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Sample records for glycoprotein gp41 contributes

  1. Enhanced Central Nervous System Transduction with Lentiviral Vectors Pseudotyped with RVG/HIV-1gp41 Chimeric Envelope Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Trabalza, Antonio; Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Sgourou, Argyro; Liao, Ting-Yi; Patsali, Petros; Lee, Heyne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To investigate the potential benefits which may arise from pseudotyping the HIV-1 lentiviral vector with its homologous gp41 envelope glycoprotein (GP) cytoplasmic tail (CT), we created chimeric RVG/HIV-1gp41 GPs composed of the extracellular and transmembrane sequences of RVG and either the full-length gp41 CT or C terminus gp41 truncations sequentially removing existing conserved motifs. Lentiviruses (LVs) pseudotyped with the chimeric GPs were evaluated in terms of particle release (physical titer), biological titers, infectivity, and in vivo central nervous system (CNS) transduction. We report here that LVs carrying shorter CTs expressed higher levels of envelope GP and showed a higher average infectivity than those bearing full-length GPs. Interestingly, complete removal of GP CT led to vectors with the highest transduction efficiency. Removal of all C-terminal gp41 CT conserved motifs, leaving just 17 amino acids (aa), appeared to preserve infectivity and resulted in a significantly increased physical titer. Furthermore, incorporation of these 17 aa in the RVG CT notably enhanced the physical titer. In vivo stereotaxic delivery of LV vectors exhibiting the best in vitro titers into rodent striatum facilitated efficient transduction of the CNS at the site of injection. A particular observation was the improved retrograde transduction of neurons in connected distal sites that resulted from the chimeric envelope R5 which included the “Kennedy” sequence (Ken) and lentivirus lytic peptide 2 (LLP2) conserved motifs in the CT, and although it did not exhibit a comparable high titer upon pseudotyping, it led to a significant increase in distal retrograde transduction of neurons. IMPORTANCE In this study, we have produced novel chimeric envelopes bearing the extracellular domain of rabies fused to the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of gp41 and pseudotyped lentiviral vectors with them. Here we report novel effects on the transduction efficiency and physical titer

  2. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein mediates apoptosis in activated PBMC by a mechanism dependent on gp41 function

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali; Tompkins, Wayne A. . E-mail: Wayne_Tompkins@ncsu.edu

    2004-12-20

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes immunodeficiency in cats, which parallels HIV-1-induced immunodeficiency in humans. It has been established that HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates T cell loss via a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding. The Env glycoprotein of FIV, similar to HIV, requires CXCR4 binding for viral entry, as well as inducing membrane fusion leading to syncytia formation. However, the role of FIV Env in T cell loss and the molecular mechanisms governing this process have not been elucidated. We studied the role of Env glycoprotein in FIV-mediated T cell apoptosis in an in vitro model. Our studies demonstrate that membrane-expressed FIV Env induces apoptosis in activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding, as the process was inhibited by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, studies regarding the role of CD134, the recently identified primary receptor of FIV, suggest that binding to CD134 may not be important for induction of apoptosis in PBMC. However, inhibiting Env-mediated fusion post CXCR4 binding by FIV gp41-specific fusion inhibitor also inhibited apoptosis. Under similar conditions, a fusion-defective gp41 mutant was unable to induce apoptosis in activated PBMC. Our findings are the first report suggesting the potential of FIV Env to mediate apoptosis in bystander cells by a process that is dependent on gp41 function.

  3. The Cytoplasmic Domain of the HIV-1 Glycoprotein gp41 Induces NF-κB Activation Through TGF-β-Activated Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Postler, Thomas S.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) primarily infect lymphocytes, which must be activated for efficient viral replication. We show that the cytoplasmic domain of the transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 (gp41CD) of both HIV-1 and SIV induces activation of NF-κB, a cellular factor important for proviral genome transcription and lymphocyte activation. This NF-κB activating property localized to a region 12–25 (SIV) or 59–70 (HIV-1) residues from the gp41 membrane-spanning domain. An siRNA-based screen of 42 key NF-κB regulators revealed that gp41CD-mediated activation occurs through the canonical NF-κB pathway via TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1). TAK1 activity was required for gp41CD-mediated NF-κB activation, and HIV-1-derived gp41CD physically interacted with TAK1 through the same region required for NF-κB activation. Importantly, an NF-κB activation-deficient HIV-1 mutant exhibited increased dependence on cellular activation for replication. These findings demonstrate an evolutionarily conserved role for gp41CD in activating NF-κB to promote infection. PMID:22341466

  4. N-terminal substitutions in HIV-1 gp41 reduce the expression of non-trimeric envelope glycoproteins on the virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Antu K.; David, Kathryn B.; Ray, Neelanjana; Ketas, Thomas J.; Klasse, Per J.; Doms, Robert W.; Moore, John P.

    2008-03-01

    The native, functional HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex is a trimer of two non-covalently associated subunits: the gp120 surface glycoprotein and the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein. However, various non-functional forms of Env are present on virus particles and HIV-1-infected cells, some of which probably arise as the native complex decays. The aberrant forms include gp120-gp41 monomers and oligomers, as well as gp41 subunits from which gp120 has dissociated. The presence of non-functional Env creates binding sites for antibodies that do not recognize native Env complexes and that are, therefore, non-neutralizing. Non-native Env forms (monomers, dimers, tetramers and aggregates) can also arise when soluble gp140 proteins, lacking the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of gp41, are expressed for vaccine studies. We recently identified five amino acids in the gp41 N-terminal region (I535, Q543, S553, K567 and R588) that promote gp140 trimerization. We have now studied their influence on the function and antigenic properties of JR-FL Env expressed on the surfaces of pseudoviruses and Env-transfected cells. The 5 substitutions in gp41 reduce the expression of non-trimeric gp160s, without affecting trimer levels. Pseudovirions bearing the mutant Env are fully infectious with similar kinetics of Env-mediated fusion. Various non-neutralizing antibodies bind less strongly to the Env mutant, but neutralizing antibody binding is unaffected. Hence the gp41 substitutions do not adversely affect Env structure, supporting their use for making new Env-based vaccines. The mutant Env might also help in studies intended to correlate antibody binding to virus neutralization. Of note is that the 5 residues are much more frequent, individually or collectively, in viruses from subtypes other than B.

  5. An alternative conformation of the gp41 heptad repeat 1 region coiled coil exists in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Mische, Claudia C.; Yuan Wen; Strack, Bettina; Craig, Stewart; Farzan, Michael; Sodroski, Joseph . E-mail: joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu

    2005-07-20

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmembrane envelope glycoprotein, gp41, which mediates virus-cell fusion, exists in at least three different conformations within the trimeric envelope glycoprotein complex. The structures of the prefusogenic and intermediate states are unknown; structures representing the postfusion state have been solved. In the postfusion conformation, three helical heptad repeat 2 (HR2) regions pack in an antiparallel fashion into the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of a triple-helical coiled coil formed by the heptad repeat 1 (HR1) regions. We studied the prefusogenic conformation of gp41 by mutagenic alteration of membrane-anchored and soluble forms of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Our results indicate that, in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein precursor, the gp41 HR1 region is in a conformation distinct from that of a trimeric coiled coil. Thus, the central gp41 coiled coil is formed during the transition of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins from the precursor state to the receptor-bound intermediate.

  6. Effects of the I559P gp41 Change on the Conformation and Function of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Membrane Envelope Glycoprotein Trimer

    PubMed Central

    Sodroski, Joseph; Finzi, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The mature human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer is produced by proteolytic cleavage of a precursor and consists of three gp120 exterior and three gp41 transmembrane subunits. The metastable Env complex is induced to undergo conformational changes required for virus entry by the binding of gp120 to the receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. An isoleucine-to-proline change (I559P) in the gp41 ectodomain has been used to stabilize soluble forms of HIV-1 Env trimers for structural characterization and for use as immunogens. In the native membrane-anchored HIV-1BG505 Env, the I559P change modestly decreased proteolytic maturation, increased the non-covalent association of gp120 with the Env trimer, and resulted in an Env conformation distinctly different from that of the wild-type HIV-1BG505 Env. Compared with the wild-type Env, the I559P Env was recognized inefficiently by polyclonal sera from HIV-1-infected individuals, by several gp41-directed antibodies, by some antibodies against the CD4-binding site of gp120, and by antibodies that preferentially recognize the CD4-bound Env. Some of the gp120-associated antigenic differences between the wild-type HIV-1BG505 Env and the I559P mutant were compensated by the SOS disulfide bond between gp120 and gp41, which has been used to stabilize cleaved soluble Env trimers. Nonetheless, regardless of the presence of the SOS changes, Envs with proline 559 were recognized less efficiently than Envs with isoleucine 559 by the VRC01 neutralizing antibody, which binds the CD4-binding site of gp120, and the PGT151 neutralizing antibody, which binds a hybrid gp120-gp41 epitope. The I559P change completely eliminated the ability of the HIV-1BG505 Env to mediate cell-cell fusion and virus entry, and abolished the capacity of the SOS Env to support virus infection in the presence of a reducing agent. These results suggest that differences exist between the quaternary structures of functional Env spikes and I559P

  7. A novel chimeric protein-based HIV-1 fusion inhibitor targeting gp41 glycoprotein with high potency and stability.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chungen; Cai, Lifeng; Lu, Hong; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2011-08-12

    T20 (enfuvirtide, Fuzeon) is the first generation HIV-1 fusion inhibitor approved for salvage therapy of HIV-1-infected patients refractory to current antiretroviral drugs. However, its application is limited by the high cost of peptide synthesis, rapid proteolysis, and poor efficacy against emerging drug-resistant strains. Here we reported the design of a novel chimera protein-based fusion inhibitor targeting gp41, TLT35, that uses a flexible 35-mer linker to couple T20 and T1144, the first and next generation HIV-1 fusion inhibitors, respectively. TLT35, which was expressed in Escherichia coli with good yield, showed low nm activity against HIV-1-mediated cell-cell fusion and infection by laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strains (X4 or R5), including T20-resistant variants and primary HIV-1 isolates of clades A to G and group O (R5 or X4R5). TLT35 was stable in human sera and in peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture and was more resistant to proteolysis than either T20 or T1144 alone. Circular dichroism spectra showed that TLT35 folded into a thermally stable conformation with high α-helical content and T(m) value in aqueous solution. It formed a highly stable complex with gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat peptide and blocked formation of the gp41 six-helix-bundle core. These merits combined with an anticipated low production cost for expression of TLT35 in E. coli make this novel protein-based fusion inhibitor a promising candidate for further development as an anti-HIV-1 microbicide or therapeutic for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:21690094

  8. The C-terminal tail of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D may exist in two conformations: an analysis of sequence, structure, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hollier, Mark J.; Dimmock, Nigel J. . E-mail: n.j.dimmock@warwick.ac.uk

    2005-07-05

    In addition to the major ectodomain, the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein of HIV-1 is now known to have a minor ectodomain that is part of the long C-terminal tail. Both ectodomains are highly antigenic, carry neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes, and are involved in virus-mediated fusion activity. However, data have so far been biologically based, and derived solely from T cell line-adapted (TCLA), B clade viruses. Here we have carried out sequence and theoretically based structural analyses of 357 gp41 C-terminal sequences of mainly primary isolates of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D. Data show that all these viruses have the potential to form a tail loop structure (the minor ectodomain) supported by three, {beta}-sheet, membrane-spanning domains (MSDs). This means that the first (N-terminal) tyrosine-based sorting signal of the gp41 tail is situated outside the cell membrane and is non-functional, and that gp41 that reaches the cell surface may be recycled back into the cytoplasm through the activity of the second tyrosine-sorting signal. However, we suggest that only a minority of cell-associated gp41 molecules - those destined for incorporation into virions - has 3 MSDs and the minor ectodomain. Most intracellular gp41 has the conventional single MSD, no minor ectodomain, a functional first tyrosine-based sorting signal, and in line with current thinking is degraded intracellularly. The gp41 structural diversity suggested here can be viewed as an evolutionary strategy to minimize HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein expression on the cell surface, and hence possible cytotoxicity and immune attack on the infected cell.

  9. On the microscopic and mesoscopic perturbations of lipid bilayers upon interaction with the MPER domain of the HIV glycoprotein gp41.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Rosario; Emendato, Alessandro; Vitiello, Giuseppe; De Santis, Augusta; Grimaldi, Manuela; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Busi, Elena; Del Vecchio, Pompea; Petraccone, Luigi; D'Errico, Gerardino

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the 665-683 fragment of the HIV fusion glycoprotein 41, corresponding to the MPER domain of the protein and named gp41MPER, on the microscopic structure and mesoscopic arrangement of palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and POPC/sphingomyelin (SM)/cholesterol (CHOL) lipid bilayers is analyzed. The microscopic structuring of the bilayers has been studied by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, using glycerophosphocholines spin-labelled in different positions along the acyl chain. Transitions of the bilayer liquid crystalline state have been also monitored by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Changes of the bilayers morphology have been studied by determining the dimension of the liposomes through Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurements. The results converge in showing that the sample preparation procedure, the bilayer composition and the peptide/lipid ratio critically tune the lipid response to the peptide/membrane interaction. When gp41MPER is added to preformed liposomes, it positions at the bilayer interface and the lipid perturbation is limited to the more external segments. In contrast, if the peptide is mixed with the lipids during the liposome preparation, it assumes a trans-membrane topology. This happens at all peptide/lipid ratios for fluid POPC bilayers, while in the case of rigid POPC/SM/CHOL membranes a minimum ratio has to be reached, thus suggesting peptide self-aggregation to occur. Peptide insertion results in a dramatic increase of the lipid ordering and bilayer stiffening, which reflect in significant changes in liposome average dimension and distribution. The biological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:27179640

  10. Design and evaluation of antiretroviral peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat region (C-HR) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Soonthornsata, Bongkot; Tian, Yu-Shi; Utachee, Piraporn; Sapsutthipas, Sompong; Isarangkura-na-ayuthaya, Panasda; Auwanit, Wattana; Takagi, Tatsuya; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Kawashita, Norihito; Kameoka, Masanori

    2010-09-15

    Two {alpha}-helical heptad repeats, N-HR and C-HR, located in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp41, play an important role in membrane fusion by forming a 6-helix bundle. C34, a peptide mimicking C-HR, inhibits the formation of the 6-helix bundle; thus, it has potential as a novel antiretroviral compound. In order to improve the inhibitory effect of C34 on HIV-1 replication, we designed new C34-derived peptides based on computational analysis of the stable conformation of the 6-helix bundle. Newly designed peptides showed a stronger inhibitory effect on the replication of recombinant viruses containing CRF01{sub A}E, subtype B or subtype C Env than C34 or a fusion inhibitor, T-20. In addition, these peptides inhibited the replication of a T-20-resistant virus. We propose that these peptides could be applied to develop novel antiretroviral compounds to inhibit the replication of various subtypes of HIV-1 as well as of T-20-resistant variants.

  11. The Role of HIV-1 gp41 Glycoprotein in Infectious Tropism Inferred from Physico-Chemical Properties of its Amino Acid Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, E.; Villarreal, C.; Huerta, L.; Cocho, G.

    2006-09-01

    We performed a statistical analysis of the amino acid sequence of the gp41 ectodomain of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1. We found strong correlations between physicochemical properties of highly variable residues and the viral infectious tropism.

  12. Mutations at the C-terminus of the simian immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein affect gp120-gp41 stability on virions

    SciTech Connect

    Affranchino, Jose L.; Gonzalez, Silvia A. . E-mail: sigonzal@ub.edu.ar

    2006-03-30

    The transmembrane (TM) subunit of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) contains an unusually long cytoplasmic domain of 164 amino acids. Previously, we identified domains in the SIV TM cytoplasmic tail that are necessary for Env incorporation into virions and viral infectivity. In this study, we investigated the relevance to Env function of the highly conserved sequence comprising the immediate C-terminal 19 residues of TM. To this end, small in-frame deletions as well as a premature stop codon mutation were introduced into the coding region for the SIV TM C-terminus. All the mutant Env glycoproteins were expressed, processed and transported to the cell surface in an essentially wild-type manner. Moreover, the ability of the mutant Env proteins to mediate cell-to-cell fusion was similar to or slightly lower than that of the wild-type Env. However, viruses expressing the mutant Env glycoproteins were found to be poorly infectious in single-cycle infectivity assays. Further characterization of the TM mutant viruses revealed that while exhibiting wild-type levels of the TM protein, they contained significantly lower levels of the Env surface (SU) subunit, which is consistent with increased SU shedding from virions after Env incorporation. This phenotype was independent of Gag processing, since genetic inactivation of the viral protease did not increase SU retention by the resulting immature particles. Our findings indicate that deletions at the C-terminus of the SIV Env promote the instability of the SU-TM association on the virion surface and point to an important role for the TM cytoplasmic domain in modulating Env structure.

  13. Oligomerization of the hydrophobic heptad repeat of gp41.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, H B; Tucker, S P; Kar, S R; McPherson, S A; McPherson, D T; Dubay, J W; Lebowitz, J; Compans, R W; Hunter, E

    1995-01-01

    The transmembrane protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contains a leucine zipper-like (hydrophobic heptad) repeat which has been predicted to form an amphipathic alpha helix. To evaluate the potential of the hydrophobic heptad repeat to induce protein oligomerization, this region of gp41 has been cloned into the bacterial expression vector pRIT2T. The resulting plasmid, pRIT3, expresses a fusion protein consisting of the Fc binding domain of monomeric protein A, a bacterial protein, and amino acids 538 to 593 of HIV-1 gp41. Gel filtration chromatography demonstrated the presence of oligomeric forms of the fusion protein, and analytical centrifugation studies confirmed that the chimeric protein formed a higher-order multimer that was greater than a dimer. Thus, we have identified a region of HIV-1 gp41 which is capable of directing the oligomerization of a fusion protein containing monomeric protein A. Point mutations, previously shown to inhibit the biological activity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, have been engineered into the segment of gp41 contained in the fusion protein, and expressed mutant proteins were purified and analyzed via fast protein liquid chromatography. A point mutation in the heptad repeat, which changed the central isoleucine to an alanine, caused a significant (> 60%) decrease in oligomerization, whereas changing the central isoleucine to aspartate or proline resulted in almost a complete loss of oligomerization. Deletions of one, two, or three amino acids following the first isoleucine also resulted in a profound decrease in oligomerization. The inhibitory effects of the mutations on oligomer formation correlated with the effects of the same mutations on envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion. A possible role of the leucine zipper-like region in the fusion process and in an oligomerization event distinct from assembly of the envelope glycoprotein complex is discussed. PMID:7707497

  14. Asymmetric Deactivation of HIV-1 gp41 following Fusion Inhibitor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Kristen M.; Steger, H. Kirby; Root, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium factors influence the efficacy of pharmaceutical agents that target intermediate states of biochemical reactions. We explored the intermediate state inhibition of gp41, part of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) that promotes viral entry through membrane fusion. This process involves a series of gp41 conformational changes coordinated by Env interactions with cellular CD4 and a chemokine receptor. In a kinetic window between CD4 binding and membrane fusion, the N- and C-terminal regions of the gp41 ectodomain become transiently susceptible to inhibitors that disrupt Env structural transitions. In this study, we sought to identify kinetic parameters that influence the antiviral potency of two such gp41 inhibitors, C37 and 5-Helix. Employing a series of C37 and 5-Helix variants, we investigated the physical properties of gp41 inhibition, including the ability of inhibitor-bound gp41 to recover its fusion activity once inhibitor was removed from solution. Our results indicated that antiviral activity critically depended upon irreversible deactivation of inhibitor-bound gp41. For C37, which targets the N-terminal region of the gp41 ectodomain, deactivation was a slow process that depended on chemokine receptor binding to Env. For 5-Helix, which targets the C-terminal region of the gp41 ectodomain, deactivation occurred rapidly following inhibitor binding and was independent of chemokine receptor levels. Due to this kinetic disparity, C37 inhibition was largely reversible, while 5-Helix inhibition was functionally irreversible. The fundamental difference in deactivation mechanism points to an unappreciated asymmetry in gp41 following inhibitor binding and impacts the development of improved fusion inhibitors and HIV-1 vaccines. The results also demonstrate how the activities of intermediate state inhibitors critically depend upon the final disposition of inhibitor-bound states. PMID:19956769

  15. Evidence for a Stable Interaction of gp41 with Pr55Gag in Immature Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Particles

    PubMed Central

    Wyma, Donald J.; Kotov, Alexander; Aiken, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Assembly of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions requires incorporation of the viral envelope glycoproteins gp41 and gp120. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the cytoplasmic tail of the transmembrane glycoprotein, gp41, associates with Pr55Gag in infected cells to facilitate the incorporation of HIV-1 envelope proteins into budding virions. However, direct evidence for an interaction between gp41 and Pr55Gag in HIV-1 particles has not been reported. To determine whether gp41 is associated with Pr55Gag in HIV-1 particles, viral cores were isolated from immature HIV-1 virions by sedimentation through detergent. The cores contained a major fraction of the gp41 that was present on untreated virions. Association of gp41 with cores required the presence of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail. In HIV-1 particles containing a functional protease, a mutation that prevents cleavage of Pr55Gag at the matrix-capsid junction was sufficient for the detergent-resistant association of gp41 with the isolated cores. In addition to gp41, a major fraction of virion-associated gp120 was also detected on immature HIV-1 cores. Isolation of cores under conditions known to disrupt lipid rafts resulted in the removal of a raft-associated protein incorporated into virions but not the HIV-1 envelope proteins. These results provide biochemical evidence for a stable interaction between Pr55Gag and the cytoplasmic tail of gp41 in immature HIV-1 particles. Moreover, findings in this study suggest that the interaction of Pr55Gag with gp41 may regulate the function of the envelope proteins during HIV-1 maturation. PMID:11000206

  16. Interactions of HIV-1 Inhibitory Peptide T20 with the gp41 N-HR Coiled Coil*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Kelly; Shishido, Akira; Root, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Cellular entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) involves fusion of viral and cellular membranes and is mediated by structural transitions in viral glycoprotein gp41. The antiviral C-peptide T20 targets the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat region (N-HR), blocking gp41 conformational changes essential for the entry process. To probe the T20 structure-activity relationship, we engineered a molecular mimic of the entire gp41 N-HR coiled coil using the 5-Helix design strategy. T20 bound this artificial protein (denoted 5H-ex) with nanomolar affinity (KD = 30 nm), close to its IC50 concentration (∼3 nm) but much weaker than the affinity of a related inhibitory C-peptide C37 (KD = 0.0007 nm). T20/C37 competitive binding assays confirmed that T20 interacts with the hydrophobic groove on the surface of the N-HR coiled coil outside of a deep pocket region crucial for C37 binding. We used 5H-ex to investigate how the T20 N and C termini contributed to the inhibitor binding activity. Mutating three aromatic residues at the T20 C terminus (WNWF → ANAA) had no effect on affinity, suggesting that these amino acids do not participate in T20 binding to the gp41 N-HR. The results support recent evidence pointing to a different role for these residues in T20 inhibition (Peisajovich, S. G., Gallo, S. A., Blumenthal, R., and Shai, Y. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 21012–21017; Liu, S., Jing, W., Cheung, B., Lu, H., Sun, J., Yan, X., Niu, J., Farmar, J., Wu, S., and Jiang, S. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 9612–9620). By contrast, mutations near the T20 N terminus substantially influenced inhibitor binding strength. When Ile was substituted for Thr in the second T20 position, a 40-fold increase in binding affinity was measured (KD = 0.75 nm). The effect of this affinity enhancement on T20 inhibitory potency varied among different viral strains. The original T20 and the higher affinity T20 variant had similar potency against wild type HIV-1. However, the higher affinity T20

  17. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-04-16

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1{sub QH1549.13} blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  18. Kinetically coupled folding of a single HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 complex in viral membrane fusion and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Junyi; Rebane, Aleksander A.; Ma, Lu; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 (gp41) mediates viral entry into host cells by coupling its folding energy to membrane fusion. Gp41 folding is blocked by fusion inhibitors, including the commercial drug T20, to treat HIV/AIDS. However, gp41 folding intermediates, energy, and kinetics are poorly understood. Here, we identified the folding intermediates of a single gp41 trimer-of-hairpins and measured their associated energy and kinetics using high-resolution optical tweezers. We found that folding of gp41 hairpins was energetically independent but kinetically coupled: Each hairpin contributed a folding energy of ∼−23 kBT, but folding of one hairpin successively accelerated the folding rate of the next one by ∼20-fold. Membrane-mimicking micelles slowed down gp41 folding and reduced the stability of the six-helix bundle. However, the stability was restored by cooperative folding of the membrane-proximal external region. Surprisingly, T20 strongly inhibited gp41 folding by actively displacing the C-terminal hairpin strand in a force-dependent manner. The inhibition was abolished by a T20-resistant gp41 mutation. The energetics and kinetics of gp41 folding established by us provides a basis to understand viral membrane fusion, infection, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26038562

  19. Reorientation of the helix of the tryptophan-rich gp41W peptide from HIV-1 at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Gladys; Benichou, Emmanuel; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Harfouch, Yara El; Brevet, Pierre-François; Besson, Françoise

    2013-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp41 from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) has an amino acid sequence enriched in tryptophan residues, the so-called gp41W peptide (i.e., KWASLWNWFNITNWLWYIK) and plays a crucial role in HIV-1 host cell infection. Using the coupling of Second Harmonic Generation targeting the tryptophan residues with lateral surface tension measurements, we investigate the interaction of gp41W with a neat air/water and a lipid/water interfaces. At the air/water interface, gp41W presents a well-defined orientation and this orientation is strongly modified at the lipid/water interface, depending on the surface pressure. These results show that this strategy is well suited to monitor tryptophan containing α-helices orientation at lipid/water interfaces.

  20. Reorientation of the helix of the tryptophan-rich gp41W peptide from HIV-1 at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Matar, Gladys; Benichou, Emmanuel; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; El Harfouch, Yara; Brevet, Pierre-François; Besson, Françoise

    2013-12-14

    The glycoprotein gp41 from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) has an amino acid sequence enriched in tryptophan residues, the so-called gp41W peptide (i.e., KWASLWNWFNITNWLWYIK) and plays a crucial role in HIV-1 host cell infection. Using the coupling of Second Harmonic Generation targeting the tryptophan residues with lateral surface tension measurements, we investigate the interaction of gp41W with a neat air∕water and a lipid∕water interfaces. At the air∕water interface, gp41W presents a well-defined orientation and this orientation is strongly modified at the lipid∕water interface, depending on the surface pressure. These results show that this strategy is well suited to monitor tryptophan containing α-helices orientation at lipid∕water interfaces. PMID:24329097

  1. Maturation-Dependent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Particle Fusion Requires a Carboxyl-Terminal Region of the gp41 Cytoplasmic Tail▿

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jiyang; Aiken, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Lentiviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), typically encode fusion glycoproteins with long cytoplasmic tails (CTs). We previously reported that immature HIV-1 particles are inhibited for fusion with target cells by a mechanism requiring the 152-amino-acid CT of gp41. The gp41 CT was also shown to mediate the detergent-resistant association of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex with immature HIV-1 particles, indicating that the gp41 CT forms a stable complex with Gag in immature virions. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of progressive truncations and point mutations in the gp41 CT on the fusion of mature and immature HIV-1 particles with target cells. We also determined the effects of these mutations on the detergent-resistant association of gp41 with immature HIV-1 particles. Removal of the C-terminal 28 amino acids relieved the dependence of HIV-1 fusion on maturation. However, a mutant Env protein lacking this region remained associated with immature HIV-1 particles treated with nonionic detergent. Further mutational analysis of the C-terminal region of gp41 revealed two specific sequences required for maturation-dependent HIV-1 fusion. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the extreme C terminus of gp41 plays a key role in coupling HIV-1 fusion competence to virion maturation. They further indicate that the stable association of gp41 with Gag in immature virions is not sufficient for inhibition of immature HIV-1 particle fusion. PMID:17609279

  2. Development of Small-molecule HIV Entry Inhibitors Specifically Targeting gp120 or gp41

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Yu, Fei; Cai, Lifeng; Debnath, Asim K.; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein surface subunit gp120 and transmembrane subunit gp41 play important roles in HIV-1 entry, thus serving as key targets for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. T20 peptide (enfuvirtide) is the first U.S. FDA-approved HIV entry inhibitor; however, its clinical application is limited by the lack of oral availability. Here, we have described the structure and function of the HIV-1 gp120 and gp41 subunits and reviewed advancements in the development of small-molecule HIV entry inhibitors specifically targeting these two Env glycoproteins. We then compared the advantages and disadvantages of different categories of HIV entry inhibitor candidates and further predicted the future trend of HIV entry inhibitor development. PMID:26324044

  3. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P.; Kim, Arthur S.; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120–gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120–gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes. PMID:26404402

  4. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P; Kim, Arthur S; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W; Zwick, Michael B; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120-gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120-gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes. PMID:26404402

  5. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P.; Kim, Arthur S.; Torrents de La Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-09-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120-gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120-gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes.

  6. Structure of HIV-1 gp120 with gp41-interactive region reveals layered envelope architecture and basis of conformational mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Pancera, Marie; Majeed, Shahzad; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Chen, Lei; Huang, Chih-chin; Kong, Leopold; Kwon, Young Do; Stuckey, Jonathan; Zhou, Tongqing; Robinson, James E.; Schief, William R.; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-04-15

    The viral spike of HIV-1 is composed of three gp120 envelope glycoproteins attached noncovalently to three gp41 transmembrane molecules. Viral entry is initiated by binding to the CD4 receptor on the cell surface, which induces large conformational changes in gp120. These changes not only provide a model for receptor-triggered entry, but affect spike sensitivity to drug- and antibody-mediated neutralization. Although some of the details of the CD4-induced conformational change have been visualized by crystal structures and cryoelectron tomograms, the critical gp41-interactive region of gp120 was missing from previous atomic-level characterizations. Here we determine the crystal structure of an HIV-1 gp120 core with intact gp41-interactive region in its CD4-bound state, compare this structure to unliganded and antibody-bound forms to identify structurally invariant and plastic components, and use ligand-oriented cryoelectron tomograms to define component mobility in the viral spike context. Newly defined gp120 elements proximal to the gp41 interface complete a 7-stranded {beta}-sandwich, which appeared invariant in conformation. Loop excursions emanating from the sandwich form three topologically separate - and structurally plastic - layers, topped off by the highly glycosylated gp120 outer domain. Crystal structures, cryoelectron tomograms, and interlayer chemistry were consistent with a mechanism in which the layers act as a shape-changing spacer, facilitating movement between outer domain and gp41-associated {beta}-sandwich and providing for conformational diversity used in immune evasion. A 'layered' gp120 architecture thus allows movement among alternative glycoprotein conformations required for virus entry and immune evasion, whereas a {beta}-sandwich clamp maintains gp120-gp41 interaction and regulates gp41 transitions.

  7. Immunologic NO synthase: elevation in severe AIDS dementia and induction by HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Adamson, D C; Wildemann, B; Sasaki, M; Glass, J D; McArthur, J C; Christov, V I; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L

    1996-12-13

    Indirect mechanisms are implicated in the pathogenesis of the dementia associated with human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Proinflammatory molecules such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and eicosanoids are elevated in the central nervous system of patients with HIV-1-related dementia. Nitric oxide (NO) is a potential mediator of neuronal injury, because cytokines may activate the immunologic (type II) isoform of NO synthase (iNOS). The levels of iNOS in severe HIV-1-associated dementia coincided with increased expression of the HIV-1 coat protein gp41. Furthermore, gp41 induced iNOS in primary cultures of mixed rat neuronal and glial cells and killed neurons through a NO-dependent mechanism. Thus, gp41-induced NO formation may contribute to the severe cognitive dysfunction associated with HIV-1 infection. PMID:8943206

  8. HIV-1 escape from the entry-inhibiting effects of a cholesterol-binding compound via cleavage of gp41 by the viral protease.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul A; Ablan, Sherimay D; Roser, James D; Sowder, Raymond C; Schaffner, Carl P; Chertova, Elena; Freed, Eric O

    2007-05-15

    HIV-1 virions are highly enriched in cholesterol relative to the cellular plasma membrane. We recently reported that a cholesterol-binding compound, amphotericin B methyl ester (AME), blocks HIV-1 entry and that single amino acid substitutions in the cytoplasmic tail of the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein gp41 confer resistance to AME. In this study, we defined the mechanism of resistance to AME. We observed that the gp41 in AME-resistant virions is substantially smaller than wild-type gp41. Remarkably, we found that this shift in gp41 size is due to cleavage of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail by the viral protease. We mapped the protease-mediated cleavage to two sites in the cytoplasmic tail and showed that gp41 truncations in this region also confer AME resistance. Thus, to escape the inhibitory effects of AME, HIV-1 evolved a mechanism of protease-mediated envelope glycoprotein cleavage used by several other retroviruses to activate envelope glycoprotein fusogenicity. In contrast to the mechanism of AME resistance observed for HIV-1, we demonstrate that simian immunodeficiency virus can escape from AME via the introduction of premature termination codons in the gp41 cytoplasmic tail coding region. These findings demonstrate that in human T cell lines, HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus can evolve distinct strategies for evading AME, reflecting their differential requirements for the gp41 cytoplasmic tail in virus replication. These data reveal that HIV-1 can escape from an inhibitor of viral entry by acquiring mutations that cause the cytoplasmic tail of gp41 to be cleaved by the viral protease. PMID:17483482

  9. Identifying possible sites for antibody neutralization escape: Implications for unique functional properties of the C-terminal tail of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhifeng; Huang, Yushen; Tan, Yue; Yu, Yang; Wang, Junyi; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2016-07-01

    A previous amino acid sequence analyses from our laboratory reported nine potential sites in gp41 glycoprotein of HIV-1 that may contribute to virus escape from antibody neutralization. Besides four sites found outside the membrane of HIV-1 virus, five located in the C-terminal tail of gp41 specifically in the lentivirus lytic peptides motifs (LLPs). To further study the bioinformatical results, the virus infectivity assay and the standard neutralization assay were conducted on conservatively mutated virus. Two sites in the LLP3 domain stood out with the ability to alter the resistance of HIV-1 virus to certain broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). While the glycoprotein incorporation on the viral membrane and the interaction of the LLP3 domain with the lipid membrane remained unaltered, the increase in neutralization resistance of the mutant virus was associated with the changes on Env conformation. Our findings demonstrate different sensibility of bNAbs to mutations in the C-terminal tail and indicate an unrecognized potential role for even minor sequence variation in the C-terminal tail in modulating the antigenicity of the ectodomain of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex. PMID:27157128

  10. Structural characterization of HIV gp41 with the membrane-proximal external region.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wuxian; Bohon, Jen; Han, Dong P; Habte, Habtom; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W; Chance, Mark R

    2010-07-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (gp120/gp41) plays a critical role in virus infection and pathogenesis. Three of the six monoclonal antibodies considered to have broadly neutralizing activities (2F5, 4E10, and Z13e1) bind to the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41. This makes the MPER a desirable template for developing immunogens that can elicit antibodies with properties similar to these monoclonal antibodies, with a long term goal of developing antigens that could serve as novel HIV vaccines. In order to provide a structural basis for rational antigen design, an MPER construct, HR1-54Q, was generated for x-ray crystallographic and x-ray footprinting studies to provide both high resolution atomic coordinates and verification of the solution state of the antigen, respectively. The crystal structure of HR1-54Q reveals a trimeric, coiled-coil six-helical bundle, which probably represents a postfusion form of gp41. The MPER portion extends from HR2 in continuation of a slightly bent long helix and is relatively flexible. The structures observed for the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes agree well with existing structural data, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicate that the antigen binds well to antibodies that recognize the above epitopes. Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting of the antigen in solution reveals specifically protected and accessible regions consistent with the predictions based on the trimeric structure from the crystallographic data. Overall, the HR1-54Q antigen, as characterized by crystallography and footprinting, represents a postfusion, trimeric form of HIV gp41, and its structure provides a rational basis for gp41 antigen design suitable for HIV vaccine development. PMID:20525690

  11. Structural Characterization of HIV gp41 with the Membrane-proximal External Region*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wuxian; Bohon, Jen; Han, Dong P.; Habte, Habtom; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W.; Chance, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (gp120/gp41) plays a critical role in virus infection and pathogenesis. Three of the six monoclonal antibodies considered to have broadly neutralizing activities (2F5, 4E10, and Z13e1) bind to the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41. This makes the MPER a desirable template for developing immunogens that can elicit antibodies with properties similar to these monoclonal antibodies, with a long term goal of developing antigens that could serve as novel HIV vaccines. In order to provide a structural basis for rational antigen design, an MPER construct, HR1-54Q, was generated for x-ray crystallographic and x-ray footprinting studies to provide both high resolution atomic coordinates and verification of the solution state of the antigen, respectively. The crystal structure of HR1-54Q reveals a trimeric, coiled-coil six-helical bundle, which probably represents a postfusion form of gp41. The MPER portion extends from HR2 in continuation of a slightly bent long helix and is relatively flexible. The structures observed for the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes agree well with existing structural data, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicate that the antigen binds well to antibodies that recognize the above epitopes. Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting of the antigen in solution reveals specifically protected and accessible regions consistent with the predictions based on the trimeric structure from the crystallographic data. Overall, the HR1-54Q antigen, as characterized by crystallography and footprinting, represents a postfusion, trimeric form of HIV gp41, and its structure provides a rational basis for gp41 antigen design suitable for HIV vaccine development. PMID:20525690

  12. Structural Characterization of HIV gp41 with the Membrane-proximal External Region

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, W.; Bohon, J; Han, D; Habte, H; Qin, Y; Cho, M; Chance, M

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (gp120/gp41) plays a critical role in virus infection and pathogenesis. Three of the six monoclonal antibodies considered to have broadly neutralizing activities (2F5, 4E10, and Z13e1) bind to the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41. This makes the MPER a desirable template for developing immunogens that can elicit antibodies with properties similar to these monoclonal antibodies, with a long term goal of developing antigens that could serve as novel HIV vaccines. In order to provide a structural basis for rational antigen design, an MPER construct, HR1-54Q, was generated for x-ray crystallographic and x-ray footprinting studies to provide both high resolution atomic coordinates and verification of the solution state of the antigen, respectively. The crystal structure of HR1-54Q reveals a trimeric, coiled-coil six-helical bundle, which probably represents a postfusion form of gp41. The MPER portion extends from HR2 in continuation of a slightly bent long helix and is relatively flexible. The structures observed for the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes agree well with existing structural data, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicate that the antigen binds well to antibodies that recognize the above epitopes. Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting of the antigen in solution reveals specifically protected and accessible regions consistent with the predictions based on the trimeric structure from the crystallographic data. Overall, the HR1-54Q antigen, as characterized by crystallography and footprinting, represents a postfusion, trimeric form of HIV gp41, and its structure provides a rational basis for gp41 antigen design suitable for HIV vaccine development.

