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Sample records for glyceryl trinitrate gtn

  1. Biotransformation of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) in isolated bovine pulmonary artery (BPA) and bovine pulmonary vein (BPV)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    A proposed mechanism of GTN-induced vasodilation requires biotransformation of GTN to glyceryl dinitrate (GDN). They have previously shown that GTN is metabolized to GDN during relaxation of isolated rabbit aorta. The authors have extended this study to include BPA and BPV and to determine if their sensitivity to GTN correlates with their ability to metabolize GTN. Strips of BPA and BPV were contracted submaximally with KCl and then incubated with 0.5 ..mu..M /sup 14/C-GTN for 2 min. GTN-induced relaxation of these vessels was monitored and tissue GTN and metabolite concentrations were measured. Data are presented which support the above hypothesis that GTN biotransformation and relaxation occur together in vascular smooth muscle; however, there appear to be factors other than extent of GTN biotransformation that account for the difference in sensitivity to GTN of the artery and vein.

  2. Biodegradation of glyceryl trinitrate by Penicillium corylophilum Dierckx.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Z; Sundaram, S T; Sharma, A; Brodman, B W

    1997-01-01

    Penicillium corylophilum Dierckx, isolated from a contaminated water wet, double-base propellant, was able to completely degrade glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) in a buffered medium (pH 7.0) containing glucose and ammonium nitrate. In the presence of 12 mg of initial fungal inoculum, GTN (48.5 to 61.6 mumol) was quantitatively transformed in a stepwise process to glyceryl dinitrate (GDN) and glyceryl mononitrate (GMN) within 48 h followed by a decrease in the GDN content with a concomitant increase in the GMN level. GDN was totally transformed to GMN within 168 h, and the complete degradation of GMN was achieved within 336 h. The presence of glucose and ammonium nitrate in the growth medium was essential for completion of the degradation of GTN and its metabolites. Complete degradation of GTN by a fungal culture has not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:9143106

  3. Biotransformation of glyceryl trinitrate occurs concurrently with relaxation of rabbit aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Brien, J.F.; McLaughlin, B.E.; Breedon, T.H.; Bennett, B.M.; Nakatsu, K.; Marks, G.S.

    1986-05-01

    This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that biotransformation of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) is involved in GTN-induced relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. Isolated rabbit aortic strips (RAS) were contracted submaximally with phenylephrine (PE) and then were incubated with 0.5 microM (/sup 14/C)GTN in a time course study. GTN-induced relaxation (inhibition of PE-induced tone) of RAS was monitored and tissue GTN and glyceryl-1,2- and 1,3-dinitrate (GDN) concentrations were measured by thin-layer chromatography and liquid scintillation spectrometry at 0.5, 1, 2 and 20 min after incubation. Biotransformation of GTN to GDN occurred during GTN-induced relaxation of RAS. The tissue GDN concentration was dependent on the time duration of incubation with GTN and was related to the magnitude of GTN-induced tissue relaxation. At the 20-min interval, the GDN concentration in the incubation medium indicated appreciable efflux of GDN metabolites from the RAS. In the biotransformation of GTN by RAS, there was about 4-fold preferential formation of 1,2-GDN compared with 1,3-GDN. RAS were made tolerant to GTN in vitro by incubation with 500 microM GTN for 1 hr. After washing, GTN-tolerant and nontolerant (incubation with vehicle for 1 hr) RAS were contracted submaximally with PE, and then were incubated with 0.5 microM (/sup 14/C)GTN for 2 min. GTN-induced relaxation of RAS and tissue GDN concentration were significantly less for GTN-tolerant tissue compared with nontolerant tissue. Tissue GTN concentration was similar for both GTN-tolerant and nontolerant RAS, which indicated that the tissue uptake of GTN was similar and that GTN biotransformation was diminished in tolerant tissue.(ABST

  4. The stability of glyceryl trinitrate tablets during patient use.

    PubMed

    Marty, J; Shaw, J; Hunt, D

    1983-04-01

    The stability of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) tablets stored in ways commonly used by patients was investigated to enable pharmacists and physicians to give better advice about tablet storage. Analysis of 43 samples of tablets collected from hospital patients showed that the GTN content of these samples differed significantly from that of fresh tablets. Tablets kept in the manufacturer's bottle contained significantly more GTN than those transferred to other airtight vials (p less than 0.05) or pill boxes (p less than 0.005). The content of GTN was also significantly lower in tablets stored in pill boxes compared with other vials (p less than 0.01). Similar trends were found when tablets were stored in glass or plastic vials, pill boxes or were left exposed to air in the laboratory. These results emphasize that the best way to store GTN tablets is in the manufacturer's container. However, since many patients find that this bottle is awkward and inconvenient, a suitable alternative would be to carry a few tablets in a small airtight container (preferably glass). The unused tablets should be discarded every two weeks and nothing else should be added to the container. The use of pill boxes should be strongly discouraged. PMID:6412672

  5. Transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin) in healthy persons: acute effects on skin temperature and hemodynamic orthostatic response.

    PubMed

    Haebisch, E M

    1995-01-01

    In order to find an explanation for individual reactions to transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) we studied the skin temperature and hemodynamic reactions in 63 healthy persons. The data were obtained before and after the application of GTN and Glycerin (GL) placebo patches, during one hour. The skin temperature was measured on both forearms, the local (left sided) and systemic (right sided) reaction on GTN was related to the skin fold and the calculated body fat content. The bilateral rise of skin temperature and its duration was higher and longer in obese than in lean persons mainly in obese women. The UV induced thermo and the later photothermoreaction (Erythema) was reduced on the left forearm after the application of GTN and GL patches. The observed hemodynamic GTN effect confirmed known postural reactions, such as decreased arterial pressure (delta mAP = -2.9%), increased heart rate (delta HR = +7.4%) and QTc prolongation (delta QTc = +4.9%) in upright position. An adverse drug effect with increased mean blood pressure (delta mAP = +12%) and increased heart rate (delta HR = +10.4%) mainly in supine position was observed in 11% of the participants, but only in men. Such a reaction was already described by Murell, 1879. Individual GTN effects were analyzed and related to habits and family history. In male smokers and in persons with hypertensive and diabetic close relatives, the hypotensive GTN effect was accentuated in supine position. In the upright position the group with hypertensives in the family presented a moderate hypotensive reaction without secondary tachycardia and the smokers presented only a slightly increased heart rate. Our observations suggest that individual reactions to transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) with its active component nitric oxide (NO) depends on physiological conditions, related to endogenous vasoactive substances, mainly the interaction with EDRF (the endogenous NO) and the activity of the Renin-Angiotensin System. PMID

  6. Analysis of responses to glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the intact chest rat.

    PubMed

    Nossaman, Bobby D; Pankey, Edward A; Badejo, Adeleke R; Casey, David B; Uppu, Satvika; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2012-05-15

    Responses to glyceryl trinitrate/nitroglycerin (GTN), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), and sodium nitrite were compared in the intact chest rat. The iv injections of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO produced dose-dependent decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. In as much as cardiac output was not reduced, the decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures indicate that GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO have significant vasodilator activity in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds in the rat. Responses to GTN were attenuated by cyanamide, but not allopurinol, whereas responses to nitrite formed by the metabolism of GTN were attenuated by allopurinol and cyanamide. The results with allopurinol and cyanamide suggest that only mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase is involved in the bioactivation of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO, whereas both pathways are involved in the bioactivation of nitrite anion in the intact rat. The comparison of vasodilator activity indicates that GSNO and GTN are more than 1000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in the rat. Following administration of 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadizaolo[4,3-]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), responses to GTN were significantly attenuated, indicating that responses are mediated by the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These data suggest that the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide formed from the metabolism of GTN, cannot account for the vasodilator activity of GTN in the intact rat and that another mechanism; perhaps the formation of an S-NO, may mediate the vasodilator response to GTN in this species. PMID:22465477

  7. Analysis of Responses to Glyceryl Trinitrate and Sodium Nitrite in the Intact Chest Rat

    PubMed Central

    Nossaman, Bobby D.; Pankey, Edward A.; Badejo, Adeleke R.; Casey, David B.; Uppu, Satvika; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Responses to glyceryl trinitrate/nitroglycerin (GTN), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), and sodium nitrite were compared in the intact chest rat. The iv injections of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO produced dose-dependent decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. In as much as cardiac output was not reduced, the decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures indicate that GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO have significant vasodilator activity in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds in the rat. Responses to GTN were attenuated by cyanamide, but not allopurinol, whereas responses to nitrite formed by the metabolism of GTN were attenuated by allopurinol and cyanamide. The results with allopurinol and cyanamide suggest that only mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase is involved in the bioactivation of GTN, sodium nitrite, and GSNO, whereas both pathways are involved in the bioactivation of nitrite anion in the intact rat. The comparison of vasodilator activity indicates that GSNO and GTN are more than 1000 fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in the rat. Following administration of 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadizaolo[4,3-]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), responses to GTN were significantly attenuated, indicating that responses are mediated by the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These data suggest that the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide formed from the metabolism of GTN, cannot account for the vasodilator activity of GTN in the intact rat and that another mechanism; perhaps the formation of an S-NO, may mediate the vasodilator response to GTN in this species. PMID:22465477

  8. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase mediates vasodilator responses of glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the pulmonary vascular bed of the rat.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adeleke M; Hodnette, Chris; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S; Casey, David B; Pankey, Edward; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-09-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) catalyzes the formation of glyceryl dinitrate and inorganic nitrite from glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), leading to an increase in cGMP and vasodilation in the coronary and systemic vascular beds. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO) formed from nitrite in mediating the response to GTN in the pulmonary vascular bed is uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to determine if nitrite plays a role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN. In this study, intravenous injections of GTN and sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure under baseline and elevated tone conditions and decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and sodium nitrite were attenuated by cyanamide, an ALDH2 inhibitor, whereas responses to the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were not altered. The decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and SNP were not altered by allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase, whereas responses to sodium nitrite were attenuated. GTN was approximately 1,000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. These results suggest that ALDH2 plays an important role in the bioactivation of GTN and nitrite in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds and that the reduction of nitrite to vasoactive NO does not play an important role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN in the intact chest rat. PMID:20543077

  9. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase mediates vasodilator responses of glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitrite in the pulmonary vascular bed of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Badejo, Adeleke M.; Hodnette, Chris; Dhaliwal, Jasdeep S.; Casey, David B.; Pankey, Edward; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Hyman, Albert L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) catalyzes the formation of glyceryl dinitrate and inorganic nitrite from glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), leading to an increase in cGMP and vasodilation in the coronary and systemic vascular beds. However, the role of nitric oxide (NO) formed from nitrite in mediating the response to GTN in the pulmonary vascular bed is uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to determine if nitrite plays a role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN. In this study, intravenous injections of GTN and sodium nitrite decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures and increased cardiac output. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure under baseline and elevated tone conditions and decreases in systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and sodium nitrite were attenuated by cyanamide, an ALDH2 inhibitor, whereas responses to the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), were not altered. The decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in response to GTN and SNP were not altered by allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase, whereas responses to sodium nitrite were attenuated. GTN was ∼1,000-fold more potent than sodium nitrite in decreasing pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. These results suggest that ALDH2 plays an important role in the bioactivation of GTN and nitrite in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds and that the reduction of nitrite to vasoactive NO does not play an important role in mediating vasodilator responses to GTN in the intact chest rat. PMID:20543077

  10. H89 enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to glyceryl trinitrate through a purinergic receptor-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cortier, Marion; Boina-Ali, Rahamata; Racoeur, Cindy; Paul, Catherine; Solary, Eric; Jeannin, Jean-François; Bettaieb, Ali

    2015-01-01

    High doses of the organic nitrate glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, are known to trigger apoptosis in human cancer cells. Here, we show that such a cytotoxic effect can be obtained with subtoxic concentrations of GTN when combined with H89, N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulphonamide.2HCl. This synergistic effect requires the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from H89 and NO from GTN treatment that causes cGMP production and PKG activation. Furthermore, the GTN/H89 synergy was attenuated by inhibition of P2-purinergic receptors with suramin and competition with ATP/UDP. By down-regulating genes with antisense oligonucleotides, P2-purinergic receptors P2X3, P2Y1, and P2Y6 were found to have a role in creating this cytotoxic effect. Thus, H89 likely acts as an ATP mimetic synergizing with GTN to trigger apoptosis in aggressive cancer cells. PMID:25762630

  11. H89 enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to glyceryl trinitrate through a purinergic receptor-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Cortier, Marion; Boina-Ali, Rahamata; Racoeur, Cindy; Paul, Catherine; Solary, Eric; Jeannin, Jean-François; Bettaieb, Ali

    2015-03-30

    High doses of the organic nitrate glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, are known to trigger apoptosis in human cancer cells. Here, we show that such a cytotoxic effect can be obtained with subtoxic concentrations of GTN when combined with H89, N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulphonamide.2HCl. This synergistic effect requires the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from H89 and NO from GTN treatment that causes cGMP production and PKG activation. Furthermore, the GTN/H89 synergy was attenuated by inhibition of P2-purinergic receptors with suramin and competition with ATP/UDP. By down-regulating genes with antisense oligonucleotides, P2-purinergic receptors P2X3, P2Y1, and P2Y6 were found to have a role in creating this cytotoxic effect. Thus, H89 likely acts as an ATP mimetic synergizing with GTN to trigger apoptosis in aggressive cancer cells. PMID:25762630

  12. RNA Sequencing of Trigeminal Ganglia in Rattus Norvegicus after Glyceryl Trinitrate Infusion with Relevance to Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Hougaard Pedersen, Sara; Maretty, Lasse; Ramachandran, Roshni; Sibbesen, Jonas Andreas; Yakimov, Victor; Elgaard-Christensen, Rikke; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Krogh, Anders; Olesen, Jes; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infusion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a donor of nitric oxide, induces immediate headache in humans that in migraineurs is followed by a delayed migraine attack. In order to achieve increased knowledge of mechanisms activated during GTN-infusion this present study aims to investigate transcriptional responses to GTN-infusion in the rat trigeminal ganglia. Methods Rats were infused with GTN or vehicle and trigeminal ganglia were isolated either 30 or 90 minutes post infusion. RNA sequencing was used to investigate transcriptomic changes in response to the treatment. Furthermore, we developed a novel method for Gene Set Analysis Of Variance (GSANOVA) to identify gene sets associated with transcriptional changes across time. Results 15 genes displayed significant changes in transcription levels in response to GTN-infusion. Ten of these genes showed either sustained up- or down-regulation in the 90-minute period after infusion. The GSANOVA analysis demonstrate enrichment of pathways pointing towards an increase in immune response, signal transduction, and neuroplasticity in response to GTN-infusion. Future functional in-depth studies of these mechanisms are expected to increase our understanding of migraine pathogenesis. PMID:27213950

  13. Cardioprotective effects of glyceryl trinitrate: beyond vascular nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Csont, Tamás; Ferdinandy, Péter

    2005-01-01

    Organic nitrates have been used for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases for more than 100 years and these drugs are still amongst the most frequently prescribed and applied drugs worldwide. Development of tolerance against the hemodynamic effects of nitrates during sustained therapy, however, limits their clinical application. Moreover, recent clinical studies have suggested that long-term nitrate treatment does not improve or may even worsen cardiovascular mortality, possibly due to the development of vascular nitrate tolerance. In agreement with these clinical findings, nitrate tolerance has been shown to increase superoxide and peroxynitrite production leading to vascular dysfunction. Nevertheless, nitrates exert a direct myocardial anti-ischemic effect that is independent from their vascular actions. The direct myocardial effect of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) has been shown to be preserved even in the state of vascular nitrate tolerance. Moreover, no oxidative stress was observed in hearts isolated from rats with vascular nitrate tolerance, while increased systemic peroxynitrite formation was detected in the plasma in the same animals. The different effects of nitrates on the heart and vasculature are not well characterized; however, tissue specific differences in the metabolism and cellular signaling of nitrates might be a plausible explanation. These data suggest that sustained nitrate treatment increases oxidative stress in the extracardiac vasculature, thereby promoting the development of vascular nitrate tolerance. However, the direct myocardial anti-ischemic effect of nitrates seems to be preserved beyond the development of vascular nitrate tolerance. These new findings may open new perspectives in the clinical use of organic nitrates and suggest that the development of either cardioselective nitrates or nitrate-antioxidant hybrid drugs may replace classical nitrates in the therapy of ischemic heart disease. PMID:15626455

  14. Acute and chronic effects of glyceryl trinitrate therapy on insulin and glucose regulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Jedrzkiewicz, Sean; Parker, John D

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effect of acute and sustained transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) therapy on insulin and glucose regulation. Totally, 12 males (18-30 years) underwent a glucose tolerance test at baseline (visit 1), 90 minutes after acute transdermal GTN 0.6 mg/h (visit 2), following 7 days of continuous GTN (visit 3), and 2 to 3 days after stopping GTN (visit 4). At each visit, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured before and 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after a 75-g oral glucose load. Indices of glucose metabolism that were examined included the insulin sensitivity index, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and the insulinogenic index. The acute administration of GTN had no effect on glucose and insulin responses (visit 2). However, after 7 days of GTN exposure (visit 3) there was an increase in the mean glucose concentration measured after the oral glucose load. On visit 1, the mean glucose concentration (± standard deviation) following the 75 g oral glucose challenge was 5.7 ± 0.5 µmol/L. On visit 3, after 7 days of transdermal GTN therapy, the mean glucose concentration after the oral glucose was significantly higher; 6.2 ± 0.5 µmol/L (P < .015; 95% confidence intervals 0.25-0.77). There was also an increase in the HOMA-IR index; on visit 1, the median HOMA-IR (interquartile range) was 5.2 (3.9) versus 6.9 (6.8) on visit 3 (P < .015). Other indices of glucose metabolism did not change. These observations document that GTN therapy modifies glucose metabolism causing evidence of increased insulin resistance during sustained therapy in normal humans. PMID:23230283

  15. Sublingual glyceryl trinitrate and the peripheral thermal responses in normal and cold-sensitive individuals.

    PubMed

    Hope, Katrina; Eglin, Clare; Golden, Frank; Tipton, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury (NFCI) is a prevalent, but largely undiagnosed and poorly understood syndrome afflicting many who, as part of their work or leisure, expose their extremities to cold temperatures. The long term sequelae of NFCI are hyperhidrosis, cold-sensitivity and pain; these can last a lifetime. We tested the hypothesis that, in comparison with a placebo, sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) would increase the peripheral microcirculation during and after a mild cold challenge of individuals who had not been diagnosed with NFCI, but were cold-sensitive. Naive participants were categorised into two cohort groups: control (n=7) or cold-sensitive (n=6). All participants undertook a standardised two minute cold exposure of their right foot while toe skin temperature (Tsk; infra-red thermograms) and blood flow (toe pad laser Doppler) were measured. GTN increased the rate of rewarming and absolute Tsk of the coldest toe after the cold challenge in cold-sensitive individuals. GTN also increased the blood flow in the great toe during rewarming in some cold-sensitive individuals. We accept our hypothesis and suggest that the impairment in the vasodilatory response seen in individuals with cold-sensitivity can be overcome by the use of GTN, an endothelial-independent NO donor, and thereby improve the rewarming of cooled peripheral tissues. PMID:24280630

  16. Effect of the nitric oxide donor, glyceryl trinitrate, on human gall bladder motility

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, R; Miller, J; O'Donnell, L; McLean, A; Farthing, M

    1998-01-01

    Background—Nitric oxide is a major neurotransmitter in non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) pathways. NANC inhibitory innervation has been shown in human gall bladder muscle in vitro; the role of nitric oxide in human gall bladder emptying however is undefined.
Aims—To study the effect of glyceryl trinitrate, a nitric oxide donor, on gall bladder emptying in healthy subjects using a randomised, double blind, crossover, placebo controlled design.
Methods—Ultrasonographic gall bladder volume was measured in the fasting state in eight healthy volunteers after randomised administration of either glyceryl trinitrate 1200 µg buccal spray or placebo spray. On two further occasions, after randomised administration of either glyceryl trinitrate 1200 µg buccal spray or placebo spray, gall bladder volumes were also measured after a liquid test meal. 
Results—Glyceryl trinitrate significantly increased fasting gall bladder volume to a mean of 114% (SEM 5%) of pretreatment volume (p=0.039). Glyceryl trinitrate also significantly impaired gall bladder emptying between five and 40 minutes postprandially. Gall bladder ejection fraction was also reduced after glyceryl trinitrate compared with placebo (43 (6.9)% versus 68.4 (6.5)%, p=0.016).
Conclusions—This study shows that glyceryl trinitrate produces gall bladder dilatation in the fasting state and reduces postprandial gall bladder emptying, suggesting that nitric oxide mechanisms may be operative in the human gall bladder in vivo. 

 Keywords: gall bladder motility; nitric oxide; glyceryl trinitrate PMID:9577350

  17. [Effects of nitrogen oxide donor glyceryl trinitrate on pressure pain threshold in humans].

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L L; Brennum, J; Iversen, H K; Olesen, J

    1997-07-21

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of the nitric oxide (NO) donor glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) on nociceptive thresholds in man. On two different study days twelve healthy subjects received a stair case infusion of GTN (0.015, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0 micrograms/kg/min 20 min each dose) or placebo in a randomized double-blind cross-over design. Before the infusion and after 15 min of infusion on each dose, pressure pain detection- and tolerance thresholds were determined by pressure algometry in three different anatomic regions (finger, a temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue and a temporal region without interposed myofascial tissue). Relative to placebo the three higher GTN doses induced a decrease in both detection- and tolerance-thresholds in the temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue. No such changes were observed in the two other stimulated regions. These results could reflect central facilitation of nociception by NO. However, convergence of nociceptive input from pericranial myofascial tissue and from cephalic blood vessels dilated by NO may provide a more likely explanation. PMID:9245041

  18. Effect of a nitric oxide donor (glyceryl trinitrate) on nociceptive thresholds in man.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L L; Brennum, J; Iversen, H K; Olesen, J

    1996-05-01

    Several animal studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) plays a role in central and peripheral modulation of nociception. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) exerts its physiological actions via donation of NO. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of this NO donor on nociceptive thresholds in man. On two different study days separated by at least a week 12 healthy subjects received a staircase infusion of GTN (0.015, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0 micrograms/kg/min, 20 min each dose) or placebo in a randomized double-blind crossover design. Before the infusion and after 15 min of infusion on each dose, pressure pain detection and tolerance thresholds were determined by pressure algometry (Somomedic AB, Sweden) in three different anatomic regions (finger, a temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue and a temporal region without interposed myofascial tissue). Relative to placebo, the three higher GTN doses induced a decrease in both detection and tolerance thresholds in the temporal region with interposed myofascial tissue (p = 0.003 detection and p = 0.002 tolerance thresholds, Friedman). No such changes were observed in the other two stimulated regions. These results could reflect central facilitation of nociception by NO. However, we regard convergence of nociceptive input from pericranial myofascial tissue and from cephalic blood vessels dilated by NO as a more likely explanation of our findings. PMID:8734768

  19. The effect of the nitric oxide donor glyceryl trinitrate on global and regional cerebral blood flow in man.

    PubMed

    White, R P; Deane, C; Hindley, C; Bloomfield, P M; Cunningham, V J; Vallance, P; Brooks, D J; Markus, H S

    2000-09-01

    Despite their potential use as cerebral vasodilatory agents there are few studies of the effect of nitric oxide (NO) donors on the cerebral circulation in non-anaesthetised man. We determined the effect of the NO donor glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) at clinically relevant doses on global and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in healthy non-anaesthetised volunteers, using H(2)(15)O PET, ultrasonic colour velocity flow imaging of carotid artery flow, and transcranial Doppler (TCD) of middle cerebral artery velocities (MCAv). Three rates of GTN infusion (0.1, 0.4, 1.0 microg/kg/min) were used. There was no significant change in common or internal carotid artery flow following GTN administration although a dose dependent fall in MCAv post GTN was observed. There was no significant change in either global or regional CBF following GTN. Thus intravenous GTN at therapeutic doses in awake humans does not alter global or regional CBF. However it does produce basal cerebral artery vasodilatation as evidenced by a fall in MCAv in the absence of a change in internal carotid artery flow. PMID:11018245

  20. Investigation of oxidant stress and vasodepression to glyceryl trinitrate in the obese Zucker rat in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Laight, David W; Kengatharan, K M; Gopaul, Nitin K; Änggård, Erik E; Carrier, Martin J

    1998-01-01

    We examined the relationship between oxidant stress and the vasodepressor activity of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) in vivo, including rapid GTN tolerance development, in 13-week old obese and age-matched lean Zucker rats which had been maintained for 4 weeks on either control diet or diets enriched with the lipophilic, chain-breaking antioxidants vitamin E (0.5% w w−1) or probucol (0.5% w w−1) or the superoxide anion scavenger tiron (1% w v−1 in drinking water).The basal plasma level of the isoprostane 8-epi-PGF2α, an in vivo marker of lipid peroxidation, was elevated by approximately 5 fold in the obese Zucker rat and markedly reduced by dietary lipophilic antioxidants and depressed by dietary tiron.Vasodepression to bolus does GTN (0.1–100 μg kg−1 i.v.), but not endothelium-dependent vasodepression to bolus dose acetylcholine (ACh, 0.02–2.0 μg kg−1 i.v.), was impaired in obese animals and completely restored by dietary antioxidants.Nitrate tolerance developed in vivo during a 1 h infusion of GTN (40 μg kg−1 min−1 i.v.) appeared more severe in obese animals. However, rapid nitrate tolerance was not affected by dietary antioxidants in either the obese or lean Zucker rat.We therefore provide evidence that elevated oxidant stress in the obese Zucker rat is associated with an impairment in nitrate vasodepressor activity. However, our data are not consistent with either a role for oxidant stress in rapid nitrate tolerance development in the anaesthetized Zucker rat or the aggravation of this tolerance by pre-existing oxidant stress. PMID:9831930

  1. The Effects of Glyceryl Trinitrate Patch on the Treatment of Preterm Labor: A Single-blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nankali, Anisodowleh; Jamshidi, Parnian Kord; Rezaei, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Background Preterm labor (PTL) is one of the main causes of neonatal mortality and morbidity. PTL leads to serious complications especially in the gestational age prior to 24-26 weeks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) patch on the treatment and complications of PTL. Methods In this clinical trial, 84 singleton pregnant women with gestational age of 27-35 weeks were surveyed. PTL was clinically diagnosed and the patients were randomly divided into two groups who were treated with GTN or placebo for 48 hr. The consequences, complications and changes in some parameters in both groups were compared. Data were analyzed with chi square test, paired and unpaired t tests by SPSS software and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results No significant difference was observed between two groups in terms of successful tocolysis, receiving full dose of corticosteroids and the mean prolongation of the pregnancy. However, delivery times in patients who delivered during the hospitalization were 31±4.4 and 18.3±2.2 hr (p=0.01), respectively. Headache was more severe in control group (p=0.007). The systolic and mean arterial blood pressure decrease (p<0.001) and maternal heart rate increase (p=0.01) were significant in GTN group. The changes of vital signs were not significant in placebo group. Conclusion The effect of GTN in the treatment of PTL is similar to the placebo without any serious complication. However, GTN delays the delivery time in delivery during the primary hospitalization. Thus, further studies with larger sample size are needed to evaluate the exact effects of GTN on PTL. PMID:24918079

  2. Conversion of glyceryl trinitrate to nitric oxide in tolerant and non-tolerant smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, D.; Pistelli, A.; Vane, J.

    1993-01-01

    1. Exposure of smooth muscle cells (SMC) to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN, 75-600 microM) for 30 min led to a concentration-dependent increase in nitrite (NO2-), one of the breakdown products of nitric oxide (NO). This was not affected by 30 min pretreatment of the cells with 0.5 mM of sulphobromophthalein (SBP) an inhibitor of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), by metyrapone or SKF-525A inhibitors of cytochrome P450. These experiments were confirmed by organ bath studies using rabbit aortic strips denuded of endothelium and contracted with phenylephrine. Thus, a 30 min incubation of the strips with 0.5 mM SPB, metyrapone or SKF-525A did not affect the relaxations in response to GTN (10(-10)-10(-6) M). 2. Potentiation of the anti-platelet effect of GTN (44 microM) by endothelial cells (EC, 40 x 10(3) cells) was not affected by prior incubation of EC with SBP, metyrapone or SKF-525A (all at 0.5 mM). 3. Potentiation of the antiplatelet activity of GTN (11-352 microM) by small numbers of SMC (24 x 10(3) cells) or EC (40 x 10(3) cells) treated with indomethacin (10 microM) was attenuated when the SMC or EC were treated in culture with a high concentration of GTN (600 microM) for 18 h beforehand (referred to as 'tolerant' cells). In addition, tolerant SMC produced far less NO2- than non-tolerant SMC. 4. Exposure of non-tolerant SMC or EC (10(5) cells) to GTN (200 microM) for 3 min increased (3-4 fold) the levels of guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8381319

  3. Glyceryl trinitrate and caprylic acid for the mitigation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilm on C1018 carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Zhang, P; Cai, W; Rosenblatt, J S; Raad, I I; Xu, D; Gu, T

    2016-02-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), also known as biocorrosion, is caused by corrosive biofilms. MIC is a growing problem, especially in the oil and gas industry. Among various corrosive microbes, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) are often the leading culprit. Biofilm mitigation is the key to MIC mitigation. Biocide applications against biofilms promote resistance over time. Thus, it is imperative to develop new biodegradable and cost-effective biocides for large-scale field applications. Using the corrosive Desulfovibrio vulgaris (an SRB) biofilm as a model biofilm, this work demonstrated that a cocktail of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and caprylic acid (CA) was very effective for biofilm prevention and mitigation of established biofilms on C1018 carbon steel coupons. The most probable number sessile cell count data and confocal laser scanning microscope biofilm images proved that the biocide cocktail of 25 ppm (w/w) GTN + 0.1% (w/w) CA successfully prevented the D. vulgaris biofilm establishment on C1018 carbon steel coupons while 100 ppm GTN + 0.1% CA effectively mitigated pre-established D. vulgaris biofilms on C1018 carbon steel coupons. In both cases, the cocktails were able to reduce the sessile cell count from 10(6) cells/cm(2) to an undetectable level. PMID:26745983

  4. Assay of glyceryl trinitrate, isosorbide dinitrate, and their metabolites in plasma by large-bore capillary column gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Booth, B P; Bennett, B M; Brien, J F; Elliott, D A; Marks, G S; McCans, J L; Nakatsu, K

    1990-11-01

    Two large-bore capillary columns, one with dimethyl polysiloxane (HP-1) as the stationary phase and the other with phenyl (50 per cent) methyl (50 per cent) polysiloxane (DB-17), were used to develop gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) assays for measuring isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN), glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), and their metabolites. ISDN, isosorbide-2-mononitrate (2-ISMN), and isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) in plasma, ranging in concentration from 1 to 300 nM, and GTN, glyceryl-1,2-dinitrate (1,2-GDN), and glyceryl-1,3-dinitrate (1,3-GDN), ranging in concentration from 3 to 60 nM in plasma, were analysed on both columns. GLC analysis yielded baseline resolution of the analytes. The method using the dimethyl polysiloxane column gave a lower limit of detectability for GTN of 0.75 nM (signal/noise (s/n) = 2), and the procedure using the phenyl-methyl column provided a lower limit of detectability for ISDN of 81 pM (s/n = 2). The large-bore column GLC procedures exhibited shorter retention times for both ISDN and GTN than those previously reported for capillary-column assays. The chromatographic resolution of analytes and column efficiency of the large-bore capillary columns were comparable to the results previously found using capillary-column GC. The assays for ISDN and GTN have been shown to be appropriate for pharmacokinetic studies in volunteers and patients. We determined that the HP-1 column is appropriate for the analysis of GTN and metabolites, and the DB-17 column is suitable for analysis of ISDN and its metabolites. We conclude that the use of large-bore capillary columns provides rapid and reliable GLC assays for organic nitrates. PMID:2125512

  5. Hemodynamic effect of avanafil and glyceryl trinitrate coadministration

    PubMed Central

    Swearingen, Dennis; Nehra, Ajay; Morelos, Susie; Peterson, Craig A

    2013-01-01

    A Phase I, double-blind, randomized, crossover study in healthy males (N=106) was conducted between March 21, 2004, and May 17, 2004, to determine the magnitude and duration of the hemodynamic interaction of avanafil (a phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor for treating males with erectile dysfunction) when coadministered with glyceryl trinitrate (NTG) compared with sildenafil and placebo. Subjects received avanafil (200 mg), sildenafil (100 mg), and placebo (on separate days) via the oral route followed by NTG (0.4 mg) 12, 8, 4, 1, or 0.5 hours post-dose via the sublingual route. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were assessed at defined intervals. Throughout the study (after administration of the study drug, and including the period after NTG administration), the effects of avanafil and sildenafil on BP and HR were significantly greatest overall, at the shortest (0.5-hour) time interval compared with placebo. By the 8- and 12-hour time intervals, no significant difference in BP or HR was observed for avanafil (8 and 12 hours) or sildenafil (12 hours) (p>0.05, compared with placebo). Compared with avanafil, sildenafil had a significantly greater effect when dosed 0.5 hours before NTG on standing HR (p=0.05); 1 hour before NTG on standing systolic blood pressure (SBP) (p<0.05), sitting SBP (p=0.01) and standing HR (p<0.01); and 12 hours before NTG on standing SBP (p=0.05). Throughout the study, symptomatic hypotension adverse events occurred in 27%, 29%, and 12%, and clinically significant reductions in standing SBP (≥30 mmHg) occurred in 15%, 29%, and 12% of subjects dosed with avanafil, sildenafil, and placebo, respectively (overall treatment differences: p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). These data show that avanafil and sildenafil have no significant effect on BP and HR if administered to healthy males ≥8 hours (avanafil) or ≥12 hours (sildenafil) before a sublingual dose of NTG. However, results may differ in populations with known vascular disease

  6. Protective effects of riboflavin and selenium on brain microsomal Ca2+-ATPase and oxidative damage caused by glyceryl trinitrate in a rat headache model.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Çelik, Ömer; Uğuz, Abdulhadi Cihangir; Bütün, Ayşe

    2015-03-01

    Migraine headaches are considered to be associated with increased mitochondrial energy metabolism. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is also important in migraine headache pathophysiology although riboflavin and selenium (Se) induced a modulator role on mitochondrial oxidative stress in the brain. The current study aimed to determine the effects of Se with/without riboflavin on the microsomal membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (MMCA), lipid peroxidation, antioxidant, and electroencephalography (EEG) values in glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-induced brain injury rats. Thirty-two rats were randomly divided into four groups. The first group was used as the control, and the second group was the GTN group. Se and Se plus oral riboflavin were administered to rats constituting the third and fourth groups for 10 days prior to GTN administration. The second, third, and fourth groups received GTN to induce headache. Ten hours after the administration of GTN, the EEG records and brain cortex samples were obtained for all groups. Brain cortex microsomes were obtained from the brain samples. The brain and microsomal lipid peroxidation levels were higher in the GTN group compared to the control group, whereas they were decreased by selenium and selenium + riboflavin treatments. Vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, and reduced glutathione (GSH) concentrations of the brain and MMCA, GSH and glutathione peroxidase values of microsomes were decreased by the GTN administration, although the values and β-carotene concentrations were increased by Se and Se + riboflavin treatments. There was no significant change in EEG records of the four groups. In conclusion, Se with/without riboflavin administration protected against GTN-induced brain oxidative toxicity by inhibiting free radicals and the modulation of MMCA activity and supporting the antioxidant redox system. PMID:25492827

  7. Riboflavin and vitamin E increase brain calcium and antioxidants, and microsomal calcium-ATP-ase values in rat headache models induced by glyceryl trinitrate.

    PubMed

    Bütün, Ayşe; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Demirci, Serpil; Çelik, Ömer; Uğuz, Abdulhadi Cihangir

    2015-04-01

    The essential use of riboflavin is the prevention of migraine headaches, although its effect on migraines is considered to be associated with the increased mitochondrial energy metabolism. Oxidative stress is also important in migraine pathophysiology. Vitamin E is a strong antioxidant in nature and its analgesic effect is not completely clear in migraines. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-sourced exogen nitric oxide (NO), in particular, and also riboflavin and/or vitamin E on involved in the headache model induced via GTN-sourced exogen NO on oxidative stress, total brain calcium levels, and microsomal membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase levels. GTN infusion is a reliable method to provoke migraine-like headaches in experimental animals and humans. GTN resulted in a significant increase in brain cortex and microsomal lipid peroxidation levels although brain calcium, vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin E, and brain microsomal-reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase values decreased through GTN. The lipid peroxidation, GSH, vitamin A, β-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E, and calcium concentrations, GSH-Px, and the Ca(2+)-ATPase activities were increased both by riboflavin and vitamin E treatments. Brain calcium and vitamin A concentrations increased through riboflavin only. In conclusion, riboflavin and vitamin E had a protective effect on the GTN-induced brain injury by inhibiting free radical production, regulation of calcium-dependent processes, and supporting the antioxidant redox system. However, the effects of vitamin E on the values seem more important than in riboflavin. PMID:25425044

  8. A common pathway of nitric oxide release from AZD3582 and glyceryl trinitrate.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Georg; Grosser, Nina; Hoogstraate, Janet; Schröder, Henning

    2004-02-01

    4-(Nitrooxy)-butyl-(S)-2-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-propanoate (AZD3582) is a cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibiting nitric oxide donator (CINOD). It donates nitric oxide (NO) in biological systems through as yet unidentified mechanisms. cGMP, a marker of intracellularly generated NO, was increased up to 27-fold over basal levels by AZD3582 (1-30microM) in LLC-PK1 kidney epithelial cells. A 5h pretreatment with glyceryl tinitrate (GTN, 0.1-1microM) attenuated the cGMP response to a subsequent challenge with AZD3582 or GTN. Similarly, AZD3582 (10-30microM) pretreatment reduced the increase in cGMP on subsequent incubation with AZD3582 or GTN. In contrast, cGMP stimulation by SIN-1, which releases NO independently of enzymatic catalysis, remained unimpaired in cells pretreated with GTN or AZD3582. Our results demonstrate that AZD3582 decreases the sensitivity of the guanylyl cyclase/cGMP system to GTN and vice versa. This suggests that bioactivation pathways for organic nitrates, which involve enzymatic catalysis, may be responsible for NO donation from AZD3582. PMID:14757506

  9. Influence of glyceryl trinitrate and nifedipine on coronary sinus blood flow and global myocardial metabolism during coronary artery operation.

