochemical isomerization

  10. Glycine activated ion channel subunits encoded by ctenophore glutamate receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Alberstein, Robert; Grey, Richard; Zimmet, Austin; Simmons, David K.; Mayer, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome projects for ctenophores have revealed the presence of numerous ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) in Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobrachia bachei, among our earliest metazoan ancestors. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that these form a distinct clade from the well-characterized AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluR subtypes found in vertebrates. Although annotated as glutamate and kainate receptors, crystal structures of the ML032222a and PbiGluR3 ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal endogenous glycine in the binding pocket, whereas ligand-binding assays show that glycine binds with nanomolar affinity; biochemical assays and structural analysis establish that glutamate is occluded from the binding cavity. Further analysis reveals ctenophore-specific features, such as an interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge, present only in subunits that bind glycine, but also a conserved disulfide in loop 1 of the LBD that is found in all vertebrate NMDA but not AMPA or kainate receptors. We hypothesize that ctenophore iGluRs are related to an early ancestor of NMDA receptors, suggesting a common evolutionary path for ctenophores and bilaterian species, and suggest that future work should consider both glycine and glutamate as candidate neurotransmitters in ctenophore species. PMID:26460032

  11. Glycine activated ion channel subunits encoded by ctenophore glutamate receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Alberstein, Robert; Grey, Richard; Zimmet, Austin; Simmons, David K; Mayer, Mark L

    2015-11-01

    Recent genome projects for ctenophores have revealed the presence of numerous ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) in Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobrachia bachei, among our earliest metazoan ancestors. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that these form a distinct clade from the well-characterized AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluR subtypes found in vertebrates. Although annotated as glutamate and kainate receptors, crystal structures of the ML032222a and PbiGluR3 ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal endogenous glycine in the binding pocket, whereas ligand-binding assays show that glycine binds with nanomolar affinity; biochemical assays and structural analysis establish that glutamate is occluded from the binding cavity. Further analysis reveals ctenophore-specific features, such as an interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge, present only in subunits that bind glycine, but also a conserved disulfide in loop 1 of the LBD that is found in all vertebrate NMDA but not AMPA or kainate receptors. We hypothesize that ctenophore iGluRs are related to an early ancestor of NMDA receptors, suggesting a common evolutionary path for ctenophores and bilaterian species, and suggest that future work should consider both glycine and glutamate as candidate neurotransmitters in ctenophore species. PMID:26460032

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 modulates the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo through activation of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Boix, Jordi; Llansola, Marta; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Felipo, Vicente

    2011-04-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) modulate important processes in cerebellum including long-term depression, which also requires formation of nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP. Some reports suggest that mGluRs could modulate the NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. However this modulation has not been studied in detail. The aim of this work was to assess by microdialysis in freely moving rats whether activation of mGluR5 modulates the NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo and to analyze the underlying mechanisms. We show that mGluR5 activation increases extracellular glutamate, citrulline and cGMP in cerebellum. Blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 does not prevent any of these effects, indicating that NMDA receptors activation is not required. However in the presence of MK-801 the effects are more transient, returning faster to basal levels. Blocking AMPA receptors prevents the increase in citrulline and cGMP induced by mGluR5 activation, but not the increase in glutamate. The release of glutamate is prevented by tetrodotoxin but not by fluoroacetate, indicating that glutamate is released from neurons and not from astrocytes. Activation of AMPA receptors increases citrulline and cGMP. These data indicate that activation of mGluR5 induces an increase of extracellular glutamate which activates AMPA receptors, leading to activation of nitric oxide synthase and increased NO, which activates guanylate cyclase, increasing cGMP. The response mediated by AMPA receptors desensitize rapidly. Activation of AMPA receptors also induces a mild depolarization, allowing activation of NMDA receptors which prolongs the duration of the effect initiated by activation of AMPA receptors. These data support that the three types of glutamate receptors: mGluR5, AMPA and NMDA cooperate in the modulation of the grade and duration of activation of the NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo. This pathway would modulate cerebellar processes such as long-term depression. PMID:21300123

  13. Mood disorders: regulation by metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Pilc, Andrzej; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Nowak, Gabriel; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2008-03-01

    Medicinal therapies for mood disorders neither fully serve the efficacy needs of patients nor are they free of side-effect issues. Although monoamine-based therapies are the primary current treatment approaches, both preclinical and clinical findings have implicated the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorders. The present commentary focuses on the metabotropic glutamate receptors and their relationship to mood disorders. Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors regulate glutamate transmission by altering the release of neurotransmitter and/or modulating the post-synaptic responses to glutamate. Convergent biochemical, pharmacological, behavioral, and clinical data will be reviewed that establish glutamatergic neurotransmission via mGlu receptors as a biologically relevant process in the regulation of mood and that these receptors may serve as novel targets for the discovery of small molecule modulators with unique antidepressant properties. Specifically, compounds that antagonize mGlu2, mGlu3, and/or mGlu5 receptors (e.g. LY341495, MGS0039, MPEP, MTEP) exhibit biochemical effects indicative of antidepressant effects as well as in vivo activity in animal models predictive of antidepressant efficacy. Both preclinical and clinical data have previously been presented to define NMDA and AMPA receptors as important targets for the modulation of major depression. In the present review, we present a model suggesting how the interplay of glutamate at the mGlu and at the ionotropic AMPA and NMDA receptors might account for the antidepressant-like effects of glutamatergic- and monoaminergic-based drugs affecting mood in patients. The current data lead to the hypothesis that mGlu-based compounds and conventional antidepressants impact a network of interactive effects that converge upon a down regulation of NMDA receptor function and an enhancement in AMPA receptor signaling. PMID:18164691

  14. Glutamate receptors at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Mark L.

    2010-12-03

    At synapses throughout the brain and spinal cord, the amino-acid glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter. During evolution, a family of glutamate-receptor ion channels seems to have been assembled from a kit consisting of discrete ligand-binding, ion-channel, modulatory and cytoplasmic domains. Crystallographic studies that exploit this unique architecture have greatly aided structural analysis of the ligand-binding core, but the results also pose a formidable challenge, namely that of resolving the allosteric mechanisms by which individual domains communicate and function in an intact receptor.

  15. Oligomers of Amyloid β Prevent Physiological Activation of the Cellular Prion Protein-Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Complex by Glutamate in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Haas, Laura T; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2016-08-12

    The dysfunction and loss of synapses in Alzheimer disease are central to dementia symptoms. We have recently demonstrated that pathological Amyloid β oligomer (Aβo) regulates the association between intracellular protein mediators and the synaptic receptor complex composed of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Here we sought to determine whether Aβo alters the physiological signaling of the PrP(C)-mGluR5 complex upon glutamate activation. We provide evidence that acute exposure to Aβo as well as chronic expression of familial Alzheimer disease mutant transgenes in model mice prevents protein-protein interaction changes of the complex induced by the glutamate analog 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine. We further show that 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine triggers the phosphorylation and activation of protein-tyrosine kinase 2-β (PTK2B, also referred to as Pyk2) and of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in wild-type brain slices but not in Alzheimer disease transgenic brain slices or wild-type slices incubated with Aβo. This study further distinguishes two separate Aβo-dependent signaling cascades, one dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and Fyn kinase activation and the other dependent on the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. Thus, Aβo triggers multiple distinct PrP(C)-mGluR5-dependent events implicated in neurodegeneration and dementia. We propose that targeting the PrP(C)-mGluR5 complex will reverse aberrant Aβo-triggered states of the complex to allow physiological fluctuations of glutamate signaling. PMID:27325698

  16. Group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors interact in the rat nucleus accumbens to influence locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    David, Hélène N; Abraini, Jacques H

    2002-03-01

    Evidence for functional interactions between metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors and dopamine (DA) neurotransmission is now clearly established. In the present study, we investigated interactions between group III mGlu receptors and D1- and D2-like receptors in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Administration, into the NAcc, of the selective group III mGlu receptor agonist, AP4, resulted in an increase in locomotor activity, which was blocked by pretreatment with the group III mGlu receptor antagonist, MPPG. In addition, pretreatment with AP4 further blocked the increase in motor activity induced by the D1-like receptor agonist, SKF 38393, but potentiated the locomotor responses induced by either the D2-like receptor agonist, quinpirole, or coinfusion of SKF 38393 and quinpirole. MPPG reversed the effects of AP4 on the motor responses induced by D1-like and/or D2-like receptor activation. These results confirm that glutamate transmission may control DA-dependent locomotor function through mGlu receptors and further indicate that group III mGlu receptors oppose the behavioural response produced by D1-like receptor activation and favour those produced by D2-like receptor activation. PMID:11906529

  17. Influence of metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists on the inhibitory effects of adenosine A1 receptor activation in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    de Mendonça, A; Ribeiro, J A

    1997-08-01

    1. Glutamate and other amino acids are the main excitatory neurotransmitters in many brain regions, including the hippocampus, by activating ion channel-coupled glutamate receptors, as well as metabotropic receptors linked to G proteins and second messenger systems. Several conditions which promote the release of glutamate, like frequency stimulation and hypoxia, also lead to an increase in the extracellular levels of the important neuromodulator, adenosine. We studied whether the activation of different subgroups of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) could modify the known inhibitory effects of a selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist on synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. The experiments were performed on hippocampal slices taken from young (12-14 days old) rats. Stimulation was delivered to the Schaffer collateral/commissural fibres, and evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fe. p.s.p.) recorded extracellularly from the stratum radiatum in the CAI area. 2. The concentration-response curve for the inhibitory effects of the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; 2-50 nM), on the fe.p.s.p. slope (EC50 = 12.5 (9.2-17.3; 95% confidence intervals)) was displaced to the right by the group I mGluR selective agonist, (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DPHG; 10 microM) (EC50 = 27.2 (21.4-34.5) nM, n = 4). The attenuation of the inhibitory effect of CPA (10 nM) on the fe.p.s.p. slope by DHPG (10 microM) was blocked in the presence of the mGluR antagonist (which blocks group I and II mGluR), (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG; 500 microM). DHPG (10 microM) itself had an inhibitory effect of 20.1 +/- 1.9% (n = 4) on the fe.p.s.p. slope. 3. The concentration-response curves for the inhibitory effects of CPA (2-20 nM) on the fe.p.s.p. slope were not modified either in the presence of the group II mGluR selective agonist, (2S,3S,4S)-alpha-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I; 1 microM), or in the presence of

  18. Influence of metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists on the inhibitory effects of adenosine A1 receptor activation in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    de Mendonça, Alexandre; Ribeiro, J A

    1997-01-01

    Glutamate and other amino acids are the main excitatory neurotransmitters in many brain regions, including the hippocampus, by activating ion channel-coupled glutamate receptors, as well as metabotropic receptors linked to G proteins and second messenger systems. Several conditions which promote the release of glutamate, like frequency stimulation and hypoxia, also lead to an increase in the extracellular levels of the important neuromodulator, adenosine. We studied whether the activation of different subgroups of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) could modify the known inhibitory effects of a selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist on synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. The experiments were performed on hippocampal slices taken from young (12–14 days old) rats. Stimulation was delivered to the Schaffer collateral/commissural fibres, and evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fe.p.s.p.) recorded extracellularly from the stratum radiatum in the CA1 area. The concentration-response curve for the inhibitory effects of the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; 2–50 nM), on the fe.p.s.p. slope (EC50=12.5 (9.2–17.3; 95% confidence intervals)) was displaced to the right by the group I mGluR selective agonist, (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DPHG; 10 μM) (EC50=27.2 (21.4–34.5) nM, n=4). The attenuation of the inhibitory effect of CPA (10 nM) on the fe.p.s.p. slope by DHPG (10 μM) was blocked in the presence of the mGluR antagonist (which blocks group I and II mGluR), (R,S)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG; 500 μM). DHPG (10 μM) itself had an inhibitory effect of 20.1±1.9% (n=4) on the fe.p.s.p. slope. The concentration-response curves for the inhibitory effects of CPA (2–20 nM) on the fe.p.s.p. slope were not modified either in the presence of the group II mGluR selective agonist, (2S,3S,4S)-α-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I; 1 μM), or in the presence of the non

  19. Calmodulin activity regulates group I metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signal transduction and synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Sethna, Ferzin; Zhang, Ming; Kaphzan, Hanoch; Klann, Eric; Autio, Dawn; Cox, Charles L; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-05-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR), including mGluR1 and mGluR 5 (mGluR1/5), are coupled to Gq and modulate activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Direct activation of mGluR1/5 causes protein translation-dependent long-term depression (LTD). Although it has been established that intracellular Ca(2+) and the Gq-regulated signaling molecules are required for mGluR1/5 LTD, whether and how Ca(2+) regulates Gq signaling and upregulation of protein expression remain unknown. Through pharmacological inhibition, we tested the function of the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin (CaM) in intracellular signaling triggered by the activation of mGluR1/5. CaM inhibitor N-[4-aminobutyl]-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W13) suppressed the mGluR1/5-stimulated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p70-S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) in hippocampal neurons. W13 also blocked the mGluR1/5 agonist-induced synaptic depression in hippocampal slices and in anesthetized mice. Consistent with the function of CaM, inhibiting the downstream targets Ca(2+) /CaM-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) blocked ERK1/2 and S6K1 activation. Furthermore, disruption of the CaM-CaMK-ERK1/2 signaling cascade suppressed the mGluR1/5-stimulated upregulation of Arc expression. Altogether, our data suggest CaM as a new Gq signaling component for coupling Ca(2+) and protein upregulation and regulating mGluR1/5-mediated synaptic modification. PMID:26864654

  20. Different pools of glutamate receptors mediate sensitivity to ambient glutamate in the cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Ambient glutamate plays an important role in pathological conditions, such as stroke, but its role during normal activity is not clear. In addition, it is not clear how ambient glutamate acts on glutamate receptors with varying affinities or subcellular localizations. To address this, we studied “endbulb of Held” synapses, which are formed by auditory nerve fibers onto bushy cells (BCs) in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus. When ambient glutamate was increased by applying the glutamate reuptake inhibitor TFB-TBOA, BCs depolarized as a result of activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Application of antagonists against NMDARs (in 0 Mg2+) or mGluRs caused hyperpolarization, indicating that these receptors were bound by a tonic source of glutamate. AMPA receptors did not show these effects, consistent with their lower glutamate affinity. We also evaluated the subcellular localization of the receptors activated by ambient glutamate. The mGluRs were not activated by synaptic stimulation and thus appear to be exclusively extrasynaptic. By contrast, NMDARs in both synaptic and extrasynaptic compartments were activated by ambient glutamate, as shown using the use-dependent antagonist MK-801. Levels of ambient glutamate appeared to be regulated in a spike-independent manner, and glia likely play a major role. These low levels of ambient glutamate likely have functional consequences, as even low concentrations of TBOA caused significant increases in BC spiking following synaptic stimulation. These results indicate that normal resting potential appears to be poised in the region of maximal sensitivity to small changes in ambient glutamate. PMID:25855696

  1. Different pools of glutamate receptors mediate sensitivity to ambient glutamate in the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A

    2015-06-01

    Ambient glutamate plays an important role in pathological conditions, such as stroke, but its role during normal activity is not clear. In addition, it is not clear how ambient glutamate acts on glutamate receptors with varying affinities or subcellular localizations. To address this, we studied "endbulb of Held" synapses, which are formed by auditory nerve fibers onto bushy cells (BCs) in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus. When ambient glutamate was increased by applying the glutamate reuptake inhibitor TFB-TBOA, BCs depolarized as a result of activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Application of antagonists against NMDARs (in 0 Mg(2+)) or mGluRs caused hyperpolarization, indicating that these receptors were bound by a tonic source of glutamate. AMPA receptors did not show these effects, consistent with their lower glutamate affinity. We also evaluated the subcellular localization of the receptors activated by ambient glutamate. The mGluRs were not activated by synaptic stimulation and thus appear to be exclusively extrasynaptic. By contrast, NMDARs in both synaptic and extrasynaptic compartments were activated by ambient glutamate, as shown using the use-dependent antagonist MK-801. Levels of ambient glutamate appeared to be regulated in a spike-independent manner, and glia likely play a major role. These low levels of ambient glutamate likely have functional consequences, as even low concentrations of TBOA caused significant increases in BC spiking following synaptic stimulation. These results indicate that normal resting potential appears to be poised in the region of maximal sensitivity to small changes in ambient glutamate. PMID:25855696

  2. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the amygdala modulates pain-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Kolber, Benedict J; Montana, Michael C; Carrasquillo, Yarimar; Xu, Jian; Heinemann, Stephen F; Muglia, Louis J; Gereau, Robert W

    2010-06-16

    The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) has been identified as a site of nociceptive processing important for sensitization induced by peripheral injury. However, the cellular signaling components underlying this function remain unknown. Here, we identify metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) as an integral component of nociceptive processing in the CeA. Pharmacological activation of mGluRs with (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) in the CeA of mice is sufficient to induce peripheral hypersensitivity in the absence of injury. DHPG-induced peripheral hypersensitivity is reduced via pharmacological blockade of mGluR5 or genetic disruption of mGluR5. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade or conditional deletion of mGluR5 in the CeA abrogates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity, demonstrating the necessity of mGluR5 in CeA-mediated pain modulation. Moreover, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is downstream of mGluR5 activation in the CeA and is necessary for the full expression of peripheral inflammation-induced behavioral sensitization. Finally, we present evidence of right hemispheric lateralization of mGluR5 modulation of amygdalar nociceptive processing. We demonstrate that unilateral pharmacological activation of mGluR5 in the CeA produces distinct behavioral responses depending on whether the right or left amygdala is injected. We also demonstrate significantly higher levels of mGluR5 expression in the right amygdala compared with the left under baseline conditions, suggesting a potential mechanism for right hemispheric lateralization of amygdala function in pain processing. Together, these results establish an integral role for mGluR5 and ERK1/2 in nociceptive processing in the CeA. PMID:20554871

  3. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the amygdala modulates pain-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kolber, Benedict J.; Montana, Michael C.; Carrasquillo, Yarimar; Xu, Jian; Heinemann, Stephen F.; Muglia, Louis J.; Gereau, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) has been identified as a site of nociceptive processing important for sensitization induced by peripheral injury. However, the cellular signaling components underlying this function remain unknown. Here, we identify metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) as an integral component of nociceptive processing in the CeA. Pharmacological activation of mGluRs with R,S-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) in the CeA of mice is sufficient to induce peripheral hypersensitivity in the absence of injury. DHPG-induced peripheral hypersensitivity is reduced via pharmacological blockade of mGluR5 or genetic disruption of mGluR5. Further, pharmacological blockade or conditional deletion of mGluR5 in the CeA abrogates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity, demonstrating the necessity of mGluR5 in CeA-mediated pain modulation. Moreover, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is downstream of mGluR5 activation in the CeA and is necessary for the full expression of peripheral inflammation-induced behavioral sensitization. Finally, we present evidence of right hemispheric lateralization of mGluR5 modulation of amygdalar nociceptive processing. We demonstrate that unilateral pharmacological activation of mGluR5 in the CeA produces distinct behavioral responses depending on whether the right or left amygdala is injected. We also demonstrate significantly higher levels of mGluR5 expression in the right amygdala compared to the left under baseline conditions, suggesting a potential mechanism for right hemispheric lateralization of amygdala function in pain processing. Taken together, these results establish an integral role for mGluR5 and ERK1/2 in nociceptive processing in the CeA. PMID:20554871

  4. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors for Parkinson's Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Fabrizio; Di Paolo, Thérèse; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar

    2013-01-01

    Excessive glutamatergic signalling within the basal ganglia is implicated in the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) and inthe emergence of dyskinesia associated with long-term treatment with L-DOPA. There is considerable research focus on the discovery and development of compounds that modulate glutamatergic signalling via glutamate receptors, as treatments for PD and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). Although initial preclinical studies with ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists showed antiparkinsonian and antidyskinetic activity, their clinical use was limited due to psychiatric adverse effects, with the exception of amantadine, a weak N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, currently used to reduce dyskinesia in PD patients. Metabotropic receptor (mGlu receptor) modulators were considered to have a more favourable side-effect profile, and several agents have been studied in preclinical models of PD. The most promising results have been seen clinically with selective antagonists of mGlu5 receptor and preclinically with selective positive allosteric modulators of mGlu4 receptor. The growing understanding of glutamate receptor crosstalk also raises the possibility of more precise modulation of glutamatergic transmission, which may lead to the development of more effective agents for PD. PMID:23853735

  5. Decreasing nicotinic receptor activity and the spatial learning impairment caused by the NMDA glutamate antagonist dizocilpine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Dennis A.; Heshmati, Pooneh; Kholdebarin, Ehsan; Levin, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic systems have been shown by a variety of studies to be involved in cognitive function. Nicotinic receptors have an inherent property to become desensitized after activation. The relative role of nicotinic receptor activation vs. net receptor inactivation by desensitization in the cognitive effects of nicotinic drugs remains to be fully understood. In these studies, we tested the effects of the α7 nicotinic receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA), the α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE), the nonspecific nicotinic channel blocker mecamylamine and the α4β2 nicotinic receptor desensitizing agent sazetidine-A on learning in a repeated acquisition test. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on a repeated acquisition learning procedure in an 8-arm radial maze. MLA (1–4 mg/kg), DHβE (1–4 mg/kg), mecamylamine (0.125–0.5 mg/kg) or sazetidine-A (1 and 3 mg/kg) were administered in four different studies either alone or together with the NMDA glutamate antagonist dizocilpine (0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg). MLA significantly counteracted the learning impairment caused by dizocilpine. The overall choice accuracy impairment caused by dizocilpine was significantly attenuated by co-administration of DHβE. Low doses of the non-specific nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine also reduced dizocilpine-induced repeated acquisition impairment. Sazetidine-A reversed the accuracy impairment caused by dizocilpine. These studies provide evidence that a net decrease in nicotinic receptor activity can improve learning by attenuating learning impairment induced by NMDA glutamate blockade. This adds to evidence in cognitive tests that nicotinic antagonists can improve cognitive function. Further research characterizing the efficacy and mechanisms underlying nicotinic antagonist and desensitization induced cognitive improvement is warranted. PMID:25064338

  6. Xanthurenic Acid Activates mGlu2/3 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and is a Potential Trait Marker for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Cavallari, Michele; Zappulla, Cristina; Ulivieri, Martina; Napoletano, Flavia; Capi, Matilde; Corigliano, Valentina; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Miele, Jessica; De Fusco, Antonio; Di Menna, Luisa; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Gradini, Roberto; Nisticò, Robert; De Blasi, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report here that the kynurenine metabolite, xanturenic acid (XA), interacts with, and activates mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in heterologous expression systems. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is unknown, and our data cannot exclude that XA acts primarily on other targets, such as the vesicular glutamate transporter, in the CNS. Systemic administration of XA in mice produced antipsychotic-like effects in the MK-801-induced model of hyperactivity. This effect required the presence of mGlu2 receptors and was abrogated by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495. Because the mGlu2 receptor is a potential drug target in the treatment of schizophrenia, we decided to measure serum levels of XA and other kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by schizophrenia. Serum XA levels were largely reduced in a large cohort of patients affected by schizophrenia, and, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, levels remained low after 12 months of antipsychotic medication. As opposed to other kynurenine metabolites, XA levels were also significantly reduced in first-degree relatives of patients affected by schizophrenia. We suggest that lowered serum XA levels might represent a novel trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:26643205

  7. Activation of synaptic group II metabotropic glutamate receptors induces long-term depression at GABAergic synapses in CNS neurons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Quan; Liu, Yu-Wei; Shi, Wei; Dinh, Emilie Hoang; Hamlet, William R; Curry, Rebecca J; Lu, Yong

    2013-10-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-dependent homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) has been studied extensively at glutamatergic synapses in the CNS. However, much less is known about heterosynaptic long-term plasticity induced by mGluRs at inhibitory synapses. Here we report that pharmacological or synaptic activation of group II mGluRs (mGluR II) induces LTD at GABAergic synapses without affecting the excitatory glutamatergic transmission in neurons of the chicken cochlear nucleus. Coefficient of variation and failure rate analysis suggested that the LTD was expressed presynaptically. The LTD requires presynaptic spike activity, but does not require the activation of NMDA receptors. The classic cAMP-dependent protein kinase A signaling is involved in the transduction pathway. Remarkably, blocking mGluR II increased spontaneous GABA release, indicating the presence of tonic activation of mGluR II by ambient glutamate. Furthermore, synaptically released glutamate induced by electrical stimulations that concurrently activated both the glutamatergic and GABAergic pathways resulted in significant and constant suppression of GABA release at various stimulus frequencies (3.3, 100, and 300 Hz). Strikingly, low-frequency stimulation (1 Hz, 15 min) of the glutamatergic synapses induced heterosynaptic LTD of GABAergic transmission, and the LTD was blocked by mGluR II antagonist, indicating that synaptic activation of mGluR II induced the LTD. This novel form of long-term plasticity in the avian auditory brainstem may play a role in the development as well as in temporal processing in the sound localization circuit. PMID:24089501

  8. Glutamate receptor ligands as anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka-Wójcik, E; Kłodzinska, A; Pilc, A

    2001-08-01

    The glutamatergic system has received considerable attention over recent years as a potential target for anxiolytic drugs. In spite of the pronounced anxiolytic-like effects of competitive and non-competitive antagonists of NMDA receptors in animal models of anxiety, these substances can not be regarded as potential anxiolytic drugs, mainly due to their side-effect profiles (eg, ataxia, myorelaxation, impairment of learning and memory processes and psychotomimetic effects). Antagonists and partial agonists of the glycine, receptor inhibit function of the NMDA receptor complex and evoke in animals an anxiolytic-like response. Although data concerning anti-anxiety-like effects of glycine, receptor antagonists are not very promising, studies are underway to develop new, brain-penetrating agents devoid of side effects. Further developments are necessary to more fully elucidate the possible involvement of AMPA/kainate receptors in anxiety. The recent discovery of metabotropic glutamate receptors, which modulate the function of the glutamatergic system, offers new hope for discovery of a new generation of anxiolytics. MPEP, a highly selective, brain penetrable, noncompetitive mGlu5 receptor antagonist, evokes anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models of anxiety, remaining remarkably free of side effects. LY-354740, a selective brain-penetrable group II mGlu receptor agonist, evokes marked anxiolytic-like effects in animal models of anxiety. LY-354740 causes mild sedation in mice, does not disturb motor coordination and has no potential to cause dependence. Therefore mGlu receptor ligands may become the anxiolytics of the future, free from the side effects characteristic of benzodiazepines. PMID:11892923

  9. Mechanisms of photoswitch conjugation and light activation of an ionotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Gorostiza, Pau; Volgraf, Matthew; Numano, Rika; Szobota, Stephanie; Trauner, Dirk; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2007-06-26

    The analysis of cell signaling requires the rapid and selective manipulation of protein function. We have synthesized photoswitches that covalently modify target proteins and reversibly present and withdraw a ligand from its binding site due to photoisomerization of an azobenzene linker. We describe here the properties of a glutamate photoswitch that controls an ion channel in cells. Affinity labeling and geometric constraints ensure that the photoswitch controls only the targeted channel, and enables spatial patterns of light to favor labeling in one location over another. Photoswitching to the activating state places a tethered glutamate at a high (millimolar) effective local concentration near the binding site. The fraction of active channels can be set in an analog manner by altering the photostationary state with different wavelengths. The bistable photoswitch can be turned on with millisecond-long pulses at one wavelength, remain on in the dark for minutes, and turned off with millisecond long pulses at the other wavelength, yielding sustained activation with minimal irradiation. The system provides rapid, reversible remote control of protein function that is selective without orthogonal chemistry. PMID:17578923

  10. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors & CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although etiology is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual’s susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor trafficking are important to Fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate (KA) receptor synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms. PMID:18537642

  11. Anti-epileptogenic and anticonvulsant activity of L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate, a presynaptic glutamate receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, A S; Attwell, P J; Singh Kent, N; Bradford, H F; Croucher, M J; Jane, D E

    1997-05-01

    The protective effect of amygdaloid (focally administered) doses of the presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) was tested on the development of electrical kindling and in fully kindled animals. L-AP4 inhibited epileptogenesis at 10 nmol in 0.5 microl buffer, by preventing the increase in both seizure score and afterdischarge duration. The effects were reversible after withdrawal of the drug, with all treated animals subsequently progressing to the fully kindled state at the same rate as control animals. The same concentration of the drug was also effective when injected into fully kindled animals. It significantly decreased the mean seizure score by 88% (P < 0.005) and increased the mean generalized seizure threshold (GST) by 85% (P < 0.005). The increase in GST was accompanied by a significant delay before the onset of generalized seizure and by a 37% reduction in generalized seizure duration. MPPG ((RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenyl glycine) a selective antagonist of L-AP4 at glutamate pre-synaptic receptors inhibited the depressant effect of L-AP4 in a dose-dependent manner. MPPG (10 nmol) inhibited the antiseizure activity of L-AP4, whilst MPPG (40 nmol) reduced both the anti-epileptogenic and antiseizure activities of L-AP4. MPPG (40 nmol) by itself had no effect on generalized seizure activity, and it had no detectable influence on the normal rate of kindled epileptogenesis. During in vitro studies using a microsuperfusion method, L-AP4 inhibited depolarization-induced release of [3H]D-aspartate from rat cortical synaptosomes (IC50 125.1 microM) and decreased the depolarization-evoked uptake of 45Ca2+ in a dose-dependent manner. Both actions of L-AP4 were reduced by the selective antagonist MPPG. When applied alone MPPG (200 microM) had no detectable action on veratridine-evoked 45Ca2+ uptake by the synaptosomes. These results suggest the mechanisms by which presynaptically active glutamate receptor

  12. On the regulative role of the glutamate receptor in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Selin, Alexey A; Lobysheva, Natalia V; Nesterov, Semen V; Skorobogatova, Yulia A; Byvshev, Ivan M; Pavlik, Lyubov L; Mikheeva, Irina B; Moshkov, Dmitry A; Yaguzhinsky, Lev S; Nartsissov, Yaroslav R

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the regulative role of the glutamate receptor found earlier in the brain mitochondria. In the present work a glutamate-dependent signaling system with similar features was detected in mitochondria of the heart. The glutamate-dependent signaling system in the heart mitochondria was shown to be suppressed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The GABA receptor presence in the heart mitochondria was shown by golding with the use of antibodies to α- and β-subunits of the receptor. The activity of glutamate receptor was assessed according to the rate of synthesis of hydrogen peroxide. The glutamate receptor in mitochondria could be activated only under conditions of hypoxic stress, which in model experiments was imitated by blocking Complex I by rotenone or fatty acids. The glutamate signal in mitochondria was shown to be calcium- and potential-dependent and the activation of the glutamate cascade was shown to be accompanied by production of hydrogen peroxide. It was discovered that H2O2 synthesis involves two complexes of the mitochondrial electron transfer system - succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and fatty acid dehydrogenase (ETF:QO). Thus, functions of the glutamate signaling system are associated with the system of respiration-glycolysis switching (the Pasteur-Crabtree) under conditions of hypoxia. PMID:26812870

  13. Activation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Regulates Ribosomes of Cochlear Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Carzoli, Kathryn L.; Hyson, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    The brain stem auditory system of the chick is an advantageous model for examining changes that occur as a result of deafness. Elimination of acoustic input through cochlear ablation results in the eventual death of approximately 30% of neurons in the chick cochlear nucleus, nucleus magnocellularis (NM). One early change following deafness is an alteration in NM ribosomes, evidenced both by a decrease in protein synthesis and reduction in antigenicity for Y10B, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a ribosomal epitope. Previous studies have shown that mGluR activation is necessary to maintain Y10B antigenicity and NM viability. What is still unclear, however, is whether or not mGluR activation is sufficient to prevent deafness-induced changes in these neurons, or if other activity-dependent factors are also necessary. The current study investigated the ability of mGluR activation to regulate cochlear nucleus ribosomes in the absence of auditory nerve input. In vitro methods were employed to periodically pressure eject glutamate or mGluR agonists over neurons on one side of a slice preparation leaving the opposite side of the same slice untreated. Immunohistochemistry was then performed using Y10B in order to assess ribosomal changes. Application of glutamate and both group I and II selective mGluR agonists effectively rescued ribosomal antigenicity on the treated side of the slice in comparison to ribosomes on the untreated side. These findings suggest that administration of mGluR agonists is sufficient to reduce the early interruption of normal ribosomal integrity that is typically seen following loss of auditory nerve activity. PMID:25334004

  14. NMDA receptors activated by subventricular zone astrocytic glutamate are critical for neuroblast survival prior to entering a synaptic network

    PubMed Central

    Platel, Jean-Claude; Dave, Kathleen A.; Gordon, Valerie; Lacar, Benjamin; Rubio, Maria E.; Bordey, Angélique

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Even before integrating into existing circuitry, adult-born neurons express receptors for neurotransmitters, but the intercellular mechanisms and their impact on neurogenesis remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that neuroblasts born in the postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) acquire NMDA receptors (NMDARs) during their migration to the olfactory bulb. Along their route, neuroblasts are ensheathed by astrocyte-like cells expressing vesicular glutamate release machinery. Increasing calcium in these specialized astrocytes induced NMDAR-activity in neuroblasts and blocking astrocytic vesicular release eliminated spontaneous NMDAR-activity. Single-cell knockout of NMDARs using neonatal electroporation resulted in neuroblast apoptosis at the time of NMDAR acquisition. This cumulated in a 40% loss of neuroblasts along their migratory route demonstrating that NMDAR acquisition is critical for neuroblast survival, prior to entering a synaptic network. In addition, our findings suggest an unexpected mechanism where SVZ astrocytes use glutamate signaling through NMDARs to control the number of adult-born neurons reaching their final destination. PMID:20346761

  15. Helicobacter pylori γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase Induces Tolerogenic Human Dendritic Cells by Activation of Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Käbisch, Romy; Semper, Raphaela P; Wüstner, Stefanie; Gerhard, Markus; Mejías-Luque, Raquel

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection is characterized by chronic persistence of the bacterium. Different virulence factors, including H. pylori γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (gGT), have been reported to induce tolerogenicity by reprogramming dendritic cells (DCs). gGT is present in all bacterial isolates, indicating an important role for gGT in the course of infection. In the current study, we have analyzed the effect of H. pylori gGT on human DCs and the subsequent adaptive immune response. We show that glutamate produced due to H. pylori gGT enzymatic activity tolerizes DCs by inhibiting cAMP signaling and dampening IL-6 secretion in response to the infection. Together, our results provide a novel molecular mechanism by which H. pylori manipulates the host's immune response to persist within its host. PMID:27183641