  13. Recombinant expression, purification, and biophysical characterization of the transmembrane and membrane proximal domains of HIV-1 gp41

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhen; Kessans, Sarah A; Song, Lusheng; Dörner, Katerina; Lee, Ho-Hsien; Meador, Lydia R; LaBaer, Joshua; Hogue, Brenda G; Mor, Tsafrir S; Fromme, Petra

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 associates noncovalently with the surface subunit (gp120) and together they play essential roles in viral mucosal transmission and infection of target cells. The membrane proximal region (MPR) of gp41 is highly conserved and contains epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies. The transmembrane (TM) domain of gp41 not only anchors the envelope glycoprotein complex in the viral membrane but also dynamically affects the interactions of the MPR with the membrane. While high-resolution X-ray structures of some segments of the MPR were solved in the past, they represent the post-fusion forms. Structural information on the TM domain of gp41 is scant and at low resolution. Here we describe the design, expression and purification of a protein construct that includes MPR and the transmembrane domain of gp41 (MPR-TMTEV-6His), which reacts with the broadly neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 and thereby may represent an immunologically relevant conformation mimicking a prehairpin intermediate of gp41. The expression level of MPR-TMTEV-6His was improved by fusion to the C-terminus of Mistic protein, yielding ∼1 mg of pure protein per liter. The isolated MPR-TMTEV-6His protein was biophysically characterized and is a monodisperse candidate for crystallization. This work will enable further investigation into the structure of MPR-TMTEV-6His, which will be important for the structure-based design of a mucosal vaccine against HIV-1. PMID:25155369

  14. A human monoclonal antibody neutralizes diverse HIV-1 isolates by binding a critical gp41 epitope

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael D.; Geleziunas, Romas; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Lennard, Simon; Hrin, Renee; Zhang, Hangchun; Lu, Meiqing; An, Zhiqiang; Ingallinella, Paolo; Finotto, Marco; Mattu, Marco; Finnefrock, Adam C.; Bramhill, David; Cook, James; Eckert, Debra M.; Hampton, Richard; Patel, Mayuri; Jarantow, Stephen; Joyce, Joseph; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Cortese, Riccardo; Lu, Ping; Strohl, William; Schleif, William; McElhaugh, Michael; Lane, Steven; Lloyd, Christopher; Lowe, David; Osbourn, Jane; Vaughan, Tristan; Emini, Emilio; Barbato, Gaetano; Kim, Peter S.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Shiver, John W.; Pessi, Antonello

    2005-01-01

    HIV-1 entry into cells is mediated by the envelope glycoprotein receptor-binding (gp120) and membrane fusion-promoting (gp41) subunits. The gp41 heptad repeat 1 (HR1) domain is the molecular target of the fusion-inhibitor drug enfuvirtide (T20). The HR1 sequence is highly conserved and therefore considered an attractive target for vaccine development, but it is unknown whether antibodies can access HR1. Herein, we use gp41-based peptides to select a human antibody, 5H/I1-BMV-D5 (D5), that binds to HR1 and inhibits the assembly of fusion intermediates in vitro. D5 inhibits the replication of diverse HIV-1 clinical isolates and therefore represents a previously unknown example of a crossneutralizing IgG selected by binding to designed antigens. NMR studies and functional analyses map the D5-binding site to a previously identified hydrophobic pocket situated in the HR1 groove. This hydrophobic pocket was proposed as a drug target and subsequently identified as a common binding site for peptide and peptidomimetic fusion inhibitors. The finding that the D5 fusion-inhibitory antibody shares the same binding site suggests that the hydrophobic pocket is a “hot spot” for fusion inhibition and an ideal target on which to focus a vaccine-elicited antibody response. Our data provide a structural framework for the design of new immunogens and therapeutic antibodies with crossneutralizing potential. PMID:16203977

  15. Determinants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Resistance to gp41-Derived Inhibitory Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rimsky, Laurence T.; Shugars, Diane C.; Matthews, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    A synthetic peptide, DP178, containing amino acids 127 to 162 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 Env glycoprotein, is a potent inhibitor of virus infection and virus mediated cell-to-cell fusion (C. Wild, T. Greenwell, and T. Matthews, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 9:1051–1053, 1993). In an effort to understand the mechanism of action of this peptide, we derived resistant variants of HIV-1IIIB and NL4-3 by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of the peptide. Sequence analysis of the resistant isolates suggested that a contiguous 3-amino-acid sequence within the amino-terminal heptad repeat motif of gp41 was associated with resistance. Site-directed mutagenesis studies confirmed this observation and indicated that changes in two of these three residues were necessary for development of the resistant phenotype. Direct binding of DP178 to recombinant protein and synthetic peptide analogs containing the wild-type and mutant heptad repeat sequences revealed a strong correlation between DP178 binding and the biological sensitivity of the corresponding virus isolates to DP178. The results are discussed from the standpoints of the mechanism of action of DP178 and recent crystallographic information for a core structure of the gp41 ectodomain. PMID:9444991

  16. Complete dissociation of the HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain and membrane proximal regions upon phospholipid binding

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M.; Aniana, Annie; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein gp41 mediates the process of membrane fusion that enables entry of the HIV-1 virus into the host cell. Strong lipid affinity of the ectodomain suggests that its heptad repeat regions play an active role in destabilizing membranes by directly binding to the lipid bilayers and thereby lowering the free-energy barrier for membrane fusion. In such a model, immediately following the shedding of gp120, the N-heptad and C-heptad helices dissociate and melt into the host cell and viral membranes, respectively, pulling the destabilized membranes into juxtaposition, ready for fusion. Post-fusion, reaching the final 6-helix bundle (6HB) conformation then involves competition between intermolecular interactions needed for formation of the symmetric 6HB trimer and the membrane affinity of gp41's ectodomain, including its membrane-proximal regions. Our solution NMR study of the structural and dynamic properties of three constructs containing the ectodomain of gp41 with and without its membrane-proximal regions suggests that these segments do not form inter-helical interactions until the very late steps of the fusion process. Interactions between the polar termini of the heptad regions, which are not associating with the lipid surface, therefore may constitute the main driving force initiating formation of the final post-fusion states. The absence of significant intermolecular ectodomain interactions in the presence of dodecyl phosphocholine highlights the importance of trimerization of gp41’s transmembrane helix to prevent complete dissociation of the trimer during the course of fusion. PMID:25631354

  17. HIV-1 viral envelope protein gp41: An NMR investigation of dodecyl phosphocholine embedded gp41 reveals a dynamic pre-fusion intermediate conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lakomek, Nils-Alexander; Kaufman, Joshua D.; Stahl, Stephen J.; Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Human immunodeficiency viral (HIV-1) fusion is mediated by the viral envelope gp120/gp41 complex (ENVelope glycoprotein). After gp120 shedding, gp41 is exposed and elicits membrane fusion via a cascade of conformational changes. In contrast to pre-fusion and post-fusion conformation, little is known about any intermediate conformation. We report on a solution NMR investigation of homotrimeric HIV-1 gp4127–194, comprising the transmembrane region and reconstituted in dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelles. The protein is mainly α-helical but experiences internal dynamics on the nanosecond and micro-to millisecond time scale and transient α-helical behavior for certain residues in the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR). Strong lipid interactions are observed, in particular for C-terminal residues of the NHR and imunodominant loop region connecting NHR and C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR). Our data indicate an extended conformation with features anticipated for a pre-fusion intermediate, presumably in exchange with a lowly populated post-fusion six-helical bundle conformation. PMID:25132083

  18. Antibody to gp41 MPER Alters Functional Properties of HIV-1 Env without Complete Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Arthur S.; Leaman, Daniel P.; Zwick, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Human antibody 10E8 targets the conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) subunit gp41 and neutralizes HIV-1 with exceptional potency. Remarkably, HIV-1 containing mutations that reportedly knockout 10E8 binding to linear MPER peptides are partially neutralized by 10E8, producing a local plateau in the dose response curve. Here, we found that virus partially neutralized by 10E8 becomes significantly less neutralization sensitive to various MPER antibodies and to soluble CD4 while becoming significantly more sensitive to antibodies and fusion inhibitors against the heptad repeats of gp41. Thus, 10E8 modulates sensitivity of Env to ligands both pre- and post-receptor engagement without complete neutralization. Partial neutralization by 10E8 was influenced at least in part by perturbing Env glycosylation. With unliganded Env, 10E8 bound with lower apparent affinity and lower subunit occupancy to MPER mutant compared to wild type trimers. However, 10E8 decreased functional stability of wild type Env while it had an opposite, stabilizing effect on MPER mutant Envs. Clade C isolates with natural MPER polymorphisms also showed partial neutralization by 10E8 with altered sensitivity to various gp41-targeted ligands. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of virus neutralization by demonstrating how antibody binding to the base of a trimeric spike cross talks with adjacent subunits to modulate Env structure and function. The ability of an antibody to stabilize, destabilize, partially neutralize as well as alter neutralization sensitivity of a virion spike pre- and post-receptor engagement may have implications for immunotherapy and vaccine design. PMID:25058619

  19. A Mutation in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Protein Destabilizes the Interaction of the Envelope Protein Subunits gp120 and gp41

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melody R.; Jiang, Jiyang; Zhou, Jing; Freed, Eric O.; Aiken, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The Gag protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) associates with the envelope protein complex during virus assembly. The available evidence indicates that this interaction involves recognition of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT) by the matrix protein (MA) region of Pr55Gag. Here we show that substitution of Asp for Leu at position 49 (L49D) in MA results in a specific reduction in particle-associated gp120 without affecting the levels of gp41. Mutant virions were markedly reduced in single-cycle infectivity despite a relatively modest defect in fusion with target cells. Studies with HIV-1 particles containing decreased levels of envelope proteins suggested that the L49D mutation also inhibits a postentry step in infection. Truncation of the gp41 tail, or pseudotyping by vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein, restored both the fusion and infectivity of L49D mutant virions to wild-type levels. Truncation of gp41 also resulted in equivalent levels of gp120 on particles with and without the MA mutation and enhanced the replication of the L49D mutant virus in T cells. The impaired fusion and infectivity of L49D mutant particles were also complemented by a single point mutation in the gp41 CT that disrupted the tyrosine-containing endocytic motif. Our results suggest that an altered interaction between the MA domain of Gag and the gp41 cytoplasmic tail leads to dissociation of gp120 from gp41 during HIV-1 particle assembly, thus resulting in impaired fusion and infectivity. PMID:16474147

  20. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Takeo; Kaori, Takaki; Enomoto, Ikumi; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2013-01-01

    The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of non-human primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb) B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7,900-, 1,000-, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody. PMID:23717307

  1. Characterization of a trimeric MPER containing HIV-1 gp41 antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hinz, Andreas; Schoehn, Guy; Quendler, Heribert; Hulsik, David Lutje; Stiegler, Gabi; Katinger, Hermann; Seaman, Michael S.; Montefiori, David; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2009-08-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 is considered as a prime target for the induction of neutralizing antibodies, since it contains the epitopes for three broadly neutralizing antibodies (2F5, 4E10 and Z13). Here we present a novel gp41 construct (HA-gp41) comprising gp41 HR2 and MPER fused to two triple-stranded coiled-coil domains at both ends. HA-gp41 is trimeric, has a high helical content in solution and forms rod-like structures as revealed by negative staining electron microscopy. Immunization of rabbits with HA-gp41 induced antibodies directed against MPER, which failed to exert significant neutralization capacity against envelopes from primary isolates. Thus trimerisation of MPER regions does not suffice to induce a potent neutralizing antibody response specific for conserved regions within gp41.

  2. Structure-Based Design of a Protein Immunogen that Displays an HIV-1 gp41 Neutralizing Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-06-27

    Antibody Z13e1 is a relatively broadly neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody that recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. Based on the crystal structure of an MPER epitope peptide in complex with Z13e1 Fab, we identified an unrelated protein, interleukin (IL)-22, with a surface-exposed region that is structurally homologous in its backbone to the gp41 Z13e1 epitope. By grafting the gp41 Z13e1 epitope sequence onto the structurally homologous region in IL-22, we engineered a novel protein (Z13-IL22-2) that contains the MPER epitope sequence for use as a potential immunogen and as a reagent for the detection of Z13e1-like antibodies. The Z13-IL22-2 protein binds Fab Z13e1 with a K{sub d} of 73 nM. The crystal structure of Z13-IL22-2 in complex with Fab Z13e1 shows that the epitope region is faithfully replicated in the Fab-bound scaffold protein; however, isothermal calorimetry studies indicate that Fab binding to Z13-IL22-2 is not a lock-and-key event, leaving open the question of whether conformational changes upon binding occur in the Fab, in Z13-IL-22, or in both.

  3. Molecular and Physicochemical Factors Governing Solubility of the HIV gp41 Ectodomain.

    PubMed

    Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Crespillo, Sara; Morel, Bertrand; Casares, Salvador; Mateo, Pedro L; Notka, Frank; Roger, Marie G; Mouz, Nicolas; El-Habib, Raphaelle; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2016-08-23

    The HIV gp41 ectodomain (e-gp41) is an attractive target for the development of vaccines and drugs against HIV because of its crucial role in viral fusion to the host cell. However, because of the high insolubility of e-gp41, most biophysical and structural analyses have relied on the production of truncated versions removing the loop region of gp41 or the utilization of nonphysiological solubilizing conditions. The loop region of gp41 is also known as principal immunodominant domain (PID) because of its high immunogenicity, and it is essential for gp41-mediated HIV fusion. In this study we identify the aggregation-prone regions of the amino acid sequence of the PID and engineer a highly soluble mutant that preserves the trimeric structure of the wild-type e-gp41 under physiological pH. Furthermore, using a reverse mutagenesis approach, we analyze the role of mutated amino acids upon the physicochemical factors that govern solubility of e-gp41. On this basis, we propose a molecular model for e-gp41 self-association, which can guide the production of soluble e-gp41 mutants for future biophysical analyses and biotechnological applications. PMID:27558714

  4. Prolonged exposure of the HIV-1 gp41 membrane proximal region with L669S substitution

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoying; Dennison, S. Moses; Liu, Pinghuang; Gao, Feng; Jaeger, Frederick; Montefiori, David C.; Verkoczy, Laurent; Haynes, Barton F.; Alam, S. Munir; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2010-01-01

    The conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 envelope is a target for the rare broadly neutralizing 2F5, Z13, and 4E10 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). One strategy to elicit such antibodies is to design an immunogen with increased exposure of the 2F5 and 4E10 mAb epitopes. In this study we characterize a single leucine to serine substitution at position 669 (L669S) in the gp41 Env MPER that confers >250-fold more neutralization sensitivity to 2F5 and 4E10 mAbs than does the wild-type gp41 sequence. On synthetic liposomes, increased solvent exposure of MPER tryptophan residues and stable docking of 2F5 and 4E10 mAbs to mutant MPER peptide liposomes indicate more favorable membrane orientation of MPER neutralizing epitopes with L669S substitution. The time during which virus is sensitive to 2F5 mAb-mediated neutralization is approximately 3-fold longer when the mutation is present. These data suggest that a major contribution to the L669S mutant virus phenotype of enhanced susceptibility to MPER mAbs is prolonged exposure of the MPER neutralizing epitope during viral entry. PMID:20231447

  5. Identification and Characterization of a Broadly Cross-Reactive HIV-1 Human Monoclonal Antibody That Binds to Both gp120 and gp41

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Yuan, Tingting; Li, Jingjing; Rosa Borges, Andrew; Watkins, Jennifer D.; Guenaga, Javier; Yang, Zheng; Wang, Yanping; Wilson, Richard; Li, Yuxing; Polonis, Victoria R.; Pincus, Seth H.; Ruprecht, Ruth M.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) may assist vaccine immunogen design. Here we report a novel human monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated m43, which co-targets the gp120 and gp41 subunits of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). M43 bound to recombinant gp140 s from various primary isolates, to membrane-associated Envs on transfected cells and HIV-1 infected cells, as well as to recombinant gp120 s and gp41 fusion intermediate structures containing N-trimer structure, but did not bind to denatured recombinant gp140 s and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) mutant, gp120 D368R, suggesting that the m43 epitope is conformational and overlaps the CD4bs on gp120 and the N-trimer structure on gp41. M43 neutralized 34% of the HIV-1 primary isolates from different clades and all the SHIVs tested in assays based on infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by replication-competent virus, but was less potent in cell line-based pseudovirus assays. In contrast to CD4, m43 did not induce Env conformational changes upon binding leading to exposure of the coreceptor binding site, enhanced binding of mAbs 2F5 and 4E10 specific for the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 Envs, or increased gp120 shedding. The overall modest neutralization activity of m43 is likely due to the limited binding of m43 to functional Envs which could be increased by antibody engineering if needed. M43 may represent a new class of bnAbs targeting conformational epitopes overlapping structures on both gp120 and gp41. Its novel epitope and possibly new mechanism(s) of neutralization could helpdesign improved vaccine immunogens and candidate therapeutics. PMID:22970187

  6. Coupling of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Fusion to Virion Maturation: a Novel Role of the gp41 Cytoplasmic Tail

    PubMed Central

    Wyma, Donald J.; Jiang, Jiyang; Shi, Jiong; Zhou, Jing; Lineberger, Janet E.; Miller, Michael D.; Aiken, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Retrovirus particles are not infectious until they undergo proteolytic maturation to form a functional core. Here we report a link between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) core maturation and the ability of the virus to fuse with target cells. Using a recently developed reporter assay of HIV-1 virus-cell fusion, we show that immature HIV-1 particles are 5- to 10-fold less active for fusion with target cells than are mature virions. The fusion of mature and immature virions was rendered equivalent by truncating the gp41 cytoplasmic domain or by pseudotyping viruses with the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus. An analysis of a panel of mutants containing mutated cleavage sites indicated that HIV-1 fusion competence is activated by the cleavage of Gag at any site between the MA and NC segments and not as an indirect consequence of an altered core structure. These results suggest a mechanism by which binding of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail to Gag within immature HIV-1 particles inhibits Env conformational changes on the surface of the virion that are required for membrane fusion. This “inside-out” regulation of HIV-1 fusion could play an important role in the virus life cycle by preventing the entry of immature, noninfectious particles. PMID:15016865

  7. Mechanisms and structural determinants of HIV-1 coat protein, gp41-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Adamson, D C; Kopnisky, K L; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L

    1999-01-01

    Of the individuals with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, 20-30% will develop the neurological complication of HIV-associated dementia (HAD). The mechanisms underlying HAD are unknown; however, indirect immunologically mediated mechanisms are theorized to play a role. Recently, the HIV-1 coat protein gp41 has been implicated as a major mediator of HAD through induction of neurocytokines and subsequent neuronal cell death. Using primary mixed cortical cultures from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) null (nNOS-/-) mice and immunological NOS null (iNOS-/-) mice, we establish iNOS-derived NO as a major mediator of gp41 neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicity elicited by gp41 is markedly attenuated in iNOS-/- cultures compared with wild-type and nNOS-/- cultures. The NOS inhibitor L-nitroarginine methyl ester is neuroprotective in wild-type and nNOS-/- cultures, confirming the role of iNOS-derived NO in gp41 neurotoxicity. Confirming that iNOS-/- cultures lack iNOS, gp41 did not induce iNOS in iNOS-/- cultures, but it markedly induced iNOS in wild-type and nNOS-/- cultures. We elucidate the region of gp41 that is critical for iNOS induction and neuronal cell death by monitoring iNOS induction with overlapping peptides spanning gp41. We show that the N-terminal region of gp41, which we designate as the neurotoxic domain, induces iNOS protein activity and iNOS-dependent neurotoxicity at picomolar concentrations in a manner similar to recombinant gp41 protein. Our experiments suggest that gp41 is eliciting the induction of iNOS through potential cell surface receptors or binding sites because the induction of iNOS is dose dependent and saturable and occurs at physiologically relevant concentrations. These data confirm that the induction of iNOS by gp41 and the production of NO are primary mediators of neuronal damage and identify a neurotoxic domain of gp41 that may play an important role in HAD. PMID:9870939

  8. HIV-1 vaccine development: constrained peptide immunogens show improved binding to the anti-HIV-1 gp41 MAb.

    PubMed

    McGaughey, G B; Citron, M; Danzeisen, R C; Freidinger, R M; Garsky, V M; Hurni, W M; Joyce, J G; Liang, X; Miller, M; Shiver, J; Bogusky, M J

    2003-03-25

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 mediates viral entry through fusion of the target cellular and viral membranes. A segment of gp41 containing the sequence Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala has previously been identified as the epitope of the HIV-1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5 (MAb 2F5). The 2F5 epitope is highly conserved among HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Antibodies directed at the 2F5 epitope have neutralizing effects on a broad range of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 variants and primary isolates. Recently, a crystal structure of the epitope bound to the Fab fragment of MAb 2F5 has shown that the 2F5 peptide adopts a beta-turn conformation [Pai, E. F., Klein, M. H., Chong, P., and Pedyczak, A. (2000) World Intellectual Property Organization Patent WO-00/61618]. We have designed cyclic peptides to adopt beta-turn conformations by the incorporation of a side-chain to side-chain lactam bridge between the i and i + 4 residues containing the Asp-Lys-Trp segment. Synthesis of extended, nonconstrained peptides encompassing the 2F5 epitope revealed that the 13 amino acid sequence, Glu-Leu-Leu-Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala-Ser-Leu-Trp-Asn, maximized MAb 2F5 binding. Constrained analogues of this sequence were explored to optimize 2F5 binding affinity. The solution conformations of the constrained peptides have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques. The results presented here demonstrate that both inclusion of the lactam constraint and extension of the 2F5 segment are necessary to elicit optimal antibody binding activity. The ability of these peptide immunogens to stimulate a high titer, peptide-specific immune response incapable of viral neutralization is discussed in regard to developing an HIV-1 vaccine designed to elicit a 2F5-like immune response. PMID:12641452

  9. Epitope map of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 derived from 47 monoclonal antibodies produced by immunization with oligomeric envelope protein.

    PubMed Central

    Earl, P L; Broder, C C; Doms, R W; Moss, B

    1997-01-01

    The biologically relevant form of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein is oligomeric, with the major points of contact between oligomeric partners located in the ectodomain of gp41. To identify and map conserved epitopes and regions in gp41 where structure is influenced by quaternary interactions, we used a panel of 38 conformation-dependent and 9 conformation-independent anti-gp41 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) produced by immunization of mice with oligomeric Env protein. By cross-competition experiments using these MAbs and several others previously described, six distinct antigenic determinants were identified and mapped. Three of these determinants are conformational in nature and dependent in part on Env oligomeric structure. MAbs to two of these determinants were broadly cross-reactive with Env proteins derived from primary virus strains. The prevalence of antibodies in HIV-1-positive human sera to the antigenic determinants was determined by the ability of such sera to block binding of MAbs to Env protein. Strong blocking activity that correlated with cross-reactivity was found. PMID:9060620

  10. Biochemistry and Biophysics of HIV-1 gp41 – membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lifeng; Gochin, Miriam; Liu, Keliang

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the pathogen of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), causes ~2 millions death every year and still defies an effective vaccine. HIV-1 infects host cells through envelope protein – mediated virus-cell fusion. The transmembrane subunit of envelope protein, gp41, is the molecular machinery which facilitates fusion. Its ectodomain contains several distinguishing functional domains, fusion peptide (FP), N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR), C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) and membrane proximal extracellular region (MPER). During the fusion process, FP inserts into the host cell membrane, and an extended gp41 prehairpin conformation bridges the viral and cell membranes through MPER and FP respectively. Subsequent conformational change of the unstable prehairpin results in a coiled-coil 6-helix bundle (6HB) structure formed between NHR and CHR. The energetics of 6HB formation drives membrane apposition and fusion. Drugs targeting gp41 functional domains to prevent 6HB formation inhibit HIV-1 infection. T20 (enfuvirtide, Fuzeon) was approved by the US FDA in 2003 as the first fusion inhibitor. It is a 36-residue peptide from the gp41 CHR, and it inhibits 6HB formation by targeting NHR and lipids. Development of new fusion inhibitors, especially small molecule drugs, is encouraged to overcome the shortcomings of T20 as a peptide drug. Hydrophobic characteristics and membrane association are critical for gp41 function and mechanism of action. Research in gp41-membrane interactions, using peptides corresponding to specific functional domains, or constructs including several interactive domains, are reviewed here to get a better understanding of gp41 mediated virus-cell fusion that can inform or guide the design of new HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. PMID:22044229

  11. Initiation of immune tolerance-controlled HIV gp41 neutralizing B cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruijun; Verkoczy, Laurent; Wiehe, Kevin; Munir Alam, S; Nicely, Nathan I; Santra, Sampa; Bradley, Todd; Pemble, Charles W; Zhang, Jinsong; Gao, Feng; Montefiori, David C; Bouton-Verville, Hilary; Kelsoe, Garnett; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Phillip D; Parks, Robert; Foulger, Andrew; Peel, Jessica N; Luo, Kan; Lu, Xiaozhi; Trama, Ashley M; Vandergrift, Nathan; Tomaras, Georgia D; Kepler, Thomas B; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-04-27

    Development of an HIV vaccine is a global priority. A major roadblock to a vaccine is an inability to induce protective broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). HIV gp41 bnAbs have characteristics that predispose them to be controlled by tolerance. We used gp41 2F5 bnAb germline knock-in mice and macaques vaccinated with immunogens reactive with germline precursors to activate neutralizing antibodies. In germline knock-in mice, bnAb precursors were deleted, with remaining anergic B cells capable of being activated by germline-binding immunogens to make gp41-reactive immunoglobulin M (IgM). Immunized macaques made B cell clonal lineages targeted to the 2F5 bnAb epitope, but 2F5-like antibodies were either deleted or did not attain sufficient affinity for gp41-lipid complexes to achieve the neutralization potency of 2F5. Structural analysis of members of a vaccine-induced antibody lineage revealed that heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) hydrophobicity was important for neutralization. Thus, gp41 bnAbs are controlled by immune tolerance, requiring vaccination strategies to transiently circumvent tolerance controls. PMID:27122615

  12. Initiation of immune tolerance–controlled HIV gp41 neutralizing B cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruijun; Verkoczy, Laurent; Wiehe, Kevin; Alam, S. Munir; Nicely, Nathan I.; Santra, Sampa; Bradley, Todd; Pemble, Charles W.; Zhang, Jinsong; Gao, Feng; Montefiori, David C.; Bouton-Verville, Hilary; Kelsoe, Garnett; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Phillip D.; Parks, Robert; Foulger, Andrew; Peel, Jessica N.; Luo, Kan; Lu, Xiaozhi; Trama, Ashley M.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2016-01-01

    Development of an HIV vaccine is a global priority. A major roadblock to a vaccine is an inability to induce protective broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). HIV gp41 bnAbs have characteristics that predispose them to be controlled by tolerance. We used gp41 2F5 bnAb germline knock-in mice and macaques vaccinated with immunogens reactive with germline precursors to activate neutralizing antibodies. In germline knock-in mice, bnAb precursors were deleted, with remaining anergic B cells capable of being activated by germline-binding immunogens to make gp41-reactive immunoglobulin M (IgM). Immunized macaques made B cell clonal lineages targeted to the 2F5 bnAb epitope, but 2F5-like antibodies were either deleted or did not attain sufficient affinity for gp41-lipid complexes to achieve the neutralization potency of 2F5. Structural analysis of members of a vaccine-induced antibody lineage revealed that heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) hydrophobicity was important for neutralization. Thus, gp41 bnAbs are controlled by immune tolerance, requiring vaccination strategies to transiently circumvent tolerance controls. PMID:27122615

  13. Viroporin potential of the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP) domains of the HIV-1 gp41 protein

    PubMed Central

    Costin, Joshua M; Rausch, Joshua M; Garry, Robert F; Wimley, William C

    2007-01-01

    Background Mechanisms by which HIV-1 mediates reductions in CD4+ cell levels in infected persons are being intensely investigated, and have broad implications for AIDS drug and vaccine development. Virally induced changes in membrane ionic permeability induced by lytic viruses of many families contribute to cytopathogenesis. HIV-1 induces disturbances in plasma membrane ion transport. The carboxyl terminus of TM (gp41) contains potential amphipathic α-helical motifs identified through their structural similarities to naturally occurring cytolytic peptides. These sequences have been dubbed lentiviral lytic peptides (LLP) -1, -2, and -3. Results Peptides corresponding to the LLP domains (from a clade B virus) partition into lipid membranes, fold into α-helices and disrupt model membrane permeability. A peptide corresponding to the LLP-1 domain of a clade D HIV-1 virus, LLP-1D displayed similar activity to the LLP-1 domain of the clade B virus in all assays, despite a lack of amino acid sequence identity. Conclusion These results suggest that the C-terminal domains of HIV-1 Env proteins may form an ion channel, or viroporin. Increased understanding of the function of LLP domains and their role in the viral replication cycle could allow for the development of novel HIV drugs. PMID:18028545

  14. Neutralization resistance of virological synapse-mediated HIV-1 Infection is regulated by the gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Durham, Natasha D; Yewdall, Alice W; Chen, Ping; Lee, Rebecca; Zony, Chati; Robinson, James E; Chen, Benjamin K

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can spread efficiently from infected to uninfected T cells through adhesive contacts called virological synapses (VSs). In this process, cell-surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) initiates adhesion and viral transfer into an uninfected recipient cell. Previous studies have found some HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera to be less effective at blocking VS-mediated infection than infection with cell-free virus. Here we employ sensitive flow cytometry-based infection assays to measure the inhibitory potency of HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAb) and HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera against cell-free and VS-mediated infection. To various degrees, anti-Env MAbs exhibited significantly higher 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)s) against VS-mediated infection than cell-free infection. Notably, the MAb 17b, which binds a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope on gp120, displayed a 72-fold reduced efficacy against VS-mediated inocula compared to cell-free inocula. A mutant with truncation mutation in the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT) which is unable to modulate Env fusogenicity in response to virus particle maturation but which can still engage in cell-to-cell infection was tested for the ability to resist neutralizing antibodies. The ΔCT mutation increased cell surface staining by neutralizing antibodies, significantly enhanced neutralization of VS-mediated infection, and had reduced or no effect on cell-free infection, depending upon the antibody. Our results suggest that the gp41 CT regulates the exposure of key neutralizing epitopes during cell-to-cell infection and plays an important role in immune evasion. Vaccine strategies should consider immunogens that reflect Env conformations exposed on the infected cell surface to enhance protection against VS-mediated HIV-1 spread. PMID:22553332

  15. Identification of the LWYIK Motif Located in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Transmembrane gp41 Protein as a Distinct Determinant for Viral Infection▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Steve S.-L.; Yang, Polung; Ke, Po-Yuan; Li, Hsiao-Fen; Chan, Woan-Eng; Chang, Ding-Kwo; Chuang, Chin-Kai; Tsai, Yu; Huang, Shu-Chen

    2009-01-01

    The highly conserved LWYIK motif located immediately proximal to the membrane-spanning domain of the gp41 transmembrane protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been proposed as being important for the surface envelope (Env) glycoprotein's association with lipid rafts and gp41-mediated membrane fusion. Here we employed substitution and deletion mutagenesis to understand the role of this motif in the virus life cycle. None of the mutants examined affected the synthesis, precursor processing, CD4 binding, oligomerization, or cell surface expression of the Env, nor did they alter Env incorporation into the virus. All of the mutants, particularly the ΔYI, ΔIK, and ΔLWYIK mutants, in which the indicated residues were deleted, exhibited greatly reduced one-cycle viral replication and the Env trans-complementation ability. All of these deletion mutant proteins were still localized in the lipid rafts. With the exception of the Trp-to-Ala (WA) mutant, which exhibited reduced viral infectivity albeit with normal membrane fusion, all mutants displayed loss of some or almost all of the membrane fusion ability. Although these deletion mutants partially inhibited in trans wild-type (WT) Env-mediated fusion, they were more effective in dominantly interfering with WT Env-mediated viral entry when coexpressed with the WT Env, implying a role of this motif in postfusion events as well. Both T20 and L43L peptides derived from the two gp41 extracellular C- and N-terminal α-helical heptad repeats, respectively, inhibited WT and ΔLWYIK Env-mediated viral entry with comparable efficacies. Biotin-tagged T20 effectively captured both the fusion-active, prehairpin intermediates of WT and mutant gp41 upon CD4 activation. Env without the deletion of the LWYIK motif still effectively mediated lipid mixing but inhibited content mixing. Our study demonstrates that the immediate membrane-proximal LWYIK motif acts as a unique and distinct determinant located in the gp41 C

  16. The Atomic Structure of the HIV-1 gp41 Transmembrane Domain and Its Connection to the Immunogenic Membrane-proximal External Region*♦

    PubMed Central

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Rujas, Edurne; Serrano, Soraya; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Jiménez, M. Ángeles; Nieva, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) C-terminal segment and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 are involved in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion and modulation of immune responses during viral infection. However, the atomic structure of this functional region remains unsolved. Here, based on the high resolution NMR data obtained for peptides spanning the C-terminal segment of MPER and the TMD, we report two main findings: (i) the conformational variability of the TMD helix at a membrane-buried position; and (ii) the existence of an uninterrupted α-helix spanning MPER and the N-terminal region of the TMD. Thus, our structural data provide evidence for the bipartite organization of TMD predicted by previous molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, but they do not support the breaking of the helix at Lys-683, as was suggested by some models to mark the initiation of the TMD anchor. Antibody binding energetics examined with isothermal titration calorimetry and humoral responses elicited in rabbits by peptide-based vaccines further support the relevance of a continuous MPER-TMD helix for immune recognition. We conclude that the transmembrane anchor of HIV-1 envelope is composed of two distinct subdomains: 1) an immunogenic helix at the N terminus also involved in promoting membrane fusion; and 2) an immunosuppressive helix at the C terminus, which might also contribute to the late stages of the fusion process. The unprecedented high resolution structural data reported here may guide future vaccine and inhibitor developments. PMID:25787074

  17. Structural and Functional Roles of HIV-1 gp41 Pretransmembrane Sequence Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Cirión, Asier; Arrondo, José L. R.; Gómara, María J.; Lorizate, Maier; Iloro, Ibón; Melikyan, Grigory; Nieva, José L.

