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Sample records for gmti radar system

  1. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  2. GMTI MIMO radar

    E-print Network

    Bliss, Daniel W., Jr.

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) extensions to radar systems enable a number of advantages compared to traditional approaches. These advantages include improved angle estimation and target detection. In this paper, ...

  3. MIMO Radar Waveform Constraints for GMTI

    E-print Network

    Forsythe, Keith W.

    Ground moving-target indication (GMTI) provides both an opportunity and challenge for coherent multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar. MIMO techniques can improve a radar's angle estimation and the minimum detectable ...

  4. Performance limits for exo-clutter Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2010-09-01

    The performance of a Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. It is often difficult to 'get your arms around' the problem of ascertaining achievable performance limits, and yet those limits exist and are dictated by physics. This report identifies and explores those limits, and how they depend on hardware system parameters and environmental conditions. Ultimately, this leads to a characterization of parameters that offer optimum performance for the overall GMTI radar system. While the information herein is not new to the literature, its collection into a single report hopes to offer some value in reducing the 'seek time'.

  5. Gmti Motion Compensation

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-07-20

    Movement of a GMTI radar during a coherent processing interval over which a set of radar pulses are processed may cause defocusing of a range-Doppler map in the video signal. This problem may be compensated by varying waveform or sampling parameters of each pulse to compensate for distortions caused by variations in viewing angles from the radar to the target.

  6. SAR based adaptive GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Duc; Guo, Bin; Xu, Luzhou; Li, Jian

    2010-04-01

    We consider ground moving target indication (GMTI) and target velocity estimation based on multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. Via forming velocity versus cross-range images, we show that small moving targets can be detected even in the presence of strong stationary ground clutter. Moreover, the velocities of the moving targets can be estimated, and the misplaced moving targets can be placed back to their original locations based on the estimated velocities. Adaptive beamforming techniques, including Capon and generalizedlikelihood ratio test (GLRT), are used to form velocity versus cross-range images for each range bin of interest. The velocity estimation ambiguities caused by the multi-channel array geometry are analyzed. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of our approaches using the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) publicly-released Gotcha SAR based GMTI data set.

  7. GMTI processing using back projection.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-07-01

    Backprojection has long been applied to SAR image formation. It has equal utility in forming the range-velocity maps for Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar processing. In particular, it overcomes the problem of targets migrating through range resolution cells.

  8. Limits to Clutter Cancellation in Multi-Aperture GMTI Data

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-aperture or multi-subaperture antennas are fundamental to Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar systems in order to detect slow-moving targets with Doppler characteristics similar to clutter. Herein we examine the performance of several subaperture architectures for their clutter cancelling performance. Significantly, more antenna phase centers isn’t always better, and in fact is sometimes worse, for detecting targets.

  9. Spatial voting with data modeling for behavior based tracking and discrimination of human from fauna from GMTI radar tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a novel method of using ground track indicators in conjunction with our Spatial Voting (SV) algorithm and data fusing Data Models to distinguish target types from motion signatures alone. We simulate 3 different types of behaviors: rabbit, coyote, and human. We then apply SV to combine individual position reports obtained via radar track indicators into object tracks that are then characterized using the methods shown in this paper. The features obtained from this characterization are then used as input into a Data Model equation classifier or a look-up table classifier to label the track behavior as either rabbit, coyote, or human. Our results and methods show promise and are presented here.

  10. Clutter in the GMTI range-velocity map.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-04-01

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar maps echo data to range and range-rate, which is a function of a moving target's velocity and its position within the antenna beam footprint. Even stationary clutter will exhibit an apparent motion spectrum and can interfere with moving vehicle detections. Consequently it is very important for a radar to understand how stationary clutter maps into radar measurements of range and velocity. This mapping depends on a wide variety of factors, including details of the radar motion, orientation, and the 3-D topography of the clutter.

  11. An Approach to Ground Moving Target Indication Using Multiple Resolutions of Multilook Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    E-print Network

    Akers, Geoffrey

    2009-12-15

    Ground moving target indication (GMTI) using multiple resolutions of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to estimate the clutter scattering statistics is shown to outperform conventional sample matrix inversion space-time adaptive processing GMTI...