  16. Glutamate Receptor Stimulation Up-Regulates Glutamate Uptake in Human Müller Glia Cells.

    PubMed

    López-Colomé, Ana María; López, Edith; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the vertebrate retina, is a well know activator of numerous signal transduction pathways, and has been critically involved in long-term synaptic changes acting through ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. However, recent findings underlining the importance of intensity and duration of glutamate stimuli for specific neuronal responses, including excitotoxicity, suggest a crucial role for Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, responsible for the removal of this neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft, in the regulation of glutamate-induced signaling. Transporter proteins are expressed in neurons and glia cells, albeit most of glutamate uptake occurs in the glial compartment. Within the retina, Müller glia cells are in close proximity to glutamatergic synapses and participate in the recycling of glutamate through the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. In this context, we decided to investigate a plausible role of glutamate as a regulatory signal for its own transport in human retinal glia cells. To this end, we determined [(3)H]-D-aspartate uptake in cultures of spontaneously immortalized human Müller cells (MIO-M1) exposed to distinct glutamatergic ligands. A time and dose-dependent increase in the transporter activity was detected. This effect was dependent on the activation of the N-methyl D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors, due to a dual effect: an increase in affinity and an augmented expression of the transporter at the plasma membrane, as established via biotinylation experiments. Furthermore, a NMDA-dependent association of glutamate transporters with the cystoskeletal proteins ezrin and glial fibrillary acidic protein was also found. These results add a novel mediator of the glutamate transporter modulation and further strengthen the notion of the critical involvement of glia cells in synaptic function. PMID:27017513

  17. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  18. Long-Term Activation of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Increases Functional TRPV1-Expressing Neurons in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Takayoshi; Kudo, Makiko; Yoshida, Junko; Ishibashi, Takaharu; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Kato, Nobuo; Imaizumi, Noriko; Nishio, Matomo

    2016-01-01

    Damaged tissues release glutamate and other chemical mediators for several hours. These chemical mediators contribute to modulation of pruritus and pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of long-term activation of excitatory glutamate receptors on functional expression of transient receptor potential vaniloid type 1 (TRPV1) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and then on thermal pain behavior. In order to detect the TRPV1-mediated responses in cultured DRG neurons, we monitored intracellular calcium responses to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, with Fura-2. Long-term (4 h) treatment with glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate, quisqualate or DHPG) increased the proportion of neurons responding to capsaicin through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, and only partially through the activation of mGluR5; engagement of these receptors was evident in neurons responding to allylisothiocyanate (AITC), a transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) agonist. Increase in the proportion was suppressed by phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C, mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or transcription inhibitors. Whole-cell recording was performed to record TRPV1-mediated membrane current; TRPV1 current density significantly increased in the AITC-sensitive neurons after the quisqualate treatment. To elucidate the physiological significance of this phenomenon, a hot plate test was performed. Intraplantar injection of quisqualate or DHPG induced heat hyperalgesia that lasted for 4 h post injection. This chronic hyperalgesia was attenuated by treatment with either mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. These results suggest that long-term activation of mGluR1/5 by peripherally released glutamate may increase the number of neurons expressing functional TRPV1 in DRG, which may be strongly associated with chronic hyperalgesia. PMID:27064319

  19. Long-Term Activation of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Increases Functional TRPV1-Expressing Neurons in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Masuoka, Takayoshi; Kudo, Makiko; Yoshida, Junko; Ishibashi, Takaharu; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Kato, Nobuo; Imaizumi, Noriko; Nishio, Matomo

    2016-01-01

    Damaged tissues release glutamate and other chemical mediators for several hours. These chemical mediators contribute to modulation of pruritus and pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of long-term activation of excitatory glutamate receptors on functional expression of transient receptor potential vaniloid type 1 (TRPV1) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and then on thermal pain behavior. In order to detect the TRPV1-mediated responses in cultured DRG neurons, we monitored intracellular calcium responses to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, with Fura-2. Long-term (4 h) treatment with glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate, quisqualate or DHPG) increased the proportion of neurons responding to capsaicin through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, and only partially through the activation of mGluR5; engagement of these receptors was evident in neurons responding to allylisothiocyanate (AITC), a transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) agonist. Increase in the proportion was suppressed by phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C, mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or transcription inhibitors. Whole-cell recording was performed to record TRPV1-mediated membrane current; TRPV1 current density significantly increased in the AITC-sensitive neurons after the quisqualate treatment. To elucidate the physiological significance of this phenomenon, a hot plate test was performed. Intraplantar injection of quisqualate or DHPG induced heat hyperalgesia that lasted for 4 h post injection. This chronic hyperalgesia was attenuated by treatment with either mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. These results suggest that long-term activation of mGluR1/5 by peripherally released glutamate may increase the number of neurons expressing functional TRPV1 in DRG, which may be strongly associated with chronic hyperalgesia. PMID:27064319

  20. Reactive oxygen species induced by presynaptic glutamate receptor activation is involved in [(3)H]GABA release from rat brain cortical nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, A; Krupko, O; Himmelreich, N

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a response to presynaptic glutamate receptor activation, and the role of ROS in neurotransmitter (GABA) release. Experiments were performed with rat brain cortical synaptosomes using glutamate, NMDA and kainate as agonists of glutamate receptors. ROS production was evaluated with the fluorogenic compound dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H(2)DCF-DA), and GABA release was studied using synaptosomes loaded with [(3)H]GABA. All agonists were found to stimulate ROS production, and specific antagonists of NMDA and kainate/AMPA receptors, dizocilpine hydrogen maleate (MK-801) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-done (CNQX), significantly inhibited the ROS increase. Spontaneous as well as agonist-evoked ROS production was effectively attenuated by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a commonly used potent inhibitor of NADPH oxidase activity, that suggests a high contribution of NADPH-oxidase to this process. The replacement of glucose with pyruvate or the simultaneous presence of both substrates in the medium led to the decrease in spontaneous and NMDA-evoked ROS production, but to the increase in ROS production induced by kainate. Scavenging of agonist-evoked ROS production by a potent antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was tightly correlated with the inhibition of agonist-evoked GABA release. Together, these findings show that the activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors induces an increase in ROS production, and there is a tight correlation between ROS production and GABA secretion. The pivotal role of kainate/AMPA receptors in ROS production is under discussion. PMID:22864357

  1. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 activation is required for long-term depression in medial prefrontal cortex and fear extinction

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Adam G.; Wenthur, Cody J.; Xiang, Zixiu; Rook, Jerri M.; Emmitte, Kyle A.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies have revealed that genetic variations in metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGlu3) affect performance on cognitive tasks dependent upon the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and may be linked to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and addiction. We have performed a series of studies aimed at understanding how mGlu3 influences PFC function and cognitive behaviors. In the present study, we found that activation of mGlu3 can induce long-term depression in the mouse medial PFC (mPFC) in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo administration of a selective mGlu3 negative allosteric modulator impaired learning in the mPFC-dependent fear extinction task. The results of these studies implicate mGlu3 as a major regulator of PFC function and cognition. Additionally, potentiators of mGlu3 may be useful in alleviating prefrontal impairments associated with several CNS disorders. PMID:25583490

  2. Single channel kinetics of a glutamate receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Kerry, C J; Kits, K S; Ramsey, R L; Sansom, M S; Usherwood, P N

    1987-01-01

    The glutamate receptor-channel of locust muscle membrane was studied using the patch-clamp technique. Muscles were pretreated with concanavalin A to block receptor-channel desensitization, thus facilitating analysis of receptor-channel gating kinetics. Single channel kinetics were analyzed to aid in identification of the molecular basis of channel gating. Channel dwell-time distributions and dwell-time autocorrelation functions were calculated from single channel data recorded in the precence of 10-4M glutamate. Analysis of the dwell time distributions in terms of mixtures of exponential functions revealed there to be at least three open states of the receptor-channel and at least four closed states. Autocorrelation function analysis showed there to be at least three pathways linking the open states with the closed. This results in a minimal scheme for gating of the glutamate receptor-channel, which is suggestive of allosteric models of receptor-channel gating. PMID:2436676

  3. Single Channel Kinetics of a Glutamate Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kerry, Cathryn J.; Kits, Karel S.; Ramsey, Robert L.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Usherwood, Peter N. R.

    1986-01-01

    The glutamate receptor-channel of locust muscle membrane was studied using the patch-clamp technique. Muscles were pretreated with concanavalin A to block receptor-channel desensitization, thus facilitating analysis of receptor-channel gating kinetics. Single channel kinetics were analyzed to aid in identification of the molecular basis of channel gating. Channel dwell-time distributions and dwell-time autocorrelation functions were calculated from single channel data recorded in the presence of 10-4 M glutamate. Analysis of the dwell time distributions in terms of mixtures of exponential functions revealed there to be at least three open states of the receptor-channel and at least four closed states. Autocorrelation function analysis showed there to be at least three pathways linking the open states with the closed. This results in a minimal scheme for gating of the glutamate receptor-channel, which is suggestive of allosteric models of receptor-channel gating. PMID:19431683

  4. Therapeutic Potential of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Hovelsø, N; Sotty, F; Montezinho, L.P; Pinheiro, P.S; Herrik, K.F; Mørk, A

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) and is a major player in complex brain functions. Glutamatergic transmission is primarily mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptors, which include NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors. However, glutamate exerts modulatory actions through a family of metabotropic G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Dysfunctions of glutamatergic neurotransmission have been implicated in the etiology of several diseases. Therefore, pharmacological modulation of ionotropic glutamate receptors has been widely investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of several disorders associated with glutamatergic dysfunction. However, blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors might be accompanied by severe side effects due to their vital role in many important physiological functions. A different strategy aimed at pharmacologically interfering with mGluR function has recently gained interest. Many subtype selective agonists and antagonists have been identified and widely used in preclinical studies as an attempt to elucidate the role of specific mGluRs subtypes in glutamatergic transmission. These studies have allowed linkage between specific subtypes and various physiological functions and more importantly to pathological states. This article reviews the currently available knowledge regarding the therapeutic potential of targeting mGluRs in the treatment of several CNS disorders, including schizophrenia, addiction, major depressive disorder and anxiety, Fragile X Syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and pain. PMID:22942876

  5. Coordinated activation of distinct Ca(2+) sources and metabotropic glutamate receptors encodes Hebbian synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Tigaret, Cezar M; Olivo, Valeria; Sadowski, Josef H L P; Ashby, Michael C; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    At glutamatergic synapses, induction of associative synaptic plasticity requires time-correlated presynaptic and postsynaptic spikes to activate postsynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs). The magnitudes of the ensuing Ca2+ transients within dendritic spines are thought to determine the amplitude and direction of synaptic change. In contrast, we show that at mature hippocampal Schaffer collateral synapses the magnitudes of Ca2+ transients during plasticity induction do not match this rule. Indeed, LTP induced by time-correlated pre- and postsynaptic spikes instead requires the sequential activation of NMDARs followed by voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels within dendritic spines. Furthermore, LTP requires inhibition of SK channels by mGluR1, which removes a negative feedback loop that constitutively regulates NMDARs. Therefore, rather than being controlled simply by the magnitude of the postsynaptic calcium rise, LTP induction requires the coordinated activation of distinct sources of Ca2+ and mGluR1-dependent facilitation of NMDAR function. PMID:26758963

  6. Coordinated activation of distinct Ca2+ sources and metabotropic glutamate receptors encodes Hebbian synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Tigaret, Cezar M.; Olivo, Valeria; Sadowski, Josef H.L.P.; Ashby, Michael C.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    At glutamatergic synapses, induction of associative synaptic plasticity requires time-correlated presynaptic and postsynaptic spikes to activate postsynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs). The magnitudes of the ensuing Ca2+ transients within dendritic spines are thought to determine the amplitude and direction of synaptic change. In contrast, we show that at mature hippocampal Schaffer collateral synapses the magnitudes of Ca2+ transients during plasticity induction do not match this rule. Indeed, LTP induced by time-correlated pre- and postsynaptic spikes instead requires the sequential activation of NMDARs followed by voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels within dendritic spines. Furthermore, LTP requires inhibition of SK channels by mGluR1, which removes a negative feedback loop that constitutively regulates NMDARs. Therefore, rather than being controlled simply by the magnitude of the postsynaptic calcium rise, LTP induction requires the coordinated activation of distinct sources of Ca2+ and mGluR1-dependent facilitation of NMDAR function. PMID:26758963

  7. Phosphorylation and Assembly of Glutamate Receptors after Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Guo, Ailan; Liu, Chunli; Comb, Micheal; Hu, Bingren

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Over-assembly of synaptic glutamate receptors leads to excitotoxicity. The goal of this study is to investigate phosphorylation and assembly of AMPA and NMDA receptors after brain ischemia with reperfusion (I/R). Methods Rats were subjected to 15 min of global ischemia followed by 0.5, 4, and 24 h of reperfusion. Phosphotyrosine (Ptyr) peptides of glutamate receptors in synaptosomal fraction after I/R were identified and quantified by state-of-the-art immuno-affinity purification of Ptyr peptides followed by LC-MS/MS analysis (IAP-LC/MS/MS). Glutamate receptor phosphorylation and synaptic assembly after I/R were studied by biochemical methods. Results Numerous Ptyr sites of AMPA and NMDA were upregulated by about 2- to 37-fold after I/R. A core glutamate receptor kinase, Src kinase, was significantly activated. GluR2/3 and NR2A/B were rapidly clustered from extrasynaptic to synaptic membrane fractions after I/R. GluR2/3 was then translocated into the intracellular pool, whereas NR2A/B remained in the synaptic fraction for as long as 24 h. Consistently, trafficking-related phosphorylation of GluR2/3-S880 was significantly but transiently upregulated, whereas NR2A/B-Y1246 and -Y1472 were significantly and persistently upregulated after I/R. Conclusions Phosphorylation of glutamate receptors at synapses may lead to over-assembly of glutamate receptors, probably via activation of Src family kinases, after I/R. This study provides “global” proteomic information about glutamate receptor tyrosine phosphorylation after brain ischemia. PMID:23212166

  8. Nonvesicular Release of Glutamate by Glial xCT Transporters Suppresses Glutamate Receptor Clustering In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Hrvoje; Grosjean, Yael; Chen, Kaiyun; Sheng, Qi; Featherstone, David E.

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that cystine/glutamate transporters (xCTs) might be critical regulators of ambient extracellular glutamate levels in the nervous system and that misregulation of this glutamate pool might have important neurophysiological and/or behavioral consequences. To test this idea, we identified and functionally characterized a novel Drosophila xCT gene, which we subsequently named “genderblind” (gb). Genderblind is expressed in a previously overlooked subset of peripheral and central glia. Genetic elimination of gb causes a 50% reduction in extracellular glutamate concentration, demonstrating that xCT transporters are important regulators of extracellular glutamate. Consistent with previous studies showing that extracellular glutamate regulates postsynaptic glutamate receptor clustering, gb mutants show a large (200–300%) increase in the number of postsynaptic glutamate receptors. This increase in postsynaptic receptor abundance is not accompanied by other obvious synaptic changes and is completely rescued when synapses are cultured in wild-type levels of glutamate. Additional in situ pharmacology suggests that glutamate-mediated suppression of glutamate receptor clustering depends on receptor desensitization. Together, our results suggest that (1) xCT transporters are critical for regulation of ambient extracellular glutamate in vivo; (2) ambient extracellular glutamate maintains some receptors constitutively desensitized in vivo; and (3) constitutive desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors suppresses their ability to cluster at synapses. PMID:17202478

  9. Glutamate Receptor Agonists and Glutamate Transporter Antagonists Regulate Differentiation of Osteoblast Lineage Cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenjie; Dolder, Silvia; Siegrist, Mark; Wetterwald, Antoinette; Hofstetter, Willy

    2016-08-01

    Development and function of osteoblast lineage cells are regulated by a complex microenvironment consisting of the bone extracellular matrix, cells, systemic hormones and cytokines, autocrine and paracrine factors, and mechanical load. Apart from receptors that transduce extracellular signals into the cell, molecular transporters play a crucial role in the cellular response to the microenvironment. Transporter molecules are responsible for cellular uptake of nutritional components, elimination of metabolites, ion transport, and cell-cell communication. In this report, the expression of molecular transporters in osteoblast lineage cells was investigated to assess their roles in cell development and activity. Low-density arrays, covering membrane and vesicular transport molecules, were used to assess gene expression in osteoblasts representing early and late differentiation states. Receptors and transporters for the amino acid glutamate were found to be differentially expressed during osteoblast development. Glutamate is a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and the mechanisms of its release, signal transduction, and cellular reabsorption in the synaptic cleft are well understood. Less clear, however, is the control of equivalent processes in peripheral tissues. In primary osteoblasts, inhibition of glutamate transporters with nonselective inhibitors leads to an increase in the concentration of extracellular glutamate. This change was accompanied by a decrease in osteoblast proliferation, stimulation of alkaline phosphatase, and the expression of transcripts encoding osteocalcin. Enzymatic removal of extracellular glutamate abolished these pro-differentiation effects, as did the inhibition of PKC- and Erk1/2-signaling pathways. These findings demonstrate that glutamate signaling promotes differentiation and activation of osteoblast lineage cells. Consequently, the glutamate system may represent a putative therapeutic target to induce an anabolic response

  10. Activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits the desensitization and internalization of metabotropic glutamate receptors 1a and 1b.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Pula, Giordano; More, Julia C A; Jane, David E; Roberts, Peter J; Kelly, Eamonn

    2004-06-01

    In this study, we characterized the effects of activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on the internalization and functional coupling of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1) splice variants mGluR1a and mGluR1b. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique to assess receptor internalization, we found that the glutamate-induced internalization of mGluR1a or mGluR1b transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells was inhibited by coactivation of endogenous beta2-adrenoceptors with isoprenaline or by direct activation of adenylyl cyclase with forskolin. The PKA inhibitor N-(2-[p-bromocinnamylamino]ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H89) blocked the effects of both isoprenaline and forskolin. The heterologous internalization of the mGluR1 splice variants triggered by carbachol was also inhibited by isoprenaline and forskolin in a PKA-sensitive fashion, whereas the constitutive (agonist-independent) internalization of mGluR1a was inhibited only modestly by PKA activation. Using inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation in cells prelabeled with [3H]inositol to assess receptor coupling, PKA activation increased basal IP accumulation in mGluR1a receptor-expressing cells and also increased glutamate-stimulated IP accumulation in both mGluR1a- and mGluR1b-expressing cells, but only at short times of glutamate addition. Furthermore, PKA activation completely blocked the carbachol-induced heterologous desensitization of glutamate-stimulated IP accumulation in both mGluR1a- and mGluR1b-expressing cells. In coimmunoprecipitation experiments, the ability of glutamate to increase association of GRK2 and arrestin-2 with mGluR1a and mGluR1b was inhibited by PKA activation with forskolin. Together, these results indicate that PKA activation inhibits the agonist-induced internalization and desensitization of mGluR1a and mGluR1b, probably by reducing their interaction with GRK2 and nonvisual arrestins. PMID:15155843

  11. Glycine release is regulated by metabotropic glutamate receptors sensitive to mGluR2/3 ligands and activated by N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG).

    PubMed

    Romei, Cristina; Raiteri, Maurizio; Raiteri, Luca

    2013-03-01

    The presence of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) of group II modulating glycine exocytosis from glycinergic nerve endings of mouse spinal cord was investigated. Purified synaptosomes were selectively prelabeled with [(3)H]glycine through the neuronal transporter GlyT2 and subsequently depolarized by superfusion with 12 mM KCl. The selective mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 inhibited the K(+)-evoked overflow of [(3)H]glycine in a concentration-dependent manner (EC(50) about 0.2 nM). The effect of LY379268 was prevented by the selective mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 (IC(50) about 1 nM). N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) inhibited [(3)H]glycine overflow with extraordinary potency (EC(50) about 50 fmol). In contrast, glutamate was ineffective up to 0.1 nM, excluding that glutamate contamination of commercial NAAG samples is responsible for the reported activity of NAAG at mGluR3. LY341495 antagonized the NAAG inhibition of [(3)H]glycine release. The effect of a combination of maximally effective concentrations of LY379268 and NAAG exhibited no additivity. The non-hydrolysable NAAG analogue N-acetylaspartyl-β-linked glutamate (β-NAAG) antagonized NAAG and LY379268. In conclusion, our results show that glycinergic nerve endings in spinal cord are endowed with group II mGluRs mediating inhibition of glycine exocytosis. NAAG can activate these presynaptic receptors with extremely high affinity and with characteristics compatible with the reported mGluR3 pharmacology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors'. PMID:22659408

  12. Glutamate Delta-1 Receptor Regulates Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Signaling in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Suryavanshi, Pratyush S; Gupta, Subhash C; Yadav, Roopali; Kesherwani, Varun; Liu, Jinxu; Dravid, Shashank M

    2016-08-01

    The delta family of ionotropic glutamate receptors consists of glutamate delta-1 (GluD1) and glutamate delta-2 receptors. We have previously shown that GluD1 knockout mice exhibit features of developmental delay, including impaired spine pruning and switch in the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit, which are relevant to autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Here, we identified a novel role of GluD1 in regulating metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) signaling in the hippocampus. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated colocalization of mGlu5 with GluD1 punctas in the hippocampus. Additionally, GluD1 protein coimmunoprecipitated with mGlu5 in the hippocampal membrane fraction, as well as when overexpressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, demonstrating that GluD1 and mGlu5 may cooperate in a signaling complex. The interaction of mGlu5 with scaffold protein effector Homer, which regulates mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, was abnormal both under basal conditions and in response to mGlu1/5 agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) in GluD1 knockout mice. The basal levels of phosphorylated mTOR and protein kinase B, the signaling proteins downstream of mGlu5 activation, were higher in GluD1 knockout mice, and no further increase was induced by DHPG. We also observed higher basal protein translation and an absence of DHPG-induced increase in GluD1 knockout mice. In accordance with a role of mGlu5-mediated mTOR signaling in synaptic plasticity, DHPG-induced internalization of surface α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor subunits was impaired in the GluD1 knockout mice. These results demonstrate that GluD1 interacts with mGlu5, and loss of GluD1 impairs normal mGlu5 signaling potentially by dysregulating coupling to its effector. These studies identify a novel role of the enigmatic GluD1 subunit in hippocampal function. PMID:27231330

  13. [Glutamate receptor-mediated retinal neuronal injury in experimental glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Feng; Yang, Xiong-Li

    2016-08-25

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by optic nerve degeneration related to apoptotic death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In the pathogenesis of RGC death following the onset of glaucoma, functional changes of glutamate receptors are commonly regarded as important risk factors. During the past several years, we have explored the mechanisms underlying RGC apoptosis and retinal Müller cell reactivation (gliosis) in a rat chronic ocular hypertension (COH) model. We demonstrated that elevated intraocular pressure in COH rats may induce changes of various signaling pathways, which are involved in RGC apoptosis by modulating glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors. Moreover, we also demonstrated that over-activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR I) by excessive extracellular glutamate in COH rats could contribute to Müller cell gliosis by suppressing Kir4.1 channels. In this review, incorporating our results, we discuss glutamate receptor- mediated RGC apoptosis and Müller cell gliosis in experimental glaucoma. PMID:27546508

  14. Functional Insights from Glutamate Receptor Ion Channel Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Janesh; Mayer, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures for the soluble amino terminal and ligand binding domains of glutamate receptor ion channels, combined with a 3.6 Å resolution structure of the full length AMPA receptor GluA2 homotetramer, provide unique insights into the mechanisms of iGluR assembly and function. Increasingly sophisticated biochemical, computational and electrophysiological experiments are beginning to reveal the mechanism of action of partial agonists, and yield new models for the mechanism of action of allosteric modulators. Newly identified NMDA receptor ligands acting at novel sites offer hope for development of subtype selective modulators. Many issues remain unsolved, including the role of the ATD in AMPA receptor signaling, and the mechanisms by which auxiliary proteins regulate receptor activity. The structural basis for ion permeation and ion channel block also remain areas of uncertainty, and despite substantial progress, molecular dynamics simulations have yet to reveal how binding of glutamate opens the ion channel pore. PMID:22974439

  15. P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity GABA and glutamate transport into rat brain cortex synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Barros-Barbosa, A R; Lobo, M G; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P; Cordeiro, J M

    2015-10-15

    Sodium-dependent high-affinity amino-acid transporters play crucial roles in terminating synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). However, there is lack of information about the mechanisms underlying the regulation of amino-acid transport by fast-acting neuromodulators, like ATP. Here, we investigated whether activation of the ATP-sensitive P2X7 receptor modulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate uptake into nerve terminals (synaptosomes) of the rat cerebral cortex. Radiolabeled neurotransmitter accumulation was evaluated by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The cell-permeant sodium-selective fluorescent indicator, SBFI-AM, was used to estimate Na(+) influx across plasma membrane. 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP (BzATP, 3-300 μM), a prototypic P2X7 receptor agonist, concentration-dependently decreased [(3)H]GABA (14%) and [(14)C]glutamate (24%) uptake; BzATP decreased transport maximum velocity (Vmax) without affecting the Michaelis constant (Km) values. The selective P2X7 receptor antagonist, A-438079 (3 μM), prevented inhibition of [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake by BzATP (100 μM). The inhibitory effect of BzATP coincided with its ability to increase intracellular Na(+) and was mimicked by Na(+) ionophores, like gramicidin and monensin. Increases in intracellular Na(+) (with veratridine or ouabain) or substitution of extracellular Na(+) by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG)(+) all decreased [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake and attenuated BzATP effects. Uptake inhibition by BzATP (100 μM) was also attenuated by calmidazolium, which selectively inhibits Na(+) currents through the P2X7 receptor pore. In conclusion, disruption of the Na(+) gradient by P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates high-affinity GABA and glutamate uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes. Interference with amino-acid transport efficacy may constitute a novel target for therapeutic management of cortical excitability. PMID

  16. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mariana P C; Nunes-Correia, Isabel; Santos, Armanda E; Custódio, José B A

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. PMID:24240127

  17. REPEATED ANABOLIC/ANDROGENIC STEROID EXPOSURE DURING ADOLESCENCE ALTERS PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE AND GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR 1 SUBUNIT IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN HAMSTER BRAIN: CORRELATION WITH OFFENSIVE AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Shannon G.; Ricci, Lesley A.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2007-01-01

    Male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) treated with moderately high doses (5.0mg/kg/day) of anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence (P27–P56) display highly escalated offensive aggression. The current study examined whether adolescent AAS-exposure influenced the immunohistochemical localization of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of glutamate, a fast-acting neurotransmitter implicated in the modulation of aggression in various species and models of aggression, as well as glutamate receptor 1 subunit (GluR1). Hamsters were administered AAS during adolescence, scored for offensive aggression using the resident-intruder paradigm, and then examined for changes in PAG and GluR1 immunoreactivity in areas of the brain implicated in aggression control. When compared with sesame oil-treated control animals, aggressive AAS-treated hamsters displayed a significant increase in the number of PAG- and area density of GluR1- containing neurons in several notable aggression regions, although the differential pattern of expression did not appear to overlap across brain regions. Together, these results suggest that altered glutamate synthesis and GluR1 receptor expression in specific aggression areas may be involved in adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. PMID:17418431

  18. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  19. Orally Active Metabotropic Glutamate Subtype 2 Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators: Structure-Activity Relationships and Assessment in a Rat Model of Nicotine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Sidique, Shyama; Dhanya, Raveendra-Panickar; Sheffler, Douglas J.; Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Yang, Li; Dahl, Russell; Mangravita-Novo, Arianna; Smith, Layton H.; D’Souza, Manoranjan S.; Semenova, Svetlana; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Markou, Athina; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.

    2012-01-01

    Compounds that modulate metabotropic glutamate subtype 2 (mGlu2) receptors have the potential to treat several disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) including drug dependence. Herein we describe the synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies around a series of mGlu2 receptor positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). The effects of N-substitution (R1) and substitutions on the aryl ring (R2) were identified as key areas for SAR exploration (Figure 3). Investigation of the effects of varying substituents in both the isoindolinone (2) and benzisothiazolone (3) series led to compounds with improved in vitro potency and/or efficacy. In addition, several analogues exhibited promising pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. Furthermore, compound 2 was shown to dose-dependently decrease nicotine self-administration in rats following oral administration. Our data, showing for the first time efficacy of an mGlu2 receptor PAM in this in vivo model, suggest potential utility for the treatment of nicotine dependence in humans. PMID:23009245

  20. New phenylglycine derivatives with potent and selective antagonist activity at presynaptic glutamate receptors in neonatal rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Jane, D E; Pittaway, K; Sunter, D C; Thomas, N K; Watkins, J C

    1995-08-01

    The depression of the monosynaptic excitation of neonatal rat motoneurones produced by the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonists (1S,3S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1, 3-dicarboxylate (ACPD) or L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) was antagonized by three novel phenylglycine analogues: (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-sulphonophenylglycine (MSPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) and (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG). The potencies of all the new compounds were greater than that of the previously reported (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG). For L-AP4-sensitive presynaptic mGluRs, the order of antagonist potency found was MPPG > MSPG > MTPG > MCPG. In contrast, the order of antagonist potency found for (1S,3S)-ACPD-sensitive presynaptic mGluRs was MTPG > MPPG > MSPG > MCPG. To date, MPPG (KD 9.2 microM) is the most potent L-AP4-sensitive receptor antagonist yet tested on the neonatal rat spinal cord. In addition, MTPG (KD 77 microM) is the most potent antagonist yet tested for (1S,3S)-ACPD-sensitive receptors in this preparation. PMID:8532166

  1. Group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Limin; Guo, Minglei; Jin, Daozhong; Xue, Bing; Wang, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroadaptations of glutamatergic transmission in the limbic reward circuitry are linked to persistent drug addiction. Accumulating data have demonstrated roles of ionotropic glutamate receptors and group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in this event. Emerging evidence also identifies Gαi/o-coupled group III mGluRs (mGluR4/7/8 subtypes enriched in the limbic system) as direct substrates of drugs of abuse and active regulators of drug action. Auto- and heteroreceptors of mGluR4/7/8 reside predominantly on nerve terminals of glutamatergic corticostriatal and GABAergic striatopallidal pathways, respectively. These presynaptic receptors regulate basal and/or phasic release of respective transmitters to maintain basal ganglia homeostasis. In response to operant administration of common addictive drugs, such as psychostimulants (cocaine and amphetamine), alcohol and opiates, limbic group III mGluRs undergo drastic adaptations to contribute to the enduring remodeling of excitatory synapses and to usually suppress drug seeking behavior. As a result, a loss-of-function mutation (knockout) of individual group III receptor subtypes often promotes drug seeking. This review summarizes the data from recent studies on three group III receptor subtypes (mGluR4/7/8) expressed in the basal ganglia and analyzes their roles in the regulation of dopamine and glutamate signaling in the striatum and their participation in the addictive properties of three major classes of drugs (psychostimulants, alcohol, and opiates). PMID:24078068

  2. Group III metabotropic glutamate receptors and drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Mao, Limin; Guo, Minglei; Jin, Daozhong; Xue, Bing; Wang, John Q

    2013-12-01

    Neuroadaptations of glutamatergic transmission in the limbic reward circuitry are linked to persistent drug addiction. Accumulating data have demonstrated roles of ionotropic glutamate receptors and group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in this event. Emerging evidence also identifies Gαi/o-coupled group III mGluRs (mGluR4/7/8 subtypes enriched in the limbic system) as direct substrates of drugs of abuse and active regulators of drug action. Auto- and heteroreceptors of mGluR4/7/8 reside predominantly on nerve terminals of glutamatergic corticostriatal and GABAergic striatopallidal pathways, respectively. These presynaptic receptors regulate basal and/or phasic release of respective transmitters to maintain basal ganglia homeostasis. In response to operant administration of common addictive drugs, such as psychostimulants (cocaine and amphetamine), alcohol and opiates, limbic group III mGluRs undergo drastic adaptations to contribute to the enduring remodeling of excitatory synapses and to usually suppress drug seeking behavior. As a result, a loss-of-function mutation (knockout) of individual group III receptor subtypes often promotes drug seeking. This review summarizes the data from recent studies on three group III receptor subtypes (mGluR4/7/8) expressed in the basal ganglia and analyzes their roles in the regulation of dopamine and glutamate signaling in the striatum and their participation in the addictive properties of three major classes of drugs (psychostimulants, alcohol, and opiates). PMID:24078068

  3. Triple threat treatment: Exploiting the dependence receptor properties of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 against melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, Tara; Hathaway, Hannah A; Wroblewski, Jarda T

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma cells that express metabotropic glutamate 1 (mGlu1) receptors depend on glutamate for their survival and proliferation. The dependence receptor properties of mGlu1 allow us to propose and justify three promising approaches for melanoma treatment: glutamate depletion, mGlu1 receptor antagonism, and targeting of mGlu1 receptor signaling.

  4. Selective blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 is neuroprotective.

    PubMed

    Bruno, V; Ksiazek, I; Battaglia, G; Lukic, S; Leonhardt, T; Sauer, D; Gasparini, F; Kuhn, R; Nicoletti, F; Flor, P J

    2000-09-01

    We have used potent and selective non-competitive antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) -- 2-methyl-6-phenylethynylpyridine (MPEP), [6-methyl-2-(phenylazo)-3-pyridinol] (SIB-1757) and [(E)-2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethenyl)pyridine] (SIB-1893) - to examine whether endogenous activation of this particular metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype contributes to neuronal degeneration. In cortical cultures challenged with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), all three mGlu5 receptor antagonists were neuroprotective. The effect of MPEP was highly specific because the close analogue, 3-methyl-6-phenylethynylpyridine (iso-MPEP), which did not antagonize heterologously expressed mGlu5 receptors, was devoid of activity on NMDA toxicity. Neuroprotection by mGlu5 receptor antagonists was also observed in cortical cultures challenged with a toxic concentration of beta-amyloid peptide. We have also examined the effect of mGlu5 receptor antagonists in in vivo models of excitotoxic degeneration. MPEP and SIB-1893 were neuroprotective against neuronal damage induced by intrastriatal injection of NMDA or quinolinic acid. These results indicate that mGlu5 receptors represent a suitable target for novel neuroprotective agents of potential application in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:10974306

  5. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C.; Nunes-Correia, Isabel; Santos, Armanda E.; Custódio, José B.A.

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. - Highlights: • MK-801 and memantine decrease melanoma cell proliferation. • The combination of MK-801 with antiestrogens inhibits melanoma cell proliferation. • These combinations greatly enhance the effects of the compounds individually. • MK-801 combined with tamoxifen active metabolites induces cell cycle arrest in G1. • The combination of MK-801 and antiestrogens is an innovative strategy for melanoma.

  6. Post-Translational Modification Biology of Glutamate Receptors and Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Li-Min; Guo, Ming-Lei; Jin, Dao-Zhong; Fibuch, Eugene E.; Choe, Eun Sang; Wang, John Q.