    PubMed

    van Wezel, H B; Bovill, J G; Koolen, J J; Patrick, M R; Fiolet, J W; van der Stroom, J G

    1986-09-01

    The effects of intravenous infusions of glyceryl trinitrate and nifedipine on systemic haemodynamic function, coronary haemodynamic function, and global myocardial metabolism were compared in two groups of eleven patients with unimpaired left ventricular function undergoing elective coronary artery operation who were anaesthetised with high dose fentanyl. Severe post-sternotomy hypertension developed in three patients in the glyceryl trinitrate group who were resistant to the hypotensive effect of this agent. All patients given nifedipine remained haemodynamically stable. Coronary sinus blood flow and myocardial oxygen consumption increased and coronary vascular resistance decreased after sternotomy in the nifedipine group but not in the glyceryl trinitrate group. There is no satisfactory explanation for the apparently paradoxical increase in myocardial oxygen consumption in the patients given nifedipine. This phenomenon did not appear to be associated with any detrimental effect of left ventricular function. Thus nifedipine was better than glyceryl trinitrate for the control of post-sternotomy hypertension in patients with good left ventricular function. Intravenous nifedipine is not recommended, however, for the intraoperative control of blood pressure in patients with unstable angina or impaired left ventricular function. PMID:3092847

  10. Time-dependent inhibition by glyceryl trinitrate of platelet aggregation caused by U46619 (a thromboxane/endoperoxide receptor agonist).

    PubMed

    Kampf, G; Ritter, J M

    1994-07-01

    Glyceryl trinitrate is a weak inhibitor of platelet aggregation in vitro. Its effect on platelet aggregation in response to U46619 (a thromboxane/endoperoxide receptor agonist) was studied turbidometrically in platelet-rich plasma from healthy volunteers. The object was to determine whether inhibition was influenced by a period of preincubation between preparation of platelet-rich plasma and addition of glyceryl trinitrate. Incubation was performed at 37 degrees C and 22 degrees C. Samples were removed at intervals and transferred to an aggregometer cuvette at 37 degrees C. Glyceryl trinitrate (100 microM) or an equal volume of distilled water was added 5 min before U46619 (2 microM), and aggregation recorded as change in light transmission. Inhibition by glyceryl trinitrate was markedly time and temperature dependent, with a progressive increase in inhibitory potency between 120 and 300 min preincubation at 37 degrees C but not at 22 degrees C. The explanation of this is unknown but the effect was not influenced by lipopolysaccharide or by cycloheximide, so it does not appear to be due to exposure to endotoxin or to enzyme induction in vitro. PMID:7946941

  11. Effect of Treatment Delay, Stroke Type, and Thrombolysis on the Effect of Glyceryl Trinitrate, a Nitric Oxide Donor, on Outcome after Acute Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Individual Patient from Randomised Trials

    PubMed Central

    Bath, Philip M.; Woodhouse, Lisa; Krishnan, Kailash; Anderson, Craig; Berge, Eivind; Ford, Gary A.; Robinson, Thompson G.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Sprigg, Nikola; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; in Acute Stroke Collaboration (BASC), Blood pressure

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nitric oxide (NO) donors are a candidate treatment for acute stroke and two trials have suggested that they might improve outcome if administered within 4–6 hours of stroke onset. We assessed the safety and efficacy of NO donors using individual patient data (IPD) from completed trials. Methods. Randomised controlled trials of NO donors in patients with acute or subacute stroke were identified and IPD sought from the trialists. The effect of NO donor versus control on functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and death, by time to randomisation. Secondary outcomes included measures of disability, mood, and quality of life. Results. Five trials (4,197 participants) were identified, all involving glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). Compared with control, GTN lowered blood pressure by 7.4/3.3 mmHg. At day 90, GTN did not alter any clinical measures. However, in 312 patients randomised within 6 hours of stroke onset, GTN was associated with beneficial shifts in the mRS (odds ratio (OR) 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34–0.78) and reduced death (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.14–0.78). Conclusions. NO donors do not alter outcome in patients with recent stroke. However, when administered within 6 hours, NO donors might improve outcomes in both ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke. PMID:27190674

  12. Avoidance of tolerance and lack of rebound with intermittent dose titrated transdermal glyceryl trinitrate. The Transdermal Nitrate Investigators.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, K M; Dargie, H J; Deanfield, J; Maseri, A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate the efficacy of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate given continuously and with a nocturnal nitrate free period. DESIGN--Double blind placebo controlled study with two parallel limbs. SETTING--Multicentre trial. PATIENTS--52 patients randomised to receive either continuous treatment (23 patients) or intermittent treatment with an individually titrated dose (29 patients) for 14 days: both treatments were compared with placebo in a cross-over fashion. INTERVENTION--Continuous treatment with 10 mg per 24 hours of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate or intermittent transdermal glyceryl trinitrate titrated to give an arbitrary 10 mm Hg drop in systolic blood pressure (mean dose 18.2 mg) given over approximately 16 hours. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Treadmill exercise stress testing and ambulatory monitoring of the ST segment after 14 days' treatment. RESULTS--After 14 days' intermittent treatment resting supine and standing systolic blood pressure fell by 7.5 mm Hg (95% confidence interval 2.7 to 12.2) and 9.0 mm Hg (95% CI 3.4 to 14.5) respectively (p less than 0.01); resting heart rate was unchanged. Mean heart rate at 1 mm ST segment depression rose by 11.9 beats/min (CI 1.1 to 23.7) (p less than 0.05), mean time to onset of angina increased by 59 seconds (CI 10.8 to 108) (p less than 0.05), and total exercise duration increased by 40 seconds (p less than 0.05). These changes were not seen after continuous treatment. The frequency of ischaemic episodes was not reduced with either regimen nor was the circadian distribution of these episodes altered, in particular nocturnal episodes did not increase during intermittent treatment. CONCLUSION--Tolerance to glyceryl trinitrate was avoided by the use of individually titrated doses administered with a nocturnal nitrate free period. There was no evidence of "rebound" on ambulatory monitoring during this treatment. PMID:1909152

  13. Lack of rebound during intermittent transdermal treatment with glyceryl trinitrate in patients with stable angina on background beta blocker.

    PubMed Central

    Holdright, D R; Katz, R J; Wright, C A; Sparrow, J L; Sullivan, A K; Cunningham, A D; Fox, K M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess whether intermittent transdermal treatment with glyceryl trinitrate causes clinically significant rebound in patients maintained on beta blockers for stable angina pectoris. DESIGN--Serial treadmill exercise testing in a double blind, randomised, placebo controlled cross over trial. Baseline exercise testing was performed at 0900 and 1100 at visit 1. Transdermal glyceryl trinitrate patches releasing 15 mg/24 h were applied at 2200 the evening before visits 2 and 3, and exercise testing was performed at 0900 the next morning. The patch was removed and replaced with either an identical patch or matching placebo and exercise tests were repeated two hours later. The alternative treatment was given at visit 3. SETTING--Tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--14 patients with stable angina pectoris maintained on beta blocker treatment alone. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Time to angina, 1 mm ST segment depression, and total time, together with heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and rate-pressure product. RESULTS--Active treatment improved treadmill performance at 0900 and 1100. Time to angina, time to 1 mm ST segment depression, and total time fell significantly on placebo compared with the 0900 exercise test on active treatment, but were not significantly different to the baseline exercise test either. CONCLUSIONS--Intermittent transdermal treatment with glyceryl trinitrate is not associated with the rebound phenomenon in patients maintained on beta blockers for stable angina pectoris. PMID:8096389

  14. Ictal lack of binding to brain parenchyma suggests integrity of the blood-brain barrier for 11C-dihydroergotamine during glyceryl trinitrate-induced migraine.

    PubMed

    Schankin, Christoph J; Maniyar, Farooq H; Seo, Youngho; Kori, Shashidar; Eller, Michael; Chou, Denise E; Blecha, Joseph; Murphy, Stephanie T; Hawkins, Randall A; Sprenger, Till; VanBrocklin, Henry F; Goadsby, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    SEE DREIER DOI 101093/AWW112 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: For many decades a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier has been postulated to occur in migraine. Hypothetically this would facilitate access of medications, such as dihydroergotamine or triptans, to the brain despite physical properties otherwise restricting their entry. We studied the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in six migraineurs and six control subjects at rest and during acute glyceryl trinitrate-induced migraine attacks using positron emission tomography with the novel radioligand (11)C-dihydroergotamine, which is chemically identical to pharmacologically active dihydroergotamine. The influx rate constant Ki, average dynamic image and time activity curve were assessed using arterial blood sampling and served as measures for receptor binding and thus blood-brain barrier penetration. At rest, there was binding of (11)C-dihydroergotamine in the choroid plexus, pituitary gland, and venous sinuses as expected from the pharmacology of dihydroergotamine. However, there was no binding to the brain parenchyma, including the hippocampus, the area with the highest density of the highest-affinity dihydroergotamine receptors, and the raphe nuclei, a postulated brainstem site of action during migraine, suggesting that dihydroergotamine is not able to cross the blood-brain barrier. This binding pattern was identical in migraineurs during glyceryl trinitrate-induced migraine attacks as well as in matched control subjects. We conclude that (11)C-dihydroergotamine is unable to cross the blood-brain barrier interictally or ictally demonstrating that the blood-brain barrier remains tight for dihydroergotamine during acute glyceryl trinitrate-induced migraine attacks. PMID:27234268

  15. Ictal lack of binding to brain parenchyma suggests integrity of the blood–brain barrier for 11C-dihydroergotamine during glyceryl trinitrate-induced migraine

    PubMed Central

    Schankin, Christoph J.; Maniyar, Farooq H.; Seo, Youngho; Kori, Shashidar; Eller, Michael; Chou, Denise E.; Blecha, Joseph; Murphy, Stephanie T.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Sprenger, Till; VanBrocklin, Henry F.

    2016-01-01

    See Dreier (doi: 10.1093/aww112) for a scientific commentary on this article. For many decades a breakdown of the blood–brain barrier has been postulated to occur in migraine. Hypothetically this would facilitate access of medications, such as dihydroergotamine or triptans, to the brain despite physical properties otherwise restricting their entry. We studied the permeability of the blood–brain barrier in six migraineurs and six control subjects at rest and during acute glyceryl trinitrate-induced migraine attacks using positron emission tomography with the novel radioligand 11C-dihydroergotamine, which is chemically identical to pharmacologically active dihydroergotamine. The influx rate constant Ki, average dynamic image and time activity curve were assessed using arterial blood sampling and served as measures for receptor binding and thus blood–brain barrier penetration. At rest, there was binding of 11C-dihydroergotamine in the choroid plexus, pituitary gland, and venous sinuses as expected from the pharmacology of dihydroergotamine. However, there was no binding to the brain parenchyma, including the hippocampus, the area with the highest density of the highest-affinity dihydroergotamine receptors, and the raphe nuclei, a postulated brainstem site of action during migraine, suggesting that dihydroergotamine is not able to cross the blood–brain barrier. This binding pattern was identical in migraineurs during glyceryl trinitrate-induced migraine attacks as well as in matched control subjects. We conclude that 11C-dihydroergotamine is unable to cross the blood–brain barrier interictally or ictally demonstrating that the blood–brain barrier remains tight for dihydroergotamine during acute glyceryl trinitrate-induced migraine attacks. PMID:27234268

  16. Biodegradation of Glycerol Trinitrate and Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate by Agrobacterium radiobacter

    PubMed Central

    White, G. F.; Snape, J. R.; Nicklin, S.

    1996-01-01

    Bacteria capable of metabolizing highly explosive and vasodilatory glycerol trinitrate (GTN) were isolated under aerobic and nitrogen-limiting conditions from soil, river water, and activated sewage sludge. One of these strains (from sewage sludge) chosen for further study was identified as Agrobacterium radiobacter subgroup B. A combination of high-pressure liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the culture medium during the growth of A. radiobacter on basal salts-glycerol-GTN medium showed the sequential conversion of GTN to glycerol dinitrates and glycerol mononitrates. Isomeric glycerol 1,2-dinitrate and glycerol 1,3-dinitrate were produced simultaneously and concomitantly with the disappearance of GTN, with significant regioselectivity for the production of the 1,3-dinitrate. Dinitrates were further degraded to glycerol 1- and 2-mononitrates, but mononitrates were not biodegraded. Cells were also capable of metabolizing pentaerythritol tetranitrate, probably to its trinitrate and dinitrate analogs. Extracts of broth-grown cells contained an enzyme which in the presence of added NADH converted GTN stoichiometrically to nitrite and the mixture of glycerol dinitrates. The specific activity of this enzyme was increased 160-fold by growth on GTN as the sole source of nitrogen. PMID:16535244

  17. Purification, properties, and sequence of glycerol trinitrate reductase from Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed Central

    Snape, J R; Walkley, N A; Morby, A P; Nicklin, S; White, G F

    1997-01-01

    Glycerol trinitrate (GTN) reductase, which enables Agrobacterium radiobacter to utilize GTN and related explosives as sources of nitrogen for growth, was purified and characterized, and its gene was cloned and sequenced. The enzyme was a 39-kDa monomeric protein which catalyzed the NADH-dependent reductive scission of GTN (Km = 23 microM) to glycerol dinitrates (mainly the 1,3-isomer) with a pH optimum of 6.5, a temperature optimum of 35 degrees C, and no dependence on metal ions for activity. It was also active on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), on isosorbide dinitrate, and, very weakly, on ethyleneglycol dinitrate, but it was inactive on isopropyl nitrate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, ammonium ions, nitrate, or nitrite. The amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence was homologous (42 to 51% identity and 61 to 69% similarity) to those of PETN reductase from Enterobacter cloacae, N-ethylmaleimide reductase from Escherichia coli, morphinone reductase from Pseudomonas putida, and old yellow enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, placing the GTN reductase in the alpha/beta barrel flavoprotein group of proteins. GTN reductase and PETN reductase were very similar in many respects except in their distinct preferences for NADH and NADPH cofactors, respectively. PMID:9401040

  18. Old yellow enzyme: Reduction of nitrate esters, glycerin trinitrate, and propylene 1,2-dinitrate

    PubMed Central

    Meah, Younus; Brown, Bette Jo; Chakraborty, Sumita; Massey, Vincent

    2001-01-01

    The reaction of the old yellow enzyme and reduced flavins with organic nitrate esters has been studied. Reduced flavins have been found to react readily with glycerin trinitrate (GTN ) (nitroglycerin) and propylene dinitrate, with rate constants at pH 7.0, 25°C of 145 M−1s−1 and 5.8 M−1s−1, respectively. With GTN, the secondary nitrate was removed reductively 6 times faster than the primary nitrate, with liberation of nitrite. With propylene dinitrate, on the other hand, the primary nitrate residue was 3 times more reactive than the secondary residue. In the old yellow enzyme-catalyzed NADPH-dependent reduction of GTN and propylene dinitrate, ping-pong kinetics are displayed, as found for all other substrates of the enzyme. Rapid-reaction studies of mixing reduced enzyme with the nitrate esters show that a reduced enzyme–substrate complex is formed before oxidation of the reduced flavin. The rate constants for these reactions and the apparent Kd values of the enzyme–substrate complexes have been determined and reveal that the rate-limiting step in catalysis is reduction of the enzyme by NADPH. Analysis of the products reveal that with the enzyme-catalyzed reactions, reduction of the primary nitrate in both GTN and propylene dinitrate is favored by comparison with the free-flavin reactions. This preferential positional reactivity can be rationalized by modeling of the substrates into the known crystal structure of the enzyme. In contrast to the facile reaction of free reduced flavins with GTN, reduced 5-deazaflavins have been found to react some 4–5 orders of magnitude slower. This finding implies that the chemical mechanism of the reaction is one involving radical transfers. PMID:11438708

  19. The GTN-AAVSO Blazar Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, L. R.; Spear, G. G.; Graves, T.; Slater, G.; Price, A.

    2004-08-01

    The GLAST Telescope Network (GTN) is a collaboration among students, teachers, amateur astronomers, small college observatories, and professional astronomers who will obtain observations of base-line activity levels and follow-up observations for bright blazars, one of the key science objectives for NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission. A key partner in the GTN is the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO, a non-profit international scientific and educational organization that has considerable experience with handling, processing, and displaying large amounts of data and with coordinating observers from every corner of the globe. The GTN-AAVSO blazar program will recommend observing sequences, and provide advice and mentoring for observing techniques and data reduction. The program will archive magnitude estimates using the AAVSO database system and lightcurve generator, as well as CCD images of blazar fields. The program will also employ the online image archiving system developed by the GTN. Images of blazar fields will be available for subsequent analysis by contributors to the program, and by the GLAST science team for mission planning and follow-up studies. We will present examples of the AAVSO lightcurve generator, examples of the GTN image archive system, plus examples of the data we are currently accumulating. The GTN-AAVSO collaboration is partially funded by the NASA's GLAST Education and Public Outreach Program.

  20. The GTN-AAVSO Blazar Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, G. G.; Mattei, J. A.; Price, A.; Graves, T.; Borders, T.; Slater, G.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2002-12-01

    The GLAST Telescope Network (GTN) is a collaboration among observers and small observatories who will obtain observations of base-line activity levels and follow-up observations for bright blazars. These AGNs have their jets pointed directly toward us, and are one of the key science objectives for NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission. Funded by the GLAST Education and Public Outreach Program, the GTN consists of students, teachers, amateur astronomers, small college observatories, and professional astronomers. The American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) is a non-profit international scientific and educational organization of thousands of advanced amateur and professional astronomers interested in stars or star-like objects that change in brightness. With millions of variable star observations dating back more than 90 years, the AAVSO has unique experience with handling, processing, and displaying large amounts of data and with coordinating observers from every corner of the globe. The GTN-AAVSO blazar program will recommend observing programs, and provide advice and mentoring for observing techniques and data reduction. The program will archive magnitude estimates and measurements of blazars, as well as CCD images of blazar fields. The GTN-AAVSO program will employ the AAVSO database system and lightcurve generator (http://www.aavso.org/adata/curvegenerator.shtml) to archive magnitude estimates. The magnitudes will either be visual estimates or CCD measurements. Magnitudes are submitted online, and will be immediately available to the public for use in planning observing programs and estimating current activity levels. The GTN-AAVSO program will also employ the online image archiving system developed by the GTN. Images of blazar fields will be available for subsequent analysis by contributors to the program, and by the GLAST science team for mission planning and follow-up studies. We will present examples of the AAVSO

  1. 21 CFR 172.811 - Glyceryl tristearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.811 Glyceryl tristearate. The food additive glyceryl tristearate may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive (CAS Reg. No. 555-43-1) is prepared...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1324 - Glyceryl monostearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glyceryl monostearate. 184.1324 Section 184.1324 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1324 Glyceryl monostearate....

  3. 21 CFR 184.1323 - Glyceryl monooleate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... commerical oleic acid that is derived either from edible sources or from tall oil fatty acids meeting the...) and glyceryl esters of fatty acids present in commercial oleic acid. (b) The ingredient must be of...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1323 - Glyceryl monooleate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... esterification of commerical oleic acid that is derived either from edible sources or from tall oil fatty acids.... No. 25496-72-4) and glyceryl esters of fatty acids present in commercial oleic acid. (b)...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1324 - Glyceryl monostearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glyceryl monostearate. 184.1324 Section 184.1324 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1324 - Glyceryl monostearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glyceryl monostearate. 184.1324 Section 184.1324 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1324 - Glyceryl monostearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glyceryl monostearate. 184.1324 Section 184.1324 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  8. 21 CFR 172.811 - Glyceryl tristearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glyceryl tristearate. 172.811 Section 172.811 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.811...

  9. 21 CFR 172.811 - Glyceryl tristearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glyceryl tristearate. 172.811 Section 172.811 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.811...

  10. 21 CFR 582.1324 - Glyceryl monostearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glyceryl monostearate. 582.1324 Section 582.1324 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1324 - Glyceryl monostearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glyceryl monostearate. 582.1324 Section 582.1324 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1323 - Glyceryl monooleate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... prepared by esterification of commerical oleic acid that is derived either from edible sources or from tall... (C21H40O4, CAS Reg. No. 25496-72-4) and glyceryl esters of fatty acids present in commercial oleic acid....

  13. 21 CFR 184.1323 - Glyceryl monooleate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... prepared by esterification of commerical oleic acid that is derived either from edible sources or from tall... (C21H40O4, CAS Reg. No. 25496-72-4) and glyceryl esters of fatty acids present in commercial oleic acid....

  14. 21 CFR 184.1328 - Glyceryl behenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... glyceryl esters of behenic acid made from glycerin and behenic acid (a saturated C22 fatty acid). The... not more than 2.5 percent free fatty acids. (2) Behenic acid. Between 80 and 90 percent of the total fatty acid content. (3) Acid value. Not more than 4. (4) Saponification value. Between 145 and 165....

  15. 21 CFR 184.1328 - Glyceryl behenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... glyceryl esters of behenic acid made from glycerin and behenic acid (a saturated C22 fatty acid). The... not more than 2.5 percent free fatty acids. (2) Behenic acid. Between 80 and 90 percent of the total fatty acid content. (3) Acid value. Not more than 4. (4) Saponification value. Between 145 and 165....

  16. 21 CFR 184.1328 - Glyceryl behenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... glyceryl esters of behenic acid made from glycerin and behenic acid (a saturated C22 fatty acid). The... not more than 2.5 percent free fatty acids. (2) Behenic acid. Between 80 and 90 percent of the total fatty acid content. (3) Acid value. Not more than 4. (4) Saponification value. Between 145 and 165....

  17. 21 CFR 184.1328 - Glyceryl behenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... glyceryl esters of behenic acid made from glycerin and behenic acid (a saturated C22 fatty acid). The... not more than 2.5 percent free fatty acids. (2) Behenic acid. Between 80 and 90 percent of the total fatty acid content. (3) Acid value. Not more than 4. (4) Saponification value. Between 145 and 165....

  18. 21 CFR 184.1323 - Glyceryl monooleate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... prepared by esterification of commerical oleic acid that is derived either from edible sources or from tall... (C21H40O4, CAS Reg. No. 25496-72-4) and glyceryl esters of fatty acids present in commercial oleic acid....

  19. High School Observations of AGN Using the GTN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLin, Kevin M.; Jordan, R.; Perkins, A.; Adkins, J.; Cominsky, L.

    2008-03-01

    Students at Deer Valley High School in Antioch, California have undertaken an AGN monitoring program using telescopes of the Global Telescope Network (GTN) and SkyNet. The GTN is a network of small telescopes funded by GLAST to support the science of high energy astrophysics missions, specifically GLAST, Swift and XMM-Newton. It is managed by the NASA E/PO Group at Sonoma State University. SkyNet is a network of small telescopes managed from the University of North Carolina to catch gamma ray burst afterglows. A primary motivator behind both networks is education. In the program outlined here, high school students will schedule, reduce and analyze observations of active galaxies in order to determine if any microflaring activity has occurred. Students will compare their results with previous studies reported in the literature and then report their own results at the Contra Costa County Science and Engineering Fair. This work will give the students direct experience with several aspects of scientific research, including literature searches, data acquisition and analysis, and reporting of results.

  20. Elderly, conscious patients have an accentuated hypotensive response to nitroglycerin.

    PubMed

    Cahalan, M K; Hashimoto, Y; Aizawa, K; Verotta, D; Ionescu, P; Balea, M; Eger, E I; Benet, L Z; Ehrenfeld, W K; Goldstone, J

    1992-10-01

    There is no adequate explanation for the highly variable response of systemic blood pressure to nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate [GTN]). Aging produces cardiovascular changes that should alter the effects of GTN, but elderly patients usually have been excluded from studies of GTN. Accordingly, the authors compared the effects of GTN on systemic blood pressure in elderly and younger patients. Fifty-three patients, aged 49-87 (with 30 patients older than 70), were studied. Before elective vascular surgery, 14 patients received an infusion of placebo; 26, a constant infusion of GTN; and 13, a stepwise increasing infusion of GTN. After a standardized anesthetic induction and the start of surgery, the identical infusion protocols were repeated in each group. Data on GTN infusion rate, arterial blood pressure, and GTN concentrations versus time, age, and other potentially influencing variables were pooled for analysis. Before anesthesia and surgery, GTN more commonly caused excessive hypotension in patients older than 70 yr than in younger patients, but none of the patients had complications. A repeated-measures model analysis indicated that age significantly influenced the effects of GTN on blood pressure. That is, patients who are in their 70s who receive 0.5 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 of GTN are predicted to experience a twofold greater decrease in systolic arterial pressure (approximately 33 mmHg) than patients in their 50s. However, no apparent effect of age on intraoperative GTN responsiveness was discernible nor was a predictable relationship found between the preoperative and intraoperative responsiveness or between arterial concentrations of GTN and blood pressure or age. Therefore, the authors conclude that, in the absence of the effects of anesthesia and surgery, elderly patients have a more pronounced blood pressure response to GTN than younger patients. Furthermore, the authors conclude that preoperative blood pressure responsiveness to GTN is not a reliable

  1. The GTN-P Data Management System: A central database for permafrost monitoring parameters of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanckman, Jean-Pierre; Elger, Kirsten; Karlsson, Ævar Karl; Johannsson, Halldór; Lantuit, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    Permafrost is a direct indicator of climate change and has been identified as Essential Climate Variable (ECV) by the global observing community. The monitoring of permafrost temperatures, active-layer thicknesses and other parameters has been performed for several decades already, but it was brought together within the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) in the 1990's only, including the development of measurement protocols to provide standardized data. GTN-P is the primary international observing network for permafrost sponsored by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and the Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS), and managed by the International Permafrost Association (IPA). All GTN-P data was outfitted with an "open data policy" with free data access via the World Wide Web. The existing data, however, is far from being homogeneous: it is not yet optimized for databases, there is no framework for data reporting or archival and data documentation is incomplete. As a result, and despite the utmost relevance of permafrost in the Earth's climate system, the data has not been used by as many researchers as intended by the initiators of the programs. While the monitoring of many other ECVs has been tackled by organized international networks (e.g. FLUXNET), there is still no central database for all permafrost-related parameters. The European Union project PAGE21 created opportunities to develop this central database for permafrost monitoring parameters of GTN-P during the duration of the project and beyond. The database aims to be the one location where the researcher can find data, metadata, and information of all relevant parameters for a specific site. Each component of the Data Management System (DMS), including parameters, data levels and metadata formats were developed in cooperation with the GTN-P and the IPA. The general framework of the GTN-P DMS is based on an object oriented model (OOM), open for as many parameters as possible, and

  2. The new database of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskaborn, B. K.; Lanckman, J.-P.; Lantuit, H.; Elger, K.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Cable, W. L.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    The Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) provides the first dynamic database associated with the Thermal State of Permafrost (TSP) and the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) programs, which extensively collect permafrost temperature and active layer thickness (ALT) data from Arctic, Antarctic and mountain permafrost regions. The purpose of GTN-P is to establish an early warning system for the consequences of climate change in permafrost regions and to provide standardized thermal permafrost data to global models. In this paper we introduce the GTN-P database and perform statistical analysis of the GTN-P metadata to identify and quantify the spatial gaps in the site distribution in relation to climate-effective environmental parameters. We describe the concept and structure of the data management system in regard to user operability, data transfer and data policy. We outline data sources and data processing including quality control strategies based on national correspondents. Assessment of the metadata and data quality reveals 63 % metadata completeness at active layer sites and 50 % metadata completeness for boreholes. Voronoi tessellation analysis on the spatial sample distribution of boreholes and active layer measurement sites quantifies the distribution inhomogeneity and provides a potential method to locate additional permafrost research sites by improving the representativeness of thermal monitoring across areas underlain by permafrost. The depth distribution of the boreholes reveals that 73 % are shallower than 25 m and 27 % are deeper, reaching a maximum of 1 km depth. Comparison of the GTN-P site distribution with permafrost zones, soil organic carbon contents and vegetation types exhibits different local to regional monitoring situations, which are illustrated with maps. Preferential slope orientation at the sites most likely causes a bias in the temperature monitoring and should be taken into account when using the data for global

  3. Stable isotope-assisted LC-MS/MS monitoring of glyceryl trinitrate bioactivation in a cell culture model of nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Axton, Elizabeth R; Hardardt, Elizabeth A; Stevens, Jan F

    2016-04-15

    The nitric oxide (NO) metabolites nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitrate (NO3(-)) can be quantified as an endpoint of endothelial function. We developed a LC-MS/MS method of measuring nitrite and nitrate isotopologues, which has a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 1 nM. This method allows for isotopic labeling to differentiate newly formed nitrite and nitrate from nanomolar to micromolar background levels of nitrite and nitrate in biological matrices. This method utilizes 2,3-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) derivatization, which reacts with nitrite under acidic conditions to produce 2,3-naphthotriazole (NAT). NAT was chromatographically separated on a Shimadzu LC System with an Agilent Extend-C18 5 μm 2.1 × 150 mm column and detected using a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method on an ABSciex 3200 QTRAP mass spectrometer operated in positive mode. Mass spectrometry allows for the quantification of (14)N-NAT (m/z 170.1) and (15)N-NAT (m/z 171.1). Both nitrite and nitrate demonstrated a linear detector response (1 nM - 10 μM, 1 nM - 100 nM, respectively), and were unaffected by common interferences (Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), fetal bovine serum (FBS), phenol red, and NADPH). This method requires minimal sample preparation, making it ideal for most biological applications. We applied this method to develop a cell culture model to study the development of nitrate tolerance in human endothelial cells (EA.hy926). PMID:26796748

  4. 21 CFR 172.852 - Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 172.852 Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids. Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids (the lactic acid... conditions: (a) They are manufactured from glycerin, lactic acid, and fatty acids conforming with § 172.860 and/or oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids conforming with § 172.862 and/or edible fats...

  5. Numerical Simulation of Tension Properties for Al-Cu Alloy Friction Stir-Welded Joints with GTN Damage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guo-Qin; Sun, Feng-Yang; Cao, Fang-Li; Chen, Shu-Jun; Barkey, Mark E.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical simulation of tensile fracture behavior on Al-Cu alloy friction stir-welded joint was performed with the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model. The parameters of the GTN model were studied in each region of the friction stir-welded joint by means of inverse identification. Based on the obtained parameters, the finite element model of the welded joint was built to predict the fracture behavior and tension properties. Good agreement can be found between the numerical and experimental results in the location of the tensile fracture and the mechanical properties.

  6. 21 CFR 178.3505 - Glyceryl tri-(12-acetoxy-stearate).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... surface of calcium carbonate at a level not to exceed 1 weight-percent of the total mixture. (b) The calcium carbonate/glyceryl tri-(12-acetoxystearate) mixture is used as an adjuvant in polymers in...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3505 - Glyceryl tri-(12-acetoxy-stearate).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... surface of calcium carbonate at a level not to exceed 1 weight-percent of the total mixture. (b) The calcium carbonate/glyceryl tri-(12-acetoxystearate) mixture is used as an adjuvant in polymers in...

  8. STUDY OF DUAL MATRIX TABLETS CONTAINING HYPROMELLOSE OF DIFFERENT VISCOSITY DEGREE AND GLYCERYL DIBEHENATE.

    PubMed

    Mužíková, Jitka; Holubová, Katerina; Komersová, Alena; Lochar, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Studies are described on the compressibility of directly compressible tableting materials containing two viscosity types of hypromellose in two concentrations and tableting materials containing additional glyceryl dibehenate, also in two concentrations. Compressibility is evaluated by means of the energy profile of the compression process and determination of tensile strength of tablets. Dissolution test examines the rate of release of the active ingredient from matrix tablets, which is subsequently evaluated mathematically. Increased concentrations of both hypromelloses and an addition of glyceryl dibehenate into tablets with both types of hypromellose improved compressibility. The rate of drug release was decreased with increasing viscosity degree of hypromellose and its increasing concentration. An addition of glyceryl dibehenate exerted the same influence on release as increased concentrations of the pertinent hypromellose. PMID:27180439

  9. The enigma of nitroglycerin bioactivation and nitrate tolerance: news, views and troubles

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, B; Beretta, M

    2008-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate; GTN) is the most prominent representative of the organic nitrates or nitrovasodilators, a class of compounds that have been used clinically since the late nineteenth century for the treatment of coronary artery disease (angina pectoris), congestive heart failure and myocardial infarction. Medline lists more than 15 000 publications on GTN and other organic nitrates, but the mode of action of these drugs is still largely a mystery. In the first part of this article, we give an overview on the molecular mechanisms of GTN biotransformation resulting in vascular cyclic GMP accumulation and vasodilation with focus on the role of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) and the link between the ALDH2 reaction and activation of vascular soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). In particular, we address the identity of the bioactive species that activates sGC and the potential involvement of nitrite as an intermediate, describe our recent findings suggesting that ALDH2 catalyses direct 3-electron reduction of GTN to NO and discuss possible reaction mechanisms. In the second part, we discuss contingent processes leading to markedly reduced sensitivity of blood vessels to GTN, referred to as vascular nitrate tolerance. Again, we focus on ALDH2 and describe the current controversy on the role of ALDH2 inactivation in tolerance development. Finally, we emphasize some of the most intriguing, in our opinion, unresolved puzzles of GTN pharmacology that urgently need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:18574453

  10. Vascular Bioactivation of Nitroglycerin by Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Barbara S.; Gorren, Antonius C. F.; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Wenzl, M. Verena; Furdui, Cristina M.; Poole, Leslie B.; Mayer, Bernd; Gruber, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) catalyzes the bioactivation of nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) in blood vessels, resulting in vasodilation by nitric oxide (NO) or a related species. Because the mechanism of this reaction is still unclear we determined the three-dimensional structures of wild-type (WT) ALDH2 and of a triple mutant of the protein that exhibits low denitration activity (E268Q/C301S/C303S) in complex with GTN. The structure of the triple mutant showed that GTN binds to the active site via polar contacts to the oxyanion hole and to residues 268 and 301 as well as by van der Waals interactions to hydrophobic residues of the catalytic pocket. The structure of the GTN-soaked wild-type protein revealed a thionitrate adduct to Cys-302 as the first reaction intermediate, which was also found by mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. In addition, the MS data identified sulfinic acid as the irreversibly inactivated enzyme species. Assuming that the structures of the triple mutant and wild-type ALDH2 reflect binding of GTN to the catalytic site and the first reaction step, respectively, superposition of the two structures indicates that denitration of GTN is initiated by nucleophilic attack of Cys-302 at one of the terminal nitrate groups, resulting in formation of the observed thionitrate intermediate and release of 1,2-glyceryl dinitrate. Our results shed light on the molecular mechanism of the GTN denitration reaction and provide useful information on the structural requirements for high affinity binding of organic nitrates to the catalytic site of ALDH2. PMID:22988236

  11. Validation of formability of laminated sheet metal for deep drawing process using GTN damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yongbin; Cha, Wan-gi; Kim, Naksoo; Ko, Sangjin

    2013-12-16

    In this study, we studied formability of PET/PVC laminated sheet metal which named VCM (Vinyl Coated Metal). VCM offers various patterns and good-looking metal steel used for appliances such as refrigerator and washing machine. But, this sheet has problems which are crack and peeling of film when the material is formed by deep drawing process. To predict the problems, we used finite element method and GTN (Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) damage model to represent damage of material. We divided the VCM into 3 layers (PET film, adhesive and steel added PVC) in finite element analysis model to express the crack and peeling phenomenon. The material properties of each layer are determined by reverse engineering based on tensile test result. Furthermore, we performed the simple rectangular deep drawing and simulated it. The simulation result shows good agreement with drawing experiment result in position, punch stroke of crack occurrence. Also, we studied the fracture mechanism of PET film on VCM by comparing the width direction strain of metal and PET film.