  12. Noncooperative rendezvous radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fire control radar system was developed, assembled, and modified. The baseline system and modified angle tracking system are described along with the performance characteristics of the baseline and modified systems. Proposed changes to provide additional techniques for radar evaluation are presented along with flight test data.

  13. Performance Analysis of a Space-Based GMTI Radar System Using Separated Spacecraft Interferometry

    E-print Network

    Troy L. Hacker, Raymond J. Sedwick, and David W. Miller May 2000 SERC #2-2000 This report is based on the unaltered thesis of Troy L. Hacker submitted to the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics in partial Interferometry by TROY L. HACKER Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics on May 24, 2000

  14. Radar Imaging Systems Joseph Charpentier

    E-print Network

    Radar Imaging Systems Joseph Charpentier Department of Computing Sciences Villanova University types of radar imaging systems; synthetic aperture radar (SAR), through-the-wall radar, and digital holographic near field radar. Each system surveyed experiments that improved the quality of the resulting

  15. GMTI Direction of Arrival Measurements from Multiple Phase Centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2015-03-01

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar attempts to detect and locate targets with unknown motion. Very slow-moving targets are difficult to locate in the presence of surrounding clutter. This necessitates multiple antenna phase centers (or equivalent) to offer independent Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements. DOA accuracy and precision generally remains dependent on target Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Clutter-toNoise Ratio (CNR), scene topography, interfering signals, and a number of antenna parameters. This is true even for adaptive techniques like Space-Time-AdaptiveProcessing (STAP) algorithms.

  16. EM-based Gaussian mixture model estimation for GMTI-based tracking using speedboat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akselrod, David; McDonald, Michael; Kirubarajan, T.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, the problem of detection, classification and tracking of highly manoeuvring boats in sea clutter is considered. The considered problem is challenging due to numerous inherent issues: abrupt direction changes, high level of false alarms, lowered detectability, group movement and re-grouping, among many others. The results of applying a proposed measurement extraction and estimation technique to a set of real data from DRDC-Ottawa trials using Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar are described. Real radar data containing a small manoeuvring boat in sea clutter is processed using Expectation Maximization (EM) Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) based estimation. A trial was undertaken to collect data against highly maneuvering speedboats in the sea. All the data were collected in the GMTI single-channel high-resolution spotlight mode. True data were collected using GPS recording equipment. Real data processing results are presented.

  17. Systems and Methods for Radar Data Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Brian (Inventor); Szeto, Roland (Inventor); Miller, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A radar information processing system is operable to process high bandwidth radar information received from a radar system into low bandwidth radar information that may be communicated to a low bandwidth connection coupled to an electronic flight bag (EFB). An exemplary embodiment receives radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth; processes the received radar information into processed radar information, the processed radar information configured for communication over a connection operable at a second bandwidth, the second bandwidth lower than the first bandwidth; and communicates the radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth.

  18. Spurious effects of analog-to-digital conversion nonlinearities on radar range-Doppler maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.; Dubbert, D. F.; Tise, B. L.

    2015-05-01

    High-performance radar operation, particularly Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar modes, are very sensitive to anomalous effects of system nonlinearities. System nonlinearities generate harmonic spurs that at best degrade, and at worst generate false target detections. One significant source of nonlinear behavior is the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). One measure of its undesired nonlinearity is its Integral Nonlinearity (INL) specification. We examine in this paper the relationship of INL to radar performance; in particular its manifestation in a range-Doppler map or image.

  19. Consistency of stochastic context-free grammars and application to stochastic parsing of GMTI tracker data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam

    2012-06-01

    Conventional trackers provide the human operator with estimated target tracks. It is desirable to make higher level inference of the target behaviour/intent (e.g., trajectory inference) in an automated manner. One such approach is to use stochastic context-free grammars and the Earley-Stoelcke parsing algorithm. The problem of inference is reformulated as one of parsing. In this paper, the consistency of stochastic context-free grammars is reviewed. Some examples illustrating the constraints on SCFGs due to consistency are presented, including a toy SCFG that has been used to successfully parse real GMTI radar data.