    2003-01-01

    The membrane-proximal segment connecting the helical core with the transmembrane anchor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 is accessible to broadly neutralizing antibodies and plays a crucial role in fusion activity. New predictive approaches including computation of interfacial affinity and the corresponding hydrophobic moments suggest that this region is functionally segmented into two consecutive subdomains: one amphipathic at the N-terminal side and one fully interfacial at the C-terminus. The N-terminal subdomain would extend α-helices from the preceding carboxy-terminal heptad repeat and provide, at the same time, a hydrophobic-at-interface surface. Experiments were performed to compare a wild-type representing pretransmembrane peptide with a nonamphipathic defective sequence, which otherwise conserved interfacial hydrophobicity at the carboxy-subdomain. Results confirmed that both penetrated equally well into lipid monolayers and both were able to partition into membrane interfaces. However only the functional sequence: 1), adopted helical structures in solution and in membranes; 2), formed homo-oligomers in solution and membranes; and 3), inhibited gp41-induced cell-cell fusion. These data support two roles for gp41 aromatic-rich pretransmembrane sequence: 1), oligomerization of gp41; and 2), immersion into the viral membrane interface. Accessibility to membrane interfaces and subsequent adoption of the low-energy structure may augment helical bundle formation and perhaps be related to a concomitant loss of immunoreactivity. These results may have implications in the development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors and vaccines. PMID:14645067

  18. Approaches for identification of HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting gp41 pocket.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Du, Lanying; Zhu, Xiaojie; Debnath, Asim K; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-01

    The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon), was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD), it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs. PMID:23344560

  19. Fusion Activity of HIV gp41 Fusion Domain is Related to its Secondary Structure and Depth of Membrane Insertion in a Cholesterol-Dependent Fashion

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Alex L.; Moorthy, Anna Eswara; Li, Yinling; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2013-01-01

    The HIV gp41 fusion domain plays a critical role in membrane fusion during viral entry. A thorough understanding of the relationship between the structure and activity of the fusion domain in different lipid environments helps to formulate mechanistic models on how it might function in mediating membrane fusion. The secondary structure of the fusion domain in small liposomes composed of different lipid mixtures was investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. In membranes containing less than 30 mol% cholesterol the fusion domain formed an α-helix and in membranes containing equal to or more than 30 mol% cholesterol the fusion domain formed β-sheet secondary structure. EPR spectra of spin-labeled fusion domains also indicated different conformations in membranes with and without cholesterol. Power saturation EPR data were further used to determine the orientation and depth of α-helical fusion domains in lipid bilayers. Fusion and membrane perturbation activities of the gp41 fusion domain were measured by lipid mixing and contents leakage. The fusion domain fused membranes in both its helical and β-sheet forms. High cholesterol, which induced β-sheet, promoted fusion, but acidic lipids, which promoted relatively deep membrane insertion as an α-helix, also induced fusion. The results indicate that the structure of the HIV gp41 fusion domain is plastic and depends critically on the lipid environment. Provided their membrane insertion is deep, α-helical and β-sheet conformations contribute to membrane fusion. PMID:22343048

  20. Striking HIV-1 Entry by Targeting HIV-1 gp41. But, Where Should We Target?

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Cátia; Barbault, Florent; Couesnon, Thierry; Gomes, José R. B.; Gomes, Paula; Maurel, François

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 gp41 facilitates the viral fusion through a conformational switch involving the association of three C-terminal helices along the conserved hydrophobic grooves of three N-terminal helices coiled-coil. The control of these structural rearrangements is thought to be central to HIV-1 entry and, therefore, different strategies of intervention are being developed. Herewith, we describe a procedure to simulate the folding of an HIV-1 gp41 simplified model. This procedure is based on the construction of plausible conformational pathways, which describe protein transition between non-fusogenic and fusogenic conformations. The calculation of the paths started with 100 molecular dynamics simulations of the non-fusogenic conformation, which were found to converge to different intermediate states. Those presenting defined criteria were selected for separate targeted molecular dynamics simulations, subjected to a force constant imposing a movement towards the gp41 fusogenic conformation. Despite significant diversity, a preferred sequence of events emerged when the simulations were analyzed in terms of the formation, breakage and evolution of the contacts. We pointed out 29 residues as the most relevant for the movement of gp41; also, 2696 possible interactions were reduced to only 48 major interactions, which reveals the efficiency of the method. The analysis of the evolution of the main interactions lead to the detection of four main behaviors for those contacts: stable, increasing, decreasing and repulsive interactions. Altogether, these results suggest a specific small cavity of the HIV-1 gp41 hydrophobic groove as the preferred target to small molecules. PMID:26785380

  1. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Imamichi, Hiromi; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark

    2015-10-15

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies is providing important insights into the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in ref. 1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific monoclonal antibody, termed 35O22, which binds a novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) <50 μg ml-1. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg ml-1, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed that it bound to a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current monoclonal-antibody-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis and vaccine design.

  2. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-120 interface

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is providing important insights regarding the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific mAb, termed 35O22, which binds novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with an IC50<50 μg/ml. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg/ml, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed it to bind a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current mAb-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis, and vaccine design. PMID:25186731

  3. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Imamichi, Hiromi; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A; Bailer, Robert T; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F; Wyatt, Richard T; Sanders, Rogier W; Binley, James M; Ward, Andrew B; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D; Connors, Mark

    2014-11-01

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies is providing important insights into the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in ref. 1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific monoclonal antibody, termed 35O22, which binds a novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) <50 μg ml(-1). The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg ml(-1), among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed that it bound to a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current monoclonal-antibody-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis and vaccine design. PMID:25186731

  4. Structural delineation of a quaternary, cleavage-dependent epitope at the gp41-gp120 interface on intact HIV-1 Env trimers

    PubMed Central

    Blattner, Claudia; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Sliepen, Kwinten; Derking, Ronald; Falkowska, Emilia; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; van Gils, Marit; Lee, Peter S.; Peng, Wenjie; Paulson, James C.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary All previously characterized broadly neutralizing antibodies to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) target one of four major sites of vulnerability. Here, we define and structurally characterize a unique epitope on Env that is recognized by a recently discovered family of human monoclonal antibodies (PGT151-158). The PGT151 epitope is comprised of residues and glycans at the interface of gp41 and gp120 within a single protomer and glycans from both subunits of a second protomer and represents a neutralizing epitope that is dependent on both gp120 and gp41. As PGT151 binds only to properly formed, cleaved trimers, this distinctive property, and its ability to stabilize Env trimers, has enabled the successful purification of mature, cleaved Env trimers from the cell surface as a complex with PGT151. Here we compare the structural and functional properties of membrane-extracted Env trimers from several clades with those of the soluble, cleaved SOSIP gp140 trimer. PMID:24768348

  5. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Ho, Joseph X.; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary L.; Ji, Xinhua; Rueker, Florian; Carter, Daniel C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2 with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  6. Evaluation of "credit card" libraries for inhibition of HIV-1 gp41 fusogenic core formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Lu, Hong; Kennedy, Jack P; Yan, Xuxia; McAllister, Laura A; Yamamoto, Noboru; Moss, Jason A; Boldt, Grant E; Jiang, Shibo; Janda, Kim D

    2006-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are of critical importance in biological systems, and small molecule modulators of such protein recognition and intervention processes are of particular interest. To investigate this area of research, we have synthesized small-molecule libraries that can disrupt a number of biologically relevant protein-protein interactions. These library members are designed upon planar motif, appended with a variety of chemical functions, which we have termed "credit-card" structures. From two of our "credit-card" libraries, a series of molecules were uncovered which act as inhibitors against the HIV-1 gp41 fusogenic 6-helix bundle core formation, viral antigen p24 formation, and cell-cell fusion at low micromolar concentrations. From the high-throughput screening assays we utilized, a selective index (SI) value of 4.2 was uncovered for compound 2261, which bodes well for future structure activity investigations and the design of more potent gp41 inhibitors. PMID:16827565

  7. Engineering Recombinant Reoviruses To Display gp41 Membrane-Proximal External-Region Epitopes from HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, Karl W.; Ikizler, Mine'; Iskarpatyoti, Jason A.; Wetzel, J. Denise; Willis, Jordan; Crowe, James E.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.

    2016-01-01

    . Antibodies that neutralize genetically diverse strains of HIV-1 bind to discrete regions of the envelope glycoproteins, including the gp41 MPER. We engineered recombinant reoviruses that displayed MPER epitopes in attachment protein σ1 (REO-MPER vectors). The REO-MPER vectors replicated with wild-type efficiency, were genetically stable, and retained native antigenicity. However, we did not detect HIV-1-specific immune responses following inoculation of the REO-MPER vectors into small animals. This work provides proof of principle for engineering reovirus to express antigenic epitopes and illustrates the difficulty in eliciting MPER-specific immune responses. PMID:27303748

  8. Engineering Recombinant Reoviruses To Display gp41 Membrane-Proximal External-Region Epitopes from HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Karl W; Ikizler, Mine'; Iskarpatyoti, Jason A; Wetzel, J Denise; Willis, Jordan; Crowe, James E; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Wilson, Gregory J; Dermody, Terence S

    2016-01-01

    neutralize genetically diverse strains of HIV-1 bind to discrete regions of the envelope glycoproteins, including the gp41 MPER. We engineered recombinant reoviruses that displayed MPER epitopes in attachment protein σ1 (REO-MPER vectors). The REO-MPER vectors replicated with wild-type efficiency, were genetically stable, and retained native antigenicity. However, we did not detect HIV-1-specific immune responses following inoculation of the REO-MPER vectors into small animals. This work provides proof of principle for engineering reovirus to express antigenic epitopes and illustrates the difficulty in eliciting MPER-specific immune responses. PMID:27303748

  9. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens. PMID:23668610

  10. Identification of the gC1qR sites for the HIV-1 viral envelope protein gp41 and the HCV core protein: Implications in viral-specific pathogenesis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pednekar, Lina; Valentino, Alisa; Ji, Yan; Tumma, Nithin; Valentino, Christopher; Kadoor, Adarsh; Hosszu, Kinga K.; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Kew, Richard R.; Kishore, Uday; Peerschke, Ellinor I.B.; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence accumulated over the past 20 years supports the concept that gC1qR is a major pathogen-associated pattern recognition receptor (PRR). This conclusion is based on the fact that, a wide range of bacterial and viral ligands are able to exploit gC1qR to either suppress the host’s immune response and thus enhance their survival, or to gain access into cells to initiate disease. Of the extensive array of viral ligands that have affinity for gC1qR, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41, and the core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) are of major interest as they are known to contribute to the high morbidity and mortality caused by these pathogens. While the HCV core protein binds gC1qR and suppresses T cell proliferation resulting in a significantly diminished immune response, the gp41 employs gC1qR to induce the surface expression of the NK cell ligand, NKp44L, on uninfected CD4+ T cells, thereby rendering them susceptible to autologous destruction by NKp44 receptor expressing NK cells. Because of the potential for the design of peptide-based or antibody-based therapeutic options, the present studies were undertaken to define the gC1qR interaction sites for these pathogen-associated molecular ligands. Employing a solid phase microplate-binding assay, we examined the binding of each viral ligand to wild type gC1qR and 11 gC1qR deletion mutants. The results obtained from these studies have identified two major HCV core protein sites on a domain of gC1qR comprising of residues 144–148 and 196–202. Domain 196–202 in turn, is located in the last half of the larger gC1qR segment encoded by exons IV–VI (residues 159–282), which was proposed previously to contain the site for HCV core protein. The major gC1qR site for gp41 on the other hand, was found to be in a highly conserved region encoded by exon IV and comprises of residues 174–180. Interestingly, gC1qR residues 174–180 also constitute the cell surface-binding site for soluble

  11. Identification of the gC1qR sites for the HIV-1 viral envelope protein gp41 and the HCV core protein: Implications in viral-specific pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Pednekar, Lina; Valentino, Alisa; Ji, Yan; Tumma, Nithin; Valentino, Christopher; Kadoor, Adarsh; Hosszu, Kinga K; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Kew, Richard R; Kishore, Uday; Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2016-06-01

    A substantial body of evidence accumulated over the past 20 years supports the concept that gC1qR is a major pathogen-associated pattern recognition receptor (PRR). This conclusion is based on the fact that, a wide range of bacterial and viral ligands are able to exploit gC1qR to either suppress the host's immune response and thus enhance their survival, or to gain access into cells to initiate disease. Of the extensive array of viral ligands that have affinity for gC1qR, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41, and the core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) are of major interest as they are known to contribute to the high morbidity and mortality caused by these pathogens. While the HCV core protein binds gC1qR and suppresses T cell proliferation resulting in a significantly diminished immune response, the gp41 employs gC1qR to induce the surface expression of the NK cell ligand, NKp44L, on uninfected CD4(+) T cells, thereby rendering them susceptible to autologous destruction by NKp44 receptor expressing NK cells. Because of the potential for the design of peptide-based or antibody-based therapeutic options, the present studies were undertaken to define the gC1qR interaction sites for these pathogen-associated molecular ligands. Employing a solid phase microplate-binding assay, we examined the binding of each viral ligand to wild type gC1qR and 11 gC1qR deletion mutants. The results obtained from these studies have identified two major HCV core protein sites on a domain of gC1qR comprising of residues 144-148 and 196-202. Domain 196-202 in turn, is located in the last half of the larger gC1qR segment encoded by exons IV-VI (residues 159-282), which was proposed previously to contain the site for HCV core protein. The major gC1qR site for gp41 on the other hand, was found to be in a highly conserved region encoded by exon IV and comprises of residues 174-180. Interestingly, gC1qR residues 174-180 also constitute the cell surface-binding site for soluble gC1qR (sgC1q

  12. Membrane-Active Sequences within gp41 Membrane Proximal External Region (MPER) Modulate MPER-Containing Peptidyl Fusion Inhibitor Activity and the Biosynthesis of HIV-1 Structural Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si Min; Jejcic, Alenka; Tam, James P.; Vahlne, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal external region (MPER) is a highly conserved membrane-active region located at the juxtamembrane positions within class I viral fusion glycoproteins and essential for membrane fusion events during viral entry. The MPER in the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) interacts with the lipid bilayers through a cluster of tryptophan (Trp) residues and a C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif. The inclusion of the MPER N-terminal sequence contributes to the membrane reactivity and anti-viral efficacy of the first two anti-HIV peptidyl fusion inhibitors T20 and T1249. As a type I transmembrane protein, Env also interacts with the cellular membranes during its biosynthesis and trafficking. Here we investigated the roles of MPER membrane-active sequences during both viral entry and assembly, specifically, their roles in the design of peptidyl fusion inhibitors and the biosynthesis of viral structural proteins. We found that elimination of the membrane-active elements in MPER peptides, namely, penta Trp→alanine (Ala) substitutions and the disruption of the C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif through deletion inhibited the anti-viral effect against the pseudotyped HIV-1. Furthermore, as compared to C-terminal dimerization, N-terminal dimerization of MPER peptides and N-terminal extension with five helix-forming residues enhanced their anti-viral efficacy substantially. The secondary structure study revealed that the penta-Trp→Ala substitutions also increased the helical content in the MPER sequence, which prompted us to study the biological relevance of such mutations in pre-fusion Env. We observed that Ala mutations of Trp664, Trp668 and Trp670 in MPER moderately lowered the intracellular and intraviral contents of Env while significantly elevating the content of another viral structural protein, p55/Gag and its derivative p24/capsid. The data suggest a role of the gp41 MPER in the membrane-reactive events during

  13. Investigating hexameric helicases: Single-molecule studies of DnaB and T4 gp41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Omar; Ribeck, Noah; Berezney, John

    2011-03-01

    Hexameric, ring-shaped motor proteins serve as replicative helicases in many systems. They function by encircling and translocating along ssDNA, denaturing dsDNA in advance of its motion by sterically occluding the complementary strand to the outside of the ring. We investigate the helicase activity of two such motors using single-molecule measurements with magnetic tweezers. First, we measure the activity of the E. coli helicase DnaB complexed with the tau subunit of the Pol III holoenzyme. Tau is known from bulk measurements to stimulate DnaB activity (Kim et al., Cell, 1996); we investigate the means of this stimulation. Second, we measure helicase activity of the T4 phage helicase gp41 in multiple tethered DNA geometries. Previous work on DnaB showed a dependence of helicase activity on DNA geometry (Ribeck et al., Biophys. J., 2010); here, we test gp41 for similar behavior to see whether it is a common characteristic of hexameric helicases.

  14. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Gilliland, G. L.; Ji, X.; Ruker, F.; Carter, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Muster T et al., 1993, J Virol 67:6642-6647) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class (Ji X, Zhang P, Armstrong RN, Gilliland GL, 1992, Biochemistry 31:10169-10184) was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(3)2(1)2, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  15. Multimerized HIV-gp41-derived peptides as fusion inhibitors and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Mizuguchi, Takaaki; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2016-11-01

    To date, several antigens based on the amino-terminal leucine/isoleucine heptad repeat (NHR) region of an HIV-1 envelope protein gp41 and fusion inhibitors based on the carboxy-terminal leucine/isoleucine heptad repeat (CHR) region of gp41 have been reported. We have developed a synthetic antigen targeting the membrane-fusion mechanism of HIV-1. This uses a template designed with C3-symmetric linkers and mimics the trimeric form of the NHR-derived peptide N36. The antiserum obtained by immunization of the N36 trimeric antigen binds preferentially to the N36 trimer and blocks HIV-1 infection effectively, compared with the antiserum obtained by immunization of the N36 monomer. Using another template designed with different C3-symmetric linkers, we have also developed a synthetic peptide mimicking the trimeric form of the CHR-derived peptide C34, with ∼100 times the inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 fusion mechanism than that of the monomer C34 peptide. A dimeric derivative of C34 has potent inhibitory activity at almost the same levels as this C34 trimer mimic, suggesting that presence of a dimeric form of C34 is structurally critical for fusion inhibitors. As examples of rising mid-size drugs, this review describes an effective strategy for the design of HIV vaccines and fusion inhibitors based on a relationship with the native structure of proteins involved in HIV fusion mechanisms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 622-628, 2016. PMID:26583370

  16. Interaction between phage BFK20 helicase gp41 and its host Brevibacterium flavum primase DnaG.

    PubMed

    Solteszova, Barbora; Halgasova, Nora; Bukovska, Gabriela

    2015-01-22

    Protein-protein interactions have been identified between the replication proteins of corynephage BFK20 and its host Brevibacterium flavum CCM 251. We tested the interactions between phage proteins gp40, gp41, gp42, gp43 and gp44 and between these phage proteins and host replication proteins DnaZX, DnaN, Dnaδ, DnaG, DnaA, RecF, TrxC, TrxB1 and SSB using a bacterial two-hybrid system. Phage proteins gp41, gp42 and gp43 self-associated, demonstrating that these proteins are oligomers in vivo. Interactions were also detected between phage protein gp41 and host proteins DnaZX, DnaN, Dnaδ, DnaG and SSB. β-galactosidase activity measurements showed that the strongest interaction was between gp41 and DnaG. The interaction was studied further using 2-dimensional blue native SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis. PMID:25463056

  17. Induction of Antibodies in Rhesus Macaques That Recognize a Fusion-Intermediate Conformation of HIV-1 gp41

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, S. Moses; Sutherland, Laura L.; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Anasti, Kara M.; Parks, Robert; Stewart, Shelley; Bowman, Cindy; Xia, Shi-Mao; Zhang, Ruijun; Shen, Xiaoying; Scearce, Richard M.; Ofek, Gilad; Yang, Yongping; Kwong, Peter D.; Santra, Sampa; Liao, Hua-Xin; Tomaras, Georgia; Letvin, Norman L.; Chen, Bing; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.

    2011-01-01

    A component to the problem of inducing broad neutralizing HIV-1 gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER) antibodies is the need to focus the antibody response to the transiently exposed MPER pre-hairpin intermediate neutralization epitope. Here we describe a HIV-1 envelope (Env) gp140 oligomer prime followed by MPER peptide-liposomes boost strategy for eliciting serum antibody responses in rhesus macaques that bind to a gp41 fusion intermediate protein. This Env-liposome immunization strategy induced antibodies to the 2F5 neutralizing epitope 664DKW residues, and these antibodies preferentially bound to a gp41 fusion intermediate construct as well as to MPER scaffolds stabilized in the 2F5-bound conformation. However, no serum lipid binding activity was observed nor was serum neutralizing activity for HIV-1 pseudoviruses present. Nonetheless, the Env-liposome prime-boost immunization strategy induced antibodies that recognized a gp41 fusion intermediate protein and was successful in focusing the antibody response to the desired epitope. PMID:22140469

  18. Modulation of Nonneutralizing HIV-1 gp41 Responses by an MHC-Restricted TH Epitope Overlapping Those of Membrane Proximal External Region Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinsong; Alam, S. Munir; Bouton-Verville, Hilary; Chen, Yao; Newman, Amanda; Stewart, Shelley; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Montefiori, David; Dennison, S. Moses; Haynes, Barton F.; Verkoczy, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    A goal of HIV-1 vaccine development is to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs), but current immunization strategies fail to induce BnAbs, and for unknown reasons, often induce non-neutralizing Abs instead. To explore potential host genetic contributions controlling Ab responses to the HIV-1 Envelope (Env), we have used congenic strains to identify a critical role for MHC class II restriction in modulating Ab responses to the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41, a key vaccine target. Immunized H-2d-congenic strains had more rapid, sustained, and elevated MPER+ Ab titers than those bearing other haplotypes, regardless of immunogen, adjuvant, or prime/boost regimen used, including formulations designed to provide T-cell help. H-2d restricted MPER+ serum Ab responses depended on CD4 TH interactions with Class II (as revealed in immunized intra-H-2d/b congenic or CD154-/- H-2d strains, and by selective abrogation of MPER re-stimulated, H-2d-restricted primed splenocytes by Class II-blocking Abs), and failed to neutralize HIV-1 in the TZM-b/l neutralization assay, coinciding with lack of specificity for an aspartate residue in the neutralization core of BnAb 2F5. Unexpectedly, H-2d restricted MPER+ responses functionally mapped to a core TH epitope partially overlapping the 2F5/z13/4E10 BnAb epitopes as well as non-neutralizing B-cell/Ab binding residues. We propose that Class II-restriction contributes to the general heterogeneity of non- neutralizing gp41 responses induced by Env. Moreover, the proximity of TH and B-cell epitopes in this restriction may have to be considered in re-designing minimal MPER immunogens aimed at exclusively binding BnAb epitopes and triggering MPER+ BnAbs. PMID:24465011

  19. Structural Plasticity in the Topology of the Membrane-Interacting Domain of HIV-1 gp41

    PubMed Central

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Freites, J. Alfredo; He, Jing; Tobias, Douglas J.; Wimley, William C.; Ladokhin, Alexey S.

    2014-01-01

    We use a number of computational and experimental approaches to investigate the membrane topology of the membrane-interacting C-terminal domain of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion protein. Several putative transmembrane regions are identified using hydrophobicity analysis based on the Wimley-White scales, including the membrane-proximal external region (MPER). The MPER region is an important target for neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies and is believed to have an interfacial topology in the membrane. To assess the possibility of a transmembrane topology of MPER, we examined the membrane interactions of a peptide corresponding to a 22-residue stretch of the MPER sequence (residues 662–683) using fluorescence spectroscopy and oriented circular dichroism. In addition to the previously reported interfacial location, we identify a stable transmembrane conformation of the peptide in synthetic lipid bilayers. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the MPER-derived peptide in a lipid bilayer demonstrate a stable helical structure with an average tilt of 24 degrees, with the five tryptophan residues sampling different environments inside the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer, consistent with the observed spectral properties of intrinsic fluorescence. The degree of lipid bilayer penetration obtained by computer simulation was verified using depth-dependent fluorescence quenching of a selectively attached fluorescence probe. Overall, our data indicate that the MPER sequence can have at least two stable conformations in the lipid bilayer, interfacial and transmembrane, and suggest a possibility that external perturbations can switch the topology during physiological functioning. PMID:24507601

  20. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, X. M.; Ruker, F.; Casale, E.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 degrees. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  1. A Conformational Switch in Human Immunodeficiency Virus gp41 Revealed by the Structures of Overlapping Epitopes Recognized by Neutralizing Antibodies ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S.; Brunel, Florence M.; Cardoso, Rosa M.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Dawson, Philip E.; Burton, Dennis R.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein (gp41) is critical for viral fusion and infectivity and is the target of three of the five known broadly neutralizing HIV type 1 (HIV-1) antibodies, 2F5, Z13, and 4E10. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Fab fragment of Z13e1, an affinity-enhanced variant of monoclonal antibody Z13, in complex with a 12-residue peptide corresponding to the core epitope (W670NWFDITN677) at 1.8-Å resolution. The bound peptide adopts an S-shaped conformation composed of two tandem, perpendicular helical turns. This conformation differs strikingly from the α-helical structure adopted by an overlapping MPER peptide bound to 4E10. Z13e1 binds to an elbow in the MPER at the membrane interface, making relatively few interactions with conserved aromatics (Trp672 and Phe673) that are critical for 4E10 recognition. The comparison of the Z13e1 and 4E10 epitope structures reveals a conformational switch such that neutralization can occur by the recognition of the different conformations and faces of the largely amphipathic MPER. The Z13e1 structure provides significant new insights into the dynamic nature of the MPER, which likely is critical for membrane fusion, and it has significant implications for mechanisms of HIV-1 neutralization by MPER antibodies and for the design of HIV-1 immunogens. PMID:19515770

  2. A recombinant mimetics of the HIV-1 gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate fused with human IgG Fc fragment elicits neutralizing antibody response in the vaccinated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Zhi; Pan, Chungen; Lu, Hong; Shui, Yuan; Li, Lin; Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Xueqing; Liu, Shuwen; Jiang, Shibo

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} One recombinant mimetics of gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate (PFI) consisting of gp41 N46 sequence, foldon and IgG Fc, designated N46FdFc, was expressed. {yields} N46FdFc-induced antibodies in mice that neutralized HIV-1 infection, inhibited PIE7 binding to PFI, blocked gp41 six-helix bundle formation, and suppressed HIV-1 mediated cell-cell fusion. {yields} These findings provide an important clue for developing recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics-based HIV vaccines. -- Abstract: HIV-1 gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate (PFI) composed of three N-terminal heptad repeats (NHR) plays a crucial role in viral fusion and entry and represents an attractive target for anti-HIV therapeutics (e.g., enfuvirtide) and vaccines. In present study, we constructed and expressed two recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics, designated N46Fd and N46FdFc. N46Fd consists of N46 (residues 536-581) in gp41 NHR and foldon (Fd), a trimerization motif. N46FdFc is composed of N46Fd fused with human IgG Fc fragment as an immunoenhancer. We immunized mice with N46 peptide, N46Fd and N46FdFc, respectively, and found that only N46FdFc elicited neutralizing antibody response in mice against infection by HIV-1 strains IIIB (clade B, X4), 92US657 (clade B, R5), and 94UG103 (clade A, X4R5). Anti-N46FdFc antibodies inhibited PIE7 binding to PFI, blocked gp41 six-helix bundle formation, and suppressed HIV-1 mediated cell-cell fusion. These findings provide an important clue for developing recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics-based HIV vaccines.

  3. The immunosuppressive domain of the transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of HIV-1 binds to human monocytes and B cells.

    PubMed

    Mühle, Michael; Kroniger, Tobias; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Denner, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The induction of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome by the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is a complex process which is not yet understood in full detail. Still open is the question whether the highly conserved so-called immunosuppressive (Isu) domain in the transmembrane envelope (TM) protein gp41 of HIV-1 is actively participating in immunopathogenesis. Inactivated virus particles, recombinant gp41 and peptides corresponding to the Isu domain have been reported to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation, as well as to alter cytokine release and gene expression. Here we demonstrate, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and competition experiments, that homopolymers of the Isu peptide of HIV-1 are binding specifically to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, mainly to monocytes and B cells. These data suggest that a putative receptor might be involved in the immunomodulatory effects observed previously. PMID:26754765

  4. Vaccination with peptide mimetics of the gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate yields neutralizing antisera against HIV-1 isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Elisabetta; Joyce, Joseph G.; Miller, Michael D.; Finnefrock, Adam C.; Liang, Xiaoping; Finotto, Marco; Ingallinella, Paolo; McKenna, Philip; Citron, Michael; Ottinger, Elizabeth; Hepler, Robert W.; Hrin, Renee; Nahas, Deborah; Wu, Chengwei; Montefiori, David; Shiver, John W.; Pessi, Antonello; Kim, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Eliciting a broadly neutralizing polyclonal antibody response against HIV-1 remains a major challenge. One approach to vaccine development is prevention of HIV-1 entry into cells by blocking the fusion of viral and cell membranes. More specifically, our goal is to elicit neutralizing antibodies that target a transient viral entry intermediate (the prehairpin intermediate) formed by the HIV-1 gp41 protein. Because this intermediate is transient, a stable mimetic is required to elicit an immune response. Previously, a series of engineered peptides was used to select a mAb (denoted D5) that binds to the surface of the gp41 prehairpin intermediate, as demonstrated by x-ray crystallographic studies. D5 inhibits the replication of HIV-1 clinical isolates, providing proof-of-principle for this vaccine approach. Here, we describe a series of peptide mimetics of the gp41 prehairpin intermediate designed to permit a systematic analysis of the immune response generated in animals. To improve the chances of detecting weak neutralizing polyclonal responses, two strategies were employed in the initial screening: use of a neutralization-hypersensitive virus and concentration of the IgG fraction from immunized animal sera. This allowed incremental improvements through iterative cycles of design, which led to vaccine candidates capable of generating a polyclonal antibody response, detectable in unfractionated sera, that neutralize tier 1 HIV-1 and simian HIV primary isolates in vitro. Our findings serve as a starting point for the design of more potent immunogens to elicit a broadly neutralizing response against the gp41 prehairpin intermediate. PMID:20483992

  5. HIV-1 gp41 Core with Exposed Membrane-Proximal External Region Inducing Broad HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Leilei; Xu, Liling; Jiang, Shibo; Chen, Ying-hua

    2011-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 gp41 consists of epitopes for the broadly cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. However, antigens containing the linear sequence of these epitopes are unable to elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibody responses in vaccinated hosts, possibly because of inappropriate conformation of these epitopes. Here we designed a recombinant antigen, designated NCM, which comprises the N- and C-terminal heptad repeats that can form a six-helix bundle (6HB) core and the MPER domain of gp41. Two mutations (T569A and I675V) previously reported to expose the neutralization epitopes were introduced into NCM to generate mutants named NCM(TA), NCM(IV), and NCM(TAIV). Our results showed that NCM and its mutants could react with antibodies specific for 6HB and MPER of gp41, suggesting that these antigens are in the form of a trimer of heterodimer (i.e., 6HB) with three exposed MPER tails. Antigen with double mutations, NCM(TAIV), elicited much stronger antibody response in rabbits than immunogens with single mutation, NCM(TA) and NCM(IV), or no mutation, NCM. The purified MPER-specific antibodies induced by NCM(TAIV) exhibited broad neutralizing activity, while the purified 6HB-specific antibodies showed no detectable neutralizing activity. Our recombinant antigen design supported by an investigation of its underlying molecular mechanisms provides a strong scientific platform for the discovery of a gp41 MPER-based AIDS vaccine. PMID:21483871

  6. The crystal structure of HIV CRF07 B′/C gp41 reveals a hyper-mutant site in the middle of HR2 heptad repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Jiansen; Xue, Hailing; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Jianhua; Shao, Yiming; Liu, Xinqi

    2013-11-15

    HIV CRF07 B′/C is a strain circulating mainly in northwest region of China. The gp41 region of CRF07 is derived from a clade C virus. In order to compare the difference of CRF07 gp41 with that of typical clade B virus, we solved the crystal structure of the core region of CRF07 gp41. Compared with clade B gp41, CRF07 gp41 evolved more basic and hydrophilic residues on its helix bundle surface. Based on sequence alignment, a hyper-mutant cluster located in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. The mutational study of these residues revealed that this site is important in HIV mediated cell–cell fusion and plays critical roles in conformational changes during viral invasion. - Highlights: • We solved the crystal structure of HIV CRF07 gp41 core region. • A hyper-mutant cluster in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. • The hyper-mutant site is important in HIV-cell fusion. • The model will help to understand the HIV fusion process.

  7. HIV-1 Envelope gp41 Antibodies Can Originate from Terminal Ileum B Cells that Share Cross-Reactivity with Commensal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Trama, Ashley M.; Moody, M. Anthony; Alam, S. Munir; Jaeger, Frederick H.; Lockwood, Bradley; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Stolarchuk, Christina; Scearce, Richard; Foulger, Andrew; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Jeffries, Thomas L.; Wiehe, Kevin; Morris, Lynn; Lambson, Bronwen; Soderberg, Kelly; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Jackson, Katherine J.L.; Roskin, Krishna M.; Boyd, Scott D.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Monoclonal antibodies derived from blood plasma cells of acute HIV-1-infected individuals are predominantly targeted to the HIV Env gp41 and cross-reactive with commensal bacteria. To understand this phenomenon, we examined anti-HIV responses in ileum B cells using recombinant antibody technology and probed their relationship to commensal bacteria. The dominant ileum B cell response was to Env gp41. Remarkably, a majority (82%) of the ileum anti-gp41 antibodies cross-reacted with commensal bacteria, and of those, 43% showed non-HIV-1 antigen polyreactivity. Pyrosequencing revealed shared HIV-1 antibody clonal lineages between ileum and blood. Mutated immunoglobulin G antibodies cross-reactive with both Env gp41 and microbiota could also be isolated from the ileum of HIV-1 uninfected individuals. Thus, the gp41 commensal bacterial antigen cross-reactive antibodies originate in the intestine, and the gp41 Env response in HIV-1 infection can be derived from a preinfection memory B cell pool triggered by commensal bacteria that cross-react with Env. PMID:25121750

  8. Monitoring human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients by ratio of antibodies to gp41 and p24.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, G; Amiraian, K; Frey, H; Wethers, J; Stevens, R W; Berns, D S

    1989-01-01

    Antibody responses of 85 patients to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antigens were quantitated by densitometric analysis of Western blot (immunoblot) assays. All patients had been classified into the following three clinical categories: asymptomatic (ASY), acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related complex (ARC), or AIDS. Fifty of the patients were monitored for 6 to 29 months. The gp41/p24 antibody ratio was examined in three studies. In the first study, initial specimens from each patient were analyzed. The mean gp41/p24 antibody ratios were 1.5 (ASY), 3.2 (ARC), and 5.4 (AIDS). Of ASY patients, 79% had antibody ratios of less than 2.0. In contrast, 72% of patients with AIDS had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. In the second study, serially obtained specimens from ASY, ARC, and AIDS patients were analyzed. These patients were further grouped according to progression of their clinical condition. Of ASY patients whose clinical condition progressed to ARC, 80% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. Of ARC patients whose clinical condition progressed to AIDS, 71% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. Of AIDS patients who died during the study, 100% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. No patients were treated with azidothymidine during the first two studies. In the third study, AIDS patients were monitored before and during treatment with azidothymidine. During treatment, ratios stabilized or improved transiently in five of seven patients. In these three studies, a gp41/p24 antibody ratio of less than 2.0 correlated with a benign clinical state and a ratio of greater than or equal to 2.0 correlated with AIDS or progression to AIDS. Images PMID:2501350

  9. Membrane structure correlates to function of LLP2 on the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 gp41 protein.