  12. Validation of formability of laminated sheet metal for deep drawing process using GTN damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yongbin; Cha, Wan-gi; Ko, Sangjin; Kim, Naksoo

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we studied formability of PET/PVC laminated sheet metal which named VCM (Vinyl Coated Metal). VCM offers various patterns and good-looking metal steel used for appliances such as refrigerator and washing machine. But, this sheet has problems which are crack and peeling of film when the material is formed by deep drawing process. To predict the problems, we used finite element method and GTN (Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) damage model to represent damage of material. We divided the VCM into 3 layers (PET film, adhesive and steel added PVC) in finite element analysis model to express the crack and peeling phenomenon. The material properties of each layer are determined by reverse engineering based on tensile test result. Furthermore, we performed the simple rectangular deep drawing and simulated it. The simulation result shows good agreement with drawing experiment result in position, punch stroke of crack occurrence. Also, we studied the fracture mechanism of PET film on VCM by comparing the width direction strain of metal and PET film.

  13. Final report on the safety assessment of trilaurin, triarachidin, tribehenin, tricaprin, tricaprylin, trierucin, triheptanoin, triheptylundecanoin, triisononanoin, triisopalmitin, triisostearin, trilinolein, trimyristin, trioctanoin, triolein, tripalmitin, tripalmitolein, triricinolein, tristearin, triundecanoin, glyceryl triacetyl hydroxystearate, glyceryl triacetyl ricinoleate, and glyceryl stearate diacetate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W

    2001-01-01

    Triesters of glycerin and aliphatic acids, known generically as glyceryl triesters and specifically as Trilaurin, etc., are used in cosmetic products as occlusive skin-conditioning agents and/or nonaqueous viscosity-increasing agents. Hundreds of glyceryl triesters are used in a wide variety of cosmetic products at concentrations ranging from a few tenths of a percent to 46%. Glyceryl triesters are also known as triglycerides; ingested triglycerides are metabolized to monoglycerides, free fatty acids, and glycerol, all of which are absorbed in the intestinal mucosa and undergo further metabolism. Dermal absorption of Triolein in mice was nil; the oil remained at the application site. Only slight absorption was seen in guinea pig skin. Tricaprylin and other glyceryl triesters have been shown to increase the skin penetration of drugs. Little or no acute, subchronic, or chronic oral toxicity was seen in animal studies unless levels approached a significant percentage of caloric intake. Subcutaneous injections of Tricaprylin in rats over a period of 5 weeks caused a granulomatous reaction characterized by oil deposits surrounded by macrophages. Dermal application was not associated with significant irritation in rabbit skin. Ocular exposures were, at most, mildly irritating to rabbit eyes. No evidence of sensitization or photosensitization was seen in a guinea pig maximization test. Most of the genotoxicity test systems were negative. Tricaprylin, Trioctanoin, and Triolein have historically been used as vehicles in carcinogenicity testing of other chemicals. In one study, subcutaneous injection of Tricaprylin in newborn mice produced more tumors in lymphoid tissue than were seen in untreated animals, whereas neither subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection in 4- to 6-week-old female mice produced any tumors in another study. Trioctanoin injected subcutaneously in hamsters produced no tumors. Trioctanoin injected intraperitoneally in pregnant rats was associated with

  14. GTN-G, WGI, RGI, DCW, GLIMS, WGMS, GCOS - What's all this about? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, F.; Raup, B. H.; Zemp, M.

    2013-12-01

    In a large collaborative effort, the glaciological community has compiled a new and spa-tially complete global dataset of glacier outlines, the so-called Randolph Glacier Inventory or RGI. Despite its regional shortcomings in quality (e.g. in regard to geolocation, gener-alization, and interpretation), this dataset was heavily used for global-scale modelling ap-plications (e.g. determination of total glacier volume and glacier contribution to sea-level rise) in support of the forthcoming 5th Assessment Report (AR5) of Working Group I of the IPCC. The RGI is a merged dataset that is largely based on the GLIMS database and several new datasets provided by the community (both are mostly derived from satellite data), as well as the Digital Chart of the World (DCW) and glacier attribute information (location, size) from the World Glacier Inventory (WGI). There are now two key tasks to be performed, (1) improving the quality of the RGI in all regions where the outlines do not met the quality required for local scale applications, and (2) integrating the RGI in the GLIMS glacier database to improve its spatial completeness. While (1) requires again a huge effort but is already ongoing, (2) is mainly a technical issue that is nearly solved. Apart from this technical dimension, there is also a more political or structural one. While GLIMS is responsible for the remote sensing and glacier inventory part (Tier 5) of the Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G) within the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS), the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS) is collecting and dis-seminating the field observations. Along with new global products derived from satellite data (e.g. elevation changes and velocity fields) and the community wish to keep a snap-shot dataset such as the RGI available, how to make all these datasets available to the community without duplicating efforts and making best use of the very limited financial resources available must now be discussed. This

  15. Prostaglandin E2-Glyceryl Ester: In Vivo Evidence for a Distinct Pharmacological Identity from Intraocular Pressure Studies.

    PubMed

    Woodward, David F; Poloso, Neil J; Wang, Jenny W

    2016-08-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-2-glyceryl ester is a cyclo-oxygenase 2 product of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonyl glycerol. It is claimed as pharmacologically novel, but this is complicated by rapid and irreversible isomerization to the 1(3) ester. For ocular studies, enzymatic hydrolysis of the ester moiety creates an additional complication. PG-glyceryl esters were stabilized to isomerization and hydrolysis by replacing the noncarbonyl O with NH, to form the serinolamide and propanediolamide as stable analogs of PG-2-glyceryl and PG-2-1(3) glyceryl esters, respectively. Intraocular pressure was measured in conscious dogs and conscious laser-induced ocular hypertensive monkeys. Pharmacological studies involved stable transfectants for each of the human recombinant prostanoid receptors and the isolated feline iris for prostamide activity. PGE2-serinolamide and PGE2- propanediolamide were essentially inactive at all receptors except the EP3 receptor (EC50, ∼500 nM). This obliged elucidation of EP3 receptor involvement in the intraocular pressure response to these PGE2-glycyerl ester analogs. Since the EP3 receptor agonists sulprostone and GR 63799 did not lower monkey intraocular pressure, a role for EP3 receptors in mediating the effects of PGE2-serinolamide and PGE2-propanediolamide is not indicated. PGE2-glyceryl ester (0.01% and 0.1%) substantially lowered intraocular pressure in monkeys. PGE2-propanediolamide was more efficacious than PGE2-serinolamide in lowering intraocular pressure in monkey eyes, but both appeared equieffective in dog eyes. PGE2-serinolamide dose-dependently (0.01- 0.1%) lowered intraocular pressure in both species, but PGF2 α-serinolamide was inactive. In conclusion, stable PGE2-glyceryl ester analogs lowered intraocular pressure. These findings are consistent with the presence of a PGE2-glyceryl ester-specific recognition site in the eye. PMID:27217589

  16. A new class of organic nitrates: investigations on bioactivation, tolerance and cross-tolerance phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmacher, S; Schulz, E; Oelze, M; König, A; Roegler, C; Lange, K; Sydow, L; Kawamoto, T; Wenzel, P; Münzel, T; Lehmann, J; Daiber, A

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The chronic use of organic nitrates is limited by serious side effects including oxidative stress, nitrate tolerance and/or endothelial dysfunction. The side effects and potency of nitroglycerine depend on mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2). We sought to determine whether this concept can be extended to a new class of organic nitrates with amino moieties (aminoalkyl nitrates). Experimental approach: Vasodilator potency of the organic nitrates, in vitro tolerance and in vivo tolerance (after continuous infusion for 3 days) were assessed in wild-type and ALDH-2 knockout mice by isometric tension studies. Mitochondrial oxidative stress was analysed by L-012-dependent chemiluminescence and protein tyrosine nitration. Key results: Aminoethyl nitrate (AEN) showed an almost similar potency to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), even though it is only a mononitrate. AEN-dependent vasodilatation was mediated by cGMP and nitric oxide. In contrast to triethanolamine trinitrate (TEAN) and GTN, AEN bioactivation did not depend on ALDH-2 and caused no in vitro tolerance. In vivo treatment with TEAN and GTN, but not with AEN, induced cross-tolerance to acetylcholine (ACh)-dependent and GTN-dependent relaxation. Although all nitrates tested induced tolerance to themselves, only TEAN and GTN significantly increased mitochondrial oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions and implications: The present results demonstrate that not all high potency nitrates are bioactivated by ALDH-2 and that high potency of a given nitrate is not necessarily associated with induction of oxidative stress or nitrate tolerance. Obviously, there are distinct pathways for bioactivation of organic nitrates, which for AEN may involve xanthine oxidoreductase rather than P450 enzymes. PMID:19563531

  17. Water-developable resists based on glyceryl methacrylate for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Baek; Jang, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Hak; Lee, Kwan-Ku; Ko, Jong-Sung

    2004-05-01

    Novel water-developable negative resists were designed to induce both cross-linking and polarity change upon exposure and bake. The matrix polymers were synthesized by copolymerization of glyceryl methacrylate and methacrolein. The acid-catalyzed acetalization of the polymer induced cross-linking, polarity change, and increase in dry-etch resistance. The resist formulated with this polymer and cast in a water-ethanol mixture, showed 0.7 μm line and space patterns using a mercury-xenone lamp in a contact printing mode and pure water as a developer.

  18. A novel glyceryl monoolein-bearing cubosomes for gambogenic acid: Preparation, cytotoxicity and intracellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qing; Lin, Tongyuan; Zhang, Cai Yuan; Zhu, Tingting; Wang, Lei; Ji, Zhaojie; Jia, Buyun; Ge, Tao; Peng, Daiyin; Chen, Weidong

    2015-09-30

    Lyotropic cubic liquid crystalline nanoparticles, also known as 'cubosomes', have been tested as effective carriers for a variety of drugs due to their ability to enhance delivery efficiency and reduced drug side effects. Cubosomes are colloidal carriers composed of biodegradable Glyceryl monooleate and F127. Being composed of well tolerable and physiological materials, these carriers are well tolerated, compatible and non-toxic. In this study, therefore, we developed a novel, water-soluble, glyceryl monooleate and F127 based multiblock copolymer for Gambogenic acid (GNA) by emulsion-evaporation and low temperature-solidification technique. Physicochemical properties, in vitro cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and in vivo pharmacokinetic of GNA-loaded cubosomes (GNA-Cubs) were investigated. The results revealed that GNA-Cubs were spherical or ellipsoidal monocellular by dynamic light scattering, meanwhile, 150-250nm in mean size with narrow polydispersity indexas determined by transmission electron microscopy. Small angle X-ray scattering indicated that GNA-Cubs retain the Pn3m cubic symmetry. Compared with GNA solution, GNA-Cubs exhibited markedly prolonged inhibitory activity in SMMC-7721 cells, as well as time-dependent increases in intra-cellular uptake. Furthermore, in vivo pharmacokinetic study showed that the Cmax values and the AUC of GNA-Cubs were higher than GNA solution approximately 1.2-fold and 9.1-fold, respectively. In conclusion, the results showed that the cubic liquid crystalline nanoparticles could be a potentially nanocarrier in the delivery of GNA for cancer therapy. PMID:26209071

  19. Dietary Nitrate Lowers Blood Pressure: Epidemiological, Pre-clinical Experimental and Clinical Trial Evidence.

    PubMed

    Gee, Lorna C; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a potent vasodilator critical in maintaining vascular homeostasis, can reduce blood pressure in vivo. Loss of constitutive NO generation, for example as a result of endothelial dysfunction, occurs in many pathological conditions, including hypertension, and contributes to disease pathology. Attempts to therapeutically deliver NO via organic nitrates (e.g. glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) to reduce blood pressure in hypertensives have been largely unsuccessful. However, in recent years inorganic (or 'dietary') nitrate has been identified as a potential solution for NO delivery through its sequential chemical reduction via the enterosalivary circuit. With dietary nitrate found in abundance in vegetables this review discusses epidemiological, pre-clinical and clinical data supporting the idea that dietary nitrate could represent a cheap and effective dietary intervention capable of reducing blood pressure and thereby improving cardiovascular health. PMID:26815004

  20. Formulation of a modified-release pregabalin tablet using hot-melt coating with glyceryl behenate.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyu Ho; Woo, Hye Seung; Kim, Chae Jin; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Jeon, Jun Young; Lee, Sang Young; Kang, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Sangkil; Choi, Young Wook

    2015-11-10

    A modified-release (MR) tablet of the anti-anxiety drug pregabalin (PRE) was prepared by hot-melt coating PRE with glyceryl behenate (GB) as a release retardant and compressing to form a matrix with microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) as a hydrophilic diluent. GB-coated PRE had a size in the range of 177-290 μm with good to acceptable flowability. Tablet hardness decreased slightly as GB content increased. PRE release from the tablet matrices was successfully modified by altering the ratio of MCC and GB, and it was found that dissolution- or diffusion-controlled release depended on the amount of GB used. Drug release was pH-independent. An accelerated stability test on the most promising MR tablet at 40°C and 75% relative humidity for 6 months showed no significant changes in PRE content, and the occurrence of total impurities--including PRE-lactam--was within acceptable limits. After oral administration of the selected MR tablet or a commercial IR capsule (Lyrica) to healthy human volunteers, pharmacokinetic parameters including Tmax, Cmax, AUC0-24, and T1/2 were compared. The confidence interval of AUC0-24 was within the adequate range, but that of Cmax was inadequate. This study demonstrated the potential use of GB for PRE-containing MR formulations. PMID:26315121

  1. Development and evaluation of liquid embolic agents based on liquid crystalline material of glyceryl monooleate.

    PubMed

    Du, Ling-Ran; Lu, Xiao-Jing; Guan, Hai-Tao; Yang, Yong-Jie; Gu, Meng-Jie; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Lv, Tian-Shi; Yan, Zi-Guang; Song, Li; Zou, Ying-Hua; Fu, Nai-Qi; Qi, Xian-Rong; Fan, Tian-Yuan

    2014-08-25

    New type of liquid embolic agents based on a liquid crystalline material of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) was developed and evaluated in this study. Ternary phase diagram of GMO, water and ethanol was constructed and three isotropic liquids (ILs, GMO:ethanol:water=49:21:30, 60:20:20 and 72:18:10 (w/w/w)) were selected as potential liquid embolic agents, which could spontaneously form viscous gel cast when contacting with water or physiological fluid. The ILs exhibited excellent microcatheter deliverability due to low viscosity, and were proved to successfully block the saline flow when performed in a device to simulate embolization in vitro. The ILs also showed good cytocompatibility on L929 mouse fibroblast cell line. The embolization of ILs to rabbit kidneys was performed successfully under monitoring of digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and embolic degree was affected by the initial formulation composition and used volume. At 5th week after embolization, DSA and computed tomography (CT) confirmed the renal arteries embolized with IL did not recanalize in follow-up period, and an obvious atrophy of the embolized kidney was observed. Therefore, the GMO-based liquid embolic agents showed feasible and effective to embolize, and potential use in clinical interventional embolization therapy. PMID:24858389

  2. Preparation of multiparticulate vaginal tablet using glyceryl monooleate for sustained progesterone delivery.

    PubMed

    Biradar, Shailesh V; Dhumal, Ravindra S; Shah, Manish H; Paradkar, Anant R; Yamamura, Shigeo

    2009-01-01

    Most of the sustained release vaginal formulations are in the form of bioadhesive gels and tablets. Though proved efficient, their presence in the vagina for a longer time as a bulk produces discomfort and interference with body functioning including sexual activities. Hence, they lack complete patient compliance. In this study, multiparticulate vaginal tablets were prepared by utilizing progesterone (PRO) loaded dry powder precursor of cubic phase (DPPCP) of glyceryl monooleate (GMO). DPPCP were obtained by spray drying GMO with magnesium trisilicate (MTS) and have presented PRO sustained release in simulated vaginal fluid (SVF) for 14 hours. The effect of hydrophilic and hydrophobic tableting excipients on compression, phase, bioadhesion and drug release properties of prepared tablets was evaluated. The effervescent hydrophilic tablet (EHT) prepared with hydrophilic excipients showed rapid disintegration but, diminished sustaining ability owing to transformation into lamellar phase whereas the multiparticulate hydrophobic tablet (MHT) obtained from hydrophobic excipients presented both rapid disintegration and sustained release in SVF by virtue of cubic phase retention. During bioadhesivity testing, fast disintegration of MHT with formation of uniform and viscous bioadhesive layer on cow mucosa was observed even with a small volume of SVF. As MHT may not produce discomfort and interference, it will be preferred over bioadhesive gel or tablet. PMID:18802845

  3. A novel method for the synthesis of glyceryl monocaffeate by the enzymatic transesterification and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shangde; Hu, Bingxue

    2017-01-01

    A novel enzymatic method for glyceryl monocaffeate (GMC) preparation by the transesterification of ethyl caffeate (EC) was investigated. The effects of reaction variables (reaction pressure, temperature, reaction time, enzyme load, and substrate ratio) on the enzymatic transesterification were studied and optimized using response surface methodology. HPLC-ESI-MS and HPLC-UV were used to monitor the transesterification. Thermodynamics, kinetic analyses and reaction mechanism were also evaluated. Results showed that, GMC can be successfully prepared by the enzymatic transesterification of EC with glycerol. Under the optimal conditions (enzyme load 22.54%, EC:glycerol=1:12.75 (mol/mol), 72.5°C, and 10.5h), EC conversion and GMC yield were 97.9±0.7% and 95.8±1.0%, respectively. The activation energies (Ea) for EC conversion and GMC formation were 44.23 and 46.51kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetic values for Vmax, Km(') and KIA were 2.18×10(-3)mol/(Lmin), 0.086mol/L, and 0.52mol/L, respectively. The transesterification mechanism with EC inhibition was also proposed. PMID:27507465

  4. Glyceryl monooleate-based otic delivery system of ofloxacin: release profile and bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Adwan, Samer; Abu-Dahab, Rana; Al-Bakri, Amal G; Sallam, Alsayyed

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the preparation and characterization of glyceryl monooleate- (GMO) based drug delivery system containing ofloxacin for the treatment of otitis externa. Acetate buffer (pH 4.5) containing dissolved ofloxacin was added to molten GMO as an aqueous phase, this resulted in the formation of a cubic and a reverse hexagonal phases. The release behavior of ofloxacin from the drug delivery system was studied using three different methods. The mechanism of drug release using paddles/dissolution apparatus and Franz diffusion cells followed Higuchi and Fickian diffusion models; whereas intrinsic release rate method showed zero-order kinetics. The intrinsic release rate was estimated and found to be 187.2 µg/cm(2)/h. The release mechanisms were similar irrespective of the loaded ofloxacin amount, however, the higher drug load displayed higher release rate. The drug delivery system was proven to be microbiologically effective by using agar diffusion method, against Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The GMO/ofloxacin formulation was stable for 6 months after preparation at room temperature as measured with respect to phase stability and antibacterial activity. PMID:24392877

  5. Nitrovasodilator-induced relaxation and tolerance development in porcine vena cordis magna: dependence on intact endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Kojda, G.; Beck, J. K.; Meyer, W.; Noack, E.

    1994-01-01

    1. Isolated segments of porcine vena cordis magna exhibited a reproducible contractile activity upon application of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) or KCl, that was independent of the presence of intact endothelium. Substance P (3 nM) elicited strictly endothelium-dependent relaxations amounting to 46.1 +/- 1.4% (n = 206) of contractions induced by 10 microM PGF2 alpha. 2. S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP), a compound that spontaneously liberates nitric oxide, concentration-dependently relaxed PGF2 alpha-precontracted (50 microM) venous segments. Tolerance induction (incubation with 100 microM SNAP for 30 min) within the same segments resulted in a 3 fold attenuation of this effect, which was not further reduced after additional preincubation with glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). Removal of endothelium or the presence of N omega-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME) significantly improved the potency of SNAP before and after tolerance induction. 3. Concentration-dependent relaxations induced by GTN in non-tolerant veins were similar in the presence and absence of endothelium but much more reduced in tolerant endothelium-denuded (75 fold) compared to intact (20 fold) segments. In contrast, the presence of L-NAME significantly improved GTN-activity solely in non-tolerant veins, which, therefore, also resulted in a more pronounced attenuation of activity due to tolerance induction (100 fold). Preincubation of intact veins with SNAP also reduced GTN-activity but to a lesser extent (10 fold). 4. The more delayed but much longer, and compared to GTN somewhat weaker, acting new nitrovasodilator N-(3-nitrato-pivaloyl)-1-cysteineethylester (SPM 3672) was more potent in denuded than intact non-tolerant venous segments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7521258

  6. Novel glyceryl glucoside is a low toxic alternative for cryopreservation agent.

    PubMed

    Su, Cathy; Allum, Allison J; Aizawa, Yasushi; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2016-08-01

    Glyceryl glucoside (GG, α-d-glucosyglycerol) is a natural glycerol derivative found in alcoholic drinks. Recently GG has been used as an alternative for glycerol in cosmetic products. However, the safety of using GG is still unclear. Currently, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol are wildly used in cryopreservation. Despite GG being a derivative of glycerol, the ability of GG in cryopreservation is still unknown. By using a system of Chinese Hamster Ovary cells (CHO), A549 cells and AG1522 cells, the study examined the cryoprotective effects of DMSO, glycerol and GG. Cytotoxic and genotoxic responses induced by the three chemicals were also investigated with CHO to determine the safety of GG for cosmetic products. Our data suggests that GG has great cryopresearvation ability in the concentration of 30%-40% (v/v). For cytotoxic studies, DMSO showed the highest cytotoxicity above 3% (v/v) in cell doubling time delay among three chemicals. For the acute cytotoxicity with trypan blue dye exclusion assay, GG showed stronger cell killing effect within 24 h above 4% (v/v). For the continuous cytotoxicity with colony formation assay for 7 days, DMSO showed significantly reduced clonogenic ability above 2%. In genotoxicity studies, CHO treated with glycerol at 2% concentration induced three times higher frequencies of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) than background levels. GG did not induce significant amounts of SCE compared to background. Micronuclei formation was equally observed in the 2% and above concentrations of glycerol and GG. Our data showed that GG has significant effects on cryopreservation compared to DMSO. Glycerol and GG have similar cytotoxicity effects to CHO, but glycerol induced genotoxic responses in the same concentration. Therefore, we conclude that GG may be a safer alternative compound to glycerol in cosmetic products and safer alternative to DMSO in cryopreservation. PMID:27235553

  7. Chitosan and glyceryl monooleate nanostructures containing gemcitabine: potential delivery system for pancreatic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Trickler, William J; Khurana, Jatin; Nagvekar, Ankita A; Dash, Alekha K

    2010-03-01

    The objectives of this study are to enhance cellular accumulation of gemcitabine with chitosan/glyceryl monooleate (GMO) nanostructures, and to provide significant increase in cell death of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The delivery system was prepared by a multiple emulsion solvent evaporation method. The nanostructure topography, size, and surface charge were determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and a zetameter. The cellular accumulation, cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of the nanostructures were evaluated by HPLC, confocal microscopy, or MTT assay in Mia PaCa-2 and BxPC-3 cells. The average particle diameter for 2% and 4% (w/w) drug loaded delivery system were 382.3 +/- 28.6 nm, and 385.2 +/- 16.1 nm, respectively with a surface charge of +21.94 +/- 4.37 and +21.23 +/- 1.46 mV. The MTT cytotoxicity dose-response studies revealed the placebo at/or below 1 mg/ml has no effect on MIA PaCa-2 or BxPC-3 cells. The delivery system demonstrated a significant decrease in the IC50 (3 to 4 log unit shift) in cell survival for gemcitabine nanostructures at 72 and 96 h post-treatment when compared with a solution of gemcitabine alone. The nanostructure reported here can be resuspended in an aqueous medium that demonstrate increased effective treatment compared with gemcitabine treatment alone in an in vitro model of human pancreatic cancer. The drug delivery system demonstrates capability to entrap both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds to potentially provide an effective treatment option in human pancreatic cancer. PMID:20238190

  8. Number of nitrate groups determines reactivity and potency of organic nitrates: a proof of concept study in ALDH-2−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, P; Hink, U; Oelze, M; Seeling, A; Isse, T; Bruns, K; Steinhoff, L; Brandt, M; Kleschyov, A L; Schulz, E; Lange, K; Weiner, H; Lehmann, J; Lackner, K J; Kawamoto, T; Münzel, T; Daiber, A

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) has been shown to provide a pathway for bioactivation of organic nitrates and to be prone to desensitization in response to highly potent, but not to less potent, nitrates. We therefore sought to support the hypothesis that bioactivation by ALDH-2 critically depends on the number of nitrate groups within the nitrovasodilator. Experimental approach: Nitrates with one (PEMN), two (PEDN; GDN), three (PETriN; glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) and four (pentaerithrityl tetranitrate, PETN) nitrate groups were investigated. Vasodilatory potency was measured in isometric tension studies using isolated aortic segments of wild type (WT) and ALDH-2−/− mice. Activity of the cGMP-dependent kinase-I (reflected by levels of phosphorylated VAsodilator Stimulated Phosphoprotein, P-VASP) was quantified by Western blot analysis, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity by HPLC. Following incubation of isolated mitochondria with PETN, PETriN-chromophore and PEDN, metabolites were quantified using chemiluminescence nitrogen detection and mass spectrometry. Key results: Compared to WT, vasorelaxation in response to PETN, PETriN and GTN was attenuated about 10fold in ALDH-2−/− mice, identical to WT vessels preincubated with inhibitors of ALDH-2. Reduced vasodilator potency correlated with reduced P-VASP formation and diminished biotransformation of the tetranitrate- and trinitrate-compounds. None of these findings were observed for PEDN, GDN and PEMN. Conclusions and implications: Our results support the crucial role of ALDH-2 in bioactivating highly reactive nitrates like GTN, PETN and PETriN. ALDH-2-mediated relaxation by organic nitrates therefore depends mainly on the number of nitrate groups. Less potent nitrates like PEDN, GDN and PEMN are apparently biotransformed by other pathways. PMID:17220910

  9. The Z' = 12 superstructure of Λ-cobalt(III) sepulchrate trinitrate governed by C-H...O hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Dey, Somnath; Schönleber, Andreas; Mondal, Swastik; Prathapa, Siriyara Jagannatha; van Smaalen, Sander; Larsen, Finn Krebs

    2016-06-01

    Λ-Cobalt(III) sepulchrate trinitrate crystallizes in P6322 with Z = 2 (Z' = 1/6) at room temperature. Slabs perpendicular to the hexagonal axis comprise molecules Co(sepulchrate) alternating with nitrate groups A and B. Coordinated by six sepulchrate molecules, highly disordered nitrate groups C are accommodated between the slabs. Here we report the fully ordered, low-temperature crystal structure of Co(sep)(NO3)3. It is found to be a high-Z' structure with Z' = 12 of the 12-fold 6a_{h}\\times\\sqrt{3}b_{h}\\times c_{h} superstructure with monoclinic symmetry P21 (c unique). Correlations between structural parameters are effectively removed by refinements within the superspace approach. Superstructure formation is governed by a densification of the packing in conjunction with ordering of nitrate group C, the latter assuming different orientations for each of the Z' = 12 independent copies in the superstructure. The Co(sep) moiety exhibits small structural variations over its 12 independent copies, while orientations of nitrate groups A and B vary less than the orientations of the nitrate group C do. Molecular packing in the superstructure is found to be determined by short C-H...H-C contacts, with H...H distances of 2.2-2.3 Å, and by short C-H...O contacts, with H...O distances down to 2.2 Å. These contacts presumably represent weak C-H...O hydrogen bonds, but in any case they prevent further densification of the structure and strengthening of weak N-H...O hydrogen bonds with observed H...O distances of 2.4-2.6 Å. PMID:27240768

  10. The Z′ = 12 superstructure of Λ-cobalt(III) sepulchrate trinitrate governed by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Somnath; Schönleber, Andreas; Mondal, Swastik; Prathapa, Siriyara Jagannatha; van Smaalen, Sander; Larsen, Finn Krebs

    2016-01-01

    Λ-Cobalt(III) sepulchrate trinitrate crystallizes in P6322 with Z = 2 (Z′ = 1/6) at room temperature. Slabs perpendicular to the hexagonal axis comprise molecules Co(sepulchrate) alternating with nitrate groups A and B. Coordinated by six sepulchrate molecules, highly disordered nitrate groups C are accommodated between the slabs. Here we report the fully ordered, low-temperature crystal structure of Co(sep)(NO3)3. It is found to be a high-Z′ structure with Z′ = 12 of the 12-fold superstructure with monoclinic symmetry P21 (c unique). Correlations between structural parameters are effectively removed by refinements within the superspace approach. Superstructure formation is governed by a densification of the packing in conjunction with ordering of nitrate group C, the latter assuming different orientations for each of the Z′ = 12 independent copies in the superstructure. The Co(sep) moiety exhibits small structural variations over its 12 independent copies, while orientations of nitrate groups A and B vary less than the orientations of the nitrate group C do. Molecular packing in the superstructure is found to be determined by short C—H⋯H—C contacts, with H⋯H distances of 2.2–2.3 Å, and by short C—H⋯O contacts, with H⋯O distances down to 2.2 Å. These contacts presumably represent weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, but in any case they prevent further densification of the structure and strengthening of weak N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds with observed H⋯O distances of 2.4–2.6 Å. PMID:27240768

  11. Roles of potassium ions, acetyl and L-glyceryl groups in native gellan double helix: an X-ray study.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, R; Radha, A; Thailambal, V G

    1992-02-01

    Native gellan, the natural form of the polysaccharide excreted by the bacterium Pseudomonas elodea, has a tetrasaccharide repeating unit that contains L-glycerol and acetate ester groups, and forms only weak and elastic gels. Based on X-ray diffraction data from well oriented and polycrystalline fibers of its potassium salt, the crystal structure of native gellan, including ions and water, has been determined and refined to a final R-value of 0.17. The molecule forms of a half-staggered, parallel, double helix of pitch 5.68 nm which is stabilized by hydrogen bonds involving the hydroxymethyl groups in one chain and both carboxylate and glyceryl groups in other. Two molecules are packed in an antiparallel fashion in a trigonal unit cell of side a = 1.65 nm. Although the gross molecular morphology and packing arrangements are isomorphous with those observed in the crystal structure of potassium gellan, which is devoid of any substitutions, native gellan exhibits exceptional changes in its ion binding characteristics with respect to gellan. In particular, the L-glyceryl groups do not allow the gellan-like coordinated interactions of the ions and the carbohydrate groups, within and between double helices, which are necessary for strong gelation. These results at the molecular level explain, for the first time, the differences in the behavior of the polymer with and without substitutions. PMID:1591755

  12. Formulation of an oral dosage form utilizing the properties of cubic liquid crystalline phases of glyceryl monooleate.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Al-Sayed; Khalil, Enam; Ibrahim, Hussain; Freij, Ibtisam

    2002-05-01

    Glyceryl monooleate is a Food and Drug Administration-approved food additive which has the ability to form various liquid crystalline phases in the presence of various amounts of water. The unique properties of the cubic liquid crystalline phase that result upon the presence of excess body fluids at body temperature were utilized to formulate an oral dosage form containing furosemide as the model drug. The aim was to develop a formula, which has both bioadhesive and sustained release properties of the resultant cubic phase, so that increasing gastric residence time to improve bioavailability of the drug and at the same time obtaining a sustained action. The system was found to be affected by the limited solubility of furosemide in both the carrier system and the pH of surrounding medium. As a consequence, the addition of some solubility modifiers was investigated in order to obtain the desired properties of the expected liquid crystalline system. PMID:11976023

  13. DOI/GTN-P climate and active-layer data acquired in the National Petroleum Reserve: Alaska and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 1998-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Urban, Frank E.; Clow, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    This report provides data collected by the climate monitoring array of the U.S. Department of the Interior on Federal lands in Arctic Alaska over the period August 1998 to July 2011; this array is part of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost, (DOI/GTN-P). In addition to presenting data, this report also describes monitoring, data collection, and quality-control methodology. This array of 16 monitoring stations spans lat 68.5°N. to 70.5°N. and long 142.5°W. to 161°W., an area of approximately 150,000 square kilometers. Climate summaries are presented along with quality-controlled data. Data collection is ongoing and includes the following climate- and permafrost-related variables: air temperature, wind speed and direction, ground temperature and soil moisture, snow depth, rainfall, up- and downwelling shortwave radiation, and atmospheric pressure. These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in close collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  14. DOI/GTN-P Climate and active-layer data acquired in the National Petroleum Reserve–Alaska and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, 1998–2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Urban, Frank E.; Clow, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    This report provides data collected by the climate monitoring array of the U.S. Department of the Interior on Federal lands in Arctic Alaska over the period August 1998 to July 2014; this array is part of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (DOI/GTN-P). In addition to presenting data, this report also describes monitoring, data collection, and quality-control methods. The array of 16 monitoring stations spans lat 68.5°N. to 70.5°N. and long 142.5°W. to 161°W., an area of approximately 150,000 square kilometers. Climate summaries are presented along with quality-controlled data. Data collection is ongoing and includes the following climate- and permafrost-related variables: air temperature, wind speed and direction, ground temperature, soil moisture, snow depth, rainfall totals, up- and downwelling shortwave radiation, and atmospheric pressure. These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in close collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  15. DOI/GTN-P climate and active-layer data acquired in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Urban, Frank E.; Clow, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    This report provides data collected by the climate monitoring array of the U.S. Department of the Interior on Federal lands in Arctic Alaska over the period August 1998 to July 2013; this array is part of the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost, (DOI/GTN-P). In addition to presenting data, this report also describes monitoring, data collection, and quality-control methods. This array of 16 monitoring stations spans lat 68.5°N. to 70.5°N. and long 142.5°W. to 161°W., an area of approximately 150,000 square kilometers. Climate summaries are presented along with quality-controlled data. Data collection is ongoing and includes the following climate- and permafrost-related variables: air temperature, wind speed and direction, ground temperature, soil moisture, snow depth, rainfall totals, up- and downwelling shortwave radiation, and atmospheric pressure. These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in close collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  16. Nitroxyl (HNO) reduces endothelial and monocyte activation and promotes M2 macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Karen L; Sampson, Amanda K; Irvine, Jennifer C; Shihata, Waled A; Michell, Danielle L; Lumsden, Natalie G; Lim, Chloe; Huet, Olivier; Drummond, Grant R; Kemp-Harper, Barbara K; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2016-09-01

    Nitroxyl anion (HNO) donors are currently being assessed for their therapeutic utility in several cardiovascular disorders including heart failure. Here, we examine their effect on factors that precede atherosclerosis including endothelial cell and monocyte activation, leucocyte adhesion to the endothelium and macrophage polarization. Similar to the NO donor glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), the HNO donors Angeli's salt (AS) and isopropylamine NONOate (IPA/NO) decreased leucocyte adhesion to activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse isolated aorta. This reduction in adhesion was accompanied by a reduction in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and the cytokines monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) which was inhibitor of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) α (IκBα)- and subsequently NFκB-dependent. Intriguingly, the effects of AS on leucocyte adhesion, like those on vasodilation, were found to not be susceptible to pharmacological tolerance, unlike those observed with GTN. As well, HNO reduces monocyte activation and promotes polarization of M2 macrophages. Taken together, our data demonstrate that HNO donors can reduce factors that are associated with and which precede atherosclerosis and may thus be useful therapeutically. Furthermore, since the effects of the HNO donors were not subject to tolerance, this confers an additional advantage over NO donors. PMID:27231254

  17. Assessment of skin absorption and irritation potential of arachidonic acid and glyceryl arachidonate using in vitro diffusion cell techniques.

    PubMed

    Eppler, A R; Kraeling, M E K; Wickett, R R; Bronaugh, R L

    2007-11-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA), a precursor of pro-inflammatory mediators, and its glycerin ester, glyceryl arachidonate (GA), are reportedly used in cosmetic products. In vitro skin penetration of AA and GA and GA's ester hydrolysis was determined in flow-through diffusion cells. AA penetration with human and rat skin was 19.5% and 52.3% of the applied dose respectively, a substantial amount of which remained in the skin at 24h. Similar penetration results were obtained with GA in human skin. However, GA penetration through cultured skin (EpiDerm) was 51% of the applied dose, almost all of which appeared in the receptor fluid. At least 27.8% of GA penetrating skin was hydrolyzed to AA. In vitro methods were used to assess skin irritation in diffusion cells. Skin irritation of AA, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and Tween 80 was determined by changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin viability (3-(4,5-dimethylthiaxol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, MTT, formation), and cytokine release (IL-1alpha). SLS irritation was much less pronounced in an emulsion versus an aqueous vehicle. No significant irritation was observed in vitro from AA in an emulsion. This work predicts that AA would penetrate human skin in vivo and that it could be formed in skin from topically applied GA. PMID:17602815

  18. Liquid crystalline systems of phytantriol and glyceryl monooleate containing a hydrophilic protein: Characterisation, swelling and release kinetics.

    PubMed

    Rizwan, S B; Hanley, T; Boyd, B J; Rades, T; Hook, S

    2009-11-01

    Swelling and phase behaviour of phytantriol and glyceryl monooleate (GMO) matrices with varying water loadings were investigated. Release of a model protein, FITC-Ova was subsequently examined. Polarised light microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering analysis showed that the addition of FITC-Ova only altered the liquid crystalline structure of phytantriol matrices at low water loadings, and that postrelease study, the phase structure of matrices at both low and high loading reflected that of the binary system. Addition of FITC-Ova to GMO matrices also altered the liquid crystalline structure when compared to the respective binary system at low but not at high loading. All samples analysed after the release study had transformed to the reverse hexagonal phase (H(II)). Swelling studies revealed a faster and more extensive swelling of GMO when compared to phytantriol. Release of FITC-Ova from phytantriol matrices was faster and occurred to a greater extent most likely due to the conversion of GMO matrices into the H(II) phase. No effect on release as a function of initial water content was observed for either lipid. We have confirmed that phytantriol based liquid crystalline matrices can sustain the release of a hydrophilic protein, suggesting its suitability as a potential sustained antigen-delivery system. PMID:19340889

  19. Interspecific Utility of Microsatellites in Fish: A Case Study of (CT)(n) and (GT)(n) Markers in the Shanny Lipophrys pholis (Pisces: Blenniidae) and Their Use in Other Blennioidei.