    2011-01-01

    Post-translational covalent modifications of glutamate receptors remain a hot topic. Early studies have established that this family of receptors, including almost all ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes, undergoes active phosphorylation at serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues in their intracellular domains. Recent evidence identifies several glutamate receptor subtypes to be direct substrates for palmitoylation at cysteine residues. Other modifications such as ubiquitination and sumoylation at lysine residues also occur to certain glutamate receptors. These modifications are dynamic and reversible in nature and are regulatable by changing synaptic inputs. The regulated modifications significantly impact the receptor in many ways, including interrelated changes in biochemistry (synthesis, subunit assembling, and protein–protein interactions), subcellular redistribution (trafficking, endocytosis, synaptic delivery, and clustering), and physiology, usually associated with changes in synaptic plasticity. Glutamate receptors are enriched in the striatum and cooperate closely with dopamine to regulate striatal signaling. Emerging evidence shows that modification processes of striatal glutamate receptors are sensitive to addictive drugs, such as psychostimulants (cocaine and amphetamine). Altered modifications are believed to be directly linked to enduring receptor/synaptic plasticity and drug-seeking. This review summarizes several major types of modifications of glutamate receptors and analyzes the role of these modifications in striatal signaling and in the pathogenesis of psychostimulant addiction. PMID:21441996

  7. Expression of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) gene in primary neurons and increase in SMN levels by activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Andreassi, Catia; Patrizi, Anna Letizia; Monani, Umrao R; Burghes, A H M; Brahe, Christina; Eboli, Maria Luisa

    2002-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common motor neuron degenerative disease caused by mutations of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) gene. The SMN protein is expressed ubiquitously as part of a 300-kilodalton multi-protein complex, incorporating several proteins critically required in pre-mRNA splicing. Although SMN mutations render SMN defective in this role, the specific alpha-motor neuron degenerative phenotype seen in the disease remains unexplained. During the differentiation process of spinal motor neurons and cerebellar granule cells, the acquisition of mature electrophysiological and molecular properties is linked to the activation of the glutamate receptors of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype. We have used primary cultures of rat cerebellar granules to study SMN expression during neuronal differentiation in vitro and in response to the activation of the NMDA receptor. We report that the expression of gems, the nuclear structures where SMN concentrates, is developmentally regulated. The highest expression is associated with the cell clustering phase and expression of NMDA receptors. Stimulation of the NMDA receptor induces an increase in gem number and in SMN transcription, through activation of its promoter. These results demonstrate that SMN levels are dependent on synaptic activity, implying that SMN may have important neuron-specific functions downstream of synaptic activation. PMID:12030329

  8. Variant ionotropic glutamate receptors as chemosensory receptors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Richard; Vannice, Kirsten S.; Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate neuronal communication at synapses throughout vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. We have characterized a novel family of iGluR-related genes in Drosophila, which we name Ionotropic Receptors (IRs). These receptors do not belong to the well-described Kainate, AMPA, or NMDA classes of iGluRs, and have divergent ligand-binding domains that lack their characteristic glutamate-interacting residues. IRs are expressed in a combinatorial fashion in sensory neurons that respond to many distinct odors but do not express either insect odorant receptors (ORs) or gustatory receptors (GRs). IR proteins accumulate in sensory dendrites and not at synapses. Mis-expression of IRs induces novel odor responses in ectopic neurons. Together, these results lead us to propose that the IRs comprise a novel family of chemosensory receptors. Conservation of IR/iGluR-related proteins in bacteria, plants, and animals suggests that this receptor family represents an evolutionarily ancient mechanism for sensing both internal and external chemical cues. PMID:19135896

  9. Activation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 7 Is Required for Induction of Long-Term Potentiation at SC-CA1 Synapses in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Klar, Rebecca; Walker, Adam G.; Ghose, Dipanwita; Grueter, Brad A.; Engers, Darren W.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Xiang, Zixiu

    2015-01-01

    Of the eight metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor subtypes, only mGlu7 is expressed presynaptically at the Schaffer collateral (SC)-CA1 synapse in the hippocampus in adult animals. Coupled with the inhibitory effects of Group III mGlu receptor agonists on transmission at this synapse, mGlu7 is thought to be the predominant autoreceptor responsible for regulating glutamate release at SC terminals. However, the lack of mGlu7-selective pharmacological tools has hampered direct testing of this hypothesis. We used a novel, selective mGlu7-negative allosteric modulator (NAM), ADX71743, and a newly described Group III mGlu receptor agonist, LSP4-2022, to elucidate the role of mGlu7 in modulating transmission in hippocampal area CA1 in adult C57BL/6J male mice. Interestingly, although mGlu7 agonists inhibit SC-CA1 EPSPs, we found no evidence for activation of mGlu7 by stimulation of SC-CA1 afferents. However, LSP4-2022 also reduced evoked monosynaptic IPSCs in CA1 pyramidal cells and, in contrast to its effect on SC-CA1 EPSPs, ADX71743 reversed the ability of high-frequency stimulation of SC afferents to reduce IPSC amplitudes. Furthermore, blockade of mGlu7 prevented induction of LTP at the SC-CA1 synapse and activation of mGlu7 potentiated submaximal LTP. Together, these data suggest that mGlu7 serves as a heteroreceptor at inhibitory synapses in area CA1 and that the predominant effect of activation of mGlu7 by stimulation of glutamatergic afferents is disinhibition, rather than reduced excitatory transmission. Furthermore, this mGlu7-mediated disinhibition is required for induction of LTP at the SC-CA1 synapse, suggesting that mGlu7 could serve as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of cognitive disorders. PMID:25972184

  10. Modulating the Intrinsic Disorder in the Cytoplasmic Domain Alters the Biological Activity of the N-Methyl-d-aspartate-sensitive Glutamate Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ucheor B.; Kazi, Rashek; Stenzoski, Natalie; Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Bowen, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    The NMDA-sensitive glutamate receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that mediates excitatory synaptic transmission in the nervous system. Extracellular zinc allosterically regulates the NMDA receptor by binding to the extracellular N-terminal domain, which inhibits channel gating. Phosphorylation of the intrinsically disordered intracellular C-terminal domain alleviates inhibition by extracellular zinc. The mechanism for this functional effect is largely unknown. Proline is a hallmark of intrinsic disorder, so we used proline mutagenesis to modulate disorder in the cytoplasmic domain. Proline depletion selectively uncoupled zinc inhibition with little effect on receptor biogenesis, surface trafficking, or ligand-activated gating. Proline depletion also reduced the affinity for a PDZ domain involved in synaptic trafficking and affected small molecule binding. To understand the origin of these phenomena, we used single molecule fluorescence and ensemble biophysical methods to characterize the structural effects of proline mutagenesis. Proline depletion did not eliminate intrinsic disorder, but the underlying conformational dynamics were changed. Thus, we altered the form of intrinsic disorder, which appears sufficient to affect the biological activity. These findings suggest that conformational dynamics within the intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domain are important for the allosteric regulation of NMDA receptor gating. PMID:23782697

  11. Effects of a metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 negative allosteric modulator in the periaqueductal grey on pain responses and rostral ventromedial medulla cell activity in rat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGluR7) negative allosteric modulator, 6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-pyridin-4-ylisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one (MMPIP), was locally microinjected into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VL PAG) and the effect on pain responses in formalin and spare nerve injury (SNI) -induced neuropathic pain models was monitored in the rat. The activity of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) “pronociceptive” ON and “antinociceptive” OFF cells was also evaluated. Intra–VL PAG MMPIP blocked the first and second phase of nocifensive behaviour in the formalin pain model. MMPIP increased the tail flick latency and simultaneously increased the activity of the OFF cells while inhibiting that of ON cells in rats with SNI of the sciatic nerve. MMPIP failed to modify nociceptive responses and associated RVM ON and OFF cell activity in sham rats. An increase in mGluR7 gene, protein and staining, the latter being associated with vesicular glutamate transporter-positive profiles, has been found in the VL PAG in SNI rats. Blockade of mGluR7 within the VL PAG has an antinociceptive effect in formalin and neuropathic pain models. VL PAG mGluR7 blockade offers a target for dis-inhibiting the VL PAG-RVM pathway and silencing pain in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. PMID:24004843

  12. Activation of Group I and Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Causes LTD and LTP of Electrical Synapses in the Rat Thalamic Reticular Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zemin; Neely, Ryan; Landisman, Carole E

    2015-05-13

    Compared with the extensive characterization of chemical synaptic plasticity, electrical synaptic plasticity remains poorly understood. Electrical synapses are strong and prevalent among the GABAergic neurons of the rodent thalamic reticular nucleus. Using paired whole-cell recordings, we show that activation of Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) induces long-term depression of electrical synapses. Conversely, activation of the Group II mGluR, mGluR3, induces long-term potentiation of electrical synapses. By testing downstream targets, we show that modifications induced by both mGluR groups converge on the same signaling cascade--adenylyl cyclase to cAMP to protein kinase A--but with opposing effects. Furthermore, the magnitude of modification is inversely correlated to baseline coupling strength. Thus, electrical synapses, like their chemical counterparts, undergo both strengthening and weakening forms of plasticity, which should play a significant role in thalamocortical function. PMID:25972185

  13. Metabotropic glutamate receptor regulation of neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Spillson, Alison Berent; Russell, James W

    2003-11-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are a family of glutamate-sensitive receptors that regulate neuronal function separately from the ionotropic glutamate receptors. By coupling to guanosine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), mGluRs are able to regulate neuronal injury and survival, likely through a series of downstream protein kinase and cysteine protease signaling pathways that affect mitochondrial regulated programmed cell death (PCD). The physiological relevance of this system is supported by evidence that mGluRs are associated with cell survival in several central nervous system neurodegenerative diseases. Evidence is presented that mGluRs are also able to prevent PCD in the peripheral nervous system, and that this may provide a novel mechanism for treatment of diabetic neuropathy. In dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, a high glucose load increases generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), destabilizes the inner mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi(M)), induces cytochrome c release from the mitochondrial intermembrane space, and induces downstream activation of caspases. In high-glucose conditions, the group II metabotropic glutamate agonist N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) blocks caspase activation and is completely reversed by the mGluR3 antagonist (S)-alpha-ethylglutamic acid (EGLU). Furthermore, the direct mGluR3 agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2, 4-dicarboxylate (APDC) prevents induction of ROS. Together these findings are consistent with an emerging concept that mGluRs may protect against cellular injury by regulating oxidative stress in the neuron. More complete understanding of the complex PCD regulatory pathways mediated by mGluRs will provide new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of a wide variety of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:14597332

  14. Increasing the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphB2 Prevents Amyloid-β-induced Depletion of Cell Surface Glutamate Receptors by a Mechanism That Requires the PDZ-binding Motif of EphB2 and Neuronal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Takashi; Kim, Daniel; Knox, Joseph A.; Johnson, Erik; Mucke, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Diverse lines of evidence suggest that amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides causally contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), the most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. However, the mechanisms by which Aβ impairs neuronal functions remain to be fully elucidated. Previous studies showed that soluble Aβ oligomers interfere with synaptic functions by depleting NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) from the neuronal surface and that overexpression of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB2 can counteract this process. Through pharmacological treatments and biochemical analyses of primary neuronal cultures expressing wild-type or mutant forms of EphB2, we demonstrate that this protective effect of EphB2 depends on its PDZ-binding motif and the presence of neuronal activity but not on its kinase activity. We further present evidence that the protective effect of EphB2 may be mediated by the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA2, which can become associated with the PDZ-binding motif of EphB2 through PDZ domain-containing proteins and can promote the retention of NMDARs in the membrane. In addition, we show that the Aβ-induced depletion of surface NMDARs does not depend on several factors that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Aβ-induced neuronal dysfunction, including aberrant neuronal activity, tau, prion protein (PrPC), and EphB2 itself. Thus, although EphB2 does not appear to be directly involved in the Aβ-induced depletion of NMDARs, increasing its expression may counteract this pathogenic process through a neuronal activity- and PDZ-dependent regulation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. PMID:26589795

  15. Simulation of Postsynaptic Glutamate Receptors Reveals Critical Features of Glutamatergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Greget, Renaud; Pernot, Fabien; Bouteiller, Jean-Marie C.; Ghaderi, Viviane; Allam, Sushmita; Keller, Anne Florence; Ambert, Nicolas; Legendre, Arnaud; Sarmis, Merdan; Haeberle, Olivier; Faupel, Michel; Bischoff, Serge; Berger, Theodore W.; Baudry, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Activation of several subtypes of glutamate receptors contributes to changes in postsynaptic calcium concentration at hippocampal synapses, resulting in various types of changes in synaptic strength. Thus, while activation of NMDA receptors has been shown to be critical for long-term potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission, activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) has been linked to either LTP or LTD. While it is generally admitted that dynamic changes in postsynaptic calcium concentration represent the critical elements to determine the direction and amplitude of the changes in synaptic strength, it has been difficult to quantitatively estimate the relative contribution of the different types of glutamate receptors to these changes under different experimental conditions. Here we present a detailed model of a postsynaptic glutamatergic synapse that incorporates ionotropic and mGluR type I receptors, and we use this model to determine the role of the different receptors to the dynamics of postsynaptic calcium with different patterns of presynaptic activation. Our modeling framework includes glutamate vesicular release and diffusion in the cleft and a glutamate transporter that modulates extracellular glutamate concentration. Our results indicate that the contribution of mGluRs to changes in postsynaptic calcium concentration is minimal under basal stimulation conditions and becomes apparent only at high frequency of stimulation. Furthermore, the location of mGluRs in the postsynaptic membrane is also a critical factor, as activation of distant receptors contributes significantly less to calcium dynamics than more centrally located ones. These results confirm the important role of glutamate transporters and of the localization of mGluRs in postsynaptic sites in their signaling properties, and further strengthen the notion that mGluR activation significantly contributes to postsynaptic calcium dynamics only following

  16. On the Role of Glutamate in Presynaptic Development: Possible Contributions of Presynaptic NMDA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fedder, Karlie N; Sabo, Shasta L

    2015-01-01

    Proper formation and maturation of synapses during development is a crucial step in building the functional neural circuits that underlie perception and behavior. It is well established that experience modifies circuit development. Therefore, understanding how synapse formation is controlled by synaptic activity is a key question in neuroscience. In this review, we focus on the regulation of excitatory presynaptic terminal development by glutamate, the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. We discuss the evidence that NMDA receptor activation mediates these effects of glutamate and present the hypothesis that local activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs) contributes to glutamate-dependent control of presynaptic development. Abnormal glutamate signaling and aberrant synapse development are both thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia. Therefore, understanding how glutamate signaling and synapse development are linked is important for understanding the etiology of these diseases. PMID:26694480

  17. On the Role of Glutamate in Presynaptic Development: Possible Contributions of Presynaptic NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fedder, Karlie N.; Sabo, Shasta L.

    2015-01-01

    Proper formation and maturation of synapses during development is a crucial step in building the functional neural circuits that underlie perception and behavior. It is well established that experience modifies circuit development. Therefore, understanding how synapse formation is controlled by synaptic activity is a key question in neuroscience. In this review, we focus on the regulation of excitatory presynaptic terminal development by glutamate, the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. We discuss the evidence that NMDA receptor activation mediates these effects of glutamate and present the hypothesis that local activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs) contributes to glutamate-dependent control of presynaptic development. Abnormal glutamate signaling and aberrant synapse development are both thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia. Therefore, understanding how glutamate signaling and synapse development are linked is important for understanding the etiology of these diseases. PMID:26694480

  18. Stimulation of peripheral cholinergic nerves by glutamate indicates a new peripheral glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Aas, P; Tansø, R; Fonnum, F

    1989-05-01

    The bronchial smooth muscle of the rat was examined for contractile responses to excitatory amino acids. The nerve-mediated contraction induced by electrical field stimulation was enhanced by exogenous L-glutamate (L-Glu). The apparent affinity (ED50) of L-Glu was 3.5 +/- 0.1 mM. Both tetrodotoxin and hemicholinium-3 completely abolished the electrical field-induced contraction and therefore the potentiation by L-Glu, which indicates that L-Glu has a prejunctional effect. Concentrations of L-Glu higher than 22 mM inhibited the electrical field-induced contractions and enhanced the tonus of the smooth muscle by postjunctional stimulation. The ED50 of exogenous ACh was not altered by L-Glu. High concentrations (62 mM) of L-Glu increased the intrinsic activity (alpha) of ACh, indicating a postjunctional potentiation of ACh-induced contractions. L-Glu did not inhibit the activity of acetylcholinesterase, therefore the postjunctional potentiation was not due to ACh accumulation. Inhibition of the electrical field-induced contraction was seen with high concentrations of D-Glu, L-aspartate (L-Asp), L-alpha-amino adipate and ibotenate. Neither glutamate diethyl ester nor 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate had any inhibitory effects on the L-Glu- and L-Asp-induced alterations of the electrical field-stimulated contraction or on the L-Glu-enhanced tonus of the bronchial smooth muscle. Kainate, N-methyl-D-aspartate, quisqualate and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate had only minor transient potentiating effects on the electrical field-induced contraction. The results provide evidence for a L-Glu receptor in rat bronchi that has a different specificity for glutamate agonists and antagonists than the L-Glu receptor described in the CNS. The receptor seems to be located prejunctionally and enhances nerve-mediated responses and thereby stimulates the bronchial smooth muscle to contract. The possible involvement of this type of receptor in the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' is discussed. PMID

  19. [Glutamate Metabotropic Receptors: Structure, Localisation, Functions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Tyurenkov, I N

    2016-01-01

    The data on the structure, location and functions of the metabotropic glutamate receptor is shown. The family consists of 8 mGluRs subtypes and is divided into three groups: I group--mGluRs1/mGluRs5, II group--mGluRs2/mGluRs3, III group--mGluRs4/mGluRs6/mGluRs7/mGluRs8. They are associated with G-protein; signaling in the cells is carried out by IP3 or adenylate cyclase signaling pathways, in the result of which, mGluRs modify glial and neuronal excitability. Receptors are localized in the CNS and periphery in non-neuronal tissues: bone, heart, kidney, pancreas pod and platelets, the gastrointestinal tract, immune system. Their participation in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, mental and cognitive disorders, autoimmune processes, etc. is displayed. Agonists, antagonists, allosteric modulators of mGluRs are considered as potential medicines for treatment of mental diseases, including depression, fragile X syndrome, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders, Parkinson's disease, etc. PMID:27530046

  20. Activation of Phosphatidylinositol-Linked Dopamine Receptors Induces a Facilitation of Glutamate-Mediated Synaptic Transmission in the Lateral Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Glovaci, Iulia; Chapman, C. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The lateral entorhinal cortex receives strong inputs from midbrain dopamine neurons that can modulate its sensory and mnemonic function. We have previously demonstrated that 1 µM dopamine facilitates synaptic transmission in layer II entorhinal cortex cells via activation of D1-like receptors, increased cAMP-PKA activity, and a resulting enhancement of AMPA-receptor mediated currents. The present study assessed the contribution of phosphatidylinositol (PI)-linked D1 receptors to the dopaminergic facilitation of transmission in layer II of the rat entorhinal cortex, and the involvement of phospholipase C activity and release of calcium from internal stores. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of glutamate-mediated evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents were obtained from pyramidal and fan cells. Activation of D1-like receptors using SKF38393, SKF83959, or 1 µM dopamine induced a reversible facilitation of EPSCs which was abolished by loading cells with either the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 or the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA. Neither the L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, nor the L/N-type channel blocker cilnidipine, blocked the facilitation of synaptic currents. However, the facilitation was blocked by blocking Ca2+ release from internal stores via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors or ryanodine receptors. Follow-up studies demonstrated that inhibiting CaMKII activity with KN-93 failed to block the facilitation, but that application of the protein kinase C inhibitor PKC(19-36) completely blocked the dopamine-induced facilitation. Overall, in addition to our previous report indicating a role for the cAMP-PKA pathway in dopamine-induced facilitation of synaptic transmission, we demonstrate here that the dopaminergic facilitation of synaptic responses in layer II entorhinal neurons also relies on a signaling cascade dependent on PI-linked D1 receptors, PLC, release of Ca2+ from internal stores, and PKC activation which is likely dependent

  1. Activation of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors inhibits basal and amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release in rat dorsal striatum: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Mao, L; Lau, Y S; Wang, J Q

    2000-09-22

    Group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase and are distributed pre-synaptically in the striatum. A behavioral study previously conducted in this laboratory shows that activation of this group of mGlu receptors attenuates acute amphetamine-stimulated motor activity. By administering a group III selective agonist or antagonist via the dialysis probe, the present study employed in vivo microdialysis to evaluate the capacity of the group III selective agents to alter extracellular levels of dopamine in the dorsal striatum of normal and amphetamine-treated rats. It was found that the group III agonist L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) dose-dependently (1, 10 and 100 microM) reduced basal levels of extracellular dopamine. In contrast, the group III antagonist alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) dose-dependently (10, 50 and 250 microM) elevated the basal release of extracellular dopamine. This elevation was antagonized by co-perfusion of L-AP4. Perfusion of 5-microM amphetamine through the dialysis probe increased extracellular dopamine in the dorsal striatum. Co-perfusion of L-AP4 (100 microM) significantly reduced amphetamine-stimulated dopamine levels, whereas co-perfusion of L-AP4 (100 microM) and MPPG (100 microM) did not alter the capacity of amphetamine to elicit dopamine release. The data obtained from this study demonstrate the presence of a tonically active glutamatergic tone on group III mGlu receptors in the dorsal striatum to pre-synaptically regulate basal dopamine release in an inhibitory fashion. Moreover, activation of L-AP4-sensitive group III mGlu receptors can suppress the phasic release of dopamine induced by a dopamine stimulant amphetamine. PMID:10996594

  2. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors inhibit glutamate release at thalamocortical synapses in the developing somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Z; Porter, J T

    2007-05-25

    Thalamocortical synapses provide a strong glutamatergic excitation to cortical neurons that is critical for processing sensory information. Unit recordings in vivo indicate that metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) reduce the effect of thalamocortical input on cortical circuits. However, it is not known whether this reduction is due to a reduction in glutamate release from thalamocortical terminals or from a decrease in cortical neuron excitability. To directly determine whether mGluRs act as autoreceptors on thalamocortical terminals, we examined the effect of mGluR agonists on thalamocortical synapses in slices. Thalamocortical excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded in layer IV cortical neurons in developing mouse brain slices. The activation of group II mGluRs with (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG IV) reduced thalamocortical EPSCs in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons, while the stimulation of group I or group III mGluRs had no effect on thalamocortical EPSCs. Consistent with a reduction in glutamate release, DCG IV increased the paired pulse ratio and the coefficient of variation of the EPSCs. The reduction induced by DCG IV was reversed by the group II mGluR antagonist, LY341495, and mimicked by another selective group II agonist, (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (APDC). The mGluR2 subtype appears to mediate the reduction of thalamocortical EPSCs, since the selective mGluR3 agonist, N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), had no effect on the EPSCs. Consistent with this, we showed that mGluR2 is expressed in the barrels. Furthermore, blocking group II mGluRs with LY341495 reduced the synaptic depression induced by a short stimulus train, indicating that synaptically released glutamate activates these receptors. These results indicate that group II mGluRs modulate thalamocortical processing by inhibiting glutamate release from thalamocortical synapses. This inhibition provides a feedback mechanism for

  3. Modulation of ionotropic glutamate receptor function by vertebrate galectins

    PubMed Central

    Copits, Bryan A; Vernon, Claire G; Sakai, Ryuichi; Swanson, Geoffrey T

    2014-01-01

    AMPA and kainate receptors are glutamate-gated ion channels whose function is known to be altered by a variety of plant oligosaccharide-binding proteins, or lectins, but the physiological relevance of this activity has been uncertain because no lectins with analogous allosteric modulatory effects have been identified in animals. We report here that members of the prototype galectin family, which are β-galactoside-binding lectins, exhibit subunit-specific allosteric modulation of desensitization of recombinant homomeric and heteromeric AMPA and kainate receptors. Galectin modulation of GluK2 kainate receptors was dependent upon complex oligosaccharide processing of N-glycosylation sites in the amino-terminal domain and downstream linker region. The sensitivity of GluA4 AMPA receptors to human galectin-1 could be enhanced by supplementation of culture media with uridine and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), precursors for the hexosamine pathway that supplies UDP-GlcNAc for synthesis of complex oligosaccharides. Neuronal kainate receptors in dorsal root ganglia were sensitive to galectin modulation, whereas AMPA receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons were insensitive, which could be a reflection of differential N-glycan processing or receptor subunit selectivity. Because glycan content of integral proteins can be modified dynamically, we postulate that physiological or pathological conditions in the CNS could arise in which galectins alter excitatory neurotransmission or neuronal excitability through their actions on AMPA or kainate receptors. PMID:24614744

  4. Dysfunction of Glutamate Receptors in Microglia May Cause Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Noda, Mami

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of glutamate signalling is important in Alzheimer's disease and other pathologies. There has been a focus on changes in neuronal glutamate signalling, but microglia also express glutamate receptors (GluRs), which are known to modulate their responses to neuropathology. Microglia express both metabotropic and ionotropic GluRs. Among ionotropic GluRs, microglial AMPA (α-amino-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionate)-type of GluRs (AMPA-Rs) are Ca2+ impermeable due to the expression of subunit GluA2. Upon activation of microglia, expression level of surface GluA2 subunits significantly increase, while expression of GluA1, A3 and A4 subunits on membrane surface significantly decrease. Owing to the GluA2 subunits-dominant composition, AMPA-Rs in activated microglia show little response to Glu. On the other hand, microglia lacking GluA2 show higher Ca(2+)-permeability, consequently inducing a significant increase in the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, such as TNF-α. It is suggested that membrane translocation of GluA2-containing AMPA-Rs in activated microglia has functional importance. Thus, dysfunction or decreased expression of GluA2 reported in patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease may accelerate Glu neurotoxicity via excess release of proinflammatory cytokines from microglia, causing more neuronal death. PMID:26567741

  5. Roles of subunit phosphorylation in regulating glutamate receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, John Q.; Guo, Ming-Lei; Jin, Dao-Zhong; Xue, Bing; Fibuch, Eugene E.; Mao, Li-Min

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important mechanism for regulating ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). Early studies have established that major iGluR subtypes, including α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, are subject to phosphorylation. Multiple serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues predominantly within the C-terminal regions of AMPA receptor and NMDA receptor subunits have been identified as sensitive phosphorylation sites. These distinct sites undergo either constitutive phosphorylation or activity-dependent phosphorylation induced by changing cellular and synaptic inputs as reversible events. An increasing number of synapse-enriched protein kinases have been found to phosphorylate iGluR. The common kinases include protein kinase A, protein kinase C, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, Src/Fyn non-receptor tyrosine kinases, and cyclin dependent kinase-5. Regulated phosphorylation plays a well-documented role in modulating the biochemical, biophysical, and functional properties of the receptor. In the future, identifying the precise mechanisms how phosphorylation regulates iGluR activities and finding the link between iGluR phosphorylation and the pathogenesis of various brain diseases, including psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, chronic pain, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and substance addiction, will be hot topics and could contribute to the development of novel pharmacotherapies, by targeting the defined phosphorylation process, for suppressing iGluR-related disorders. PMID:24291102

  6. Pharmacological or genetic orexin1 receptor inhibition attenuates MK-801 induced glutamate release in mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Aluisio, Leah; Fraser, Ian; Berdyyeva, Tamara; Tryputsen, Volha; Shireman, Brock T; Shoblock, James; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The orexin/hypocretin neuropeptides are produced by a cluster of neurons within the lateral posterior hypothalamus and participate in neuronal regulation by activating their receptors (OX1 and OX2 receptors). The orexin system projects widely through the brain and functions as an interface between multiple regulatory systems including wakefulness, energy balance, stress, reward, and emotion. Recent studies have demonstrated that orexins and glutamate interact at the synaptic level and that orexins facilitate glutamate actions. We tested the hypothesis that orexins modulate glutamate signaling via OX1 receptors by monitoring levels of glutamate in frontal cortex of freely moving mice using enzyme coated biosensors under inhibited OX1 receptor conditions. MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, was administered subcutaneously (0.178 mg/kg) to indirectly disinhibit pyramidal neurons and therefore increase cortical glutamate release. In wild-type mice, pretreatment with the OX1 receptor antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg S.C.) which had no effect by itself, significantly attenuated the cortical glutamate release elicited by MK-801. OX1 receptor knockout mice had a blunted glutamate release response to MK-801 and exhibited about half of the glutamate release observed in wild-type mice in agreement with the data obtained with transient blockade of OX1 receptors. These results indicate that pharmacological (transient) or genetic (permanent) inhibition of the OX1 receptor similarly interfere with glutamatergic function in the cortex. Selectively targeting the OX1 receptor with an antagonist may normalize hyperglutamatergic states and thus may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with hyperactive states. PMID:24904253

  7. Pharmacological or genetic orexin1 receptor inhibition attenuates MK-801 induced glutamate release in mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Aluisio, Leah; Fraser, Ian; Berdyyeva, Tamara; Tryputsen, Volha; Shireman, Brock T.; Shoblock, James; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The orexin/hypocretin neuropeptides are produced by a cluster of neurons within the lateral posterior hypothalamus and participate in neuronal regulation by activating their receptors (OX1 and OX2 receptors). The orexin system projects widely through the brain and functions as an interface between multiple regulatory systems including wakefulness, energy balance, stress, reward, and emotion. Recent studies have demonstrated that orexins and glutamate interact at the synaptic level and that orexins facilitate glutamate actions. We tested the hypothesis that orexins modulate glutamate signaling via OX1 receptors by monitoring levels of glutamate in frontal cortex of freely moving mice using enzyme coated biosensors under inhibited OX1 receptor conditions. MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, was administered subcutaneously (0.178 mg/kg) to indirectly disinhibit pyramidal neurons and therefore increase cortical glutamate release. In wild-type mice, pretreatment with the OX1 receptor antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg S.C.) which had no effect by itself, significantly attenuated the cortical glutamate release elicited by MK-801. OX1 receptor knockout mice had a blunted glutamate release response to MK-801 and exhibited about half of the glutamate release observed in wild-type mice in agreement with the data obtained with transient blockade of OX1 receptors. These results indicate that pharmacological (transient) or genetic (permanent) inhibition of the OX1 receptor similarly interfere with glutamatergic function in the cortex. Selectively targeting the OX1 receptor with an antagonist may normalize hyperglutamatergic states and thus may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with hyperactive states. PMID:24904253

  8. Activation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Type 2/3 Supports the Involvement of the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Pathway on Contextual Fear Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daumas, Stephanie; Ceccom, Johnatan; Halley, Helene; Frances, Bernard; Lassalle, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    Elucidating the functional properties of the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 areas is critical for understanding the role of the dorsal hippocampus in contextual fear memory processing. In order to specifically disrupt various hippocampal inputs, we used region-specific infusions of DCG-IV, the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, which…

  9. The neuroactive peptide N-acetylaspartylglutamate is not an agonist at the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 of metabotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Maninder; Yao, Yi; Blake, Timothy J; Hampson, David R; Johnson, Edwin C

    2009-07-01

    The peptide N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is present in high concentrations in the mammalian central nervous system. Various mechanisms have been proposed for its action, including selective activation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) subtype 3, its action at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, or the production of glutamate by its hydrolysis catalyzed by an extracellular protease. To re-examine its agonist activity at mGluR3, we coexpressed human or rat mGluR3 with G protein inward rectifying channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of commercial sources of NAAG showed 0.38 to 0.48% glutamate contamination. Although both human and rat mGluR3 were highly sensitive to glutamate, with EC(50) values of 58 and 28 nM, respectively, purified NAAG (100 microM) had little activity (7.7% of full activation by glutamate). Only in the millimolar range did it show significant activity, possibly due to residual traces of glutamate remaining in the purified NAAG preparations. In contrast, the unpurified NAAG sample did produce a full agonist response with mGluR3 coexpressed with G alpha(15), with an EC(50) of 120 microM, as measured by a calcium release assay. This response can be explained by the 0.38 to 0.48% glutamate contamination. Our results suggest that NAAG may not have a direct agonist activity at the mGluR3 receptor. Thus, several in vivo and in vitro published results that did not address the issue of glutamate contamination of NAAG preparations may need to be re-evaluated. PMID:19389924

  10. Progress toward advanced understanding of metabotropic glutamate receptors: structure, signaling and therapeutic indications

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shen; Niswender, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are a group of Class C Seven Transmembrane Spanning/G Protein Coupled Receptors (7TMRs/GPCRs). These receptors are activated by glutamate, one of the standard amino acids and the major excitatory neurotransmitter. By activating G protein-dependent and non G protein-dependent signaling pathways, mGlus modulate glutamatergic transmission in both the periphery and throughout the central nervous system. Since the discovery of the first mGlu receptor, especially the last decade, a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the signaling, structure, pharmacological manipulation and therapeutic indications of the 8 mGlu members. PMID:24793301

  11. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  12. Magnesium Sulfate Protects Against the Bioenergetic Consequences of Chronic Glutamate Receptor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, Pascaline; Young, Christina A.; Bordt, Evan A.; Grigore, Alina M.; Fiskum, Gary; Polster, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular glutamate is elevated following brain ischemia or trauma and contributes to neuronal injury. We tested the hypothesis that magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, 3 mM) protects against metabolic failure caused by excitotoxic glutamate exposure. Rat cortical neuron preparations treated in medium already containing a physiological concentration of Mg2+ (1 mM) could be segregated based on their response to glutamate (100 µM). Type I preparations responded with a decrease or small transient increase in oxygen consumption rate (OCR). Type II neurons responded with >50% stimulation in OCR, indicating a robust response to increased energy demand without immediate toxicity. Pre-treatment with MgSO4 improved the initial bioenergetic response to glutamate and ameliorated subsequent loss of spare respiratory capacity, measured following addition of the uncoupler FCCP, in Type I but not Type II neurons. Spare respiratory capacity in Type I neurons was also improved by incubation with MgSO4 or NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 in the absence of glutamate treatment. This finding indicates that the major difference between Type I and Type II preparations is the amount of endogenous glutamate receptor activity. Incubation of Type II neurons with 5 µM glutamate prior to excitotoxic (100 µM) glutamate exposure recapitulated a Type I phenotype. MgSO4 protected against an excitotoxic glutamate-induced drop in neuronal ATP both with and without prior 5 µM glutamate exposure. Results indicate that MgSO4 protects against chronic moderate glutamate receptor stimulation and preserves cellular ATP following treatment with excitotoxic glutamate. PMID:24236167

  13. Activation of type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor promotes the proliferation of rat retinal progenitor cell via activation of the PI-3-K and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Hu, F; Liu, Y; Ma, B; Chen, X; Zhu, K; Shi, Y; Wei, T; Xing, Y; Gao, Y; Lu, H; Liu, Y; Kang, Q

    2016-05-13

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) regulates neurogenesis in the brain, but the effect of mGluR5 on retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) remains unknown. In this study, we found that mGluR5 promoted the proliferation of rat RPCs with activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI-3-K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in vitro. The mGluR5 agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine hydrate (DHPG) increased the cellular viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, whereas the mGluR5 antagonist 6-methyl-2-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MTEP) had the opposite effect, as shown by 3-((2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MTT) assay. Treatment with DHPG (100μM) also promoted the proliferation of RPCs, as indicated by 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine (BrdU) staining and flow cytometry, and likewise, MTEP (100μM) and mGluR5 knockdown abolished the action of mGluR5 activity. Western blot demonstrated that the activation of mGluR5 enhanced the expression of Cyclin D1 and the phosphorylation level of PKC however, MTEP or mGluR5 knockdown also abrogated the effect of DHPG on RPCs. Furthermore, we found that activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathways was involved in the proliferation of RPC. After DHPG treatment, the levels of both p-ERK1/2 and p-AKT increased in a time-dependent manner. Then we used MTEP, mGluR5 knockdown, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and the AKT inhibitor LY294002 to pretreat the cells, and all of them clearly eliminated the influence of DHPG. These results demonstrated that mGluR5 regulates neurogenesis in RPCs through the MAPK and PI-3-K signaling pathways, and these findings may motivate a pharmacological study investigating a potential mechanism for the treatment of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). PMID:26902516