    PubMed

    Boscia, Alexander L; Akabori, Kiyotaka; Benamram, Zachary; Michel, Jonathan A; Jablin, Michael S; Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Montelaro, Ronald C; Nagle, John F; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2013-08-01

    Mutation studies previously showed that the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP2) sequence of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope protein inhibited viral-initiated T-cell death and T-cell syncytium formation, at which time in the HIV life cycle the gp41 protein is embedded in the T-cell membrane. In striking contrast, the mutants did not affect virion infectivity, during which time the gp41 protein is embedded in the HIV envelope membrane. To examine the role of LLP2/membrane interactions, we applied synchrotron x-radiation to determine structure of hydrated membranes. We focused on WT LLP2 peptide (+3 charge) and MX2 mutant (-1 charge) with membrane mimics for the T-cell and the HIV-1 membranes. To investigate the influence of electrostatics, cholesterol content, and peptide palmitoylation, we also studied three other LLP2 variants and HIV-1 mimics without negatively charged lipids or cholesterol as well as extracted HIV-1 lipids. All LLP2 peptides bound strongly to T-cell membrane mimics, as indicated by changes in membrane structure and bending. In contrast, none of the weakly bound LLP2 variants changed the HIV-1 membrane mimic structure or properties. This correlates well with, and provides a biophysical basis for, previously published results that reported lack of a mutant effect in HIV virion infectivity in contrast to an inhibitory effect in T-cell syncytium formation. It shows that interaction of LLP2 with the T-cell membrane modulates biological function. PMID:23931314

  10. Evidence against extracellular exposure of a highly immunogenic region in the C-terminal domain of the simian immunodeficiency virus gp41 transmembrane protein.

    PubMed

    Postler, Thomas S; Martinez-Navio, José M; Yuste, Eloísa; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2012-01-01

    The generally accepted model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein topology includes a single membrane-spanning domain. An alternate model has been proposed which features multiple membrane-spanning domains. Consistent with the alternate model, a high percentage of HIV-1-infected individuals produce unusually robust antibody responses to a region of envelope, the so-called "Kennedy epitope," that in the conventional model should be in the cytoplasm. Here we show analogous, robust antibody responses in simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques to a region of SIVmac239 envelope located in the C-terminal domain, which in the conventional model should be inside the cell. Sera from SIV-infected rhesus macaques consistently reacted with overlapping oligopeptides corresponding to a region located within the cytoplasmic domain of gp41 by the generally accepted model, at intensities comparable to those observed for immunodominant areas of the surface component gp120. Rabbit serum raised against this highly immunogenic region (HIR) reacted with SIV envelope in cell surface-staining experiments, as did monoclonal anti-HIR antibodies isolated from an SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaque. However, control experiments demonstrated that this surface staining could be explained in whole or in part by the release of envelope protein from expressing cells into the supernatant and the subsequent attachment to the surfaces of cells in the culture. Serum and monoclonal antibodies directed against the HIR failed to neutralize even the highly neutralization-sensitive strain SIVmac316. Furthermore, a potential N-linked glycosylation site located close to the HIR and postulated to be outside the cell in the alternate model was not glycosylated. An artificially introduced glycosylation site within the HIR was also not utilized for glycosylation. Together, these data support the conventional model of SIV envelope as a type Ia transmembrane

  11. pH-Dependent Vesicle Fusion Induced by the Ectodomain of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Membrane Fusion Protein gp41: Two Kinetically Distinct Processes and Fully-Membrane-Associated gp41 with Predominant β Sheet Fusion Peptide Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Ratnayake, Punsisi U.; Sackett, Kelly; Nethercott, Matthew J.; Weliky, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The gp41 protein of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) catalyzes fusion between HIV and host cell membranes. The ~180-residue ectodomain of gp41 is outside the virion and is the most important gp41 region for membrane fusion. The ectodomain consists of an apolar fusion peptide (FP) region followed by N-heptad repeat (NHR), loop, and C-heptad repeat (CHR) regions. The FP is critical for fusion and is hypothesized to bind to the host cell membrane. Large ectodomain constructs either with or without the FP are highly aggregated at physiologic pH but soluble in the pH 3–4 range with hyperthermostable hairpin structure with antiparallel NHR and CHR helices. The present study focuses on the large gp41 ectodomain constructs “Hairpin” (HP) containing NHR+loop+CHR and “FP-Hairpin” (FP-HP) containing FP+NHR+loop+CHR. Both proteins induce rapid and extensive fusion of anionic vesicles at pH 4 where the protein is positively-charged but do not induce fusion at pH 7 where the protein is negatively charged. This observation, along with lack of fusion of neutral vesicles at either pH supports the significance of attractive protein/membrane electrostatics in fusion. The functional role of the hydrophobic FP is supported by increases in the rate and extent of fusion for FP-HP relative to HP. There are two kinetically distinct fusion processes at pH 4: (1) a faster ~100 ms−1 process with rate strongly positively correlated with vesicle charge; and (2) a slower ~5 ms−1 process with extent strongly inversely correlated with this charge. The faster charge-dependent process is likely related to the electrostatic energy released upon initial monomer protein binding to the vesicle. After dissipation of this energy, the subsequent slower process is likely due to the equilibrium membrane-associated structure of the protein. The slower process may be more physiologically relevant because HIV/host cell fusion occurs at physiologic pH with gp41 restricted to the narrow region

  12. Modulating immunogenic properties of HIV-1 gp41 membrane-proximal external region by destabilizing six-helix bundle structure.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saikat; Shi, Heliang; Habte, Habtom H; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W

    2016-03-01

    The C-terminal alpha-helix of gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER; (671)NWFDITNWLWYIK(683)) encompassing 4E10/10E8 epitopes is an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. We previously reported that gp41-HR1-54Q, a trimeric protein comprised of the MPER in the context of a stable six-helix bundle (6HB), induced strong immune responses against the helix, but antibodies were directed primarily against the non-neutralizing face of the helix. To better target 4E10/10E8 epitopes, we generated four putative fusion intermediates by introducing double point mutations or deletions in the heptad repeat region 1 (HR1) that destabilize 6HB in varying degrees. One variant, HR1-∆10-54K, elicited antibodies in rabbits that targeted W672, I675 and L679, which are critical for 4E10/10E8 recognition. Overall, the results demonstrated that altering structural parameters of 6HB can influence immunogenic properties of the MPER and antibody targeting. Further exploration of this strategy could allow development of immunogens that could lead to induction of 4E10/10E8-like antibodies. PMID:26803471

  13. Immunogenic properties of a trimeric gp41-based immunogen containing an exposed membrane-proximal external region.

    PubMed

    Habte, Habtom H; Banerjee, Saikat; Shi, Heliang; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W

    2015-12-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 is an attractive target for vaccine development. Thus, better understanding of its immunogenic properties in various structural contexts is important. We previously described the crystal structure of a trimeric protein complex named gp41-HR1-54Q, which consists of the heptad repeat regions 1 and 2 and the MPER. The protein was efficiently recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Here, we describe its immunogenic properties in rabbits. The protein was highly immunogenic, especially the C-terminal end of the MPER containing 4E10 and 10E8 epitopes ((671)NWFDITNWLWYIK(683)). Although antibodies exhibited strong competition activity against 4E10 and 10E8, neutralizing activity was not detected. Detailed mapping analyses indicated that amino acid residues critical for recognition resided on faces of the alpha helix that are either opposite of or perpendicular to the epitopes recognized by 4E10 and 10E8. These results provide critical information for designing the next generation of MPER-based immunogens. PMID:26454663

  14. Structure of the HIV-1 gp41 Membrane-Proximal Ectodomain Region in a Putative Prefusion Conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Deng, Y; Dey, A; Moore, J; Lu, M

    2009-01-01

    The conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope protein is the established target for very rare but broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NAbs) elicited during natural human infection. Nevertheless, attempts to generate an HIV-1 neutralizing antibody response with immunogens bearing MPER epitopes have met with limited success. Here we show that the MPER peptide (residues 662-683) forms a labile ?-helical trimer in aqueous solution and report the crystal structure of this autonomous folding subdomain stabilized by addition of a C-terminal isoleucine zipper motif. The structure reveals a parallel triple-stranded coiled coil in which the neutralization epitope residues are buried within the interface between the associating MPER helices. Accordingly, both the 2F5 and 4E10 NAbs recognize the isolated MPER peptide but fail to bind the trimeric MPER subdomain. We propose that the trimeric MPER structure represents the prefusion conformation of gp41, preceding the putative prehairpin intermediate and the postfusion trimer-of-hairpins structure. As such, the MPER trimer should inform the design of new HIV-1 immunogens to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies.

  15. Comparison of Predicted Scaffold-Compatible Sequence Variation in the Triple-Hairpin Structure of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41 with Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    Boutonnet, Nathalie; Janssens, Wouter; Boutton, Carlo; Verschelde, Jean-Luc; Heyndrickx, Leo; Beirnaert, Els; van der Groen, Guido; Lasters, Ignace

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that the ectodomain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 (e-gp41), involved in HIV entry into the target cell, exists in at least two conformations, a pre-hairpin intermediate and a fusion-active hairpin structure. To obtain more information on the structure-sequence relationship in e-gp41, we performed in silico a full single-amino-acid substitution analysis, resulting in a Fold Compatible Database (FCD) for each conformation. The FCD contains for each residue position in a given protein a list of values assessing the energetic compatibility (ECO) of each of the 20 natural amino acids at that position. Our results suggest that FCD predictions are in good agreement with the sequence variation observed for well-validated e-gp41 sequences. The data show that at a minECO threshold value of 5 kcal/mol, about 90% of the observed patient sequence variation is encompassed by the FCD predictions. Some inconsistent FCD predictions at N-helix positions packing against residues of the C helix suggest that packing of both peptides may involve some flexibility and may be attributed to an altered orientation of the C-helical domain versus the N-helical region. The permissiveness of sequence variation in the C helices is in agreement with FCD predictions. Comparison of N-core and triple-hairpin FCDs suggests that the N helices may impose more constraints on sequence variation than the C helices. Although the observed sequences of e-gp41 contain many multiple mutations, our method, which is based on single-point mutations, can predict the natural sequence variability of e-gp41 very well. PMID:12097573

  16. Crystallization of the Fab from a human monoclonal antibody against gp 41 of human immunodeficiency virus type I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casale, Elena; He, Xiao-Min; Snyder, Robert S.; Carter, Daniel C.; Wenisch, Elisabeth; Jungbauer, Alois; Tauer, Christa; Ruker, Florian; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal IgG antibody directed against gp 41 from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has been crystallized in both intact and Fab forms. Crystals of the intact antibody grow as tetragonal-like prisms too small for conventional X-ray analysis. However, the Fab portion of the antibody produces suitable platelike crystals which belong to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with unit cell constants of a = 66.5 A, b = 74.3 A, and c = 105.3 A. There is one molecule of Fab in the asymmetric unit. The Fab crystals show diffraction to d-spacings less than 3.0 A.

  17. Deletion of fusion peptide or destabilization of fusion core of HIV gp41 enhances antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Chen Xi; Jiang Shibo Chen Yinghua

    2008-11-07

    The human monoclonal antibody 4E10 against the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 demonstrates broad neutralizing activity across various strains, and makes its epitope an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. Although the contiguous epitope of 4E10 has been identified, attempts to re-elicit 4E10-like antibodies have failed, possibly due to the lack of proper conformation of the 4E10 epitope. Here we used pIg-tail expression system to construct a panel of eukaryotic cell-surface expression plasmids encoding the extracellular domain of gp41 with deletion of fusion peptide and/or introduction of L568P mutation that may disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle core conformation as DNA vaccines for immunization of mice. We found that these changes resulted in significant increase of the antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope. This information is thus useful for rational design of vaccines targeting the HIV-1 gp41 MPER.

  18. Cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing activity of serum IgG from a rabbit immunized with gp41 fused to IgG1 Fc: Possible role of the prolonged half-life of the immunogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Wang, Yanping; Mankowski, Marie K.; Ptak, Roger G.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    The elicitation of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies in humans remains a major challenge in developing a viable AIDS vaccine. We hypothesized that prolonged exposure to candidate vaccine immunogens could enhance the elicitation of such antibodies. In an attempt to develop HIV-1 vaccine immunogens with prolonged half-lives and increased stability, we constructed a fusion protein, gp41Fc, in which a truncated HIV-1 gp4189.6 was fused to a human IgG1 Fc. Gp41Fc is stable in solution, retains its antigenic structure and is highly immunogenic in rabbits. The serum titers reached 1:102,400 for the gp41Fc and 1:5,120 for gp14089.6. Rabbit IgG neutralized diverse HIV-1 isolates and HIV-2, and the neutralization activity was attributed to gp41-specific IgG. The concentration of the gp41Fc in the serum correlated with the neutralization activity of rabbit IgG which recognized mostly conformation-independent epitopes on gp41 and predominantly bound to peptides derived from the gp41 immunodominant loop region. These results suggest that the prolonged half-life of gp41Fc in the serum may enhance the generation of cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. Further research is needed to confirm and extend these results which may have implications for the development of vaccine immunogens with enhanced capability to elicit cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:19084043

  19. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Xiao M.; Rueker, Florian; Casale, Elena; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 deg. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  20. Effects of sequence changes in the HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide on CCR5 inhibitor resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Johan Klasse, Per; Moore, John P.

    2012-07-05

    A rare pathway of HIV-1 resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as Vicriviroc (VCV) involves changes solely in the gp41 fusion peptide (FP). Here, we show that the G516V change is critical to VCV resistance in PBMC and TZM-bl cells, although it must be accompanied by either M518V or F519I to have a substantial impact. Modeling VCV inhibition data from the two cell types indicated that G516V allows both double mutants to use VCV-CCR5 complexes for entry. The model further identified F519I as an independent determinant of preference for the unoccupied, high-VCV affinity form of CCR5. From inhibitor-free reversion cultures, we also identified a substitution in the inner domain of gp120, T244A, which appears to counter the resistance phenotype created by the FP substitutions. Examining the interplay of these changes will enhance our understanding of Env complex interactions that influence both HIV-1 entry and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors.

  1. Structure and Immunogenicity of a Peptide Vaccine, Including the Complete HIV-1 gp41 2F5 Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Soraya; Araujo, Aitziber; Apellániz, Beatriz; Bryson, Steve; Carravilla, Pablo; de la Arada, Igor; Huarte, Nerea; Rujas, Edurne; Pai, Emil F.; Arrondo, José L. R.; Domene, Carmen; Jiménez, María Angeles; Nieva, José L.

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 harbors the epitope recognized by the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV 2F5 antibody, a research focus in HIV-1 vaccine development. In this work, we analyze the structure and immunogenic properties of MPERp, a peptide vaccine that includes the following: (i) the complete sequence protected from proteolysis by the 2F5 paratope; (ii) downstream residues postulated to establish weak contacts with the CDR-H3 loop of the antibody, which are believed to be crucial for neutralization; and (iii) an aromatic rich anchor to the membrane interface. MPERp structures solved in dodecylphosphocholine micelles and 25% 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (v/v) confirmed folding of the complete 2F5 epitope within continuous kinked helices. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) measurements demonstrated the retention of main helical conformations in immunogenic formulations based on alum, Freund's adjuvant, or two different types of liposomes. Binding to membrane-inserted MPERp, IR, molecular dynamics simulations, and characterization of the immune responses further suggested that packed helical bundles partially inserted into the lipid bilayer, rather than monomeric helices adsorbed to the membrane interface, could encompass effective MPER peptide vaccines. Together, our data constitute a proof-of-concept to support MPER-based peptides in combination with liposomes as stand-alone immunogens and suggest new approaches for structure-aided MPER vaccine development. PMID:24429284

  2. HIV gp41-Mediated Membrane Fusion Occurs at Edges of Cholesterol-Rich Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Simmons, James A.; White, Judith M.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts in plasma membranes have emerged as possible platforms for entry of HIV and other viruses into cells. However, how lipid phase heterogeneity contributes to viral entry is little known due to the fine-grained and still poorly understood complexity of biological membranes. We used model systems mimicking HIV envelopes and T-cell membranes and showed that raft-like (Lo phase) lipid domains are necessary and sufficient for efficient membrane targeting and fusion. Interestingly, membrane binding and fusion was low in homogeneous Ld and Lo phase membranes, indicating that lipid phase heterogeneity is essential. The HIV fusion peptide preferentially targeted to Lo/Ld boundary regions and promoted full fusion at the interface between ordered and disordered lipids. Ld phase vesicles proceeded only to hemifusion. Thus, we propose that the edges, but not the areas of raft-like ordered lipid domains are vital for HIV entry and membrane fusion. PMID:25915200

  3. The Crystal Structure of the Streptococcal Collagen-like Protein 2 Globular Domain from Invasive M3-type Group A Streptococcus Shows Significant Similarity to Immunomodulatory HIV Protein gp41*

    PubMed Central

    Squeglia, Flavia; Bachert, Beth; De Simone, Alfonso; Lukomski, Slawomir; Berisio, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The arsenal of virulence factors deployed by streptococci includes streptococcal collagen-like (Scl) proteins. These proteins, which are characterized by a globular domain and a collagen-like domain, play key roles in host adhesion, host immune defense evasion, and biofilm formation. In this work, we demonstrate that the Scl2.3 protein is expressed on the surface of invasive M3-type strain MGAS315 of Streptococcus pyogenes. We report the crystal structure of Scl2.3 globular domain, the first of any Scl. This structure shows a novel fold among collagen trimerization domains of either bacterial or human origin. Despite there being low sequence identity, we observed that Scl2.3 globular domain structurally resembles the gp41 subunit of the envelope glycoprotein from human immunodeficiency virus type 1, an essential subunit for viral fusion to human T cells. We combined crystallographic data with modeling and molecular dynamics techniques to gather information on the entire lollipop-like Scl2.3 structure. Molecular dynamics data evidence a high flexibility of Scl2.3 with remarkable interdomain motions that are likely instrumental to the protein biological function in mediating adhesive or immune-modulatory functions in host-pathogen interactions. Altogether, our results provide molecular tools for the understanding of Scl-mediated streptococcal pathogenesis and important structural insights for the future design of small molecular inhibitors of streptococcal invasion. PMID:24356966

  4. Blockade of immunoregulatory Fc-signalling by HIV peptides: oligopeptides from HIV gp120 and gp41 bind the Fc portion of IgG and increase the in vitro anti-ssDNA response.

    PubMed Central

    Rahimpour, R; Anderson, C C; Sinclair, N R

    1993-01-01

    Concomitant ligation of antigen receptors with Fc-receptors negatively signals B cells. Antibodies to the Fc portion of IgG prevent this negative Fc-signalling, provided that these antibodies do not emit Fc signals. Prevention of Fc signals leads to augmented antibody responses to self and foreign antigens, and reduces the requirement for T cells by 10- to 100-fold in T cell-dependent antibody responses. In ELISA assays, peptides from conserved portions of the glycoproteins, HIV-1 gp120 or gp41 from HIV-1 and HIV-2 bind to the Fc portion of IgG, but do not bind the F(ab')2 portion of IgG. HIV-derived peptides, which bind to the Fc portion of IgG, augment the antibody-forming cell response to single-stranded (ss)DNA. The spontaneous response to ssDNA using spleen cells from young mice, and the response in the presence of exogenous DNA using spleen cells from old mice, are augmented to the greatest extent. These results demonstrate that HIV peptides bind to the Fc portion of IgG and augment immune responses to DNA; they suggest the possibility that blockade of the Fc portion of IgG antibodies is associated with a reduction in Fc-mediated regulation of anti-self responses. Blockade of regulatory Fc-signalling may account for increased circulating immunoglobulins and autoantibodies in clinical AIDS. PMID:8403512

  5. Insights into the Conformation of the Membrane Proximal Regions Critical to the Trimerization of the HIV-1 gp41 Ectodomain Bound to Dodecyl Phosphocholine Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Louis, John M.; Baber, James L.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Aniana, Annie; Bax, Ad; Roche, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The transitioning of the ectodomain of gp41 from a pre-hairpin to a six-helix bundle conformation is a crucial aspect of virus-cell fusion. To gain insight into the intermediary steps of the fusion process we have studied the pH and dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelle dependent trimer association of gp41 by systematic deletion analysis of an optimized construct termed 17–172 (residues 528 to 683 of Env) that spans the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) to the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41, by sedimentation velocity and double electron-electron resonance (DEER) EPR spectroscopy. Trimerization at pH 7 requires the presence of both the FPPR and MPER regions. However, at pH 4, the protein completely dissociates to monomers. DEER measurements reveal a partial fraying of the C-terminal MPER residues in the 17–172 trimer while the other regions, including the FPPR, remain compact. In accordance, truncating nine C-terminal MPER residues (675–683) in the 17–172 construct does not shift the trimer-monomer equilibrium significantly. Thus, in the context of the gp41 ectodomain spanning residues 17–172, trimerization is clearly dependent on FPPR and MPER regions even when the terminal residues of MPER unravel. The antibody Z13e1, which spans both the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes in MPER, binds to 17–172 with a Kd of 1 ± 0.12 μM. Accordingly, individual antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 also recognize the 17–172 trimer/DPC complex. We propose that binding of the C-terminal residues of MPER to the surface of the DPC micelles models a correct positioning of the trimeric transmembrane domain anchored in the viral membrane. PMID:27513582

  6. Insights into the Conformation of the Membrane Proximal Regions Critical to the Trimerization of the HIV-1 gp41 Ectodomain Bound to Dodecyl Phosphocholine Micelles.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Baber, James L; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Aniana, Annie; Bax, Ad; Roche, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The transitioning of the ectodomain of gp41 from a pre-hairpin to a six-helix bundle conformation is a crucial aspect of virus-cell fusion. To gain insight into the intermediary steps of the fusion process we have studied the pH and dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelle dependent trimer association of gp41 by systematic deletion analysis of an optimized construct termed 17-172 (residues 528 to 683 of Env) that spans the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) to the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41, by sedimentation velocity and double electron-electron resonance (DEER) EPR spectroscopy. Trimerization at pH 7 requires the presence of both the FPPR and MPER regions. However, at pH 4, the protein completely dissociates to monomers. DEER measurements reveal a partial fraying of the C-terminal MPER residues in the 17-172 trimer while the other regions, including the FPPR, remain compact. In accordance, truncating nine C-terminal MPER residues (675-683) in the 17-172 construct does not shift the trimer-monomer equilibrium significantly. Thus, in the context of the gp41 ectodomain spanning residues 17-172, trimerization is clearly dependent on FPPR and MPER regions even when the terminal residues of MPER unravel. The antibody Z13e1, which spans both the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes in MPER, binds to 17-172 with a Kd of 1 ± 0.12 μM. Accordingly, individual antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 also recognize the 17-172 trimer/DPC complex. We propose that binding of the C-terminal residues of MPER to the surface of the DPC micelles models a correct positioning of the trimeric transmembrane domain anchored in the viral membrane. PMID:27513582

  7. Mutation of critical serine residues in HIV-1 matrix result in an envelope incorporation defect which can be rescued by truncation of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Ajay K.; Kaushik, Rajnish; Campbell, Nancy A.; Pontow, Suzanne E.; Ratner, Lee

    2009-02-05

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix (MA) domain is involved in both early and late events of the viral life cycle. Simultaneous mutation of critical serine residues in MA has been shown previously to dramatically reduce phosphorylation of MA. However, the role of phosphorylation in viral replication remains unclear. Viruses harboring serine to alanine substitutions at positions 9, 67, 72, and 77 are severely impaired in their ability to infect target cells. In addition, the serine mutant viruses are defective in their ability to fuse with target cell membranes. Interestingly, both the fusion defect and the infectivity defect can be rescued by truncation of the long cytoplasmic tail of gp41 envelope protein (gp41CT). Sucrose density gradient analysis also reveals that these mutant viruses have reduced levels of gp120 envelope protein incorporated into the virions as compared to wild type virus. Truncation of the gp41CT rescues the envelope incorporation defect. Here we propose a model in which mutation of specific serine residues prevents MA interaction with lipid rafts during HIV-1 assembly and thereby impairs recruitment of envelope to the sites of viral budding.

  8. GP41-specific Antibody Blocks Cell-free HIV-1 Transcytosis through Human Rectal Mucosa and Model Colonic Epithelium#

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ruizhong; Drelichman, Ernesto R.; Bimczok, Diane; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Tudor, Daniela; Bomsel, Morgane; Smythies, Lesley E.; Smith, Phillip D.

    2013-01-01

    Monostratified epithelial cells translocate HIV-1 from the apical to the basolateral surface via vesicular transcytosis. Since acutely transmitted HIV-1 is almost exclusively CCR5-tropic and human intestinal epithelial cells preferentially transcytose CCR5-tropic virus, we established epithelial monolayers using polarized HT-29 cells transduced to express CCR5, and an explant system using normal human rectal mucosa, to characterize biological parameters of epithelial cell transcytosis of HIV-1 and assess antiviral antibody blockade of transcytosis. The amount of cell-free HIV-1 transcytosed through the epithelial monolayer increased linearly in relation to the amount of virus applied to the apical surface, indicating transcytosis efficiency was constant (r2 = 0.9846, P<0.0001). The efficiency of HIV-1 transcytosis ranged between 0.05% and 1.21%, depending on the virus strain, producer cell type and gp120 V1-V3 loop signature. Inoculation of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies to the immunodominant region (7B2) or the conserved membrane proximal external region (2F5) of gp41 or to cardiolipin (IS4) onto the apical surface of epithelial monolayers prior to inoculation of virus significantly reduced HIV-1 transcytosis. 2F5 was the most potent of these IgG1 mAbs. Dimeric IgA (dIgA) and monomeric IgA (mIgA), but not polymeric IgM, 2F5 antibodies also blocked HIV-1 transcytosis across the epithelium and, importantly, across explanted normal human rectal mucosa, with mIgA substantially more potent than dIgA in effecting transcytosis blockade. These findings underscore the potential role of transcytosis blockade in the prevention of HIV-1 transmission across columnar epithelium such as that of the rectum. PMID:20208001

  9. Intranasal HIV-1-gp160-DNA/gp41 peptide prime-boost immunization regimen in mice results in long-term HIV-1 neutralizing humoral mucosal and systemic immunity.

    PubMed

    Devito, Claudia; Zuber, Bartek; Schröder, Ulf; Benthin, Reinhold; Okuda, Kenji; Broliden, Kristina; Wahren, Britta; Hinkula, Jorma

    2004-12-01

    An intranasal DNA vaccine prime followed by a gp41 peptide booster immunization was compared with gp41 peptide and control immunizations. Serum HIV-1-specific IgG and IgA as well as IgA in feces and vaginal and lung secretions were detected after immunizations. Long-term humoral immunity was studied for up to 12 mo after the booster immunization by testing the presence of HIV-1 gp41- and CCR5-specific Abs and IgG/IgA-secreting B lymphocytes in spleen and regional lymph nodes in immunized mice. A long-term IgA-specific response in the intestines, vagina, and lungs was obtained in addition to a systemic immune response. Mice immunized only with gp41 peptides and L3 adjuvant developed a long-term gp41-specific serum IgG response systemically, although over a shorter period (1-9 mo), and long-term mucosal gp41-specific IgA immunity. HIV-1-neutralizing serum Abs were induced that were still present 12 mo after booster immunization. HIV-1 SF2-neutralizing fecal and lung IgA was detectable only in the DNA-primed mouse groups. Intranasal DNA prime followed by one peptide/L3 adjuvant booster immunization, but not a peptide prime followed by a DNA booster, was able to induce B cell memory and HIV-1-neutralizing Abs for at least half of a mouse's life span. PMID:15557206

  10. Thymic pathogenicity of an HIV-1 envelope is associated with increased CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-dependent activity, but not V1/V2-associated CD4 binding efficiency and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Eric G.; Coffield, Vernon M.; Su Lishan . E-mail: lsu@med.unc.edu

    2005-06-05

    We previously described a thymus-tropic HIV-1 envelope (R3A Env) from a rapid progressor obtained at the time of transmission. An HIV-1 molecular recombinant with the R3A Env supported extensive replication and pathogenesis in the thymus and did not require Nef. Another Env from the same patient did not display the same thymus-tropic pathogenesis (R3B Env). Here, we show that relative to R3B Env, R3A Env enhances viral entry of T cells, increases fusion-induced cytopathicity, and shows elevated binding efficiency for both CD4 and CXCR4, but not CCR5, in vitro. We created chimeric envelopes to determine the region(s) responsible for each in vitro phenotype and for thymic pathogenesis. Surprisingly, while V1/V2 contributed to enhanced viral entry, CD4 binding efficiency, and cytopathicity in vitro, it made no contribution to thymic pathogenesis. Rather, CXCR4 binding efficiency and V5-gp41-associated activity appear to independently contribute to thymic pathogenesis of the R3A Env. These data highlight the contribution of unique HIV pathogenic factors in the thymic microenvironment and suggest that novel mechanisms may be involved in Env pathogenic activity in vivo.

  11. Functional characteristics of the natural polymorphisms of HIV-1 gp41 in HIV-1 isolates from enfuvirtide-naïve Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, YoungHyun; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Yang, Hyo-Jin; Lim, Hoyong; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Sung Soon; Kang, Chun

    2016-06-01

    HIV-1 gp41 plays a key role in viral entry. The insertion of Thr at position 4 and Met/Val/Phe substitutions at position 7 are frequently observed in the fusion peptide (FP) motif of gp41 without major enfuvirtide resistance associated with mutation in heptad repeats 1/2 (HR1/2) of HIV-1 isolates from Korean patients. Here, the influence of these mutations on their biological function was evaluated by employing HIV-1 variants with mutant FPs as shown previously and with recombinant HIV-1 using the env genes of 20 HIV-1 isolates from Korean patients. In an infectivity assay, all FP mutants showed lower infectivity than the wild-type NL4-3. In particular, the substitutions at position 7 led to much greater reductions in infectivity than the insertions at position 4. Nevertheless, the replication kinetics of most mutants were similar to those of the wild type, except that the FP mutants with an Ile insertion at position 4 and a Phe substitution at position 7 showed reduced replication. Moreover, most point mutants showed lower IC50 values for enfuvirtide than the wild type, whereas the L7M substitution resulted in a slightly increased IC50 value. The infectivity using the HIV-1 env recombinant viruses decreased in 14 cases but increased slightly in six cases compared with the wild type. Most recombinants were more susceptible to enfuvirtide than the wild type, except for three recombinants that showed slight resistance. Our findings may help to explain the potential mechanisms corresponding to the natural polymorphism of gp41 and to predict the efficiency of enfuvirtide in treatment of HIV-1-infected patients in Korea. PMID:26997611

  12. Virion incorporation of envelope glycoproteins with long but not short cytoplasmic tails is blocked by specific, single amino acid substitutions in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Freed, E O; Martin, M A

    1995-01-01

    Incorporation of envelope glycoproteins into a budding retrovirus is an essential step in the formation of an infectious virus particle. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified specific amino acid residues in the matrix domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein that are critical to the incorporation of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins into virus particles. Pseudotyping analyses were used to demonstrate that two heterologous envelope glycoproteins with short cytoplasmic tails (the envelope of the amphotropic murine leukemia virus and a naturally truncated HIV-2 envelope) are efficiently incorporated into HIV-1 particles bearing the matrix mutations. Furthermore, deletion of the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein gp41 from 150 to 7 or 47 residues reversed the incorporation block imposed by the matrix mutations. These results suggest the existence of a specific functional interaction between the HIV-1 matrix and the gp41 cytoplasmic tail. PMID:7853546

  13. Single-chain protein mimetics of the N-terminal heptad-repeat region of gp41 with potential as anti-HIV-1 drugs.

    PubMed

    Crespillo, Sara; Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Casares, Salvador; Morel, Bertrand; Cobos, Eva S; Mateo, Pedro L; Mouz, Nicolas; Martin, Christophe E; Roger, Marie G; El Habib, Raphaelle; Su, Bin; Moog, Christiane; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2014-12-23

    During HIV-1 fusion to the host cell membrane, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) and the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of the envelope subunit gp41 become transiently exposed and accessible to fusion inhibitors or Abs. In this process, the NHR region adopts a trimeric coiled-coil conformation that can be a target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we present an approach to rationally design single-chain protein constructs that mimic the NHR coiled-coil surface. The proteins were built by connecting with short loops two parallel NHR helices and an antiparallel one with the inverse sequence followed by engineering of stabilizing interactions. The constructs were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified with high yield, and folded as highly stable helical coiled coils. The crystal structure of one of the constructs confirmed the predicted fold and its ability to accurately mimic an exposed gp41 NHR surface. These single-chain proteins bound to synthetic CHR peptides with very high affinity, and furthermore, they showed broad inhibitory activity of HIV-1 fusion on various pseudoviruses and primary isolates. PMID:25489108

  14. Single-chain protein mimetics of the N-terminal heptad-repeat region of gp41 with potential as anti–HIV-1 drugs

    PubMed Central

    Crespillo, Sara; Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Casares, Salvador; Morel, Bertrand; Cobos, Eva S.; Mateo, Pedro L.; Mouz, Nicolas; Martin, Christophe E.; Roger, Marie G.; El Habib, Raphaelle; Su, Bin; Moog, Christiane; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    During HIV-1 fusion to the host cell membrane, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) and the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of the envelope subunit gp41 become transiently exposed and accessible to fusion inhibitors or Abs. In this process, the NHR region adopts a trimeric coiled-coil conformation that can be a target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we present an approach to rationally design single-chain protein constructs that mimic the NHR coiled-coil surface. The proteins were built by connecting with short loops two parallel NHR helices and an antiparallel one with the inverse sequence followed by engineering of stabilizing interactions. The constructs were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified with high yield, and folded as highly stable helical coiled coils. The crystal structure of one of the constructs confirmed the predicted fold and its ability to accurately mimic an exposed gp41 NHR surface. These single-chain proteins bound to synthetic CHR peptides with very high affinity, and furthermore, they showed broad inhibitory activity of HIV-1 fusion on various pseudoviruses and primary isolates. PMID:25489108

  15. Analysis of HIV Type 1 gp41 and Enfuvirtide Susceptibility among Men in the United States Who Were HIV Infected Prior to Availability of HIV Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hudelson, Sarah E.; Marlowe, Natalia; Huang, Wei; Bruce, Robert; Church, Jessica D.; Husnik, Marla; Donnell, Deborah; Coates, Thomas; Jackson, J. Brooks; Chesney, Margaret; Koblin, Beryl

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We analyzed HIV gp41 from 195 men in the United States who were HIV-1 infected between 1999 and 2002, before enfuvirtide (ENF) was approved for clinical use in the United States. gp41 genotyping results were obtained for 175 samples. None of the samples had major ENF resistance mutations. Six (3.4%) samples had minor ENF resistance mutations in the HR1 region (V38G, N43K, L44M, L45M). Twenty-eight (16%) samples had the N42S polymorphism, which is associated with ENF hypersusceptibility. Accessory mutations in the HR2 region were identified in some samples (E137K, S138A). Five of the six samples with HR1 resistance mutations were analyzed with a phenotypic assay; one sample had reduced ENF susceptibility (a sample with N42S + L44M + E137K). Prior to the availability of ENF, some men in the United States were infected with HIV that contained mutations associated with ENF resistance or hypersusceptibility. However, most of the mutations were not associated with phenotypic ENF resistance. PMID:19552592

  16. Resistance of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor can involve sequence changes in both gp120 and gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G. Ketas, Thomas J.; Depetris, Rafael S.; Thomas, Antonia M.; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P.