    PubMed

    Guillemaud; Almada; Serrão Santos R; Cancela

    2000-05-01

    We report the development of new microsatellite markers that can be used for population analyses in the shanny Lipophrys pholis. The procedure involved the construction of a microsatellite-enriched genomic bank. Five (GT)(n) and (CT)(n) microsatellites have been characterized, four of which are polymorphic. The analysis of one population allowed us to verify their usefulness as markers in population studies. Moreover, interspecific amplifications have been performed using primers defined in other species to amplify Lipophrys pholis, or using the primers defined in Lipophrys pholis to amplify other species. We use these results to discuss the hypothesis that microsatellites are highly conserved in fish. PMID:10852803

  20. Glyceryl monooleyl ether-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles as a transdermal delivery system of flurbiprofen: characterization and in vitro transport.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Tomonobu; Murata, Akiko; Miyazaki, Yasunori; Oka, Toshihiko; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Liquid crystalline nanoparticles (LCNs) were prepared using glyceryl monooleyl ether (GME) by the modified film rehydration method. Hydrogenated lecithin (HL), 1,3-butylene glycol (1,3-BG), and Poloxamer 407 were used as additives. The prepared LCN formulations were evaluated based on particle size, small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXS) analysis, (1)H- and (19)F-NMR spectra, and in vitro skin permeation across Yucatan micropig skin. The composition (weight percent) of the LCN formulations were GME-HL-1,3-BG (4 : 1 : 15), 4% GME-based LCN and GME-HL-1,3-BG (8 : 1 : 15), 8% GME-based LCN and their mean particle sizes were 130-175 nm. Flurbiprofen 5 and 10 mg was loaded into 4% GME-based LCN and 8% GME-based LCN systems, respectively. The results of SAXS and NMR suggested that both flurbiprofen-loaded formulations consist of particles with reverse type hexagonal phase (formation of hexosome) and flurbiprofen molecules were localized in the lipid domain through interaction of flurbiprofen with the lipid components. Flurbiprofen transport from the LCN systems across the Yucatan micropig skin was increased compared to flurbiprofen in citric buffer (pH=3.0). The 8% GME-based LCN systems was superior to the 4% GME-based LCN for flurbiprofen transport. Since the internal hexagonal phase in the 8% GME-based LCN systems had a higher degree of order compared to the 4% GME-based LCN in SAXS patterns, the 8% GME-based LCN system had a larger surface area, which might influence flurbiprofen permeation. These results indicated that the GME-based LCN system is effective in improving the skin permeation of flurbiprofen across the skin. PMID:25948327

  1. Eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol suppress LPS-induced iNOS expression by down-regulating NF-kappaB AND AP-1 through inhibition of MAPKS and AKT/IkappaBalpha signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yeh, J L; Hsu, J H; Hong, Y S; Wu, J R; Liang, J C; Wu, B N; Chen, I J; Liou, S F

    2011-01-01

    Eugenol and isoeugenol, two components of clover oil, have been reported to possess several biomedical properties, such as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant effects. This study aims to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of eugenol, isoeugenol and four of their derivatives on expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7), and to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. We found that two derivatives, eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol, had potent inhibitory effects on LPS-induced upregulation of nitrite levels, iNOS protein and iNOS mRNA. In addition, they both suppressed the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) induced by LPS. Moreover, they both attenuated the DNA binding of NF-kB and AP-1, phosphorylation of inhibitory kB-alpha (IkB-alpha), and nuclear translocation of p65 protein induced by LPS. Finally, we demonstrated that glyceryl-isoeugenol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAPK, whereas eugenolol suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these results suggest that that eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol suppress LPS-induced iNOS expression by down-regulating NF-kB and AP-1 through inhibition of MAPKs and Akt/IkB-alpha signaling pathways. Thus, this study implies that eugenolol and glyceryl-isoeugenol may provide therapeutic benefits for inflammatory diseases. PMID:21658309

  2. S-nitrosothiols as vasodilators: implications regarding tolerance to nitric oxide-containing vasodilators.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, P. J.; Drummer, O. H.; Horowitz, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    1. The formation of an S-nitrosothiol compound, S-nitroso-N-acetylcysteine (SNAC) has recently been proposed to mediate the augmentation of the anti-aggregatory and haemodynamic effects of glyceryl trinitrate observed in the presence of N-acetylcysteine. This study investigated the effects on an isolated coronary artery preparation of acute and prolonged exposure to S-nitrosothiol compounds and nitric oxide (NO). 2. Single doses of NO and of the S-nitrosothiol compounds, SNAC and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), induced rapid, but transient, relaxations in U46619-contracted bovine isolated coronary artery rings. Peak relaxation responses to SNAP and NO were attenuated in the presence of N-acetylcysteine, cysteine, ascorbic acid and methylene blue. The duration of the relaxation responses to SNAC was two to three times longer than those to SNAP and NO. In the presence of N-acetylcysteine (but not cysteine, ascorbic acid or methylene blue) the duration of the relaxation responses to SNAP and NO (but not to SNAC) was markedly increased. H.p.l.c. assay confirmed that, in the presence of N-acetylcysteine, SNAP and, to a lesser degree, NO were converted to the relatively more stable and longer acting vasodilator, SNAC. 3. When compared to control rings, coronary artery rings superfused with glyceryl trinitrate were subsequently markedly less responsive to the vasodilator actions of glyceryl trinitrate, whereas responsiveness to SNAC or NO was only marginally reduced. On the other hand, coronary artery rings superfused with SNAC or NO were subsequently less responsive to glyceryl trinitrate, SNAC and NO. Thus prolonged vascular exposure to SNAC or NO induced a form of tolerance different from that induced with glyceryl trinitrate and which is possibly associated with impaired guanylate cyclase activity. 4. Coronary artery rings superfused with NO were markedly less responsive to glyceryl trinitrate and NO, whereas responses to the endothelium-dependent vasodilator

  3. A new class of furoxan derivatives as NO donors: mechanism of action and biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ferioli, R; Folco, G C; Ferretti, C; Gasco, A M; Medana, C; Fruttero, R; Civelli, M; Gasco, A

    1995-01-01

    1. The mechanism of action and biological activity of a series of R-substituted and di-R-substituted phenylfuroxans is reported. 2. Maximal potency as vasodilators on rabbit aortic rings, precontracted with noradrenaline (1 microM), was shown by phenyl-cyano isomers and by the 3,4-dicyanofuroxan, characterized by a potency ratio 3-10 fold higher than glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). This effect was reduced upon coincubation with methylene blue or oxyhaemoglobin (10 microM). 3. The furoxan derivatives showing maximal potency as vasodilators were also able to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation, with IC50 values in the sub-micromolar range. 4. The furoxan derivatives were able to stimulate partially purified, rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase; among the most active compounds, the 3-R-substituted isomers displayed a higher level of stimulatory effect than the 4-R analogues. 5. Solutions (0.1 mM) of all the tested furoxans, prepared using 50 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, (diluting 10 mM DMSO stock solutions) did not release nitric oxide (NO) spontaneously; however in presence of 5 mM L-cysteine, a significant NO-releasing capacity was observed, which correlated significantly with their stimulation of the guanylate cyclase activity. PMID:7773542

  4. Nitric oxide (NO)--biogeneration, regulation, and relevance to human diseases.

    PubMed

    Bian, Ka; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    On October 12, 1998, the Nobel Assembly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology to scientists Robert Furchgott, Louis Ignarro, and Ferid Murad for their discoveries concerning nitric oxide as a signalling molecule in the cardiovascular system. In contrast with the short research history of the enzymatic synthesis of NO, the introduction of nitrate-containing compounds for medicinal purposes marked its 150th anniversary in 1997. Glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin; GTN) is the first compound of this category. Alfred Nobel (the founder of Nobel Prize) himself had suffered from angina pectoris and was prescribed nitroglycerin for his chest pain. Almost a century later, research in the NO field has dramatically extended and the role of NO in physiology and pathology has been extensively studied. The steady-state concentration and the biological effects of NO are critically determined not only by its rate of formation, but also by its rate of decomposition. Biotransformation of NO and its related N-oxides occurs via different metabolic routes within the body and presents another attractive field for our research as well as for the venture of drug discovery. PMID:12456375

  5. Resiniferatoxin and piperine: capsaicin-like stimulators of oxygen uptake in the perfused rat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Eldershaw, T P; Colquhoun, E Q; Bennett, K L; Dora, K A; Clark, M G

    1994-01-01

    The naturally occurring capsaicin-like molecules, resiniferatoxin (RTX, Euphorbia spp.) and piperine (Piper nigrum), each stimulated oxygen uptake (VO2) in association with increased vascular resistance in a concentration-dependent manner when infused into the perfused rat hindlimb. 5 microM glyceryl trinitrate (GTN, a nitrovasodilator) significantly blocked the oxygen and pressure responses to both RTX and piperine, indicating a close relationship between changes in VO2 and the vasoconstriction. Concentrations greater than those required for maximal VO2 resulted in an inhibition of VO2, although perfusion pressure continued to increase. Time course studies showed that both RTX and piperine at high doses resulted in a tri-phasic response. An initial phase of transient VO2 stimulation was followed by a second phase of inhibition. A third phase involving an often larger but transient stimulation of VO2 followed removal of the agents and continued after the pressure returned to basal. The actions of RTX and piperine were similar to those of other active capsaicin-like molecules tested previously in this system, including capsaicinoids (Capsicum spp.), gingerols (Zingiber officinale), and shogoals (Zingiber officinale). RTX was the most potent, and piperine the least potent of this series. Although receptor involvement has yet to be unequivocally established, the data are consistent with the presence of a functional capsaicin-like (vanilloid) receptor in the vasculature of the rat hindlimb that mediates vasoconstriction and oxygen uptake. These findings may have implications for the future development of thermogenic agents. PMID:8035653

  6. A prospective randomized longitudinal study involving 6 months of endurance or resistance exercise. Conduit artery adaptation in humans.

    PubMed

    Spence, Angela L; Carter, Howard H; Naylor, Louise H; Green, Daniel J

    2013-03-01

    Abstract  This randomized trial evaluated the impact of different exercise training modalities on the function and size of conduit arteries in healthy volunteers. Young (27 ± 5 years) healthy male subjects were randomized to undertake 6 months of either endurance training (ET; n = 10) or resistance training (RT; n = 13). High-resolution ultrasound was used to determine brachial, femoral and carotid artery diameter and wall thickness (IMT) and femoral and brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-mediated dilatation. Improvements in peak oxygen uptake occurred with ET (from 3.6 ± 0.7 to 3.8 ± 0.6 l min(-1), P = 0.024) but not RT. Upper body muscular strength increased following RT (from 57.8 ± 17.7 to 69.0 ± 19.5 kg, P < 0.001), but not ET. Both groups exhibited increases in lean body mass (ET, 1.4 ± 1.8 kg and RT, 2.3 ± 1.3 kg, P < 0.05). Resistance training increased brachial artery resting diameter (from 3.8 ± 0.5 to 4.1 ± 0.4 mm, P < 0.05), peak FMD diameter (+0.2 ± 0.2 mm, P < 0.05) and GTN-mediated diameter (+0.3 ± 0.3 mm, P < 0.01), as well as brachial FMD (from 5.1 ± 2.2 to 7.0 ± 3.9%, P < 0.05). No improvements in any brachial parameters were observed following ET. Conversely, ET increased femoral artery resting diameter (from 6.2 ± 0.7 to 6.4 ± 0.6 mm, P < 0.05), peak FMD diameter (+0.4 ± 0.4 mm, P < 0.05) and GTN-induced diameter (+0.3 ± 0.3 mm, P < 0.05), as well as femoral FMD-to-GTN ratio (from 0.6 ± 0.3 to 1.1 ± 0.8, P < 0.05). Resistance training did not induce changes in femoral artery parameters. Carotid artery IMT decreased in response to both forms of training. These findings indicate that 6 months of supervised exercise training induced changes in brachial and femoral artery size and function and decreased carotid artery IMT. These impacts of both RT and ET would be expected to translate to decreased cardiovascular risk. PMID:23247114

  7. Impaired vasodilator response to organic nitrates in isolated basilar arteries

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Dorothee; Kojda, Georg

    2001-01-01

    The differential responsiveness of various sections and regions in the vascular system to the vasodilator activity of organic nitrates is important for the beneficial antiischaemic effects of these drugs. In this study we examined the vasodilator activity of organic nitrates in cerebral arteries, where vasodilation causes substantial nitrate induced headache. Isolated porcine basilar and coronary arteries were subjected to increasing concentrations of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), isosorbide-5-nitrate (ISMN) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) and endothelium-dependent vasodilation was investigated for comparison purpose. The vasodilator potency (halfmaximal effective concentration in −logM) of GTN (4.33±0.1, n=8), ISMN (1.61±0.07, n=7) and PETN (>10 μM, n=7) in basilar arteries was more than 100 fold lower than that of GTN (6.52±0.06, n=12), ISMN (3.66±0.08, n=10) and PETN (6.3±0.13, n=8) observed in coronary arteries. In striking contrast, the vasodilator potency of SNAP (halfmaximal effective concentration in −logM) was almost similar in basilar (7.76±0.05, n=7) and coronary arteries (7.59±0.05, n=9). Likewise, no difference in endothelium dependent relaxation was observed. Denudation of the endothelium resulted in a small increase of the vasodilator potency (halfmaximal effective concentration in −logM) of GTN (4.84±0.09, n=7, P<0.03) in basilar arteries and similar results were obtained in the presence of the NO-synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine (4.59±0.05, n=9, P<0.03). These results suggest that cerebral conductance blood vessels such as porcine basilar arteries seems to have a reduced expression and/or activity of certain cellular enzymatic electron transport systems such as cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are necessary to bioconvert organic nitrates to NO. PMID:11156558

  8. Glyceryl monooleate/poloxamer 407 cubic nanoparticles as oral drug delivery systems: I. In vitro evaluation and enhanced oral bioavailability of the poorly water-soluble drug simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jie; Chen, Jianming; Lu, Yi; Sun, Jing; Hu, Fuqiang; Yin, Zongning; Wu, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Glyceryl monooleate (GMO)/poloxamer 407 cubic nanoparticles were investigated as potential oral drug delivery systems to enhance the bioavailability of the water-insoluble model drug simvastatin. The simvastatin-loaded cubic nanoparticles were prepared through fragmentation of the GMO/poloxamer 407 bulk cubic-phase gel using high-pressure homogenization. The internal structure of the cubic nanoparticles was identified by cryo-transmission electron microscopy. The mean diameter of the cubic nanoparticles varied within the range of 100-150 nm, and both GMO/poloxamer 407 ratio and theoretical drug loading had no significant effect on particle size and distribution. Almost complete entrapment with efficiency over 98% was achieved due to the high affinity of simvastatin to the hydrophobic regions of the cubic phase. Release of simvastatin from the cubic nanoparticles was limited both in 0.1 M hydrochloride solution containing 0.2% sodium lauryl sulfate and fasted-state simulated intestinal fluid with a total release of <3.0% at 10 h. Pharmacokinetic profiles in beagle dogs showed sustained plasma levels of simvastatin for cubic nanoparticles over 12 h. The relative oral bioavailability of simvastatin cubic nanoparticles calculated on the basis of area under the curve was 241% compared to simvastatin crystal powder. The enhancement of simvastatin bioavailability was possibly attributable to facilitated absorption by lipids in the formulation rather than improved release. PMID:19636709

  9. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction after ionized radiation: selective impairment of the nitric oxide component of endothelium-dependent vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Soloviev, Anatoly I; Tishkin, Sergey M; Parshikov, Alexander V; Ivanova, Irina V; Goncharov, Eugene V; Gurney, Alison M

    2003-01-01

    Gamma radiation impairs vascular function, leading to the depression of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Loss of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway has been implicated, but little is known about radiation effects on other endothelial mediators. This study investigated the mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in rabbits subjected to whole-body irradiation from a cobalt60 source. The endothelium-dependent relaxation of rabbit aorta evoked by acetylcholine (ACh) or A23187 was impaired in a dose-dependent manner by irradiation at 2 Gy or above. Inhibition was evident 9 days post-irradiation and persisted over the 30 day experimental period. Endothelium-independent responses to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) were suppressed over a similar dose range at 7–9 days post-irradiation, but recovered fully by 30 days post-irradiation. In healthy vessels, ACh-induced relaxation was inhibited by L-Nω-nitroarginine (L-NA; 3×10−4 M) and charybdotoxin (10−8 M) plus apamin (10−6 M) but resistant to indomethacin, indicating the involvement of NO and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Supporting this, ACh caused smooth muscle hyperpolarization that was reduced by L-NA and charybdotoxin plus apamin. In irradiated vessels, responses to ACh were insensitive to L-NA but abolished by charybdotoxin plus apamin, indicating selective loss of NO-mediated relaxation. In animals treated shortly after irradiation with the antioxidant, α-tocopherol acetate, the NO-dependent relaxation was restored without effect on the EDHF-dependent component. The results imply that radiation selectively impairs the NO pathway as a consequence of oxidative stress, while EDHF is able to maintain endothelium-dependent relaxation at a reduced level. PMID:12642385

  10. Role of aldehyde dehydrogenase in hypoxic vasodilator effects of nitrite in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Sayqa; Borgognone, Alessandra; Lin, Erica Lai-Sze; O'Sullivan, Aine G; Sharma, Vishal; Drury, Nigel E; Menon, Ashvini; Nightingale, Peter; Mascaro, Jorge; Bonser, Robert S; Horowitz, John D; Feelisch, Martin; Frenneaux, Michael P; Madhani, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hypoxic conditions favour the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide (NO) to elicit vasodilatation, but the mechanism(s) responsible for bioconversion remains ill defined. In the present study, we assess the role of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in nitrite bioactivation under normoxia and hypoxia in the rat and human vasculature. Experimental Approach The role of ALDH2 in vascular responses to nitrite was studied using rat thoracic aorta and gluteal subcutaneous fat resistance vessels from patients with heart failure (HF; 16 patients) in vitro and by measurement of changes in forearm blood flow (FBF) during intra-arterial nitrite infusion (21 patients) in vivo. Specifically, we investigated the effects of (i) ALDH2 inhibition by cyanamide or propionaldehyde and the (ii) tolerance-independent inactivation of ALDH2 by glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) on the vasodilator activity of nitrite. In each setting, nitrite effects were measured via evaluation of the concentration–response relationship under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in the absence or presence of ALDH2 inhibitors. Key Results Both in rat aorta and human resistance vessels, dilatation to nitrite was diminished following ALDH2 inhibition, in particular under hypoxia. In humans there was a non-significant trend towards attenuation of nitrite-mediated increases in FBF. Conclusions and Implications In human and rat vascular tissue in vitro, hypoxic nitrite-mediated vasodilatation involves ALDH2. In patients with HF in vivo, the role of this enzyme in nitrite bioactivation is at the most, modest, suggesting the involvement of other more important mechanisms. PMID:25754766

  11. Complete denitration of nitroglycerin by bacteria isolated from a washwater soakaway.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S J; White, G F

    2001-06-01

    Four axenic bacterial species capable of biodegrading nitroglycerin (glycerol trinitrate [GTN]) were isolated from soil samples taken from a washwater soakaway at a disused GTN manufacturing plant. The isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence homology as Pseudomonas putida, an Arthrobacter species, a Klebsiella species, and a Rhodococcus species. Each of the isolates utilized GTN as its sole nitrogen source and removed nitro groups sequentially from GTN to produce glycerol dinitrates and mononitrates (GMN), with the exception of the Arthrobacter strain, which achieved removal of only the first nitro group within the time course of the experiment. The Klebsiella strain exhibited a distinct preference for removal of the central nitro group from GTN, while the other five strains exhibited no such regioselectivity. All strains which removed a second nitro group from glycerol 1,2-dinitrate showed regiospecific removal of the end nitro group, thereby producing glycerol 2-mononitrate. Most significant was the finding that the Rhodococcus species was capable of removing the final nitro group from GMN and thus achieved complete biodegradation of GTN. Such complete denitration of GTN has previously been shown only in mixed bacterial populations and in cultures of Penicillium corylophilum Dierckx supplemented with an additional carbon and nitrogen source. Hence, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a microorganism that can achieve complete denitration of GTN. PMID:11375172

  12. Influence of nitrovasodilators and endothelin-1 on rheology of human blood in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Roland; Mark, Michael; Gaudenz, Roman; Harris, Llinos G; Reinhart, Walter H

    1999-01-01

    The shear stress of flowing blood profoundly influences the release of endothelium-dependent vasodilative and constrictive factors. Conversely, the influence of these mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) or endothelin-1 (ET-1) on blood rheology remains elusive. In the present study the influence of nitrovasodilators and ET-1 on red blood cell (RBC) shape and whole blood viscosity were investigated.Incubation of whole blood with sodium-nitroprusside (SNP, 10−5–10−2 M), glyceryl trinitrate (GTN, 0.0001–0.1 mg mL−1), S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP, 10−6–10−3 M), and the active metabolite of molsidomine (SIN-1, 10−6–10−3 M), but not molsidomine (10−6–10−3 M), resulted in significantly increased amounts of methaemoglobin, indicating a relevant interaction with RBCs. Treatment with SNP at 10−2 M induced a marked echinocytosis (morphological index: 2.23±0.98 vs −0.17±0.10; P<0.001) and increased blood viscosity (haematocrit 45%) at a high shear rate of 94.5 s−1 (6.46±0.60 vs 5.07±0.35 mPa·s; P<0.01) and a low shear rate of 0.1 s−1 (88.6±36.8 vs 42.1±11.7 mPa·s; P<0.01). Echinocytosis was probably due to cyanide accumulation. SIN-1 at 10−3 M slightly decreased high shear viscosity (4.88±0.28 vs 4.95±0.30 mPa·s; P<0.05). SNAP at 10−3 M slightly increased both high (5.14±0.23 vs 5.05±0.24 mPa·s; P<0.01) and low shear (53.9±7.2 vs 51.2±5.9 mPa·s; P<0.05) viscosity. Molsidomine and GTN failed to influence whole blood viscosity. ET-1 (10−9–10−6 M) had no effect on RBC shape and viscosity.We conclude that the most important modulators of vascular tone, NO and ET-1, do not affect RBC shape and blood viscosity, which is important from both a physiological and a pharmacological point of view. PMID:10516657

  13. The Genotype of the Donor for the (GT)n Polymorphism in the Promoter/Enhancer of FOXP3 Is Associated with the Development of Severe Acute GVHD but Does Not Affect the GVL Effect after Myeloablative HLA-Identical Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Víctor; Martínez-Laperche, Carolina; Buces, Elena; Pion, Marjorie; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Martín-Antonio, Beatriz; Guillem, Vicent; Bosch-Vizcaya, Anna; Bento, Leyre; González-Rivera, Milagros; Balsalobre, Pascual; Kwon, Mi; Serrano, David; Gayoso, Jorge; de la Cámara, Rafael; Brunet, Salut; Rojas-Contreras, Rafael; Nieto, José B; Martínez, Carmen; Gónzalez, Marcos; Espigado, Ildefonso; Vallejo, Juan C; Sampol, Antonia; Jiménez-Velasco, Antonio; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Solano, Carlos; Gallardo, David; Díez-Martín, José L; Buño, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    The FOXP3 gene encodes for a protein (Foxp3) involved in the development and functional activity of regulatory T cells (CD4+/CD25+/Foxp3+), which exert regulatory and suppressive roles over the immune system. After allogeneic stem cell transplantation, regulatory T cells are known to mitigate graft versus host disease while probably maintaining a graft versus leukemia effect. Short alleles (≤(GT)15) for the (GT)n polymorphism in the promoter/enhancer of FOXP3 are associated with a higher expression of FOXP3, and hypothetically with an increase of regulatory T cell activity. This polymorphism has been related to the development of auto- or alloimmune conditions including type 1 diabetes or graft rejection in renal transplant recipients. However, its impact in the allo-transplant setting has not been analyzed. In the present study, which includes 252 myeloablative HLA-identical allo-transplants, multivariate analysis revealed a lower incidence of grade III-IV acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients transplanted from donors harboring short alleles (OR = 0.26, CI 0.08-0.82, p = 0.021); without affecting chronic GVHD or graft versus leukemia effect, since cumulative incidence of relapse, event free survival and overall survival rates are similar in both groups of patients. PMID:26473355

  14. The Genotype of the Donor for the (GT)n Polymorphism in the Promoter/Enhancer of FOXP3 Is Associated with the Development of Severe Acute GVHD but Does Not Affect the GVL Effect after Myeloablative HLA-Identical Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Buces, Elena; Pion, Marjorie; Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Martín-Antonio, Beatriz; Guillem, Vicent; Bosch-Vizcaya, Anna; Bento, Leyre; González-Rivera, Milagros; Balsalobre, Pascual; Kwon, Mi; Serrano, David; Gayoso, Jorge; de la Cámara, Rafael; Brunet, Salut; Rojas-Contreras, Rafael; Nieto, José B.; Martínez, Carmen; Gónzalez, Marcos; Espigado, Ildefonso; Vallejo, Juan C.; Sampol, Antonia; Jiménez-Velasco, Antonio; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Solano, Carlos; Gallardo, David; Díez-Martín, José L.; Buño, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    The FOXP3 gene encodes for a protein (Foxp3) involved in the development and functional activity of regulatory T cells (CD4+/CD25+/Foxp3+), which exert regulatory and suppressive roles over the immune system. After allogeneic stem cell transplantation, regulatory T cells are known to mitigate graft versus host disease while probably maintaining a graft versus leukemia effect. Short alleles (≤(GT)15) for the (GT)n polymorphism in the promoter/enhancer of FOXP3 are associated with a higher expression of FOXP3, and hypothetically with an increase of regulatory T cell activity. This polymorphism has been related to the development of auto- or alloimmune conditions including type 1 diabetes or graft rejection in renal transplant recipients. However, its impact in the allo-transplant setting has not been analyzed. In the present study, which includes 252 myeloablative HLA-identical allo-transplants, multivariate analysis revealed a lower incidence of grade III-IV acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients transplanted from donors harboring short alleles (OR = 0.26, CI 0.08–0.82, p = 0.021); without affecting chronic GVHD or graft versus leukemia effect, since cumulative incidence of relapse, event free survival and overall survival rates are similar in both groups of patients. PMID:26473355

  15. Efficacy of nitric oxide, with or without continuing antihypertensive treatment, for management of high blood pressure in acute stroke (ENOS): a partial-factorial randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background High blood pressure is associated with poor outcome after stroke. Whether blood pressure should be lowered early after stroke, and whether to continue or temporarily withdraw existing antihypertensive drugs, is not known. We assessed outcomes after stroke in patients given drugs to lower their blood pressure. Methods In our multicentre, partial-factorial trial, we randomly assigned patients admitted to hospital with an acute ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke and raised systolic blood pressure (systolic 140–220 mm Hg) to 7 days of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (5 mg per day), started within 48 h of stroke onset, or to no glyceryl trinitrate (control group). A subset of patients who were taking antihypertensive drugs before their stroke were also randomly assigned to continue or stop taking these drugs. The primary outcome was function, assessed with the modified Rankin Scale at 90 days by observers masked to treatment assignment. This study is registered, number ISRCTN99414122. Findings Between July 20, 2001, and Oct 14, 2013, we enrolled 4011 patients. Mean blood pressure was 167 (SD 19) mm Hg/90 (13) mm Hg at baseline (median 26 h [16–37] after stroke onset), and was significantly reduced on day 1 in 2000 patients allocated to glyceryl trinitrate compared with 2011 controls (difference −7·0 [95% CI −8·5 to −5·6] mm Hg/–3·5 [–4·4 to −2·6] mm Hg; both p<0·0001), and on day 7 in 1053 patients allocated to continue antihypertensive drugs compared with 1044 patients randomised to stop them (difference −9·5 [95% CI −11·8 to −7·2] mm Hg/–5·0 [–6·4 to −3·7] mm Hg; both p<0·0001). Functional outcome at day 90 did not differ in either treatment comparison—the adjusted common odds ratio (OR) for worse outcome with glyceryl trinitrate versus no glyceryl trinitrate was 1·01 (95% CI 0·91–1·13; p=0·83), and with continue versus stop antihypertensive drugs OR was 1·05 (0·90–1·22; p=0·55). Interpretation

  16. Nitroglycerin dinitrate metabolites do not affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of nitroglycerin in the dog: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Lee, F W; Hu, J; Metzler, C H; Benet, L Z

    1993-04-01

    Studies were carried out in conscious dogs to determine the effects of 1,2-glyceryl dinitrate (1,2-GDN) and 1,3-glyceryl dinitrate (1,3-GDN) on nitroglycerin (GTN) pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In the first set of experiments, steady state plasma levels (Css) of either 1,2-GDN or 1,3-GDN in three dogs were rapidly achieved by giving an iv bolus (77 micrograms/kg), followed immediately by an infusion (50 micrograms/min) of the same GDN. A single iv bolus dose of GTN (0.025 micrograms/kg) was given 50 min after beginning the GDN infusion and compared with plasma concentrations following a similar GTN dose in the absence of dosed GDNs. No significant differences in GTN AUC (p > 0.9) and CL(app) (p > 0.7) were found. In a second set of experiments, an infusion of nitroglycerin was begun in each of 4 dogs and continued for 160 min at an infusion rate of 100 micrograms/min. Steady state concentrations of GTN were achieved within 100 min, at which time the dog received, simultaneously, an iv bolus dose (5.14 mg) of one of the GDNs and an infusion dose (100 micrograms/min) of the same GDN. For both dinitrate metabolites no significant differences (p > 0.5) were found between control and interaction arterial and venous clearances, although venous GTN clearances tended to decrease in the presence of dosed GDNs. Steady state systolic blood pressure during GDN infusions could be further reduced when GTN doses were administered; however, the steady state systolic blood pressure decrease caused by GTN could not be further reduced by the GDN infusions. Results suggest that the GDNs do not inhibit nitroglycerin metabolism or hemodynamics at the dose levels studied here. PMID:8229678

  17. Mechanisms mediating nitroglycerin-induced delayed-onset hyperalgesia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Levine, J D; Green, P G

    2016-03-11

    Nitroglycerin (glycerol trinitrate, GTN) induces headache in migraineurs, an effect that has been used both diagnostically and in the study of the pathophysiology of this neurovascular pain syndrome. An important feature of this headache is a delay from the administration of GTN to headache onset that, because of GTN's very rapid metabolism, cannot be due to its pharmacokinetic profile. It has recently been suggested that activation of perivascular mast cells, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine, may contribute to this delay. We reported that hyperalgesia induced by intradermal GTN has a delay to onset of ∼ 30 min in male and ∼ 45 min in female rats. This hyperalgesia was greater in females, was prevented by pretreatment with the anti-migraine drug, sumatriptan, as well as by chronic pretreatment with the mast cell degranulator, compound 48/80. The acute administration of GTN and compound 48/80 both induced hyperalgesia that was prevented by pretreatment with octoxynol-9, which attenuates endothelial function, suggesting that GTN and mast cell-mediated hyperalgesia are endothelial cell-dependent. Furthermore, A-317491, a P2X3 antagonist, which inhibits endothelial cell-dependent hyperalgesia, also prevents GTN and mast cell-mediated hyperalgesia. We conclude that delayed-onset mechanical hyperalgesia induced by GTN is mediated by activation of mast cells, which in turn release mediators that stimulate endothelial cells to release ATP, to act on P2X3, a ligand-gated ion channel, in perivascular nociceptors. A role of the mast and endothelial cell in GTN-induced hyperalgesia suggests potential novel risk factors and targets for the treatment of migraine. PMID:26779834

  18. Recurrent myocardial infarction secondary to Prinzmetal’s variant angina

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Dale; Dhillon, Priyanka; Niranjan, Selvanayagam

    2015-01-01

    Prinzmetal’s variant angina describes chest pain secondary to reversible coronary artery vasospasm in the context of both diseased and non-diseased coronary arteries. Symptoms typically occur when the patient is at rest and are associated with transient ST-segment elevation. Acute episodes respond to glyceryl trinitrate, but myocardial infarction and other potentially fatal complications can occur, and long-term management can be challenging. Although it is not well understood, the underlying mechanism appears to involve a combination of endothelial damage and vasoactive mediators. In this case, a 35-year-old woman with myocardial infarction secondary to coronary artery vasospasm experienced recurrent chest pain. Coronary angiography revealed severe focal stenosis in the mid left anterior descending artery, which completely resolved after administration of intracoronary glyceryl trinitrate. The patient was discharged on nitrates and calcium channel blockers. The patient re-presented with another myocardial infarction, requiring up-titration of medical therapy. PMID:26034323

  19. 21 CFR 184.1324 - Glyceryl monostearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... glycerolysis of certain fats or oils that are derived from edible sources or by esterification, with glycerin, of stearic acid that is derived from edible sources. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity...

  20. 21 CFR 172.811 - Glyceryl tristearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... glycerol content: Not to exceed 0.5 percent. Unsaponifiable matter: Not to exceed 0.5 percent. Melting point (Class II): 69 °C-73 °C. (c) The additive is used or intended for use as follows when standards...

  1. 21 CFR 172.811 - Glyceryl tristearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... glycerol content: Not to exceed 0.5 percent. Unsaponifiable matter: Not to exceed 0.5 percent. Melting point (Class II): 69 °C-73 °C. (c) The additive is used or intended for use as follows when standards...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1328 - Glyceryl behenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... acid made from glycerin and behenic acid (a saturated C22 fatty acid). The mixture contains... fatty acids. (2) Behenic acid. Between 80 and 90 percent of the total fatty acid content. (3) Acid...