  14. Nicotine recruits glutamate receptors to postsynaptic sites.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing-Jing; Lozada, Adrian F; Gou, Chen-Yu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Yuan; Berg, Darwin K

    2015-09-01

    Cholinergic neurons project throughout the nervous system and activate nicotinic receptors to modulate synaptic function in ways that shape higher order brain function. The acute effects of nicotinic signaling on long-term synaptic plasticity have been well-characterized. Less well understood is how chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine, such as those encountered by habitual smokers, can alter neural connections to promote addiction and other lasting behavioral effects. We show here that chronic exposure of hippocampal neurons in culture to low levels of nicotine recruits AMPA and NMDA receptors to the cell surface and sequesters them at postsynaptic sites. The receptors include GluA2-containing AMPA receptors, which are responsible for most of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by AMPA receptors on the neurons, and include NMDA receptors containing GluN1 and GluN2B subunits. Moreover, we find that the nicotine treatment also increases expression of the presynaptic component synapsin 1 and arranges it in puncta juxtaposed to the additional AMPA and NMDA receptor puncta, suggestive of increases in synaptic contacts. Consistent with increased synaptic input, we find that the nicotine treatment leads to an increase in the excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. Further, the increases skew the ratio of excitatory-to-inhibitory input that the cell receives, and this holds both for pyramidal neurons and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. The GluN2B-containing NMDA receptor redistribution at synapses is associated with a significant increase in GluN2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a site known to prevent GluN2B endocytosis. These results suggest that chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine not only alters functional connections but also is likely to change excitability levels across networks. Further, it may increase the propensity for synaptic plasticity, given the increase in synaptic NMDA receptors. PMID

  15. The Amino Acid Transporter JhI-21 Coevolves with Glutamate Receptors, Impacts NMJ Physiology, and Influences Locomotor Activity in Drosophila Larvae.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Anna B; Augustin, Hrvoje; Clark, Nathan L; Berthelot-Grosjean, Martine; Simonnet, Mégane M; Steinert, Joern R; Geillon, Flore; Manière, Gérard; Featherstone, David E; Grosjean, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in synaptic physiology underlie neuronal network plasticity and behavioral phenomena, which are adjusted during development. The Drosophila larval glutamatergic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) represents a powerful synaptic model to investigate factors impacting these processes. Amino acids such as glutamate have been shown to regulate Drosophila NMJ physiology by modulating the clustering of postsynaptic glutamate receptors and thereby regulating the strength of signal transmission from the motor neuron to the muscle cell. To identify amino acid transporters impacting glutmatergic signal transmission, we used Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), a recently developed bioinformatic tool. Our screen identified ten proteins co-evolving with NMJ glutamate receptors. We selected one candidate transporter, the SLC7 (Solute Carrier) transporter family member JhI-21 (Juvenile hormone Inducible-21), which is expressed in Drosophila larval motor neurons. We show that JhI-21 suppresses postsynaptic muscle glutamate receptor abundance, and that JhI-21 expression in motor neurons regulates larval crawling behavior in a developmental stage-specific manner. PMID:26805723

  16. The Amino Acid Transporter JhI-21 Coevolves with Glutamate Receptors, Impacts NMJ Physiology, and Influences Locomotor Activity in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Anna B.; Augustin, Hrvoje; Clark, Nathan L.; Berthelot-Grosjean, Martine; Simonnet, Mégane M.; Steinert, Joern R.; Geillon, Flore; Manière, Gérard; Featherstone, David E.; Grosjean, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in synaptic physiology underlie neuronal network plasticity and behavioral phenomena, which are adjusted during development. The Drosophila larval glutamatergic neuromuscular junction (NMJ) represents a powerful synaptic model to investigate factors impacting these processes. Amino acids such as glutamate have been shown to regulate Drosophila NMJ physiology by modulating the clustering of postsynaptic glutamate receptors and thereby regulating the strength of signal transmission from the motor neuron to the muscle cell. To identify amino acid transporters impacting glutmatergic signal transmission, we used Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), a recently developed bioinformatic tool. Our screen identified ten proteins co-evolving with NMJ glutamate receptors. We selected one candidate transporter, the SLC7 (Solute Carrier) transporter family member JhI-21 (Juvenile hormone Inducible-21), which is expressed in Drosophila larval motor neurons. We show that JhI-21 suppresses postsynaptic muscle glutamate receptor abundance, and that JhI-21 expression in motor neurons regulates larval crawling behavior in a developmental stage-specific manner. PMID:26805723

  17. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Processing by a Unit of Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Uniporter and Na(+)/Ca(2+) Exchanger Supports the Neuronal Ca(2+) Influx via Activated Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Strokin, Mikhail; Reiser, Georg

    2016-06-01

    The current study demonstrates that in hippocampal neurons mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing supports Ca(2+) influx via ionotropic glutamate (Glu) receptors. We define mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing as Ca(2+) uptake via mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) combined with subsequent Ca(2+) release via mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). Our tool is to measure the Ca(2+) influx rate in primary hippocampal co-cultures, i.e. neurons and astrocytes, by fluorescent digital microscopy, using a Fura-2-quenching method where we add small amounts of Mn(2+) in the superfusion medium. Thus, Ca(2+) influx is measured with Mn(2+) in the bath. Ru360 as inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake through MCU strongly reduces the rate of Ca(2+) influx in Glu-stimulated primary hippocampal neurons. Similarly, the Ca(2+) influx rate in Glu-stimulated neurons declines after suppression of potential-dependent MCU, when we depolarize mitochondria with rotenone. With inhibition of Ca(2+) release from mitochondria via NCX using CGP-37157 the Ca(2+) influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)- and kainate-sensitive receptors is slowed down. Working jointly as mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing unit, MCU and NCX, apparently sustain the Ca(2+) throughput of activated Glu-sensitive receptors. Our results revise the role frequently attributed to mitochondria in neuronal Ca(2+) homeostasis, where mitochondria function mainly as Ca(2+) buffer, and prevent excessively high cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration increase during neuronal activity. The mechanism to control Ca(2+) influx in neurons, as discovered in this study, highlights mitochondrial Ca(2+) processing as a promising pharmacological target. We discuss this pathway in relation to the endoplasmic reticulum-related mechanisms of Ca(2+) processing. PMID:26842930

  18. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Dependent Cortical Plasticity in Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Koga, Kohei; Li, Shermaine; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Many cortical areas play crucial roles in higher order brain functions such as pain and emotion-processing, decision-making, and cognition. Among them, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insular cortex (IC) are two key areas. Glutamate mediates major excitatory transmission during long-term plasticity in both physiological and pathological conditions. Specifically related to nociceptive or pain behaviors, metabotropic glutamate subtype receptors (mGluRs) have been involved in different types of synaptic modulation and plasticity from periphery to the spinal cord. However, less is known about their functional roles in plasticity related to pain and its related behaviors within cortical regions. In this review, we first summarized previous studies of synaptic plasticity in both the ACC and IC, and discussed how mGluRs may be involved in both cortical long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD)-especially in LTD. The activation of mGluRs contributes to the induction of LTD in both ACC and IC areas. The loss of LTD caused by peripheral amputation or nerve injury can be rescued by priming ACC or IC with activations of mGluR1 receptors. We also discussed the potential functional roles of mGluRs for pain-related behaviors. We propose that targeting mGluRs in the cortical areas including the ACC and IC may provide a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of chronic pain, phantom pain or anxiety. PMID:27296638

  19. Ubiquitin-dependent trafficking and turnover of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Marisa S.; Scudder, Samantha L.; Patrick, Gentry N.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in synaptic strength underlie the basis of learning and memory and are controlled, in part, by the insertion or removal of AMPA-type glutamate receptors at the postsynaptic membrane of excitatory synapses. Once internalized, these receptors may be recycled back to the plasma membrane by subunit-specific interactions with other proteins or by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation. Alternatively, these receptors may be targeted for destruction by multiple degradation pathways in the cell. Ubiquitination, another post-translational modification, has recently emerged as a key signal that regulates the recycling and trafficking of glutamate receptors. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on the role of ubiquitination in the trafficking and turnover of ionotropic glutamate receptors and plasticity of excitatory synapses. PMID:26528125

  20. Modulation of the intracellular calcium concentration in photoreceptor terminals by a presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptor

    PubMed Central

    Koulen, Peter; Kuhn, Rainer; Wässle, Heinz; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system is mediated through glutamate acting on ionotropic glutamate receptors. However, glutamate acting on metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) can also exert an inhibitory action. Here, we report by immunocytochemistry and physiology, to our knowledge, the first glutamate receptor to be found in terminals of photoreceptors in the mammalian retina—the group III metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR8. Glutamate is the transmitter of photoreceptors, and thus mGluR8 functions as an autoreceptor. Activation of mGluR8 by the group III mGluR agonists l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate and l-serine-O-phosphate, or by glutamate itself, evokes a decrease in the intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) in isolated photoreceptors. This effect is blocked by the group III mGluR antagonists (RS)-α-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine and (RS)-α-methylserine-O-phosphate. Agonists for other classes of glutamate receptors—n-methyl-d-aspartic acid, quisqualic acid, kainic acid, or (RS)-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid—have no effect on the [Ca2+]i in isolated photoreceptors. The down-regulation of the [Ca2+]i in photoreceptors by mGluR8 provides evidence for an inhibitory feedback loop at the photoreceptor synapse in the mammalian retina. This negative feedback may be a mechanism for the fine adjustment of the light-regulated release of glutamate from photoreceptors and may serve as a safety device against excitotoxic levels of release at this tonic synapse. Such a mechanism may provide a model for feedback inhibition in other parts of the central nervous system. PMID:10449793

  1. Presynaptic kainate receptor facilitation of glutamate release involves protein kinase A in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio; Sihra, Talvinder S

    2004-01-01

    We have explored the mechanisms involved in the facilitation of glutamate release mediated by the activation of kainate receptors in the rat hippocampus using isolated nerve terminal (synaptosome) and slice preparations. In hippocampal nerve terminals, kainate (KA) produced an increase of glutamate release at concentrations of agonist ranging from 10 to 1000 μm. In hippocampal slices, KA at low nanomolar concentrations (20–50 nm) also produced an increase of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) at mossy fibre–CA3 synapses. In both, synaptosomes and slices, the effect of KA was antagonized by CNQX, and persisted after pretreatment with a cocktail of antagonists for other receptors whose activation could potentially have produced facilitation of release. These data indicate that the facilitation of glutamate release observed is mediated by the activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors of the kainate type. Mechanistically, the observed effects of KA appear to be the same in synaptosomal and slice preparations. Thus, the effect of KA on glutamate release and mossy fibre–CA3 synaptic transmission was occluded by the stimulation of adenylyl cyclase by forskolin and suppressed by the inhibition of protein kinase A by H-89 or Rp-Br-cAMP. We conclude that kainate receptors present at presynaptic terminals in the rat hippocampus mediate the facilitation of glutamate release through a mechanism involving the activation of an adenylyl cyclase–second messenger cAMP–protein kinase A signalling cascade. PMID:15107475

  2. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2002-10-28

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H]Arachidonic acid release induced by both sPLA and glutamate was partially blocked by MK-801, indicating that the glutamate-NMDA-cPLA pathway contributes to sPLA -induced arachidonic acid release. Systemic administration of MK-801 to rats that had sPLA injected into the right striatum significantly decreased neuronal cell death. We conclude that glutamatergic synaptic activity modulates sPLA -induced neuronal cell death. PMID:12395100

  3. NEURONAL ACTIVITY REGULATES GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER DYNAMICS IN DEVELOPING ASTROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Benediktsson, A.M.; Marrs, G.S.; Tu, J.C.; Worley, P.F.; Rothstein, J.D.; Bergles, D.E.; Dailey, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate transporters maintain a low ambient level of glutamate in the CNS and shape the activation of glutamate receptors at synapses. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and localization of transporters near sites of glutamate release are poorly understood. Here we examined the subcellular distribution and dynamic remodeling of the predominant glutamate transporter GLT-1 (EAAT2) in developing hippocampal astrocytes. Immunolabeling revealed that endogenous GLT-1 is concentrated into discrete clusters along branches of developing astrocytes that were apposed preferentially to synapsin-1 positive synapses. GFP-GLT-1 fusion proteins expressed in astrocytes also formed distinct clusters that lined the edges of astrocyte processes, as well as the tips of filopodia and spine-like structures. Time-lapse 3D confocal imaging in tissue slices revealed that GFP-GLT-1 clusters were dynamically remodeled on a timescale of minutes. Some transporter clusters moved within developing astrocyte branches as filopodia extended and retracted, while others maintained stable positions at the tips of spine-like structures. Blockade of neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin reduced both the density and perisynaptic localization of GLT-1 clusters. Conversely, enhancement of neuronal activity increased the size of GLT-1 clusters and their proximity to synapses. Together, these findings indicate that neuronal activity influences both the organization of glutamate transporters in developing astrocyte membranes and their position relative to synapses. PMID:22052455

  4. Glutamate receptor antibodies in neurological diseases: anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies, anti-mGluR1 antibodies or anti-mGluR5 antibodies are present in subpopulations of patients with either: epilepsy, encephalitis, cerebellar ataxia, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric SLE, Sjogren's syndrome, schizophrenia, mania or stroke. These autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies can bind neurons in few brain regions, activate glutamate receptors, decrease glutamate receptor's expression, impair glutamate-induced signaling and function, activate blood brain barrier endothelial cells, kill neurons, damage the brain, induce behavioral/psychiatric/cognitive abnormalities and ataxia in animal models, and can be removed or silenced in some patients by immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the Central Nervous System (CNS), and it is crucially needed for numerous key neuronal functions. Yet, excess glutamate causes massive neuronal death and brain damage by excitotoxicity--detrimental over activation of glutamate receptors. Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is the main pathological process taking place in many types of acute and chronic CNS diseases and injuries. In recent years, it became clear that not only excess glutamate can cause massive brain damage, but that several types of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies, that are present in the serum and CSF of subpopulations of patients with a kaleidoscope of human neurological diseases, can undoubtedly do so too, by inducing several very potent pathological effects in the CNS. Collectively, the family of anti-glutamate receptor autoimmune antibodies seem to be the most widespread, potent, dangerous and interesting anti-brain autoimmune antibodies discovered up to now. This impression stems from taking together the presence of various types of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies in a kaleidoscope of human neurological and autoimmune diseases, their high levels in the CNS due to intrathecal production, their multiple pathological effects in the brain, and the unique and diverse mechanisms of action by which they can affect glutamate receptors, signaling and effects, and subsequently impair neuronal signaling and induce brain damage. The two main families of autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies that were already found in patients with neurological and/or autoimmune diseases, and that were already shown to be detrimental to the CNS, include the antibodies directed against ionotorpic glutamate receptors: the anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies and anti-NMDA-NR2 antibodies, and the antibodies directed against Metabotropic glutamate receptors: the anti-mGluR1 antibodies and the anti-mGluR5 antibodies. Each type of these anti-glutamate

  5. Role of glutamate receptors in tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-47) neurotoxicity in mouse cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lucio G; Tagliaferri, Sara; Roqué, Pamela J; Pellacani, Claudia

    2016-01-22

    The polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants are developmental neurotoxicants, as evidenced by numerous in vitro, animal and human studies. PBDEs can alter the homeostasis of thyroid hormone and directly interact with brain cells. Induction of oxidative stress, leading to DNA damage and apoptotic cell death is a prominent mechanism of PBDE neurotoxicity, though other mechanisms have also been suggested. In the present study we investigated the potential role played by glutamate receptors in the in vitro neurotoxicity of the tetrabromodiphenyl ether BDE-47, one of the most abundant PBDE congeners. Toxicity of BDE-47 in mouse cerebellar neurons was diminished by antagonists of glutamate ionotropic receptors, but not by antagonists of glutamate metabotropic receptors. Antagonists of NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors also inhibited BDE-47-induced oxidative stress and increases in intracellular calcium. The calcium chelator BAPTA-AM also inhibited BDE-47 cytotoxicity and oxidative stress. BDE-47 caused a rapid increase of extracellular glutamate levels, which was not antagonized by any of the compounds tested. The results suggest that BDE-47, by still unknown mechanisms, increases extracellular glutamate which in turn activates ionotropic glutamate receptors leading to increased calcium levels, oxidative stress, and ultimately cell death. PMID:26640238

  6. Distinct inhibition of acute cocaine-stimulated motor activity following microinjection of a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist into the dorsal striatum of rats.

    PubMed

    Mao, L; Wang, J Q

    2000-09-01

    Group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase through G-proteins. Activation of this group of mGluRs shows an inhibition of dopaminergic transmission in the forebrain. To define the role of striatal group III mGluRs in the regulation of basal and dopamine-stimulated motor behavior, the recently developed agonist and antagonist relatively selective for group III mGluRs were utilized to pharmacologically enhance and reduce group III mGluR glutamatergic tone in the dorsal striatum of chronically cannulated rats. Bilateral injections of a group III agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4), did not alter basal levels of motor activity at three doses surveyed (1, 10, and 100 nmol). Neither did intracaudate injection of a group III antagonist, alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG), at 10, 30, and 100 nmol. However, pretreatment with L-AP4 (10 and 100 nmol) dose dependently blocked hyperlocomotion induced by acute injection of cocaine (20 mg/kg, i.p.), amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), or apomorphine (1 mg/kg, s.c.). The behavioral activity induced by cocaine was much more sensitive to L-AP4 than that induced by amphetamine and apomorphine. At 100 nmol, L-AP4 completely blocked cocaine effect whereas amphetamine- and apomorphine-stimulated behaviors were blocked only by 28% and 31%, respectively. The blocking effect of L-AP4 on cocaine action was reversed by pretreatment with MPPG. MPPG itself did not modify behavioral responses to cocaine, amphetamine, or apomorphine. These data indicate that the glutamatergic tone on the group III mGluRs is not active in the regulation of basal and acute dopamine-stimulated motor activity. However, enhanced group III mGluR glutamatergic transmission by an exogenous ligand is capable of suppressing behavioral responses to acute exposure of dopamine stimulants. PMID:11113488

  7. Cannabinoid 1 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors discretely modulate evoked glutamate separately from spontaneous glutamate transmission.

    PubMed

    Fawley, Jessica A; Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Andresen, Michael C

    2014-06-11

    Action potentials trigger synaptic terminals to synchronously release vesicles, but some vesicles release spontaneously. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can modulate both of these processes. At cranial primary afferent terminals, the GPCR cannabinoid 1 (CB1) is often coexpressed with transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a nonselective cation channel present on most afferents. Here we tested whether CB1 activation modulates synchronous, action potential-evoked (eEPSCs) and/or spontaneous (sEPSCs) EPSCs at solitary tract nucleus neurons. In rat horizontal brainstem slices, activation of solitary tract (ST) primary afferents generated ST-eEPSCs that were rapidly and reversibly inhibited from most afferents by activation of CB1 with arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) or WIN 55,212-2 [R-(+)-(2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl)(1-naphthalenyl) methanone monomethanesulfonate]. The CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 [N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide] blocked these responses. Despite profound depression of ST-eEPSCs during CB1 activation, sEPSCs in these same neurons were unaltered. Changes in temperature changed sEPSC frequency only from TRPV1(+) afferents (i.e., thermal sEPSC responses only occurred in TRPV1(+) afferents). CB1 activation failed to alter these thermal sEPSC responses. However, the endogenous arachidonate metabolite N-arachidonyldopamine (NADA) promiscuously activated both CB1 and TRPV1 receptors. NADA inhibited ST-eEPSCs while simultaneously increasing sEPSC frequency, and thermally triggered sEPSC increases in neurons with TRPV1(+) afferents. We found no evidence for CB1/TRPV1 interactions suggesting independent regulation of two separate vesicle pools. Together, these data demonstrate that action potential-evoked synchronous glutamate release is modulated separately from TRPV1-mediated glutamate release despite coexistence

  8. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  9. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis capsule induces nitric oxide production via the platelet activating factor receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Kyu; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Jungchan; Rhie, Gi-Eun

    2015-12-01

    The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule, a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, confers protection of the bacillus from phagocytosis and allows its unimpeded growth in the host. PGA capsules released from B. anthracis are associated with lethal toxin in the blood of experimentally infected animals and enhance the cytotoxic effect of lethal toxin on macrophages. In addition, PGA capsule itself activates macrophages and dendritic cells to produce proinflammatory cytokine such as IL-1β, indicating multiple roles of PGA capsule in anthrax pathogenesis. Here we report that PGA capsule of Bacillus licheniformis, a surrogate of B. anthracis capsule, induces production of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. NO production was induced by PGA in a dose-dependent manner and was markedly reduced by inhibitors of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), suggesting iNOS-dependent production of NO. Induction of NO production by PGA was not observed in macrophages from TLR2-deficient mice and was also substantially inhibited in RAW264.7 cells by pretreatment of TLR2 blocking antibody. Subsequently, the downstream signaling events such as ERK, JNK and p38 of MAPK pathways as well as NF-κB activation were required for PGA-induced NO production. In addition, the induced NO production was significantly suppressed by treatment with antagonists of platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) or PAFR siRNA, and mediated through PAFR/Jak2/STAT-1 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that PGA capsule induces NO production in macrophages by triggering both TLR2 and PAFR signaling pathways which lead to activation of NF-kB and STAT-1, respectively. PMID:26350415

  10. Differential effects of chronic hyperammonemia on modulation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and low and high affinity AMPA receptors in cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Llansola, Marta; Reznikov, Vitaliy; Boix, Jordi; Felipo, Vicente

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies show that chronic hyperammonemia impairs learning ability of rats by impairing the glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate (cGMP) pathway in cerebellum. Three types of glutamate receptors cooperate in modulating the NO-cGMP pathway: metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), (RS)-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. The aim of this work was to assess whether hyperammonemia alters the modulation of this pathway by mGluR5 and AMPA receptors in cerebellum in vivo. The results support that in control rats: (1) low AMPA concentrations (0.1mM) activate nearly completely Ca(2+)-permeable (glutamate receptor subunit 2 (GluR2)-lacking) AMPA receptors and the NO-cGMP pathway; (2) higher AMPA concentrations (0.3 mM) also activate Ca(2+)-impermeable (GluR2-containing) AMPA receptors, leading to activation of NMDA receptors and of NO-cGMP pathway. Moreover, the data support that chronic hyperammonemia: (1) reduces glutamate release and activation of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway by activation of mGluR5; (2) strongly reduces the direct activation by AMPA receptors of the NO-cGMP pathway, likely due to reduced entry of Ca(2+) through GluR2-lacking, high affinity AMPA receptors; (3) strongly increases the indirect activation of the NO-cGMP pathway by high affinity AMPA receptors, likely due to increased entry of Na(+) through GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors activation; (4) reduces the indirect activation of the NO-cGMP pathway by low affinity AMPA receptors, likely due to reduced activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:22521775

  11. Translational neurophysiological markers for activity of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2) modulator JNJ-40411813: Sleep EEG correlates in rodents and healthy men.

    PubMed

    Ahnaou, A; de Boer, P; Lavreysen, H; Huysmans, H; Sinha, V; Raeymaekers, L; Van De Casteele, T; Cid, J M; Van Nueten, L; Macdonald, G J; Kemp, J A; Drinkenburg, W H I M

    2016-04-01

    Alterations in rapid eye movement sleep (REM) have been suggested as valid translational efficacy markers: activation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) was shown to increase REM latency and to decrease REM duration. The present paper addresses the effects on vigilance states of the mGluR2 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) JNJ-40411813 at different circadian times in rats and after afternoon dosing in humans. Due to its dual mGluR2 PAM/serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor antagonism in rodents, mGlu2R specificity of effects was studied in wild-type (WT) and mGluR2 (-/-) mice. 5-HT2A receptor occupancy was determined in humans using positron emission tomography (PET). Tolerance development was examined in rats after chronic dosing. EEG oscillations and network connectivity were assessed using multi-channel EEG. In rats, JNJ-40411813 increased deep sleep time and latency of REM onset but reduced REM time when administered 2 h after 'lights on' (CT2): this was sustained after chronic dosing. At CT5 similar effects were elicited, at CT10 only deep sleep was enhanced. Withdrawal resulted in baseline values, while re-administration reinstated drug effects. Parieto-occipital cortical slow theta and gamma oscillations were correlated with low locomotion. The specificity of functional response was confirmed in WT but not mGluR2 (-/-) mice. A double-blind, placebo-controlled polysomnographic study in healthy, elderly subjects showed that 500 mg of JNJ-40411813 consistently increased deep sleep time, but had no effect on REM parameters. This deep sleep effect was not explained by 5-HT2A receptor binding, as in the PET study even 700 mg only marginally displaced the tracer. JNJ-40411813 elicited comparable functional responses in rodents and men if circadian time of dosing was taken into account. These findings underscore the translational potential of sleep mechanisms in evaluating mGluR2 therapeutics when administered at the appropriate circadian time. PMID

  12. Transient receptor potential-like channels mediate metabotropic glutamate receptor EPSCs in rat dopamine neurones.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, C Peter; Tozzi, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Mercuri, Nicola B

    2004-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels form cationic channels activated by diverse factors including mechanical stimuli, changes in osmolarity, pH and temperature, as well as the exogenous irritant, capsaicin. Metabotropic glutamate receptors have also recently been linked to TRP channel activation in neurones of the substantia nigra, hippocampus and cerebellum, suggesting a novel role for such channels in synaptic communication via endogenous neurotransmitters. We tested this for dopamine neurones in rat brain slices by characterizing the current-voltage relationship and pharmacology of EPSCs mediated by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1). Slow inward currents (273 +/- 35 pA peak amplitude, 381 +/- 25 ms latency, holding potential (V(h)) =-73 mV) representing evoked mGluR1 EPSCs were isolated in the presence of antagonists of AMPA, NMDA, GABA(A), GABA(B), muscarinic and glycine receptors. CPCCOEt (100 microM), an mGluR1 antagonist, blocked the residual EPSC in all recordings. mGluR1-activated EPSCs reversed polarity near -10 mV, consistent with the involvement of a cationic channel. Extracellular application of the non-selective TRP channel blockers SKF 96365, flufenamic acid and ruthenium red caused reversible inhibition of mGluR1-activated EPSCs. These characteristics parallel those of mGluR1 activation with an agonist and indicate the involvement of a TRP-like channel in mGluR1-mediated EPSCs. PMID:14724196

  13. Deletion of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors 2 and 3 (mGlu2 & mGlu3) in Mice Disrupts Sleep and Wheel-Running Activity, and Increases the Sensitivity of the Circadian System to Light.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, David; Jagannath, Aarti; Brown, Laurence A; Tam, Shu K E; Hasan, Sibah; Gatti, Silvia; Harrison, Paul J; Bannerman, David M; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N

    2015-01-01

    Sleep and/or circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD) is seen in up to 80% of schizophrenia patients. The co-morbidity of schizophrenia and SCRD may in part stem from dysfunction in common brain mechanisms, which include the glutamate system, and in particular, the group II metabotropic glutamate receptors mGlu2 and mGlu3 (encoded by the genes Grm2 and Grm3). These receptors are relevant to the pathophysiology and potential treatment of schizophrenia, and have also been implicated in sleep and circadian function. In the present study, we characterised the sleep and circadian rhythms of Grm2/3 double knockout (Grm2/3-/-) mice, to provide further evidence for the involvement of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in the regulation of sleep and circadian rhythms. We report several novel findings. Firstly, Grm2/3-/- mice demonstrated a decrease in immobility-determined sleep time and an increase in immobility-determined sleep fragmentation. Secondly, Grm2/3-/- mice showed heightened sensitivity to the circadian effects of light, manifested as increased period lengthening in constant light, and greater phase delays in response to nocturnal light pulses. Greater light-induced phase delays were also exhibited by wildtype C57Bl/6J mice following administration of the mGlu2/3 negative allosteric modulator RO4432717. These results confirm the involvement of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in photic entrainment and sleep regulation pathways. Finally, the diurnal wheel-running rhythms of Grm2/3-/- mice were perturbed under a standard light/dark cycle, but their diurnal rest-activity rhythms were unaltered in cages lacking running wheels, as determined with passive infrared motion detectors. Hence, when assessing the diurnal rest-activity rhythms of mice, the choice of assay can have a major bearing on the results obtained. PMID:25950516

  14. Deletion of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors 2 and 3 (mGlu2 & mGlu3) in Mice Disrupts Sleep and Wheel-Running Activity, and Increases the Sensitivity of the Circadian System to Light

    PubMed Central

    Pritchett, David; Jagannath, Aarti; Brown, Laurence A.; Tam, Shu K. E.; Hasan, Sibah; Gatti, Silvia; Harrison, Paul J.; Bannerman, David M.; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep and/or circadian rhythm disruption (SCRD) is seen in up to 80% of schizophrenia patients. The co-morbidity of schizophrenia and SCRD may in part stem from dysfunction in common brain mechanisms, which include the glutamate system, and in particular, the group II metabotropic glutamate receptors mGlu2 and mGlu3 (encoded by the genes Grm2 and Grm3). These receptors are relevant to the pathophysiology and potential treatment of schizophrenia, and have also been implicated in sleep and circadian function. In the present study, we characterised the sleep and circadian rhythms of Grm2/3 double knockout (Grm2/3-/-) mice, to provide further evidence for the involvement of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in the regulation of sleep and circadian rhythms. We report several novel findings. Firstly, Grm2/3-/- mice demonstrated a decrease in immobility-determined sleep time and an increase in immobility-determined sleep fragmentation. Secondly, Grm2/3-/- mice showed heightened sensitivity to the circadian effects of light, manifested as increased period lengthening in constant light, and greater phase delays in response to nocturnal light pulses. Greater light-induced phase delays were also exhibited by wildtype C57Bl/6J mice following administration of the mGlu2/3 negative allosteric modulator RO4432717. These results confirm the involvement of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in photic entrainment and sleep regulation pathways. Finally, the diurnal wheel-running rhythms of Grm2/3-/- mice were perturbed under a standard light/dark cycle, but their diurnal rest-activity rhythms were unaltered in cages lacking running wheels, as determined with passive infrared motion detectors. Hence, when assessing the diurnal rest-activity rhythms of mice, the choice of assay can have a major bearing on the results obtained. PMID:25950516

  15. Lithium stimulates glutamate "release" and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation via activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in monkey and mouse cerebral cortex slices.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J F; Los, G V; Hokin, L E

    1994-01-01

    Beginning at therapeutic concentrations (1-1.5 mM), the anti-manic-depressive drug lithium stimulated the release of glutamate, a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, in monkey cerebral cortex slices in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and this was associated with increased inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] accumulation. (+/-)-3-(2-Carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphoric acid (CPP), dizocilpine (MK-801), ketamine, and Mg(2+)-antagonists to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor/channel complex selectively inhibited lithium-stimulated Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation. Antagonists to cholinergic-muscarinic, alpha 1-adrenergic, 5-hydroxytryptamine2 (serotoninergic), and H1 histaminergic receptors had no effect. Antagonists to non-NMDA glutamate receptors had no effect on lithium-stimulated Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation. Possible reasons for this are discussed. Similar results were obtained in mouse cerebral cortex slices. Carbetapentane, which inhibits glutamate release, inhibited lithium-induced Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation in this model. It is concluded that the primary effect of lithium in the cerebral cortex slice model is stimulation of glutamate release, which, presumably via activation of the NMDA receptor, leads to Ca2+ entry. Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation increases due to the presumed increased influx of intracellular Ca2+, which activates phospholipase C. These effects may have relevance to the therapeutic action of lithium in the treatment of manic depression as well as its toxic effects, especially at lithium blood levels above 1.5 mM. Images PMID:8078888

  16. Ionotropic glutamate receptor expression in human white matter.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Pia Crone; Samadi-Bahrami, Zahra; Pavlov, Vlady; Stys, Peter K; Moore, G R Wayne

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate is the key excitatory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system (CNS). Its role in human grey matter transmission is well understood, but this is less clear in white matter (WM). Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR) are found on both neuronal cell bodies and glia as well as on myelinated axons in rodents, and rodent WM tissue is capable of glutamate release. Thus, rodent WM expresses many of the components of the traditional grey matter neuron-to-neuron synapse, but to date this has not been shown for human WM. We demonstrate the presence of iGluRs in human WM by immunofluorescence employing high-resolution spectral confocal imaging. We found that the obligatory N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunit GluN1 and the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA4 co-localized with myelin, oligodendroglial cell bodies and processes. Additionally, GluA4 colocalized with axons, often in distinct clusters. These findings may explain why human WM is vulnerable to excitotoxic events following acute insults such as stroke and traumatic brain injury and in more chronic inflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Further exploration of human WM glutamate signalling could pave the way for developing future therapies modulating the glutamate-mediated damage in these and other CNS disorders. PMID:27443784

  17. Regulation of glutamate carboxypeptidase II hydrolysis of N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) in crayfish nervous tissue is mediated by glial glutamate and acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Urazaev, Albert K; Grossfeld, Robert M; Lieberman, Edward M

    2005-05-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), a glial ectoenzyme, is responsible for N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) hydrolysis. Its regulation in crayfish nervous tissue was investigated by examining uptake of [3H]glutamate derived from N-acetylaspartyl-[3H]glutamate ([3H]NAAG) to measure GCPII activity. Electrical stimulation (100 Hz, 10 min) during 30 min incubation with [3H]NAAG increased tissue [3H]glutamate tenfold. This was prevented by 2-(phosphonomethyl)-pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA), a GCPII inhibitor, suggesting that stimulation increased the hydrolysis of [3H]NAAG and metabolic recycling of [3H]glutamate. Antagonists of glial group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGLURII), NMDA receptors and acetylcholine (ACh) receptors that mediate axon-glia signaling in crayfish nerve fibers decreased the effect of stimulation by 58-83%, suggesting that glial receptor activation leads to stimulation of GCPII activity. In combination, they reduced [3H]NAAG hydrolysis during stimulation to unstimulated control levels. Agonist stimulation of mGLURII mimicked the effect of electrical stimulation, and was prevented by antagonists of GCPII or mGLURII. Raising extracellular K+ to three times the normal level stimulated [3H]NAAG release and GCPII activity. These effects were also blocked by antagonists of GCPII and mGLUR(II). No receptor antagonist or agonist tested or 2-PMPA affected uptake of [3H]glutamate. We conclude that NAAG released from stimulated nerve fibers activates its own hydrolysis via stimulation of GCPII activity mediated through glial mGLURII, NMDA and ACh receptors. PMID:15836619

  18. Synthesis, structure-activity relationships and biological evaluation of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydropyrazolopyrazines as metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 negative allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Wataru; Kato, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Kassai, Momoe; Takata, Makoto; Hayashi, Shun; Arai, Yukiyo; Imai, Satoki; Yoshida, Kohzo

    2016-08-15

    The design, synthesis and SAR studies of novel 4,5,6,7-tetrahydropyrazolopyrazines as metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) are presented in this letter. Starting from a HTS hit compound (1, IC50=477nM), optimization of various groups led to the synthesis of a potent mGluR5 NAM (32, IC50=75nM) with excellent rat PK profile and good brain penetration. This compound produced oral antidepressant-like effect in a mouse tale suspension model (MED: 30mg/kg). PMID:27432763