    2011-04-25

    Here, we describe the genetic pathways taken by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolate, D101.12, to become resistant to the small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, vicriviroc (VCV), in vitro. Resistant D101.12 variants contained at least one substitution in the gp120 V3 region (H308P), plus one of two patterns of gp41 sequence changes involving the fusion peptide (FP) and a downstream residue: G514V+V535M or M518V+F519L+V535M. Studies of Env-chimeric and point-substituted viruses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TZM-bl cells showed that resistance can arise from the cooperative action of gp120 and gp41 changes, while retaining CCR5 usage. Modeling the VCV inhibition data from the two cell types suggests that D101.12 discriminates between high- and low-VCV affinity forms of CCR5 less than D1/85.16, a resistant virus with three FP substitutions.

  17. Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies define a glycan-dependent epitope on the pre-fusion conformation of the gp41 protein on cleaved Envelope trimers

    PubMed Central

    Falkowska, Emilia; Le, Khoa M.; Ramos, Alejandra; Doores, Katie J.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Blattner, Claudia; Ramirez, Alejandro; Derking, Ronald; van Gils, Marit J.; Liang, Chi-Hui; Mcbride, Ryan; von Bredow, Benjamin; Shivatare, Sachin S.; Wu, Chung-Yi; Chan-Hui, Po-Ying; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Zwick, Michael B.; Koff, Wayne C.; Seaman, Michael S.; Swiderek, Kristine; Moore, John P.; Evans, David; Paulson, James C.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV are much sought-after (a) to guide vaccine design, both as templates and to inform on the authenticity of vaccine candidates, (b) to assist in structural studies and (c) as potential therapeutics. However, the number of targets on the viral envelope spike for such antibodies is limited. Here, we describe a set of human monoclonal antibodies that define a previously undefined target on HIV Env. The antibodies recognize a glycan-dependent epitope on the prefusion conformation of gp41 and unambiguously distinguish cleaved from uncleaved Env trimers, an important property given increasing evidence that cleavage is required for vaccine candidates that seek to mimic the functional HIV envelope spike. The availability of this set of antibodies expands the number of vaccine targets on HIV and provides reagents to characterize the native envelope spike. PMID:24768347

  18. HIV reverse transcriptase inhibiting antibodies detected by a new technique: relation to p24 and gp41 antibodies, HIV antigenemia and clinical variables.

    PubMed

    Neumüller, M; Karlsson, A; Lennerstrand, J; Källander, C F; Holmberg, V; Långström-Persson, U; Thorstensson, R; Sandström, E; Gronowitz, J S

    1991-05-01

    A new assay for HIV reverse transcriptase activity inhibiting antibodies (RTI-ab) was used for the analysis of a large collection of sera sampled before and after confirmation of HIV infection. In this assay HIV-RT was preincubated with diluted serum, after which residual RT activity was determined by a technique using a template coupled to macrobeads and 125I-lodo-deoxyuridine-triphosphate as the tracer-substrate. Of the 936 sera analysed, 818 were found positive for RTI-ab, and 824 were positive in Western blot (Wb). The prevalence of RTI-ab compared to Wb was therefore 99.3%. The corresponding figure for 930 sera analysed for envelope-ab, i.e., gp41-ab, was 823 positive, and of these 930 sera 815 were Wb positive, giving a comparative prevalence of 101%. In contrast, only 678 samples of 993 analyzed for core ab, i.e., p24, were positive, giving a prevalence of 77.0% as 880 of these samples were Wb positive. Thus, RTI-ab was as prevalent as gp41-ab, and although the analyses of RTI-ab amounts in different stages showed decreasing levels in stage IV compared to stages II or III, all of the sera except 1 were found positive in stages III and IV. Further, it was found that both the few RTI-ab negative samples in stage II and the few RTI-ab positive samples among Wb negative sera were sampled in connection with seroconversion. The specificity of the RTI-ab assay was 100% in a test of 200 serum samples from HIV negative blood donors. It was concluded that RTI-ab analyses can be made highly sensitive and specific and useful for studies of HIV infection. PMID:1715898

  19. Biophysical Characterization of a Vaccine Candidate against HIV-1: The Transmembrane and Membrane Proximal Domains of HIV-1 gp41 as a Maltose Binding Protein Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhen; Martin-Garcia, Jose M.; Daskalova, Sasha M.; Craciunescu, Felicia M.; Song, Lusheng; Dörner, Katerina; Hansen, Debra T.; Yang, Jay-How; LaBaer, Joshua; Hogue, Brenda G.; Mor, Tsafrir S.; Fromme, Petra

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal region (MPR, residues 649–683) and transmembrane domain (TMD, residues 684–705) of the gp41 subunit of HIV-1’s envelope protein are highly conserved and are important in viral mucosal transmission, virus attachment and membrane fusion with target cells. Several structures of the trimeric membrane proximal external region (residues 662–683) of MPR have been reported at the atomic level; however, the atomic structure of the TMD still remains unknown. To elucidate the structure of both MPR and TMD, we expressed the region spanning both domains, MPR-TM (residues 649–705), in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP). MPR-TM was initially fused to the C-terminus of MBP via a 42 aa-long linker containing a TEV protease recognition site (MBP-linker-MPR-TM). Biophysical characterization indicated that the purified MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein was a monodisperse and stable candidate for crystallization. However, crystals of the MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein could not be obtained in extensive crystallization screens. It is possible that the 42 residue-long linker between MBP and MPR-TM was interfering with crystal formation. To test this hypothesis, the 42 residue-long linker was replaced with three alanine residues. The fusion protein, MBP-AAA-MPR-TM, was similarly purified and characterized. Significantly, both the MBP-linker-MPR-TM and MBP-AAA-MPR-TM proteins strongly interacted with broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. With epitopes accessible to the broadly neutralizing antibodies, these MBP/MPR-TM recombinant proteins may be in immunologically relevant conformations that mimic a pre-hairpin intermediate of gp41. PMID:26295457

  20. HIV Entry and Envelope Glycoprotein-mediated Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Robert; Durell, Stewart; Viard, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    HIV entry involves binding of the trimeric viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120/gp41 to cell surface receptors, which triggers conformational changes in Env that drive the membrane fusion reaction. The conformational landscape that the lipids and Env navigate en route to fusion has been examined by biophysical measurements on the microscale, whereas electron tomography, x-rays, and NMR have provided insights into the process on the nanoscale and atomic scale. However, the coupling between the lipid and protein pathways that give rise to fusion has not been resolved. Here, we discuss the known and unknown about the overall HIV Env-mediated fusion process. PMID:23043104

  1. A viral regulator of glycoprotein complexes contributes to human cytomegalovirus cell tropism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Nguyen, Christopher C.; Ryckman, Brent J.; Britt, William J.; Kamil, Jeremy P.

    2015-01-01

    Viral glycoproteins mediate entry of enveloped viruses into cells and thus play crucial roles in infection. In herpesviruses, a complex of two viral glycoproteins, gH and gL (gH/gL), regulates membrane fusion events and influences virion cell tropism. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gH/gL can be incorporated into two different protein complexes: a glycoprotein O (gO)-containing complex known as gH/gL/gO, and a complex containing UL128, UL130, and UL131 known as gH/gL/UL128-131. Variability in the relative abundance of the complexes in the virion envelope correlates with differences in cell tropism exhibited between strains of HCMV. Nonetheless, the mechanisms underlying such variability have remained unclear. We have identified a viral protein encoded by the UL148 ORF (UL148) that influences the ratio of gH/gL/gO to gH/gL/UL128-131 and the cell tropism of HCMV virions. A mutant disrupted for UL148 showed defects in gH/gL/gO maturation and enhanced infectivity for epithelial cells. Accordingly, reintroduction of UL148 into an HCMV strain that lacked the gene resulted in decreased levels of gH/gL/UL128-131 on virions and, correspondingly, decreased infectivity for epithelial cells. UL148 localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, but not to the cytoplasmic sites of virion envelopment. Coimmunoprecipitation results indicated that gH, gL, UL130, and UL131 associate with UL148, but that gO and UL128 do not. Taken together, the findings suggest that UL148 modulates HCMV tropism by regulating the composition of alternative gH/gL complexes. PMID:25831500

  2. Common tolerance mechanisms, but distinct cross-reactivities associated with gp41 and lipids, limit production of HIV-1 broad neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E102

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Zhang, Jinsong; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Bouton-Verville, Hilary; Xia, Shi-Mao; Newman, Amanda; Ouyang, Ying-Bin; Haynes, Barton F.; Verkoczy, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Developing an HIV-1 vaccine has been hampered by the inability of immunogens to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that protect against infection. Previously, we used knockin (KI) mice expressing a prototypical gp41-specific bnAb, 2F5, to demonstrate that immunological tolerance triggered by self-reactivity of the 2F5 H chain, impedes bnAb induction. Here, we generate KI models expressing H chains from two other HIV-1 Abs: 4E10 (another self-/polyreactive, α-gp41 bnAb) and 48d (an α-CD4 inducible, non-polyreactive Ab), and find a similar developmental blockade consistent with central B-cell deletion in 4E10, but not in 48d VH KI mice. Furthermore, in KI strains expressing the complete 2F5 and 4E10 Abs as BCRs, we find that residual splenic B-cells arrest at distinct developmental stages, yet exhibit uniformly low surface Ig densities, elevated basal activation, profoundly muted responses to BCR ligation, and when captured as hybridoma mAb lines, maintain their dual (gp41/lipid) affinities and capacities to neutralize HIV-1, establishing a key role for anergy in suppressing residual 2F5 or 4E10-expressing B-cells. Importantly, serum IgGs from naïve 2F5 and 4E10 KI strains selectively eliminate gp41 and lipid binding, respectively, suggesting B-cells expressing 2F5 or 4E10 as BCRs exhibit specificity for a distinct spectrum of host antigens, including selective interactions by 2F5 BCR+ B-cells (i.e., and not 4E10 BCR+ B-cells) with residues in self-antigen(s) that mimic its gp41 neutralization epitope. PMID:23825311

  3. Native oligomeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein elicits diverse monoclonal antibody reactivities.

    PubMed Central

    Earl, P L; Broder, C C; Long, D; Lee, S A; Peterson, J; Chakrabarti, S; Doms, R W; Moss, B

    1994-01-01

    We synthesized and purified a recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein, lacking the gp120/gp41 cleavage site as well as the transmembrane domain, that is secreted principally as a stable oligomer. Mice were immunized with separated monomeric and oligomeric HIV-1 Env glycoproteins to analyze the repertoire of antibody responses to the tertiary and quaternary structure of the protein. Hybridomas were generated and assayed for reactivity by immunoprecipitation of nondenatured Env protein. A total of 138 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were generated and cloned, 123 of which were derived from seven animals immunized with oligomeric Env. Within this group, a significant response was obtained against the gp41 ectodomain; 49 MAbs recognized epitopes in gp41, 82% of which were conformational. The influence of conformation on gp120 antigenicity was less pronounced, with 40% of the anti-gp120 MAbs binding to conformational epitopes, many of which blocked CD4 binding. Surprisingly, less than 7% of the MAbs derived from mice immunized with oligomeric Env recognized the V3 loop. In addition, MAbs to linear epitopes in the C-terminal domain of gp120 were not obtained, suggesting that this region of the protein may be partially masked in the oligomeric molecule. A total of 15 MAbs were obtained from two mice immunized with monomeric Env. Nearly half of these recognized the V3 loop, suggesting that this region may be a less predominant epitope in the context of oligomeric Env than in monomeric protein. Thus, immunization with oligomeric Env generates a large proportion of antibodies to conformational epitopes in both gp120 and gp41, many of which may be absent from monomeric Env. Images PMID:7512157

  4. A vaccine strategy against AIDS: an HIV gp41 peptide immunization prevents NKp44L expression and CD4+ T cell depletion in SHIV-infected macaques.

    PubMed

    Vieillard, Vincent; Le Grand, Roger; Dausset, Jean; Debré, Patrice

    2008-02-12

    We previously showed that a gp41 peptide (3S) induces expression of a natural killer (NK) ligand (NKp44L) on CD4+ T cells during HIV-1 infection and that those cells are highly sensitive to NK lysis. In HIV-infected patients, anti-3S antibodies are associated with the maintenance of CD4+ T cell counts close to their baseline values, and CD4+ T cells decrease with the antibody titer. This study sought to determine whether anti-3S immunization could prevent NKp44L expression on these CD4+ T cells in vivo and inhibits the subsequent decline in CD4+ T cell counts by immunizing macaques with 3S and then infecting them with simian HIV(162P3). The results show that anti-3S antibodies inhibited NKp44L expression and NK activity and cytotoxicity. They also decreased the apoptosis rate of CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes. These data raise questions about the pathogenesis of HIV and present opportunities for both preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccine strategies. PMID:18234855

  5. A vaccine strategy against AIDS: An HIV gp41 peptide immunization prevents NKp44L expression and CD4+ T cell depletion in SHIV-infected macaques

    PubMed Central

    Vieillard, Vincent; Le Grand, Roger; Dausset, Jean; Debré, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We previously showed that a gp41 peptide (3S) induces expression of a natural killer (NK) ligand (NKp44L) on CD4+ T cells during HIV-1 infection and that those cells are highly sensitive to NK lysis. In HIV-infected patients, anti-3S antibodies are associated with the maintenance of CD4+ T cell counts close to their baseline values, and CD4+ T cells decrease with the antibody titer. This study sought to determine whether anti-3S immunization could prevent NKp44L expression on these CD4+ T cells in vivo and inhibits the subsequent decline in CD4+ T cell counts by immunizing macaques with 3S and then infecting them with simian HIV162P3. The results show that anti-3S antibodies inhibited NKp44L expression and NK activity and cytotoxicity. They also decreased the apoptosis rate of CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes. These data raise questions about the pathogenesis of HIV and present opportunities for both preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccine strategies. PMID:18234855

  6. Site-specific Isopeptide Bridge Tethering of Chimeric gp41 N-terminal Heptad Repeat Helical Trimers for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xue; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Huixin; Lai, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Ye, Ling; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2016-01-01

    Peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of HIV-1 gp41 can be potent inhibitors against viral entry when presented in a nonaggregating trimeric coiled-coil conformation via the introduction of exogenous trimerization motifs and intermolecular disulfide bonds. We recently discovered that crosslinking isopeptide bridges within the de novo helical trimers added exceptional resistance to unfolding. Herein, we attempted to optimize (CCIZN17)3, a representative disulfide bond-stabilized chimeric NHR-trimer, by incorporating site-specific interhelical isopeptide bonds as the redox-sensitive disulfide surrogate. In this process, we systematically examined the effect of isopeptide bond position and molecular sizes of auxiliary trimeric coiled-coil motif and NHR fragments on the antiviral potency of these NHR-trimers. Pleasingly, (IZ14N24N)3 possessed promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 infection and markedly increased proteolytic stability relative to its disulfide-tethered counterpart, suggesting good potential for further development as an effective antiviral agent for treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27562370

  7. Site-specific Isopeptide Bridge Tethering of Chimeric gp41 N-terminal Heptad Repeat Helical Trimers for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xue; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Huixin; Lai, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Ye, Ling; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2016-01-01

    Peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of HIV-1 gp41 can be potent inhibitors against viral entry when presented in a nonaggregating trimeric coiled-coil conformation via the introduction of exogenous trimerization motifs and intermolecular disulfide bonds. We recently discovered that crosslinking isopeptide bridges within the de novo helical trimers added exceptional resistance to unfolding. Herein, we attempted to optimize (CCIZN17)3, a representative disulfide bond-stabilized chimeric NHR-trimer, by incorporating site-specific interhelical isopeptide bonds as the redox-sensitive disulfide surrogate. In this process, we systematically examined the effect of isopeptide bond position and molecular sizes of auxiliary trimeric coiled-coil motif and NHR fragments on the antiviral potency of these NHR-trimers. Pleasingly, (IZ14N24N)3 possessed promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 infection and markedly increased proteolytic stability relative to its disulfide-tethered counterpart, suggesting good potential for further development as an effective antiviral agent for treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27562370

  8. Antibody elicited against the gp41 N-heptad repeat (NHR) coiled-coil can neutralize HIV-1 with modest potency but non-neutralizing antibodies also bind to NHR mimetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Josh D.; Kinkead, Heather; Brunel, Florence M.; Leaman, Dan; Jensen, Richard; Louis, John M.; Maruyama, Toshiaki; Bewley, Carole A.; Bowdish, Katherine; Clore, G. Marius; Dawson, Philip E.; Frederickson, Shana; Mage, Rose G.; Richman, Douglas D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Zwick, Michael B.

    2008-07-20

    Following CD4 receptor binding to the HIV-1 envelope spike (Env), the conserved N-heptad repeat (NHR) region of gp41 forms a coiled-coil that is a precursor to the fusion reaction. Although it has been a target of drug and vaccine design, there are few monoclonal antibody (mAb) tools with which to probe the antigenicity and immunogenicity specifically of the NHR coiled-coil. Here, we have rescued HIV-1-neutralizing anti-NHR mAbs from immune phage display libraries that were prepared (i) from b9 rabbits immunized with a previously described mimetic of the NHR coiled-coil, N35{sub CCG}-N13, and (ii) from an HIV-1 infected individual. We describe a rabbit single-chain Fv fragment (scFv), 8K8, and a human Fab, DN9, which specifically recognize NHR coiled-coils that are unoccupied by peptide corresponding to the C-heptad repeat or CHR region of gp41 (e.g. C34). The epitopes of 8K8 and DN9 were found to partially overlap with that of a previously described anti-NHR mAb, IgG D5; however, 8K8 and DN9 were much more specific than D5 for unoccupied NHR trimers. The mAbs, including a whole IgG 8K8 molecule, neutralized primary HIV-1 of clades B and C in a pseudotyped virus assay with comparable, albeit relatively modest potency. Finally, a human Fab T3 and a rabbit serum (both non-neutralizing) were able to block binding of D5 and 8K8 to a gp41 NHR mimetic, respectively, but not the neutralizing activity of these mAbs. We conclude from these results that NHR coiled-coil analogs of HIV-1 gp41 elicit many Abs during natural infection and through immunization, but that due to limited accessibility to the corresponding region on fusogenic gp41 few can neutralize. Caution is therefore required in targeting the NHR for vaccine design. Nevertheless, the mAb panel may be useful as tools for elucidating access restrictions to the NHR of gp41 and in designing potential improvements to mimetics of receptor-activated Env.

  9. Cross-Reactive HIV-1 Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Selected by Screening of an Immune Human Phage Library against an Envelope Glycoprotein (gp140) Isolated from a Patient (R2) with Broadly HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Vidita; Zhang, Mei-Yun; Sidorov, Igor A.; Louise, John M.; Harris, Ilia; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Bouma, Peter; Cham, Fatim; Choudhary, Anil; Rybak, Susanna M.; Fouts, Timothy; Montefiori, David C.; Broder, Christopher C.; Quinnan, Gerald V.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2009-01-01

    Elicitation of broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (bcnAbs) in HIV infections is rare. To test the hypothesis that such antibodies could be elicited by HIV envelope glycoproteins (Envs) with unusual immunogenic properties and to identify novel bcnAbs, we used a soluble Env ectodomain (gp140) from a donor (R2) with high level of bcnAbs as an antigen for panning of an immune phage-displayed antibody library. The panning with the R2 Env resulted in significantly higher number of cross-reactive antibody clones than by using Envs from two other isolates (89.6 and IIIB). Two of the identified human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs), m22 and m24, had sequences, neutralizing and binding activities similar or identical to those of the gp120-specific bcnAbs m18 and m14. The use of the R2 Env but not other Envs for panning resulted in the identification of a novel gp41-specific hmAb, m46. For several of the tested HIV-1 primary isolates its potency on molar basis was comparable to that of T20. It inhibited entry of primary isolates from different clades with an increased activity for cell lines with low CCR5 surface concentrations. The m46 neutralizing activity against a panel of clade C isolates was significantly higher in an assay based on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (4 out of 5 isolates were neutralized with an IC50 in the range from 1.5 to 25 μg/ml) than in an assay based on a cell line with relatively high concentration of cell-surface associated CCR5. In contrast to 2F5 and Z13, this antibody did not bind to denatured gp140 and gp41-derived peptides indicating a conformational nature of its epitope. It bound to a 5-helix bundle but not to N-heptad repeat coiled coils and a 6-helix bundle construct indicating contribution of both gp41 heptad repeats to its epitope and to a possible mechanism of neutralization. These results indicate that the R2 Env may contain unique exposed conserved epitopes that could contribute to its ability to elicit broadly cross

  10. The Transmission Interfaces Contribute Asymmetrically to the Assembly and Activity of Human P-glycoprotein*

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Tip W.; Clarke, David M.

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) is an ABC drug pump that protects us from toxic compounds. It is clinically important because it confers multidrug resistance. The homologous halves of P-gp each contain a transmembrane (TM) domain (TMD) with 6 TM segments followed by a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). The drug- and ATP-binding sites reside at the interface between the TMDs and NBDs, respectively. Each NBD is connected to the TMDs by a transmission interface involving a pair of intracellular loops (ICLs) that form ball-and-socket joints. P-gp is different from CFTR (ABCC7) in that deleting NBD2 causes misprocessing of only P-gp. Therefore, NBD2 might be critical for stabilizing ICLs 2 and 3 that form a tetrahelix bundle at the NBD2 interface. Here we report that the NBD1 and NBD2 transmission interfaces in P-gp are asymmetric. Point mutations to 25 of 60 ICL2/ICL3 residues at the NBD2 transmission interface severely reduced P-gp assembly while changes to the equivalent residues in ICL1/ICL4 at the NBD1 interface had little effect. The hydrophobic nature at the transmission interfaces was also different. Mutation of Phe-1086 or Tyr-1087 to arginine at the NBD2 socket blocked activity or assembly while the equivalent mutations at the NBD1 socket had only modest effects. The results suggest that the NBD transmission interfaces are asymmetric. In contrast to the ICL2/3-NBD2 interface, the ICL1/4-NBD1 transmission interface is more hydrophilic and insensitive to mutations. Therefore the ICL2/3-NBD2 transmission interface forms a precise hydrophobic connection that acts as a linchpin for assembly and trafficking of P-gp. PMID:25987565

  11. Structural Basis of HIV-1 Neutralization by Affinity Matured Fabs Directed against the Internal Trimeric Coiled-Coil of gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Gustchina, Elena; Li, Mi; Louis, John M.; Anderson, D.Eric; Lloyd, John; Frisch, Christian; Bewley, Carole A.; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Clore, G.Marius

    2010-12-03

    The conserved internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR) of HIV-1 gp41 is transiently exposed during the fusion process by forming a pre-hairpin intermediate, thus representing an attractive target for the design of fusion inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies. In previous studies we reported a series of broadly neutralizing mini-antibodies derived from a synthetic naive human combinatorial antibody library by panning against a mimetic of the trimeric N-HR coiled coil, followed by affinity maturation using targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop. Here we report crystal structures of the N-HR mimetic 5-Helix with two Fabs that represent the extremes of this series: Fab 8066 is broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of B and C type HIV-1 viruses, whereas Fab 8062 is non-neutralizing. The crystal structures reveal important differences in the conformations of the CDR-H2 loops in the complexes that propagate into other regions of the antigen-antibody interface, and suggest that both neutralization properties and affinity for the target can be attributed, at least in part, to the differences in the interactions of the CDR-H2 loops with the antigen. Furthermore, modeling of the complex of an N-HR trimer with three Fabs suggests that the CDR-H2 loop may be involved in close intermolecular contacts between neighboring antibody molecules, and that such contacts may hinder the formation of complexes between the N-HR trimer and more than one antibody molecule depending on the conformation of the bound CDR-H2 loop which is defined by its interactions with antigen. Comparison with the crystal structure of the complex of 5-Helix with another neutralizing monoclonal antibody known as D5, derived using an entirely different antibody library and panning procedure, reveals remarkable convergence in the optimal sequence and conformation of the CDR-H2 loop.

  12. Swapped domain constructs of the glycoprotein-41 ectodomain are potent inhibitors of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shidong; Kaur, Hardeep; Nemati, Ariana; Walsh, Joseph D.; Partida, Vivian; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Gochin, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The conformational rearrangement of N-and C-heptad repeats (NHR, CHR) of the HIV-1 glycoprotein-41 (gp41) ectodomain into a trimer of hairpins triggers virus – cell fusion by bringing together membrane-spanning N- and C-terminal domains. Peptides derived from the NHR and CHR inhibit fusion by targeting a prehairpin intermediate state of gp41. Typically, peptides derived from the CHR are low nM inhibitors, while peptides derived from the NHR are low μM inhibitors. Here we describe the inhibitory activity of swapped domain gp41 mimics of the form CHR-loop-NHR, which were designed to form reverse hairpin trimers exposing NHR grooves. We observed low nM inhibition of HIV fusion in constructs that possessed the following properties: an extended NHR C-terminus, an exposed conserved hydrophobic pocket on the NHR, high helical content and trimer stability. Low nM activity was independent of CHR length. CD studies in membrane mimetic dodecylphosphocholine micelles suggested that bioactivity could be related to the ability of the inhibitors to interact with a membrane-associated prehairpin intermediate. The swapped domain design resolves the problem of unstable and weakly active NHR peptides, and suggests a different mechanism of action from that of CHR peptides in inhibition of HIV-1 fusion. PMID:25646644

  13. Mutation of the Dominant Endocytosis Motif in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41 Can Complement Matrix Mutations without Increasing Env Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    West, John T.; Weldon, Sally K.; Wyss, Stephanie; Lin, Xiaoxu; Yu, Qin; Thali, Markus; Hunter, Eric

    2002-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) is efficiently endocytosed in a clathrin-dependent manner. Internalization is mediated by a tyrosine-containing motif within the cytoplasmic domain, and replacement of the cytoplasmic tyrosine by cysteine or phenylalanine increased expression of mutant glycoprotein on the surface of transfected cells by as much as 2.5-fold. Because interactions between the cytoplasmic domain of Env and the matrix protein (MA) have been suggested to mediate incorporation of Env in virus particles, we examined whether perturbation of endocytosis would alter incorporation. Proviruses were constructed to contain the wild-type or mutant Env in conjunction with point mutations in MA that had previously been shown to block Env incorporation. These constructs were used to evaluate the effect of glycoprotein endocytosis on incorporation into virus particles and to test the necessity for a specific interaction between Env and MA to mediate incorporation. Viruses produced from transfected 293T cells were used to infect various cell lines, including MAGI, H9, and CEMx174. Viruses encoding both a disrupted endocytosis motif signal and mutations within MA were significantly more infectious in MAGI cells than their counterparts encoding a mutant MA and wild-type Env. This complementation of infectivity for the MA incorporation mutant viruses was not due to increased glycoprotein incorporation into particles but instead reflected an enhanced fusogenicity of the mutated Env proteins. Our findings further support the concept that a specific interaction between the long cytoplasmic domain of TM and MA is required for efficient incorporation of Env into assembling virions. Alteration of the endocytosis signal of Env, and the resulting increase in cell surface glycoprotein, has no effect on incorporation despite demonstrable effects on fusion, virus entry, and infectivity. PMID:11884559

  14. The C34 Peptide Fusion Inhibitor Binds to the Six-Helix Bundle Core Domain of HIV-1 gp41 by Displacement of the C-Terminal Helical Repeat Region.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Baber, James L; Clore, G Marius

    2015-11-17

    The conformational transition of the core domain of HIV-1 gp41 from a prehairpin intermediate to a six-helix bundle is responsible for virus-cell fusion. Several inhibitors which target the N-heptad repeat helical coiled-coil trimer that is fully accessible in the prehairpin intermediate have been designed. One such inhibitor is the peptide C34 derived from the C-heptad repeat of gp41 that forms the exterior of the six-helix bundle. Here, using a variety of biophysical techniques, including dye tagging, size-exclusion chromatography combined with multiangle light scattering, double electron-electron resonance EPR spectroscopy, and circular dichroism, we investigate the binding of C34 to two six-helix bundle mimetics comprising N- and C-heptad repeats either without (core(SP)) or with (core(S)) a short spacer connecting the two. In the case of core(SP), C34 directly exchanges with the C-heptad repeat. For core(S), up to two molecules of C34 bind the six-helix bundle via displacement of the C-heptad repeat. These results suggest that fusion inhibitors such as C34 can target a continuum of transitioning conformational states from the prehairpin intermediate to the six-helix bundle prior to the occurrence of irreversible fusion of viral and target cell membranes. PMID:26506247

  15. Expression and characterization of glycophospholipid-anchored human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Salzwedel, K; Johnston, P B; Roberts, S J; Dubay, J W; Hunter, E

    1993-01-01

    Four chimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env genes were constructed which encoded the extracellular domain of either the wild-type or a cleavage-defective HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp160) fused at one of two different positions in env to a C-terminal glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) attachment signal from the mouse Thy-1.1 glycoprotein. All four of the constructs encoded glycoproteins that were efficiently expressed when Rev was supplied in trans, and the two cleavable forms were processed normally to gp120 and a chimeric "gp41." The chimeric glycoproteins, in contrast to the wild-type glycoprotein, could be cleaved from the surface of transfected cells by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, indicating that they were anchored in the plasma membrane by a GPI moiety. These GPI-anchored glycoproteins were transported intracellularly at a rate only slightly lower than that of the full-length HIV-1 glycoprotein and were present on the cell surface in equivalent amounts. Nevertheless, all four glycoproteins were defective in mediating both cell-cell and virus-cell fusion as determined by syncytium formation in COS-1-HeLa-T4 cell mixtures and trans complementation of an env-defective HIV-1 genome. Images PMID:8102410

  16. Increasing the α 2, 6 Sialylation of Glycoproteins May Contribute to Metastatic Spread and Therapeutic Resistance in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal glycosylation due to dysregulated glycosyltransferases and glycosidases is a key phenomenon of many malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). In particular, increased ST6 Gal I (β-galactoside α 2, 6 sialyltransferase) and subsequently elevated levels of cell-surface α 2, 6-linked sialic acids have been associated with metastasis and therapeutic failure in CRC. As many CRC patients experience metastasis to the liver or lung and fail to respond to curative therapies, intensive research efforts have sought to identify the molecular changes underlying CRC metastasis. ST6 Gal I has been shown to facilitate CRC metastasis, and we believe that additional investigations into the involvement of ST6 Gal I in CRC could facilitate the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. This review summarizes how ST6 Gal I has been implicated in the altered expression of sialylated glycoproteins, which have been linked to CRC metastasis, radioresistance, and chemoresistance. PMID:24312702

  17. Individual contributions of the human metapneumovirus F, G, and SH surface glycoproteins to the induction of neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Skiadopoulos, Mario H. . E-mail: mskiadopoulos@niaid.nih.gov; Biacchesi, Stephane; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Amaro-Carambot, Emerito; Surman, Sonja R.; Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.

    2006-02-20

    We evaluated the individual contributions of the three surface glycoproteins of human metapneumovirus (HMPV), namely the fusion F, attachment G, and small hydrophobic SH proteins, to the induction of serum HMPV-binding antibodies, serum HMPV-neutralizing antibodies, and protective immunity. Using reverse genetics, each HMPV protein was expressed individually from an added gene in recombinant human parainfluenza virus type 1 (rHPIV1) and used to infect hamsters once or twice by the intranasal route. The F protein was highly immunogenic and protective, whereas G and SH were only weakly or negligibly immunogenic and protective, respectively. Thus, in contrast to other paramyxoviruses, the HMPV attachment G protein is not a major neutralization or protective antigen. Also, although the SH protein of HMPV is a virion protein that is much larger than its counterparts in previously studied paramyxoviruses, it does not appear to be a significant neutralization or protective antigen.

  18. Contribution of radixin to P-glycoprotein expression and transport activity in mouse small intestine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kentaro; Tomono, Takumi; Sakai, Riyo; Kano, Takashi; Morimoto, Kaori; Kato, Yukio; Ogihara, Takuo

    2013-08-01

    The ERM proteins, ezrin, radixin, and moesin, are membrane-cytoskeleton cross-linkers with multiple physiological functions. We previously showed that radixin is involved in posttranslational regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. Here, we investigated the physiological role of radixin in regulating P-gp expression and activity in the small intestine by comparing wild-type- and radixin knockout (Rdx) mice. In intestinal tissue homogenates, P-gp protein levels increased markedly from the upper part to the lower part of the small intestine in both wild-type- and Rdx(-/-) mice. In the membrane fractions, a similar pattern was seen in wild-type mice. However, the membrane expression of P-gp protein remained at the same level from the upper to the lower part of the small intestine in Rdx(-/-) mice. When rhodamine123 (Rho123), a substrate of P-gp, was orally administered to Rdx(-/-) and wild-type mice, the absorption phase of Rho123 was greater in Rdx(-/-) than in wild-type mice, whereas the elimination phase in Rdx(-/-) mice was not different from that of wild-type mice. Our results indicate that radixin plays an important role in regulating P-gp localization and P-gp functional activity at the intestinal membrane. PMID:23754525

  19. Glycoprotein Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Daryl; Spencer, Daniel

    This chapter provides an overview of practical methods for glycosylation analysis of glycoprotein therapeutics . The topics include glycoprofiling methods for glycoforms, monosaccharides (neutral and N-acetylated species as well as sialic acids), oligosaccharides (chemical and enzymatic methods for glycan release, post-release purification, labeling and derivatization, different types of glycan HPLC and MS), and glycosylation site profiling.