  3. Statistical analysis plan for the 'Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke' (ENOS) trial.

    PubMed

    Bath, Philip M W; Houlton, Aimee; Woodhouse, Lisa; Sprigg, Nikola; Wardlaw, Joanna; Pocock, Stuart

    2014-04-01

    High blood pressure is common during the acute phase of stroke and is associated with a poor outcome. However, the management of high blood pressure remains unclear. The 'Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke' trial tested whether transdermal glyceryl trinitrate, a nitric oxide donor that lowers blood pressure, is safe and effective in improving outcome after acute stroke. Efficacy of Nitric Oxide in Stroke is an international multicenter, prospective, randomized, single-blind, blinded endpoint trial, with funding from the U.K. Medical Research Council. Patients with acute ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage and systolic blood pressure 140-220 mmHg were randomized to glyceryl trinitrate or no glyceryl trinitrate and, where relevant, to continue or stop prestroke antihypertensive therapy. The primary outcome is shift in modified Rankin Scale at three-months. Patients or relatives gave written informed (proxy) consent, and all sites had research ethics approval. Analyses will be done by intention to treat. This paper and attachment describe the trial's statistical analysis plan, developed prior to unblinding of date. The statistical analysis plan contains design and methods for analyses, and unpopulated tables and figures for the two primary publications and some secondary publications. The database will be locked in late February 2014 in preparation for presentation of the results in May 2014. The data from the trial will improve the precision of the estimates of the overall treatment effects (efficacy and safety) of results from completed trials of blood pressure management in acute stroke, and provide the first large-scale randomized evidence on transdermal glyceryl trinitrate, and of continuing (vs. stopping) prestroke antihypertensive medications, in acute stroke. PMID:24588789

  4. Conduit artery structure and function in lowlanders and native highlanders: relationships with oxidative stress and role of sympathoexcitation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nia C S; Bailey, Damian M; Dumanoir, Gregory R; Messinger, Laura; Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D; Donnelly, Joseph; McEneny, Jane; Young, Ian S; Stembridge, Mike; Burgess, Keith R; Basnet, Aparna S; Ainslie, Philip N

    2014-03-01

    Research detailing the normal vascular adaptions to high altitude is minimal and often confounded by pathology (e.g., chronic mountain sickness) and methodological issues. We examined vascular function and structure in: (1) healthy lowlanders during acute hypoxia and prolonged (∼2 weeks) exposure to high altitude, and (2) high-altitude natives at 5050 m (highlanders). In 12 healthy lowlanders (aged 32 ± 7 years) and 12 highlanders (Sherpa; 33 ± 14 years) we assessed brachial endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), endothelium-independent dilatation (via glyceryl trinitrate; GTN), common carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and diameter (ultrasound), and arterial stiffness via pulse wave velocity (PWV; applanation tonometry). Cephalic venous biomarkers of free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation (lipid hydroperoxides, LOOH), nitrite (NO2-) and lipid soluble antioxidants were also obtained at rest. In lowlanders, measurements were performed at sea level (334 m) and between days 3-4 (acute high altitude) and 12-14 (chronic high altitude) following arrival to 5050 m. Highlanders were assessed once at 5050 m. Compared with sea level, acute high altitude reduced lowlanders' FMD (7.9 ± 0.4 vs. 6.8 ± 0.4%; P = 0.004) and GTN-induced dilatation (16.6 ± 0.9 vs. 14.5 ± 0.8%; P = 0.006), and raised central PWV (6.0 ± 0.2 vs. 6.6 ± 0.3 m s(-1); P = 0.001). These changes persisted at days 12-14, and after allometrically scaling FMD to adjust for altered baseline diameter. Compared to lowlanders at sea level and high altitude, highlanders had a lower carotid wall:lumen ratio (∼19%, P ≤ 0.04), attributable to a narrower CIMT and wider lumen. Although both LOOH and NO2- increased with high altitude in lowlanders, only LOOH correlated with the reduction in GTN-induced dilatation evident during acute (n = 11, r = -0.53) and chronic (n = 7, r = -0.69; P ≤ 0.01) exposure to 5050 m. In a follow-up, placebo-controlled experiment (n = 11 healthy lowlanders

  5. The effect of a national quality improvement collaborative on prehospital care for acute myocardial infarction and stroke in England

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown wide variations in prehospital ambulance care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a Quality Improvement Collaborative (QIC) for improving ambulance care for AMI and stroke. Methods We used an interrupted time series design to investigate the effect of a national QIC on change in delivery of care bundles for AMI (aspirin, glyceryl trinitrate [GTN], pain assessment and analgesia) and stroke (face-arm-speech test, blood pressure and blood glucose recording) in all English ambulance services between January 2010 and February 2012. Key strategies for change included local quality improvement (QI) teams in each ambulance service supported by a national coordinating expert group that conducted workshops educating staff in QI methods to improve AMI and stroke care. Expertise and ideas were shared between QI teams who met together at three national workshops, between QI leads through monthly teleconferences, and between the expert group and participants. Feedback was provided to services using annotated control charts. Results We analyzed change over time using logistic regression with three predictor variables: time, gender, and age. There were statistically significant improvements in care bundles in nine (of 12) participating trusts for AMI (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.04, 1.04), nine for stroke (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.05, 1.07), 11 for either AMI or stroke, and seven for both conditions. Overall care bundle performance for AMI increased in England from 43 to 79% and for stroke from 83 to 96%. Successful services all introduced provider prompts and individualized or team feedback. Other determinants of success included engagement with front-line clinicians, feedback using annotated control charts, expert support, and shared learning between participants and organizations. Conclusions This first national prehospital QIC led to significant improvements in ambulance care for AMI and

  6. Vascular natriuretic peptide receptor-linked particulate guanylate cyclases are modulated by nitric oxide–cyclic GMP signalling

    PubMed Central

    Madhani, Melanie; Scotland, Ramona S; MacAllister, Raymond J; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2003-01-01

    The sensitivity of the particulate guanylate cyclase–cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) system to atrial (ANP) and C-type (CNP) natriuretic peptides was investigated in aortae and mesenteric small arteries from wild-type (WT) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knockout (KO) mice. ANP and CNP produced concentration-dependent relaxations of mouse aorta that were significantly attenuated by the natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A/B antagonist HS-142-1 (10−5 M). Both ANP and CNP were more potent in aortae from eNOS KO mice compared to WT. The potency of ANP and CNP in aortae from WT animals was increased in the presence of the NOS inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (3 × 10−4 M) and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolol[4,3,a]quinoxalin-1-one (5 × 10−6 M). In contrast, the potency of ANP and CNP in aortae from eNOS KO animals was reduced following pretreatment of tissues with supramaximal concentrations of the NO-donor, glyceryl trinitrate (3 × 10−5 M, 30 min) or ANP (10−7 M, 30 min). Responses to acetylcholine in aortae from WT mice (dependent on the release of endothelium-derived NO) were significantly reduced following pretreatment of tissues with GTN (3 × 10−5 M, 30 min) and ANP (10−7 M, 30 min). CNP and the NO-donor, spermine-NONOate caused concentration-dependent relaxations of mesenteric small arteries from WT animals that were significantly increased in eNOS KO mice compared to WT. ANP was unable to significantly relax mesenteric arteries from WT or eNOS KO animals. In conclusion, both NPR-A- and NPR-B-linked pGC pathways are modulated by NO–cGMP in murine aorta and mesenteric small arteries and crossdesensitisation occurs between NPR subtypes. The biological activity of endothelium-derived NO is also influenced by the ambient concentration of NO and natriuretic peptides. Such an autoregulatory pathway may represent an important physiological homeostatic mechanism and link the paracrine activity

  7. sGC-cGMP signaling: target for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bian, Ka; Murad, Ferid

    2014-01-01

    The biologic endogenous production of cGMP was reported in the 1960s and followed by the demonstration of guanylyl cyclase activity and the isoforms of soluble and membrane-bound guanylyl cyclases. During the same period, cGMP specific phosphodiesterases also was discovered. Murad's lab established link between the endothelium derived relaxation factor (EDRF) and elevated cGMP concentration in the vascular system. October 12, 1998, the Nobel Assembly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology to scientists Robert Furchgott, Louis Ignarro, and Ferid Murad for their discoveries concerning nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. In contrast with the short research history of the enzymatic synthesis of NO, the introduction of nitrate-containing compounds for medicinal purposes marked its 150th anniversary in 1997. Glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin; GTN) is the first compound of this category. Alfred Nobel (the founder of the Nobel Prize) himself had suffered from angina pectoris and was prescribed nitroglycerin for his chest pain while he refused to take due to the induction of headaches. Almost a century after its first chemical use, research in the nitric oxide and 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) pathway has dramatically expanded and the role of NO/cGMP in physiology and pathology has been extensively studied. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the receptor for NO. The α1β1 heterodimer is the predominant isoform of sGC that is obligatory for catalytic activity. NO binds to the ferrous (Fe(2+)) heme at histidine 105 of the β1 subunit and leads to an increase in sGC activity and cGMP production of at least 200-fold. In this chapter, we reviewed the studies of sGC-cGMP signaling in cell proliferation; introduced our work of targeting sGC-cGMP signaling for cancer therapy; and explored the role of sGC-cGMP signaling in the chromatin-microenvironment. PMID:25015797

  8. [Cardiovascular impact of end-stage renal insufficiency in children undergoing hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Aggoun, Y; Niaudet, P; Laffont, A; Sidi, D; Kachaner, J; Bonnet, D

    2000-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy and arterial dysfunction have been described in end-stage renal disease (ESDR) in adults. The incremental elastic modulus (Einc), is a marker of vascular wall material stiffness and an independant predictor of cardiovascular mortality in adults with ESRD on hemodialysis. The relationship between arterial changes and the heart is unknown in the children with ESRD in the same conditions. Using a high-resolution vascular ultrasound and a computerized system of measurement (Iotec), we assessed noninvasively 10 ESRD patients (mean +/- SD, age, 11.5 +/- 4 years; blood pressure [BP], 120 +/- 10/63 +/- 4 mmHg) and 10 age-, sex-, and BP-matched controls (mean +/- SD, age, 11 +/- 4 years; BP, 114 +/- 8/58 +/- 8 mmHg). The systolic and diastolic diameter of the common carotid artery (CCA), the thickness of the wall (intima-media thickness, IMT), the cross sectional compliance (CSC), the cross sectional distensibility (CSD) and the (Einc) were determined. CSC and CSD were evaluated at the same level of pressure. The CCA pressure waveform was obtained by applanation tonometry to assess the reflected wave by the augmentation index (AI). Further the left ventricular mass index was assessed. The flow mediated dilation (FMD) (endothelium-dependent function) and the vasodilation induced by glyceryl-trinitrate (GTNMD) (GTN, an endothelium-independent dilator) were evaluated at the brachial artery site. Compared to control subjects, ESRD patients have mechanical artery dysfunction with lower CSC and CSD (0.11 +/- 0.04 vs 0.18 +/- 0.05 mm2.mmHg-1; p < 0.01; 0.43 +/- 0.10 vs 0.82 +/- 0.20 mmHg-1.10(-2); p < 0.001) and higher Einc (2.60 +/- 1.00 vs 1.40 +/- 0.30 mmHg.10(3); p < 0.001). Furthermore an earlier return of the reflected pulse wave (AI -0.24 +/- 0.08 vs -0.58 +/- 0.06; p < 0.005) is correlated to LV mass index (r = 0.55, P < 0.01) that is significantly increased (134 +/- 63 vs 69 +/- 25 g/m2; p < 0.005). These patients have an impaired FMD (4 +/- 2 vs 7

  9. Optimal value of filling pressure in the right side of the heart in acute right ventricular infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, S; Kastrati, A; Goda, A; Popa, Y

    1990-01-01

    Haemodynamic monitoring was performed within the first 48 hours after the onset of symptoms in basal conditions, during volume loading, and during infusion of glyceryl trinitrate in 41 patients who fulfilled the diagnostic electrocardiographic and haemodynamic criteria of right ventricular infarction. In most patients an increase of mean right atrial pressure up to 10-14 mm Hg was followed by an increase in right ventricular stroke work index. But raising the mean right atrial pressure above 14 mm Hg was almost always accompanied by a reduction in right ventricular stroke work index. When the mean right atrial pressure was reduced by intravenous glyceryl trinitrate to less than 14 mm Hg the right ventricular stroke index increased. The same response was seen with cardiac and stroke index. The mean (SD) values of optimal right atrial and pulmonary capillary pressures were 11.7 (2.1) and 16.5 (2.7) mm Hg respectively. Thus cardiac and stroke index increased and the right ventricle reached its maximum stroke work index when the filling pressure was 10-14 mm Hg. These values may be regarded as the optimal level of right ventricular filling pressure in patients with right ventricular infarction. PMID:2107863

  10. Effects of buccal nitrate on left ventricular haemodynamics and volume at rest and during exercise-induced angina.

    PubMed Central

    Silke, B; Verma, S P; Frais, M A; Hafizullah, M; Taylor, S H

    1985-01-01

    A novel approach has been employed to characterize the effects of a cardioactive drug on left ventricular haemodynamics and volume by simultaneously determining cardiac stroke volume (thermodilution) and left ventricular ejection fraction (nuclear probe). The effects of glyceryl trinitrate were evaluated in 12 patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease at rest and 3, 7, 15 and 30 min following 10 mg buccal nitroglycerin (Suscard) administration. The impact of the drug on left ventricular haemodynamics and volume during exercise-induced angina was determined by repeating exercise 30 min following drug administration, at the workload that reliably induced angina during control exercise. At rest buccal nitroglycerin reduced systemic arterial pressure, cardiac and stroke volume indices, and increased heart rate. The left ventricular ejection fraction (E.F.) increased; its filling pressure together with end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were significantly reduced. Compared with control supine-bicycle exercise, the drug reduced mean systemic arterial pressure and left ventricular filling pressure without change in cardiac and stroke volume indices. There was a smaller increase in left ventricular volume during exercise, and the fall in E.F. was attenuated. These data demonstrated differential actions of glyceryl trinitrate on left ventricular function related to the physiological state in obstructive coronary artery disease. These techniques appear to hold promise in the evaluation of the effects of other therapies on left ventricular volume in coronary artery disease. PMID:3935147

  11. Dissimilarities between methylene blue and cyanide on relaxation and cyclic GMP formation in endothelium-intact intrapulmonary artery caused by nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators and acetylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to ascertain whether cyanide shares the properties of methylene blue as a selective inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle relaxation elicited by agents that stimulate the formation of cyclic GMP. Experiments were performed with endothelium-intact rings prepared from bovine intrapulmonary artery. Methylene blue, a good inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase, antagonized both arterial relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation in response to sodium nitroprusside, glyceryl trinitrate, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine and acetylcholine. In contrast, cyanide inhibited only the responses to sodium nitroprusside. Increasing concentrations of methylene blue depressed resting arterial levels of cyclic GMP and caused slowly developing but marked contractions whereas cyanide was without effect. Contractile responses to phenylephrine, potassium and U46619 were potentiated by methylene blue but not by cyanide. Preincubation of dilute solutions of cyanide containing sodium nitroprusside in oxygenated Krebs' buffer at 37 degrees C for 15 min before addition to bath chambers depressed relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation caused by sodium nitroprusside markedly. Similar treatment of glyceryl trinitrate, however, failed to alter its effects in arterial rings. A chemical inactivation of sodium nitroprusside by cyanide appears to account for the specific inhibitory action of cyanide on arterial responses to sodium nitroprusside. This study indicates clearly that cyanide does not share the properties of methylene blue as an inhibitor of arterial relaxation elicited by vasodilators that stimulate cyclic GMP formation.

  12. Slow release nifedipine plus atenolol in chronic stable angina pectoris.

    PubMed Central

    Challenor, V F; Waller, D G; Renwick, A G; George, C F

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of adding slow release nifedipine in doses of 20 mg and 40 mg twice daily to atenolol therapy (50 mg twice daily) were assessed in 18 patients with chronic stable angina. 2. The addition of the lower dose of nifedipine to atenolol did not significantly alter the weekly consumption of glyceryl trinitrate or the mean number of anginal attacks as assessed by diary cards. However, 2 h after dosing there was a significant prolongation during stress testing in the time to onset of both 1 mm ST depression on the ECG (by 28%) and to angina (by 37%) compared with atenolol alone, but no benefit was apparent by 12 h after dosing. 3. At a dose of 40 mg twice daily, nifedipine significantly reduced glyceryl trinitrate consumption by 25% and the number of anginal attacks by 36%. The times to onset of ST depression and angina were increased by 37% and 55% respectively at 2 h and by 24% and 26% respectively 12 h after dosing. 4. Analysis of the frequency distribution of anginal attacks showed decreasing efficacy with time after administration of nifedipine. The overall results also suggest a relationship between efficacy and the plasma nifedipine concentration, with a mean 20% improvement in time to development of angina occurring at a nifedipine plasma concentration of approximately 30-40 ng ml-1. 5. In conclusion, the reduction of effort-related angina by nifedipine is related to its plasma concentration and the effective duration of action of the 20 mg slow release formulation is less than 12 h. PMID:2511911

  13. Complex stenosis morphology and vasomotor responses to inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tousoulis, D; Tentolouris, C; Crake, T; Goumas, G; Stefanadis, C; Toutouzas, P; Davies, G

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the relation between coronary vasomotor effects of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (LNMMA) administration and coronary stenosis morphology, length, and severity in patients with stable angina.
DESIGN—In 28 patients (24 male, four female) with coronary artery disease and chronic stable angina, intracoronary normal saline and 4 µmol/min LNMMA were infused for four minutes each, followed by an intracoronary bolus of 250 µg glyceryl trinitrate. Coronary stenoses were classified as concentric (smooth), eccentric (smooth), or complicated (irregular). The diameters of these stenoses and their adjacent reference proximal segments were measured by quantitative angiography.
RESULTS—During LNMMA infusion a significantly larger proportion of complicated stenoses than concentric and eccentric stenoses constricted by ⩾ 5% (p < 0.01) and the magnitude of vasoconstriction was greater in complicated than in concentric and eccentric stenoses (p < 0.05). For complicated stenoses the magnitude of constriction (in mm) with reference to normal saline was greater than that of the concentric and eccentric stenoses (p < 0.05), whereas concentric and eccentric stenoses constricted similarly. Irrespective of the type of morphology, there was a correlation (p < 0.05) between both the severity and the length of stenoses and the magnitude of vasoconstriction to LNMMA. A similar proportion of concentric, eccentric, and complicated stenoses showed ⩾ 5% increase in diameter with glyceryl trinitrate, and the magnitude of the response was similar in the three groups.
CONCLUSIONS—In patients with coronary artery disease, the response to LNMMA is greater when stenosis morphology is complex, indicating greater nitric oxide activity. This provides further evidence that plaques with complex morphology are in an active state.


Keywords: endothelium; nitric oxide; coronary artery disease; stenosis morphology PMID:11040015

  14. Endothelial function and chronic exposure to air pollution in normal male subjects.

    PubMed

    Briet, Marie; Collin, Cédric; Laurent, Stéphane; Tan, Alice; Azizi, Michel; Agharazii, Mohsen; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2007-11-01

    Exposure to urban air pollution, ultrafine particles or gases, is associated with acute cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We investigated the effect of ambient air pollution on endothelial function in 40 healthy white male nonsmokers spontaneously breathing ambient air in Paris, France. Air pollutant levels (nitrogen, sulfur and carbon oxides, and particulate matter) were averaged during the 5 days preceding arterial measurements. Brachial artery endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation and reactive hyperemia induced by hand ischemia and endothelium-independent glyceryl trinitrate dilatation were measured using a radiofrequency-based echo-tracking device at 2-week intervals. Flow-mediated dilatation was independently and negatively correlated with the average levels of sulfur dioxide (P<0.001) and nitrogen monoxide (P<0.01). Sulfur dioxide levels explained 19% of the variance of flow-mediated dilatation. An increase in gaseous pollutants, 2 weeks apart, was significantly associated with a decreased in flow-mediated dilatation. No association was found between air pollutants and glyceryl trinitrate-induced vasodilatation. Reactive hyperemia was significantly and positively correlated with particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters <10 microm and <2.5 microm (P<0.0001 and P<0.001, respectively) and nitrogen dioxide (P<0.01). An increase in particulate matter, 2 weeks apart, was significantly correlated with an increase in reactive hyperemia. Endothelial function was impaired by ordinary levels of pollution in healthy young males, in an urban area, and may be reduced by 50% between the least and the most polluted day. Gaseous pollutants affect large artery endothelial function, whereas particulate matter exaggerates the dilatory response of small arteries to ischemia. PMID:17875820

  15. Dobutamine echocardiography and thallium-201 imaging predict functional improvement after revascularisation in severe ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Senior, R.; Glenville, B.; Basu, S.; Sridhara, B. S.; Anagnostou, E.; Stanbridge, R.; Edmondson, S. J.; Handler, C. E.; Raftery, E. B.; Lahiri, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate the concordance between thallium-201 uptake and echocardiographic wall thickening, which are both indicators of potentially reversible myocardial dysfunction, in patients with chronic ischaemic left ventricular failure and to assess their relative contribution to predicting improvement in regional function after revascularisation in a subgroup. PATIENTS AND METHODS--45 patients with chronic ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction (mean (SD) ejection fraction 25 (8)%) underwent echocardiography before and after dobutamine infusion (10 micrograms/kg/min). Of these, 22 patients underwent rest echocardiography at a mean (SD) of 9 (1) weeks after revascularisation. 201Tl imaging was performed during dobutamine echocardiography and at rest, 1, and 4 h after treatment with sublingual glyceryl trinitrate on two separate days. Potentially reversible dysfunction was thought to be present when a myocardial segment contained a Tl score of > or = 3 (ascending score 1-4), or showed improved wall thickening of a dysynergic segment during dobutamine stimulation. RESULTS--Of the 201Tl protocols, the redistribution scan 1 h after treatment with glyceryl trinitrate best demonstrated myocardial viability. Concordance between 201Tl and dobutamine induced wall thickening was 82% (kappa = 0.59) for detecting potentially reversible myocardial dysfunction before revascularisation (n = 45). Regional function improved in 18 of 22 patients after revascularisation. There were 168 dysynergic segments before intervention. The sensitivity of echocardiography and 201Tl imaging for detecting "recoverable" or viable segments after revascularisation was 87% and 92% respectively and specificity was 82% and 78% respectively (P = NS). CONCLUSIONS--Dobutamine echocardiography and 201Tl imaging may be used to predict mechanical improvement in dysynergic segments after revascularisation in patients with chronic ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction. Images PMID:7488446

  16. Acute and chronic arterial and venous effects of captopril in congestive cardiac failure.

    PubMed Central

    Capewell, S.; Taverner, D.; Hannan, W. J.; Muir, A. L.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether captopril alters peripheral venous tone in patients with congestive cardiac failure. DESIGN--Open study of patients at start of captopril treatment and three months later. SETTING--A hospital gamma camera laboratory. PATIENTS--16 Men with congestive cardiac failure in New York Heart Association class II or III, aged 57-73. INTERVENTIONS--Patients were initially given 500 micrograms sublingual glyceryl trinitrate followed by 25 mg oral captopril. The study was then repeated after three months' captopril treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Previously validated non-invasive radionuclide techniques were used to measure changes in central haemodynamic variables and peripheral venous volumes in the calf. RESULTS--After 25 mg captopril there were falls in blood pressure and relative systemic vascular resistance and increases in cardiac index and left ventricular ejection fraction. This was accompanied by a 16% increase in peripheral venous volume (95% confidence interval 13.4% to 18.4%, p less than 0.01), which compared with an 11% increase after 500 micrograms glyceryl trinitrate (10% to 12%, p less than 0.01). Eleven patients were restudied after three months' continuous treatment with captopril. The resting venous volume was higher than it had been initially, by about 10%, and increased by a further 8.4% after 25 mg captopril (5.4% to 11.4%, p less than 0.05). CONCLUSIONS--Captopril is an important venodilator. Venous and arterial dilatation are produced short term and during long term treatment. PMID:2508945

  17. Assessment of left ventricular function in coronary artery disease with the nuclear probe during intervention studies.

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, A; Bowles, M J; Jones, R I; Crawley, J C; Raftery, E B

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear probe was used for measuring left ventricular function in 11 normal subjects and the results compared with those using a digital gammacamera. The probe was then used to measure left ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease during dynamic exercise and stress atrial pacing. The ability of the probe to detect changes induced by glyceryl trinitrate was also evaluated in separate parallel studies. In the 11 normal subjects there was a good correlation between the left ventricular ejection fraction measured by the gammacamera and the nuclear probe both at rest and during exercise. Exercise increased this value by at least 5% in all normal subjects during measurements with both the gammacamera and the nuclear probe. The mean (SD) difference was -0.3% (2.60) at rest and 2.3% (5.02) at peak exercise. Both exercise and pacing produced angina in the patient group and the mean (SEM) value fell from 52% (3.5) to 28% (2.6) and from 46% (5.1) to 34% (3.2) respectively. Glyceryl trinitrate prolonged the exercise and pacing times, and the corresponding falls in ejection fraction were significantly reduced. The non-imaging nuclear probe is a cheap and portable instrument capable of assessing left ventricular function in patients with cardiac disease. It is designed for high count rate acquisition over a short period of time and can thus provide both beat to beat and summated left ventricular time activity curves suitable for quantitative analysis. It therefore has important advantages in the clinical setting and during controlled interventions compared with the gammacameras. PMID:6433946

  18. In-vivo evaluation of clindamycin release from glyceryl monooleate-alginate microspheres by NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amir Ibrahim; Ahmed, Osama A A; Amin, Suzan; Elkadi, Omar Anwar; Kassem, Mohamed A

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to use near-infrared (NIR) transmission spectroscopic technique to determine clindamycin plasma concentration after oral administration of clindamycin loaded GMO-alginate microspheres using rabbits as animal models. Lyophilized clindamycin-plasma standard samples at a concentration range of 0.001-10 μg/ml were prepared and analyzed by NIR and HPLC as a reference method. NIR calibration model was developed with partial least square (PLS) regression analysis. Then, a single dose in-vivo evaluation was carried out and clindamycin-plasma concentration was estimated by NIR. Over 24 h time period, the pharmacokinetic parameters of clindamycin were calculated for the clindamycin loaded GMO-alginate microspheres (F3) and alginate microspheres (F2), and compared with the plain drug (F1). PLS calibration model with 7-principal components (PC), and 8000-9200 cm(-1) spectral range shows a good correlation between HPLC and NIR values with root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), and calibration coefficient (R(2)) values of 0.245, 1.164, and 0.9753, respectively, which suggests that NIR transmission technique can be used for drug-plasma analysis without any extraction procedure. F3 microspheres exhibited controlled and prolonged absorption Tmax of 4.0 vs. 1.0 and 0.5 h; Cmax of 2.37±0.3 vs. 3.81±0.8 and 5.43±0.7 μg/ml for F2 and F1, respectively. These results suggest that the combination of GMO and alginate (1:4 w/w) could be successfully employed for once daily clindamycin microspheres formulation which confirmed by low Cmax and high Tmax values. PMID:26276253

  19. Surface components of chylomicrons from rats fed glyceryl or alkyl esters of fatty acids: minor components.

    PubMed

    Yang, L Y; Kuksis, A; Myher, J J; Pang, H

    1992-08-01

    The lipid class, fatty acid and molecular species composition of the minor polar surface components of rat lymph chylomicrons were determined during absorption of menhaden oil and corn oil or of the corresponding fatty acid ethyl esters. In addition to the previously reported minor polar lipids (sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine), we identified phosphatidylglycerol, dimethylphosphatidylethanolamine, ceramide and cholesteryl sulfate in the chylomicrons from both oil and ester feeding. The dietary fatty acids were found to be incorporated to a variable extent into the different phospholipid classes, the proportions of which remained the same during both types of feeding. No evidence was obtained for the presence of the minor glycerophospholipids characteristic of the lysosomal membranes (e.g., bis-phosphatidic, lysobisphosphatidic and semilysobis-phosphatidic acids), although special efforts were made to identify them. These results indicate that the chylomicrons arising from the monoacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid pathways of triacylglycerol biosynthesis become enveloped in closely similar monolayers of phospholipids. Hence, all triacylglycerols may be secreted from the villus cells via a common mechanism as suggested by the previously demonstrated convergence (at the 2-monoacylglycerol stage) of the monoacylglycerol and the phosphatidic acid pathways of mucosal triacylglycerol formation [Yang, Y.L., and Kuksis, A. (1991) J. Lipid Res. 32, 1173-1186]. PMID:1406072

  20. Treatment of Xerosis with a Topical Formulation Containing Glyceryl Glucoside, Natural Moisturizing Factors, and Ceramide

    PubMed Central

    Kausch, Martina; Rippke, Frank; Schoelermann, Andrea M.; Filbry, Alexander W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of Light Formulation, an oil-in-water emulsion, and Rich Formulation, a water-in-oil emulsion, for the treatment of xerosis. Design: Two double-blind, vehicle-controlled trials (both formulations); a double-blind, randomized regression study (Rich Formulation); and a single-blind tolerability study (Light Formulation). The two formulations were applied twice daily for two weeks, for five days in the regression study, and twice daily for two weeks in the tolerability study. Setting: Studies were conducted during winter in Hamburg, Germany. Participants: A total of 169 subjects were enrolled and 154 completed the studies. The majority were between 50 and 80 years of age, women, all with very dry skin. One withdrew because of an incompatibility reaction that reoccurred with the subject's own body lotion after sun exposure. Measurements: Skin hydration and skin barrier function with both formulations over two weeks, long-term moisturization effect after discontinuation of Rich Formulation, and symptom improvement and skin tolerability with Light Formulation. Results: Vehicle-controlled studies of Light and Rich Formulations demonstrated significantly improved hydration at Weeks 1 and 2 versus the untreated site and vehicles, and significantly reduced transepidermal water loss versus untreated site and basic vehicle. Both products significantly decreased visible dryness and tactile roughness. In the regression study, Rich Formulation maintained significant moisturization six days after treatment discontinuation. Light Formulation reduced symptoms of itching, burning, tightness, tingling, and feeling of dryness. Conclusion: These formulations represent a new approach for the treatment of xerosis by addressing multiple key deficiencies in skin hydration. PMID:22916312

  1. Effect of drug solubility and different excipients on floating behaviour and release from glyceryl monooleate matrices.

    PubMed

    Kumar M, Kiran; Shah, Manish H; Ketkar, Anant; Mahadik, K R; Paradkar, Anant

    2004-03-19

    Glycerol monooleate (GMO) matrix was found to be a gastro-retentive carrier system suitable for both polar and as well as non-polar drugs. Chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM) and diazepam (DZP) were used as model drugs. Effect of PEG 4000, PEG 10000, and stearic acid on floatability and release profile was studied. Water uptake increased with increase in the loading of polar drug (CPM) and decreased with non-polar drug (DZP). Similar effect was found to occur in case of drug release. PEGs increased the release up to certain concentration and decreased thereafter. Drug release decreased linearly with concentration of stearic acid. The type and extent of mesophases formed were significantly affected by the nature of drug, excipients and their concentration. Thus the selection of suitable excipients depending on polarity of drug, could help to modulate the floatability and release profile from GMO matrices. PMID:15019078

  2. Glycerophosphocholine Metabolism in Higher Plant Cells. Evidence of a New Glyceryl-Phosphodiester Phosphodiesterase

    PubMed Central

    van der Rest, Benoît; Boisson, Anne-Marie; Gout, Elisabeth; Bligny, Richard; Douce, Roland

    2002-01-01

    Glycerophosphocholine (GroPCho) is a diester that accumulates in different physiological processes leading to phospholipid remodeling. However, very little is known about its metabolism in higher plant cells. 31P-Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical analyses performed on carrot (Daucus carota) cells fed with GroPCho revealed the existence of an extracellular GroPCho phosphodiesterase. This enzymatic activity splits GroPCho into sn-glycerol-3-phosphate and free choline. In vivo, sn-glycerol-3-phosphate is further hydrolyzed into glycerol and inorganic phosphate by acid phosphatase. We visualized the incorporation and the compartmentation of choline and observed that the major choline pool was phosphorylated and accumulated in the cytosol, whereas a minor fraction was incorporated in the vacuole as free choline. Isolation of plasma membranes, culture medium, and cell wall proteins enabled us to localize this phosphodiesterase activity on the cell wall. We also report the existence of an intracellular glycerophosphodiesterase. This second activity is localized in the vacuole and hydrolyzes GroPCho in a similar fashion to the cell wall phosphodiesterase. Both extra- and intracellular phosphodiesterases are widespread among different plant species and are often enhanced during phosphate deprivation. Finally, competition experiments on the extracellular phosphodiesterase suggested a specificity for glycerophosphodiesters (apparent Km of 50 μm), which distinguishes it from other phosphodiesterases previously described in the literature. PMID:12226504

  3. 21 CFR 172.852 - Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... esters of fatty acids (the lactic acid esters of mono- and diglycerides) may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) They are manufactured from glycerin, lactic acid, and fatty acids conforming with § 172.860 and/or oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty...

  4. 21 CFR 172.852 - Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... esters of fatty acids (the lactic acid esters of mono- and diglycerides) may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) They are manufactured from glycerin, lactic acid, and fatty acids conforming with § 172.860 and/or oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty...

  5. 21 CFR 172.852 - Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... esters of fatty acids (the lactic acid esters of mono- and diglycerides) may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) They are manufactured from glycerin, lactic acid, and fatty acids conforming with § 172.860 and/or oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty...

  6. 21 CFR 172.852 - Glyceryl-lacto esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... esters of fatty acids (the lactic acid esters of mono- and diglycerides) may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) They are manufactured from glycerin, lactic acid, and fatty acids conforming with § 172.860 and/or oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty...

  7. [Quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of pentaerythrityl tetranitrate metabolites pentaerythrityl trinitrate, pentaerythrityl dinitrate and pentaerythrityl in human plasma].

    PubMed

    Schütz, A; Kötting, J; Epple, F; Ziegler, R; Maier-Lenz, H; Stalleicken, D

    1999-11-01

    Assay methods based on gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) may be used to measure PE1N (pentaerithrityl mononitrate, CAS 1607-00-7), PE2N (pentaerithrityl dinitrate, CAS 1607-01-8) and intermediate pentaerithrityltrinitrate (PE3N, CAS 1607-17-6) in human plasma. Based on this method a simplified method to quantify the metabolites of PETN (pentaerithrityl tetranitrate, CAS 78-11-5, Pentalong) is described. In the present study a consistent method to extract the metabolites of human plasma and following derivatisation is described. Since PE1N can be quantified up to 150 ng/ml, PE2N and PE3N up to 30 ng/ml in human plasma, a dilution of the plasma samples can be avoided. The mean recovery rate is not so high as in other described methods, and inaccuracy is about 10%. Therefore a calibration range between 0.2-30 ng/ml of PE2N and 1-150 ng/ml of PE1N has to be considered. The described method offers an alternative and applicable option to quantify the PETN-metabolites and elucidate their part as NO-donors. PMID:10604040

  8. Brain BDNF levels are dependent on cerebrovascular endothelium-derived nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Banoujaafar, Hayat; Monnier, Alice; Pernet, Nicolas; Quirié, Aurore; Garnier, Philippe; Prigent-Tessier, Anne; Marie, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Scientific evidence continues to demonstrate a link between endothelial function and cognition. Besides, several studies have identified a complex interplay between nitric oxide (NO) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin largely involved in cognition. Therefore, this study investigated the link between cerebral endothelium-derived NO and BDNF signaling. For this purpose, levels of BDNF and the phosphorylated form of endothelial NO synthase at serine 1177 (p-eNOS) were simultaneously measured in the cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to either bilateral common carotid occlusion (n = 6), physical exercise (n = 6) or a combination of both (n = 6) as experimental approaches to modulate flow-induced NO production by the cerebrovasculature. Tropomyosin-related kinase type B (TrkB) receptors and its phosphorylated form at tyrosine 816 (p-TrkB) were also measured. Moreover, we investigated BDNF synthesis in brain slices exposed to the NO donor glyceryl trinitrate. Our results showed increased p-eNOS and BDNF levels after exercise and decreased levels after vascular occlusion as compared to corresponding controls, with a positive correlation between changes in p-eNOS and BDNF (r = 0.679). Exercise after vascular occlusion did not change levels of these proteins. Gyceryl trinitrate increased proBDNF and BDNF levels in brain slices, thus suggesting a possible causal relationship between NO and BDNF. Moreover, vascular occlusion, like exercise, resulted in increased TrkB and p-TrkB levels, whereas no change was observed with the combination of both. These results suggest that brain BDNF signaling may be dependent on cerebral endothelium-derived NO production. PMID:27306299

  9. Temperature data acquired from the DOI/GTN-P Deep Borehole Array on the Arctic Slope of Alaska, 1973-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    System (GTOS). The data will also be useful for refining our basic understanding of the physical conditions in permafrost in Arctic Alaska, as well as providing important information for validating predictive models used for climate impact assessments. The processed data are available from the Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (ACADIS) repository at doi:10.5065/D6N014HK.

  10. Effect of ethylcellulose and propylene glycol on the controlled-release performance of glyceryl monooleate-mertronidazole periodontal gel.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Al-Sayed; Hamudi, Firas Falih; Khalil, Enam Ayoub

    2015-03-01

    Controlled-release metronidazole, mucoadhesive gel proposed as a drug-delivery system for periodontal application was developed and characterized. The system was based on a mixture of glycerylmonooleate (GMO) and ethylcellulose (EC). The mechanism of release depends: firstly, on the ability of GMO to form a viscous liquid crystalline mesophases and secondly on the solubilized EC to form a hydrophobic network when the mixture comes into contact with water resulting in sustaining the release of the drug. Ethylcellulose dissolved in GMO had a profound influence on the rate of drug release, reduced the initial drug release and prolonged the sustained release of metronidazole. Propylene glycol (PG) was added to increase the solubility of the drug and water was added with PG to control the viscosity. A controlled release formulation containing w/w, 20% metronidazole, 10% PG, 5% water and 65% GMO that contains 7% EC was found to be mucoadhesive, easily injectable at room temperature, and to follow Fickian diffusion release mechanism. When the drug loading was increased the drug release was accelerated, and the mechanism followed anomalous controlled-release mechanism. Stability studies indicated that the formulation should be stored at 4 °C in a dark place. PMID:24262092

  11. A comparison of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor-NO donors (CINOD), NMI-1182 and AZD3582, using in vitro biochemical and pharmacological methods.