  19. Structure-Activity Relationships in a Novel Series of 7-Substituted-Aryl Quinolines and 5-Substituted-Aryl Benzothiazoles at the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zou, Mu-Fa; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2010-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) has been implicated in numerous neuropsychiatric disorders including addiction. We have discovered that the rigid diaryl alkyne template, derived from the potent and selective noncompetitive mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP), can serve to guide the design of novel quinoline analogues and pharmacophore optimization has resulted in potent mGluR5 noncompetitive antagonists (EC50 range 60–100 nM) in the quinoline series. PMID:20382541

  20. Presynaptic c-Jun N-terminal Kinase 2 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent glutamate release

    PubMed Central

    Nisticò, Robert; Florenzano, Fulvio; Mango, Dalila; Ferraina, Caterina; Grilli, Massimo; Di Prisco, Silvia; Nobili, Annalisa; Saccucci, Stefania; D'Amelio, Marcello; Morbin, Michela; Marchi, Mario; Mercuri, Nicola B.; Davis, Roger J.; Pittaluga, Anna; Feligioni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway is a critical step for neuronal death occurring in several neurological conditions. JNKs can be activated via receptor tyrosine kinases, cytokine receptors, G-protein coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, including the NMDA glutamate receptors. While JNK has been generally associated with postsynaptic NMDA receptors, its presynaptic role remains largely unexplored. Here, by means of biochemical, morphological and functional approaches, we demonstrate that JNK and its scaffold protein JIP1 are also expressed at the presynaptic level and that the NMDA-evoked glutamate release is controlled by presynaptic JNK-JIP1 interaction. Moreover, using knockout mice for single JNK isoforms, we proved that JNK2 is the essential isoform in mediating this presynaptic event. Overall the present findings unveil a novel JNK2 localization and function, which is likely to play a role in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25762148

  1. Activation of Type 4 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Death of Neural Stem Cells with Inhibition of JNK and p38 MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhichao; Ma, Wen; Wang, Li; Gong, Hanshi; Tian, Yumei; Zhang, Jianshui; Liu, Jianxin; Lu, Haixia; Chen, Xinlin; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-15

    Promoting both endogenous and exogenous neural stem cells' (NSCs) survival in the hostile host environments is essential to cell replacement therapy for central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR4), one of the members of mGluRs, has been shown to protect neurons from acute and chronic excitotoxic insults in various brain damages. The present study investigated the preventive effects of mGluR4 on NSC injury induced by oxidative stress. Under challenge with H2O2, loss of cell viability was observed in cultured rat NSCs, and treatment with selective mGluR4 agonist VU0155041 conferred protective effects against the loss of cellular viability in a concentration-dependent manner, as shown by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Pretreatment of VU0155041 (30 μM) also inhibited the excessive NSC death induced by H2O2, and group III mGluRs antagonist (RS)-a-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP) or gene-targeted knockdown abolished the protective action of mGluR4, indicated by propidium iodide-Hoechst and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Western blot assay demonstrated that mGluR4 activation reversed the decreased procaspase-8/9/3and the destructed Bcl-2/Bax expressing balance, and likewise, MSOP and mGluR4 knockdown abrogated the action of mGluR4 activity. Furthermore, inhibition of JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were observed after mGluR4 activation, and as paralleling control, JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125 and p38-specific inhibitor SB203580 significantly rescued the H2O2-mediated NSC apoptosis and cleavage of procaspase-3. We suggest that activation of mGluR4 prevents oxidative stress-induced NSC death and apoptotic-associated protein activities with involvement of inhibiting the JNK and p38 pathways in cell culture. Our findings may help to develop strategies for enhancing the resided and transplanted NSC survival

  2. Antipsychotic treatment modulates glutamate transport and NMDA receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Zink, Mathias; Englisch, Susanne; Schmitt, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia patients often suffer from treatment-resistant cognitive and negative symptoms, both of which are influenced by glutamate neurotransmission. Innovative therapeutic strategies such as agonists at metabotropic glutamate receptors or glycin reuptake inhibitors try to modulate the brain's glutamate network. Interactions of amino acids with monoamines have been described on several levels, and first- and second-generation antipsychotic agents (FGAs, SGAs) are known to exert modulatory effects on the glutamatergic system. This review summarizes the current knowledge on effects of FGAs and SGAs on glutamate transport and receptor expression derived from pharmacological studies. Such studies serve as a control for molecular findings in schizophrenia brain tissue and are clinically relevant. Moreover, they may validate animal models for psychosis, foster basic research on antipsychotic substances and finally lead to a better understanding of how monoaminergic and amino acid neurotransmissions are intertwined. In the light of these results, important differences dependent on antipsychotic substances, dosage and duration of treatment became obvious. While some post-mortem findings might be confounded with multifold drug effects, others are unlikely to be influenced by antipsychotic treatment and could represent important markers of schizophrenia pathophysiology. In similarity to the convergence of toxic and psychotomimetic effects of dopaminergic, serotonergic and anti-glutamatergic substances, the therapeutic mechanisms of SGAs might merge on a yet to be defined molecular level. In particular, serotonergic effects of SGAs, such as an agonism at 5HT1A receptors, represent important targets for further clinical research. PMID:25214389

  3. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Genes in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Maj, Carlo; Minelli, Alessandra; Giacopuzzi, Edoardo; Sacchetti, Emilio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies revealed two main components in the genetic architecture of schizophrenia, one constituted by common variants determining a distributed polygenic effect and one represented by a large number of heterogeneous rare and highly disruptive mutations. These gene modifications often affect neural transmission and different studies proved an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia phenotype. Through the combination of literature information with genomic data from public repositories, we analyzed the current knowledge on the involvement of genetic variations of the human metabotropic glutamate receptors in schizophrenia and related endophenotypes. Despite the analysis did not reveal a definitive connection, different suggestive associations have been identified and in particular a relevant role has emerged for GRM3 in affecting specific schizophrenia endophenotypes. This supports the hypothesis that these receptors are directly involved in schizophrenia disorder. PMID:27296644

  4. Lack of the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 7 Selectively Modulates Theta Rhythm and Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holscher, Christian; Schmid, Susanne; Pilz, Peter K. D.; Sansig, Gilles; van der Putten, Herman; Plappert, Claudia F.

    2005-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are known to play a role in synaptic plasticity and learning. We have previously shown that mGluR7 deletion in mice produces a selective working memory (WM) impairment, while other types of memory such as reference memory remain unaffected. Since WM has been associated with Theta activity (6-12 Hz) in…

  5. Redefining the classification of AMPA-selective ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Abstract AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) represent the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptor in the developing and adult vertebrate CNS. They are crucial for the normal hardwiring of glutamatergic circuits but also fine tune synaptic strength by cycling into and out of synapses during periods of sustained patterned activity or altered homeostasis. AMPARs are grouped into two functionally distinct tetrameric assemblies based on the inclusion or exclusion of the GluA2 receptor subunit. GluA2-containing receptors are thought to be the most abundant AMPAR in the CNS, typified by their small unitary events, Ca2+ impermeability and insensitivity to polyamine block. In contrast, GluA2-lacking AMPARs exhibit large unitary conductance, marked divalent permeability and nano- to micromolar polyamine affinity. Here, I review evidence for the existence of a third class of AMPAR which, though similarly Ca2+ permeable, is characterized by its near-insensitivity to internal and external channel block by polyamines. This novel class of AMPAR is most notably found at multivesicular release synapses found in the avian auditory brainstem and mammalian retina. Curiously, these synapses lack NMDA-type iGluRs, which are conventionally associated with controlling AMPAR insertion. The lack of NMDARs suggests that a different set of rules may govern AMPAR cycling at these synapses. AMPARs with similar functional profiles are also found on some glial cells suggesting they may have a more widespread distribution in the mammalian CNS. I conclude by noting that modest changes to the ion-permeation pathway might be sufficient to retain divalent permeability whilst eliminating polyamine sensitivity. Consequently, this emerging AMPAR subclass need not be assembled from novel subunits, yet to be cloned, but could simply occur by varying the stoichiometry of existing proteins. PMID:22106175

  6. Metabotropic glutamate receptors: their therapeutic potential in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Spooren, Will; Lesage, Anne; Lavreysen, Hilde; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Steckler, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Psychiatric and neurological disorders are linked to changes in synaptic excitatory processes with a key role for glutamate, that is, the most abundant excitatory amino-acid. Molecular cloning of the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors has led to the identification of eight mGlu receptors, which, in contrast to ligand-gated ion channels (responsible for fast excitatory transmission), modulate and fine-tune the efficacy of synaptic transmission. mGlu receptors are G protein-coupled and constitute a new group of "drugable" targets for the treatment of various CNS disorders. The recent discovery of small molecules that selectively bind to receptors of Groups I (mGlu1 and mGlu5) and II (mGlu2 and mGlu3) allowed significant advances in our understanding of the roles of these receptors in brain function and dysfunction including anxiety. Although investigation of the role of the Group III (mGlu4, 6, 7, and 8) receptors is less advanced, the generation of genetically manipulated animals and recent advances in the identification of subtype-selective compounds have revealed some first insights into the therapeutic potential of this group of receptors. PMID:21309118

  7. Roles of the NMDA Receptor and EAAC1 Transporter in the Modulation of Extracellular Glutamate by Low and High Affinity AMPA Receptors in the Cerebellum in Vivo: Differential Alteration in Chronic Hyperammonemia.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Taoro, Lucas; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2015-12-16

    The roles of high- and low-affinity AMPA receptors in modulating extracellular glutamate in the cerebellum remain unclear. Altered glutamatergic neurotransmission is involved in neurological alterations in hyperammonemia, which differently affects high- and low-affinity AMPA receptors. The aims were to assess by in vivo microdialysis (a) the effects of high- and low-affinity AMPA receptor activation on extracellular glutamate in the cerebellum; (b) whether chronic hyperammonemia alters extracellular glutamate modulation by high- and/or low-affinity AMPA receptors; and (c) the contribution of NMDA receptors and EAAC1 transporter to AMPA-induced changes in extracellular glutamate. In control rats, high affinity receptor activation does not affect extracellular glutamate but increases glutamate if NMDA receptors are blocked. Low affinity AMPA receptor activation increases transiently extracellular glutamate followed by reduction below basal levels and return to basal values. The reduction is associated with transient increased membrane expression of EAAC1 and is prevented by blocking NMDA receptors. Blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 induces a transient increase in extracellular glutamate which is associated with reduced membrane expression of EAAC1 followed by increased membrane expression of the glutamate transporter GLT-1. Chronic hyperammonemia does not affect responses to activation of low affinity AMPA receptors. Activation of high affinity AMPA receptors increases extracellular glutamate in hyperammonemic rats by an NMDA receptor-dependent mechanism. In conclusion, these results show that there is a tightly controlled interplay between AMPA and NMDA receptors and an EAAC1 transporter in controlling extracellular glutamate. Hyperammonemia alters high- but not low-affinity AMPA receptors. PMID:26428532

  8. Atypical signaling of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gelb, Tara; Pshenichkin, Sergey; Hathaway, Hannah A; Grajkowska, Ewa; Dalley, Carrie Bowman; Wolfe, Barry B; Wroblewski, Jarda T

    2015-11-01

    The metabotropic glutamate 1 (mGlu1) receptor has emerged as a novel target for the treatment of metastatic melanoma and various other cancers. Our laboratory has demonstrated that a selective, non-competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonist slows human melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we sought to determine if the activation of a canonical G protein-dependent signal transduction cascade, which is often used as an output of mGlu1 receptor activity in neuronal cells, correlated with mGlu1 receptor-mediated melanoma cell viability. Glutamate, the endogenous ligand of mGlu1 receptors, significantly increased melanoma cell viability, but did not stimulate phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in several human melanoma cell lines. In contrast, melanoma cell viability was not increased by quisqualate, a highly potent mGlu1 receptor agonist, or DHPG, a selective group I mGlu receptor agonist. Similarly to glutamate, quisqualate also failed to stimulate PI hydrolysis in mGlu1 receptor-expressing melanoma cells. These results suggest that the canonical G protein-dependent signal transduction cascade is not coupled to mGlu1 receptors in all human melanoma cells. On the other hand, dynamin inhibition selectively decreased viability of mGlu1 receptor-expressing melanoma cells, suggesting that a mechanism requiring internalization may control melanoma cell viability. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the approaches commonly used to study mGlu1 receptor function and signaling in other systems may be inappropriate for studying mGlu1 receptor-mediated melanoma cell viability. PMID:26291396

  9. Emerging structural insights into the function of ionotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karakas, Erkan; Regan, Michael C.; Furukawa, Hiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission crucial for brain development and function including learning and memory formation. Recently a wealth of structural studies on iGluRs, including AMPA receptors (AMPARs), kainate receptors, and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) became available.. These studies showed structures of non-NMDARs including AMPAR and kainate receptor in various functional states, thereby providing the first visual sense of how non-NMDAR iGluRs may function in the context of homotetramers. Furthermore, they provided the first view of heterotetrameric NMDAR ion channels, which illuminated the similarities with and differences from non-NMDARs, thus raising a mechanistic distinction between the two groups of iGluRs. Here we review mechanistic insights into iGluR functions gained through structural studies of multiple groups. PMID:25941168

  10. Glutamate Receptor Homologs in Plants: Functions and Evolutionary Origins

    PubMed Central

    Price, Michelle Beth; Jelesko, John; Okumoto, Sakiko

    2012-01-01

    The plant glutamate-like receptor homologs (GLRs) are homologs of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) which were discovered more than 10 years ago, and are hypothesized to be potential amino acid sensors in plants. Although initial progress on this gene family has been hampered by gene redundancy and technical issues such as gene toxicity; genetic, pharmacological, and electrophysiological approaches are starting to uncover the functions of this protein family. In parallel, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating the structure of animal glutamate receptors (iGluRs), which in turn will help understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant GLR functions. In this review, we will summarize recent progress on the plant GLRs. Emerging evidence implicates plant GLRs in various biological processes in and beyond N sensing, and implies that there is some overlap in the signaling mechanisms of amino acids between plants and animals. Phylogenetic analysis using iGluRs from metazoans, plants, and bacteria showed that the plant GLRs are no more closely related to metazoan iGluRs as they are to bacterial iGluRs, indicating the separation of plant, other eukaryotic, and bacterial GLRs might have happened as early on as the last universal common ancestor. Structural similarities and differences with animal iGluRs, and the implication thereof, are also discussed. PMID:23115559

  11. Hyperammonaemia alters the mechanisms by which metabotropic glutamate receptors in nucleus accumbens modulate motor function.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Omar; Mlili, Nisrin; Rodrigo, Regina; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-10-01

    Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors by injecting (S)3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) increases motor activity by different mechanisms in control rats and in rats with chronic liver failure due to portacaval shunt. In control rats DHPG increases extracellular dopamine in NAcc and induces locomotion by activating the 'normal' circuit: NAcc-->ventral pallidum-->medial-dorsal thalamus-->prefrontal cortex, which is not activated in portacaval shunt rats. In these rats, DHPG activates an 'alternative' circuit: NAcc-->substantia nigra pars reticulata-->ventro-medial thalamus-->prefrontal cortex, which is not activated in control rats. The reasons by which liver failure leads to activation of this 'alternative' circuit remain unclear. The aim of this work was to assess whether hyperammonaemia could be responsible for the alterations found in chronic liver failure. We injected DHPG in NAcc of control or hyperammonaemic rats and analysed, by in vivo brain microdialysis, the neurochemical responses of the 'normal' and 'alternative' circuits. In hyperammonaemic rats DHPG injection in NAcc activates both the 'normal' and 'alternative' circuits. In hyperammonaemia, activation of the 'alternative' circuit and increased motor response following metabotropic glutamate receptors activation in NAcc seem due to an increase in extracellular glutamate which activates AMPA receptors. PMID:17587309

  12. Solubilization, partial purification, and reconstitution of glutamate- and N-methyl-D-aspartate-activated cation channels from brain synaptic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ly, A.M.; Michaelis, E.K. )

    1991-04-30

    L-Glutamate-activated cation channel proteins from rat brain synaptic membranes were solubilized, partially purified, and reconstituted into liposomes. Optimal conditions for solubilization and reconstitution included treatment of the membranes with nonionic detergents in the presence of neutral phospholipids plus glycerol. Quench-flow procedures were developed to characterize the rapid kinetics of ion flux induced by receptor agonists. ({sup 14}C)Methylamine, a cation that permeates through the open channel of both vertebrate and invertebrate glutamate receptors, was used to measure the activity of glutamate receptor-ion channel complexes in reconstituted liposomes. L-Glutamate caused an increase in the rate of ({sup 14}C)methylamine influx into liposomes reconstituted with either solubilized membrane proteins or partially purified glutamate-binding proteins. Of the major glutamate receptor agonists, only N-methyl-D-aspartate activated cation fluxes in liposomes reconstituted with glutamate-binding proteins. In liposomes reconstituted with glutamate-binding proteins, N-methyl-D-aspartate- or glutamate-induced influx of NA{sup +} led to a transient increase in the influx of the lipid-permeable anion probe S{sup 14}CN{sup {minus}}. These results indicate the functional reconstitution of N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive glutamate receptors and the role of the {approximately}69-kDa protein in the function of these ion channels.

  13. Coantagonism of Glutamate Receptors and Nicotinic Acetylcholinergic Receptors Disrupts Fear Conditioning and Latent Inhibition of Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Thomas J.; Lewis, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the hypothesis that both nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors (nAChRs) and glutamate receptors ([alpha]-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors (AMPARs) and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs)) are involved in fear conditioning, and may modulate similar processes. The effects of the…

  14. Peripheral and spinal antihyperalgesic activity of SIB-1757, a metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR(5)) antagonist, in experimental neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Dogrul, A; Ossipov, M H; Lai, J; Malan, T P; Porreca, F

    2000-10-01

    Recent studies suggest a role of Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors in mediating the development of spinal hypersensitivity in some pain states. Here, the possible role of mGluR(5) receptors in experimental neuropathic pain elicited by ligation of spinal nerves (L(5)/L(6) spinal nerve ligation, SNL) was explored with SIB-1757, a selective mGluR(5) antagonist. SNL-induced tactile allodynia was detected by decreased paw withdrawal thresholds to probing with von Frey filaments and thermal hyperalgesia by decreased paw withdrawal latencies to radiant heat applied to the plantar aspect of the hindpaw. SIB-1757 was given by either intrathecal (i.th.), subcutaneous (s.c.) or intraplantar (i.pl.) injection. In SNL rats, i.th. SIB-1757 produced a partial reversal of tactile allodynia with a shallow dose-response curve ranging over three-orders of magnitude; SIB-1757 was inactive against allodynia when given systemically. SIB-1757 produced full reversal of thermal hyperalgesia in SNL rats following administration either spinally or locally to the injured paw; administration to the contralateral paw had no effect. SIB-1757 did not produce antinociception in either the SNL or sham-operated rats by any route. These data suggest a significant modulation of thermal hyperalgesia by mGluR(5) antagonists, consistent with reports that this receptor may be associated with afferent C-fibers. The less impressive effect seen on tactile allodynia, likely to be mediated by large fiber input, suggests that the observed modulation may be related to blockade of mGluR(5)-mediated spinal sensitization. These results do not support the involvement of these receptors in modulation of acute nociception but suggest the possibility of a role for Group I mGluRs in the mediation of aspects of neuropathic pain which may be associated with C-fiber inputs. PMID:10998562

  15. Design and Synthesis of Systemically Active Metabotropic Glutamate Subtype-2 and -3 (mGlu2/3) Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators (PAMs): Pharmacological Characterization and Assessment in a Rat Model of Cocaine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As part of our ongoing small-molecule metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) research, we performed structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies around a series of group II mGlu PAMs. Initial analogues exhibited weak activity as mGlu2 receptor PAMs and no activity at mGlu3. Compound optimization led to the identification of potent mGlu2/3 selective PAMs with no in vitro activity at mGlu1,4–8 or 45 other CNS receptors. In vitro pharmacological characterization of representative compound 44 indicated agonist-PAM activity toward mGlu2 and PAM activity at mGlu3. The most potent mGlu2/3 PAMs were characterized in assays predictive of ADME/T and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, allowing the discovery of systemically active mGlu2/3 PAMs. On the basis of its overall profile, compound 74 was selected for behavioral studies and was shown to dose-dependently decrease cocaine self-administration in rats after intraperitoneal administration. These mGlu2/3 receptor PAMs have significant potential as small molecule tools for investigating group II mGlu pharmacology. PMID:24735492

  16. The nuclear receptor FXR regulates hepatic transport and metabolism of glutamine and glutamate.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; D'Amore, Claudio; Zampella, Angela; Monti, Maria Chiara; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2011-11-01

    Hepatic transport and metabolism of glutamate and glutamine are regulated by intervention of several proteins. Glutamine is taken up by periportal hepatocytes and is the major source of ammonia for urea synthesis and glutamate for N-acetylglutamate (NAG) synthesis, which is catalyzed by the N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS). Glutamate is taken up by perivenous hepatocytes and is the main source for the synthesis of glutamine, catalyzed by glutamine synthase (GS). Accumulation of glutamate and ammonia is a common feature of chronic liver failure, but mechanism that leads to failure of the urea cycle in this setting is unknown. The Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) is a bile acid sensor in hepatocytes. Here, we have investigated its role in the regulation of the metabolism of both glutamine and glutamate. In vitro studies in primary cultures of hepatocytes from wild type and FXR(-/-) mice and HepG2 cells, and in vivo studies, in FXR(-/-) mice as well as in a rodent model of hepatic liver failure induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)), demonstrate a role for FXR in regulating this metabolism. Further on, promoter analysis studies demonstrate that both human and mouse NAGS promoters contain a putative FXRE, an ER8 sequence. EMSA, ChIP and luciferase experiments carried out to investigate the functionality of this sequence demonstrate that FXR is essential to induce the expression of NAGS. In conclusion, FXR activation regulates glutamine and glutamate metabolism and FXR ligands might have utility in the treatment of hyperammonemia states. PMID:21757002

  17. Metabotropic glutamate receptors depress glutamate-mediated synaptic input to rat midbrain dopamine neurones in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wigmore, M A; Lacey, M G

    1998-02-01

    1. Glutamate (AMPA receptor-mediated) excitatory postsynaptic potentials (e.p.s.ps.), evoked by electrical stimulation rostral to the recording site, were examined by intracellular microelectrode recording from dopamine neurones in parasagittal slices of rat ventral midbrain. 2. The e.p.s.p. was depressed by the group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonist L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4; 0.01-30 microM) by up to 60% with an EC50 of 0.82 microM. The depression induced by L-AP4 (3 microM) was reversed by the group III preferring mGlu receptor antagonist, alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG; 250 microM). 3. The group I and II mGlu agonist, 1S,3R-aminocyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (ACPD; 3-30 microM) also depressed the e.p.s.p. in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of ACPD (10 microM) was reversed by (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG; 1 mM; 4 cells). This effect of ACPD was also partially antagonized (by 50.3+/-15.7%, 4 cells) by MPPG (250 microM). 4. The selective agonist at group I mGlu receptors, dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG; 100 microM), decreased e.p.s.p. amplitude by 27.1+/-8.2% (7 cells), as did the group II mGlu receptor-selective agonist (1S,1R,2'R,3'R)-2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV; 1 microM) by 26.7+/-4.3% (5 cells). 5. DHPG (10-100 microM) caused a depolarization of the recorded cell, as did ACPD (3-30 microM), whereas no such postsynaptic effect of either L-AP4 or DCG-IV was observed. 6. These results provide evidence for the presence of presynaptic inhibitory metabotropic glutamate autoreceptors from the mGlu receptor groups II and III on descending glutamatergic inputs to midbrain dopamine neurones. Group I mGlu receptors mediate a postsynaptic depolarization, and can also depress glutamatergic transmission, but may not necessarily be localized presynaptically. These sites represent novel drug targets for treatment of schizophrenia and movement disorders of basal ganglia origin. PMID

  18. Metabotropic glutamate receptors depress glutamate-mediated synaptic input to rat midbrain dopamine neurones in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wigmore, Mark A; Lacey, Michael G

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate (AMPA receptor-mediated) excitatory postsynaptic potentials (e.p.s.ps.), evoked by electrical stimulation rostral to the recording site, were examined by intracellular microelectrode recording from dopamine neurones in parasagittal slices of rat ventral midbrain. The e.p.s.p. was depressed by the group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonist L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4; 0.01–30 μM) by up to 60% with an EC50 of 0.82 μM. The depression induced by L-AP4 (3 μM) was reversed by the group III preferring mGlu receptor antagonist, α-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG; 250 μM). The group I and II mGlu agonist, 1S,3R-aminocyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (ACPD; 3–30 μM) also depressed the e.p.s.p. in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of ACPD (10 μM) was reversed by (+)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG; 1 mM; 4 cells). This effect of ACPD was also partially antagonized (by 50.3±15.7%, 4 cells) by MPPG (250 μM). The selective agonist at group I mGlu receptors, dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG; 100 μM), decreased e.p.s.p. amplitude by 27.1±8.2% (7 cells), as did the group II mGlu receptor-selective agonist (1S,1′R,2′R,3′R)-2-(2,3-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV; 1 μM) by 26.7±4.3% (5 cells). DHPG (10–100 μM) caused a depolarization of the recorded cell, as did ACPD (3–30 μM), whereas no such postsynaptic effect of either L-AP4 or DCG-IV was observed. These results provide evidence for the presence of presynaptic inhibitory metabotropic glutamate autoreceptors from the mGlu receptor groups II and III on descending glutamatergic inputs to midbrain dopamine neurones. Group I mGlu receptors mediate a postsynaptic depolarization, and can also depress glutamatergic transmission, but may not necessarily be localized presynaptically. These sites represent novel drug targets for treatment of schizophrenia and movement disorders of basal ganglia origin. PMID:9517386

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptors are required for the induction of long-term potentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, F.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Recent observations have led to the suggestion that the metabotropic glutamate receptor may play a role in the induction or maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP). However, experimental evidence supporting a role for this receptor in the induction of LTP is still inconclusive and controversial. Here we report that, in rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN) neurons, which have the highest density of metabotropic receptors and show functional responses, the induction of LTP is not blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate, but is blocked by two putative metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, L-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid and L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate. Furthermore, superfusion of (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid, a selective metabotropic glutamate agonist, resulted in a long-lasting potentiation of synaptic transmission similar to that induced by tetanic stimuli. Our results demonstrated that activation of postsynaptic metabotropic receptors is both necessary and sufficient for the induction of LTP in the DLSN, and we suggest that such a mechanism may be important at other CNS synapses.

  20. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A.; Jenkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:25904555

  1. An Optimized Glutamate Receptor Photoswitch with Sensitized Azobenzene Isomerization.

    PubMed

    Gascón-Moya, Marta; Pejoan, Arnau; Izquierdo-Serra, Mercè; Pittolo, Silvia; Cabré, Gisela; Hernando, Jordi; Alibés, Ramon; Gorostiza, Pau; Busqué, Félix

    2015-10-16

    A new azobenzene-based photoswitch, 2, has been designed to enable optical control of ionotropic glutamate receptors in neurons via sensitized two-photon excitation with NIR light. In order to develop an efficient and versatile synthetic route for this molecule, a modular strategy is described which relies on the use of a new linear fully protected glutamate derivative stable in basic media. The resulting compound undergoes one-photon trans-cis photoisomerization via two different mechanisms: direct excitation of its azoaromatic unit and irradiation of the pyrene sensitizer, a well-known two-photon sensitive chromophore. Moreover, 2 presents large thermal stability of its cis isomer, in contrast to other two-photon responsive switches relying on the intrinsic nonlinear optical properties of push-pull substituted azobenzenes. As a result, the molecular system developed herein is a very promising candidate for evoking large photoinduced biological responses during the multiphoton operation of neuronal glutamate receptors with NIR light, which require accumulation of the protein-bound cis state of the switch upon repeated illumination. PMID:26414427

  2. Molecular signalling mediating the protective effect of A1 adenosine and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptor activation against apoptosis by oxygen/glucose deprivation in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Renata; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Ballerini, Patrizia; D'Auro, Mariagrazia; Nargi, Eleonora; Buccella, Silvana; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Bruno, Valeria; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Caciagli, Francesco

    2007-05-01

    Astrocyte death may occur in neurodegenerative disorders and complicates the outcome of brain ischemia, a condition associated with high extracellular levels of adenosine and glutamate. We show that pharmacological activation of A(1) adenosine and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors with N(6)-chlorocyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) and (-)2-oxa-4-aminocyclo-[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268), respectively, protects cultured astrocytes against apoptosis induced by a 3-h exposure to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). Protection by CCPA and LY379268 was less than additive and was abrogated by receptor blockade with selective competitive antagonists or pertussis toxin. Both in control astrocytes and in astrocytes exposed to OGD, CCPA and LY379268 induced a rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which are known to support cell survival. In cultures exposed to OGD, CCPA and LY379268 reduced the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38/MAPK, reduced the levels of the proapoptotic protein Bad, increased the levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-X(L), and were highly protective against apoptotic death, as shown by nuclear 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and measurements of caspase-3 activity. All of these effects were attenuated by treatment with 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(methylthio)butadiene (U0126) and 2-(4-morpholinyl)-8-phenyl-1(4H)-benzopyran-4-one hydrochloride (LY294002), which inhibit the MAPK and the PI3K pathways, respectively. These data suggest that pharmacological activation of A(1) and mGlu3 receptors protects astrocytes against hypoxic/ischemic damage by stimulating the PI3K and ERK1/2 MAPK pathways. PMID:17293559

  3. Three-dimensional models of non-NMDA glutamate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, M J; Wo, Z G; Oswald, R E

    1996-01-01

    Structural models have been produced for three types of non-NMDA inotropic glutamate receptors: an AMPA receptor, GluR1, a kainate receptor, GluR6; and a low-molecular-weight kainate receptor from goldfish, GFKAR alpha. Modeling was restricted to the domains of the proteins that bind the neurotransmitter glutamate and that form the ion channel. Model building combined homology modeling, distance geometry, molecular mechanics, interactive modeling, and known constraints. The models indicate new potential interactions in the extracellular domain between protein and agonists, and suggest that the transition from the "closed" to the "open" state involves the movement of a conserved positive residue away from, and two conserved negative residues into, the extracellular entrance to the pore upon binding. As a first approximation, the ion channel domain was modeled with a structure comprising a central antiparallel beta-barrel that partially crosses the membrane, and against which alpha-helices from each subunit are packed; a third alpha-helix packs against these two helices in each subunit. Much, but not all, of the available data were consistent with this structure. Modifying the beta-barrel to a loop-like topology produced a model consistent with available data. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785317

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 antagonism in learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Simonyi, Agnes; Schachtman, Todd R.; Christoffersen, Gert R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The role of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5 receptor) in learning and memory and other behaviors are reviewed by examining the influence of selective antagonists and genetic knockout on performance. This receptor is involved in spatial learning, contextual fear conditioning, inhibitory avoidance, fear potentiated startle, and conditioned taste aversion. However, mGlu5 receptor antagonists have proven to be ineffective in other learning tasks, such as the delayed-match-to-position test and a three-hole spatial learning task. Locomotion is often decreased by mGlu5 receptor antagonists; and other behaviors such as social interaction and consummatory responses can also be affected. In mGlu5 receptor knockout mice, performance in contextual fear conditioning and spatial water maze tasks is impaired. Although the available evidence is suggestive of an important contribution of mGlu5 receptors to cognitive functions, further studies are needed, particularly those with in vivo evaluation of the role of mGlu5 receptors in selective brain regions in different stages of memory formation. PMID:20363219

  5. EVALUATING THE NMDA-GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR AS A SITE OF ACTION FOR TOLUENE, IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro, toluene disrupts the function of NMDA-glutamate receptors, indicating that effects on NMDA receptor function may contribute to toluene neurotoxicity. NMDA-glutamate receptors are widely present in the visual system and contribute to pattern-elicited visual evoked potent...

  6. Different glutamate receptors convey feedforward and recurrent processing in macaque V1.

    PubMed

    Self, Matthew W; Kooijmans, Roxana N; Supèr, Hans; Lamme, Victor A; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2012-07-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) receive feedforward input from the thalamus, which shapes receptive-field properties. They additionally receive recurrent inputs via horizontal connections within V1 and feedback from higher visual areas that are thought to be important for conscious visual perception. Here, we investigated what roles different glutamate receptors play in conveying feedforward and recurrent inputs in macaque V1. As a measure of recurrent processing, we used figure-ground modulation (FGM), the increased activity of neurons representing figures compared with background, which depends on feedback from higher areas. We found that feedforward-driven activity was strongly reduced by the AMPA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), whereas this drug had no effect on FGM. In contrast, blockers of the NMDA receptor reduced FGM, whereas their effect on visually driven activity varied with the subunit specificity of the drug. The NMDA receptor blocker 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) caused a slight reduction of the visual response, whereas ifenprodil, which targets NMDA receptors containing the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit, increased the visual response. These findings demonstrate that glutamate receptors contribute differently to feedforward and recurrent processing in V1 and suggest ways to selectively disrupt recurrent processing so that its role in visual perception can be elucidated. PMID:22615394

  7. X-ray structure, symmetry and mechanism of an AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevsky, Alexander I.; Rosconi, Michael P.; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-02-02

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate most excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and function by opening a transmembrane ion channel upon binding of glutamate. Despite their crucial role in neurobiology, the architecture and atomic structure of an intact ionotropic glutamate receptor are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the {alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)-sensitive, homotetrameric, rat GluA2 receptor at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution in complex with a competitive antagonist. The receptor harbours an overall axis of two-fold symmetry with the extracellular domains organized as pairs of local dimers and with the ion channel domain exhibiting four-fold symmetry. A symmetry mismatch between the extracellular and ion channel domains is mediated by two pairs of conformationally distinct subunits, A/C and B/D. Therefore, the stereochemical manner in which the A/C subunits are coupled to the ion channel gate is different from the B/D subunits. Guided by the GluA2 structure and site-directed cysteine mutagenesis, we suggest that GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors have a similar architecture, with subunits arranged in a 1-2-1-2 pattern. We exploit the GluA2 structure to develop mechanisms of ion channel activation, desensitization and inhibition by non-competitive antagonists and pore blockers.