  20. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-10-31

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  1. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

    2009-07-14

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  2. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-05-15

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  3. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2005-08-09

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  4. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-08-28

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  5. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-02

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  6. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-07-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  7. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-02-27

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  8. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-16

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  9. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Shultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-04-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 envelope glycoproteins oligomerize through conserved sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Center, R J; Kemp, B E; Poumbourios, P

    1997-01-01

    Hetero-oligomerization between human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) envelope glycoprotein (Env) truncation mutants and epitope-tagged gp160 is dependent on the presence of gp41 transmembrane protein (TM) amino acids 552 to 589, a putative amphipathic alpha-helical sequence. HIV-2 Env truncation mutants containing this sequence were also able to form cross-type hetero-oligomers with HIV-1 Env. HIV-2/HIV-1 hetero-oligomerization was, however, more sensitive to disruption by mutagenesis or increased temperature. The conservation of the Env oligomerization function of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 alpha-helical sequences suggests that retroviral TM alpha-helical motifs may have a universal role in oligomerization. PMID:9188654

  11. An update on post-translational modifications of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins: toward a model highlighting their contribution to plant cell wall architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, May; Velasquez, Silvia M.; Jamet, Elisabeth; Estevez, José M.; Albenne, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composite structures mainly composed of polysaccharides, also containing a large set of proteins involved in diverse functions such as growth, environmental sensing, signaling, and defense. Research on cell wall proteins (CWPs) is a challenging field since present knowledge of their role into the structure and function of cell walls is very incomplete. Among CWPs, hydroxyproline (Hyp)-rich O-glycoproteins (HRGPs) were classified into three categories: (i) moderately glycosylated extensins (EXTs) able to form covalent scaffolds; (ii) hyperglycosylated arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs); and (iii) Hyp/proline (Pro)-Rich proteins (H/PRPs) that may be non-, weakly- or highly-glycosylated. In this review, we provide a description of the main features of their post-translational modifications (PTMs), biosynthesis, structure, and function. We propose a new model integrating HRGPs and their partners in cell walls. Altogether, they could form a continuous glyco-network with non-cellulosic polysaccharides via covalent bonds or non-covalent interactions, thus strongly contributing to cell wall architecture. PMID:25177325

  12. Glycoprotein Nonmetastatic Melanoma B (Gpnmb)-Positive Macrophages Contribute to the Balance between Fibrosis and Fibrolysis during the Repair of Acute Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Kotaro; Tabu, Kazuaki; Sasaki, Fumisato; Takami, Yoichiro; Morinaga, Yuko; Mawatari, Seiichi; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Tanoue, Shiroh; Kanmura, Shuji; Tamai, Tsutomu; Moriuchi, Akihiro; Uto, Hirofumi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Ido, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma B (Gpnmb), a transmembrane glycoprotein that is expressed in macrophages, negatively regulates inflammation. We have reported that Gpnmb is strongly expressed in the livers of rats fed a choline-deficient, L-amino acid-defined (CDAA) diet. However, the role of macrophage-expressed Gpnmb in liver injury is still unknown. This study aimed to clarify the characteristics of infiltrating macrophages that express Gpnmb, and the involvement of Gpnmb in the repair process in response to liver injury. Methods C57BL/6J, DBA/2J [DBA] and DBA/2J-Gpnmb+ [DBA-g+] mice were treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) at a dose of 1.0 mL/kg body weight. Mice were sacrificed at predetermined time points, followed by measurement of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and histological examination. Expression of Gpnmb, pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokines, and profibrotic/antifibrotic factors were examined by quantitative RT-PCR and/or Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry, fluorescent immunostaining and flow cytometry were used to determine the expression of Gpnmb, CD68, CD11b and α-SMA, phagocytic activity, and the presence of apoptotic bodies. We used quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA to examine TGF-β and MMP-13 expression and the concentrations and supernatants of isolated infiltrating hepatic macrophages transfected with siGpnmb. Results In C57BL/6J mice, serum ALT levels increased at two days after CCl4 injection and decreased at four days. Gpnmb expression in the liver was stimulated four days after CCl4 injection. Histological examination and flow cytometry showed that Gpnmb-positive cells were almost positive for CD68-positive macrophages, contained engulfed apoptotic bodies and exhibited enhanced phagocytic activity. Isolated infiltrating hepatic macrophages transfected with siGpnmb showed high MMP-13 secretion. There was no significant difference in the magnitude of CCl4-induced

  13. Envelope Glycoprotein Internalization Protects Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Cells from Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    von Bredow, Benjamin; Arias, Juan F.; Heyer, Lisa N.; Gardner, Matthew R.; Farzan, Michael; Rakasz, Eva G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytoplasmic tails of human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV, respectively) envelope glycoproteins contain a highly conserved, membrane-proximal endocytosis motif that prevents the accumulation of Env on the surface of infected cells prior to virus assembly. Using an assay designed to measure the killing of virus-infected cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), we show that substitutions in this motif increase the susceptibility of HIV-1- and SIV-infected cells to ADCC in a manner that directly correlates with elevated Env levels on the surface of virus-infected cells. In the case of HIV-1, this effect is additive with a deletion in vpu recently shown to enhance the susceptibility of HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC as a result of tetherin-mediated retention of budding virions on the cell surface. These results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the membrane-proximal endocytosis motif of gp41 in protecting HIV-1- and SIV-infected cells from antibody responses by regulating the amount of Env present on the cell surface. IMPORTANCE This study reveals an unappreciated role for the membrane-proximal endocytosis motif of gp41 in protecting HIV-1- and SIV-infected cells from elimination by Env-specific antibodies. Thus, strategies designed to interfere with this mechanism of Env internalization may improve the efficacy of antibody-based vaccines and antiretroviral therapies designed to enhance the immunological control of HIV-1 replication in chronically infected individuals. PMID:26269175

  14. Effect of trimerization motifs on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of a noncleavable HIV-1 gp140 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Sean X.; Idiart, Rebecca J.; Mariano, Ellaine B.; Chen, Helen; Jiang Peifeng; Xu Li; Ostrow, Kristin M.; Wrin, Terri; Phung, Pham; Binley, James M.; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Ballantyne, John A.; Whalen, Robert G.

    2009-12-05

    The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120 and the gp41 ectodomain, collectively known as gp140) contain all known viral neutralization epitopes. Various strategies have been used to create soluble trimers of the envelope to mimic the structure of the native viral protein, including mutation of the gp120-gp41 cleavage site, introduction of disulfide bonds, and fusion to heterologous trimerization motifs. We compared the effects on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of three such motifs: T4 fibritin, a GCN4 variant, and the Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase catalytic subunit. Fusion of each motif to the C-terminus of a noncleavable JRCSF gp140(-) envelope protein led to enhanced trimerization but had limited effects on the antigenic profile and CD4-binding ability of the trimers. Immunization of rabbits provided no evidence that the trimerized gp140(-) constructs induced significantly improved neutralizing antibodies to several HIV-1 pseudoviruses, compared to gp140 lacking a trimerization motif. However, modest differences in both binding specificity and neutralizing antibody responses were observed among the various immunogens.

  15. The Envelope Cytoplasmic Tail of HIV-1 Subtype C Contributes to Poor Replication Capacity through Low Viral Infectivity and Cell-to-Cell Transmission.

    PubMed

    Santos da Silva, Eveline; Mulinge, Martin; Lemaire, Morgane; Masquelier, Cécile; Beraud, Cyprien; Rybicki, Arkadiusz; Servais, Jean-Yves; Iserentant, Gilles; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Perez Bercoff, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail (gp41CT) of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) mediates Env incorporation into virions and regulates Env intracellular trafficking. Little is known about the functional impact of variability in this domain. To address this issue, we compared the replication of recombinant virus pairs carrying the full Env (Env viruses) or the Env ectodomain fused to the gp41CT of NL4.3 (EnvEC viruses) (12 subtype C and 10 subtype B pairs) in primary CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived-macrophages (MDMs). In CD4+ T-cells, replication was as follows: B-EnvEC = B-Env>C-EnvEC>C-Env, indicating that the gp41CT of subtype C contributes to the low replicative capacity of this subtype. In MDMs, in contrast, replication capacity was comparable for all viruses regardless of subtype and of gp41CT. In CD4+ T-cells, viral entry, viral release and viral gene expression were similar. However, infectivity of free virions and cell-to-cell transmission of C-Env viruses released by CD4+ T-cells was lower, suggestive of lower Env incorporation into virions. Subtype C matrix only minimally rescued viral replication and failed to restore infectivity of free viruses and cell-to-cell transmission. Taken together, these results show that polymorphisms in the gp41CT contribute to viral replication capacity and suggest that the number of Env spikes per virion may vary across subtypes. These findings should be taken into consideration in the design of vaccines. PMID:27598717

  16. Glycosylation Engineering of Glycoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadamoto, Reiko; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    Naturally occurring glycosylation of glycoproteins varies in glycosylation site and in the number and structure of glycans. The engineering of well-defined glycoproteins is an important technology for the preparation of pharmaceutically relevant glycoproteins and in the study of the relationship between glycans and proteins on a structure-function level. In pharmaceutical applications of glycoproteins, the presence of terminal sialic acids on glycans is particularly important for the in vivo circulatory half life, since sialic acid-terminated glycans are not recognized by asialoglycoprotein receptors. Therefore, there have been a number of attempts to control or modify cellular metabolism toward the expression of glycoproteins with glycosylation profiles similar to that of human glycoproteins. In this chapter, recent methods for glycoprotein engineering in various cell culture systems (mammalian cells, plant, yeast, and E. coli) and advances in the chemical approach to glycoprotein formation are described.

  17. Determining the Structure of an Unliganded and Fully Glycosylated SIV gp120 Envelope Glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bing; Vogan, Erik M.; Gong, Haiyun; Skehel, John J.; Wiley, Don C.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2010-07-13

    HIV/SIV envelope glycoproteins mediate the first steps in viral infection. They are trimers of a membrane-anchored polypeptide chain, cleaved into two fragments known as gp120 and gp41. The structure of HIV gp120 bound with receptor (CD4) has been known for some time. We have now determined the structure of a fully glycosylated SIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein in an unliganded conformation by X-ray crystallography at 4.0 {angstrom} resolution. We describe here our experimental and computational approaches, which may be relevant to other resolution-limited crystallographic problems. Key issues were attention to details of beam geometry mandated by small, weakly diffracting crystals, and choice of strategies for phase improvement, starting with two isomorphous derivatives and including multicrystal averaging. We validated the structure by analyzing composite omit maps, averaged among three distinct crystal lattices, and by calculating model-based, SeMet anomalous difference maps. There are at least four ordered sugars on many of the thirteen oligosaccharides.

  18. Influences on the Design and Purification of Soluble, Recombinant Native-Like HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Rajesh P.; Yasmeen, Anila; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Go, Eden P.; Pritchard, Laura K.; Guttman, Miklos; Ketas, Thomas A.; Cottrell, Christopher A.; Wilson, Ian A.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Cupo, Albert; Crispin, Max; Lee, Kelly K.; Desaire, Heather; Ward, Andrew B.; Klasse, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have investigated factors that influence the production of native-like soluble, recombinant trimers based on the env genes of two isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), specifically 92UG037.8 (clade A) and CZA97.012 (clade C). When the recombinant trimers based on the env genes of isolates 92UG037.8 and CZA97.012 were made according to the SOSIP.664 design and purified by affinity chromatography using broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against quaternary epitopes (PGT145 and PGT151, respectively), the resulting trimers are highly stable and they are fully native-like when visualized by negative-stain electron microscopy. They also have a native-like (i.e., abundant) oligomannose glycan composition and display multiple bNAb epitopes while occluding those for nonneutralizing antibodies. In contrast, uncleaved, histidine-tagged Foldon (Fd) domain-containing gp140 proteins (gp140UNC-Fd-His), based on the same env genes, very rarely form native-like trimers, a finding that is consistent with their antigenic and biophysical properties and glycan composition. The addition of a 20-residue flexible linker (FL20) between the gp120 and gp41 ectodomain (gp41ECTO) subunits to make the uncleaved 92UG037.8 gp140-FL20 construct is not sufficient to create a native-like trimer, but a small percentage of native-like trimers were produced when an I559P substitution in gp41ECTO was also present. The further addition of a disulfide bond (SOS) to link the gp120 and gp41 subunits in the uncleaved gp140-FL20-SOSIP protein increases native-like trimer formation to ∼20 to 30%. Analysis of the disulfide bond content shows that misfolded gp120 subunits are abundant in uncleaved CZA97.012 gp140UNC-Fd-His proteins but very rare in native-like trimer populations. The design and stabilization method and the purification strategy are, therefore, all important influences on the quality of trimeric Env proteins and hence their suitability as vaccine components

  19. A monoclonal antibody to CD4 domain 2 blocks soluble CD4-induced conformational changes in the envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-1 infection of CD4+ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J P; Sattentau, Q J; Klasse, P J; Burkly, L C

    1992-01-01

    The murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) 5A8, which is reactive with domain 2 of CD4, blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and syncytium formation of CD4+ cells (L. C. Burkly, D. Olson, R. Shapiro, G. Winkler, J. J. Rosa, D. W. Thomas, C. Williams, and P. Chisholm, J. Immunol., in press). Here we show that, in contrast to the CD4 domain 1 MAb 6H10, 5A8 and its Fab fragment do not block soluble CD4 (sCD4) binding to virions, whereas they do inhibit sCD4-induced exposure of cryptic epitopes on gp41 and dissociation of gp120 from virions. Two other MAbs, OKT4 and L120, which are reactive with domains 3 and 4 of CD4, have little or no effect on HIV-1 infection, syncytium formation, or sCD4-induced conformational changes in the envelope glycoproteins. The mechanisms of action of 5A8 and 6H10 can be further distinguished in syncytium inhibition assays: 6H10 blocks competitively, while 5A8 does not. We opine that 5A8 blocks HIV-1 infection and fusion by interfering with conformational changes in gp120/gp41 and/or CD4 that are necessary for virus-cell fusion. Images PMID:1378510

  20. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-terminal flanks of flexible segments that are likely to be proteolytic cleavage sites. In this study, the influence of gp120 conformation on the dominance pattern in gp120 from HIV strain 89.6 was examined in CBA mice, whose MHC class II protein has one of the most well defined peptide-binding preferences. Only one of six dominant epitopes contained the most conserved element of the I-Ak binding motif, an aspartic acid. Destabilization of the gp120 conformation by deletion of single disulfide bonds preferentially enhanced responses to the cryptic I-Ak motif-containing sequences, as reported by T-cell proliferation or cytokine secretion. Conversely, inclusion of CpG in the adjuvant with gp120 enhanced responses to the dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes. The gp120 destabilization affected secretion of some cytokines more than others, suggesting that antigen conformation could modulate T-cell functions through mechanisms of antigen processing. IMPORTANCE CD4+ helper T cells play an essential role in protection against HIV and other pathogens. Thus, the sites of helper T-cell recognition, the dominant epitopes, are targets for vaccine design; and the corresponding T cells may provide markers for monitoring infection and immunity. However, T-cell epitopes are difficult to identify and predict. It is also unclear whether CD4+ T cells specific for one epitope are more protective than T cells specific for other epitopes. This work shows that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of an

  1. Elite Control, Gut CD4 T Cell Sparing, and Enhanced Mucosal T Cell Responses in Macaca nemestrina Infected by a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Lacking a gp41 Trafficking Motif

    PubMed Central

    Breed, Matthew W.; Elser, Samra E.; Torben, Workineh; Jordan, Andrea P. O.; Aye, Pyone P.; Midkiff, Cecily; Schiro, Faith; Sugimoto, Chie; Alvarez-Hernandez, Xavier; Blair, Robert V.; Somasunderam, Anoma; Utay, Netanya S.; Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Pahar, Bapi; Wiseman, Roger W.; O'Connor, David H.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Marsh, Mark; Li, Yuan; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Keele, Brandon F.; Fultz, Patricia N.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deletion of Gly-720 and Tyr-721 from a highly conserved GYxxØ trafficking signal in the SIVmac239 envelope glycoprotein cytoplasmic domain, producing a virus termed ΔGY, leads to a striking perturbation in pathogenesis in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Infected macaques develop immune activation and progress to AIDS, but with only limited and transient infection of intestinal CD4+ T cells and an absence of microbial translocation. Here we evaluated ΔGY in pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina), a species in which SIVmac239 infection typically leads to increased immune activation and more rapid progression to AIDS than in rhesus macaques. In pig-tailed macaques, ΔGY also replicated acutely to high peak plasma RNA levels identical to those for SIVmac239 and caused only transient infection of CD4+ T cells in the gut lamina propria and no microbial translocation. However, in marked contrast to rhesus macaques, 19 of 21 pig-tailed macaques controlled ΔGY replication with plasma viral loads of <15 to 50 RNA copies/ml. CD4+ T cells were preserved in blood and gut for up to 100 weeks with no immune activation or disease progression. Robust antiviral CD4+ T cell responses were seen, particularly in the gut. Anti-CD8 antibody depletion demonstrated CD8+ cellular control of viral replication. Two pig-tailed macaques progressed to disease with persisting viremia and possible compensatory mutations in the cytoplasmic tail. These studies demonstrate a marked perturbation in pathogenesis caused by ΔGY's ablation of the GYxxØ trafficking motif and reveal, paradoxically, that viral control is enhanced in a macaque species typically predisposed to more pathogenic manifestations of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) reflects a balance between viral replication, host innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses, and sustained immune activation

  2. The role of eukaryotic subtilisin-like endoproteases for the activation of human immunodeficiency virus glycoproteins in natural host cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hallenberger, S; Moulard, M; Sordel, M; Klenk, H D; Garten, W

    1997-01-01

    Proteolytic activation of the precursor envelope glycoproteins gp160 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and gp140 of HIV-2, a prerequisite for viral infection, results in the formation of gp120/gp41 and gp125/gp36, respectively. Cleavage is mediated by cellular proteases. Furin, a member of the eukaryotic subtilisin family, has been shown to be an activating protease for HIV. Here, we compared the presence of furin and other mammalian subtilisins in lymphatic cells and tissues. Northern blot analyses revealed that furin and the recently discovered protease LPC/PC7 were the only subtilisin-like enzymes transcribed in such cells. Furin was identified as an enzymatically active endoprotease present in different lymphocytic, as well as monocytic, cell lines. When expressed from vaccinia virus vectors, the proprotein convertases were correctly processed, transported, and secreted into the media and enzymatically active. Coexpression of different subtilisins with the HIV envelope precursors revealed that furin and LPC/PC7 are able to cleave HIV-1 gp160. Moreover, both enzymes proteolytically processed the envelope precursor of HIV-2. gp140 was also cleaved to some extent by PC1, which is not, however, present in lymphatic cells. Furin- and LPC/PC7-catalyzed cleavage of HIV-1 gp160 resulted in biologically active envelope protein. In conclusion, among the known members of the subtilisin family, only furin and LPC/PC7 fulfill the requirements of a protease responsible for in vivo activation of HIV envelope glycoproteins. PMID:8995623

  3. Bloch spin waves and emergent structure in protein folding with HIV envelope glycoprotein as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jin; Niemi, Antti J.; He, Jianfeng; Sieradzan, Adam; Ilieva, Nevena

    2016-03-01

    We inquire how structure emerges during the process of protein folding. For this we scrutinize collective many-atom motions during all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce, develop, and employ various topological techniques, in combination with analytic tools that we deduce from the concept of integrable models and structure of discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The example we consider is an α -helical subunit of the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41. The helical structure is stable when the subunit is part of the biological oligomer. But in isolation, the helix becomes unstable, and the monomer starts deforming. We follow the process computationally. We interpret the evolving structure both in terms of a backbone based Heisenberg spin chain and in terms of a side chain based XY spin chain. We find that in both cases the formation of protein supersecondary structure is akin the formation of a topological Bloch domain wall along a spin chain. During the process we identify three individual Bloch walls and we show that each of them can be modelled with a precision of tenths to several angstroms in terms of a soliton solution to a discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  4. Bloch spin waves and emergent structure in protein folding with HIV envelope glycoprotein as an example.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin; Niemi, Antti J; He, Jianfeng; Sieradzan, Adam; Ilieva, Nevena

    2016-03-01

    We inquire how structure emerges during the process of protein folding. For this we scrutinize collective many-atom motions during all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce, develop, and employ various topological techniques, in combination with analytic tools that we deduce from the concept of integrable models and structure of discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The example we consider is an α-helical subunit of the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41. The helical structure is stable when the subunit is part of the biological oligomer. But in isolation, the helix becomes unstable, and the monomer starts deforming. We follow the process computationally. We interpret the evolving structure both in terms of a backbone based Heisenberg spin chain and in terms of a side chain based XY spin chain. We find that in both cases the formation of protein supersecondary structure is akin the formation of a topological Bloch domain wall along a spin chain. During the process we identify three individual Bloch walls and we show that each of them can be modelled with a precision of tenths to several angstroms in terms of a soliton solution to a discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. PMID:27078392

  5. Glycoproteins: Occurrence and Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Valentin

    Protein glycosylation is regarded as the most complex form of post-translational modification leading to a heterogeneous expression of glycoproteins as mixtures of glycoforms. This chapter describes the structure and occurrence of glycoproteins with respect to their glycan chains. Discussed are different carbohydrate-peptide linkages including GPI anchors, common structures of N- and O-glycans, and the structure of glycosaminoglycans contained in proteoglycans. Also covered are the bacterial cell wall polymer peptidoglycan and the glycopeptide antibiotics of the vancomycin group. Properties and functions of the glycans contained in glycoproteins are dealt with in the next chapter of this book.

  6. Robust Neutralizing Antibodies Elicited by HIV-1 JRFL Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yu; Sharma, Shailendra Kumar; McKee, Krisha; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Mascola, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Host cell-mediated proteolytic cleavage of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 precursor glycoprotein into gp120 and gp41 subunits is required to generate fusion-competent envelope glycoprotein (Env) spikes. The gp120-directed broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNabs) isolated from HIV-infected individuals efficiently recognize fully cleaved JRFL Env spikes; however, nonneutralizing gp120-directed monoclonal antibodies isolated from infected or vaccinated subjects recognize only uncleaved JRFL spikes. Therefore, as an immunogen, cleaved spikes that selectively present desired neutralizing epitopes to B cells may elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. Accordingly, we inoculated nonhuman primates (NHPs) with plasmid DNA encoding transmembrane-anchored, cleaved JRFL Env or by electroporation (EP). Priming with DNA expressing soluble, uncleaved gp140 trimers was included as a comparative experimental group of NHPs. DNA inoculation was followed by boosts with soluble JRFL gp140 trimers, and control NHPs were inoculated with soluble JRFL protein trimers without DNA priming. In the TZM-bl assay, elicitation of neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 tier 1 isolates was robust following the protein boost. Neutralization of tier 2 isolates was detected, but only in animals primed with plasmid DNA and boosted with trimeric protein. Using the more sensitive A3R5 assay, consistent neutralization of both clade B and C tier 2 isolates was detected from all regimens assessed in the current study, exceeding levels achieved by our previous vaccine regimens in primates. Together, these data suggest a potential advantage of B cell priming followed by a rest interval and protein boosting to present JRFL Env spikes to the immune system to better generate HIV-1 cross-clade neutralizing antibodies. PMID:24067980

  7. Residues in the membrane-spanning domain core modulate conformation and fusogenicity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2010-09-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for its biological activity. Initial studies have defined an almost invariant 'core' structure in the MSD and demonstrated that it is crucial for anchoring Env in the membrane and virus entry. We show here that amino acid substitutions in the MSD 'core' do not influence specific virus-cell attachment, nor CD4 receptor and CXCR4 coreceptor recognition by Env. However, substitutions within the MSD 'core' delayed the kinetics and reduced the efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by Env. Although we observed no evidence that membrane fusion mediated by the MSD core mutants was arrested at a hemifusion stage, impaired Env fusogenicity was correlated with minor conformational changes in the V2, C1, and C5 regions in gp120 and the immunodominant loop in gp41. These changes could delay initiation of the conformational changes required in the fusion process.

  8. Structure–Activity Relationship Studies of Indole-Based Compounds as Small Molecule HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitors Targeting Glycoprotein 41

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We previously described indole-containing compounds with the potential to inhibit HIV-1 fusion by targeting the hydrophobic pocket of transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. Here we report optimization and structure–activity relationship studies on the basic scaffold, defining the role of shape, contact surface area, and molecular properties. Thirty new compounds were evaluated in binding, cell–cell fusion, and viral replication assays. Below a 1 μM threshold, correlation between binding and biological activity was diminished, indicating an amphipathic requirement for activity in cells. The most active inhibitor 6j exhibited 0.6 μM binding affinity and 0.2 μM EC50 against cell–cell fusion and live virus replication and was active against T20 resistant strains. Twenty-two compounds with the same connectivity displayed a consensus pose in docking calculations, with rank order matching the biological activity. The work provides insight into requirements for small molecule inhibition of HIV-1 fusion and demonstrates a potent low molecular weight fusion inhibitor. PMID:24856833

  9. Labelling of membrane glycoprotein in erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium knowlesi*

    PubMed Central

    Trigg, P. I.; Hirst, S. I.; Shakespeare, P. G.; Tappenden, L.

    1977-01-01

    Normal rhesus monkey erythrocytes and erythrocytes infected by P. knowlesi were labelled with galactose oxidase (EC 1.1.3.9) and tritiated sodium borohydride. The glycoproteins of normal erythrocytes were not labelled unless the cells were pretreated with neuraminidase, when peaks of activity with apparent molecular weights of 170 000, 126 000, 90 000, 50 000, and 35 000 were observed. Schizont-infected erythrocytes showed an absence of glycoprotein labelling even after neuraminidase treatment. The results indicate that there is an alteration in the glycoproteins of schizont-infected erythrocytes, which may contribute to the increased permeability and the immunological alterations on the surface of these cells. PMID:412601

  10. Identification of members of the P-glycoprotein multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, W.F.; Sarangi, F.; Zastawny, R.L.; Veinot-Drebot, L.; Ling, V. )

    1989-03-01

    Overproduction of P-glycoprotein is intimately associated with multidrug resistance. This protein appears to be encoded by a multigene family. Thus, differential expression of different members of this family may contribute to the complexity of the multidrug resistance phenotype. Three lambda genomic clones isolated from a hamster genomic library represent different members of the hamster P-glycoprotein gene family. Using a highly conserved exon probe, the authors found that the hamster P-glycoprotein gene family consists of three genes. They also found that the P-glycoprotein gene family consists of three genes in mice but has only two genes in humans and rhesus monkeys. The hamster P-glycoprotein genes have similar exon-intron organizations within the 3' region encoding the cytoplasmic domains. The propose that the hamster P-glycoprotein gene family arose from gene duplication. The hamster pgpl and pgp2 genes appear to be more closely related to each other than either gene is to the pgp3 gene. They speculate that the hamster pgpl and pgp2 genes arose from a recent gene duplication event and that primates did not undergo this duplication and therefore contain only two P-glycoprotein genes.

  11. Pulsatile glycoprotein hormone secretion in glycoprotein-producing pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Samuels, M H; Henry, P; Kleinschmidt-Demasters, B K; Lillehei, K; Ridgway, E C

    1991-12-01

    To study patterns of hormone production and secretion in glycoprotein-producing pituitary tumors, 12 patients with such tumors underwent the following studies. Preoperatively, all patients had serum TSH, LH, FSH, and alpha-subunit levels measured every 15 min for 24 h. Hormone pulses were located by cluster analysis, and pulse parameters were compared to those in healthy young men, healthy young women, healthy postmenopausal women, and subjects with primary hypothyroidism. After surgery, immunocytochemistry for the four glycoproteins was performed on all tumors, and Northern blot analysis was performed in six tumors with probes for the four subunits. By immunocytochemistry, 42% of the tumors were positive for TSH beta, 83% for LH beta, 75% for FSH beta, and 92% for alpha-subunit. Preoperative serum hormone levels varied widely between patients and were not well correlated with the intensity of immunocytochemical staining. Northern blot analysis did not appear to be as sensitive as immunocytochemistry for detection of the glycoproteins. All patients had pulsatile glycoprotein secretion, with pulses of normal frequency but varied amplitude. These results suggest that in patients with glycoprotein tumors, hormone pulses may be an integral part of autonomous secretion, or that hypothalamic control is involved in glycoprotein secretion and, perhaps, in the pathogenesis of these tumors. PMID:1955510

  12. Lubrication by glycoprotein brushes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappone, Bruno; Ruths, Marina; Greene, George W.; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2006-03-01

    Grafted polyelectrolyte brushes show excellent lubricating properties under water and have been proposed as a model to study boundary lubrication in biological system. Lubricin, a glycoprotein of the synovial fluid, is considered the major boundary lubricant of articular joints. Using the Surface Force Apparatus, we have measured normal and friction forces between model surfaces (negatively charged mica, positively charged poly-lysine and aminothiol, hydrophobic alkanethiol) bearing adsorbed layers of lubricin. Lubricin layers acts like a versatile anti-adhesive, adsorbing on all the surfaces considered and creating a repulsion similar to the force between end-grafted polymer brushes. Analogies with polymer brushes also appear from bridging experiment, where proteins molecules are end-adsorbed on two opposing surfaces at the same time. Lubricin `brushes' show good lubricating ability at low applied pressures (P<0.5MPa), especially on negatively charged surfaces like mica. At higher load, the adsorbed layers wears and fails lubricating the surfaces, while still protecting the underlying substrate from wearing. Lubricin might thus be a first example of biological polyelectrolytes providing `brush-like' lubrication and wear-protection.

  13. Stabilizing Exposure of Conserved Epitopes by Structure Guided Insertion of Disulfide Bond in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Pampi; Labranche, Celia; Go, Eden P.; Clark, Daniel F.; Sun, Yide; Nandi, Avishek; Hartog, Karin; Desaire, Heather; Montefiori, David; Carfi, Andrea; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Barnett, Susan W.

    2013-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into target cells requires binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to cellular receptors and subsequent conformational changes that culminates in fusion of viral and target cell membranes. Recent structural information has revealed that these conformational transitions are regulated by three conserved but potentially flexible layers stacked between the receptor-binding domain (gp120) and the fusion arm (gp41) of Env. We hypothesized that artificial insertion of a covalent bond will ‘snap’ Env into a conformation that is less mobile and stably expose conserved sites. Therefore, we analyzed the interface between these gp120 layers (layers 1, 2 and 3) and identified residues that may form disulfide bonds when substituted with cysteines. We subsequently probed the structures of the resultant mutant gp120 proteins by assaying their binding to a variety of ligands using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) assay. We found that a single disulfide bond strategically inserted between the highly conserved layers 1 and 2 (C65-C115) is able to ‘lock’ gp120 in a CD4 receptor bound conformation (in the absence of CD4), as indicated by the lower dissociation constant (Kd) for the CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope binding 17b antibody. When disulfide-stabilized monomeric (gp120) and trimeric (gp140) Envs were used to immunize rabbits, they were found to elicit a higher proportion of antibodies directed against both CD4i and CD4 binding site epitopes than the wild-type proteins. These results demonstrate that structure-guided stabilization of inter-layer interactions within HIV-1 Env can be used to expose conserved epitopes and potentially overcome the sequence diversity of these molecules. PMID:24146829

  14. Conformational properties of the third variable loop of HIV-1AD8 envelope glycoprotein in the liganded conditions.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Satoshi; Takizawa, Mari; Miyauchi, Kosuke; Urano, Emiko; Fujino, Masayuki; Murakami, Toshio; Murakami, Tsutomu; Komano, Jun

    2016-06-17

    The conformational dynamics of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 and gp41 (Env) remains poorly understood. Here we examined how the V3 loop conformation is regulated in the liganded state using a panel of recombinant HIV-1NL4-3 clones bearing HIV-1AD8 Env by two experimental approaches, one adopting a monoclonal neutralizing antibody KD-247 (suvizumab) that recognizes the tip of the V3 loop, and the other assessing the function of the V3 loop. A significant positive correlation of the Env-KD-247 binding was detected between the liganded and unliganded conditions. Namely, the mutation D163G located in the V2 loop, which enhances viral susceptibility to KD-247 by 59.4-fold, had little effect on the sCD4-induced increment of the virus-KD-247 binding. By contrast, a virus with the S370N mutation in the C3 region increased the virus-KD-247 binding by 91.4-fold, although it did not influence the KD-247-mediated neutralization. Co-receptor usage and the susceptibility to CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc were unaffected by D163G and S370N mutations. Collectively, these data suggest that the conformation of the liganded V3-loop of HIV-1AD8 Env is still under regulation of other Env domains aside from the V3 loop, including V2 and C3. Our results give an insight into the structural properties of HIV-1 Env and viral resistance to entry inhibitors by non-V3 loop mutations. PMID:27178216

  15. Salivary Mucin 19 Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Culp, David J.; Robinson, Bently; Cash, Melanie N.; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Stewart, Carol; Cuadra-Saenz, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Saliva functions in innate immunity of the oral cavity, protecting against demineralization of teeth (i.e. dental caries), a highly prevalent infectious disease associated with Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen also linked to endocarditis and atheromatous plaques. Gel-forming mucins are a major constituent of saliva. Because Muc19 is the dominant salivary gel-forming mucin in mice, we studied Muc19−/− mice for changes in innate immune functions of saliva in interactions with S. mutans. When challenged with S. mutans and a cariogenic diet, total smooth and sulcal surface lesions are more than 2- and 1.6-fold higher in Muc19−/− mice compared with wild type, whereas the severity of lesions are up to 6- and 10-fold higher, respectively. Furthermore, the oral microbiota of Muc19−/− mice display higher levels of indigenous streptococci. Results emphasize the importance of a single salivary constituent in the innate immune functions of saliva. In vitro studies of S. mutans and Muc19 interactions (i.e. adherence, aggregation, and biofilm formation) demonstrate Muc19 poorly aggregates S. mutans. Nonetheless, aggregation is enhanced upon adding Muc19 to saliva from Muc19−/− mice, indicating Muc19 assists in bacterial clearance through formation of heterotypic complexes with salivary constituents that bind S. mutans, thus representing a novel innate immune function for salivary gel-forming mucins. In humans, expression of salivary MUC19 is unclear. We find MUC19 transcripts in salivary glands of seven subjects and demonstrate MUC19 glycoproteins in glandular mucous cells and saliva. Similarities and differences between mice and humans in the expression and functions of salivary gel-forming mucins are discussed. PMID:25512380

  16. Glycan analysis of therapeutic glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are glycoproteins produced by living cell systems. The glycan moieties attached to the proteins can directly affect protein stability, bioactivity, and immunogenicity. Therefore, glycan variants of a glycoprotein product must be adequately analyzed and controlled to ensure product quality. However, the inherent complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. This review provides an update of recent advances in glycan analysis, including the potential utility of lectin-based microarray for high throughput glycan profiling. Emphasis is placed on comparison of the major types of analytics for use in determining unique glycan features such as glycosylation site, glycan structure, and content. PMID:26599345

  17. Inflammatory glycoproteins in cardiometabolic disorders, autoimmune diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Margery A; Gruppen, Eke G; Otvos, James D; Dullaart, Robin P F

    2016-08-01

    The physiological function initially attributed to the oligosaccharide moieties or glycans on inflammatory glycoproteins was to improve protein stability. However, it is now clear that glycans play a prominent role in glycoprotein structure and function and in some cases contribute to disease states. In fact, glycan processing contributes to pathogenicity not only in autoimmune disorders but also in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes and malignancy. While most clinical laboratory tests measure circulating levels of inflammatory proteins, newly developed diagnostic and prognostic tests are harvesting the information that can be gleaned by measuring the amount or structure of the attached glycans, which may be unique to individuals as well as various diseases. As such, these newer glycan-based tests may provide future means for more personalized approaches to patient stratification and improved patient care. Here we will discuss recent progress in high-throughput laboratory methods for glycomics (i.e. the study of glycan structures) and glycoprotein quantification by methods such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We will also review the clinical utility of glycoprotein and glycan measurements in the prediction of common low-grade inflammatory disorders including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, as well as for monitoring autoimmune disease activity. PMID:27312321

  18. Bio-vaterite formation by glycoproteins from freshwater pearls.

    PubMed

    Natoli, Antonino; Wiens, Matthias; Schröder, Heinz-Christoph; Stifanic, Mauro; Batel, Renato; Soldati, Analia L; Jacob, Dorrit E; Müller, Werner E G

    2010-06-01

    A 48 kDa acidic and putative calcium-binding glycoprotein was isolated from pearls of the freshwater mussel Hyriopsis cumingii. This protein was compared with a related 46 kDa polypeptide, obtained from the nacreous shell of the same species. Separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that the difference in molecular weight is due to the higher extent of glycosylation of the 48 kDa protein existing in pearls. Evidence is presented that the sugar moieties of the protein contribute to crystal growth, starting with the nucleation step. In in vitro precipitation experiments, the 48 kDa glycoprotein of pearls directed the formation of round-shaped vaterite crystals while the 46 kDa glycoprotein of shells promoted formation of small irregular calcite particles. Furthermore, both proteins, 48 kDa/46 kDa, comprised carbonic anhydrase activity that has been implicated in CaCO(3) formation. Thus, a function of the isolated glycoproteins in biomineralization is proposed together with the mechanism by which they can stabilize different calcium carbonate polymorphs. PMID:20171896

  19. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado, W.; Horwitz, S.B.

    1987-11-03

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistant phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl/sub 2/ was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 ..mu..M cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance.

  20. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Mellado, W; Horwitz, S B

    1987-11-01

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistance phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl2 was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 microM cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by [gamma-32P]ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance. PMID:3427052

  1. Effect of glycoprotein-processing inhibitors on fucosylation of glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, P.M.; Elbein, A.D.

    1985-11-25

    Influenza viral hemagglutinin contains L-fucose linked alpha 1,6 to some of the innermost GlcNAc residues of the complex oligosaccharides. To determine what structural features of the oligosaccharide were required for fucosylation influenza virus-infected MDCK cells were incubated in the presence of various inhibitors of glycoprotein processing to stop trimming at different points. After several hours of incubation with the inhibitors, (5,6-TH)fucose and (1- UC)mannose were added to label the glycoproteins, and cells were incubated in inhibitor and isotope for about 40 h to produce mature virus. Glycopeptides were prepared from the viral and the cellular glycoproteins, and these glycopeptides were isolated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-4. The glycopeptides were then digested with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H and rechromatographed on the Bio-Gel column. In the presence of castanospermine or 2,5-dihydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine, both inhibitors of glucosidase I, most of the radioactive mannose was found in Glc3Man7-9GlcNAc structures, and these did not contain radioactive fucose. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, most of the ( UC)mannose was in a Man9GlcNAc structure which was also not fucosylated. However, in the presence of swainsonine, an inhibitor of mannosidase II, the ( UC)mannose was mostly in hybrid types of oligosaccharides, and these structures also contained radioactive fucose. Treatment of the hybrid structures with endoglucosaminidase H released the (TH)fucose as a small peptide (Fuc-GlcNAc-peptide), whereas the ( UC)mannose remained with the oligosaccharide. The data support the conclusion that the addition of fucose linked alpha 1,6 to the asparagine-linked GlcNAc is dependent upon the presence of a beta 1,2-GlcNAc residue on the alpha 1,3-mannose branch of the core structure.