    PubMed

    Young, Delano V; Cochran, Edward D; Dhawan, Vijay; Earl, Richard A; Ellis, James L; Garvey, David S; Janero, David R; Khanapure, Subhash P; Letts, L Gordon; Melim, Terry L; Murty, Madhavi G; Shumway, Matthew J; Wey, Shiow-Jyi; Zemtseva, Irina S; Selig, William M

    2005-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX, EC 1.14.99.1) inhibitor-nitric oxide (NO) donor (CINOD) hybrid compounds represent an attractive alternative to NSAID and coxib therapy. This report compares two CINODs, NMI-1182 (naproxen-glyceryl dinitrate) and AZD3582 (naproxen-n-butyl nitrate), for their ability to inhibit COX-1 and -2, deliver bioavailable nitric oxide, and release naproxen, using in vitro biochemical and pharmacological methods. In human whole blood, both CINODs showed inhibition, comparable to naproxen, of both COX isozymes and slowly released naproxen. Both CINODs donated bioavailable NO, as detected by cGMP induction in the pig kidney transformed cell line, LLC-PK1, but NMI-1182 was more potent by 30-100 times than AZD3582, GTN, GDN, and ISDN and considerably faster in inducing cGMP synthesis than AZD3582. The nitrate groups of GTN, NMI-1182, and AZD3582 appeared to be bioactivated via a common pathway, since each compound desensitized LLC-PK1 cells to subsequent challenge with the other compounds. Similar cGMP induction also occurred in normal, untransformed cells (human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells and hepatocytes from man, rat, and monkey); again, NMI-1182 was superior to AZD3582. NMI-1182 was also the more metabolically labile compound, releasing more absolute nitrate and nitrite (total NO(x)) in human stomach (in which NO is salutary) and liver S9 homogenates. Naproxen was also more rapidly freed from NMI-1182 than AZD3582 in human stomach, although liver S9 hydrolyzed both CINODs with similar rates. These in vitro tests revealed that NMI-1182 may be a better CINOD than AZD3582 because of its superior NO donating and naproxen liberating properties. PMID:16168964

  12. Mechanism of shock associated with right ventricular infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Creamer, J E; Edwards, J D; Nightingale, P

    1991-01-01

    Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the shock sometimes associated with right ventricular infarction, but only small numbers of patients with clinical shock have been studied. The haemodynamic profiles of seven patients with clinical cardiogenic shock after right ventricular myocardial infarction were studied prospectively. They were selected because all had a stable cardiac rhythm and none had absolute hypovolaemia during the study period. In all of them the mean right atrial pressure exceeded the pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. After treatment with varying combinations of dopamine, dobutamine, and glyceryl trinitrate (titrated to achieve the optimum haemodynamic response) the mean systemic arterial pressure increased, as did the cardiac index. There was an associated increase in the left ventricular stroke work index but the right ventricular stroke work index was unchanged. There was no significant change in heart rate, mean right atrial pressure, or pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. This suggests that the probable mechanism of the shock associated with right ventricular infarction is concomitant severe left ventricular dysfunction. PMID:1867948

  13. Collaboration: a solution to the challenge of conducting nursing research in cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Robyn; Sadler, Leonie; Kirkness, Ann; Belshaw, Julie; Roach, Kellie; Warrington, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Clinical nurse leaders such as clinical nurse consultants are required to conduct research and incorporate outcomes of this research into their every day practice. However, undertaking research presents issues for cardiac rehabilitation clinical nurse consultants because they may have competing demands, difficulty with finding replacements and may be relatively isolated from other researchers. The solution to this situation is the formation of a collaborative research team with other cardiac rehabilitation clinical nurse consultants, with the inclusion of an experienced university academic as a mentor for the cardiac rehabilitation clinical nurse consultants working in an Area Health Service encompassing both rural and metropolitan hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. The related research project aimed to evaluate and improve the clients' knowledge and practices related to the use of sublingual glyceryl trinitrate. The team's experiences and suggestions for clinical nurse Leaders are presented in this paper. Essential team characteristics include having shared motivation, good communication practices, flexibility and tolerance, an effective team size, achieving success, willingness to accept challenges and an experienced mentor. The benefits of developing a collaborative team for research led by clinical nurse consultants in cardiac rehabilitation by far outweigh the time and effort involved in the process. PMID:24596995

  14. Patellar Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Aaron; Watson, Jonathan N.; Hutchinson, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patellar tendinopathy is a common condition. There are a wide variety of treatment options available, the majority of which are nonoperative. No consensus exists on the optimal method of treatment. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed spanning 1962-2014. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The majority of cases resolve with nonoperative therapy: rest, physical therapy with eccentric exercises, cryotherapy, anti-inflammatories, corticosteroid injections, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, glyceryl trinitrate, platelet-rich plasma injections, and ultrasound-guided sclerosis. Refractory cases may require either open or arthroscopic debridement of the patellar tendon. Corticosteroid injections provide short-term pain relief but increase risk of tendon rupture. Anti-inflammatories and injectable agents have shown mixed results. Surgical treatment is effective in many refractory cases unresponsive to nonoperative modalities. Conclusion: Physical therapy with an eccentric exercise program is the mainstay of treatment for patellar tendinopathy. Platelet-rich plasma has demonstrated mixed results; evidence-based recommendations on its efficacy cannot be made. In the event that nonoperative treatment fails, surgical intervention has produced good to excellent outcomes in the majority of patients. PMID:26502416

  15. Reaction of organic nitrate esters and S-nitrosothiols with reduced flavins: a possible mechanism of bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Wong, P S; Fukuto, J M

    1999-04-01

    Organic nitrate esters, such as glyceryl trinitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, are a class of compounds used to treat a variety of vascular ailments. Their effectiveness relies on their ability to be bioactivated to nitric oxide (NO) which, in turn, relaxes vascular smooth muscle. Although there have been many biological studies that indicate that NO can be formed from organic nitrate esters in a biological environment, the chemical mechanism by which this occurs has yet to be established. Previous studies have implicated both flavins and thiols in organic nitrate ester bioactivation. Thus, we examined the chemical interactions of flavins and thiols with organic nitrate esters as a means of determining the role these species may play in NO production. Based on these studies we concluded that a reasonable chemical mechanism for organic nitrate ester bioactivation involves reduction to the organic nitrite ester followed by conversion to a nitrosothiol. The release of NO from nitrosothiols can occur via a variety of processes including reaction with dihydroflavins and NADH. PMID:10232931

  16. Angioplasty of forearm arteries as a finger salvage procedure for patient with end-stage renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Law, Yuk; Chan, Yiu Che; Cheng, Stephen Wing-Keung

    2016-01-01

    Due to the relatively low metabolic demand and extensive collaterals of the upper limb, peripheral arterial disease seldom leads to tissue loss, except in patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF), rheumatologic diseases, Raynaud’s disease, frostbites, or distal emboli. We report a case of a 51-year-old lady with ESRF who presented to our tertiary referral vascular center with infected gangrene of her right ring finger. Duplex ultrasound showed that her forearm arteries were severely diseased. Digital subtraction angiogram showed severe multilevel stenoses/occlusions in her forearm radial and ulnar arteries. These lesions were successfully angioplastized with 2 mm × 25 mm angioplasty balloon. Completion angiogram showed good radiological results with some post-dilatation spasm which improved with intra-arterial glyceryl trinitrate. The sepsis improved after revascularization, and the distal phalanx was allowed to self-demarcate with dressings and autoamputate with good clinical results. Our case illustrated that even in delayed setting, patients could still benefit from specialist vascular care with a combination of expert care and angioplasty of forearm arteries, with successful salvage of her finger. PMID:27143949

  17. Angioplasty of forearm arteries as a finger salvage procedure for patient with end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Law, Yuk; Chan, Yiu Che; Cheng, Stephen Wing-Keung

    2016-01-01

    Due to the relatively low metabolic demand and extensive collaterals of the upper limb, peripheral arterial disease seldom leads to tissue loss, except in patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF), rheumatologic diseases, Raynaud's disease, frostbites, or distal emboli. We report a case of a 51-year-old lady with ESRF who presented to our tertiary referral vascular center with infected gangrene of her right ring finger. Duplex ultrasound showed that her forearm arteries were severely diseased. Digital subtraction angiogram showed severe multilevel stenoses/occlusions in her forearm radial and ulnar arteries. These lesions were successfully angioplastized with 2 mm × 25 mm angioplasty balloon. Completion angiogram showed good radiological results with some post-dilatation spasm which improved with intra-arterial glyceryl trinitrate. The sepsis improved after revascularization, and the distal phalanx was allowed to self-demarcate with dressings and autoamputate with good clinical results. Our case illustrated that even in delayed setting, patients could still benefit from specialist vascular care with a combination of expert care and angioplasty of forearm arteries, with successful salvage of her finger. PMID:27143949

  18. Inflammation in rat pregnancy inhibits spiral artery remodeling leading to fetal growth restriction and features of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Cotechini, Tiziana; Komisarenko, Maria; Sperou, Arissa; Macdonald-Goodfellow, Shannyn; Adams, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) and preeclampsia (PE) are often associated with abnormal maternal inflammation, deficient spiral artery (SA) remodeling, and altered uteroplacental perfusion. Here, we provide evidence of a novel mechanistic link between abnormal maternal inflammation and the development of FGR with features of PE. Using a model in which pregnant rats are administered low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on gestational days 13.5–16.5, we show that abnormal inflammation resulted in FGR mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF). Inflammation was also associated with deficient trophoblast invasion and SA remodeling, as well as with altered uteroplacental hemodynamics and placental nitrosative stress. Moreover, inflammation increased maternal mean arterial pressure (MAP) and was associated with renal structural alterations and proteinuria characteristic of PE. Finally, transdermal administration of the nitric oxide (NO) mimetic glyceryl trinitrate prevented altered uteroplacental perfusion, LPS-induced inflammation, placental nitrosative stress, renal structural and functional alterations, increase in MAP, and FGR. These findings demonstrate that maternal inflammation can lead to severe pregnancy complications via a mechanism that involves increased maternal levels of TNF. Our study provides a rationale for the use of antiinflammatory agents or NO-mimetics in the treatment and/or prevention of inflammation-associated pregnancy complications. PMID:24395887

  19. Endothelium-derived relaxing factor produced and released from artery and vein is nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Buga, G.M.; Wood, K.S.; Byrns, R.E.; Chaudhuri, G.

    1987-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) is responsible for the vascular smooth muscle relaxation elicited by endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). EDRF is an unstable humoral substance released from artery and vein that mediates the action of endothelium-dependent vasodilators. NO is and unstable endothelium-independent vasodilator that is released from vasodilator drugs such as nitroprusside and glyceryl trinitrate. The authors have repeatedly observed that the actions of NO on vascular smooth muscle closely resemble those of EDRF. In the present study the vascular effects of EDRF released from perfused bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein were compared with the effects of NO delivered by superfusion over endothelium-denuded arterial and venous strips arranged in a cascade. EDRF was indistinguishable from NO in that both were labile inactivated by pyrogallol or superoxide anion, stabilized by superoxide dismutase, and inhibited by oxyhemoglobin or potassium. Both EDRF and NO produced comparable increases in cyclic GMP accumulation in artery and vein, and this cyclic GMP accumulation was inhibited by pyrogallol, oxyhemoglobin, potassium, and methylene blue. EDRF was identified chemically as NO, or a labile nitroso species, by two procedures. Thus, EDRF released from artery and vein possesses identical and biological and chemical properties as NO.

  20. Vascular system: role of nitric oxide in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Bian, Ka; Doursout, Marie-Françoise; Murad, Ferid

    2008-04-01

    In contrast with the short research history of the enzymatic synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), the introduction of nitrate-containing compounds for medicinal purposes marked its 150th anniversary in 1997. Glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin) is the first compound of this category. On October 12, 1998, the Nobel Assembly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology to scientists Robert Furchgott, Louis Ignarro, and Ferid Murad for their discoveries concerning NO as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. NO-mediated signaling is a recognized component in various physiologic processes (eg, smooth muscle relaxation, inhibition of platelet and leukocyte aggregation, attenuation of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, neurotransmission, and immune defense), to name only a few. NO has also been implicated in the pathology of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis, myocarditis, colitis, and nephritis and a large number of pathologic conditions such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Some of these processes (eg, smooth muscle relaxation, platelet aggregation, and neurotransmission) require only a brief production of NO at low nanomolar concentrations and are dependent on the recruitment of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent signaling. Other processes are associated with direct interaction of NO or reactive nitrogen species derived from it with target proteins and requires a more sustained production of NO at higher concentrations but do not involve the cGMP pathway. PMID:18401228

  1. Sensitivity analysis of near-infrared functional lymphatic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Michael; Kassis, Timothy; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2012-06-01

    Near-infrared imaging of lymphatic drainage of injected indocyanine green (ICG) has emerged as a new technology for clinical imaging of lymphatic architecture and quantification of vessel function, yet the imaging capabilities of this approach have yet to be quantitatively characterized. We seek to quantify its capabilities as a diagnostic tool for lymphatic disease. Imaging is performed in a tissue phantom for sensitivity analysis and in hairless rats for in vivo testing. To demonstrate the efficacy of this imaging approach to quantifying immediate functional changes in lymphatics, we investigate the effects of a topically applied nitric oxide (NO) donor glyceryl trinitrate ointment. Premixing ICG with albumin induces greater fluorescence intensity, with the ideal concentration being 150 μg/mL ICG and 60 g/L albumin. ICG fluorescence can be detected at a concentration of 150 μg/mL as deep as 6 mm with our system, but spatial resolution deteriorates below 3 mm, skewing measurements of vessel geometry. NO treatment slows lymphatic transport, which is reflected in increased transport time, reduced packet frequency, reduced packet velocity, and reduced effective contraction length. NIR imaging may be an alternative to invasive procedures measuring lymphatic function in vivo in real time.

  2. Endothelium-derived relaxing factor (nitric oxide) has protective actions in the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    MacNaughton, W.K.; Wallace, J.L. ); Cirino, G. )

    1989-01-01

    The role that nitric oxide, an endothelium-derived relaxing factor, may play in the regulation of gastric mucosal defense was investigated by assessing the potential protective actions of this factor against the damage caused by ethanol in an ex vivo chamber preparation of the rat stomach. Topical application of glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitroprusside, which have been shown to release nitric oxide, markedly reduced the area of 70% ethanol-induced hemorrhagic damage. Topical application of a 0.01% solution of authentic nitric oxide also significantly reduced the severity of mucosal damage. Pretreatment with indomethacin precluded the involvement of endogenous prostaglandins in the protective effects of these agents. The protective effects of NO were transient, since a delay of 5 minutes between NO administration and ethanal administration resulted in a complete loss of the protective activity. The protection against ethanol afforded by 10 ug/ml nitroprusside could be completely reversed by intravenous infusion of either 1% methylene blue or 1 mM hemoglobin, both of which inhibit vasodilation induced by nitric oxide. Intravenous infusion of 1% methylene blue significantly increased the susceptibility of the mucosa to damage induced by topical 20% ethanol.

  3. Circadian variation of tissue plasminogen activator and its inhibitor, von Willebrand factor antigen, and prostacyclin stimulating factor in men with ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, A B; McLaren, M; Scott, N A; Pringle, T H; McNeill, G P; Belch, J J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine whether plasma concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator antigen, von Willebrand factor antigen, and prostacyclin stimulating factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor activity show circadian variation in men with ischaemic heart disease. DESIGN--Blood samples were obtained every four hours for 24 hours from 10 men with ischaemic heart disease. The men were ambulant from 08:10 until 00:00 when they went to bed and they remained in bed until 08:00 the following morning. PATIENTS--Ten men with positive diagnostic exercise tolerance tests with no significant past history, who were not regularly taking any medical treatment except for glyceryl trinitrate. RESULTS--There was significant circadian variation in plasminogen activator inhibitor activity (p = 0.001) (peak value 04:00 and trough value 20:00), but not in plasma concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator antigen, von Willebrand factor, or prostacyclin stimulating factor. CONCLUSION--Men with ischaemic heart disease showed a significant circadian variation in fibrinolysis. The combination of peak values of plasminogen activator inhibitor activity and failure of plasma concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator antigen to increase in the early morning must predispose to thrombosis at this time. The circadian variation in fibrinolysis may contribute to the increased incidence of myocardial infarction in the morning. PMID:8435236

  4. A fluorescence anisotropy study of stabilizing effect of tri- and tetra- nitrovasodilatory drugs on DPPC liposomal membrane.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A K; Mukherjee, J; Basu, R; Chatterjee, M; Nandy, P

    1993-11-21

    Glyceryl trinitrate (GT) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PT) are two vasodilatory drugs. The physical properties of the membrane lipid matrix, which determine the structure and function of the membrane-bound proteins, generally control the perturbation mechanism of these drugs. Thus, physical interaction of these drugs with membrane lipids is very crucial for their clinical use, different cellular processes, as well as for targetted drug delivery systems. In the present paper, we have reported for the first time the interaction between these drugs and the lipid molecules in the liposomal system of dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-choline (DPPC), as measured by steady-state fluorescence anisotropy using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) as fluorescent probe. Our results show that by dissolving in the lipid matrix these two drugs effectively stabilise the liposomal membrane: the effect being more in case of GT than in PT, indicating that the rigidifying effect is independent of the number of nitrate groups of the two drugs. This effect increases with the increase in drug concentration, implying solubilisation of all drug molecules. Though our in vitro study has more physical significance than a physiological one, the results obtained here may be used to interpret the effects that are observed in vivo. PMID:8241246

  5. Crystal structure of tri-hydrogen bis-{[1,1,1-tris-(2-oxido-ethyl-amino-meth-yl)ethane]-cobalt(III)} trinitrate.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Waqas; Johannesen, Heini V; Morsing, Thorbjørn J; Piligkos, Stergios; Weihe, Høgni

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, [Co2(L)2](3+)·3NO3 (-) [where L = CH3C(CH2NHCH2CH2OH1/2)3], has been synthesized from the ligand 1,1,1-tris-(2-hy-droxy-ethyl-amino-meth-yl)ethane. The cobalt(III) dimer has an inter-esting and uncommon O-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding motif with the three bridging hy-droxy H atoms each being equally disordered over two positions. In the dimeric trication, the octa-hedrally coordinated Co(III) atoms and the capping C atoms lie on a threefold rotation axis. The N atoms of two crystallographically independent nitrate anions also lie on threefold rotation axes. N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding between the complex cations and nitrate anions leads to the formation of a three-dimensional network structure. The compound is a racemic conglomerate of crystals containing either d or l mol-ecules. The crystal used for this study is a d crystal. PMID:26870462

  6. Role of the lipid peroxidation product, 4-hydroxynonenal, in the development of nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Yohan; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Bennett, Brian M

    2014-04-21

    Tolerance to nitrates such as nitroglycerin (GTN) is associated with oxidative stress, inactivation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), and decreased GTN-induced cGMP accumulation and vasodilation. We hypothesized that GTN-induced inactivation of ALDH2 results in increased 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) adduct formation of key proteins involved in GTN bioactivation, and, consequently, an attenuated vasodilator response to GTN (i.e., tolerance). We used an in vivo GTN tolerance model, a cell culture model of nitrate action, and Aldh2(-/-) mice to assess whether GTN exposure resulted in HNE adduct formation, and whether exogenous HNE affected GTN-induced relaxation and cGMP accumulation. Immunoblot analysis indicated a marked increase in HNE adduct formation in GTN-tolerant porcine kidney epithelial cells (PK1) and in aortae from GTN-tolerant rats and untreated Aldh2(-/-) mice. Preincubation of PK1 cells with HNE resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTN-induced cGMP accumulation, and pretreatment of isolated rat aorta with HNE resulted in dose-dependent decreases in the vasodilator response to GTN, thus mimicking GTN-tolerance. Pretreatment of aortae from Aldh2(-/-) mice with 10 μM HNE resulted in a desensitized vasodilator response to GTN. In the in vivo rat tolerance model, changes in HNE adduct formation correlated well with the onset of GTN tolerance and tolerance reversal. Furthermore, coadministration of an HNE scavenger during the tolerance induction protocol completely prevented HNE adduct formation and GTN tolerance but did not prevent the inactivation of ALDH2. The data are consistent with a novel mechanism of GTN tolerance suggesting a primary role of HNE adduct formation in the development of GTN tolerance. PMID:24555687

  7. Nebivolol increases arterial distensibility in vivo.

    PubMed

    McEniery, Carmel M; Schmitt, Matthias; Qasem, Ahmad; Webb, David J; Avolio, Alberto P; Wilkinson, Ian B; Cockcroft, John R

    2004-09-01

    Arterial stiffness is a key determinant of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. beta-Blockers appear to be less effective than other drugs in improving outcome in hypertensive patients, and a potential explanation may be that beta-blockers are less effective in reducing arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to assess the direct effect of beta-blockade on pulse wave velocity (PWV), a robust measure of arterial distensibility, using a local, ovine, hind-limb model. In addition, we hypothesized that the vasodilating beta-blocker nebivolol, but not atenolol, would increase arterial distensibility in vivo. All studies were conducted in anesthetized sheep. PWV was recorded in vivo using a dual pressure-sensing catheter placed in the common iliac artery. Intraarterial infusion of nebivolol reduced PWV by 6+/-3% at the higher dose (P<0.001), but did not alter mean arterial pressure (change of -1+/-3 mm Hg, P=0.1). In contrast, atenolol had no effect on PWV (P=0.11) despite a small drop in mean pressure (change of -5+/-3 mm Hg, P<0.01). Infusion of glyceryl trinitrate led to a dose-dependent fall in PWV, and 2 nmol/min produced a similar reduction in PWV to the higher dose of nebivolol (500 nmol/min). The effect of nebivolol on PWV was significantly attenuated during coinfusion of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (P=0.003) and also during coinfusion of butoxamine (P=0.02). These results demonstrate that nebivolol, but not atenolol, increases arterial distensibility. This effect of nebivolol is mediated through the release of NO via a beta2 adrenoceptor-dependent mechanism. Thus, nebivolol may be of benefit in conditions of increased large artery stiffness, such as isolated systolic hypertension. PMID:15262912

  8. Topical analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Argoff, Charles E

    2013-02-01

    Oral analgesics are commonly prescribed for the treatment of acute and chronic pain, but these agents often produce adverse systemic effects, which sometimes are severe. Topical analgesics offer the potential to provide the same analgesic relief provided by oral analgesics but with minimal adverse systemic effects. This article describes the results of a systematic review of the efficacy of topical analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain conditions. A literature search of MEDLINE/PubMed was conducted using the keywords topical analgesic AND chronic pain OR acute pain OR neuropathic pain and focused only on individual clinical trials published in English-language journals. The search identified 92 articles, of which 65 were eligible for inclusion in the review. The most commonly studied topical analgesics were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (n=27), followed by lidocaine (n=9), capsaicin (n=6), amitriptyline (n=5), glyceryl trinitrate (n=3), opioids (n=2), menthol (n=2), pimecrolimus (n=2), and phenytoin (n=2). The most common indications were acute soft tissue injuries (n=18), followed by neuropathic pain (n=17), experimental pain (n=6), osteoarthritis and other chronic joint-related conditions (n=5), skin or leg ulcers (n=5), and chronic knee pain (n=2). Strong evidence was identified for the use of topical diclofenac and topical ibuprofen in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries or chronic joint-related conditions, such as osteoarthritis. Evidence also supports the use of topical lidocaine in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy. Currently, limited evidence is available to support the use of other topical analgesics in acute and chronic pain. PMID:23374622

  9. Self-management of coronary heart disease in older patients after elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Dawkes, Susan; Smith, Graeme D; Elliott, Lawrie; Raeside, Robert; Donaldson, Jayne H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore how older patients self-manage their coronary heart disease (CHD) after undergoing elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Methods This mixed methods study used a sequential, explanatory design and recruited a convenience sample of patients (n = 93) approximately three months after elective PTCA. The study was conducted in two phases. Quantitative data collected in Phase 1 by means of a self-administered survey were subject to univariate and bivariate analysis. Phase 1 findings informed the purposive sampling for Phase 2 where ten participants were selected from the original sample for an in-depth interview. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. This paper will primarily report the findings from a sub-group of older participants (n = 47) classified as 65 years of age or older. Results 78.7% (n = 37) of participants indicated that they would manage recurring angina symptoms by taking glyceryl trinitrate and 34% (n = 16) thought that resting would help. Regardless of the duration or severity of the symptoms 40.5% (n = 19) would call their general practitioner or an emergency ambulance for assistance during any recurrence of angina symptoms. Older participants weighed less (P = 0.02) and smoked less (P = 0.01) than their younger counterparts in the study. Age did not seem to affect PTCA patients' likelihood of altering dietary factors such as fruit, vegetable and saturated fat consumption (P = 0.237). Conclusions The findings suggest that older people in the study were less likely to know how to correctly manage any recurring angina symptoms than their younger counterparts but they had fewer risk factors for CHD. Age was not a factor that influenced participants' likelihood to alter lifestyle factors. PMID:27594866

  10. Endothelial dysfunction in young patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shyh-Ming; Tsai, Tzu-Hsien; Hang, Chi-Ling; Yip, Hon-Kan; Fang, Chi-Yuan; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Guo, Gary Bih-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction may be particularly important in the pathogenesis of young patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), because they have different clinical characteristics compared with older patients. We investigated endothelial function in relation to AMI in this young age group. From January 2005 to March 2008, 29 of 31 consecutive patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who were <40 years old and received direct percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were enrolled in the study. We compared the coronary risk factors and flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) in the brachial artery between the acute STEMI patients and 29 age- and gender-matched controls that did not have AMI. Baseline brachial artery diameter and responses to glyceryl trinitrate were similar between the two groups. In contrast, FMD was significantly lower in the young acute STEMI group than in the control (3.47 ± 4.08 vs. 7.45 ± 4.67%, p = 0.001) and correlated with the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) risk score. The impaired FMD in the acute STEMI group was independent of smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, nitrate use, or body mass index. In multiple logistic regression analysis, only FMD and age, not traditional cardiovascular risk factors, were found to be significantly associated with acute STEMI (odds ratio = 0.75, 95% CI 0.63-0.90, p < 0.01). In conclusion, independent of conventional risk factors, severe endothelial dysfunction occurs in young acute STEMI patients and correlates with TIMI score. In addition to age, impaired FMD is the only significant factor associated with acute STEMI in this young population. PMID:20949355

  11. Cortical NADH during pharmacological manipulations of the respiratory chain and spreading depression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rex, A; Pfeifer, L; Fink, F; Fink, H

    1999-08-01

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is one of the main means for energy transfer in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and is an important parameter of cellular metabolism. NADH can be measured by its fluorescence and various fluorometric methods have been developed. In this study, a pulsed nitrogen laser combined with a fibreoptic set-up and photomultipliers was used to induce and measure NADH fluorescence on the cortical surface. The aim of the study was to assess the suitability of the laser induced spectroscopy for in vivo and on-line measurement of NADH in neuroscience and particularly for the assessment of neuronal metabolism. Changes in cerebral blood flow may affect fluorescence measurement. To assess the consequences of alterations in blood flow, the vasodilators glyceryl trinitrate and nimodipine and the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 were applied. The induced hemodynamic changes were verified by colour Doppler sonography. The tests using the vasodilators showed that an increased blood flow in the brain increased not only NADH fluorescence but also the scattered light measured. The vasoconstrictor caused opposite effects. Insertion of a compensation method (subtraction of the scattered light) allowed the exclusion of hemodynamic artifacts. Effects of changes in the cellular metabolism were induced by sodium cyanide, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, or by 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP), an uncoupler of the oxidative phosphorylation. Sodium cyanide induced a transient increase of NADH fluorescence and 2,4-DNP decreased intracellular NADH fluorescence. Furthermore, the repercussions of cortical spreading depressions (CSD), a response of the brain to noxious stimuli, on cortical NADH fluorescence were determined. A single CSD decreased cortical NADH fluorescence for about 1 min, followed by a 5- to 10-min increase. The changes in NADH levels seem to correspond with the excitation and inhibition of neuronal metabolism, respectively. In

  12. Efficacy of folic acid supplementation on endothelial function and plasma homocysteine concentration in coronary artery disease: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    YI, XIN; ZHOU, YANLI; JIANG, DINGSHENG; LI, XIAOYAN; GUO, YI; JIANG, XUEJUN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct an updated meta-analysis of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in order to estimate the effect of folic acid supplementation on endothelial function and the concentration of plasma homocysteine in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). An extensive search of PubMed was conducted to identify RCTs that compared folic acid with placebo therapy. The mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used as a measure of the correlation between folic acid supplementation and endothelial function/plasma homocysteine concentration. Of the 377 patients included in this analysis, 191 patients underwent folic acid supplementation and 186 individuals underwent placebo treatment. Compared with the use of a placebo, folic acid supplementation alone exhibited significant efficacy on increasing flow-mediated dilation (FMD; MD, 57.72 μm; 95% CI, 50.14–65.31; P<0.05) and lowering the concentration of plasma homocysteine (MD, −3.66 μmol/l; 95% CI, −5.44–−1.87; P<0.05; I2, 87%). There was no significant change in the response to end diastolic diameter, glyceryl-trinitrate diameter, heart rate, baseline and peak hyperemic flow and systolic and diastolic blood pressure between the folic acid and placebo groups (P>0.05). Therefore, the meta-analysis indicated that 5 mg folic acid daily supplementation for >4 weeks significantly improved FMD and lowered the concentration of plasma homocysteine in patients with CAD. However, more RCTs are required in order to confirm these observations. PMID:24940394

  13. Direct and reflex effects of nitroglycerin on coronary and left ventricular dynamics in conscious dogs

    PubMed Central

    Vatner, Stephen F.; Higgins, Charles B.; Millard, Ronald W.; Franklin, Dean

    1972-01-01

    The effects of intravenous and sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin), 40 μg/kg, were studied on coronary blood flow and resistance, left ventricular (LV) pressures (P) and diameters (D), rate of change of pressure (dP/dt), (dP/dt)/P, and on the velocity (V) of myocardial fiber shortening in conscious dogs. Nitroglycerin i.v. caused substantial coronary vasodilatation prior to any changes in systemic hemodynamics. Mean coronary flow increased by a maximum of 47 ml/min and coronary sinus Po2 rose from 16 to 26 mm Hg while pressure and diameter began to fall, and heart rate began to rise. After the maximal fall in mean arterial pressure (—26 mm Hg), a secondary peak in coronary flow occurred which was associated with increases in heart rate (100 beats/min), (dP/dt)/P (22%), and isolength V (12%). Beta blockade prevented the reflex increases in contractility but only a part of the reflex tachycardia; the remainder was prevented by cholinergic blockade. Maintaining heart rate constant minimized the decreases in LV D and increases in contractility. When the reflex inotropic and chronotropic effects were prevented by a combination of atrial pacing and beta blockade the early coronary vasodilatation was unaltered, but the later coronary vasodilatation was minimized. Thus i.v. nitroglycerin in the conscious dog exerts a potent direct coronary vasodilating action and also a secondary coronary vasodilation caused by reflex increases in contractility and heart rate. The decreases in diameter are largely the result of tachycardia. Sublingual nitroglycerin produced directionally similar, but quantitatively lesser effects on coronary flow and resistance, LV D, LV P, and contractility. Images PMID:4404139

  14. Minimally invasive method for determining the effective lymphatic pumping pressure in rats using near-infrared imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Tyler S.; Akin, Ryan E.; Weiler, Michael J.; Kassis, Timothy; Kornuta, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to quantify collecting vessel function in a minimally invasive fashion is crucial to the study of lymphatic physiology and the role of lymphatic pump function in disease progression. Therefore, we developed a highly sensitive, minimally invasive research platform for quantifying the pumping capacity of collecting lymphatic vessels in the rodent tail and forelimb. To achieve this, we have integrated a near-infrared lymphatic imaging system with a feedback-controlled pressure cuff to modulate lymph flow. After occluding lymphatic flow by inflating a pressure cuff on the limb or tail, we gradually deflate the cuff while imaging flow restoration proximal to the cuff. Using prescribed pressure applications and automated image processing of fluorescence intensity levels in the vessels, we were able to noninvasively quantify the effective pumping pressure (Peff, pressure at which flow is restored after occlusion) and vessel emptying rate (rate of fluorescence clearance during flow occlusion) of lymphatics in the rat. To demonstrate the sensitivity of this system to changes in lymphatic function, a nitric oxide (NO) donor cream, glyceryl trinitrate ointment (GTNO), was applied to the tails. GTNO decreased Peff of the vessels by nearly 50% and the average emptying rate by more than 60%. We also demonstrate the suitability of this approach for acquiring measurements on the rat forelimb. Thus, this novel research platform provides the first minimally invasive measurements of Peff and emptying rate in rodents. This experimental platform holds strong potential for future in vivo studies that seek to evaluate changes in lymphatic health and disease. PMID:24430884

  15. Intrathecal Clonidine Pump Failure Causing Acute Withdrawal Syndrome With 'Stress-Induced' Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwee Min D; Ruggoo, Varuna; Graudins, Andis

    2016-03-01

    Clonidine is a central alpha(2)-agonist antihypertensive used widely for opioid/alcohol withdrawal, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and chronic pain management. We describe a case of clonidine withdrawal causing life-threatening hypertensive crisis and stress-induced cardiomyopathy. A 47-year-old man with chronic back pain, treated with clonidine for many years via intrathecal pump (550 mcg/24 h), presented following a collapse and complaining of sudden worsening of back pain, severe headache, diaphoresis, nausea and vomiting. A few hours prior to presentation, his subcutaneous pump malfunctioned. On presentation, vital signs included pulse 100 bpm, BP 176/103 mmHg, temperature 37.8 °C and O2 saturation 100 % (room air). Acute clonidine withdrawal with hypertensive crisis was suspected. Intravenous clonidine loading dose and a 50 mcg/h infusion were commenced. Five hours later, severe chest pain, dyspnoea, tachycardia, hypoxia, with BP 180/120 mmHg and pulmonary edema ensued. ECG showed sinus tachycardia with no ST elevation. Repeated intravenous clonidine doses were given (25 mcg every 5-10 min), with ongoing clonidine infusion to control blood pressure. Glyceryl trinitrate infusion, positive pressure ventilation and intravenous benzodiazepines were added. Bedside echocardiogram showed stress-induced cardiomyopathy pattern. Serum troponin-I was markedly elevated. His coronary angiography showed minor irregularities in the major vessels. Over the next 3 days in the ICU, drug infusions were weaned. Discharge was 12 days later on oral clonidine, metoprolol, perindopril, aspirin and oxycodone-SR. Two months later, his echocardiogram was normal. The intrathecal pump was removed. We report a case of stress-induced cardiomyopathy resulting from the sudden cessation of long-term intrathecal clonidine. This was managed by re-institution of clonidine and targeted organ-specific therapies. PMID:26370679

  16. Nitric oxide, and not vasoactive intestinal peptide, as the main neurotransmitter of vagally induced relaxation of the guinea pig stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Desai, K M; Warner, T D; Bishop, A E; Polak, J M; Vane, J R

    1994-01-01

    1. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was localized in the guinea pig stomach by immunocytochemistry. In vitro experiments were carried out on the isolated stomach of the guinea pig to study any possible links between nitric oxide (NO) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in mediating relaxations induced by vagal stimulation. 2. NOS was localized to nerve cell bodies and nerve fibre varicosities of the myenteric plexus in wholemounts of the longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the stomach fundus. The NOS-positive cells had a Dogiel type I morphology characteristic of motor neurones. 3. The cross-sections of the stomach wall showed NOS-positive neurones mainly in the myenteric plexus ganglia and NOS-positive nerve fibre varicosities in the circular muscle layer. 4. Relaxations induced by vagal stimulation were almost completely prevented by L-NAME with an IC50 value of 5.5 x 10(-6) M. This inhibition was reversed by L-arginine (2 mM). 5. VIP (100 nM) induced reproducible relaxations of the stomach. These were unaffected by tetrodotoxin (2 microM) or N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 microM). 6. Desensitization to the relaxant effect of VIP partially reduced relaxations induced by vagal stimulation, glyceryl trinitrate or sodium nitroprusside but not noradrenaline. 7. These results show that NO has a neuronal origin in the guinea pig stomach, and support NO, and not VIP, as the major neurotransmitter of vagally induced gastric relaxation in the guinea pig. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7534182

  17. Relaxant mechanisms of 3, 5, 7, 3', 4'-pentamethoxyflavone on isolated human cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Jansakul, Chaweewan; Tachanaparuksa, Kuldej; Mulvany, Michael J; Sukpondma, Youwapa

    2012-09-15

    We have investigated effects and mechanisms responsible for the activity of 3, 5, 7, 3', 4'-pentamethoxyflavone (PMF) on isolated human cavernosum. PMF is the major flavone isolated from Kaempferia parviflora claimed to act as an aphrodisiac. PMF caused relaxation of phenylephrine precontracted human cavernosal strips, and this effect was slightly inhibited by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, but not by ODQ (soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor), TEA (tetraethylammonium, blocker of voltage-dependent K(+) channels) or glybenclamide (blocker of ATP-dependent K(+) channels). PMF did not significantly inhibit the relaxant activity of glyceryltrinitrate or acetylcholine on human cavernosal strips precontracted with phenylephrine. In contrast, sildenafil (phosphodiesterase inhibitor) potentiated the relaxant activity of glyceryl trinitrate but not of acetylcholine. In normal Krebs solution with nifedipine (blocker of l-type Ca(2+) channels), or in Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution, PMF caused a further inhibition of human cavernosum contracted with phenylephrine. In human cavernosum treated with thapsigargin (inhibitor of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase) in Ca(2+)-free medium, PMF suppressed the concentration-response curve of human cavernosum to phenylephrine and a further suppression was found when SKF-96365 (a blocker of store-operated Ca(2+) channels and Y-27632 (inhibitor of Rho-kinase)), but not nifedipine, were added sequentially. Thus, PMF had only a weak effect on the release of nitric oxide, and had no effect as a K(ATP)- or K(Ca) channel opener, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, a store-operated Ca(2+) channel blocker or a Rho-kinase inhibitor. Therefore, these studies suggest that PMF causes relaxation of human cavernosum through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and other mechanisms associated with calcium mobilization. PMID:22800934

  18. The association between functional and morphological assessments of endothelial function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). One of the earliest manifestations of CVD is endothelial dysfunction (ED), which can lead to functional and morphological vascular abnormalities. Several non-invasive assessments of vascular function and morphology can be utilised to assess vascular health, but little is known about the association between each of these assessments in patients with RA, and they tend to be used interchangeably in the literature. The objective of the present study was to examine associations between measures of vascular function and morphology in patients with RA. Methods A total of 201 RA patients (155 females, median (25th to 75th percentile) age: 67 (59 to 73)) underwent assessments of microvascular endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function (laser Doppler imaging with iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium-nitroprusside respectively), macrovascular endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function (flow-mediated dilatation and glyceryl-trinitrate-mediated dilation respectively), and vascular morphology (pulse wave analysis, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), and carotid plaque). Results Spearman's correlations revealed that from the functional parameters, only macrovascular endothelium-independent function was inversely associated with cIMT (-0.294 (P < 0.001)) after applying the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. For carotid plaque, t tests showed that macrovascular endothelium-independent function was lower in patients with plaque than without (15.5 ± 8.3 vs. 23.1 ± 9.1%, P = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions With the exception of macrovascular endothelium-independent function, all other measures of vascular function were not associated with vascular morphology. This suggests that different assessments of vascular function and morphology in patients with RA reflect quite distinct mechanisms and phases of the

  19. Lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase products in the control of regional kidney blood flow in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Jeremy J; Eppel, Gabriela A; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W; Evans, Roger G

    2003-11-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to examine the roles of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)- and lipoxygenase (LOX)-dependent arachidonate signalling cascades in the control of regional kidney blood flow. 2. In pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rabbits treated with NG-nitro-l-arginine and glyceryl trinitrate to 'clamp' nitric oxide, we determined the effects of ibuprofen (a COX inhibitor) and esculetin (a LOX inhibitor) on resting systemic and renal haemodynamics and responses to renal arterial infusions of vasoconstrictors. 3. Ibuprofen increased mean arterial pressure (14 +/- 5%) and reduced medullary laser Doppler flux (MLDF; 26 +/- 6%) when administered with esculetin. A similar pattern of responses was observed when ibuprofen was given alone, although the reduction in MLDF was not statistically significant. Esculetin tended to increase renal blood flow (RBF; 16 +/- 7%) and MLDF (28 +/- 13%) when given alone, but not when combined with ibuprofen. 4. After vehicle, renal arterial infusions of noradrenaline, angiotensin II and endothelin-1 reduced RBF and cortical laser Doppler flux (CLDF), but not MLDF. In contrast, renal arterial [Phe2,Ile3,Orn8]-vasopressin reduced MLDF but not RBF or CLDF. Ibuprofen alone did not significantly affect these responses. Esculetin, when given alone, but not when combined with ibuprofen, enhanced noradrenaline-induced renal vasoconstriction. In contrast, esculetin did not significantly affect responses to [Phe2,Ile3,Orn8]-vasopressin, angiotensin II or endothelin-1. 5. We conclude that COX products contribute to the maintenance of arterial pressure and renal medullary perfusion under 'nitric oxide clamp' conditions, but not to renal haemodynamic responses to the vasoconstrictors we tested. Lipoxygenase products may blunt noradrenaline-induced vasoconstriction, but our observations may, instead, reflect LOX-independent effects of esculetin. PMID:14678242

  20. 77 FR 59608 - Gas Transmission Northwest LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Gas Transmission Northwest LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order... Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2)(2012), Gas Transmission Northwest LLC (GTN), filed a petition... forth and used in GTN's tariff does not mean that the natural gas GTN transports on its system must...