  8. Ionotropic glutamate receptors in the external lateral parabrachial nucleus participate in processing cardiac sympathoexcitatory reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhi-Ling; Longhurst, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischemia with metabolites such as bradykinin (BK) evokes sympathoexcitatory reflex responses and activates neurons in the external lateral parabrachial nucleus (elPBN). The present study tested the hypothesis that this region in the pons processes sympathoexcitatory cardiac reflexes through an ionotropic glutamate receptor mechanism. The ischemic metabolite BK (0.1–1 μg) was injected into the pericardial space of anesthetized and bilaterally vagotomized or intact cats. Hemodynamic and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) responses to repeated administration of BK before and after unilateral 50-nl microinjections of kynurenic acid (Kyn; 25 mM), 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5; 25 mM), and 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzol(F)quinoxaline (NBQX; 10 mM) into the elPBN were recorded. Intrapericardial BK evoked significant increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and RSNA in seven vagotomized cats. After blockade of glutamate receptors with the nonselective glutamate receptor antagonist Kyn, the BK-evoked reflex increases in MAP (50 ± 6 vs. 29 ± 2 mmHg) and RSNA (59 ± 8.6 vs. 29 ± 4.7%, before vs. after) were significantly attenuated. The BK-evoked responses returned to pre-Kyn levels 85 min after the application of Kyn. Similarly, BK-evoked reflex responses were reversibly attenuated by blockade of glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors with AP5 (n = 5) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors with NBQX (n = 5). In contrast, we observed that the repetitive administration of BK evoked consistent reflex responses including MAP and RSNA before and after microinjection of 50 nl of the artificial cerebrospinal fluid vehicle into the elPBN in five animals. Microinjection of glutamate receptor antagonists into regions outside the elPBN did not alter BK-induced reflex responses. Microinjection of Kyn into the elPBN reversibly attenuated BK

  9. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate OFF responses in light-adapted ON bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-Jie; Gao, Fan; Wu, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that photoreceptor synaptic inputs to depolarizing bipolar cells (DBCs or ON bipolar cells) are mediated by mGluR6 receptors and those to hyperpolarizing bipolar cells (HBCs or OFF bipolar cells) are mediated by AMPA/kainate receptors. Here we show that in addition to mGluR6 receptors which mediate the sign-inverting, depolarizing light responses, subpopulations of cone-dominated and rod/cone mixed DBCs use GluR4 AMPA receptors to generate a transient sign-preserving OFF response under light adapted conditions. These AMPA receptors are located at the basal junctions postsynaptic to rods and they are silent under dark-adapted conditions, as tonic glutamate release in darkness desensitizes these receptors. Light adaptation enhances rod-cone coupling and thus allows cone photocurrents with an abrupt OFF depolarization to enter the rods. The abrupt rod depolarization triggers glutamate activation of unoccupied AMPA receptors, resulting in a transient OFF response in DBCs. It has been widely accepted that the DNQX-sensitive, OFF transient responses in retinal amacrine cells and ganglion cells are mediated exclusively by HBCs. Our results suggests that this view needs revision as AMPA receptors in subpopulations of DBCs are likely to significantly contribute to the DNQX-sensitive OFF transient responses in light-adapted third- and higher-order visual neurons. PMID:22842089

  10. Release of ATP and glutamate in the nucleus tractus solitarii mediate pulmonary stretch receptor (Breuer–Hering) reflex pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gourine, Alexander V; Dale, Nicholas; Korsak, Alla; Llaudet, Enrique; Tian, Faming; Huckstepp, Robert; Spyer, K Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Breuer–Hering inflation reflex is initiated by activation of the slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptor afferents (SARs), which monosynaptically activate second-order relay neurones in the dorsal medullary nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Here we demonstrate that during lung inflation SARs release both ATP and glutamate from their central terminals to activate these NTS neurones. In anaesthetized and artificially ventilated rats, ATP- and glutamate-selective microelectrode biosensors placed in the NTS detected rhythmic release of both transmitters phase-locked to lung inflation. This release of ATP and glutamate was independent of the centrally generated respiratory rhythm and could be reversibly abolished during the blockade of the afferent transmission in the vagus nerve by topical application of local anaesthetic. Microionophoretic application of ATP increased the activity of all tested NTS second-order relay neurones which receive monosynaptic inputs from the SARs. Unilateral microinjection of ATP into the NTS site where pulmonary stretch receptor afferents terminate produced central apnoea, mimicking the effect of lung inflation. Application of P2 and glutamate receptor antagonists (pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulphonic acid, suramin and kynurenic acid) significantly decreased baseline lung inflation-induced firing of the second-order relay neurones. These data demonstrate that ATP and glutamate are released in the NTS from the central terminals of the lung stretch receptor afferents, activate the second-order relay neurones and hence mediate the key respiratory reflex — the Breuer—Hering inflation reflex. PMID:18617567

  11. Both glutamate receptor antagonists and prefrontal cortex lesions prevent induction of cocaine sensitization and associated neuroadaptations.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Hu, X T; Berney, T G; Vartanian, A J; Stine, C D; Wolf, M E; White, F J

    1999-12-01

    Behavioral sensitization to psychomotor stimulants is accompanied by a number of alterations in the mesoaccumbens dopamine (DA) system, including DA autoreceptor subsensitivity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and DA D1 receptor supersensitivity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We investigated the role of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmission in the induction of cocaine sensitization and these accompanying DA receptor alterations. To do so, we used three glutamate receptor antagonists, the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg), the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist CGS 19755 (10.0 mg/kg), and the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (12.5 mg/kg). Rats received daily double injections of either one of these antagonists or saline with either cocaine (15.0 mg/kg) or saline for 5 days. Cocaine sensitization was defined as an increase in horizontal locomotor activity in response to cocaine challenge (7.5 mg/kg) on the third day of withdrawal. All three antagonists prevented the induction of cocaine sensitization. Extracellular single cell recordings revealed that these antagonists also prevented the induction of DA autoreceptor subsensitivity in the VTA and DA D1 receptor supersensitivity in the NAc. To determine whether the relevant glutamate receptors were under regulation by medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) EAA efferents, we next lesioned the mPFC bilaterally with ibotenic acid at least 7 days before repeated cocaine treatment began. These lesions also prevented the induction of cocaine sensitization and the associated neuroadaptations. Our findings indicate that glutamate transmission from mPFC to the mesoaccumbens DA system is critical for the induction of cocaine sensitization and its cellular correlates. PMID:10523754

  12. Novel potent selective phenylglycine antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Bedingfield, J S; Jane, D E; Kemp, M C; Toms, N J; Roberts, P J

    1996-08-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor antagonist properties of novel phenylglycine analogues were investigated in adult rat cortical slices (mGlu receptors negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase), neonatal rat cortical slices and in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (mGlu receptors coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis). (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-sulphonophenylglycine (MSPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-3-carboxymethyl-4-hydroxyphenylglycine (M3CM4HPG) and (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-hydroxy-3-phosphonomethylphenylglycine (M4H3PMPG) were demonstrated to have potent and selective effects against 10 microM L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4)- and 0.3 microM (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(2-carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-1)-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in the adult rat cortex. In contrast, these compounds demonstrated either weak or no antagonism at mGlu receptors coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis in either neonatal rat cortex or in cultured cerebellar granule cells. These compounds thus appear to be useful discriminatory pharmacological tools for mGlu receptors and form the basis for the further development of novel antagonists. PMID:8864696

  13. Inside story of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors (mGluRs).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Samarjit

    2016-08-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by the neurotransmitter glutamate in the central nervous system. Among the eight subtypes, mGluR1 and mGluR5 belong to the group I family. These receptors play important roles in the brain and are believed to be involved in multiple forms of experience dependent synaptic plasticity including learning and memory. In addition, group I mGluRs also have been implicated in various neuropsychiatric disorders like Fragile X syndrome, autism etc. The normal signaling depends on the precise location of these receptors in specific region of the neuron and the process of receptor trafficking plays a crucial role in controlling this localization. Intracellular trafficking could also regulate the desensitization, resensitization, down-regulation and intracellular signaling of these receptors. In this review I focus on the current understanding of group I mGluR regulation in the central nervous system and also their role in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26987586

  14. Structure and organization of heteromeric AMPA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Herguedas, Beatriz; García-Nafría, Javier; Cais, Ondrej; Fernández-Leiro, Rafael; Krieger, James; Ho, Hinze; Greger, Ingo H

    2016-04-29

    AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), which are central mediators of rapid neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity, predominantly exist as heteromers of the subunits GluA1 to GluA4. Here we report the first AMPAR heteromer structures, which deviate substantially from existing GluA2 homomer structures. Crystal structures of the GluA2/3 and GluA2/4 N-terminal domains reveal a novel compact conformation with an alternating arrangement of the four subunits around a central axis. This organization is confirmed by cysteine cross-linking in full-length receptors, and it permitted us to determine the structure of an intact GluA2/3 receptor by cryogenic electron microscopy. Two models in the ligand-free state, at resolutions of 8.25 and 10.3 angstroms, exhibit substantial vertical compression and close associations between domain layers, reminiscent of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Model 1 resembles a resting state and model 2 a desensitized state, thus providing snapshots of gating transitions in the nominal absence of ligand. Our data reveal organizational features of heteromeric AMPARs and provide a framework to decipher AMPAR architecture and signaling. PMID:26966189

  15. Presynaptic inhibition of corticothalamic feedback by metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Georgia M; Godwin, Dwayne W

    2005-07-01

    The thalamus relays sensory information to cortex, but this information may be influenced by excitatory feedback from cortical layer VI. The full importance of this feedback has only recently been explored, but among its possible functions are influences on the processing of sensory features, synchronization of thalamic firing, and transitions in response mode of thalamic relay cells. Uncontrolled, corticothalamic feedback has also been implicated in pathological thalamic rhythms associated with certain neurological disorders. We have found a form of presynaptic inhibition of corticothalamic synaptic transmission that is mediated by a Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) and activated by high-frequency corticothalamic activity. We tested putative retinogeniculate and corticogeniculate synapses for Group II mGluR modulation within the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the ferret thalamus. Stimulation of optic-tract fibers elicited paired-pulse depression of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), whereas stimulation of the optic radiations elicited paired-pulse facilitation. Paired-pulse responses were subsequently used to characterize the pathway of origin of stimulated synapses. Group II mGluR agonists (LY379268 and DCG-IV) applied to thalamic neurons under voltage-clamp conditions reduced the amplitude of corticogeniculate EPSCs. Stimulation with high-frequency trains produced a facilitating response that was reduced by Group II mGluR agonists, but was enhanced by the selective antagonist LY341495, revealing a presynaptic, mGluR-mediated reduction of high-frequency corticogeniculate feedback. Agonist treatment did not affect EPSCs from stimulation of the optic tract. NAAG (reported to be selective for mGluR3) was ineffective at the corticogeniculate synapse, implicating mGluR2 in the observed effects. Our data are the first to show a synaptically elicited form of presynaptic inhibition of corticothalamic synaptic transmission that is mediated by

  16. Glutamate and its receptors in the pathophysiology and treatment of major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Dawn F.; Richards, Erica M.; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Monoaminergic neurotransmitter (serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine) mechanisms of disease dominated the research landscape in the pathophysiology and treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) for more than 50 years and still dominate available treatment options. However, the sum of all brain neurons that use monoamines as their primary neurotransmitter is <20 %. In addition, most patients treated with monoaminergic antidepressants are left with significant residual symptoms and psychosocial disability not to mention side effects, e.g., sexual dysfunction. In the past several decades, there has been greater focus on the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the human brain, glutamate, in the pathophysiology and treatment of MDD. Although several preclinical and human magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies had already implicated glutamatergic abnormalities in the human brain, it was rocketed by the discovery that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine has rapid and potent antidepressant effects in even the most treatment-resistant MDD patients, including those who failed to respond to electroconvulsive therapy and who have active suicidal ideation. In this review, we will first provide a brief introduction to glutamate and its receptors in the mammalian brain. We will then review the clinical evidence for glutamatergic dysfunction in MDD, the discovery and progress-to-date with ketamine as a rapidly acting antidepressant, and other glutamate receptor modulators (including proprietary medications) for treatment-resistant depression. We will finally conclude by offering potential future directions necessary to realize the enormous therapeutic promise of glutamatergic antidepressants. PMID:24318540

  17. Reduction in Ventral Midbrain NMDA Receptors Reveals Two Opposite Modulatory Roles for Glutamate on Reward.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Giovanni; Khodami-Pour, Ali; Lévesque, Daniel; Rompré, Pierre-Paul

    2015-06-01

    Glutamate is a major component of the reward circuitry and recent clinical studies suggest that new molecules that would target glutamate neurotransmission are most likely to constitute more effective medications for mood disorders. It is well known that activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs) initiates dopamine burst firing, a mode associated with reward signaling; but NMDARs also contribute to the maintenance of an inhibitory drive to dopamine neurons. Such opposite modulatory functions imply that different subtypes of NMDARs are expressed on different ventral midbrain (VM) neurons and/or afferent inputs to dopamine neurons. By using the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique, we studied the effects of VM downregulation of NMDAR subunits GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2D on reward induced by dorsal raphe electrical stimulation. Reward thresholds were measured before and 24 h after each of three consecutive daily bilateral microinjections of siRNA for the targeted receptor subunit(s) or non-active RNA sequence. After the last measurement, reward thresholds were reassessed following a bilateral microinjection of the preferred GluN2A-NMDA antagonist, (2R,4S)-4-(3-Phosphopropyl)-2-piperidinecarboxylic acid (PPPA). Western-blot analysis showed that siRNAs reduced GluN1- and GluN2A-containing receptors whereas behavioral tests showed that only a reduction in GluN1 produced reward attenuation. Despite NMDAR reduction, reward-enhancing effect of PPPA remained unchanged. We conclude that VM glutamate relays the reward signal initiated by dorsal raphe electrical stimulation by acting on NMDARs devoid of GluN2A/2D subunits and exerts an inhibition on this reward signal by acting on GluN2A-containing NMDARs most likely located on afferent terminals. PMID:25578795

  18. Reduction in Ventral Midbrain NMDA Receptors Reveals Two Opposite Modulatory Roles for Glutamate on Reward

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Giovanni; Khodami-Pour, Ali; Lévesque, Daniel; Rompré, Pierre-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is a major component of the reward circuitry and recent clinical studies suggest that new molecules that would target glutamate neurotransmission are most likely to constitute more effective medications for mood disorders. It is well known that activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs) initiates dopamine burst firing, a mode associated with reward signaling; but NMDARs also contribute to the maintenance of an inhibitory drive to dopamine neurons. Such opposite modulatory functions imply that different subtypes of NMDARs are expressed on different ventral midbrain (VM) neurons and/or afferent inputs to dopamine neurons. By using the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique, we studied the effects of VM downregulation of NMDAR subunits GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2D on reward induced by dorsal raphe electrical stimulation. Reward thresholds were measured before and 24 h after each of three consecutive daily bilateral microinjections of siRNA for the targeted receptor subunit(s) or non-active RNA sequence. After the last measurement, reward thresholds were reassessed following a bilateral microinjection of the preferred GluN2A-NMDA antagonist, (2R,4S)-4-(3-Phosphopropyl)-2-piperidinecarboxylic acid (PPPA). Western-blot analysis showed that siRNAs reduced GluN1- and GluN2A-containing receptors whereas behavioral tests showed that only a reduction in GluN1 produced reward attenuation. Despite NMDAR reduction, reward-enhancing effect of PPPA remained unchanged. We conclude that VM glutamate relays the reward signal initiated by dorsal raphe electrical stimulation by acting on NMDARs devoid of GluN2A/2D subunits and exerts an inhibition on this reward signal by acting on GluN2A-containing NMDARs most likely located on afferent terminals. PMID:25578795

  19. Localization of two metabotropic glutamate receptor genes, GRM3 and GRM8, to human chromosome 7q

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.W.; Heng, H.H.Q.; Lap-Chee Tsui

    1996-01-15

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (GRMs) are neutrotransmitter receptors that respond to glutamate stimulations by activating GTP-binding proteins and modulating second-messenger cascades. Eight related GRMs have been identified to date. In this study, we have mapped GRM3 and GRM8 to human chromosome 7q21.1-q21.2 and 7q31.3-q32.1, respectively, using somatic cell hybrid and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. A yeast artificial chromosome contig was constructed surrounding the genes, allowing their location to be integrated into the genetic and physical map of chromosome 7. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Radial Symmetry in a Chimaeric Glutamate Receptor Pore

    PubMed Central

    Wilding, Timothy J; Lopez, Melany N.; Huettner, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors comprise two conformationally different A/C and B/D subunit pairs. Closed channels exhibit 4-fold radial symmetry in the transmembrane domain (TMD) but transition to 2-fold dimer-of-dimers symmetry for extracellular ligand binding and N-terminal domains. Here, to evaluate symmetry in open pores we analyzed interaction between the Q/R editing site near the pore loop apex and the transmembrane M3 helix of kainate receptor subunit GluK2. Chimaeric subunits that combined the GluK2 TMD with extracellular segments from NMDA receptors, which are obligate heteromers, yielded channels made up of A/C and B/D subunit pairs with distinct substitutions along M3 and/or Q/R site editing status, in an otherwise identical homotetrameric TMD. Our results indicate that Q/R site interaction with M3 occurs within individual subunits and is essentially the same for both A/C and B/D subunit conformations, suggesting that 4-fold pore symmetry persists in the open state. PMID:24561802

  1. Whole-Cell Patch-Clamp Analysis of Recombinant NMDA Receptor Pharmacology Using Brief Glutamate Applications

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Nathan G.; Johnson, Jon W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors that are essential for synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Dysfunction of NMDARs has been implicated in many nervous system disorders; therefore, pharmacological modulation of NMDAR activity has great therapeutic potential. However, given the broad physiological importance of NMDARs, modulating their activity often has detrimental side effects precluding pharmaceutical use of many NMDAR modulators. One approach to possibly improve the therapeutic potential of NMDAR modulators is to identify compounds that modulate subsets of NMDARs. An obvious target for modulating NMDAR subsets are the many NMDAR subtypes produced through different combinations of NMDAR subunits. With seven identified genes that encode NMDAR subunits, there are many neuronal NMDAR subtypes with distinct properties and potentially differential pharmacological sensitivities. Study of NMDAR subtype-specific pharmacology is complicated in neurons, however, because most neurons express at least three NMDAR subtypes. Thus, use of an approach that permits study in isolation of a single receptor subtype is preferred. Additionally, the effects of drugs on agonist-activated responses typically depend on duration of agonist exposure. To evaluate drug effects on synaptic transmission, an approach should be used that allows activation of receptor responses as brief as those observed during synaptic transmission, both in the absence and presence of drug. To address these issues, we designed a fast perfusion system capable of (1) delivering brief (~5 ms) and consistent applications of glutamate to recombinant NMDARs of known subunit composition, and (2) easily and quickly (~5 seconds) changing between glutamate applications in the absence and presence of drug. PMID:25023300

  2. Classical Conditioning of the Rabbit Eyelid Response Increases Glutamate Receptor Binding in Hippocampal Synaptic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamounas, Laura A.; Thompson, Richard F.; Lynch, Gary; Baudry, Michel

    1984-04-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons exhibit a rapid within-trial increase in firing frequency during classical conditioning of the rabbit eyelid response. It has been proposed that the cellular mechanisms responsible for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) may also mediate this learning-dependent increase in neuronal activity. The induction of LTP in rat hippocampal slices results in an increase in the number of [3H]glutamate-binding sites in the potentiated region. The present study investigates the kinetics of [3H]glutamate binding to hippocampal synaptic membranes after eyelid conditioning in the rabbit. We report that the regional distribution of [3H]glutamate binding across the layers of rabbit hippocampus is compatible with a dendritic localization. The pharmacological and ionic properties of the binding suggest that it is associated with an excitatory amino acid receptor. After eyelid conditioning, the maximal number of hippocampal [3H]glutamate-binding sites is increased in animals receiving paired presentations of the tone conditioned stimulus and corneal air-puff unconditioned stimulus relative to that found in naive or unpaired control animals. These results strengthen the hypothesis that an LTP-like mechanism underlies the increase in hippocampal firing frequency during rabbit eyelid conditioning.

  3. Structural, signalling and regulatory properties of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors: prototypic family C G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, E; Challiss, R A

    2001-01-01

    In 1991 a new type of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was cloned, the type 1a metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor, which, despite possessing the defining seven-transmembrane topology of the GPCR superfamily, bore little resemblance to the growing number of other cloned GPCRs. Subsequent studies have shown that there are eight mammalian mGlu receptors that, together with the calcium-sensing receptor, the GABA(B) receptor (where GABA is gamma-aminobutyric acid) and a subset of pheromone, olfactory and taste receptors, make up GPCR family C. Currently available data suggest that family C GPCRs share a number of structural, biochemical and regulatory characteristics, which differ markedly from those of the other GPCR families, most notably the rhodopsin/family A GPCRs that have been most widely studied to date. This review will focus on the group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5). This subgroup of receptors is widely and differentially expressed in neuronal and glial cells within the brain, and receptor activation has been implicated in the control of an array of key signalling events, including roles in the adaptative changes needed for long-term depression or potentiation of neuronal synaptic connectivity. In addition to playing critical physiological roles within the brain, the mGlu receptors are also currently the focus of considerable attention because of their potential as drug targets for the treatment of a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:11672421

  4. Glutamate transporters and presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors protect neocortical Cajal-Retzius cells against over-excitation.

    PubMed

    Dvorzhak, Anton; Unichenko, Petr; Kirischuk, Sergei

    2012-08-01

    Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells, early generated neurons in the marginal zone of developing neocortex, are reported to be highly vulnerable to excitotoxic damage. Because extracellular glutamate concentration in the central nervous system is mainly controlled by glutamate transporters (EAATs), we studied the effects of EAAT blockade on CR cells. DL: -TBOA, a specific EAAT antagonist, induced NMDA receptor-dependent bursting discharges in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, indicating that EAATs operate in the uptake mode and their blockade leads to elevation of extracellular glutamate concentration. In CR cells, however, DL: -TBOA failed to change either the membrane resistance or holding current, and moreover, it reduced the frequency of spontaneous GABAergic postsynaptic currents. DL: -TBOA decreased the mean amplitude and increased paired-pulse ratio of evoked GABAergic postsynaptic currents, indicating the presynaptic locus of its action. Indeed, LY379268, a specific agonist of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR-II), mimicked the DL: -TBOA-mediated effects, and LY341495, an unspecific mGluR antagonist, eliminated the DL: -TBOA-induced effects. As dihydrokainic acid, a specific EAAT2 blocker, failed to affect evoked GABAergic postsynaptic currents, whereas TFB-TBOA, a selective blocker of EAAT1 and EAAT2, produced effects similar to that of DL: -TBOA, extracellular glutamate concentration in the marginal zone is mainly controlled by EAAT1 (GLAST). Thus, even though CR cells are highly vulnerable to excitotoxic damage, a number of mechanisms serve to protect them against excessive extracellular glutamate concentration including a lack of functional glutamatergic synapses, Mg(2+) blockade of NMDA receptors, and presynaptic mGluRs that inhibit transmission at GABAergic synapses. PMID:22665047

  5. Incubation of Methamphetamine Craving Is Associated with Selective Increases in Expression of Bdnf and Trkb, Glutamate Receptors, and Epigenetic Enzymes in Cue-Activated Fos-Expressing Dorsal Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, F. Javier; Zeric, Tamara; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Kambhampati, Sarita; Cates, Hannah M.; Kennedy, Pamela J.; Liu, Qing-Rong; Cimbro, Raffaello; Hope, Bruce T.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Cue-induced methamphetamine seeking progressively increases after withdrawal (incubation of methamphetamine craving), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We determined whether this incubation is associated with alterations in candidate genes in dorsal striatum (DS), a brain area implicated in cue- and context-induced drug relapse. We first measured mRNA expression of 24 candidate genes in whole DS extracts after short (2 d) or prolonged (1 month) withdrawal in rats following extended-access methamphetamine or saline (control condition) self-administration (9 h/d, 10 d). We found minimal changes. Next, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we compared gene expression in Fos-positive dorsal striatal neurons, which were activated during “incubated” cue-induced drug-seeking tests after prolonged withdrawal, with nonactivated Fos-negative neurons. We found significant increases in mRNA expression of immediate early genes (Arc, Egr1), Bdnf and its receptor (Trkb), glutamate receptor subunits (Gria1, Gria3, Grm1), and epigenetic enzymes (Hdac3, Hdac4, Hdac5, GLP, Dnmt3a, Kdm1a) in the Fos-positive neurons only. Using RNAscope to determine striatal subregion and cell-type specificity of the activated neurons, we measured colabeling of Fos with Drd1 and Drd2 in three DS subregions. Fos expression was neither subregion nor cell-type specific (52.5 and 39.2% of Fos expression colabeled with Drd1 and Drd2, respectively). Finally, we found that DS injections of SCH23390 (C17H18ClNO), a D1-family receptor antagonist known to block cue-induced Fos induction, decreased incubated cue-induced methamphetamine seeking after prolonged withdrawal. Results demonstrate a critical role of DS in incubation of methamphetamine craving and that this incubation is associated with selective gene-expression alterations in cue-activated D1- and D2-expressing DS neurons. PMID:26019338

  6. Enhanced type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide signaling after pertussis toxin treatment.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, A M; Challiss, R A; Mistry, R; Saunders, R; Thomsen, C; Nahorski, S R

    1997-09-01

    The regulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis by the type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1alpha) was investigated in stably transfected baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Incubation of the cells with L-glutamate, quisqualate, and 1-aminocyclopentane-1S, 3R-dicarboxylic acid resulted in a marked accumulation of [3H]inositol monophosphate (InsP1) and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] mass in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BHK-mGluR1alpha cells with pertussis toxin [ 100 ng/ml, 24 hr] led to a dramatic 12-16-fold increase in the accumulation of [3H]InsP1 and a 2-fold increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 in the absence of added agonist. Although only very low levels (glutamate could be detected in medium taken from control and PTX-treated cell monolayers, the PTX-elicited effect on basal [3H]InsP1 was fully reversed by preincubation of cells in the presence of glutamic-pyruvic transaminase and pyruvate, suggesting that an increased sensitivity to endogenous glutamate was responsible for the apparent agonist-independent activation of phosphoinositidase C (PIC) after PTX treatment. Consistent with this hypothesis, in the presence of glutamic-pyruvic transaminase/pyruvate, the maximal [3H]InsP1 response to quisqualate was increased by >/=75%, and the EC50 shifted leftward by 65-fold [-log EC50 values (molar), 7.26 +/- 0.23 versus 5.45 +/- 0.07; n = 4) in PTX-treated compared with control cells. In contrast, antagonist effects on agonist-stimulated [3H]InsP1 responses were similar in control and PTX-treated BHK-mGluR1alpha cells. These changes in the concentration-effect curves for mGluR agonists are consistent with a model in which the receptor associates with PTX-sensitive inhibitory (Gi/o) and PTX-insensitive stimulatory (Gq/11) G proteins that can each influence PIC activity. The present observations are consistent with a dual regulation of mGluR1alpha-mediated PIC activity that could be fundamental in

  7. Mobility of NMDA autoreceptors but not postsynaptic receptors at glutamate synapses in the rat entorhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Chamberlain, Sophie E L; Woodhall, Gavin L; Jones, Roland S G

    2008-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDAr) are known to undergo recycling and lateral diffusion in postsynaptic spines and dendrites. However, NMDAr are also present as autoreceptors on glutamate terminals, where they act to facilitate glutamate release, but it is not known whether these receptors are also mobile. We have used functional pharmacological approaches to examine whether NMDA receptors at excitatory synapses in the rat entorhinal cortex are mobile at either postsynaptic sites or in presynaptic terminals. When NMDAr-mediated evoked EPSCs (eEPSCs) were blocked by MK-801, they showed no evidence of recovery when the irreversible blocker was removed, suggesting that postsynaptic NMDAr were relatively stably anchored at these synapses. However, using frequency-dependent facilitation of AMPA receptor (AMPAr)-mediated eEPSCs as a reporter of presynaptic NMDAr activity, we found that when facilitation was blocked with MK-801 there was a rapid (∼30–40 min) anomalous recovery upon removal of the antagonist. This was not observed when global NMDAr blockade was induced by combined perfusion with MK-801 and NMDA. Anomalous recovery was accompanied by an increase in frequency of spontaneous EPSCs, and a variable increase in frequency-facilitation. Following recovery from blockade of presynaptic NMDAr with a competitive antagonist, frequency-dependent facilitation of AMPAr-mediated eEPSCs was also transiently enhanced. Finally, an increase in frequency of miniature EPSCs induced by NMDA was succeeded by a persistent decrease. Our data provide the first evidence for mobility of NMDAr in the presynaptic terminals, and may point to a role of this process in activity-dependent control of glutamate release. PMID:18718983

  8. Pharmacological profiles of the metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Naples, M A; Hampson, D R

    2001-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are a family of G-protein coupled receptors that are expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The purpose of this study was to compare the ligand binding selectivity profiles of the mGluR agonist [(3)H]L-AP4 and the novel radiolabeled phenylglycine antagonist [(3)H]CPPG at all eight rat mGluR subtypes expressed in transfected human embryonic kidney cells. At a concentration of 30 nM [(3)H]L-AP4, no specific binding was detected in membranes expressing the group I receptors mGluR1a or mGluR5a, or in membranes expressing the group II mGluRs, mGluR2 and mGluR3. Among the group III mGluRs, specific [(3)H]L-AP4 binding was detected in cells expressing mGluR4a and mGluR8a but not in cells expressing mGluR6 or mGluR7a. The binding of [(3)H]CPPG showed an exceptional pattern of selectivity amongst the mGluR subtypes; at a concentration of 20 nM [(3)H]CPPG, a high level of specific binding was seen in membranes containing mGluR8a but not in any of the other mGluR subtypes. The affinity constant (K(D)) calculated for [(3)H]CPPG binding to mGluR8a was 183 nM. In competition experiments, the phosphono-substituted phenylglycine congeners including MPPG, (RS)-PPG, and unlabeled CPPG were the most potent inhibitors of [(3)H]CPPG binding while non-phosphonated compounds such as L-glutamate and MCPG were substantially less potent. These results demonstrate that [(3)H]L-AP4 and [(3)H]CPPG can be used as probes to selectively label group III mGluRs and that CPPG and related phenylglycine derivatives are useful for studying differences in the ligand recognition sites of highly homologous mGluRs. PMID:11114395

  9. Cocaine Decreases Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor mGluR1 Currents in Dopamine Neurons by Activating mGluR5.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Paul F; Williams, John T

    2015-09-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are important mediators of reward and movement and are sensitive to cocaine-induced plasticity. After even a single injection of cocaine, there is an increase in AMPA-dependent synaptic transmission. The present study examines cocaine-induced plasticity of mGluR-dependent currents in dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra. Activation of mGluR1 and mGluR5 resulted in a mixture of inward and outward currents mediated by a nonselective cation conductance and a calcium-activated potassium conductance (SK), respectively. A single injection of cocaine decreased the current activated by mGluR1 in dopamine neurons, and it had no effect on the size of the mGluR5-mediated current. When the injection of cocaine was preceded by treatment of the animals with a blocker of mGluR5 receptors (MPEP), cocaine no longer decreased the mGluR1 current. Thus, the activation of mGluR5 was required for the cocaine-mediated suppression of mGluR1-mediated currents in dopamine neurons. The results support the hypothesis that mGluR5 coordinates a reduction in mGluR1 functional activity after cocaine treatment. PMID:25829143

  10. The Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 4 Positive Allosteric Modulator ADX88178 Inhibits Inflammatory Responses in Primary Microglia.

    PubMed

    Ponnazhagan, Ranjani; Harms, Ashley S; Thome, Aaron D; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Gogliotti, Rocco; Niswender, Colleen M; Conn, P Jeffrey; Standaert, David G

    2016-06-01

    While the specific trigger of Parkinson Disease (PD) in most patients is unknown, considerable evidence suggests that the neuroinflammatory response makes an essential contribution to the neurodegenerative process. Drugs targeting metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu receptors), 7 Transmembrane (7TM) spanning/G protein coupled receptors that bind glutamate, are emerging as therapeutic targets for PD and may have anti-inflammatory properties. ADX88178 is novel potent, selective, and brain-penetrant positive allosteric modulator of the mGlu4 which is under evaluation for treatment of PD and other neurological disorders. We used microglia cultured from mouse brain to determine if ADX88178 had direct effects on the inflammatory responses of these cells. We studied both microglia from wild type and Grm4 knock out mice. We found that activation of mGlu4 with ADX88178 attenuated LPS-induced inflammation in primary microglia, leading to a decrease in the expression of TNFα, MHCII, and iNOS, markers of pro-inflammatory responses. These effects were absent in microglia from mice lacking mGlu4. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous anti-inflammatory effect of ADX88178 mediated mGlu4 activation on microglia, and suggest that this drug or similar activators or potentiators of mGlu4 may have disease-modifying as well as symptomatic effects in PD and other brain disorders with an inflammatory component. PMID:26872456

  11. Expression and plasticity of glutamate receptors in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Pak, C Wook; Currás-Collazo, Margarita C

    2002-01-15

    Magnocellular neuroendocrine cells (MNCs) of the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SON) produce and release the hormones vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) in response to a variety of stimuli to regulate body water and salt, parturition and lactation. Hormone release is influenced by the pattern of neuronal firing of these MNCs, which, in turn, is governed by intrinsic conductances and synaptic inputs, including those mediated by the neurotransmitter glutamate. Functional and molecular evidence has confirmed the expression of AMPA-, NMDA-, and metabotropic-type glutamate receptors in the SON, that together may orchestrate the effects of glutamatergic transmission on neuroendocrine function. However, the specific roles of the different subtypes of glutamate receptors is not yet clear. As with other central neurons, the subunit composition of glutamate receptors on MNCs will likely determine their properties and may potentially help define the differential properties of VP- and OT-producing MNCs. Possible functions of glutamate receptors on SON MNCs include altering excitatory synaptic transmission of osmotic information, neuronal firing, hormone production and release, and calcium signaling. Of interest are the anatomical, molecular, and functional changes at glutamatergic synapses in the SON that occur in response to pertinent physiological stimuli or development. These types of plasticity may include changes in glutamatergic synaptic density, glutamate receptor levels, or glutamate receptor subunit expression, all of which can affect the efficiency of synaptic transmission. PMID:11810712

  12. Neuronal activity regulates remyelination via glutamate signalling to oligodendrocyte progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Hélène O. B.; Evans, Kimberley A.; Volbracht, Katrin; James, Rachel; Sitnikov, Sergey; Lundgaard, Iben; James, Fiona; Lao-Peregrin, Cristina; Reynolds, Richard; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur T

    2015-01-01

    Myelin regeneration can occur spontaneously in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the underlying mechanisms and causes of its frequent failure remain incompletely understood. Here we show, using an in-vivo remyelination model, that demyelinated axons are electrically active and generate de novo synapses with recruited oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), which, early after lesion induction, sense neuronal activity by expressing AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid)/kainate receptors. Blocking neuronal activity, axonal vesicular release or AMPA receptors in demyelinated lesions results in reduced remyelination. In the absence of neuronal activity there is a ∼6-fold increase in OPC number within the lesions and a reduced proportion of differentiated oligodendrocytes. These findings reveal that neuronal activity and release of glutamate instruct OPCs to differentiate into new myelinating oligodendrocytes that recover lost function. Co-localization of OPCs with the presynaptic protein VGluT2 in MS lesions implies that this mechanism may provide novel targets to therapeutically enhance remyelination. PMID:26439639

  13. Neuronal activity regulates remyelination via glutamate signalling to oligodendrocyte progenitors.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Hélène O B; Evans, Kimberley A; Volbracht, Katrin; James, Rachel; Sitnikov, Sergey; Lundgaard, Iben; James, Fiona; Lao-Peregrin, Cristina; Reynolds, Richard; Franklin, Robin J M; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur T

    2015-01-01

    Myelin regeneration can occur spontaneously in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the underlying mechanisms and causes of its frequent failure remain incompletely understood. Here we show, using an in-vivo remyelination model, that demyelinated axons are electrically active and generate de novo synapses with recruited oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), which, early after lesion induction, sense neuronal activity by expressing AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid)/kainate receptors. Blocking neuronal activity, axonal vesicular release or AMPA receptors in demyelinated lesions results in reduced remyelination. In the absence of neuronal activity there is a ∼6-fold increase in OPC number within the lesions and a reduced proportion of differentiated oligodendrocytes. These findings reveal that neuronal activity and release of glutamate instruct OPCs to differentiate into new myelinating oligodendrocytes that recover lost function. Co-localization of OPCs with the presynaptic protein VGluT2 in MS lesions implies that this mechanism may provide novel targets to therapeutically enhance remyelination. PMID:26439639

  14. D1 dopamine receptor-induced cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation and potentiation of striatal glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Kim, P; Raymond, L A

    1999-12-01

    Dopamine receptor activation regulates cyclic AMP levels and is critically involved in modulating neurotransmission in the striatum. Others have shown that alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA)-type glutamate receptor-mediated current is potentiated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activation. We made whole-cell patch clamp recordings from cultured striatal neurons and tested whether D1-type dopamine receptor activation affected AMPA receptor-mediated currents. After a 5-min exposure to the D1 agonist SKF 81297 (1 microM), kainate-evoked current amplitude was enhanced in approximately 75% of cells to 121+/-2.5% of that recorded prior to addition of drug. This response was inhibited by the D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and mimicked by activators of PKA. Moreover, by western blot analysis using an antibody specific for the phosphorylated PKA site Ser845 of GluR1, we observed a marked increase in phosphorylated GluR1 following a 10-min exposure of striatal neurons to 1 microM SKF 81297. Our data demonstrate that activation of D1-type dopamine receptors on striatal neurons promotes phosphorylation of AMPA receptors by PKA as well as potentiation of current amplitude. These results elucidate one mechanism by which dopamine can modulate neurotransmission in the striatum. PMID:10582604

  15. Can targeting glutamate receptors with long-term heat acclimation improve outcomes following hypoxic injury?

    PubMed Central

    Ely, Brett R; Brunt, Vienna E; Minson, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Long-term heat acclimation appears to improve tolerance to hypoxic insults in various tissues, including brain, providing a promising avenue to improve functional outcomes following cerebrovascular events. Glutamate discharge is implicated in dysfunction following hypoxic stress and thus, targeting glutamate receptors with heat acclimation could improve cognitive outcomes following hypoxic injury. PMID:27227003

  16. Modulation of Chronic Pain by Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiechio, Santina

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) belong to class C G-protein-coupled receptors. They are expressed throughout the nervous system on both neurons and glial cells. In the central nervous system (CNS), mGluRs are mainly located in the proximity of the synaptic cleft where they regulate glutamatergic transmission in addition to a number of other neurotransmitters. To date, eight subtypes of mGluRs (mGluR1-mGluR8) have been cloned and classified into three groups on the basis of sequence similarities, and pharmacological and biochemical properties. Consequently, group I mGluRs includes mGluR1 and mGluR5, group II mGluRs includes mGluR2 and mGluR3, and group III mGluRs consists of mGluR4, mGluR6, mGluR7, and mGluR8. With the exception of mGluR6, whose localization is restricted within the retina, all mGluRs are ubiquitously expressed throughout the peripheral and CNS with some subtype specificity in different anatomical regions. mGluRs participate in many physiological processes and play important roles in a number of neurological conditions including anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and neurodegenerative disorders. mGluRs also participate in the physiological transmission of pain stimuli as well as to mechanisms involved in the establishment of chronic pain. Therefore, these receptors are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in several neurological disorders including chronic pain. Thus, understanding the physiological function and role of each mGluR subtype in the development of chronic pain will provide a better insight into the potential use of subtype-selective drugs currently being developed as orthosteric or allosteric ligands. PMID:26920009

  17. The N-terminal domain of GluR6-subtype glutamate receptor ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Janesh; Schuck, Peter; Jin, Rongsheng; Mayer, Mark L.