  2. Functional roles of membrane glycoprotein CD36.

    PubMed

    Daviet, L; McGregor, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are mediated by a number of membrane glycoproteins. On the basis of structural homologies, several families of cell adhesion molecules (integrins, selectins, immunoglobulins, cadherins, leucine-rich glycoproteins) have been established. Since 1991, a new family of CD36-like proteins has been identified. CD36 is a cell surface glycoprotein that interacts with a large variety of ligands. CD36 has been implicated in thrombosis, vascular biology, lipid metabolism and atherogenesis. In this review, we aim to summarize our present knowledge on this important, multifunctional glycoprotein. PMID:21043590

  3. Expression of the CD68 glycoprotein in the rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Giovanna; De Pasquale, Valeria; Della Morte, Rossella; Avallone, Luigi; Costagliola, Anna; Vittoria, Alfredo; Tafuri, Simona

    2015-11-01

    The 110 kDa trans-membrane glycoprotein CD68 is highly expressed by human monocytes and tissue macrophages. However, in addition to the monocyte/macrophage system, CD68 has been also found in normal and tumor cells with no macrophagic activity such as lymphocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, small intestinal epithelial cells, and neoplastic cells of different origins. Here, for the first time we demonstrate the immunohistochemical localization of CD68 in the principal cells of the cranial and caudal segments of rat epididymis. These results were confirmed by biochemical analyses showing the expression of CD68 mRNA transcripts and the protein in the epididymis tissues. Our findings, while providing further evidence that CD68 expression is not restricted to the monocyte/macrophage system, suggest that the glycoprotein might be involved in the functions of epididymal principal cells that contribute to spermatozoa maturation process. PMID:26433032

  4. The B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2)-inhibitors, ABT-737 and ABT-263, are substrates for P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Meike; Dickens, David; Dyer, Martin J.S.; Owen, Andrew; Pirmohamed, Munir; Cohen, Gerald M.

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The BCL2-inhibitor ABT-263 is a substrate for P-glycoprotein. {yields} Apoptosis is inhibited by P-glycoprotein expression. {yields} Overexpression of P-glycoprotein may contribute to resistance to ABT-263 or ABT-737. -- Abstract: Inhibition of BCL2 proteins is one of the most promising new approaches to targeted cancer therapy resulting in the induction of apoptosis. Amongst the most specific BCL2-inhibitors identified are ABT-737 and ABT-263. However, targeted therapy is often only effective for a limited amount of time because of the occurrence of drug resistance. In this study, the interaction of BCL2-inhibitors with the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein was investigated. Using {sup 3}H labelled ABT-263, we found that cells with high P-glycoprotein activity accumulated less drug. In addition, cells with increased P-glycoprotein expression were more resistant to apoptosis induced by either ABT-737 or ABT-263. Addition of tariquidar or verapamil sensitized the cells to BCL2-inhibitor treatment, resulting in higher apoptosis. Our data suggest that the BCL2-inhibitors ABT-737 and ABT-263 are substrates for P-glycoprotein. Over-expression of P-glycoprotein may be, at least partly, responsible for resistance to these BCL2-inhibitors.

  5. UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT1) promotes substrate solubility in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Sean P.; Jaber, Nikita S.; Molinari, Maurizio; Arvan, Peter; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is error prone, and ER quality control (ERQC) processes ensure that only correctly folded proteins are exported from the ER. Glycoproteins can be retained in the ER by ERQC, and this retention contributes to multiple human diseases, termed ER storage diseases. UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT1) acts as a central component of glycoprotein ERQC, monoglucosylating deglucosylated N-glycans of incompletely folded glycoproteins and promoting subsequent reassociation with the lectin-like chaperones calreticulin and calnexin. The extent to which UGGT1 influences glycoprotein folding, however, has only been investigated for a few selected substrates. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking UGGT1 or those with UGGT1 complementation, we investigated the effect of monoglucosylation on the soluble/insoluble distribution of two misfolded α1-antitrypsin (AAT) variants responsible for AAT deficiency disease: null Hong Kong (NHK) and Z allele. Whereas substrate solubility increases directly with the number of N-linked glycosylation sites, our results indicate that additional solubility is conferred by UGGT1 enzymatic activity. Monoglucosylation-dependent solubility decreases both BiP association with NHK and unfolded protein response activation, and the solubility increase is blocked in cells deficient for calreticulin. These results suggest that UGGT1-dependent monoglucosylation of N-linked glycoproteins promotes substrate solubility in the ER. PMID:23864712

  6. Sweating the small stuff: Glycoproteins in human sweat and their unexplored potential for microbial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Robyn A; Gueniche, Audrey; Adam de Beaumais, Ségolène; Breton, Lionel; Dalko-Csiba, Maria; Packer, Nicolle H

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that secretory fluids such as tears, saliva and milk play an important role in protecting the human body from infection via a washing mechanism involving glycan-mediated adhesion of potential pathogens to secretory glycoproteins. Interaction of sweat with bacteria is well established as the cause of sweat-associated malodor. However, the role of sweat glycoproteins in microbial attachment has received little, if any, research interest in the past. In this review, we demonstrate how recent published studies involving high-throughput proteomic analysis have inadvertently, and fortuitously, exposed an abundance of glycoproteins in sweat, many of which have also been identified in other secretory fluids. We bring together research demonstrating microbial adhesion to these secretory glycoproteins in tears, saliva and milk and suggest a similar role of the sweat glycoproteins in mediating microbial attachment to sweat and/or skin. The contribution of glycan-mediated microbial adhesion to sweat glycoproteins, and the associated impact on sweat derived malodor and pathogenic skin infections are unchartered new research areas that we are beginning to explore. PMID:26582610

  7. Rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein expression levels are not critical for pathogenicity of RV.

    PubMed

    Wirblich, Christoph; Schnell, Matthias J

    2011-01-01

    Previous comparisons of different rabies virus (RV) strains suggested an inverse relationship between pathogenicity and the amount of glycoprotein produced in infected cells. In order to provide more insight into this relationship, we pursued an experimental approach that allowed us to alter the glycoprotein expression level without altering the glycoprotein sequence, thereby eliminating the contribution of amino acid changes to differences in viral virulence. To this end, we constructed an infectious clone of the highly pathogenic rabies virus strain CVS-N2c and replaced its cognate glycoprotein gene with synthetic versions in which silent mutations were introduced to replace wild-type codons with the most or least frequently used synonymous codons. A recombinant N2c variant containing the fully codon-optimized G gene and three variants carrying a partially codon-deoptimized G gene were recovered on mouse neuroblastoma cells and shown to express 2- to 3-fold more and less glycoprotein, respectively, than wild-type N2c. Pathogenicity studies in mice revealed the WT-N2c virus to be the most pathogenic strain. Variants containing partially codon-deoptimized glycoprotein genes or the codon-optimized gene were less pathogenic than WT-N2c but still caused significant mortality. We conclude that the expression level of the glycoprotein gene does have an impact on pathogenicity but is not a dominant factor that determines pathogenicity. Thus, strategies such as changes in codon usage that aim solely at altering the expression level of the glycoprotein gene do not suffice to render a pathogenic rabies virus apathogenic and are not a viable and safe approach for attenuation of a pathogenic strain. PMID:21068252

  8. Rabies Virus (RV) Glycoprotein Expression Levels Are Not Critical for Pathogenicity of RV▿

    PubMed Central

    Wirblich, Christoph; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2011-01-01

    Previous comparisons of different rabies virus (RV) strains suggested an inverse relationship between pathogenicity and the amount of glycoprotein produced in infected cells. In order to provide more insight into this relationship, we pursued an experimental approach that allowed us to alter the glycoprotein expression level without altering the glycoprotein sequence, thereby eliminating the contribution of amino acid changes to differences in viral virulence. To this end, we constructed an infectious clone of the highly pathogenic rabies virus strain CVS-N2c and replaced its cognate glycoprotein gene with synthetic versions in which silent mutations were introduced to replace wild-type codons with the most or least frequently used synonymous codons. A recombinant N2c variant containing the fully codon-optimized G gene and three variants carrying a partially codon-deoptimized G gene were recovered on mouse neuroblastoma cells and shown to express 2- to 3-fold more and less glycoprotein, respectively, than wild-type N2c. Pathogenicity studies in mice revealed the WT-N2c virus to be the most pathogenic strain. Variants containing partially codon-deoptimized glycoprotein genes or the codon-optimized gene were less pathogenic than WT-N2c but still caused significant mortality. We conclude that the expression level of the glycoprotein gene does have an impact on pathogenicity but is not a dominant factor that determines pathogenicity. Thus, strategies such as changes in codon usage that aim solely at altering the expression level of the glycoprotein gene do not suffice to render a pathogenic rabies virus apathogenic and are not a viable and safe approach for attenuation of a pathogenic strain. PMID:21068252

  9. Development of indole compounds as small molecule fusion inhibitors targeting HIV-1 glycoprotein-41

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guangyan; Wu, Dong; Snyder, Beth; Ptak, Roger G.; Kaur, Harmeet; Gochin, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Non-peptide inhibition of fusion remains an important goal in anti-HIV research, due to its potential for low cost prophylaxis or prevention of cell–cell transmission of the virus. We report here on a series of indole compounds that have been identified as fusion inhibitors of gp41 through a structure-based drug design approach. Experimental binding affinities of the compounds for the hydrophobic pocket were strongly correlated to fusion inhibitory data (R2 = 0.91), and corresponding inhibition of viral replication confirmed the hydrophobic pocket as a valid target for low molecular weight fusion inhibitors. The most active compound bound to the hydrophobic pocket and inhibited cell-cell fusion and viral replication at sub-µM levels. A common binding mode for the inhibitors in this series was established by carrying out docking studies using structures of gp41 in the Protein Data Bank. The molecules were flexible enough to conform to the contours of the pocket, and the most active compound was able to adopt a structure mimicking the hydrophobic contacts of the D-peptide PIE7. The results enhance our understanding of indole compounds as inhibitors of gp41. PMID:21928824

  10. Osmotic water permeability in glycoprotein containing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Neitchev, V Z; Kostadinov, A P

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of osmotic water permeability in proteoliposomes containing alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was investigated by means of stopped-flow spectrophotometry. A biphasic time-course of scattered light with time was registered. The rate constants calculated from fits to an exponential function in the first phase were proportional to the final medium osmolarity. The apparent second order rate constants Kapp (Osm-1 sec-1) were determined at different glycoprotein concentrations in the original mixture for preparation of proteoliposomes. The value of Kapp at lipid:glycoprotein weight ratio = 1 was plotted in Arrhenius coordinates. The calculated activation energy for water permeation through the lipid bilayer suggests that eventual channel mechanism may be involved due to the presence of glycoprotein molecule in the liposomes. PMID:3431542

  11. Forcible destruction of severely misfolded mammalian glycoproteins by the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ninagawa, Satoshi; Okada, Tetsuya; Sumitomo, Yoshiki; Horimoto, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Takehiro; Ishikawa, Tokiro; Takeda, Shunichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kamiya, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    Glycoproteins and non-glycoproteins possessing unfolded/misfolded parts in their luminal regions are cleared from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by ER-associated degradation (ERAD)-L with distinct mechanisms. Two-step mannose trimming from Man9GlcNAc2 is crucial in the ERAD-L of glycoproteins. We recently showed that this process is initiated by EDEM2 and completed by EDEM3/EDEM1. Here, we constructed chicken and human cells simultaneously deficient in EDEM1/2/3 and analyzed the fates of four ERAD-L substrates containing three potential N-glycosylation sites. We found that native but unstable or somewhat unfolded glycoproteins, such as ATF6α, ATF6α(C), CD3-δ–ΔTM, and EMC1, were stabilized in EDEM1/2/3 triple knockout cells. In marked contrast, degradation of severely misfolded glycoproteins, such as null Hong Kong (NHK) and deletion or insertion mutants of ATF6α(C), CD3-δ–ΔTM, and EMC1, was delayed only at early chase periods, but they were eventually degraded as in wild-type cells. Thus, higher eukaryotes are able to extract severely misfolded glycoproteins from glycoprotein ERAD and target them to the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway to maintain the homeostasis of the ER. PMID:26572623

  12. Requirements for Cell Rounding and Surface Protein Down-Regulation by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Francica, Joseph R.; Matukonis, Meghan K.; Bates, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Ebola virus causes an acute hemorrhagic fever that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The viral glycoprotein is thought to contribute to pathogenesis, though precise mechanisms are unknown. Cellular pathogenesis can be modeled in vitro by expression of the Ebola viral glycoprotein (GP) in cells, which causes dramatic morphological changes, including cell rounding and surface protein down-regulation. These effects are known to be dependent on the presence of a highly glycosylated region of the glycoprotein, the mucin domain. Here we show that the mucin domain from the highly pathogenic Zaire subtype of Ebola virus is sufficient to cause characteristic cytopathology when expressed in the context of a foreign glycoprotein. Similarly to full length Ebola GP, expression of the mucin domain causes rounding, detachment from the extracellular matrix, and the down-regulation of cell surface levels of β1 integrin and major histocompatibility complex class 1. These effects were not seen when the mucin domain was expressed in the context of a glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored isoform of the foreign glycoprotein. In contrast to earlier analysis of full length Ebola glycoproteins, chimeras carrying the mucin domains from the Zaire and Reston strains appear to cause similar levels of down-modulation and cell detachment. Cytopathology associated with Ebola glycoprotein expression does not occur when GP expression is restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast to a previously published report, our results demonstrate that GP-induced surface protein down-regulation is not mediated through a dynamin-dependent pathway. Overall, these results support a model in which the mucin domain of Ebola GP acts at the cell surface to induce protein down modulation and cytopathic effects. PMID:19013626

  13. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers. PMID:26330015

  14. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers. PMID:26330015

  15. Uncleaved prefusion-optimized gp140 trimers derived from analysis of HIV-1 envelope metastability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Leopold; He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Vora, Nemil; Morris, Charles D.; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    The trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for host immune recognition and neutralization. Despite advances in trimer design, the roots of Env trimer metastability remain elusive. Here we investigate the contribution of two Env regions to metastability. First, we computationally redesign a largely disordered bend in heptad region 1 (HR1) of SOSIP trimers that connects the long, central HR1 helix to the fusion peptide, substantially improving the yield of soluble, well-folded trimers. Structural and antigenic analyses of two distinct HR1 redesigns confirm that redesigned Env closely mimics the native, prefusion trimer with a more stable gp41. Next, we replace the cleavage site between gp120 and gp41 with various linkers in the context of an HR1 redesign. Electron microscopy reveals a potential fusion intermediate state for uncleaved trimers containing short but not long linkers. Together, these results outline a general approach for stabilization of Env trimers from diverse HIV-1 strains.

  16. Uncleaved prefusion-optimized gp140 trimers derived from analysis of HIV-1 envelope metastability

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Leopold; He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Vora, Nemil; Morris, Charles D.; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for host immune recognition and neutralization. Despite advances in trimer design, the roots of Env trimer metastability remain elusive. Here we investigate the contribution of two Env regions to metastability. First, we computationally redesign a largely disordered bend in heptad region 1 (HR1) of SOSIP trimers that connects the long, central HR1 helix to the fusion peptide, substantially improving the yield of soluble, well-folded trimers. Structural and antigenic analyses of two distinct HR1 redesigns confirm that redesigned Env closely mimics the native, prefusion trimer with a more stable gp41. Next, we replace the cleavage site between gp120 and gp41 with various linkers in the context of an HR1 redesign. Electron microscopy reveals a potential fusion intermediate state for uncleaved trimers containing short but not long linkers. Together, these results outline a general approach for stabilization of Env trimers from diverse HIV-1 strains. PMID:27349805

  17. Uncleaved prefusion-optimized gp140 trimers derived from analysis of HIV-1 envelope metastability.

    PubMed

    Kong, Leopold; He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Vora, Nemil; Morris, Charles D; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for host immune recognition and neutralization. Despite advances in trimer design, the roots of Env trimer metastability remain elusive. Here we investigate the contribution of two Env regions to metastability. First, we computationally redesign a largely disordered bend in heptad region 1 (HR1) of SOSIP trimers that connects the long, central HR1 helix to the fusion peptide, substantially improving the yield of soluble, well-folded trimers. Structural and antigenic analyses of two distinct HR1 redesigns confirm that redesigned Env closely mimics the native, prefusion trimer with a more stable gp41. Next, we replace the cleavage site between gp120 and gp41 with various linkers in the context of an HR1 redesign. Electron microscopy reveals a potential fusion intermediate state for uncleaved trimers containing short but not long linkers. Together, these results outline a general approach for stabilization of Env trimers from diverse HIV-1 strains. PMID:27349805

  18. Convallatoxin: a new P-glycoprotein substrate.

    PubMed

    Gozalpour, Elnaz; Greupink, Rick; Bilos, Albert; Verweij, Vivienne; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G M; Koenderink, Jan B

    2014-12-01

    Digitalis-like compounds (DLCs), such as digoxin and digitoxin that are derived from digitalis species, are currently used to treat heart failure and atrial fibrillation, but have a narrow therapeutic index. Drug-drug interactions at the transporter level are frequent causes of DLCs toxicity. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) is the primary transporter of digoxin and its inhibitors influence pharmacokinetics and disposition of digoxin in the human body; however, the involvement of P-gp in the disposition of other DLCs is currently unknown. In present study, the transport of fourteen DLCs by human P-gp was studied using membrane vesicles originating from human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells overexpressing P-gp. DLCs were quantified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The Lily of the Valley toxin, convallatoxin, was identified as a P-gp substrate (Km: 1.1±0.2 mM) in the vesicular assay. Transport of convallatoxin by P-gp was confirmed in rat in vivo, in which co-administration with the P-gp inhibitor elacridar, resulted in increased concentrations in brain and kidney cortex. To address the interaction of convallatoxin with P-gp on a molecular level, the effect of nine alanine mutations was compared with the substrate N-methyl quinidine (NMQ). Phe343 appeared to be more important for transport of NMQ than convallatoxin, while Val982 was particularly relevant for convallatoxin transport. We identified convallatoxin as a new P-gp substrate and recognized Val982 as an important amino acid involved in its transport. These results contribute to a better understanding of the interaction of DLCs with P-gp. PMID:25264938

  19. Glycoprotein Structural Genomics: Solving the Glycosylation Problem

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Veronica T.; Crispin, Max; Aricescu, A. Radu; Harvey, David J.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Fennelly, Janet A.; Yu, Chao; Boles, Kent S.; Evans, Edward J.; Stuart, David I.; Dwek, Raymond A.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Owens, Raymond J.; Davis, Simon J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Glycoproteins present special problems for structural genomic analysis because they often require glycosylation in order to fold correctly, whereas their chemical and conformational heterogeneity generally inhibits crystallization. We show that the “glycosylation problem” can be solved by expressing glycoproteins transiently in mammalian cells in the presence of the N-glycosylation processing inhibitors, kifunensine or swainsonine. This allows the correct folding of the glycoproteins, but leaves them sensitive to enzymes, such as endoglycosidase H, that reduce the N-glycans to single residues, enhancing crystallization. Since the scalability of transient mammalian expression is now comparable to that of bacterial systems, this approach should relieve one of the major bottlenecks in structural genomic analysis. PMID:17355862

  20. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistant associated glycoprotein (p-glycoprotein): Preparation and characterization of 7-acetyltaxol

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado, W.

    1988-01-01

    To assess the role of phosphorylation in P-glycoprotein function, phosphorylation of P-glycoprotein in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. Results obtained with cell-free membrane fractions indicate that P-glycoprotein is a substrate for a membrane-associated protein kinase A (PK-A). To assess whether P-glycoprotein was phosphorylated in vivo by PK-A, MDR cells were incubated with ({sup 32}P)Pi in the presence or absence of 100 uM 8Br-cAMP. The tryptic phosphopeptides of six P-glycoproteins from five independently derived MDR cell lines were analyzed by HPLC. A similar analysis carried out with two other P-glycoproteins (from J7.V3-1 and the lower band of J7.T1-50) demonstrated a major phosphopeptide with a retention time of 26 min. Fraction 26 was resolved as a single phosphopeptide by 2-D mapping. The phosphorylation of fraction 26 which was derived from P-glycoprotein in J7.V3-1 or the J7.T1-50 lower band was enhanced when the cells were treated with 8BrcAMP.

  1. Entrapment in anti myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Faber, Catharina G; Notermans, Nicolette C; Wokke, John H J; Franssen, Hessel

    2009-04-01

    Anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) neuropathy is a chronic disorder in which IgM antibodies react with Schwann cell glycoproteins, including MAG and peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). Nerve conduction studies show features of axon loss and predominantly distal slowing consistent with demyelination. Because a genetic loss of PMP22 function yields hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), loss of PMP22 function due to anti- MAG antibodies may result in increased sensitivity to entrapment. We investigated this by performing standardized electrophysiological studies in 16 patients with anti-MAG neuropathy and 16 disease controls with genetically confirmed HNPP. Disproportionate slowing relative to adjacent segments occurred in similar proportions of patients with anti-MAG neuropathy and HNPP, and was of the same magnitude in each group. Affected were the elbow, carpal tunnel and the wrist-hand segments of the median and ulnar nerves. However, in anti-MAG neuropathy as compared to HNPP, absolute values of distal motor latencies and conduction velocities outside entrapment sites were slower and amplitudes were lower. In conclusion, increased sensitivity for entrapment may occur in anti-MAG neuropathy and contribute to part of the nerve damage. PMID:19306083

  2. Adherence of oral streptococci to salivary glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, P A; Prakobphol, A; Lee, T; Hoover, C I; Fisher, S J

    1992-01-01

    We used an overlay method to study the ability of human salivary glycoproteins to serve as receptors for several strains of streptococci that colonize the oral cavity. Parotid and submandibular-sublingual salivas were collected as ductal secretions, separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and transferred to nitrocellulose membranes. The resulting blots were overlaid with [35S]methionine-labeled bacteria, and salivary components to which the bacteria bound were detected by autoradiography. Potential glycoprotein receptors were identified for 8 of the 16 strains tested. In three cases (Streptococcus sanguis 72-40 and 804 and Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ176), highly specific interactions with a single salivary component were detected. Removal of sialic acid residues from the low-molecular-weight salivary mucin prevented adherence of one of these strains (S. sanguis 72-40), suggesting that this saccharide either mediates binding or is a critical component of the receptor site. In the remaining five strains (Streptococcus gordonii G9B and 10558, S. sanguis 10556, and Streptococcus oralis 10557 and 72-41), interactions with multiple salivary components, including the low-molecular-weight salivary mucin, highly glycosylated proline-rich glycoproteins, and alpha-amylase, were detected. These results suggest that some oral streptococci can bind specifically to certain of the salivary glycoproteins. The interactions identified may play an important role in governing bacterial adherence and clearance within the oral cavity. Images PMID:1729194

  3. Altered intracellular pH regulation in cells with high levels of P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Gregory; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter that pumps many structurally unrelated drugs out of cells through an ATP-dependent mechanism. As a result, multidrug-resistant cells that overexpress P-glycoprotein have reduced intracellular steady-state levels of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, increased cytosolic pH has been a frequent finding in multidrug-resistant cells that express P-glycoprotein, and it has been proposed that this consequence of P-glycoprotein expression may contribute to the lower intracellular levels of chemotherapeutic agents. In these studies, we measured intracellular pH and the rate of acid extrusion in response to an acid load in two cells with very different levels of P-glycoprotein expression: V79 parental cells and LZ-8 multidrug resistant cells. Compared to the wild-type V79 cells, LZ-8 cells have a lower intracellular pH and a slower recovery of intracellular pH after an acid load. The data also show that LZ-8 cells have reduced ability to extrude acid, probably due to a decrease in Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity. The alterations in intracellular pH and acid extrusion in LZ-8 cells are reversed by 24-h exposure to the multidrug-resistance modulator verapamil. The lower intracellular pH in LZ-8 indicates that intracellular alkalinization is not necessary for multidrug resistance. The reversal by verapamil of the decreased acid-extrusion suggests that P-glycoprotein can affect other membrane transport mechanism. PMID:22003434

  4. Glycan structures contain information for the spatial arrangement of glycoproteins in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Hall, M Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A; Chen, Jian ming; Bernetski, Christopher J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2013-01-01

    Glycoconjugates at the cell surface are crucial for cells to communicate with each other and the extracellular microenvironment. While it is generally accepted that glycans are vectorial biopolymers, their information content is unclear. This report provides evidence that distinct N-glycan structures influence the spatial arrangement of two integral membrane glycoproteins, Kv3.1 and E-cadherin, at the adherent membrane which in turn alter cellular properties. Distinct N-glycan structures were generated by heterologous expression of these glycoproteins in parental and glycosylation mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. Unlike the N-linked glycans, the O-linked glycans of the mutant cell lines are similar to those of the parental cell line. Western and lectin blots of total membranes and GFP immunopurified samples, combined with glycosidase digestion reactions, were employed to verify the glycoproteins had predominantly complex, oligomannose, and bisecting type N-glycans from Pro(-)5, Lec1, and Lec10B cell lines, respectively. Based on total internal reflection fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscopy techniques, and cellular assays of live parental and glycosylation mutant CHO cells, we propose that glycoproteins with complex, oligomannose or bisecting type N-glycans relay information for localization of glycoproteins to various regions of the plasma membrane in both a glycan-specific and protein-specific manner, and furthermore cell-cell interactions are required for deciphering much of this information. These distinct spatial arrangements also impact cell adhesion and migration. Our findings provide direct evidence that N-glycan structures of glycoproteins contribute significantly to the information content of cells. PMID:24040379

  5. Immunization of Rabbits with Highly Purified, Soluble, Trimeric Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Glycoprotein Induces a Vigorous B Cell Response and Broadly Cross-Reactive Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Quinnan, Gerald V.; Onabajo, Olusegun; Zhang, Pengfei; Yan, Lianying; Mattapallil, Joseph J.; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Dong, Ming; Lu, Min; Montefiori, David; LaBranche, Celia; Broder, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we described induction of cross-reactive HIV-1 neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits using a soluble HIV-1 gp140 envelope glycoprotein (Env) in an adjuvant containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and QS21 (AS02A). Here, we compared different forms of the same HIV-1 strain R2 Env for antigenic and biophysical characteristics, and in rabbits characterized the extent of B cell induction for specific antibody expression and secretion and neutralizing responses. The forms of this Env that were produced in and purified from stably transformed 293T cells included a primarily dimeric gp140, a trimeric gp140 appended to a GCN4 trimerization domain (gp140-GCN4), gp140-GCN4 with a 15 amino acid flexible linker between the gp120 and gp41 ectodomain (gp140-GCN4-L), also trimeric, and a gp140 with the flexible linker purified from cell culture supernatants as either dimer (gp140-L(D)) or monomer (gp140-L(M)). Multimeric states of the Env proteins were assessed by native gel electrophoresis and analytical ultracentrifugation. The different forms of gp140 bound broadly cross-reactive neutralizing (BCN) human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) similarly in ELISA and immunoprecipitation assays. All Envs bound CD4i mAbs in the presence and absence of sCD4, as reported for the R2 Env. Weak neutralization of some strains of HIV-1 was seen after two additional doses in AS02A. Rabbits that were given a seventh dose of gp140-GCN4-L developed BCN responses that were weak to moderate, similar to our previous report. The specificity of these responses did not appear similar to that of any of the known BCN human mAbs. Induction of spleen B cell and plasma cells producing immunoglobulins that bound trimeric gp140-GCN4-L was vigorous, based on ELISpot and flow cytometry analyses. The results demonstrate that highly purified gp140-GCN4-L trimer in adjuvant elicits BCN responses in rabbits accompanied by vigorous B cell induction. PMID:24846288

  6. Evidence for mucin-like glycoproteins that tether sporozoites of Cryptosporidium parvum to the inner surface of the oocyst wall.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Banerjee, Sulagna; Steffen, Martin; O'Connor, Roberta M; Ward, Honorine D; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, which are spread by the fecal-oral route, have a single, multilayered wall that surrounds four sporozoites, the invasive form. The C. parvum oocyst wall is labeled by the Maclura pomifera agglutinin (MPA), which binds GalNAc, and the C. parvum wall contains at least two unique proteins (Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein 1 [COWP1] and COWP8) identified by monoclonal antibodies. C. parvum sporozoites have on their surface multiple mucin-like glycoproteins with Ser- and Thr-rich repeats (e.g., gp40 and gp900). Here we used ruthenium red staining and electron microscopy to demonstrate fibrils, which appear to attach or tether sporozoites to the inner surface of the C. parvum oocyst wall. When disconnected from the sporozoites, some of these fibrillar tethers appear to collapse into globules on the inner surface of oocyst walls. The most abundant proteins of purified oocyst walls, which are missing the tethers and outer veil, were COWP1, COWP6, and COWP8, while COWP2, COWP3, and COWP4 were present in trace amounts. In contrast, MPA affinity-purified glycoproteins from C. parvum oocysts, which are composed of walls and sporozoites, included previously identified mucin-like glycoproteins, a GalNAc-binding lectin, a Ser protease inhibitor, and several novel glycoproteins (C. parvum MPA affinity-purified glycoprotein 1 [CpMPA1] to CpMPA4). By immunoelectron microscopy (immuno-EM), we localized mucin-like glycoproteins (gp40 and gp900) to the ruthenium red-stained fibrils on the inner surface wall of oocysts, while antibodies to the O-linked GalNAc on glycoproteins were localized to the globules. These results suggest that mucin-like glycoproteins, which are associated with the sporozoite surface, may contribute to fibrils and/or globules that tether sporozoites to the inner surface of oocyst walls. PMID:19949049

  7. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. E.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  8. Human Milk Glycoproteins Protect Infants Against Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Breastfeeding protects the neonate against pathogen infection. Major mechanisms of protection include human milk glycoconjugates functioning as soluble receptor mimetics that inhibit pathogen binding to the mucosal cell surface, prebiotic stimulation of gut colonization by favorable microbiota, immunomodulation, and as a substrate for bacterial fermentation products in the gut. Human milk proteins are predominantly glycosylated, and some biological functions of these human milk glycoproteins (HMGPs) have been reported. HMGPs range in size from 14 kDa to 2,000 kDa and include mucins, secretory immunoglobulin A, bile salt-stimulated lipase, lactoferrin, butyrophilin, lactadherin, leptin, and adiponectin. This review summarizes known biological roles of HMGPs that may contribute to the ability of human milk to protect neonates from disease. PMID:23697737

  9. Platelet glycoprotein Ibα supports experimental lung metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shashank; Zuka, Masahiko; Liu, Jungling; Russell, Susan; Dent, Judith; Guerrero, José A.; Forsyth, Jane; Maruszak, Brigid; Gartner, T. Kent; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; Ware, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    The platelet paradigm in hemostasis and thrombosis involves an initiation step that depends on platelet membrane receptors binding to ligands on a damaged or inflamed vascular surface. Once bound to the surface, platelets provide a unique microenvironment supporting the accumulation of more platelets and the elaboration of a fibrin-rich network produced by coagulation factors. The platelet-specific receptor glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX, is critical in this process and initiates the formation of a platelet-rich thrombus by tethering the platelet to a thrombogenic surface. A role for platelets beyond the hemostasis/thrombosis paradigm is emerging with significant platelet contributions in both tumorigenesis and inflammation. We have established congenic (N10) mouse colonies (C57BL/6J) with dysfunctional GP Ib-IX receptors in our laboratory that allow us an opportunity to examine the relevance of platelet GP Ib-IX in syngeneic mouse models of experimental metastasis. Our results demonstrate platelet GP Ib-IX contributes to experimental metastasis because a functional absence of GP Ib-IX correlates with a 15-fold reduction in the number of lung metastatic foci using B16F10.1 melanoma cells. The results demonstrate that the extracellular domain of the α-subunit of GP Ib is the structurally relevant component of the GP Ib-IX complex contributing to metastasis. Our results support the hypothesis that platelet GP Ib-IX functions that support normal hemostasis or pathologic thrombosis also contribute to tumor malignancy. PMID:17494758

  10. HCMV Encoded Glycoprotein M (UL100) Interacts with Rab11 Effector Protein FIP4

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzaniak, Magdalena A.; Mach, Michael; Britt, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The envelope of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) consists of a large number of glycoproteins. The most abundant glycoprotein in the HCMV envelope is the glycoprotein M (UL100) which together with glycoprotein N (UL73) form the gM/gN protein complex. Using yeast two hybrid screening, we found that the gM carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic tail (gM-CT) interacts with FIP4, a Rab11-GTPase effector protein. Depletion of FIP4 expression in HCMV infected cells resulted in a decrease of infectious virus production that was also associated with an alteration of the HCMV assembly compartment (AC) phenotype. A similar phenotype was also observed in HCMV infected cells that expressed dominant negative Rab11(S25N). Recently, it has been shown that FIP4 interactions with Rab11 and additionally with Arf6/Arf5 are important for the vesicular transport of proteins in the endosomal recycling compartment (ERC) and during cytokinesis. Surprisingly, FIP4 interaction with gM-CT limited binding of FIP4 with Arf5/Arf6, however, FIP4 interaction with gM-CT did not prevent recruitment of Rab11 into the ternary complex. These data argued for a contribution of the ERC during cytoplasmic envelopment of HCMV and revealed a novel FIP4 function independent of Arf5 or Arf6 activity. PMID:19761540

  11. Association of erosive esophagitis with Helicobacter pylori eradication: a role of salivary bicarbonate and glycoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Namiot, D B; Namiot, Z; Markowski, A R; Leszczyńska, K; Bucki, R; Kemona, A; Gołebiewska, M

    2009-01-01

    In some populations, Helicobacter pylori eradication is associated with development of erosive esophagitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of salivary bicarbonate and glycoprotein secretion to the pathogenesis of erosive esophagitis developing after H. pylori eradication. Gastroscopy and saliva collection were performed at recruitment and 12 months after completion of eradication therapy. Eighty-eight patients with duodenal ulcer were recruited to the study. Erosive esophagitis was found in 13 patients (grade A, 8 patients; grade B, 4 patients; grade C, 1 patient). Among the 74 subjects who completed the study, erosive esophagitis was detected in 21 patients (grade A, 15 patients; grade B, 6 patients); they all were successfully eradicated. Bicarbonate and glycoprotein secretion was not found to differ significantly between the subjects with and without erosive esophagitis both before and 1 year after H. pylori eradication. However, it was lower in H. pylori-infected (baseline) than in H. pylori-noninfected erosive esophagitis subjects (1 year after successful eradication) (bicarbonate 2.34 [1.29-3.40)]vs. 3.64 [2.70-4.58]micromol/min and glycoprotein 0.23 [0.15-0.31]vs. 0.35 [0.28-0.43] mg/min, P= 0.04 and P= 0.04, respectively). We conclude that changes in salivary bicarbonate and glycoprotein secretion related to H. pylori eradication do not promote the development of erosive esophagitis in duodenal ulcer patients. PMID:19222537

  12. Interaction of Sindbis virus glycoproteins during morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K J; Scupham, R K; Pfeil, J A; Wan, K; Sagik, B P; Bose, H R

    1977-01-01

    In cells infected with the Sindbis temperature-sensitive mutants ts-23 and ts-10 (complementation group D), which contain a defect in the envelope glycoprotein E1, the precursor polypeptide PE2 is not cleaved to the envelope glycoprotein E2 at the nonpermissive temperature. This defect is phenotypically identical to the defect observed in the complementation group E mutant, ts-20. The lesion in ts-23 is reversible upon shift to permissive temperature, whereas that of ts-10 is not. Antiserum against whole virus, E1, or E2 also prevents the cleavage of PE2 in cells infected with wild-type Sindbis virus. Because the cleavage of PE2 is inhibited by the lesion in mutants that are genotypically distinct and by anti-E1 or -E2 serum, it appears that PE2 and E1 exist as a complex in the membrane of the infected cell. Images PMID:833949

  13. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewis(a) substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review. PMID:25324850

  14. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewisa substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review. PMID:25324850

  15. Chemical and Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Glycoproteins for Deciphering Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lai-Xi; Amin, Mohammed N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glycoproteins are an important class of biomolecules involved in a number of biological recognition processes. However, natural and recombinant glycoproteins are usually produced as mixtures of glycoforms that differ in the structures of the pendent glycans, which are difficult to separate in pure glycoforms. As a result, synthetic homogeneous glycopeptides and glycoproteins have become indispensable probes for detailed structural and functional studies. A number of elegant chemical and biological strategies have been developed for synthetic construction of tailor-made, full-size glycoproteins to address specific biological problems. In this review, we highlight recent advances in chemical and chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous glycoproteins. Selected examples are given to demonstrate the applications of tailor-made, glycan-defined glycoproteins for deciphering glycosylation functions. PMID:24439206

  16. Native functionality and therapeutic targeting of arenaviral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Crispin, Max; Zeltina, Antra; Zitzmann, Nicole; Bowden, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    Surface glycoproteins direct cellular targeting, attachment, and membrane fusion of arenaviruses and are the primary target for neutralizing antibodies. Despite significant conservation of the glycoprotein architecture across the arenavirus family, there is considerable variation in the molecular recognition mechanisms used during host cell entry. We review recent progress in dissecting these infection events and describe how arenaviral glycoproteins can be targeted by small-molecule antivirals, the natural immune response, and immunoglobulin-based therapeutics. Arenaviral glycoprotein-mediated assembly and infection pathways present numerous opportunities and challenges for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27104809

  17. Antigenic properties of a transport-competent influenza HA/HIV Env chimeric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Sun Yuliang; Lin Jianguo; Bu Zhigao; Wu Qingyang; Jiang, Shibo; Steinhauer, David A.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-15

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV Env glycoprotein contains conserved neutralizing epitopes which are not well-exposed in wild-type HIV Env proteins. To enhance the exposure of these epitopes, a chimeric protein, HA/gp41, in which the gp41 of HIV-1 89.6 envelope protein was fused to the C-terminus of the HA1 subunit of the influenza HA protein, was constructed. Characterization of protein expression showed that the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins were expressed on cell surfaces and formed trimeric oligomers, as found in the HIV Env as well as influenza HA proteins. In addition, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein expressed on the cell surface can also be cleaved into 2 subunits by trypsin treatment, similar to the influenza HA. Moreover, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein was found to maintain a pre-fusion conformation. Interestingly, the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins on cell surfaces exhibited increased reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the HIV Env gp41 subunit compared with the HIV-1 envelope protein, including the two broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine expressing the HA/gp41 chimeric protein induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 protein and these antibodies exhibit neutralizing activity against infection by an HIV SF162 pseudovirus. These results demonstrate that the construction of such chimeric proteins can provide enhanced exposure of conserved epitopes in the HIV Env gp41 and may represent a novel vaccine design strategy for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV.