  1. Brain metastases from gestational trophoblastic neoplasia: review of pertinent literature.

    PubMed

    Piura, E; Piura, B

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastasis from gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is rare with about 222 cases documented in the literature and an incidence of about 11% in living GTN patients. Brain metastasis from GTN was part of a disseminated disease in 90% of patients, single metastases in the brain - 80% and located in the cerebrum - 90%. Brain metastasis was the only manifestation of metastatic GTN in 11.3% of patients, appeared synchronously with metastatic GTN in other sites of the body - 30.6% and was diagnosed from 0.3 to 60 months after diagnosis of metastatic GTN in other sites (most often in the lung) - 58.1%. Overall, 83.9% of patients with brain metastases from GTN had also lung metastases from GTN. Brain metastases from GTN showed a greater tendency to be hemorrhagic compared to brain metastases from other primaries. In patients with brain metastases from GTN, the best outcome was achieved with multimodal therapy including craniotomy, whole brain radiotherapy, and EP-EMA or EMA-CO chemotherapy. Nonetheless, brain metastasis from GTN is a grave disease with a median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastasis of about 12 months. PMID:25118474

  2. Crystal structure of tri­hydrogen bis­{[1,1,1-tris­(2-oxido­ethyl­amino­meth­yl)ethane]­cobalt(III)} trinitrate

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Waqas; Johannesen, Heini V.; Morsing, Thorbjørn J.; Piligkos, Stergios; Weihe, Høgni

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, [Co2(L)2]3+·3NO3 − [where L = CH3C(CH2NHCH2CH2OH1/2)3], has been synthesized from the ligand 1,1,1-tris­(2-hy­droxy­ethyl­amino­meth­yl)ethane. The cobalt(III) dimer has an inter­esting and uncommon O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding motif with the three bridging hy­droxy H atoms each being equally disordered over two positions. In the dimeric trication, the octa­hedrally coordinated CoIII atoms and the capping C atoms lie on a threefold rotation axis. The N atoms of two crystallographically independent nitrate anions also lie on threefold rotation axes. N—H⋯O hydrogen bonding between the complex cations and nitrate anions leads to the formation of a three-dimensional network structure. The compound is a racemic conglomerate of crystals containing either d or l mol­ecules. The crystal used for this study is a d crystal. PMID:26870462

  3. Clinical pharmacokinetics of vasodilators. Part II.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, R; Nelson, K; Kirsten, D; Heintz, B

    1998-07-01

    Stimulating cardiac beta 1-adrenoceptors with oxyfedrine causes dilatation of coronary vessels and positive inotropic effects on the myocardium. beta 1-adrenergic agonists increase coronary blood flow in nonstenotic and stenotic vessels. The main indication for the use of the phosphodiesterase inhibitors pamrinone, mirinone, enoximone and piroximone is acute treatment of severe congestive heart failure. Theophylline is indicated for the treatment of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, apnea in preterm infants ans sleep apnea syndrome. Severe arterial occlusive disease associated with atherosclerosis can be beneficially affected by elcosanoids. These drugs must be administered parenterally and have a half-life of only a few minutes. Sublingual or buccal preparations of nitrates are the only prompt method (within 1 or 2 min) of terminating anginal pain, except for biting nifedipine capsules. The short half-life (about 2.5 min) of nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate) makes long term therapy impossible. Tolerance is a problem encountered with longer-acting nitric oxide donors. Knowledge of the pharmacokinetic properties of vasodilating drugs can prevent a too sudden and severe blood pressure decrease in patients with chronic hypertension. In considering the administration of a second dose, or another drug, the time necessary for the initially administered drug to reach maximal efficacy should be taken into account. In hypertensive emergencies urapidil, sodium nitroprusside, nitroglycerin, hydralazine and phentolamine are the drugs of choice, with the addition of beta-blockers during catecholamine crisis or dissecting aortic aneurysm. Childhood hypertension is most often treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or calcium antagonists, primarily nifedipine. Because of the teratogenic risk involved with ACE inhibitors, extreme caution must be exercised when prescribing for adolescent females. The propagation of health benefits to breast

  4. Abnormalities of endothelial function in patients with predialysis renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Thambyrajah, J; Landray, M; McGlynn, F; Jones, H; Wheeler, D; Townend, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in the development of atherosclerotic vascular disease, which is the leading cause of mortality in patients with chronic renal failure.
OBJECTIVE—To examine the relation between predialysis renal failure and endothelial function.
DESIGN—Two groups were studied: 80 patients with non-diabetic chronic renal failure and 26 healthy controls, with similar age and sex distributions. Two indices of endothelial function were assessed: high resolution ultrasonography to measure flow mediated endothelium dependent dilatation of the brachial artery following reactive hyperaemia, and plasma concentration of von Willebrand factor. Endothelium independent dilatation was also assessed following sublingual glyceryl trinitrate. The patients were divided into those with and without overt atherosclerotic vascular disease.
RESULTS—Although patients with chronic renal failure had significantly impaired endothelium dependent dilatation compared with controls (median (interquartile range), 2.6% (0.7% to 4.8%) v 6.5% (4.8% to 8.3%); p < 0.001) and increased von Willebrand factor (254 (207 to 294) v 106 (87 to 138) iu/dl; p < 0.001), there was no difference between renal failure patients with and without atherosclerotic vascular disease. Within the chronic renal failure group, endothelium dependent dilatation and von Willebrand factor were similar in patients in the upper and lower quartiles of glomerular filtration rate (2.7% (0.7% to 6.7%) v 2.8% (1.1% to 5.0%); and 255 (205 to 291) v 254 (209 to 292) iu/dl, respectively). Endothelium independent dilatation did not differ between the renal failure or control groups and was also similar in patients with renal failure irrespective of the degree of renal failure or the presence of atherosclerotic vascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS—Endothelial function is abnormal in chronic renal failure, even in patients with mild renal insufficiency and those without

  5. Inhibition of rat platelet aggregation by the diazeniumdiolate nitric oxide donor MAHMA NONOate

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Kerry L; Wanstall, Janet C

    2002-01-01

    Inhibition of rat platelet aggregation by the nitric oxide (NO) donor MAHMA NONOate (Z-1-{N-methyl-N-[6-(N-methylammoniohexyl)amino]}diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate) was investigated. The aims were to compare its anti-aggregatory effect with vasorelaxation, to determine the effects of the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one), and to investigate the possible role of activation of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA), independent of soluble guanylate cyclase, using thapsigargin. MAHMA NONOate concentration-dependently inhibited sub-maximal aggregation responses to collagen (2–10 μg ml−1) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 2 μM) in platelet rich plasma. It was (i) more effective at inhibiting aggregation induced by collagen than by ADP, and (ii) less potent at inhibiting platelet aggregation than relaxing rat pulmonary artery. ODQ (10 μM) caused only a small shift (approximately half a log unit) in the concentration-response curve to MAHMA NONOate irrespective of the aggregating agent. The NO-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, YC-1 (3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole; 1–100 μM), did not inhibit aggregation. The cGMP analogue, 8-pCPT-cGMP (8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine 3′5′ cyclic monophosphate; 0.1–1 mM), caused minimal inhibition. On collagen-aggregated platelets responses to MAHMA NONOate (ODQ 10 μM present) were abolished by thapsigargin (200 nM). On ADP-aggregated platelets thapsigargin caused partial inhibition. Results with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) resembled those with MAHMA NONOate. Glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitroprusside were poor inhibitors of aggregation. Thus inhibition of rat platelet aggregation by MAHMA NONOate (like GSNO) is largely ODQ-resistant and, by implication, independent of soluble guanylate cyclase. A likely mechanism of inhibition is activation of SERCA. PMID:12429580

  6. The pharmacology of sildenafil, a novel and selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) type 5.

    PubMed

    Wallis, R M

    1999-10-01

    Sildenafil (1-[4-ethoxy-3-(6,7-dihydro-1-methyl-7-oxo-3-propyl-1H-pyrazolo [4,3-d]pyrimidin-5-yl) phenylsulphonyl]-4-methylpiperazine) has been shown to be an effective oral treatment for male erectile dysfunction. Sildenafil is a potent competitive inhibitor of PDE5 (IC50 3.5 nM) and is selective over PDE1 to 4 (80 to 19,000-fold) and retinal PDE6 (10-fold). Sildenafil enhanced cGMP accumulation driven with sodium nitroprusside in the corpus cavernosum of rabbits without affecting cAMP formulation. In the absence of nitric oxide drive, sildenafil had no functional effect on the human and rabbit isolated corpus cavernosum, but potently potentiated the relaxant effects of nitric oxide on these tissues. In the anaesthetised dog, sildenafil (ED50: 12 to 16 micrograms/kg i.v.) enhanced the increase in intracavernosal pressure induced by electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve or intracavernosal injection of sodium nitroprusside in the absence of meaningful effects on blood pressure. Consistent with its mode of action, sildenafil potentiated the vasorelaxant effects of glyceryl trinitrate on rabbit isolated aortic rings. However, unlike milrinone, sildenafil had no inotropic effects on the dog isolated trabeculae carneae. Thus it is unlikely to have the deleterious effects on cardiac function associated with PDE3 inhibitors. As a consequence of inhibition of PDE6 in the retina, sildenafil (1 to 100 microM) altered the kinetics of the light response of the dog isolated retina. In the anaesthetised dog, sildenafil modified the a- and b-wave of the electroretinogram induced by a flash of blue light. These effects were proportional to plasma concentrations, were fully reversible and only occurred following plasma concentrations higher (approximately 30-fold) than those active on intracavernosal pressure. These studies have shown that sildenafil is a potent and selective inhibitor of PDE5. It enhances the effect of nitric oxide on the corpus cavernosum and has been shown

  7. Lesions in Guddesn's tegmental nuclei produce behavioral and 5-HT effects similar to those after raphe lesions.

    PubMed

    Lorens, S A; Köhler, C; Guldberg, H C

    1975-01-01

    Lesions largely restricted to the dorsal and ventral tegmental nuclei of Gudden (GTN) produced several effects similar to those seen after midbrain raphe lesions. GTN lesions significantly reduced the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration of the diencephalon (31 percent), hippocampus (59 percent), and remaining portion of the telencephalon (29 percent). Striatal 5-HT, however, was not affected. GTN lesions enhanced activity in an enclosed field and facilitated two-way avoidance acquisition. Pain sensitivity as measured by the flinch-jump method was not affected. These results suggest that the GTN may be the origin of ascending 5-HT fides and may be involved in the regulation of activity level and the adaptation of an animal to aversive situations. Thus, some of the behavioral and 5-HT effects of lesions in the midbrain raphe nuclei may be due to their involvement of the GTN and associated pathways. PMID:1187729

  8. Bioactivation of Nitroglycerin by Purified Mitochondrial and Cytosolic Aldehyde Dehydrogenases*

    PubMed Central

    Beretta, Matteo; Gruber, Karl; Kollau, Alexander; Russwurm, Michael; Koesling, Doris; Goessler, Walter; Keung, Wing Ming; Schmidt, Kurt; Mayer, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Metabolism of nitroglycerin (GTN) to 1,2-glycerol dinitrate (GDN) and nitrite by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is essentially involved in GTN bioactivation resulting in cyclic GMP-mediated vascular relaxation. The link between nitrite formation and activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is still unclear. To test the hypothesis that the ALDH2 reaction is sufficient for GTN bioactivation, we measured GTN-induced formation of cGMP by purified sGC in the presence of purified ALDH2 and used a Clark-type electrode to probe for nitric oxide (NO) formation. In addition, we studied whether GTN bioactivation is a specific feature of ALDH2 or is also catalyzed by the cytosolic isoform (ALDH1). Purified ALDH1 and ALDH2 metabolized GTN to 1,2- and 1,3-GDN with predominant formation of the 1,2-isomer that was inhibited by chloral hydrate (ALDH1 and ALDH2) and daidzin (ALDH2). GTN had no effect on sGC activity in the presence of bovine serum albumin but caused pronounced cGMP accumulation in the presence of ALDH1 or ALDH2. The effects of the ALDH isoforms were dependent on the amount of added protein and, like 1,2-GDN formation, were sensitive to ALDH inhibitors. GTN caused biphasic sGC activation with apparent EC50 values of 42 ± 2.9 and 3.1 ± 0.4 μm in the presence of ALDH1 and ALDH2, respectively. Incubation of ALDH1 or ALDH2 with GTN resulted in sustained, chloral hydrate-sensitive formation of NO. These data may explain the coupling of ALDH2-catalyzed GTN metabolism to sGC activation in vascular smooth muscle. PMID:18450747

  9. Involvement of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 in goniothalamin-induced TP53-dependent and -independent apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma-derived cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chen, Lih-Ren; Li, Chien-Feng; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2011-10-01

    The objective was to investigate the upstream apoptotic mechanisms that were triggered by a styrylpyrone derivative, goniothalamin (GTN), in tumor protein p53 (TP53)-positive and -negative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-derived cells. Effects of GTN were evaluated by the flow cytometry, alkaline comet assay, immunocytochemistry, small-hairpin RNA interference, mitochondria/cytosol fractionation, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting analysis and caspase 3 activity assays in two HCC-derived cell lines. Results indicated that GTN triggered phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1, also known as NOXA)-mediated apoptosis via TP53-dependent and -independent pathways. In TP53-positive SK-Hep1 cells, GTN furthermore induced TP53 transcription-dependent and -independent apoptosis. After GTN treatment, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, formation of DNA double-strand breaks, transactivation of TP53 and/or PMAIP1 gene, translocation of TP53 and/or PMAIP1 proteins to mitochondria, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, cleavage of caspases and induction of apoptosis in both cell lines were sustained. GTN might represent a novel class of anticancer drug that induces apoptosis in HCC-derived cells through PMAIP1 transactivation regardless of the status of TP53 gene. - Highlights: > Goniothalamin (GTN) induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinomas-derived cells. > The apoptosis induced by GTN is PMAIP1-dependent, regardless of TP53 status. > The apoptosis induced by GTN might be TP53 transcription-dependent or -independent. > GTN-induced apoptosis is mitochondria- and caspases-mediated.

  10. 21 CFR 582.60 - Synthetic flavoring substances and adjuvants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...). Geranyl acetate (geraniol acetate). Glycerol (glyceryl) tributyrate (tributyrin, butyrin). Limonene (d-, l... (benzoic aldehyde). N-Butyric acid (butanoic acid). d- or l-Carvone (carvol). Cinnamaldehyde...

  11. 21 CFR 582.60 - Synthetic flavoring substances and adjuvants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...). Geranyl acetate (geraniol acetate). Glycerol (glyceryl) tributyrate (tributyrin, butyrin). Limonene (d-, l... (benzoic aldehyde). N-Butyric acid (butanoic acid). d- or l-Carvone (carvol). Cinnamaldehyde...

  12. 21 CFR 582.60 - Synthetic flavoring substances and adjuvants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...). Geranyl acetate (geraniol acetate). Glycerol (glyceryl) tributyrate (tributyrin, butyrin). Limonene (d-, l... (benzoic aldehyde). N-Butyric acid (butanoic acid). d- or l-Carvone (carvol). Cinnamaldehyde...

  13. 21 CFR 582.60 - Synthetic flavoring substances and adjuvants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...). Geranyl acetate (geraniol acetate). Glycerol (glyceryl) tributyrate (tributyrin, butyrin). Limonene (d-, l... (benzoic aldehyde). N-Butyric acid (butanoic acid). d- or l-Carvone (carvol). Cinnamaldehyde...

  14. 21 CFR 582.60 - Synthetic flavoring substances and adjuvants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...). Geranyl acetate (geraniol acetate). Glycerol (glyceryl) tributyrate (tributyrin, butyrin). Limonene (d-, l... (benzoic aldehyde). N-Butyric acid (butanoic acid). d- or l-Carvone (carvol). Cinnamaldehyde...

  15. 5-HIAA

    MedlinePlus

    HIAA; 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid; Serotonin metabolite ... interfere with the test. Medicines that can increase 5-HIAA measurements include acetaminophen (Tylenol), acetanilide, phenacetin, glyceryl ...

  16. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) The acrylate ester copolymer is a fully polymerized copolymer of ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate... emulsion defoamer. Disodium hydrogen phosphate Do. Formaldehyde Glyceryl monostearate Methyl...

  17. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... polymerized copolymer of ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate, and methacrylic acid applied in emulsion form to... Glyceryl monostearate Methyl cellulose Mineral oil Paraffin wax Potassium hydroxide Potassium...

  18. 21 CFR 175.210 - Acrylate ester copolymer coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) The acrylate ester copolymer is a fully polymerized copolymer of ethyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate... emulsion defoamer. Disodium hydrogen phosphate Do. Formaldehyde Glyceryl monostearate Methyl...

  19. Nitroglycerin induces DNA damage and vascular cell death in the setting of nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Fahrer, Jörg; Oelze, Matthias; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Steven, Sebastian; Welschof, Philipp; Zinßius, Elena; Stamm, Paul; Kashani, Fatemeh; Roohani, Siyer; Kress, Joana Melanie; Ullmann, Elisabeth; Tran, Lan P; Schulz, Eberhard; Epe, Bernd; Kaina, Bernd; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) and other organic nitrates are widely used vasodilators. Their side effects are development of nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Given the potential of GTN to induce nitro-oxidative stress, we investigated the interaction between nitro-oxidative DNA damage and vascular dysfunction in experimental nitrate tolerance. Cultured endothelial hybridoma cells (EA.hy 926) and Wistar rats were treated with GTN (ex vivo: 10-1000 µM; in vivo: 10, 20 and 50 mg/kg/day for 3 days, s.c.). The level of DNA strand breaks, 8-oxoguanine and O (6)-methylguanine DNA adducts was determined by Comet assay, dot blot and immunohistochemistry. Vascular function was determined by isometric tension recording. DNA adducts and strand breaks were induced by GTN in cells in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. GTN in vivo administration leads to endothelial dysfunction, nitrate tolerance, aortic and cardiac oxidative stress, formation of DNA adducts, stabilization of p53 and apoptotic death of vascular cells in a dose-dependent fashion. Mice lacking O (6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase displayed more vascular O (6)-methylguanine adducts and oxidative stress under GTN therapy than wild-type mice. Although we were not able to prove a causal role of DNA damage in the etiology of nitrate tolerance, the finding of GTN-induced DNA damage such as the mutagenic and toxic adduct O (6)-methylguanine, and cell death supports the notion that GTN based therapy may provoke adverse side effects, including endothelial function. Further studies are warranted to clarify whether GTN pro-apoptotic effects are related to an impaired recovery of patients upon myocardial infarction. PMID:27357950

  20. 21 CFR 172.832 - Monoglyceride citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN... glyceryl monooleate and its citric acid monoester manufactured by the reaction of glyceryl monooleate with... addition to oils and fats whereby the additive does not exceed 200 parts per million of the combined...

  1. 21 CFR 172.832 - Monoglyceride citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN... glyceryl monooleate and its citric acid monoester manufactured by the reaction of glyceryl monooleate with... addition to oils and fats whereby the additive does not exceed 200 parts per million of the combined...

  2. 21 CFR 172.832 - Monoglyceride citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN... glyceryl monooleate and its citric acid monoester manufactured by the reaction of glyceryl monooleate with... addition to oils and fats whereby the additive does not exceed 200 parts per million of the combined...

  3. 76 FR 5796 - Gas Transmission Northwest Corporation; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Gas Transmission Northwest Corporation; Notice of Application January 26, 2011. Take notice that on January 14, 2011, Gas Transmission Northwest Corporation (GTN), 717 Texas..., Manager, Project Determinations & Regulatory Administration, Gas Transmission Northwest Corporation,...

  4. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-independent bioactivation of nitroglycerin in porcine and bovine blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Regina; Wölkart, Gerald; Opelt, Marissa; Schwarzenegger, Christine; Hofinger, Marielies; Neubauer, Andrea; Kollau, Alexander; Schmidt, Kurt; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN), yielding 1,2-glycerol dinitrate and nitric oxide or a related activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, is catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) in rodent and human blood vessels. The essential role of ALDH2 has been confirmed in many studies and is considered as general principle of GTN-induced vasodilation in mammals. However, this view is challenged by an early report showing that diphenyleneiodonium, which we recently characterized as potent ALDH2 inhibitor, has no effect on GTN-induced relaxation of bovine coronary arteries (De La Lande et al., 1996). We investigated this issue and found that inhibition of ALDH2 attenuates GTN-induced coronary vasodilation in isolated perfused rat hearts but has no effect on relaxation to GTN of bovine and porcine coronary arteries. This observation is explained by low levels of ALDH2 protein expression in bovine coronary arteries and several types of porcine blood vessels. ALDH2 mRNA expression and the rates of GTN denitration were similarly low, excluding a significant contribution of ALDH2 to the bioactivation of GTN in these vessels. Attempts to identify the responsible pathway with enzyme inhibitors did not provide conclusive evidence for the involvement of ALDH3A1, cytochrome P450, or GSH-S-transferase. Thus, the present manuscript describes a hitherto unrecognized pathway of GTN bioactivation in bovine and porcine blood vessels. If present in the human vasculature, this pathway might contribute to the therapeutic effects of organic nitrates that are not metabolized by ALDH2. PMID:25576686

  5. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-independent bioactivation of nitroglycerin in porcine and bovine blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Regina; Wölkart, Gerald; Opelt, Marissa; Schwarzenegger, Christine; Hofinger, Marielies; Neubauer, Andrea; Kollau, Alexander; Schmidt, Kurt; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-02-15

    The vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN), yielding 1,2-glycerol dinitrate and nitric oxide or a related activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, is catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) in rodent and human blood vessels. The essential role of ALDH2 has been confirmed in many studies and is considered as general principle of GTN-induced vasodilation in mammals. However, this view is challenged by an early report showing that diphenyleneiodonium, which we recently characterized as potent ALDH2 inhibitor, has no effect on GTN-induced relaxation of bovine coronary arteries (De La Lande et al., 1996). We investigated this issue and found that inhibition of ALDH2 attenuates GTN-induced coronary vasodilation in isolated perfused rat hearts but has no effect on relaxation to GTN of bovine and porcine coronary arteries. This observation is explained by low levels of ALDH2 protein expression in bovine coronary arteries and several types of porcine blood vessels. ALDH2 mRNA expression and the rates of GTN denitration were similarly low, excluding a significant contribution of ALDH2 to the bioactivation of GTN in these vessels. Attempts to identify the responsible pathway with enzyme inhibitors did not provide conclusive evidence for the involvement of ALDH3A1, cytochrome P450, or GSH-S-transferase. Thus, the present manuscript describes a hitherto unrecognized pathway of GTN bioactivation in bovine and porcine blood vessels. If present in the human vasculature, this pathway might contribute to the therapeutic effects of organic nitrates that are not metabolized by ALDH2. PMID:25576686

  6. Nitroglycerin drives endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Fernandes, Denise C.; Tanaka, Leonardo Y.; Fukai, Tohru; Laurindo, Francisco R.M.; Mason, Ronald P.; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Minshall, Richard D.; Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G.

    2012-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) has been clinically used to treat angina pectoris and acute heart episodes for over 100 years. The effects of GTN have long been recognized and active research has contributed to the unraveling of numerous metabolic routes capable of converting GTN to the potent vasoactive messenger nitric oxide. Recently, the mechanism by which minute doses of GTN elicit robust pharmacological responses was revisited and eNOS activation was implicated as an important route mediating vasodilation induced by low GTN doses (1–50 nM). Here, we demonstrate that at such concentrations the pharmacologic effects of nitroglycerin are largely dependent on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt/PKB, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) signal transduction axis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nitroglycerin-dependent accumulation of 3,4,5-InsP3, probably because of inhibition of PTEN, is important for eNOS activation, conferring a mechanistic basis for GTN pharmacological action at pharmacologically relevant doses. PMID:22037515

  7. Nitroglycerin drives endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway.

    PubMed

    Mao, Mao; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Fernandes, Denise C; Tanaka, Leonardo Y; Fukai, Tohru; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Mason, Ronald P; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Minshall, Richard D; Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G

    2012-01-15

    Nitroglycerin (GTN) has been clinically used to treat angina pectoris and acute heart episodes for over 100 years. The effects of GTN have long been recognized and active research has contributed to the unraveling of numerous metabolic routes capable of converting GTN to the potent vasoactive messenger nitric oxide. Recently, the mechanism by which minute doses of GTN elicit robust pharmacological responses was revisited and eNOS activation was implicated as an important route mediating vasodilation induced by low GTN doses (1-50nM). Here, we demonstrate that at such concentrations the pharmacologic effects of nitroglycerin are largely dependent on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt/PKB, and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) signal transduction axis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that nitroglycerin-dependent accumulation of 3,4,5-InsP(3), probably because of inhibition of PTEN, is important for eNOS activation, conferring a mechanistic basis for GTN pharmacological action at pharmacologically relevant doses. PMID:22037515

  8. Circulating Cell Free DNA in the Diagnosis of Trophoblastic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Openshaw, Mark R.; Harvey, Richard A.; Sebire, Neil J.; Kaur, Baljeet; Sarwar, Naveed; Seckl, Michael J.; Fisher, Rosemary A.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) represents a group of diseases characterized by production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Since non-gestational tumors may occasionally secrete hCG, histopathological diagnosis is important for appropriate clinical management. However, a histopathological diagnosis is not always available. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extracting cell free DNA (cfDNA) from the plasma of women with GTN for use as a “liquid biopsy” in patients without histopathological diagnosis. cfDNA was prepared from the plasma of 20 women with a diagnosis of GTN and five with hCG-secreting tumors of unknown origin. Genotyping of cfDNA from the patient, genomic DNA from her and her partner and DNA from the tumor tissue identified circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) (from 9% to 53% of total cfDNA) in 12 of 20 patients with GTN. In one case without a tissue diagnosis, ctDNA enabled a diagnosis of GTN originating in a non-molar conception and in another a diagnosis of non-gestational tumor, based on the high degree of allelic instability and loss of heterozygosity in the ctDNA. In summary ctDNA can be detected in the plasma of women with GTN and can facilitate the diagnosis of both gestational and non-gestational trophoblastic tumors in cases without histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26981554

  9. In vivo depletion of free thiols does not account for nitroglycerin-induced tolerance: a thiol-nitrate interaction hypothesis as an alternative explanation for nitroglycerin activity and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Haj-Yehia, A I; Benet, L Z

    1996-09-01

    The present study investigates the effects of thiol-depleting/ modifying agents on the activity of and tolerance to nitroglycerin (GTN), sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) in an in vivo rat model. Rats were treated with either vehicle (control), GTN (before and after induction of tolerance), diethyl maleate (a thiol-depleting agent) or N-ethylmaleimide (a thiol-modifying agent). The effects of GTN, SNP and SNAP on vascular cyclic GMP levels were investigated before and after each treatment. In addition, plasma and tissue thiol concentrations were measured in the same tissues as used for the determination of cyclic GMP in aorta and inferior vena cava after single and serial i.v. bolus doses of each drug. Depletion of free thiols (glutathione and cysteine) was not found to accompany tolerance development in GTN-treated tolerant rats or to significantly enhance tolerance development or augment its magnitude in diethyl maleate-treated rats. When rats were pretreated with a low single dose of N-ethylmaleimide, where no significant changes in vascular free thiols were observed, significant reduction in GTN- and SNP-induced, but not SNAP-induced, vascular cyclic GMP production was obtained. Considering the differential effects of diethyl maleate (mainly free thiol depletion) and N-ethylmaleimide (mainly proteinous thiol-alkylation) on vascular thiols, these results indicate that depletion of sulfhydryl groups other than those from free glutathione and cysteine seems to be involved in the mechanisms defining GTN and SNP (but not SNAP) action and tolerance. Here we propose that SNAP may act either directly by nitrosation of the heme moiety of the enzyme or via an S-enzyme-S-drug transnitrosation reaction, whereas GTN and SNP actions are mediated by the formation of S-nitrosothiol on the enzyme itself, rather than by activation of the enzyme by free S-nitrosothiols. PMID:8819515

  10. Application of Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman Constitutive Model to the Tensile Behavior of Reinforcing Bars with Corrosion Pits

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yidong; Qian, Chunxiang

    2013-01-01

    Based on meso-damage mechanics and finite element analysis, the aim of this paper is to describe the feasibility of the Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman (GTN) constitutive model in describing the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars. The orthogonal test results showed that different fracture pattern and the related damage evolution process can be simulated by choosing different material parameters of GTN constitutive model. Compared with failure parameters, the two constitutive parameters are significant factors affecting the tensile strength. Both the nominal yield and ultimate tensile strength decrease markedly with the increase of constitutive parameters. Combining with the latest data and trial-and-error method, the suitable material parameters of GTN constitutive model were adopted to simulate the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars in concrete under carbonation environment attack. The numerical predictions can not only agree very well with experimental measurements, but also simplify the finite element modeling process. PMID:23342140

  11. Fatal Cases of Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia in a National Trophoblastic Disease Reference Center in Dakar Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Gueye, Mamour; Ndiaye-Gueye, Mame Diarra; Kane Gueye, Serigne Modou; Moreau, Jean Charles

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to analyze deaths after gestational trophoblastic neoplasia and to determine the factors of treatment failure. Methods: This is a retrospective study in Aristide Le Dantec teaching Hospital in Dakar, Senegal, between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2014. We took into account socio-epidemiological characteristics of patients, initial diagnosis, time between uterine evacuation and admission, time to onset of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN), treatment received (deadlines, protocols), difficulties experienced in the diagnosis and the initiation of treatment and survival. Results: In total, 1044 patients were admitted during the study period; 164 cases of GTN were diagnosed (15.7%); and 21 deaths occurred leading to a specific lethality of 12.8%. The average age was 30 years. Almost all patients (n = 18; 85.7%) had low income or no income. Eight out of 21 patients (38.1%) were seen in our department after GTN onset. The mean time to onset of GTN of all patients was 22.1 weeks. For 66.6%, histology was not available; the diagnosis of hydatidiform mole was made on the clinical history and sonographic features and GTN on human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) evolution and ultrasound findings. None of the patients had regular chemotherapy due to financial reasons. Patients who died within 3 months after diagnosis had metastatic tumors (7 of 21). All these women had resistance to treatment or progressed after three courses of chemotherapy. Ten of the 12 women with high-risk GTN were not treated with multi-agent chemotherapy (EMA-CO) for purely financial reasons. Conclusion and Global Health Implications: The high incidence and mortality require a profound reorganization of our health system and a high awareness of practitioners to refer to time or to declare all suspected cases of hydatidiform mole or gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. PMID:27622010

  12. Effect of heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter polymorphism on cancer risk by histological subtype: A prospective study in arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meei-Maan; Lee, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Ling-I; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Lee, Te-Chang; Wang, Yuang-Hung; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2016-04-15

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is upregulated by many stressful stimuli, including arsenic. A GT-repeat ((GT)n) polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter inversely modulates the levels of HO-1 induction. Previous HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism studies in relation to cancer risk have shown disparate results. We prospectively investigated the associations between HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism and cancer risk related to arsenic from drinking water. Totally, 1,013 participants from community-based cohorts of arseniasis-endemic areas in Taiwan were followed for 13 years. Allelic polymorphisms were classified into long (L, ≥ 27 (GT)n) and short (S, <27 (GT)n). Newly developed cases were identified through linkage with National Cancer Registry of Taiwan. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard methods were used to evaluate effects of the HO-1 polymorphism alone or combined with arsenic exposure. Results showed that participants with the S/S genotype had an increased risk of Bowen's disease (HR = 10.49; 95% CI: 2.77-39.7), invasive skin cancer (HR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.13-7.87), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (HR = 3.39; 95% CI: 1.15-9.95) versus those with L/S or L/L genotype. The S/S genotype combined with high arsenic exposure (>300 μg/L) had a greater risk of skin cancer compared to the genotype alone. Consistent with previous findings, participants with the S-allele had a reduced risk of lung adenocarcinoma (HR = 0.21; 95% CI: 0.03-0.68) versus those with L/L genotype. There were no significant differences in risk of urothelial carcinoma among the three genotypes. Associations of HO-1 (GT)n polymorphism with cancer risk differs by histological subtype and the polymorphism should be considered a modifier in the risk assessment of arsenic exposure. PMID:26566708

  13. The Canoe Ridge Natural Gas Storage Project

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, Steve P.; Spane, Frank A.; Johnson, Vernon G.

    2003-06-18

    In 1999 the Pacific Gas and Electric Gas Transmission Northwest (GTN) drilled a borehole to investigate the feasibility of developing a natural gas-storage facility in a structural dome formed in Columbia River basalts in the Columbia Basin of south-central Washington State. The proposed aquifer storage facility will be an unconventional one where natural gas will be initially injected (and later retrieved) in one or multiple previous horizons (interflow zones) that are confined between deep (>700 meters) basalt flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group. This report summarizes the results of joint investigations on that feasibility study by GTN and the US Department of Energy.

  14. Triploidy—Observations in 154 Diandric Cases

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Nanna Brink; Bolund, Lars; Nyegaard, Mette; Faaborg, Louise; Jørgensen, Mette Warming; Lund, Helle; Niemann, Isa; Sunde, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Hydatidiform moles (HMs) are abnormal human pregnancies with vesicular chorionic villi, imposing two clinical challenges; miscarriage and a risk of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN). The parental type of most HMs are either diandric diploid (PP) or diandric triploid (PPM). We consecutively collected 154 triploid or near-triploid samples from conceptuses with vesicular chorionic villi. We used analysis of DNA markers and/or methylation sensitive-MLPA and collected data from registries and patients records. We performed whole genome SNP analysis of one case of twinning (PP+PM).In all 154 triploids or near-triploids we found two different paternal contributions to the genome (P1P2M). The ratios between the sex chromosomal constitutions XXX, XXY, and XYY were 5.7: 6.9: 1.0. No cases of GTN were observed. Our results corroborate that all triploid human conceptuses with vesicular chorionic villi have the parental type P1P2M. The sex chromosomal ratios suggest approximately equal frequencies of meiosis I and meiosis II errors with selection against the XYY conceptuses or a combination of dispermy, non-disjunction in meiosis I and meiosis II and selection against XYY conceptuses. Although single cases of GTN after a triploid HM have been reported, the results of this study combined with data from previous prospective studies estimate the risk of GTN after a triploid mole to 0% (95% CI: 0–1,4%). PMID:26562155

  15. Triploidy--Observations in 154 Diandric Cases.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Nanna Brink; Bolund, Lars; Nyegaard, Mette; Faaborg, Louise; Jørgensen, Mette Warming; Lund, Helle; Niemann, Isa; Sunde, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Hydatidiform moles (HMs) are abnormal human pregnancies with vesicular chorionic villi, imposing two clinical challenges; miscarriage and a risk of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN). The parental type of most HMs are either diandric diploid (PP) or diandric triploid (PPM). We consecutively collected 154 triploid or near-triploid samples from conceptuses with vesicular chorionic villi. We used analysis of DNA markers and/or methylation sensitive-MLPA and collected data from registries and patients records. We performed whole genome SNP analysis of one case of twinning (PP+PM).In all 154 triploids or near-triploids we found two different paternal contributions to the genome (P1P2M). The ratios between the sex chromosomal constitutions XXX, XXY, and XYY were 5.7: 6.9: 1.0. No cases of GTN were observed. Our results corroborate that all triploid human conceptuses with vesicular chorionic villi have the parental type P1P2M. The sex chromosomal ratios suggest approximately equal frequencies of meiosis I and meiosis II errors with selection against the XYY conceptuses or a combination of dispermy, non-disjunction in meiosis I and meiosis II and selection against XYY conceptuses. Although single cases of GTN after a triploid HM have been reported, the results of this study combined with data from previous prospective studies estimate the risk of GTN after a triploid mole to 0% (95% CI: 0-1,4%). PMID:26562155

  16. 77 FR 48132 - Gas Transmission Northwest, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Gas Transmission Northwest, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on July 31, 2012, Gas Transmission Northwest, LLC (GTN), filed in Docket No. CP12-494-000, an application... directed to Mr. Richard Parke, Manager, Certificates, Gas Transmission Northwest, LLC, 717 Texas...