    2009-09-25

    The amino-terminal domain (ATD) of glutamate receptor ion channels, which controls their selective assembly into AMPA, kainate and NMDA receptor subtypes, is also the site of action of NMDA receptor allosteric modulators. Here we report the crystal structure of the ATD from the kainate receptor GluR6. The ATD forms dimers in solution at micromolar protein concentrations and crystallizes as a dimer. Unexpectedly, each subunit adopts an intermediate extent of domain closure compared to the apo and ligand-bound complexes of LIVBP and G protein-coupled glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and the dimer assembly has a markedly different conformation from that found in mGluRs. This conformation is stabilized by contacts between large hydrophobic patches in the R2 domain that are absent in NMDA receptors, suggesting that the ATDs of individual glutamate receptor ion channels have evolved into functionally distinct families.

  18. Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Regulates CD4(+) CTLA-4 Expression and Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Modjeski, K L; Levy, S C; Ture, S K; Field, D J; Shi, G; Ko, K; Zhu, Q; Morrell, C N

    2016-05-01

    PDZ domains are common 80- to 90-amino-acid regions named after the first three proteins discovered to share these domains: postsynaptic density 95, discs large, and zonula occludens. PDZ domain-containing proteins typically interact with the C-terminus of membrane receptors. Glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1), a seven-PDZ domain protein scaffold, regulates glutamate receptor surface expression and trafficking in neurons. We have found that human and mouse T cells also express GRIP1. T cell-specific GRIP1(-/-) mice >11 weeks old had prolonged cardiac allograft survival. Compared with wild-type T cells, in vitro stimulated GRIP1(-/-) T cells had decreased expression of activation markers and increased apoptotic surface marker expression. Surface expression of the strong T cell inhibitory molecule cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) was increased on GRIP1(-/-) T cells from mice >11 weeks old. CTLA-4 increases with T cell stimulation and its surface expression on GRIP1(-/-) T cells remained high after stimulation was removed, indicating a possible internalization defect in GRIP1-deficient T cells. CTLA-4-blocking antibody treatment following heart transplantation led to complete rejection in T cell GRIP1(-/-) mice, indicating that increased CTLA-4 surface expression contributed to the extended graft survival. Our data indicate that GRIP1 regulates T cell activation by regulating CTLA-4 surface expression. PMID:26601915

  19. Monosodium glutamate neonatal intoxication associated with obesity in adult stage is characterized by chronic inflammation and increased mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Roman-Ramos, Ruben; Almanza-Perez, Julio C; Garcia-Macedo, Rebeca; Blancas-Flores, Gerardo; Fortis-Barrera, Angeles; Jasso, Edgar I; Garcia-Lorenzana, Mario; Campos-Sepulveda, Alfonso E; Cruz, Miguel; Alarcon-Aguilar, Francisco J

    2011-06-01

    The monosodium glutamate (MSG) neonatal administration in mice provides a model of obesity with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and insulin resistance. However, the inflammatory profile of cytokines produced from fat tissue and its relationship to the metabolic dysfunction induced by MSG have not yet been revealed. The aim of this study was to establish the inflammatory profile attributed to MSG by measuring the expression of adipokines in visceral fat and serum of 19-week-old mice as well as the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma (PPARα and γ). Some metabolic and biochemical parameters were also quantified. The MSG increased mRNA expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), resistin and leptin, but adiponectin did not exhibit any changes. In addition, impaired glucose tolerance, increased levels of insulin, resistin and leptin were observed in serum. Both PPARα and PPARγ were activated in MSG-induced obese mice, which might explain its inflammatory profile. However, liver transaminases were severely depressed, indicating that MSG may also induce liver injury, contributing to inflammation. The MSG neonatal neuro-intoxication in mice may thus provide a model of obesity and inflammation characterized by the dual activation of PPARα and PPARγ, which might offer new insights into the mechanism of inflammatory diabetes in obesity leading to steatohepatitis, as well as a suitable model to study the role of new therapeutic agents to prevent or reduce insulin resistance, the inflammatory state and liver steatosis. PMID:21205225

  20. Role of glutamate receptors and glial cells in the pathophysiology of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ku; Na, Kyoung-Sae

    2016-10-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) causes substantial socioeconomic burden. Although a consensus on the definition of TRD has not yet been reached, it is certain that classic monoaminergic antidepressants are ineffective for TRD. One decade ago, many researchers found ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, to be an alternative to classic monoaminergic antidepressants. The major mechanisms of action of ketamine rapidly induce synaptogenesis in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pathway. Although excessive glutamatergic neurotransmission and consequent excitotoxicity were considered a major cause of TRD, recent evidence suggests that the extrasynaptic glutamatergic receptor signal pathway mainly contributes to the detrimental effects of TRD. Glial cells such as microglia and astrocytes, early life adversity, and glucocorticoid receptor dysfunction participate in complex cross-talk. An appropriate reuptake of glutamate at the astrocyte is crucial for preventing 'spill-over' of synaptic glutamate and binding to the extrasynaptic NMDA receptor. Excessive microglial activation and the inflammatory process cause astrocyte glutamatergic dysfunction, which in turn activates microglial function. Early life adversity and glucocorticoid receptor dysfunction result in vulnerability to stress in adulthood. A maladaptive response to stress leads to increased glutamatergic release and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which then activate microglia. However, since the role of inflammatory mediators such as pro-inflammatory cytokines is not specific for depression, more disease-specific mechanisms should be identified. Last, although much research has focused on ketamine as an alternative antidepressant for TRD, its long-lasting effectiveness and adverse events have not been rigorously demonstrated. Additionally, evidence suggests that substantial brain abnormalities develop in ketamine abusers. Thus, more investigations for ketamine and other novel

  1. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Actions of Orthosteric and Allosteric Ligands on Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1α*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jason Y.; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Meyer, Rebecca C.; Zhang, Li; Hamelberg, Donald; Hall, Randy A.; Brown, Edward M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Yang, Jenny J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α), a member of the family C G protein-coupled receptors, is emerging as a potential drug target for various disorders, including chronic neuronal degenerative diseases. In addition to being activated by glutamate, mGluR1α is also modulated by extracellular Ca2+. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Moreover, it has long been challenging to develop receptor-specific agonists due to homologies within the mGluR family, and the Ca2+-binding site(s) on mGluR1α may provide an opportunity for receptor-selective targeting by therapeutics. In the present study, we show that our previously predicted Ca2+-binding site in the hinge region of mGluR1α is adjacent to the site where orthosteric agonists and antagonists bind on the extracellular domain of the receptor. Moreover, we found that extracellular Ca2+ enhanced mGluR1α-mediated intracellular Ca2+ responses evoked by the orthosteric agonist l-quisqualate. Conversely, extracellular Ca2+ diminished the inhibitory effect of the mGluR1α orthosteric antagonist (S)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine. In addition, selective positive (Ro 67-4853) and negative (7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester) allosteric modulators of mGluR1α potentiated and inhibited responses to extracellular Ca2+, respectively, in a manner similar to their effects on the response of mGluR1α to glutamate. Mutations at residues predicted to be involved in Ca2+ binding, including E325I, had significant effects on the modulation of responses to the orthosteric agonist l-quisqualate and the allosteric modulator Ro 67-4853 by extracellular Ca2+. These studies reveal that binding of extracellular Ca2+ to the predicted Ca2+-binding site in the extracellular domain of mGluR1α modulates not only glutamate-evoked signaling but also the actions of both orthosteric ligands and allosteric modulators on mGluR1α. PMID:24280223

  2. Expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHUO; WEI, XING; CHEN, BINGYAO; ZHAO, MIN; SONG, GUANGZE; ZHANG, ZENGLIANG; LI, NAN

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGluR4) has been associated with the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. The aim of this study was to investigate mGluR4 expression and its clinical significance in osteosarcoma patients. mGluR4 expression was investigated using immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 58 osteosarcomas and 32 giant-cell tumors of bone. The correlations between mGluR4 expression and clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed with the Chi-squared test and survival curves were generated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The IHC results demonstrated that 20.69% (12/58) of the osteosarcomas and 43.75% (14/32) of the giant-cell tumors were mGluR4-positive. The statistical analysis revealed that mGluR4 expression was correlated with gender, age, Enneking stage and tumor volume in osteosarcomas (P<0.05). In the multivariate stepwise Cox regression analysis, Enneking stage was found to be statistically significantly associated with survival (P<0.05) and the survival analysis demonstrated that the survival probability was significantly higher in patients with higher mGluR4 expression compared with those with lower expression (P<0.05). Therefore, mGluR4 expression may be used to estimate the prognosis of osteosarcoma patients. PMID:26870360

  3. Development of PET and SPECT Probes for Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Morio

    2015-01-01

    l-Glutamate and its receptors (GluRs) play a key role in excitatory neurotransmission within the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Impaired regulation of GluRs has also been implicated in various neurological disorders. GluRs are classified into two major groups: ionotropic GluRs (iGluRs), which are ligand-gated ion channels, and metabotropic GluRs (mGluRs), which are coupled to heterotrimeric guanosine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins). Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of GluRs could provide a novel view of CNS function and of a range of brain disorders, potentially leading to the development of new drug therapies. Although no satisfactory imaging agents have yet been developed for iGluRs, several PET ligands for mGluRs have been successfully employed in clinical studies. This paper reviews current progress towards the development of PET and SPECT probes for GluRs. PMID:25874256

  4. N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Activation May Contribute to Glufosinate Neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Activation May Contribute to Glufosinate Neurotoxicity Glufosinate (GLF) at high levels in mammals causes convulsions through a mechanism that is not completely understood. The structural similarity of GLF to glutamate (GLU) implicates the glutamate...

  5. TiO2 nanoparticle-induced neurotoxicity may be involved in dysfunction of glutamate metabolism and its receptor expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ze, Xiao; Su, Mingyu; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Hao; Hong, Jie; Yu, Xiaohong; Liu, Dong; Xu, Bingqing; Sheng, Lei; Zhou, Qiuping; Zhou, Junling; Cui, Jingwen; Li, Kai; Wang, Ling; Ze, Yuguan; Hong, Fashui

    2016-06-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have been used in environmental management, food, medicine, and industry. But TiO2 NPs have been demonstrated to cross the blood-brain barrier and store up in the brain organization, leading to glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity. However, the neurotoxicity in the brain is not well understood. In this study, mice were exposed to 1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg body weight TiO2 NPs for 9 months, and the glutamate-glutamine cyclic pathway and expressions of glutamate receptors associated with the hippocampal neurotoxicity were investigated. Our findings showed elevations of glutamate release and phosphate-activated glutaminase activity, and reductions in glutamine and glutamine synthetase in the hippocampus following exposure to TiO2 NPs. Furthermore, TiO2 NPs significantly inhibited the expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunits (including NR1, NR2A, and NR2B) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 in mouse hippocampus. These findings suggest that the imbalance of glutamate metabolism triggered inhibitions of glutamate receptor expression in the TiO2 NP-exposed hippocampus. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 655-662, 2016. PMID:25411160

  6. CTEP: a novel, potent, long-acting, and orally bioavailable metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Lothar; Jaeschke, Georg; Michalon, Aubin; Vieira, Eric; Honer, Michael; Spooren, Will; Porter, Richard; Hartung, Thomas; Kolczewski, Sabine; Büttelmann, Bernd; Flament, Christophe; Diener, Catherine; Fischer, Christophe; Gatti, Silvia; Prinssen, Eric P; Parrott, Neil; Hoffmann, Gerhard; Wettstein, Joseph G

    2011-11-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) is a glutamate-activated class C G protein-coupled receptor widely expressed in the central nervous system and clinically investigated as a drug target for a range of indications, including depression, Parkinson's disease, and fragile X syndrome. Here, we present the novel potent, selective, and orally bioavailable mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator with inverse agonist properties 2-chloro-4-((2,5-dimethyl-1-(4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl)-1H-imidazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine (CTEP). CTEP binds mGlu5 with low nanomolar affinity and shows >1000-fold selectivity when tested against 103 targets, including all known mGlu receptors. CTEP penetrates the brain with a brain/plasma ratio of 2.6 and displaces the tracer [(3)H]3-(6-methyl-pyridin-2-ylethynyl)-cyclohex-2-enone-O-methyl-oxime (ABP688) in vivo in mice from brain regions expressing mGlu5 with an average ED(50) equivalent to a drug concentration of 77.5 ng/g in brain tissue. This novel mGlu5 inhibitor is active in the stress-induced hyperthermia procedure in mice and the Vogel conflict drinking test in rats with minimal effective doses of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg, respectively, reflecting a 30- to 100-fold higher in vivo potency compared with 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) and fenobam. CTEP is the first reported mGlu5 inhibitor with both long half-life of approximately 18 h and high oral bioavailability allowing chronic treatment with continuous receptor blockade with one dose every 48 h in adult and newborn animals. By enabling long-term treatment through a wide age range, CTEP allows the exploration of the full therapeutic potential of mGlu5 inhibitors for indications requiring chronic receptor inhibition. PMID:21849627

  7. Interaction of mechanisms involving epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, adenosine receptors, and metabotropic glutamate receptors in neurovascular coupling in rat whisker barrel cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanrong; Liu, Xiaoguang; Gebremedhin, Debebe; Falck, John R; Harder, David R; Koehler, Raymond C

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine, astrocyte metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) have been implicated in neurovascular coupling. Although A2A and A2B receptors mediate cerebral vasodilation to adenosine, the role of each receptor in the cerebral blood flow (CBF) response to neural activation remains to be fully elucidated. In addition, adenosine can amplify astrocyte calcium, which may increase arachidonic acid metabolites such as EETs. The interaction of these pathways was investigated by determining if combined treatment with antagonists exerted an additive inhibitory effect on the CBF response. During whisker stimulation of anesthetized rats, the increase in cortical CBF was reduced by approximately half after individual administration of A2B, mGluR and EET antagonists and EET synthesis inhibitors. Combining treatment of either a mGluR antagonist, an EET antagonist, or an EET synthesis inhibitor with an A2B receptor antagonist did not produce an additional decrement in the CBF response. Likewise, the CBF response also remained reduced by ~50% when an EET antagonist was combined with an mGluR antagonist or an mGluR antagonist plus an A2B receptor antagonist. In contrast, A2A and A3 receptor antagonists had no effect on the CBF response to whisker stimulation. We conclude that (1) adenosine A2B receptors, rather than A2A or A3 receptors, play a significant role in coupling cortical CBF to neuronal activity, and (2) the adenosine A2B receptor, mGluR, and EETs signaling pathways are not functionally additive, consistent with the possibility of astrocytic mGluR and adenosine A2B receptor linkage to the synthesis and release of vasodilatory EETs. PMID:17519974

  8. GABAB and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in the striatopallidal complex in primates

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, YOLAND; CHARARA, ALI; HANSON, JESSE E.; PAQUET, MARYSE; LEVEY, ALLAN I.

    2000-01-01

    GPi. Consistent with the immunoperoxidase data, immunoparticles were found in the presynaptic grid of asymmetric synapses established by cortical- and subthalamic-like glutamatergic terminals. These findings indicate that both GABA and glutamate metabotropic receptors are located to subserve various modulatory functions of the synaptic transmission in the primate striatopallidal complex. Furthermore, their pattern of localisation raises issues about their roles and mechanisms of activation in normal and pathological conditions. Because of their ‘modulatory’ functions, these receptors are ideal targets for chronic drug therapies in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:10923987

  9. Metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling is required for NMDA receptor-dependent ocular dominance plasticity and LTD in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sidorov, Michael S.; Kaplan, Eitan S.; Osterweil, Emily K.; Lindemann, Lothar; Bear, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    A feature of early postnatal neocortical development is a transient peak in signaling via metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). In visual cortex, this change coincides with increased sensitivity of excitatory synapses to monocular deprivation (MD). However, loss of visual responsiveness after MD occurs via mechanisms revealed by the study of long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission, which in layer 4 is induced by acute activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) rather than mGluR5. Here we report that chronic postnatal down-regulation of mGluR5 signaling produces coordinated impairments in both NMDAR-dependent LTD in vitro and ocular dominance plasticity in vivo. The data suggest that ongoing mGluR5 signaling during a critical period of postnatal development establishes the biochemical conditions that are permissive for activity-dependent sculpting of excitatory synapses via the mechanism of NMDAR-dependent LTD. PMID:26417096

  10. Driving Cellular Plasticity and Survival Through the Signal Transduction Pathways of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Li, Faqi

    2008-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) share a common molecular morphology with other G protein–linked receptors, but there expression throughout the mammalian nervous system places these receptors as essential mediators not only for the initial development of an organism, but also for the vital determination of a cell’s fate during many disorders in the nervous system that include amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, epilepsy, trauma, and stroke. Given the ubiquitous distribution of these receptors, the mGluR system impacts upon neuronal, vascular, and glial cell function and is activated by a wide variety of stimuli that includes neurotransmitters, peptides, hormones, growth factors, ions, lipids, and light. Employing signal transduction pathways that can modulate both excitatory and inhibitory responses, the mGluR system drives a spectrum of cellular pathways that involve protein kinases, endonucleases, cellular acidity, energy metabolism, mitochondrial membrane potential, caspases, and specific mitogen-activated protein kinases. Ultimately these pathways can converge to regulate genomic DNA degradation, membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) residue exposure, and inflammatory microglial activation. As we continue to push the envelope for our understanding of this complex and critical family of metabotropic receptors, we should be able to reap enormous benefits for both clinical disease as well as our understanding of basic biology in the nervous system. PMID:16375723

  11. A Toolkit for Orthogonal and in vivo Optical Manipulation of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, Joshua; Popescu, Andrei T.; Reiner, Andreas; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to optically manipulate specific neuronal signaling proteins with genetic precision paves the way for the dissection of their roles in brain function, behavior, and disease. Chemical optogenetic control with photoswitchable tethered ligands (PTLs) enables rapid, reversible and reproducible activation or block of specific neurotransmitter-gated receptors and ion channels in specific cells. In this study, we further engineered and characterized the light-activated GluK2 kainate receptor, LiGluR, to develop a toolbox of LiGluR variants. Low-affinity LiGluRs allow for efficient optical control of GluK2 while removing activation by native glutamate, whereas variant RNA edited versions enable the synaptic role of receptors with high and low Ca2+ permeability to be assessed and spectral variant photoswitches provide flexibility in illumination. Importantly, we establish that LiGluR works efficiently in the cortex of awake, adult mice using standard optogenetic techniques, thus opening the door to probing the role of specific synaptic receptors and cellular signals in the neural circuit operations of the mammalian brain in normal conditions and in disease. The principals developed in this study are widely relevant to the engineering and in vivo use of optically controllable proteins, including other neurotransmitter receptors. PMID:26869877

  12. Group 1 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Function and Its Regulation of Learning and Memory in the Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Caroline; Quirion, Rémi

    2012-01-01

    Normal aging is generally characterized by a slow decline of cognitive abilities albeit with marked individual differences. Several animal models have been studied to explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and its receptors have been closely linked to spatial learning and hippocampus-dependent memory processes. For decades, ionotropic glutamate receptors have been known to play a critical role in synaptic plasticity, a form of adaptation regulating memory formation. Over the past 10 years, several groups have shown the importance of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) in successful cognitive aging. These G-protein-coupled receptors are enriched in the hippocampal formation and interact physically with other proteins in the membrane including glutamate ionotropic receptors. Synaptic plasticity is crucial to maintain cognitive abilities and long-term depression (LTD) induced by group 1 mGluR activation, which has been linked to memory in the aging brain. The translation and synthesis of proteins by mGluR-LTD modulate ionotropic receptor trafficking and expression of immediate early genes related to cognition. Fragile X syndrome, a genetic form of autism characterized by memory deficits, has been associated to mGluR receptor malfunction and aberrant activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Dysfunction of mGluR could also be involved in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Indeed, beta-amyloid, the main component of insoluble senile plaques and one of the hallmarks of AD, occludes mGluR-dependent LTD leading to diminished functional synapses. This review highlights recent findings regarding mGluR signaling, related synaptic plasticity, and their potential involvement in normal aging and neurological disorders. PMID:23091460

  13. Structure–Activity Relationships Comparing N-(6-Methylpyridin-yl)-Substituted Aryl Amides to 2-Methyl-6-(substituted-arylethynyl)pyridines or 2-Methyl-4-(substituted-arylethynyl)thiazoles as Novel Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Antagonists†

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Santosh S.; Zou, Mu-Fa; Cao, Jianjing; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2010-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) has been implicated in anxiety, depression, pain, mental retardation, and addiction. The potent and selective noncompetitive mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP, 1) has been a critically important tool used to further elucidate the role of mGluR5 in these CNS disorders. In an effort to provide novel and structurally diverse selective mGluR5 antagonists, we previously described a set of analogues with moderate activity wherein the alkyne bond was replaced with an amide group. In the present report, extended series of both amide and alkyne-based ligands were synthesized. MGluR5 binding and functional data were obtained that identified (1) several novel alkynes with comparable affinities to 1 at mGluR5 (e.g., 10 and 20–23), but (2) most structural variations to the amide template were not well tolerated, although a few potent amides were discovered (e.g., 55 and 56). Several of these novel analogues show drug-like physical properties (e.g., cLogP range) 2–5) that support their use for in vivo investigation into the role of mGluR5 in CNS disorders. PMID:19445453

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptors promote disinhibition of olfactory bulb glomeruli that scales with input strength

    PubMed Central

    Zak, Joseph D.; Whitesell, Jennifer D.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the neural circuitry within glomeruli of the olfactory bulb plays a major role in affecting information flow between olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and output mitral cells (MCs). Glutamatergic external tufted (ET) cells, located at glomeruli, can act as intermediary cells in excitation between OSNs and MCs, whereas activation of MCs by OSNs is, in turn, suppressed by inhibitory synapses onto ET cells. In this study, we used patch-clamp recordings in rat olfactory bulb slices to examine the function of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in altering these glomerular signaling mechanisms. We found that activation of group II mGluRs profoundly reduced inhibition onto ET cells evoked by OSN stimulation. The mGluRs that mediated disinhibition were located on presynaptic GABAergic periglomerular cells and appeared to be activated by glutamate transients derived from dendrites in glomeruli. In terms of glomerular output, the mGluR-mediated reduction in GABA release led to a robust increase in the number of action potentials evoked by OSN stimulation in both ET cells and MCs. Importantly, however, the enhanced excitation was specific to when a glomerulus was strongly activated by OSN inputs. By being selective for strong vs. weak glomerular activation, mGluR-mediated disinhibition provides a mechanism to enhance the contrast in odor signals that activate OSN inputs into a single glomerulus at varying intensities. PMID:25552635

  15. Two-photon brightness of azobenzene photoswitches designed for glutamate receptor optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Elizabeth C.; Berlin, Shai; Levitz, Joshua; Kienzler, Michael A.; Yuan, Zhe; Madsen, Dorte; Larsen, Delmar S.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian neurotransmitter-gated receptors can be conjugated to photoswitchable tethered ligands (PTLs) to enable photoactivation, or photoantagonism, while preserving normal function at neuronal synapses. “MAG” PTLs for ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) are based on an azobenzene photoswitch that is optimally switched into the liganding state by blue or near-UV light, wavelengths that penetrate poorly into the brain. To facilitate deep-tissue photoactivation with near-infrared light, we measured the efficacy of two-photon (2P) excitation for two MAG molecules using nonlinear spectroscopy. Based on quantitative characterization, we find a recently designed second generation PTL, l-MAG0460, to have a favorable 2P absorbance peak at 850 nm, enabling efficient 2P activation of the GluK2 kainate receptor, LiGluR. We also achieve 2P photoactivation of a metabotropic receptor, LimGluR3, with a new mGluR-specific PTL, d-MAG0460. 2P photoswitching is efficiently achieved using digital holography to shape illumination over single somata of cultured neurons. Simultaneous Ca2+-imaging reports on 2P photoswitching in multiple cells with high temporal resolution. The combination of electrophysiology or Ca2+ imaging with 2P activation by optical wavefront shaping should make second generation PTL-controlled receptors suitable for studies of intact neural circuits. PMID:25653339

  16. Two-photon brightness of azobenzene photoswitches designed for glutamate receptor optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; Berlin, Shai; Levitz, Joshua; Kienzler, Michael A; Yuan, Zhe; Madsen, Dorte; Larsen, Delmar S; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2015-02-17

    Mammalian neurotransmitter-gated receptors can be conjugated to photoswitchable tethered ligands (PTLs) to enable photoactivation, or photoantagonism, while preserving normal function at neuronal synapses. "MAG" PTLs for ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) are based on an azobenzene photoswitch that is optimally switched into the liganding state by blue or near-UV light, wavelengths that penetrate poorly into the brain. To facilitate deep-tissue photoactivation with near-infrared light, we measured the efficacy of two-photon (2P) excitation for two MAG molecules using nonlinear spectroscopy. Based on quantitative characterization, we find a recently designed second generation PTL, L-MAG0460, to have a favorable 2P absorbance peak at 850 nm, enabling efficient 2P activation of the GluK2 kainate receptor, LiGluR. We also achieve 2P photoactivation of a metabotropic receptor, LimGluR3, with a new mGluR-specific PTL, D-MAG0460. 2P photoswitching is efficiently achieved using digital holography to shape illumination over single somata of cultured neurons. Simultaneous Ca(2+)-imaging reports on 2P photoswitching in multiple cells with high temporal resolution. The combination of electrophysiology or Ca(2+) imaging with 2P activation by optical wavefront shaping should make second generation PTL-controlled receptors suitable for studies of intact neural circuits. PMID:25653339

  17. Maternal inflammation leads to impaired glutamate homeostasis and up-regulation of glutamate carboxypeptidase II in activated microglia in the fetal/newborn rabbit brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Bassam, Bassam; Thomas, Ajit G; Williams, Monica; Liu, Jinhuan; Nance, Elizabeth; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S; Kannan, Sujatha

    2016-10-01

    Astrocyte dysfunction and excessive activation of glutamatergic systems have been implicated in a number of neurologic disorders, including periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and cerebral palsy (CP). However, the role of chorioamnionitis on glutamate homeostasis in the fetal and neonatal brains is not clearly understood. We have previously shown that intrauterine endotoxin administration results in intense microglial 'activation' and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in the periventricular region (PVR) of the neonatal rabbit brain. In this study, we assessed the effect of maternal inflammation on key components of the glutamate pathway and its relationship to astrocyte and microglial activation in the fetal and neonatal New Zealand white rabbit brain. We found that intrauterine endotoxin exposure at gestational day 28 (G28) induced acute and prolonged glutamate elevation in the PVR of fetal (G29, 1day post-injury) and postnatal day 1 (PND1, 3days post-injury) brains along with prominent morphological changes in the astrocytes (soma hypertrophy and retracted processes) in the white matter tracts. There was a significant increase in glutaminase and N-Methyl-d-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) NR2 subunit expression along with decreased glial L-glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) in the PVR at G29, that would promote acute dysregulation of glutamate homeostasis. This was accompanied with significantly decreased TGF-β1 at PND1 in CP kits indicating ongoing neuroinflammation. We also show for the first time that glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) was significantly increased in the activated microglia at the periventricular white matter area in both G29 and PND1 CP kits. This was confirmed by in vitro studies demonstrating that LPS activated primary microglia markedly upregulate GCPII enzymatic activity. These results suggest that maternal intrauterine endotoxin exposure results in early onset and long-lasting dysregulation of glutamate homeostasis, which may be mediated by

  18. Role of Spinophilin in Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Endocytosis, Signaling, and Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Di Sebastiano, Andrea R; Fahim, Sandra; Dunn, Henry A; Walther, Cornelia; Ribeiro, Fabiola M; Cregan, Sean P; Angers, Stephane; Schmid, Susanne; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2016-08-19

    Activation of Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) activates signaling cascades, resulting in calcium release from intracellular stores, ERK1/2 activation, and long term changes in synaptic activity that are implicated in learning, memory, and neurodegenerative diseases. As such, elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying Group I mGluR signaling is important for understanding physiological responses initiated by the activation of these receptors. In the current study, we identify the multifunctional scaffolding protein spinophilin as a novel Group I mGluR-interacting protein. We demonstrate that spinophilin interacts with the C-terminal tail and second intracellular loop of Group I mGluRs. Furthermore, we show that interaction of spinophilin with Group I mGluRs attenuates receptor endocytosis and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, an effect that is dependent upon the interaction of spinophilin with the C-terminal PDZ binding motif encoded by Group I mGluRs. Spinophilin knock-out results in enhanced mGluR5 endocytosis as well as increased ERK1/2, AKT, and Ca(2+) signaling in primary cortical neurons. In addition, the loss of spinophilin expression results in impaired mGluR5-stimulated LTD. Our results indicate that spinophilin plays an important role in regulating the activity of Group I mGluRs as well as their influence on synaptic activity. PMID:27358397

  19. Convergence of dopamine and glutamate signaling onto striatal ERK activation in response to drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Emma; Salery, Marine; Vanhoutte, Peter; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    Despite their distinct targets, all addictive drugs commonly abused by humans evoke increases in dopamine (DA) concentration within the striatum. The main DA Guanine nucleotide binding protein couple receptors (GPCRs) expressed by medium-sized spiny neurons of the striatum are the D1R and D2R, which are positively and negatively coupled to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, respectively. These two DA GPCRs are largely segregated into distinct neuronal populations, where they are co-expressed with glutamate receptors in dendritic spines. Direct and indirect interactions between DA GPCRs and glutamate receptors are the molecular basis by which DA modulates glutamate transmission and controls striatal plasticity and behavior induced by drugs of abuse. A major downstream target of striatal D1R is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase pathway. ERK activation by drugs of abuse behaves as a key integrator of D1R and glutamate NMDAR signaling. Once activated, ERK can trigger chromatin remodeling and induce gene expression that permits long-term cellular alterations and drug-induced morphological and behavioral changes. Besides the classical cAMP/PKA pathway, downstream of D1R, recent evidence implicates a cAMP-independent crosstalk mechanism by which the D1R potentiates NMDAR-mediated calcium influx and ERK activation. The mounting evidence of reciprocal modulation of DA and glutamate receptors adds further intricacy to striatal synaptic signaling and is liable to prove relevant for addictive drug-induced signaling, plasticity, and behavior. Herein, we review the evidence that built our understanding of the consequences of this synergistic signaling for the actions of drugs of abuse. PMID:24409148

  20. The role of metabotropic glutamate receptors and cortical adaptation in habituation of odor-guided behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yadon, Carly A.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2005-01-01

    Decreases in behavioral investigation of novel stimuli over time may be mediated by a variety of factors including changes in attention, internal state, and motivation. Sensory cortical adaptation, a decrease in sensory cortical responsiveness over prolonged stimulation, may also play a role. In olfaction, metabotropic glutamate receptors on cortical afferent pre-synaptic terminals have been shown to underlie both cortical sensory adaptation and habituation of odor-evoked reflexes. The present experiment examined whether blockade of sensory cortical adaptation through bilateral infusion of the group III metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (CPPG) into the anterior piriform cortex could reduce habituation of a more complex odor-driven behavior such as investigation of a scented object or a conspecific. The results demonstrate that time spent investigating a scented jar, or a conspecific, decreases over the course of a continuous 10 minute trial. Acute infusion of CPPG bilaterally into the anterior piriform cortex significantly enhanced the time spent investigating the scented jar compared to investigation time in control rats, without affecting overall behavioral activity levels. Infusions into the brain outside of the piriform cortex were without effect. CPPG infusion into the piriform cortex also produced an enhancement of time spent investigating a conspecific, although this effect was not significant. PMID:16322361