  18. THE EFFECTS OF HIV INFECTION ON THE EXPRESSION OF THE DRUG EFFLUX PROTEINS P-GLYCOPROTEIN AND BREAST CANCER RESISTANCE PROTEIN IN A HUMAN INTESTINE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Kelstan; Marlin, Jerry; Taylor, Tracey AH; Fitting, Sylvia; Hauser, Kurt F.; Rice, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In HIV infection, decreased penetration of antiretroviral drugs is postulated to contribute to HIV persistence within lymphoid rich regions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, mechanistic explanations for this phenomenon remain unclear. Specifically, investigations of HIV effects on drug efflux proteins within intestinal models are minimal. Methods Using an in vitro co-culture model of the GI tract, effects of HIV infection on drug efflux proteins, P-glycoprotein and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) were evaluated. The influence of the HIV-1 protein, Tat, and oxidative stress on P-glycoprotein and BCRP also was evaluated. Key Findings P-glycoprotein expression demonstrated an HIV-induced upregulation in Caco-2 cells over time for cells grown in co-culture with resting lymphocytes. BCRP overall expression increased with HIV exposure in activated primary human lymphocytes co-cultured with Caco-2 cells. Tat treatment resulted in no significant alterations in P-glycoprotein (43% increase), BCRP expression, or oxidative stress. Conclusions HIV exposure within an in vitro intestinal model resulted in increases in, P-glycoprotein and BCRP in a cell specific manner. Additionally, observed changes were not mediated by Tat. Collectively, these results suggest that alterations in BCRP and P-glycoprotein may contribute, in part, to decreased antiretroviral concentrations within the gastrointestinal tract in HIV infection. PMID:25557407

  19. [Lactoferrin - a glycoprotein of great therapeutic potentials].

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Ryszard; Kamińska, Ewa; Michalski, Piotr; Lauterbach, Jan Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein, which is present in most biological fluids with particularly high levels in colostrum and in mammalian milk. Bovine lactoferrin is more than 70% homologous with human lactoferrin. Most of the clinical trials have used bovine lactoferrin for supplementation. This review summarizes the recent advances in explaining the mechanisms, which are responsible for the multifunctional roles of lactoferrin, and presents its potential prophylactic and therapeutic applications. On the ground of the results of preliminary clinical observations, authors suggest beneficial effect of lactoferrin supplementation on the prevalence of necrotizing enterocolitis in infants with birth weight below 1250 grams. PMID:27442696

  20. Pseudorabies Virus Glycoprotein M Inhibits Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, Barbara G.; Nixdorf, Ralf; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    A transient transfection-fusion assay was established to investigate membrane fusion mediated by pseudorabies virus (PrV) glycoproteins. Plasmids expressing PrV glycoproteins under control of the immediate-early 1 promoter-enhancer of human cytomegalovirus were transfected into rabbit kidney cells, and the extent of cell fusion was quantitated 27 to 42 h after transfection. Cotransfection of plasmids encoding PrV glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH, and gL resulted in formation of polykaryocytes, as has been shown for homologous proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) (A. Turner, B. Bruun, T. Minson, and H. Browne, J. Virol. 72:873–875, 1998). However, in contrast to HSV-1, fusion was also observed when the gD-encoding plasmid was omitted, which indicates that PrV gB, gH, and gL are sufficient to mediate fusion. Fusogenic activity was enhanced when a carboxy-terminally truncated version of gB (gB-008) lacking the C-terminal 29 amino acids was used instead of wild-type gB. With gB-008, only gH was required in addition for fusion. A very rapid and extended fusion was observed after cotransfection of plasmids encoding gB-008 and gDH, a hybrid protein consisting of the N-terminal 271 amino acids of gD fused to the 590 C-terminal amino acids of gH. This protein has been shown to substitute for gH, gD, and gL function in the respective viral mutants (B. G. Klupp and T. C. Mettenleiter, J. Virol. 73:3014–3022, 1999). Cotransfection of plasmids encoding PrV gC, gE, gI, gK, and UL20 with gB-008 and gDH had no effect on fusion. However, inclusion of a gM-expressing plasmid strongly reduced the extent of fusion. An inhibitory effect was also observed after inclusion of plasmids encoding gM homologs of equine herpesvirus 1 or infectious laryngotracheitis virus but only in conjunction with expression of the gM complex partner, the gN homolog. Inhibition by PrV gM was not limited to PrV glycoprotein-mediated fusion but also affected fusion induced by the F protein of bovine

  1. The Purification of a Blood Group A Glycoprotein: An Affinity Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estelrich, J.; Pouplana, R.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a purification process through affinity chromatography necessary to obtain specific blood group glycoproteins from erythrocytic membranes. Discusses the preparation of erythrocytic membranes, extraction of glycoprotein from membranes, affinity chromatography purification, determination of glycoproteins, and results. (CW)

  2. Properties of a glycopeptide isolated from human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein. Interaction with leucoagglutinin and anti-(human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein) antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Abbondanza, A; Franceschi, C; Licastro, F; Serafini-Cessi, F

    1980-01-01

    A sialylated glycopeptide isolated after Pronase digestion of human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein behaves as a powerful monovalent hapten in the precipitin reaction between human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein and leucoagglutinin, but fails to inhibit the interaction of the glycoprotein with rabbit anti-(human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein) antibodies. The glycopeptide is much less active than the intact glycoprotein as an inhibitor of lymphocyte transformation induced by leucoagglutinin. PMID:6967312

  3. Annotating Human P-Glycoprotein Bioassay Data

    PubMed Central

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Pinto, Marta; Vasanthanathan, Poongavanam; Williams, Antony J; Balderud, Linda Zander; Engkvist, Ola; Chichester, Christine; Hersey, Anne; Overington, John P; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Huge amounts of small compound bioactivity data have been entering the public domain as a consequence of open innovation initiatives. It is now the time to carefully analyse existing bioassay data and give it a systematic structure. Our study aims to annotate prominent in vitro assays used for the determination of bioactivities of human P-glycoprotein inhibitors and substrates as they are represented in the ChEMBL and TP-search open source databases. Furthermore, the ability of data, determined in different assays, to be combined with each other is explored. As a result of this study, it is suggested that for inhibitors of human P-glycoprotein it is possible to combine data coming from the same assay type, if the cell lines used are also identical and the fluorescent or radiolabeled substrate have overlapping binding sites. In addition, it demonstrates that there is a need for larger chemical diverse datasets that have been measured in a panel of different assays. This would certainly alleviate the search for other inter-correlations between bioactivity data yielded by different assay setups. PMID:23293680

  4. Enhanced detection of glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Marshall, S; Cabrera, M; Horvat, A

    1988-05-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method to enhance detection of glycoproteins resolved by either one- or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is described. The method is a modification of the procedure described by D. Fargeaud et al. (D. Fargeaud, J. C. Benoit, F. Kato, and G. Chappuis (1984) Arch. Virol. 80, 69-82) that uses concanavalin A conjugated with fluorescein isothyocyanate to detect the carbohydrate moiety of glycoproteins. Briefly, the electrophoresed gel is exposed to the fluorescent lectin, thoroughly washed, and sequentially transferred to 50% methanol in deionized water and to absolute methanol. The result is an abrupt dehydration of the gel which turns evenly white and stiff. At least a twofold enhancement of fluorescence is obtained as detected by exposing the treated gel to an appropriate uv source. The sensitivity of the procedure allows us to detect purified immunoglobulin molecules by their carbohydrate content in the range of 0.2 microgram of total protein. The specificity of the detection is demonstrated by a comparison with the corresponding polypeptide profile obtained by silver nitrate staining of the gel. PMID:3394948

  5. Podoplanin - a small glycoprotein with many faces.

    PubMed

    Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr; Suchanski, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin is a small membrane glycoprotein with a large number of O-glycoside chains and therefore it belongs to mucin-type proteins. It can be found on the surface of many types of normal cells originating from various germ layers. It is present primarily on the endothelium of lymphatic vessels, type I pneumocytes and glomerular podocytes. Increased levels of podoplanin or its neo-expression have been found in numerous types of human carcinomas, but it is especially common in squamous cell carcinomas, such as cervical, larynx, oral cavity, skin and lung cancer. This small sialomucin is also seen on the surface of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in lung adenocarcinomas, as well as in breast and pancreatic tumors. In most cancers, a high level of podoplanin expression, both in cancer cells, as well as in CAFs, is correlated with an increased incidence of metastasis to lymph nodes and shorter survival time of patients. Little is known about the biological role of podoplanin, however research carried out on mice with a knock-out gene of this glycoprotein shows that the presence of podoplanin determines normal development of lungs, the lymphatic system and heart. Podoplanin on cancer cells and CAFs seems to play an important role in the development and progression of various cancers. However, its role in these processes is both unclear and controversial. In this review, the role of podoplanin in both physiological processes and carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:27186410

  6. Podoplanin - a small glycoprotein with many faces

    PubMed Central

    Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr; Suchanski, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin is a small membrane glycoprotein with a large number of O-glycoside chains and therefore it belongs to mucin-type proteins. It can be found on the surface of many types of normal cells originating from various germ layers. It is present primarily on the endothelium of lymphatic vessels, type I pneumocytes and glomerular podocytes. Increased levels of podoplanin or its neo-expression have been found in numerous types of human carcinomas, but it is especially common in squamous cell carcinomas, such as cervical, larynx, oral cavity, skin and lung cancer. This small sialomucin is also seen on the surface of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in lung adenocarcinomas, as well as in breast and pancreatic tumors. In most cancers, a high level of podoplanin expression, both in cancer cells, as well as in CAFs, is correlated with an increased incidence of metastasis to lymph nodes and shorter survival time of patients. Little is known about the biological role of podoplanin, however research carried out on mice with a knock-out gene of this glycoprotein shows that the presence of podoplanin determines normal development of lungs, the lymphatic system and heart. Podoplanin on cancer cells and CAFs seems to play an important role in the development and progression of various cancers. However, its role in these processes is both unclear and controversial. In this review, the role of podoplanin in both physiological processes and carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:27186410

  7. Glycosylation modulates arenavirus glycoprotein expression and function

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, Cyrille J. Capul, Althea A. Lauron, Elvin J. Bederka, Lydia H. Knopp, Kristeene A. Buchmeier, Michael J.

    2011-01-20

    The glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) contains nine potential N-linked glycosylation sites. We investigated the function of these N-glycosylations by using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. All the available sites were occupied on GP1 and two of three on GP2. N-linked glycan mutations at positions 87 and 97 on GP1 resulted in reduction of expression and absence of cleavage and were necessary for downstream functions, as confirmed by the loss of GP-mediated fusion activity with T87A and S97A mutants. In contrast, T234A and E379N/A381T mutants impaired GP-mediated cell fusion without altered expression or processing. Infectivity via virus-like particles required glycans and a cleaved glycoprotein. Glycosylation at the first site within GP2, not normally utilized by LCMV, exhibited increased VLP infectivity. We also confirmed the role of the N-linked glycan at position 173 in the masking of the neutralizing epitope GP-1D. Taken together, our results indicated a strong relationship between fusion and infectivity.

  8. Ammonia transport in the kidney by Rhesus glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Verlander, Jill W.

    2014-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism is a fundamental element of acid-base homeostasis, comprising a major component of both basal and physiologically altered renal net acid excretion. Over the past several years, a fundamental change in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal epithelial cell ammonia transport has occurred, replacing the previous model which was based upon diffusion equilibrium for NH3 and trapping of NH4+ with a new model in which specific and regulated transport of both NH3 and NH4+ across renal epithelial cell membranes via specific membrane proteins is required for normal ammonia metabolism. A major advance has been the recognition that members of a recently recognized transporter family, the Rhesus glycoprotein family, mediate critical roles in renal and extrarenal ammonia transport. The erythroid-specific Rhesus glycoprotein, Rh A Glycoprotein (Rhag), was the first Rhesus glycoprotein recognized as an ammonia-specific transporter. Subsequently, the nonerythroid Rh glycoproteins, Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), were cloned and identified as ammonia transporters. They are expressed in specific cell populations and membrane domains in distal renal epithelial cells, where they facilitate ammonia secretion. In this review, we discuss the distribution of Rhbg and Rhcg in the kidney, the regulation of their expression and activity in physiological disturbances, the effects of genetic deletion on renal ammonia metabolism, and the molecular mechanisms of Rh glycoprotein-mediated ammonia transport. PMID:24647713

  9. Role of envelope glycoproteins in intracellular virus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The possible role viral glycoproteins in intracellular maturation was studied by using two different viruses, avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a coronavirus, and Punta Toro virus (PTV), a bunyavirus. Using the antibiotic tunicamycin, which inhibits glycosylation of N-linked glycoproteins, it was shown that coronavirus particles are formed in the absence of glycosylation. Analysis of the protein composition of these particles indicated that they contain an unglycosylated form of the membrane-associated E1 glycoprotein but lack the E2 spike glycoprotein. A cDNA clone derived from the PTV M RNA genome segment, which encodes the G1 and G2 glycoproteins, was cloned into vaccinia virus. Studies by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the glycoproteins synthesized from this recombinant were found to accumulate intracellularly at the Golgi complex, where virus budding usually takes place. Surface immunoprecipitation and {sup 125}I-protein A binding assays also demonstrated that a majority of the glycoproteins are retained intracellularly and are not transported to the cellular surface. The sequences which encode the G1 and G2 glycoproteins were independently cloned into vaccinia virus as well.

  10. Glycoprotein synthesis in the Golgi apparatus of spermatids during spermiogenesis of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Clermont, Y.; Tang, X.M.

    1985-09-01

    During steps 1-7 of spermiogenesis the Golgi apparatus contributes to the formation of the acrosomic system which develops at the surface of the nucleus. Later, in step 8, the Golgi apparatus detaches from the acrosome and remains suspended in the elongated cytoplasm until it degenerates during step 16. Using /sup 3/H-fucose as a tracer and the radioautographic technique, we observed that the Golgi apparatus incorporates the tracer and delivers the labeled glycoproteins to the developing acrosomic system during steps 1-7 of spermiogenesis, to multivesicular bodies during steps 1-9, and to the remaining cytoplasm and plasma membrane during steps 1-15. Throughout these steps of spermiogenesis the Golgi apparatus does not show major changes in structure; it is composed of a cortex made up of connected stacks of saccules and a medulla showing a loose aggregate of vesicular profiles. Glycoprotein synthesis in this Golgi apparatus, before and after it contributes lysosomal glycoproteins to the growing acrosomic system, was quantitatively assessed in electron microscope EM radioautographs of tissue sections from animals sacrificed at 1, 4, 8, and 24 h of 3H-fucose injection. The incorporation of the labeled sugar was found to remain quantitatively similar during steps 1-15 of spermiogenesis, and therefore, no shift in glycoprotein synthesis took place following separation of the Golgi apparatus from the acrosomic system. Throughout these steps, fucose molecules are first incorporated in the cortex of the organelle and subsequently transported to the medulla, where they temporarily accumulate before being delivered, depending on the step of spermiogenesis, to the acrosomic system, to the multivesicular bodies, and also, presumably, to the plasma membrane.

  11. Solubilization of glycoproteins of envelope viruses by detergents

    SciTech Connect

    Berezin, V.E.; Zaides, V.M.; Artamsnov, A.F.; Isaeva, E.S.; Zhdanov, V.M.

    1986-11-20

    The action of a number of known ionic and nonionic detergents, as well as the new nonionic detergent MESK, on envelope viruses was investigated. It was shown that the nonionic detergents MESK, Triton X-100, and octyl-..beta..-D-glucopyranoside selectively solubilize the outer glycoproteins of the virus particles. The nonionic detergent MESK has the mildest action. Using MESK, purified glycoproteins of influenza, parainfluenza, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, rabies, and herpes viruses were obtained. The procedure for obtaining glycoproteins includes incubation of the virus suspension with the detergent MESK, removal of subvirus structures by centrifuging, and purification of glycoproteins from detergents by dialysis. Isolated glycoproteins retain a native structure and biological activity and possess high immunogenicity. The detergent MESK is promising for laboratory tests and with respect to the production of subunit vaccines.

  12. Aberrant expression of a chemokinetic glycoprotein in psoriatic skin.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, S; Schmalsteig, F C; Brysk, M M; Hendrick, S J; Solomon, A R

    1987-05-01

    Clinically involved and uninvolved skin samples of 6 psoriatic patients, 4 samples each of normal skin specimens, basal cell carcinoma and keratoacanthoma were studied by an indirect immunofluorescence technique. The monospecific antibody used in this study was directed against a 30 kD glycoprotein, normally expressed by the terminally differentiated corneocytes. Functional characterization of this glycoprotein was evaluated by neutrophil cell movement assays. The involved and uninvolved skin of psoriatic patients expressed the 30 kD glycoprotein not only in the stratum corneum but in all the viable epidermal layers as well. Functional studies revealed this glycoprotein to be a potent chemokinetic molecule. These results suggest that the 30 kD glycoprotein is an intrinsic chemokinetic molecule of the terminally differentiated corneocytes, and its precocious and aberrant expression in psoriatic epidermis is potentially responsible for some of the pathophysiologic aspects of psoriasis. PMID:3302266

  13. Properties of odour-binding glycoproteins from rat olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fesenko, E E; Novoselov, V I; Bystrova, M F

    1988-01-22

    The specific membrane glycoproteins with high affinity for camphor and decanal were isolated from rat olfactory epithelium. Antibodies to these glycoproteins inhibited both the electroolfactogram and the binding of odorants. The enzyme immunoassay has shown these glycoproteins to be present in the olfactory epithelium of rat, mouse, guinea-pig and hamster but not in that of frog and carp. The molecular mass of the odour-binding glycoproteins from rat olfactory epithelium solubilized by Triton X-100 was approx. 140 kDa. They consisted of two subunits (88 and 55 kDa). The 88 kDa subunit was capable of binding odorants. The data obtained suggest that the glycoproteins isolated have some properties that make them plausible candidates for olfactory receptor molecules. PMID:3337807

  14. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics of fungal wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qing Yuan; de Groot, Piet W J; de Koster, Chris G; Klis, Frans M

    2008-01-01

    The manifold functions of fungal wall glycoproteins include maintenance of cell wall integrity, homotypic and heterotypic adhesion, biofilm formation, acquisition of iron and sterols, protein degradation and coping with oxidative stress. Transcriptome studies indicate that the expression levels of most cell wall glycoproteins can vary widely and are tightly controlled. However, owing to their complex and variable glycosylation, fungal wall glycoproteins are difficult to analyze using traditional proteomics approaches. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have enabled rapid and sensitive identification and quantitation of fungal wall glycoproteins; this will be particularly useful for studying the dynamics of the subproteome of fungal wall glycoproteins, and for the development of novel vaccines and diagnostic tools. PMID:18096391

  15. P-glycoprotein in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    García-Carrasco, M; Mendoza-Pinto, C; Macias Díaz, S; Vera-Recabarren, M; Vázquez de Lara, L; Méndez Martínez, S; Soto-Santillán, P; González-Ramírez, R; Ruiz-Arguelles, A

    2015-07-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a transmembrane protein of 170 kD encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR-1) gene, localized on chromosome 7. More than 50 polymorphisms of the MDR-1 gene have been described; a subset of these has been shown to play a pathophysiological role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease, femoral head osteonecrosis induced by steroids, lung cancer and renal epithelial tumors. Polymorphisms that have a protective effect on the development of conditions such as Parkinson disease have also been identified. P-glycoprotein belongs to the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter superfamily and its structure comprises a chain of approximately 1280 aminoacid residues with an N-C terminal structure, arranged as 2 homologous halves, each of which has 6 transmembrane segments, with a total of 12 segments with 2 cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains. Many cytokines like interleukin 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha increase Pgp expression and activity. Pgp functions as an efflux pump for a variety of toxins in order to protect particular organs and tissues as the central nervous system. Pgp transports a variety of substrates including glucocorticoids while other drugs such as tacrolimus and cyclosporine A act as modulators of this protein. The most widely used method to measure Pgp activity is flow cytometry using naturally fluorescent substrates such as anthracyclines or rhodamine 123. The study of drug resistance and its association to Pgp began with the study of resistance to chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer and antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus; however, the role of Pgp in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis has been a focus of study lately and has emerged as an important mechanism by which treatment failure occurs. The present review analyzes the role of Pgp in these autoimmune diseases. PMID:25712147

  16. The N-glycan Glycoprotein Deglycosylation Complex (Gpd) from Capnocytophaga canimorsus Deglycosylates Human IgG

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Francesco; Manfredi, Pablo; Mally, Manuela; Moes, Suzette; Jenö, Paul; Cornelis, Guy R.

    2011-01-01

    C. canimorsus 5 has the capacity to grow at the expenses of glycan moieties from host cells N-glycoproteins. Here, we show that C. canimorsus 5 also has the capacity to deglycosylate human IgG and we analyze the deglycosylation mechanism. We show that deglycosylation is achieved by a large complex spanning the outer membrane and consisting of the Gpd proteins and sialidase SiaC. GpdD, -G, -E and -F are surface-exposed outer membrane lipoproteins. GpdDEF could contribute to the binding of glycoproteins at the bacterial surface while GpdG is a endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase cleaving the N-linked oligosaccharide after the first N-linked GlcNAc residue. GpdC, resembling a TonB-dependent OM transporter is presumed to import the oligosaccharide into the periplasm after its cleavage from the glycoprotein. The terminal sialic acid residue of the oligosaccharide is then removed by SiaC, a periplasm-exposed lipoprotein in direct contact with GpdC. Finally, most likely degradation of the oligosaccharide proceeds sequentially from the desialylated non reducing end by the action of periplasmic exoglycosidases, including β-galactosidases, β-N-Acetylhexosaminidases and α-mannosidases. PMID:21738475

  17. Immunomodulatory Effects of Nontoxic Glycoprotein Fraction Isolated from Rice Bran.

    PubMed

    Park, Ho-Young; Yu, A-Reum; Hong, Hee-Do; Kim, Ha Hyung; Lee, Kwang-Won; Choi, Hee-Don

    2016-05-01

    Rice bran, a by-product of brown rice milling, is a rich source of dietary fiber and protein, and its usage as a functional food is expected to increase. In this study, immunomodulatory effects of glycoprotein obtained from rice bran were studied in normal mice and mouse models of cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression. We prepared glycoprotein from rice bran by using ammonium precipitation and anion chromatography techniques. Different doses of glycoprotein from rice bran (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) were administered orally for 28 days. On day 21, cyclophosphamide at a dose of 100 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally. Glycoprotein from rice bran showed a significant dose-dependent restoration of the spleen index and white blood cell count in the immunocompromised mice. Glycoprotein from rice bran affected the immunomodulatory function by inducing the proliferation of splenic lymphocytes, which produce potential T and B cells. Moreover, it prevented cyclophosphamide-induced damage of Th1-type immunomodulatory function through enhanced secretion of Th1-type cytokines (interferon-γ and interleukin-12). These results indicate that glycoprotein from rice bran significantly recovered cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression. Based on these data, it was concluded that glycoprotein from rice bran is a potent immunomodulator and can be developed to recover the immunity of immunocompromised individuals. PMID:26891000

  18. N-Glycoproteomics of Human Seminal Plasma Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, Mayank; Joenväärä, Sakari; Tomar, Anil Kumar; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita; Renkonen, Risto

    2016-03-01

    Seminal plasma aids sperm by inhibiting premature capacitation, helping in the intracervical transport and formation of an oviductal sperm reservoir, all of which appear to be important in the fertilization process. Epitopes such as Lewis x and y are known to be present on seminal plasma glycoproteins, which can modulate the maternal immune response. It is suggested by multiple studies that seminal plasma glycoproteins play, largely undiscovered, important roles in the process of fertilization. We have devised a strategy to analyze glycopeptides from a complex, unknown mixture of protease-digested proteins. This analysis provides identification of the glycoproteins, glycosylation sites, glycan compositions, and proposed structures from the original sample. This strategy has been applied to human seminal plasma total glycoproteins. We have elucidated glycan compositions and proposed structures for 243 glycopeptides belonging to 73 N-glycosylation sites on 50 glycoproteins. The majority of the proposed glycan structures were complex type (83%) followed by high-mannose (10%) and then hybrid (7%). Most of the glycoproteins were either sialylated, fucosylated, or both. Many Lewis x/a and y/b epitopes bearing glycans were found, suggesting immune-modulating epitopes on multiple seminal plasma glycoproteins. The study also shows that large scale N-glycosylation mapping is achievable with current techniques and the depth of the analysis is roughly proportional to the prefractionation and complexity of the sample. PMID:26791533

  19. The effect of ginger extract on glycoproteins of Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Zahra; Nassir-Ud-Din; Kohan, Haleemeh Kabini; Kadivar, Mehdi; Kalyee, Zahra; Rad, Behzad Laame; Iravani, Ayda; Rahimi, Nourooz Ali; Wahabi, Farideh; Sadeghi, Sedigheh; Pourfallah, Fatemeh; Arjmand, Mohammad

    2014-01-15

    Protein glycosylation is associated with the development and progression of specific diseases, including cancers. The ginger rhizome is known to have anti-cancer and anti-fungal properties. This investigation was carried out to study the effect of ginger on glycoproteins of Raji cells. A 10% yield of ginger extract was mixed with 0.01% DMSO and added to 6 x 10(4) Raji cells at different concentrations for 24, 48 and 72 h at 37 degrees C. Their half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined and analyzed statistically using Graphpad prism software. Cell extracts were prepared and their glycoproteins purified using lectin-affinity chromatography (Q proteome total glycoprotein and O glycoprotein kits) and SDS PAGE was carried out. IC50 of ginger extract on Raji cells was 20 microg mL(-1) at 72 h with < 0.01 significance. Silver staining of purified glycoprotiens in Raji cells indicated the presence of O-glycans and N-glycans. N-linked mannose and N-linked sialic acids were detected with the total glycoprotein kit. O-linked galactose and O-linked sialic acids were identified with the O-glycoprotein. Ginger reduced the expression of O-linked sialic acid and also N-linked mannose on Raji cells but had no effect on other glycoproteins. Sialic acid is now well known as a cancer marker and investigations are on to use it as a drug-target in cancerous tissues. PMID:24783808

  20. Encoding Asymmetry of the N-Glycosylation Motif Facilitates Glycoprotein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan; Mohammad, Naveed; Ho, Chi Yip; Li, Carey F.; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Demetriou, Michael; Dennis, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation is found in all domains of life and has a conserved role in glycoprotein folding and stability. In animals, glycoproteins transit through the Golgi where the N-glycans are trimmed and rebuilt with sequences that bind lectins, an innovation that greatly increases structural diversity and redundancy of glycoprotein-lectin interaction at the cell surface. Here we ask whether the natural tension between increasing diversity (glycan-protein interactions) and site multiplicity (backup and status quo) might be revealed by a phylogenic examination of glycoproteins and NXS/T(X≠P) N-glycosylation sites. Site loss is more likely by mutation at Asn encoded by two adenosine (A)-rich codons, while site gain is more probable by generating Ser or Thr downstream of an existing Asn. Thus mutations produce sites at novel positions more frequently than the reversal of recently lost sites, and therefore more paths though sequence space are made available to natural selection. An intra-species comparison of secretory and cytosolic proteins revealed a departure from equilibrium in sequences one-mutation-away from NXS/T and in (A) content, indicating strong selective pressures and exploration of N-glycosylation positions during vertebrate evolution. Furthermore, secretory proteins have evolved at rates proportional to N-glycosylation site number, indicating adaptive interactions between the N-glycans and underlying protein. Given the topology of the genetic code, mutation of (A) is more often nonsynonomous, and Lys, another target of many PTMs, is also encoded by two (A)-rich codons. An examination of acetyl-Lys sites in proteins indicated similar evolutionary dynamics, consistent with asymmetry of the target and recognition portions of modified sites. Our results suggest that encoding asymmetry is an ancient mechanism of evolvability that increases diversity and experimentation with PTM site positions. Strong selective pressures on PTMs may have contributed to

  1. Synonymous codon usage pattern in glycoprotein gene of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Morla, Sudhir; Makhija, Aditi; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-06-10

    Rabies virus (RABV) is the causative agent of a fatal nervous system ailment. The disease is zoonotic and prevalent in many developing countries. The glycoprotein (G) of RABV is the major antigenic determinant of the virus and plays a pivotal role in its neurovirulence. Various aspects of 'G' protein biology have been explored, but the factors affecting the nucleotide choice and synonymous codon usage have never been reported. In the present study, we have analyzed the relative synonymous codon usage and effective number of codons (Nc) using 132 'G' protein genes of RABV. Corresponding analysis was used to calculate major trends in codon usage. The correlation between base composition and codon usage as well as the plot between Nc and GC3 suggest that mutational pressure is the major factor that influences the codon usage in the G gene of RABV. In addition, factors like aromaticity, aliphatic index and hydropathy have shown slight correlation suggesting that natural selection also contributes to the codon usage variations of the 'G' gene. In conclusion, codon usage bias in 'G' gene of RABV is mainly by mutational pressure and natural selection. PMID:26945626

  2. Understanding and exploiting 5T4 oncofoetal glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Stern, Peter L; Brazzatti, Julie; Sawan, Saladin; McGinn, Owen J

    2014-12-01

    Oncofoetal antigens are present during foetal development with generally limited expression in the adult but are upregulated in cancer. These molecules can sometimes be used to diagnose or follow treatment of tumours or as a target for different immunotherapies. The 5T4 oncofoetal glycoprotein was identified by searching for shared surface molecules of human trophoblast and cancer cells with the rationale that they may function to allow survival of the foetus as a semi-allograft in the mother or a tumour in its host, potentially influencing growth, invasion or altered immune surveillance of the host. 5T4 tumour selective expression has stimulated the development of 5T4 vaccine, 5T4 antibody targeted-superantigen and 5T4 antibody-drug therapies through preclinical and into clinical studies. It is now apparent that 5T4 expression is a marker of the use (or not) of several cellular pathways relevant to tumour growth and spread. Thus 5T4 expression is mechanistically associated with the directional movement of cells through epithelial mesenchymal transition, facilitation of CXCL12/CXCR4 chemotaxis, blocking of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin while favouring non-canonical pathway signalling. These processes are highly regulated in development and in normal adult tissues but can contribute to the spread of cancer cells. Understanding the differential impact of these pathways marked by 5T4 can potentially improve existing, or aid development of novel cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25066861

  3. Lectin binding and surface glycoprotein pattern of human macrophage populations.

    PubMed

    Kreipe, H; Radzun, H J; Schumacher, U; Parwaresch, M R

    1986-01-01

    In the present study unstimulated and stimulated human blood monocytes, untreated and phorbol ester treated U-937 cells, as well as human peritoneal and alveolar macrophages were studied with respect to their surface membrane properties. Binding of different lectins and electrophoretic patterns of tritium labeled surface glycoproteins were compared. The analysis of surface glycoproteins could be interpreted as evidence for a common origin of the analysed cell populations. Furthermore, banding patterns of glycoproteins might be useful to define certain activation states within monocyte/macrophage differentiation. In contrast, lectin binding pattern did not clearly discriminate macrophage subpopulations. PMID:3102412

  4. 21 CFR 866.5430 - Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system....5430 Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein I... the beta-2-glycoprotein I (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system....5420 Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-glycoproteins... alpha-1-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-1 group when subjected...

  6. Increase of α1-acid glycoprotein after treatment with amitriptyline

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, P.; Tinguely, D.; Schöpf, J.

    1982-01-01

    Sixteen primary depressive patients were treated for 3 weeks with amitriptyline 150 mg daily. In thirteen patients the plasma level of α1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) significantly increased after the treatment but the albumin levels did not change. PMID:7104160

  7. Detection of glycoproteins in the Acanthamoeba plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Paatero, G.I.L. ); Gahmberg, C.G. )

    1988-11-01

    In the present study the authors have shown that glycoproteins are present in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii by utilizing different radioactive labeling techniques. Plasma membrane proteins in the amoeba were iodinated by {sup 125}I-lactoperoxidase labeling and the solubilized radiolabeled glycoproteins were separated by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The periodate/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} and galactose oxidase/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} labeling techniques were used for labeling of surface carbohydrates in the amoeba. Several surface-labeled glycoproteins were observed in addition to a diffusely labeled region with M{sub r} of 55,000-75,000 seen on electrophoresis, which could represent glycolipids. The presence of glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii was confirmed by metabolic labeling with ({sup 35}S)methionine followed by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  8. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. PMID:24889823

  9. Reduction of cerebral glucose utilization by the HIV envelope glycoprotein Gp-120

    SciTech Connect

    Kimes, A.S.; London, E.D.; Szabo, G.; Raymon, L.; Tabakoff, B. )

    1991-05-01

    Gp-120 is a glycoprotein constituent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope. The effects of gp-120 on cerebral glucose utilization in rats were studied by the quantitative 2-deoxy-D-(1-14C) glucose method. Intracerebroventricular injection of gp-120 significantly reduced glucose utilization in the lateral habenula and the suprachiasmatic nucleus and decreased the global cerebral metabolic rate for glucose. The findings suggest that gp-120 and closely related peptides can alter neuronal function, thereby contributing to the sequelae of HIV infection.

  10. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc. PMID:14533798