  17. Variations in the heme oxygenase-1 microsatellite polymorphism are associated with plasma CD14 and viral load in HIV-infected African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Seu, Lillian; Burt, Trevor D.; Witte, John S.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; McCune, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an anti-inflammatory enzyme that maintains homeostasis during cellular stress. Given previous findings that shorter length variants of a HO-1 promoter-region GTn microsatellite polymorphism are associated with increased HO-1 expression in cell lines, we hypothesized that shorter variants would also be associated with increased levels of HO-1 expression, less inflammation, and lower levels of inflammation-associated viral replication in HIV-infected subjects. Healthy donors (n=20) with shorter GTn repeats had higher HO-1 mRNA transcript in peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (r= −0.38, p=0.05). The presence of fewer GTn repeats in subjects with untreated HIV disease was associated with higher HO-1 mRNA levels in peripheral blood (r= −0.41, p=0.02); similar observations were made in CD14+ monocytes from antiretroviral-treated subjects (r= −0.36, p=0.04). In African-Americans, but not Caucasians, greater GTn repeats were correlated with higher soluble CD14 (sCD14) levels during highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (r= 0.38, p=0.007) as well as higher mean viral load off-therapy (r= 0.24, p=0.04). These data demonstrate that the HO-1 GTn microsatellite polymorphism is associated with higher levels of HO-1 expression and that this pathway may have important effects on the association between inflammation and HIV replication. PMID:22048453

  18. LINE-1 Methylation Patterns as a Predictor of Postmolar Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lertkhachonsuk, Ruangsak; Paiwattananupant, Krissada; Tantbirojn, Patou; Rattanatanyong, Prakasit; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To study the potential of long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) methylation change in the prediction of postmolar gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN). Methods. The LINE-1 methylation pattern from first trimester placenta, hydatidiform mole, and malignant trophoblast specimens were compared. Then, hydatidiform mole patients from 11999 to 2010 were classified into the following 2 groups: a remission group and a group that developed postmolar GTN. Specimens were prepared for a methylation study. The methylation levels and percentages of LINE-1 loci were evaluated for their sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the prediction of postmolar GTN. Results. First, 12 placentas, 38 moles, and 19 malignant trophoblast specimens were compared. The hydatidiform mole group had the highest LINE-1 methylation level (p = 0.003) and the uCuC of LINE-1 increased in the malignant trophoblast group (p ≤ 0.001). One hundred forty-five hydatidiform mole patients were classified as 103 remission and 42 postmolar GTN patients. The %mCuC and %uCmC of LINE-1 showed the lowest p value for distinguishing between the two groups (p < 0.001). The combination of the pretreatment β-hCG level (≥100,000 mIU/mL) with the %mCuC and %uCmC, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy modified the levels to 60.0%, 92.2%, 77.4%, 83.8%, and 82.3%, respectively. Conclusions. A reduction in the partial methylation of LINE-1 occurs early before the clinical appearance of malignant transformation. The %mCuC and %uCmC of LINE-1s may be promising markers for monitoring hydatidiform moles before progression to GTN. PMID:26448937

  19. Incorporation of phosphatidylglycerol into murein lipoprotein in intact cells of Salmonella typhimurium by phospholipid vesicle fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, P K; Lai, J S; Wu, H C

    1979-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the diglyceride moiety of murein lipoprotein was studied by fusion of labeled phospholipid vesicles with intact cells of Salmonella typhimurium. Phosphatidylglycerol was found to be an excellent donor for the glyceryl moiety in lipoprotein, whereas phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin were not. The incorporation of radioactivity from monoacyl-phosphatidylglycerol into lipoprotein can be attributed to its conversion to phosphatidylglycerol. The results strongly support our hypothesis that the glyceryl residue covalently linked to murein lipoprotein is derived from the nonacylated glycerol moiety of phosphatidylglycerol. PMID:368018

  20. In vitro drug release mechanism and drug loading studies of cubic phase gels.

    PubMed

    Lara, Marilisa G; Bentley, M Vitória L B; Collett, John H

    2005-04-11

    Glyceryl monooleate/water cubic phase systems were investigated as drug delivery systems, using salicylic acid as a model drug. The liquid crystalline phases formed by the glyceryl monooleate (GMO)/water systems were characterized by polarizing microscopy. In vitro drug release studies were performed and the influences of initial water content, swelling and drug loading on the drug release properties were evaluated. Water uptake followed second-order swelling kinetics. In vitro release profiles showed Fickian diffusion control and were independent on the initial water content and drug loading, suggesting GMO cubic phase gels suitability for use as drug delivery system. PMID:15778062

  1. Rifabutin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for inhaled antitubercular therapy: Physicochemical and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Diana P; Faria, Vasco; Gonçalves, Lídia M D; Taboada, Pablo; Remuñán-López, Carmen; Almeida, António J

    2016-01-30

    Systemic administration of antitubercular drugs can be complicated by off-target toxicity to cells and tissues that are not infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis . Delivery of antitubercular drugs via nanoparticles directly to the infected cells has the potential to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity. The present work demonstrates the potential of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) as a delivery platform for rifabutin (RFB). Two different RFB-containing SLN formulations were produced using glyceryl dibehenate or glyceryl tristearate as lipid components. Full characterization was performed in terms of particle size, encapsulation and loading efficiency, morphology by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies. Physical stability was evaluated when formulations were stored at 5 ± 3°C and in the freeze-dried form. Formulations were stable throughout lyophilization without significant variations on physicochemical properties and RFB losses. The SLN showed to be able to endure harsh temperature conditions as demonstrated by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Release studies revealed that RFB was almost completely released from SLN. In vitro studies with THP1 cells differentiated in macrophages showing a nanoparticle uptake of 46 ± 3% and 26 ± 9% for glyceryl dibehenate and glyceryl tristearate SLN, respectively. Cell viability studies using relevant lung cell lines (A549 and Calu-3) revealed low cytotoxicity for the SLN, suggesting these could be new potential vehicles for pulmonary delivery of antitubercular drugs. PMID:26656946

  2. 21 CFR 172.832 - Monoglyceride citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION... monooleate and its citric acid monoester manufactured by the reaction of glyceryl monooleate with citric acid... percent-17 percent. (b) It is used, or intended for use, in antioxidant formulations for addition to...

  3. 21 CFR 172.832 - Monoglyceride citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.832... manufactured by the reaction of glyceryl monooleate with citric acid under controlled conditions may be safely... use, in antioxidant formulations for addition to oils and fats whereby the additive does not...

  4. 75 FR 20785 - Polyglyceryl Phthalate Ester of Coconut Oil Fatty Acids; Exemption from the Requirement of a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... . II. What Does this Correction Do? In the Federal Register of July 8, 2009, (74 FR 32456), EPA's... of polyglyceryl phthalate ester of coconut oil fatty acids, including fatty acid coco polymers with... acid coco of surfactants polymers with glyceryl and phthalic anhydride (CAS No. 67746-02-5) and...

  5. Investigations into the chemistry and insecticidal activity of euonymus europaeus seed oil and methanol extract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Euonymus europaeus seeds and seed oil were investigated for their volatiles using GC-MS-FID, Headspace-SPME/GC-MS-FID, and derivative GC-MS-FID for their volatiles and HPLC-DAD-CAD/MS for their non-volatile compounds. The seeds contain about 30% of fatty oil, mainly glyceryl trioleate, small amounts...

  6. Antihistamine Effect of a Pure Bioactive Compound Isolated from Slug (Diplosolenodes occidentalis) Material

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, AS; Simon, OR; Wheatle, D; Ruddock, P; McCook, K

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Folklore claims of the therapeutic effect of garden slug (Diplosolenodes occidentalis) extract used to relieve bronchoconstriction in asthmatic individuals were never validated scientifically. The aim of this study was to isolate the pure bioactive compound from slug extract causing this effect. Methods: The crude ground material was prepared in ethanol and after filtration, separation by flash column chromatography method was done. The structure was elucidated by data from hydrogen and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) profiles. The bioactive compound was assessed for dose dependent response effects on guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle pre-contracted with histamine. Receptor specificity studies were done by using HTMT dimaleate (H1 agonist). The type of antagonism was also identified. Results: The pure component isolated from garden slug material was identified by spectral studies as glyceryl trilinolenate. It caused dose-dependent relaxation in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle strips pre-contracted with histamine, it acted via H1 type receptors and showed non-competitive antagonism. Conclusion: Glyceryl trilinolenate produced dose-dependent relaxation in tracheal smooth muscle strips in the presence of the agonist histamine. Glyceryl trilinolenate displayed non-competitive antagonism at H1 receptors in the trachea. This agent was able to alleviate bronchoconstriction in individuals presenting with atopic asthma in rural agricultural areas in Jamaica (verbal communications). It is possible that glyceryl trilinolenate can be used therapeutically to produce tracheal smooth muscle relaxation in individuals presenting with atopic asthma. PMID:25781274

  7. 76 FR 21339 - Certain New Chemicals; Receipt and Status Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ...)-, reaction products with bu glycidyl ether* P-11-0043......... 10/26/10 01/23/11 Gelest, Inc. (S) Conversion... alkanediol and cyclic ether, alkanoate P-11-0054......... 11/03/10 01/31/11 Mane, USA (G) Perfumery (S) 2H...) A component (G) Glyceryl in ultraviolet polypropylene light/electron glycol ether beam...

  8. The pharmacology and therapeutic relevance of endocannabinoid derived cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 products.

    PubMed

    Woodward, D F; Carling, R W C; Cornell, C L; Fliri, H G; Martos, J L; Pettit, S N; Liang, Y; Wang, J W

    2008-10-01

    The discovery of anandamide and 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) as naturally occurring mammalian endocannabinoids has had important and wide-reaching therapeutic implications. This, to a large extent, ensues from the complexity of endocannabinoid biology. One facet of endocannabinoid biology now receiving increased attention is the cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) derived oxidation products. Anandamide and 2-AG are oxidized to a range of PG-ethanolamides and PG-glyceryl esters that closely approaches that of the prostaglandins (PGs) formed from arachidonic acid. The pharmacology of these electrochemically neutral PG-ethanolamides (prostamides) and PG-glyceryl esters appears to be unique. No meaningful interaction with natural or recombinant prostanoid receptors is apparent. Nevertheless, in certain cells and tissues, prostamides and PG-glyceryl esters exert potent effects. The recent discovery of selective antagonists for the putative prostamide receptor has been a major advance in further establishing prostamide pharmacology as an entity distinct from prostanoid receptors. Since discovery of the prototype prostamide antagonist (AGN 204396), rapid progress has been made. The latest prostamide antagonists (AGN 211334-6) are 100 times more potent than the prototype and are, therefore, sufficiently active to be used in living animal studies. These compounds will allow a full evaluation of the role of prostamides in health and disease. To date, the only therapeutic application for prostamides is in glaucoma. The prostamide analog, bimatoprost, being the most effective ocular hypotensive drug currently available. Interestingly, PGE(2)-glyceryl ester and its chemically stable analog PGE(2)-serinolamide also lower intraocular pressure in dogs. Nevertheless, the therapeutic future of PGE(2)-glyceryl ester is more likely to reside in inflammation. PMID:18700152

  9. Unusual Presentation of Hypothyroidism in a Pregnant Woman, Mimicking Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Karisani, Narmin; Mazloomi, Maryam; Rahimi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common health issue worldwide with varying clinical manifestations. We report a woman who experienced an incomplete abortion and undiagnosed hypothyroidism who was referred to the oncologist with the suspicion of metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasm (GTN). A 29-year-old woman with incomplete abortion was referred to an oncologist for possible GTN due to persistent active vaginal bleeding, an elevated beta human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), abnormal cervical inspection exam, abnormal liver function tests, ovarian enlargement, ascites, and a pleural effusion. She was found to have hypothyroidism in further work-up. She was managed with thyroid hormone replacement therapy and her condition improved after 6 weeks. Complete resolution of the ovarian mass and pericardial and pleural effusion was achieved. This case describes an important experience; hypothyroidism should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any woman with an incomplete abortion presenting with an ovarian mass. Evaluation and correct diagnosis are important to prevent mismanagement. PMID:27034864

  10. Dual-stimuli-responsive drug release from interpenetrating polymer network-structured hydrogels of gelatin and dextran.

    PubMed

    Kurisawa, M; Yui, N

    1998-07-31

    Interpenetrating polymer network (IPN)-structured hydrogels of gelatin (Gtn) and dextran (Dex) were prepared with lipid microspheres (LMs) as a drug microreservoir, and LM release from these hydrogels was examined in relation to their dual-stimuli-responsive degradation. A phase morphology in the IPN-structured hydrogels was varied with the preparation temperature, i.e. above or below the sol-gel transition temperature (Ttrans) of Gtn. The IPN-structured hydrogel prepared below Ttrans exhibited a specific degradation-controlled LM release behavior: LM release from the hydrogel in the presence of either alpha-chymotrypsin or dextranase alone was completely hindered, whereas LM release was observed in the presence of both enzymes. It is concluded that dual-stimuli-responsive drug release can be achieved by specific degradation of a particular IPN-structured hydrogel. PMID:9724906

  11. The Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers: an overview of recent activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    The Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G) is an organizational framework for three operational bodies dedicated to global mapping and monitoring of glacier changes. In this talk I will provide an overview of recent progress made by the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS), the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) toward distribution and analysis of global in-situ and remotely sensed glacier observations. I will highlight new initiatives aimed at database integration, modernization of internet-based tools, and enhanced community outreach. These activities are helping to generate new discoveries in cryospheric studies, which I will illustrate through several example applications. Finally, I will outline a vision for future GTN-G efforts that will enable rapid response to anticipated glacier variations resulting from climate variability.

  12. International glacier monitoring and data archiving, from a national perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, Liss M.

    2016-04-01

    The Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G) is a framework for internationally coordinated monitoring of glaciers and ice caps and run by three operational bodies: the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS), the US National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) initiative. In this talk, I will present recent progresses by GTN-G in efforts to store and provide extensive glaciological data to the community. I will also discuss some of the challenges in monitoring and data archiving, illustrated with examples from my own experiences as a data provider. Finally, I would like to discuss how we as a community could enrich and complete existing databases.

  13. Unusual Presentation of Hypothyroidism in a Pregnant Woman, Mimicking Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Mazloomi, Maryam; Rahimi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common health issue worldwide with varying clinical manifestations. We report a woman who experienced an incomplete abortion and undiagnosed hypothyroidism who was referred to the oncologist with the suspicion of metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasm (GTN). A 29-year-old woman with incomplete abortion was referred to an oncologist for possible GTN due to persistent active vaginal bleeding, an elevated beta human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), abnormal cervical inspection exam, abnormal liver function tests, ovarian enlargement, ascites, and a pleural effusion. She was found to have hypothyroidism in further work-up. She was managed with thyroid hormone replacement therapy and her condition improved after 6 weeks. Complete resolution of the ovarian mass and pericardial and pleural effusion was achieved. This case describes an important experience; hypothyroidism should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any woman with an incomplete abortion presenting with an ovarian mass. Evaluation and correct diagnosis are important to prevent mismanagement. PMID:27034864

  14. Single synchronous pulmonary metastasis from placental site trophoblastic tumor and teratoma.

    PubMed

    Billè, Andrea; Girelli, Lara; Colecchia, Maurizio; Pastorino, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    Placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT) is a rare variant of gestational trophoblastic tumor (GTN), accounting for 1-2% of all GTNs. Primary testicular PSTTs are extremely rare. Thirty percent of patients with PSTT show multiple lung and brain metastases at the time of diagnosis. We present the first case of a synchronous single pulmonary trophoblastic placental tumor metastasis together with a teratoma and a mixed germinal tumor of the testis, treated with minimally invasive lung metastasectomy. PMID:25908040

  15. Estimating Riverine Water and Constiuent Fluxes in a Data Assimilation Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, B. M.; Saile, P.

    2012-12-01

    River systems are the primary means of transporting waters over the landscape from headwaters to basin mouth while carrying various constituents. Rivers give home to diverse aquatic habitats, while serving humans water needs. River discharge is the most accurately measured component of the hydrological cycle, when it is carried out on the ground using traditional in-situ measurements. While in-situ river monitoring is cost competitive to remote sensing alternatives, comprehensive water flux assessments need to combine in-situ and remote sensing observations with hydrological modeling. The capabilities of in-situ vs. remote sensing sensors are largely complementary that data assimilation frameworks built on top of hydrological models can utilize. The Global Terrestrial Networks for Hydrology (GTN-H) effort of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) was designed to implement such data assimilation on top of the data assets from its partner institutions. GTN-H seeks to hold a comprehensive repository of a wide range of hydrological information ranging from climate data (including various reanalysis and precipitation data products) that are available for near realtime hydrological simulations, in-situ discharge records collected by the Global Runoff Data Centre, Koblenz, Germany, complemented by key water quality variables from UNEP's Global Environmental Monitoring - Water (GEMS/Water) programme. The modeling platform serving GTN-H is currently built on the Framework for Aquatic Modeling of the Earth System (FrAMES) developed by the CUNY Environmental CrossRoads Initiative with contributions from the University of New Hampshire and Colorado University. FrAMES offers high degree of flexibility in configuring large scale hydrological simulations coupled with the capability of tracking dissolved and suspended constituents. This presentation will show the key components of the GTN-H data archive and the application of FrAMES to produce value added hydrological

  16. Acute changes in forearm venous volume and tone using radionuclide plethysmography

    SciTech Connect

    Manyari, D.E.; Malkinson, T.J.; Robinson, V.; Smith, E.R.; Cooper, K.E.

    1988-10-01

    In this investigation blood pool scintigraphy was validated as a method to study acute changes in human forearm veins. Changes in regional forearm vascular volume (capacity) and the occluding pressure-volume (P-V) relationship induced by sublingual nifedipine (NIF) and nitroglycerin (GTN) were recorded in 16 patients with simultaneous data collection by the radionuclide and the mercury-in-rubber strain-gauge techniques. The standard error of estimate (Syx) between successive control measurements using the radionuclide method was 3.1% compared with 3.2% for the strain-gauge method. The venous P-V curves were highly reproducible using both techniques. Strain gauge and radionuclide measurements of acute changes in forearm venous volume correlated well (r = 0.86; Syx = 7%, n = 156). After 20 mg of NIF or 0.6 mg of GTN, mean heart rate increased from 71 +/- 10 to 77 +/- 9 and from 68 +/- 10 to 75 +/- 11 beats/min, respectively, and group systolic blood pressure decreased from 128 +/- 22 to 120 +/- 19 and from 136 +/- 18 to 126 +/- 23 mmHg, respectively (P less than 0.05). At venous occluding pressures of 0 and 30 mmHg, the forearm vascular volume did not change after NIF (2 +/- 4 and -1 +/- 4%; P greater than 0.05), whereas it increased after GTN (8 +/- 5 and 12 +/- 7%; P less than 0.001). The forearm venous P-V relationship did not change after NIF, whereas a significant rightward shift (venodilation, with an increase in unstressed volume) occurred after GTN.

  17. Anti-inflammatory therapies in TRAMP mice: delay in PCa progression.

    PubMed

    Kido, Larissa Akemi; Montico, Fabio; Sauce, Rafael; Macedo, Aline Barbosa; Minatel, Elaine; Costa, Débora Barbosa Vendramini; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Pilli, Ronaldo Aloise; Cagnon, Valeria Helena Alves

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the structural and molecular biology as well as evaluate the immediate and late responses of prostatic cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model after treatment with goniothalamin (GTN) and celecoxib. The treated mice received GTN (150 mg/kg, gavage) or celecoxib (10 mg/kg, gavage) from 8 to 12 weeks of age. They were killed at different ages: the immediate-response groups at 12 weeks and the late-response groups at 22 weeks. The ventral prostate was collected for light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, TUNEL, and ELISA. Morphological analyses indicated that GTN treatment delayed the progression of prostatic adenocarcinoma, leading to a significant decrease of prostatic lesion frequency in both experimental period responses to this treatment, mainly high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Also, the celecoxib treatment showed a particular decrease in the proliferative processes (PCNA) in both the experimental periods. Despite celecoxib diminishing the COX2 and IGFR1 levels, GTN presented higher action spectrum considering the decrease of a greater molecular number involved in the proliferative and inflammatory processes in prostatic cancer. Goniothalamin attenuated the pro-inflammatory response in TRAMP prostatic microenvironment, delaying prostate cancer (PCa) progression. Celecoxib treatment was efficient in the regulation of COX2 in the TRAMP mice, mainly in the advanced disease grade. Finally, we concluded that inflammatory process control in early grades of PCa was crucial for the downregulation of the signaling pathways involved in the proliferative processes in advanced cancer grades. PMID:26772819

  18. Likelihood and Bayesian analyses reveal major genes affecting body composition, carcass, meat quality and the number of false teats in a Chinese European pig line

    PubMed Central

    Marie-Pierre, Sanchez; Bidanel, Jean-Pierre; Zhang, Siqing; Naveau, Jean; Burlot, Thierry; Le Roy, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Segregation analyses were performed using both maximum likelihood – via a Quasi Newton algorithm – (ML-QN) and Bayesian – via Gibbs sampling – (Bayesian-GS) approaches in the Chinese European Tiameslan pig line. Major genes were searched for average ultrasonic backfat thickness (ABT), carcass fat (X2 and X4) and lean (X5) depths, days from 20 to 100 kg (D20100), Napole technological yield (NTY), number of false (FTN) and good (GTN) teats, as well as total teat number (TTN). The discrete nature of FTN was additionally considered using a threshold model under ML methodology. The results obtained with both methods consistently suggested the presence of major genes affecting ABT, X2, NTY, GTN and FTN. Major genes were also suggested for X4 and X5 using ML-QN, but not the Bayesian-GS, approach. The major gene affecting FTN was confirmed using the threshold model. Genetic correlations as well as gene effect and genotype frequency estimates suggested the presence of four different major genes. The first gene would affect fatness traits (ABT, X2 and X4), the second one a leanness trait (X5), the third one NTY and the last one GTN and FTN. Genotype frequencies of breeding animals and their evolution over time were consistent with the selection performed in the Tiameslan line. PMID:12927073

  19. Tegafur Substitution for 5-Fu in Combination with Actinomycin D to Treat Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mei; Ding, Yiling; Yu, Ling; Deng, Yali; Lai, Weisi; Hu, Yun; Zhang, Hongwen; Wu, Xianqing; Fan, Hong; Ding, Hui; Wu, Yilin; Tao, Guangshi

    2015-01-01

    Although 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) combination chemotherapy provides a satisfactory therapeutic response in patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasms (GTNs), it has severe side effects. The current study analyzed the therapeutic effects and side effects of tegafur plus actinomycin D (Act-D) vs. 5-Fu plus Act-D for the treatment of GTNs based on controlled historical records. A total of 427 GTN cases that received tegafur and Act-D combination chemotherapy at the Second Xiangya Hospital of XiangYa Medical School between August 2003 and July 2013 were analyzed based on historical data. A total of 393 GTN cases that received 5-Fu plus Act-D between August 1993 and July 2003 at the same hospital were also analyzed, which constituted the control group. The therapeutic effects, toxicity and side effects after chemotherapy were compared between the groups. The overall response rate was 90.63% in the tegafur+Act-D group (tegafur group) and 92.37% in the 5-Fu+Act-D group (5-Fu group); these rates were not significantly different (P > 0.05). However, the incidence rates of myelosuppression (white blood cell decline), gastrointestinal reactions (nausea, vomiting, dental ulcer, and diarrhea), skin lesions and phlebitis were lower in the tegafur group than in the 5-Fu group (P < 0.05). The results of this study may provide useful data for the clinical application of tegafur in GTN treatment. PMID:26599757

  20. Tegafur Substitution for 5-Fu in Combination with Actinomycin D to Treat Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Mei; Ding, Yiling; Yu, Ling; Deng, Yali; Lai, Weisi; Hu, Yun; Zhang, Hongwen; Wu, Xianqing; Fan, Hong; Ding, Hui; Wu, Yilin; Tao, Guangshi

    2015-01-01

    Although 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) combination chemotherapy provides a satisfactory therapeutic response in patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasms (GTNs), it has severe side effects. The current study analyzed the therapeutic effects and side effects of tegafur plus actinomycin D (Act-D) vs. 5-Fu plus Act-D for the treatment of GTNs based on controlled historical records. A total of 427 GTN cases that received tegafur and Act-D combination chemotherapy at the Second Xiangya Hospital of XiangYa Medical School between August 2003 and July 2013 were analyzed based on historical data. A total of 393 GTN cases that received 5-Fu plus Act-D between August 1993 and July 2003 at the same hospital were also analyzed, which constituted the control group. The therapeutic effects, toxicity and side effects after chemotherapy were compared between the groups. The overall response rate was 90.63% in the tegafur+Act-D group (tegafur group) and 92.37% in the 5-Fu+Act-D group (5-Fu group); these rates were not significantly different (P > 0.05). However, the incidence rates of myelosuppression (white blood cell decline), gastrointestinal reactions (nausea, vomiting, dental ulcer, and diarrhea), skin lesions and phlebitis were lower in the tegafur group than in the 5-Fu group (P < 0.05). The results of this study may provide useful data for the clinical application of tegafur in GTN treatment. PMID:26599757

  1. The Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost Database: metadata statistics and prospective analysis on future permafrost temperature and active layer depth monitoring site distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskaborn, B. K.; Lanckman, J.-P.; Lantuit, H.; Elger, K.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Cable, W. L.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-03-01

    The Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) provides the first dynamic database associated with the Thermal State of Permafrost (TSP) and the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) programs, which extensively collect permafrost temperature and active layer thickness data from Arctic, Antarctic and Mountain permafrost regions. The purpose of the database is to establish an "early warning system" for the consequences of climate change in permafrost regions and to provide standardized thermal permafrost data to global models. In this paper we perform statistical analysis of the GTN-P metadata aiming to identify the spatial gaps in the GTN-P site distribution in relation to climate-effective environmental parameters. We describe the concept and structure of the Data Management System in regard to user operability, data transfer and data policy. We outline data sources and data processing including quality control strategies. Assessment of the metadata and data quality reveals 63% metadata completeness at active layer sites and 50% metadata completeness for boreholes. Voronoi Tessellation Analysis on the spatial sample distribution of boreholes and active layer measurement sites quantifies the distribution inhomogeneity and provides potential locations of additional permafrost research sites to improve the representativeness of thermal monitoring across areas underlain by permafrost. The depth distribution of the boreholes reveals that 73% are shallower than 25 m and 27% are deeper, reaching a maximum of 1 km depth. Comparison of the GTN-P site distribution with permafrost zones, soil organic carbon contents and vegetation types exhibits different local to regional monitoring situations on maps. Preferential slope orientation at the sites most likely causes a bias in the temperature monitoring and should be taken into account when using the data for global models. The distribution of GTN-P sites within zones of projected temperature change show a high

  2. Reduction of aliphatic nitroesters and N-nitramines by Enterobacter cloacae PB2 pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase: quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Nivinskas, Henrikas; Sarlauskas, Jonas; Anusevicius, Zilvinas; Toogood, Helen S; Scrutton, Nigel S; Cenas, Narimantas

    2008-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae PB2 NADPH:pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase (PETNR) performs the biodegradation of explosive organic nitrate esters via their reductive denitration. In order to understand the enzyme substrate specificity, we have examined the reactions of PETNR with organic nitrates (n = 15) and their nitrogen analogues, N-nitramines (n = 4). The reactions of these compounds with PETNR were accompanied by the release of 1-2 mol of nitrite per mole of compound, but were not accompanied by their redox cycling and superoxide formation. The reduction rate constants (k(cat)/K(m)) of inositol hexanitrate, diglycerol tetranitrate, erythritol tetranitrate, mannitol hexanitrate and xylitol pentanitrate were similar to those of the established PETNR substrates, PETN and glycerol trinitrate, whereas the reactivities of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine were three orders of magnitude lower. The log k(cat)/K(m) value of the compounds increased with a decrease in the enthalpy of formation of the hydride adducts [DeltaH(f)(R-O-N(OH)O(-)) or DeltaH(f)(R(1),R(2) > N-N(OH)O(-))], and with an increase in their lipophilicity (octanol/water partition coefficient, log P(ow)), and did not depend on their van der Waals' volumes. Hydrophobic organic nitroesters and hydrophilic N-nitramines compete for the same binding site in the reduced enzyme form. The role of the hydrophobic interaction of PETNR with glycerol trinitrate was supported by the positive dependence of glycerol trinitrate reactivity on the solution ionic strength. The discrimination of nitroesters and N-nitramines according to their log P(ow) values seems to be a specific feature of the Old Yellow Enzyme family of flavoenzymes. PMID:19016851

  3. Biodegradation of Glycidol and Glycidyl Nitrate †

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, David L.; Cornell, John H.; Kaplan, Arthur M.

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitutions in the Ames test for mutagenicity, whereas glycerol 1-mononitrate tests were negative. PMID:16345917

  4. Internationally coordinated glacier monitoring - a timeline since 1894

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Samuel U.; Armstrong, Richard; Fetterer, Florence; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Hoelzle, Martin; Machguth, Horst; Mölg, Nico; Paul, Frank; Raup, Bruce H.; Zemp, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Changes in glaciers and ice caps provide some of the clearest evidence of climate change, with impacts on sea-level variations, regional hydrological cycles, and natural hazard situations. Therefore, glaciers have been recognized as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV). Internationally coordinated collection and distribution of standardized information about the state and change of glaciers and ice caps was initiated in 1894 and is today organized within the Global Terrestrial Network for Glaciers (GTN-G). GTN-G ensures the continuous development and adaptation of the international strategies to the long-term needs of users in science and policy. A GTN-G Steering Committee coordinates, supports and advices the operational bodies responsible for the international glacier monitoring, which are the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS), the US National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) initiative. In this presentation, we trace the development of the internationally coordinated glacier monitoring since its beginning in the 19th century. Today, several online databases containing a wealth of diverse data types with different levels of detail and global coverage provide fast access to continuously updated information on glacier fluctuation and inventory data. All glacier datasets are made freely available through the respective operational bodies within GTN-G, and can be accessed through the GTN-G Global Glacier Browser (http://www.gtn-g.org/data_browser.html). Glacier inventory data (e.g., digital outlines) are available for about 180,000 glaciers (GLIMS database, RGI - Randolph Glacier Inventory, WGI - World Glacier Inventory). Glacier front variations with about 45,000 entries since the 17th century and about 6,200 glaciological and geodetic mass (volume) change observations dating back to the 19th century are available in the Fluctuations of Glaciers (FoG) database. These datasets reveal clear evidence that

  5. [Studies on the constituents of trichosanthes root. III. Constituents of roots of Trichosanthes bracteata Voigt].

    PubMed

    Kitajima, J; Mukai, A; Masuda, Y; Tanaka, Y

    1989-04-01

    From the fresh roots of Trichosanthes bracteata Voigt., the following substances were identified: methyl palmitate, palmitic acid, suberic acid, alpha-spinasterol, stigmast-7-en-3 beta-ol, alpha-spinasterol 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, stigmast-7-en-3 beta-ol 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, glyceryl 1-palmitate, glyceryl 1-stearate, bryonolic acid, cucurbitacin B, isocucurbitacin B, 3-epi-isocucurbitacin B, 23,24-dihydrocucurbitacin B, 23,24-dihydroisocucurbitacin B, 23,24-dihydro-3-epi-isocucurbitacin B, cucurbitacin D, isocucurbitacin D and D-glucose. This root contains more than 6 times cucurbitacin of the root of T. kirilowii Maxim. var. japonicum Kitam. PMID:2760813

  6. Electrochemical characterization of bilayer lipid membrane-semiconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiao Kang; Baral, S.; Fendler, J.H. )

    1990-03-08

    Three different systems of glyceryl monooleate (GMO), bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) supported semiconductor particles have been prepared and characterized. A single composition of particulate semiconductor deposited only on one side of the BLM constituted system A, two different compositions of particulate semiconductors sequentially deposited on the same side of the BLM represented system B, and two different compositions of particulate semiconductors deposited on the opposite sides of the BLM made up system C.

  7. Direct Synthesis of ESBO Derivatives-18O Labelled with Dioxirane

    PubMed Central

    Tommasi, Immacolata; Fusco, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses a new approach developed in our laboratory, consisting in the application of isolated dimethyldioxirane (DDO, 1a) labelled with 18O for synthesis of epoxidized glyceryl linoleate (Gly-LLL, 2). We expect that this work could contribute in improving analytical methods for the determination of epoxidized soybean oil (ESBO) in complex food matrices by adopting an 18O-labelled-epoxidized triacylglycerol as an internal standard. PMID:24163617

  8. 21 CFR 184.1901 - Triacetin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Triacetin. 184.1901 Section 184.1901 Food and....1901 Triacetin. (a) Triacetin (C8 H14O6, CAS Reg. No. 102-76-1), also known as 1,2,3,-propanetriol triacetate or glyceryl triacetate, is the triester of glycerin and acetic acid. Triacetin can be prepared...

  9. Development of novel sustained release matrix pellets of betahistine dihydrochloride: effect of lipophilic surfactants and co-surfactants.

    PubMed

    Shamma, Rehab Nabil; Basalious, Emad B; Shoukri, Raguia

    2012-01-01

    Sustained release matrix pellets of the freely water soluble drug, betahistine dihydrochloride (BH), were prepared using freeze pelletization technique. Different waxes and lipids (cetyl alcohol, beeswax, glyceryl tripalmitate (GTP) and glyceryl tristearate) were evaluated for the preparation of matrix pellets. A D-optimal design was employed for the optimization and to explore the effect of drug loading (X(1)), concentration of lipophilic surfactant (X(2)), concentration of co-surfactant (X(3)) and wax type (X(4)) on the release extent of the drug from matrix pellets. The entrapment efficiency (Y(1)), pellet diameter (Y(2)), and the percentage drug released at given times were selected as dependent variables. Results revealed a significant impact of all independent variables on drug release from the formulated pellets. The lipophilic surfactant significantly increased both the entrapment efficiency and the in vitro drug release and significantly decreased the pellet size. The optimized BH-loaded pellets were composed of 19.95% drug loading, 9.95% Span(®) 80 (surfactant), 0.25% Capmul(®) (co-surfactant) using glyceryl tripalmitate as a matrix former. The release profiles of the drug from hard gelatin capsule containing optimized pellets equivalent to 32 mg BH was similar to that of target release model for once-daily administration based on similarity factor. It could be concluded that a promising once-daily capsule containing sustained release pellets of BH was successfully designed. PMID:21770719

  10. Acute Lipotoxicity Regulates Severity of Biliary Acute Pancreatitis without Affecting Its Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Cline, Rachel; Trivedi, Ram N.; DeLany, James P.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Lee, Kenneth; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Navina, Sarah; Murad, Faris; Singh, Vijay P.

    2015-01-01

    Obese patients have worse outcomes during acute pancreatitis (AP). Previous animal models of AP have found worse outcomes in obese rodents who may have a baseline proinflammatory state. Our aim was to study the role of acute lipolytic generation of fatty acids on local severity and systemic complications of AP. Human postpancreatitis necrotic collections were analyzed for unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and saturated fatty acids. A model of biliary AP was designed to replicate the human variables by intraductal injection of the triglyceride glyceryl trilinoleate alone or with the chemically distinct lipase inhibitors orlistat or cetilistat. Parameters of AP etiology and outcomes of local and systemic severity were measured. Patients with postpancreatitis necrotic collections were obese, and 13 of 15 had biliary AP. Postpancreatitis necrotic collections were enriched in UFAs. Intraductal glyceryl trilinoleate with or without the lipase inhibitors resulted in oil red O–positive areas, resembling intrapancreatic fat. Both lipase inhibitors reduced the glyceryl trilinoleate–induced increase in serum lipase, UFAs, pancreatic necrosis, serum inflammatory markers, systemic injury, and mortality but not serum alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin, or amylase. We conclude that UFAs are enriched in human necrotic collections and acute UFA generation via lipolysis worsens pancreatic necrosis, systemic inflammation, and injury associated with severe AP. Inhibition of lipolysis reduces UFA generation and improves these outcomes of AP without interfering with its induction. PMID:24854864