  1. Allosteric Modulation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Structural Insights and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J.; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Meiler, Jens; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Allosteric modulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represents a novel approach to the development of probes and therapeutics that is expected to enable subtype-specific regulation of central nervous system target receptors. The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus) are class C GPCRs that play important neuromodulatory roles throughout the brain, as such they are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention for a number of psychiatric and neurological disorders including anxiety, depression, Fragile X Syndrome, Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Over the last fifteen years, selective allosteric modulators have been identified for many members of the mGlu family. The vast majority of these allosteric modulators are thought to bind within the transmembrane-spanning domains of the receptors to enhance or inhibit functional responses. A combination of mutagenesis-based studies and pharmacological approaches are beginning to provide a better understanding of mGlu allosteric sites. Collectively, when mapped onto a homology model of the different mGlu subtypes based on the β2-adrenergic receptor, the previous mutagenesis studies suggest commonalities in the location of allosteric sites across different members of the mGlu family. In addition, there is evidence for multiple allosteric binding pockets within the transmembrane region that can interact to modulate one another. In the absence of a class C GPCR crystal structure, this approach has shown promise with respect to the interpretation of mutagenesis data and understanding structure-activity relationships of allosteric modulator pharmacophores. PMID:20637216

  2. Palmitoylation-dependent regulation of glutamate receptors and their PDZ domain-containing partners

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gareth M.; Huganir, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that both AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid)- and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate)-type glutamate receptors, and many of their interacting partners, are palmitoylated proteins. Interfering with palmitoylation dramatically affects receptor trafficking and distribution and, in turn, can profoundly alter synaptic transmission. Increased knowledge of synaptic palmitoylation not only will aid our understanding of physiological neuronal regulation, but also may provide insights into, and even novel treatments for, neuropathological conditions. In the present paper, we review recent advances regarding the regulation of ionotropic glutamate receptor trafficking and function by palmitoylation. PMID:23356261

  3. Structure of metabotropic glutamate receptor C-terminal domains in contact with interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Enz, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) regulate intracellular signal pathways that control several physiological tasks, including neuronal excitability, learning, and memory. This is achieved by the formation of synaptic signal complexes, in which mGluRs assemble with functionally related proteins such as enzymes, scaffolds, and cytoskeletal anchor proteins. Thus, mGluR associated proteins actively participate in the regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Importantly, dysfunction of mGluRs and interacting proteins may lead to impaired signal transduction and finally result in neurological disorders, e.g., night blindness, addiction, epilepsy, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson's disease. In contrast to solved crystal structures of extracellular N-terminal domains of some mGluR types, only a few studies analyzed the conformation of intracellular receptor domains. Intracellular C-termini of most mGluR types are subject to alternative splicing and can be further modified by phosphorylation and SUMOylation. In this way, diverse interaction sites for intracellular proteins that bind to and regulate the glutamate receptors are generated. Indeed, most of the known mGluR binding partners interact with the receptors' C-terminal domains. Within the last years, different laboratories analyzed the structure of these domains and described the geometry of the contact surface between mGluR C-termini and interacting proteins. Here, I will review recent progress in the structure characterization of mGluR C-termini and provide an up-to-date summary of the geometry of these domains in contact with binding partners. PMID:22536173

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptors depress vagal and aortic baroreceptor signal transmission in the NTS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Chen, C Y; Bonham, A C

    1998-11-01

    We sought to determine whether metabotropic glutamate receptors contribute to frequency-dependent depression of vagal and aortic baroreceptor signal transmission in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in vivo. In alpha-chloralose-anesthetized rabbits, we determined the number of extracellular action potentials synaptically evoked by low (1 Hz)- or high-frequency vagal (3-20 Hz) or aortic depressor nerve (ADN) (6-80 Hz) stimulation and postsynaptically evoked by the ionotropic glutamate receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (2S,1'S, 2'S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I) attenuated NTS responses monosynaptically evoked by 1-Hz vagus stimulation by 34% (n = 25; P = 0.011), while augmenting AMPA-evoked responses by 64% (n = 17; P = 0.026). The metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) did not affect NTS responses to low-frequency vagal stimulation (n = 11) or AMPA (n = 10) but augmented responses to high-frequency stimulation by 50% (n = 25; P = 0.0001). MPPG also augmented NTS responses to high-frequency ADN stimulation by 35% (n = 9; P = 0.048) but did not affect responses to low-frequency stimulation (n = 9) or AMPA (n = 7). The results suggest that metabotropic glutamate receptors, presumably at presynaptic sites, contribute to frequency-dependent depression of vagal and aortic baroreceptor signal transmission in NTS. PMID:9815076

  5. Increased glutamate receptor gene expression in the cerebral cortex of insulin induced hypoglycemic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Joseph, A; Antony, S; Paulose, C S

    2008-10-01

    Hypoglycemia causes brain fuel deprivation, resulting in functional brain failure and brain death. It is a serious complication of insulin therapy in diabetic patients. A single intrafemoral dose of streptozotocin was administered to induce diabetes. Hypoglycemia was induced by appropriate doses of insulin s.c. in control and diabetic rats. Glutamate content and glutamate receptor kinetics were studied using [3H]glutamate. [3H]MK 801 was used to study the NMDA receptor kinetics. NMDA2B and metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 5 subunits receptor gene expressions were done using real time PCR. There was a significant (P<0.001) increase in the glutamate content in the cerebral cortex of hypoglycemic and diabetic rats when compared with control with more glutamate content in the hypoglycemic group. Scatchard analysis using [3H]glutamate and [3H]MK 801 in the cerebral cortex showed a significant (P<0.001) increase in the maximal binding (Bmax) in both hypoglycemic and diabetic rats when compared with control with no significant change in equilibrium dissociation constant. The glutamate and NMDA receptor binding parameters were significantly (P<0.001) enhanced in the hypoglycemic rats compared with hyperglycemic rats. Real time PCR analysis also showed a significant increase (P<0.001) in the gene expression of NMDA2B and mGluR5 subunits of glutamate receptor. This increased gene expression of NMDA2B and mGluR5 glutamate receptor subunits confirmed the enhanced mRNA of receptor subunits and subsequently at the protein level from the receptor kinetic studies. The enhanced glutamate receptors were more prominent in hypoglycemic group which is of significance in this study. Up-regulation of glutamate leads to Ca2+ overload in cells, potentially leading to cell damage and death. This functional damage during hypoglycemia is suggested to contribute to cognitive and memory deficits which has immense clinical relevance in the therapeutic management of diabetes. PMID:18761060

  6. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu2/3) in drug addiction

    PubMed Central

    Moussawi, Khaled; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Drug addiction is characterized by maladaptive decision-making and dysfunctional brain circuitry regulating motivated behaviors, resulting in loss of the behavioral flexibility needed to abstain from drug seeking. Hence, addicts face high risk of relapse even after prolonged periods of abstinence from drug use. This is thought to result from long-lasting drug-induced neuroadaptations of glutamate and dopaminergic transmission in the mesocorticolimbic and corticostriatal circuits where group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu2/3 receptors) are densely expressed. mGlu2/3 receptors presynaptically control glutamate as well as dopamine release throughout the mesocorticolimbic structures involved in reward processing and drug seeking, and their function is reduced after prolonged exposure to drugs of abuse. In pre-clinical models, mGlu2/3 receptors have been shown to regulate both reward processing and drug seeking, in part through the capacity to control release of dopamine and glutamate respectively. Specifically, mGlu2/3 receptor agonists administered systemically or locally into certain brain structures reduce the rewarding value of commonly abused drugs and inhibit the reinstatement of drug seeking. Given the ability of mGlu2/3 receptor agonists to compensate for and possibly reverse drug-induced neuroadaptations in mesocorticolimbic circuitry, this class of receptors emerges as a new therapeutic target for reducing relapse in drug addiction. PMID:20371233

  7. Metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists potentiate a slow afterdepolarization in CNS neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, F.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that, in the rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN), metabotropic glutamate receptor (met-GluR) agonists evoked a slow depolarization accompanied by an increase in membrane conductance and burst firing. We have speculated that the burst firing elicited by met-GluR agonists may be due to activation or enhancement of a non-specific cation current, which exists in some DLSN neurons. Now we report that a slow afterdepolarization (sADP) mediated by a non-specific cation current was potentiated by both 1S,3R-ACPD and quisqualate. In addition, met-GluR agonists unmask a sADP in DLSN neurons which did not show a sADP under control conditions. Our data suggest that a non-specific cation current can be potentiated by activation of the met-GluR.

  8. Hyperammonemia alters the modulation by different neurosteroids of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway through NMDA- GABAA - or sigma receptors in cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    González-Usano, Alba; Cauli, Omar; Agustí, Ana; Felipo, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Several neurosteroids modulate the glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway in cerebellum through modulation of NMDA- GABAA - or sigma receptors. Hyperammonemia alters the concentration of several neurosteroids and impairs the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway, leading to impaired learning ability. This work aimed to assess whether chronic hyperammonemia alters the modulation by different neurosteroids of GABAA, NMDA, and/or sigma receptors and of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Neurosteroids were administered through microdialysis probes, and extracellular cGMP and citrulline were measured. Then NMDA was administered to assess the effects on the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway activation. Hyperammonemia completely modifies the effects of pregnanolone and pregnenolone. Pregnanolone acts as a GABAA receptor agonist in controls, but as an NMDA receptor antagonist in hyperammonemic rats. Pregnenolone does not induce any effect in controls, but acts as a sigma receptor agonist in hyperammonemic rats. Hyperammonemia potentiates the actions of tetrahydrodeoxy-corticosterone (THDOC) as a GABAA receptor agonist, allopregnanolone as an NMDA receptor antagonist, and pregnenolone sulfate as an NMDA receptor activation enhancer. Neurosteroids that reduce the pathway (pregnanolone, THDOC, allopregnanolone, DHEAS) may contribute to cognitive impairment in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy. Pregnenolone would impair cognitive function in hyperammonemia. Neurosteroids that restore the pathway in hyperammonemia (pregnenolone sulfate) could restore cognitive function in hyperammonemia and encephalopathy. PMID:23227932

  9. Depletion of serotonin in the basolateral amygdala elevates glutamate receptors and facilitates fear-potentiated startle

    PubMed Central

    Tran, L; Lasher, B K; Young, K A; Keele, N B

    2013-01-01

    Our previous experiments demonstrated that systemic depletion of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), similar to levels reported in patients with emotional disorders, enhanced glutamateric activity in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) and potentiated fear behaviors. However, the effects of isolated depletion of 5-HT in the LA, and the molecular mechanisms underlying enhanced glutamatergic activity are unknown. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that depletion of 5-HT in the LA induces increased fear behavior, and concomitantly enhances glutamate receptor (GluR) expression. Bilateral infusions of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (4 μg per side) into the LA produced a regional reduction of serotonergic fibers, resulting in decreased 5-HT concentrations. The induction of low 5-HT in the LA elevated fear-potentiated startle, with a parallel increase in GluR1 mRNA and GluR1 protein expression. These findings suggest that low 5-HT concentrations in the LA may facilitate fear behavior through enhanced GluR-mediated mechanisms. Moreover, our data support a relationship between 5-HT and glutamate in psychopathologies. PMID:24002084

  10. Spatio-temporal characteristics of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 traffic at or near the plasma membrane in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, William; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes can sense extracellular glutamate and respond to it by elevating their intracellular Ca(2+) levels via the activation of G-protein coupled receptors, such as metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), which, during early postnatal development, is the primary receptor responsible for glutamatergic signaling in astrocytes. However, the detailed spatio-temporal characteristics of mGluR5 traffic at or near the plasma membrane of astrocytes are not well understood. To address this issue, we expressed recombinant fluorescent protein chimera of mGluR5 and used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy on rat visual cortical astrocytes in culture. We used astrocytes lacking major processes, otherwise posing as a diffusion barrier, to infer into the general dynamics of this receptor. We found that plasmalemmal mGluR5 clusters in distinct areas, the size, and initial spatio-temporal level of occupancy of which dictated mGluR5 trafficking characteristics upon glutamate stimulation. These findings will be valuable in the interpretation of point-to-point information transfer and volume transmission between astrocytes and neurons, as well as that of paracrine signaling within astrocytic networks. PMID:27014856

  11. Cross-signaling in metabotropic glutamate 2 and serotonin 2A receptor heteromers in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Baki, Lia; Fribourg, Miguel; Younkin, Jason; Eltit, Jose Miguel; Moreno, Jose L; Park, Gyu; Vysotskaya, Zhanna; Narahari, Adishesh; Sealfon, Stuart C; Gonzalez-Maeso, Javier; Logothetis, Diomedes E

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported that co-expression of the Gi-coupled metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGlu2R) and the Gq-coupled serotonin (5-HT) 2A receptor (2AR) in Xenopus oocytes (Fribourg et al. Cell 147:1011-1023, 2011) results in inverse cross-signaling, where for either receptor, strong agonists suppress and inverse agonists potentiate the signaling of the partner receptor. Importantly, through this cross-signaling, the mGlu2R/2AR heteromer integrates the actions of psychedelic and antipsychotic drugs. To investigate whether mGlu2R and 2AR can cross-signal in mammalian cells, we stably co-expressed them in HEK293 cells along with the GIRK1/GIRK4 channel, a reporter of Gi and Gq signaling activity. Crosstalk-positive clones were identified by Fura-2 calcium imaging, based on potentiation of 5-HT-induced Ca(2+) responses by the inverse mGlu2/3R agonist LY341495. Cross-signaling from both sides of the complex was confirmed in representative clones by using the GIRK channel reporter, both in whole-cell patch-clamp and in fluorescence assays using potentiometric dyes, and further established by competition binding assays. Notably, only 25-30 % of the clones were crosstalk-positive. The crosstalk-positive phenotype correlated with (a) increased colocalization of the two receptors at the cell surface, (b) lower density of mGlu2R binding sites and higher density of 2AR binding sites in total membrane preparations, and (c) higher ratios of mGlu2R/2AR normalized surface protein expression. Consistent with our results in Xenopus oocytes, a combination of ligands targeting both receptors could elicit functional crosstalk in a crosstalk-negative clone. Crosstalk-positive clones can be used in high-throughput assays for identification of antipsychotic drugs targeting this receptor heterocomplex. PMID:26780666

  12. A role of ADAR2 and RNA editing of glutamate receptors in mood disorders and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pre-mRNAs of 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)-propanoic acid (AMPA)/kainate glutamate receptors undergo post-transcriptional modification known as RNA editing that is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA type 2 (ADAR2). This modification alters the amino acid sequence and function of the receptor. Glutamatergic signaling has been suggested to have a role in mood disorders and schizophrenia, but it is unknown whether altered RNA editing of AMPA/kainate receptors has pathophysiological significance in these mental disorders. In this study, we found that ADAR2 expression tended to be decreased in the postmortem brains of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Results Decreased ADAR2 expression was significantly correlated with decreased editing of the R/G sites of AMPA receptors. In heterozygous Adar2 knockout mice (Adar2+/− mice), editing of the R/G sites of AMPA receptors was decreased. Adar2+/− mice showed a tendency of increased activity in the open-field test and a tendency of resistance to immobility in the forced swimming test. They also showed enhanced amphetamine-induced hyperactivity. There was no significant difference in amphetamine-induced hyperactivity between Adar2+/− and wild type mice after the treatment with an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline. Conclusions These findings collectively suggest that altered RNA editing efficiency of AMPA receptors due to down-regulation of ADAR2 has a possible role in the pathophysiology of mental disorders. PMID:24443933

  13. Metabotropic Glutamate 2/3 Receptors and Epigenetic Modifications in Psychotic Disorders: A Review.

    PubMed

    Matrisciano, Francesco; Panaccione, Isabella; Grayson, Danis R; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder are chronic psychiatric disorders, both considered as "major psychosis"; they are thought to share some pathogenetic factors involving a dysfunctional gene x environment interaction. Alterations in the glutamatergic transmission have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of psychosis. Our group developed an epigenetic model of schizophrenia originated by Prenatal Restraint Stress (PRS) paradigm in mice. PRS mice developed some behavioral alterations observed in schizophrenic patients and classic animal models of schizophrenia, i.e. deficits in social interaction, locomotor activity and prepulse inhibition. They also showed specific changes in promoter DNA methylation activity of genes related to schizophrenia such as reelin, BDNF and GAD67, and altered expression and function of mGlu2/3 receptors in the frontal cortex. Interestingly, behavioral and molecular alterations were reversed by treatment with mGlu2/3 agonists. Based on these findings, we speculate that pharmacological modulation of these receptors could have a great impact on early phase treatment of psychosis together with the possibility to modulate specific epigenetic key protein involved in the development of psychosis. In this review, we will discuss in more details the specific features of the PRS mice as a suitable epigenetic model for major psychosis. We will then focus on key proteins of chromatin remodeling machinery as potential target for new pharmacological treatment through the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:26813121

  14. Linking cocaine to endoplasmic reticulum in striatal neurons: role of glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Choe, Eun Sang; Ahn, Sung Min; Yang, Ju Hwan; Go, Bok Soon; Wang, John Q

    2011-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) controls protein folding. Accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER triggers an ER stress response to accelerate normal protein folding or if failed to cause apoptosis. The ER stress response is a conserved cellular response in mammalian cells and is sensitive to various physiological or pathophysiological stimuli. Recent studies unravel that this response in striatal neurons is subject to the tight modulation by psychostimulants. Cocaine and amphetamines markedly increased expression of multiple ER stress reporter proteins in the dorsal striatum (caudate putamen) and other basal ganglia sites. This evoked ER stress response is mediated by activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Converging Ca(2+) signals derived from activation of these receptors activate the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway to evoke ER stress responses. The discovery of robust ER stress responses to stimulant exposure establishes a previously unrecognized stimulant-ER coupling. This inducible coupling seems to contribute to neurotoxicity of stimulants related to various neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative illnesses. Elucidating cellular mechanisms linking cocaine and other stimulants to ER is therefore important for the development of therapeutic agents for treating neurological disorders resulted from stimulant toxicity. PMID:21808746

  15. Metabotropic Glutamate 2/3 Receptors and Epigenetic Modifications in Psychotic Disorders: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Matrisciano, Francesco; Panaccione, Isabella; Grayson, Danis R.; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder are chronic psychiatric disorders, both considered as “major psychosis”; they are thought to share some pathogenetic factors involving a dysfunctional gene x environment interaction. Alterations in the glutamatergic transmission have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of psychosis. Our group developed an epigenetic model of schizophrenia originated by Prenatal Restraint Stress (PRS) paradigm in mice. PRS mice developed some behavioral alterations observed in schizophrenic patients and classic animal models of schizophrenia, i.e. deficits in social interaction, locomotor activity and prepulse inhibition. They also showed specific changes in promoter DNA methylation activity of genes related to schizophrenia such as reelin, BDNF and GAD67, and altered expression and function of mGlu2/3 receptors in the frontal cortex. Interestingly, behavioral and molecular alterations were reversed by treatment with mGlu2/3 agonists. Based on these findings, we speculate that pharmacological modulation of these receptors could have a great impact on early phase treatment of psychosis together with the possibility to modulate specific epigenetic key protein involved in the development of psychosis. In this review, we will discuss in more details the specific features of the PRS mice as a suitable epigenetic model for major psychosis. We will then focus on key proteins of chromatin remodeling machinery as potential target for new pharmacological treatment through the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:26813121

  16. Developmental regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate- and kainate-type glutamate receptor expression in the rat spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegenga, S. L.; Kalb, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    Spinal motor neurons undergo experience-dependent development during a critical period in early postnatal life. It has been suggested that the repertoire of glutamate receptor subunits differs between young and mature motor neurons and contributes to this activity-dependent development. In the present study we examined the expression patterns of N-methyl-D-aspartate- and kainate-type glutamate receptor subunits during the postnatal maturation of the spinal cord. Young motor neurons express much higher levels of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 than do adult motor neurons. Although there are eight potential splice variants of NR1, only a subgroup is expressed by motor neurons. With respect to NR2 receptor subunits, young motor neurons express NR2A and C, while adult motor neurons express only NR2A. Young motor neurons express kainate receptor subunits GluR5, 6 and KA2 but we are unable to detect these or any other kainate receptor subunits in the adult spinal cord. Other spinal cord regions display a distinct pattern of developmental regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptor subunit expression in comparison to motor neurons. Our findings indicate a precise spatio-temporal regulation of individual subunit expression in the developing spinal cord. Specific combinations of subunits in developing neurons influence their excitable properties and could participate in the emergence of adult neuronal form and function.

  17. Relationship between Zinc (Zn2+) and Glutamate Receptors in the Processes Underlying Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pochwat, Bartłomiej; Nowak, Gabriel; Szewczyk, Bernadeta

    2015-01-01

    The results from numerous studies have shown that an imbalance between particular neurotransmitters may lead to brain circuit dysfunction and development of many pathological states. The significance of glutamate pathways for the functioning of the nervous system is equivocal. On the one hand, glutamate transmission is necessary for neuroplasticity, synaptogenesis, or cell survival, but on the other hand an excessive and long-lasting increased level of glutamate in the synapse may lead to cell death. Under clinical conditions, hyperactivity of the glutamate system is associated with ischemia, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and many others. The achievement of glutamate activity in the physiological range requires efficient control by endogenous regulatory factors. Due to the fact that the free pool of ion Zn2+ is a cotransmitter in some glutamate neurons; the role of this element in the pathophysiology of a neurodegenerative diseases has been intensively studied. There is a lot of evidence for Zn2+ dyshomeostasis and glutamate system abnormalities in ischemic and neurodegenerative disorders. However, the precise interaction between Zn2+ regulative function and the glutamate system is still not fully understood. This review describes the relationship between Zn2+ and glutamate dependent signaling pathways under selected pathological central nervous system (CNS) conditions. PMID:26106488

  18. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Guillermo Hugo; Bergamini, Carina Viviana; Hynes, Erica Rut

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor. PMID:27266631

  19. Clickable Photoaffinity Ligands for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Based on Select Acetylenic Negative Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Karen J; Velagaleti, Ranganadh; Thal, David M; Brady, Ryan M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lapinsky, David J

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of current drug targets. In particular, small-molecule allosteric modulators offer substantial potential for selectively "tuning" GPCR activity. However, there remains a critical need for experimental strategies that unambiguously determine direct allosteric ligand-GPCR interactions, to facilitate both chemical biology studies and rational structure-based drug design. We now report the development and use of first-in-class clickable allosteric photoprobes for a GPCR based on metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) negative allosteric modulator (NAM) chemotypes. Select acetylenic mGlu5 NAM lead compounds were rationally modified to contain either a benzophenone or an aryl azide as a photoreactive functional group, enabling irreversible covalent attachment to mGlu5 via photoactivation. Additionally, a terminal alkyne or an aliphatic azide was incorporated as a click chemistry handle, allowing chemoselective attachment of fluorescent moieties to the irreversibly mGlu5-bound probe via tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation. These clickable photoprobes retained submicromolar affinity for mGlu5 and negative cooperativity with glutamate, interacted with the "common allosteric-binding site," displayed slow binding kinetics, and could irreversibly label mGlu5 following UV exposure. We depleted the number of functional mGlu5 receptors using an irreversibly bound NAM to elucidate and delineate orthosteric agonist affinity and efficacy. Finally, successful conjugation of fluorescent dyes via click chemistry was demonstrated for each photoprobe. In the future, these clickable photoprobes are expected to aid our understanding of the structural basis of mGlu5 allosteric modulation. Furthermore, tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation is expected to be a broadly applicable experimental strategy across the entire GPCR superfamily. PMID:27115427

  20. Central phencyclidine (PCP) receptor binding is glutamate dependent: evidence for a PCP/excitatory amino acid receptor (EAAR) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, P.; Braunwalder, A.; Lehmann, J.; Williams, M.

    1986-03-01

    PCP and other dissociative anesthetica block the increase in neuronal firing rate evoked by the EAAR agonist, N-methyl-Daspartate. NMDA and other EAAs such as glutamate (glu) have not been previously shown to affect PCP ligand binding. In the present study, using once washed rat forebrain membranes, 10 ..mu..M-glu was found to increase the binding of (/sup 3/H)TCP, a PCP analog, to defined PCP recognition sites by 20%. Removal of glu and aspartate (asp) by extensive washing decreased TCP binding by 75-90%. In these membranes, 10 ..mu..M L-glu increased TCP binding 3-fold. This effect was stereospecific and evoked by other EAAs with the order of activity, L-glu > D-asp > L- asp > NMDA > D-glu > quisqualate. Kainate, GABA, NE, DA, 5-HT, 2-chloroadenosine, oxotremorine and histamine had no effect on TCP binding at concentrations up to 100 ..mu..M. The effects of L-glu were attenuated by the NMDA-type receptor antagonist, 2-amino-7--phosphonoheptanoate (AP7; 10 ..mu..M-1 mM). These findings indicate that EAAS facilitate TCP binding, possibly through NMDA-type receptors. The observed interaction between the PCP receptor and EAARs may reflect the existence of a macromolecular receptor complex similar to that demonstrated for the benzodiazepines and GABA.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin receptors modulate glutamate-induced phase shifts of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Michel, S.; Clark, J. P.; Ding, J. M.; Colwell, C. S.

    2008-01-01

    Light information reaches the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) through a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells. Previous work raised the possibility that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high-affinity tropomyosin-related receptor kinase may be important as modulators of this excitatory input into the SCN. In order to test this possibility, we used whole-cell patch-clamp methods to measure spontaneous excitatory currents in mouse SCN neurons. We found that the amplitude and frequency of these currents were increased by BDNF and decreased by the neurotrophin receptor inhibitor K252a. The neurotrophin also increased the magnitude of currents evoked by application of N-methyl-D-aspartate and amino-methyl proprionic acid. Next, we measured the rhythms in action potential discharge from the SCN brain slice preparation. We found that application of K252a dramatically reduced the magnitude of phase shifts of the electrical activity rhythm generated by the application of glutamate. By itself, BDNF caused phase shifts that resembled those produced by glutamate and were blocked by K252a. The results demonstrate that BDNF and neurotrophin receptors can enhance glutamatergic synaptic transmission within a subset of SCN neurons and potentiate glutamate-induced phase shifts of the circadian rhythm of neural activity in the SCN. PMID:16930436

  2. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of gluazo, a Photo-Switchable Ligand for the Glutamate Receptor GluK2

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Wolter, Tino; Kubař, Tomáš; Sumser, Martin; Trauner, Dirk; Elstner, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Photochromic ligands (PCLs), defined as photoswitchable molecules that are able to endow native receptors with a sensitivity towards light, have become a promising photopharmacological tool for various applications in biology. In general, PCLs consist of a ligand of the target receptor covalently linked to an azobenzene, which can be reversibly switched between two configurations upon light illumination. Gluazo, as a PCL that targets excitatory amino acid receptors, in its dark-adapted trans iso-form was characterized to be a partial agonist of the kainate glutamate receptor GluK2. Application of UV light leads to the formation of the cis form, with remarkedly reduced affinity towards GluK2. The mechanism of the change of ligand affinity induced by the photoisomerization was unresolved. The presented computational study explains how the isomerization of such a PCL affects the structural changes in the target receptor that lead to its activation. PMID:26308344

  3. Overlapping binding sites drive allosteric agonism and positive cooperativity in type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Xavier; Malhaire, Fanny; Scholler, Pauline; Rodrigo, Jordi; Gonzalez-Bulnes, Patricia; Llebaria, Amadeu; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Giraldo, Jesús; Goudet, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Type 4 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu4) receptors are emerging targets for the treatment of various disorders. Accordingly, numerous mGlu4-positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been identified, some of which also display agonist activity. To identify the structural bases for their allosteric action, we explored the relationship between the binding pockets of mGlu4 PAMs with different chemical scaffolds and their functional properties. By use of innovative mGlu4 biosensors and second-messenger assays, we show that all PAMs enhance agonist action on the receptor through different degrees of allosteric agonism and positive cooperativity. For example, whereas VU0155041 and VU0415374 display equivalent efficacies [log(τ(B)) = 1.15 ± 0.38 and 1.25 ± 0.44, respectively], they increase the ability of L-AP4 to stabilize the active conformation of the receptor by 4 and 39 times, respectively. Modeling and docking studies identify 2 overlapping binding pockets as follows: a first site homologous to the pocket of natural agonists of class A GPCRs linked to allosteric agonism and a second one pointing toward a site topographically homologous to the Na(+) binding pocket of class A GPCRs, occupied by PAMs exhibiting the strongest cooperativity. These results reveal that intrinsic efficacy and cooperativity of mGlu4 PAMs are correlated with their binding mode, and vice versa, integrating structural and functional knowledge from different GPCR classes. PMID:25342125

  4. Contribution of metabotropic glutamate receptors to the depression of excitatory postsynaptic potentials during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    de Mendonça, A; Ribeiro, J A

    1997-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) might contribute to the depression of excitatory postsynaptic potentials during hypoxia. The experiments were performed on hippocampal slices taken from young (12-14 days old) Wistar rats. The depression induced by hypoxia (14 min) was not modified in the presence of either the non-selective mGluR antagonist (which blocks mainly group I and II mGluR), MCPG (500 microM) or the selective group III mGluR antagonist, MPPG (500 microM). However, in experiments performed in the presence of the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, DPCPX (50 nM), part of the hypoxia-induced depression could be prevented by MPPG (500 microM). Activation of group III mGluR may contribute to the hypoxia-induced depression, but this contribution is only revealed when adenosine A1 receptors are blocked. PMID:9427348

  5. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor-Mediated Gene Transcription and Implications for Synaptic Plasticity and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hansen; Zhuo, Min

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) initiates a wide variety of signaling pathways. Group I mGluR activation can regulate gene expression at both translational and transcriptional levels, and induces translation or transcription-dependent synaptic plastic changes in neurons. The group I mGluR-mediated translation-dependent neural plasticity has been well reviewed. In this review, we will highlight group I mGluR-induced gene transcription and its role in synaptic plasticity. The signaling pathways (PKA, CaMKs, and MAPKs) which have been shown to link group I mGluRs to gene transcription, the relevant transcription factors (CREB and NF-κB), and target proteins (FMRP and ARC) will be documented. The significance and future direction for characterizing group I mGluR-mediated gene transcription in fragile X syndrome, schizophrenia, drug addiction, and other neurological disorders will also be discussed. PMID:23125836

  6. A Temporally Distinct Role for Group I and Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors in Object Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm Watson; Warburton, Elizabeth Clea; Barker, Gareth Robert Isaac; Bashir, Zafar Iqbal

    2006-01-01

    Recognition memory, involving the ability to discriminate between a novel and familiar object, depends on the integrity of the perirhinal cortex (PRH). Glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the cortex, is essential for many types of memory processes. Of the subtypes of glutamate receptor, metabotropic receptors (mGluRs) have received…

  7. Group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors contribute to different aspects of visual response processing in the rat superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Cirone, Jennifer; Salt, Thomas E

    2001-01-01

    Neurones in the superior colliculus (SC) respond to novel sensory stimuli and response habituation is a key feature of this. It is known that both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors participate in visual responses of superficial SC neurones. A feature of Group II and Group III mGlu receptors is that they may modulate specific neural pathways, possibly via presynaptic mechanisms. However, less is known about how this may relate to functions of systems in whole animals. We have therefore investigated whether these receptors affect specific attributes of visual responses in the superficial SC. Recordings were made from visually responsive neurones in anaesthetised rats, and agonists and antagonists of Group II and III mGlu receptors were applied iontophoretically at the recording site. We found that application of the Group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) produced an increase in visual response habituation, whilst Group III antagonists decreased habituation. These effects were independent of the response habituation mediated via GABAB receptors. In contrast, modulation of Group II mGlu receptors with the specific agonist LY354740 or the antagonist LY341495 did not affect response habituation, although these compounds did modulate visual responses. This suggests a specific role for Group III mGlu receptors in visual response habituation. The magnitude of Group II effects was smaller during presentation of low contrast stimuli compared with high contrast stimuli. This suggests that activation of Group II receptors may be activity dependent and that these receptors can translate this into a functional effect in adapting to high contrast stimuli. PMID:11433000

  8. Therapeutic potential of targeting group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Duty, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Current drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), for example, L-DOPA and dopamine agonists, are very effective at reversing the motor symptoms of the disease. However, they do little to combat the underlying degeneration of dopaminergic neurones in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and their long-term use is associated with the appearance of adverse effects such as L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Much emphasis has therefore been placed on finding alternative non-dopaminergic drugs that may circumvent some or all of these problems. Group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors were first identified in the basal ganglia a decade ago. One or more of these receptors (mGlu4, mGlu7 or mGlu8) is found on pre-synaptic terminals of basal ganglia pathways whose overactivity is implicated not only in the generation of motor symptoms in PD, but also in driving the progressive SNc degeneration. The finding that drugs which activate group III mGlu receptors can inhibit transmission across these overactive synapses has lead to the proposal that group III mGlu receptors are promising targets for drug discovery in PD. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the role and target potential of group III mGlu receptors in the basal ganglia. Overwhelming evidence obtained from in vitro studies and animal models of PD supports group III mGlu receptors as potentially important drug targets for providing both symptom relief and neuroprotection in PD. PMID:20735415

  9. Qualification of LSP1-2111 as a Brain Penetrant Group III Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Orthosteric Agonist

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    LSP1-2111 is a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist with preference toward the mGlu4 receptor subtype. This compound has been extensively used as a tool to explore the pharmacology of mGlu4 receptor activation in preclinical animal behavioral models. However, the blood–brain barrier penetration of this amino acid derivative has never been studied. We report studies on the central nervous system (CNS) disposition of LSP1-2111 using quantitative microdialysis in rat. Significant unbound concentrations of the drug relative to its in vitro binding affinity and functional potency were established in extracellular fluid (ECF). These findings support the use of LSP1-2111 to study the CNS pharmacology of mGlu4 receptor activation through orthosteric agonist mechanisms. PMID:24900783

  10. The influence of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands on anxiety-like effect of amphetamine withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Koltunowska, D; Gibula-Bruzda, E; Kotlinska, J H

    2013-08-01

    Chronic amphetamine use results in anxiety-like states after drug cessation. The aim of the study was to determine a role of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands in amphetamine-evoked withdrawal anxiety in the elevated plus-maze test in rats. In our study memantine (8 and 12 mg/kg), a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist did not reduce amphetamine withdrawal anxiety. Acamprosate (NMDA and metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor (mGluR5) antagonist) at the dose 200 and 400mg/kg showed anxiolytic-like effect, thus increasing the percent of time spent in open arms and a number of open arm entries. mGluR5 selective antagonist, MTEP (3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine hydrochloride) and mGluR2/3 agonist, LY354740 (1S,2S,5R,6S)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid), caused effects similar to acamprosate at doses 1.25-5mg/kg and 2.5-5mg/kg, respectively. None of the glutamate ligands influenced locomotor activity of rats when given to the saline-treated group. Taking into account the positive correlation between amphetamine withdrawal-induced anxiety and relapse to amphetamine taking, our results suggest that modulation of mGluRs may prevent relapse to amphetamine and might pose a new direction in amphetamine abuse therapy. PMID:23623810