  20. An application of space-time adaptive processing to airborne and spaceborne monostatic and bistatic radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, Richard James

    A challenging problem faced by Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radars on both airborne and spaceborne platforms is the ability to detect slow moving targets due the presence of non-stationary and heterogeneous ground clutter returns. Space-Time Adaptive Processing techniques process both the spatial signals from an antenna array as well as radar pulses simultaneously to aid in mitigating this clutter which has an inherent Doppler shift due to radar platform motion, as well as spreading across Angle-Doppler space attributable to a variety of factors. Additional problems such as clutter aliasing, widening of the clutter notch, and range dependency add additional complexity when the radar is bistatic in nature, and vary significantly as the bistatic radar geometry changes with respect to the targeted location. The most difficult situation is that of a spaceborne radar system due to its high velocity and altitude with respect to the earth. A spaceborne system does however offer several advantages over an airborne system, such as the ability to cover wide areas and to provide access to areas denied to airborne platforms. This dissertation examines both monostatic and bistatic radar performance based upon a computer simulation developed by the author, and explores the use of both optimal STAP and reduced dimension STAP architectures to mitigate the modeled clutter returns. Factors such as broadband jamming, wind, and earth rotation are considered, along with their impact on the interference covariance matrix, constructed from sample training data. Calculation of the covariance matrix in near real time based upon extracted training data is computer processor intensive and reduced dimension STAP architectures relieve some of the computation burden. The problems resulting from extending both monostatic and bistatic radar systems to space are also simulated and studied.

  1. Goldstone solar system radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, Raymond F.

    1991-01-01

    Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) radar astronomers made use of the Very Large Array (VLA) at Socorro, NM, during February 1990, to receive radio echoes from the planet Venus. The transmitter was the 70 meter antenna at the Goldstone complex northwest of Barstow, CA. These observations contain new information about the roughness of Venus at cm to decimeter scales and are complementary to information being obtained by the Magellan spacecraft. Asteroid observations are also discussed.

  2. Goldstone solar system radar signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, R.; Satorius, E.; Sanchez, O.

    1992-01-01

    A performance analysis of the planetary radar data acquisition system is presented. These results extend previous computer simulation analysis and are facilitated by the development of a simple analytical model that predicts radar system performance over a wide range of operational parameters. The results of this study are useful to both the radar system designer and the science investigator in establishing operational radar data acquisition parameters which result in the best systems performance for a given set of input conditions.

  3. Goldstone solar system radar signal processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurgens, R. F.; Satorius, E.; Sanchez, O.

    1992-01-01

    A performance analysis of the planetary radar data acquisition system is presented. These results extend previous computer simulation analysis and are facilitated by the development of a simple analytical model that predicts radar system performance over a wide range of operational parameters. The results of this study are useful to both the radar systems designer and the science investigator in establishing operational radar data acquisition parameters which result in the best systems performance for a given set of input conditions.

  4. Obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Carlos E. (Livermore, CA); Zumstein, James E. (Livermore, CA); Chang, John T. (Danville, CA); Leach, Jr.. Richard R. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2006-12-12

    An obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system for the detection, tracking, and imaging of an individual, animal, or object comprising a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units that produce a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object, and a processing system for said set of return radar signals for detection, tracking, and imaging of the individual, animal, or object. The system provides a radar video system for detecting and tracking an individual, animal, or object by producing a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object with a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units, and processing said set of return radar signals for detecting and tracking of the individual, animal, or object.

  5. A Through-Dielectric Radar Imaging System

    E-print Network

    Charvat, Gregory L.

    Through-lossy-slab radar imaging will be shown at stand-off ranges using a low-power, ultrawideband (UWB), frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar system. FMCW is desirable for through-slab applications because ...

  6. Mars Radar Observations with the Goldstone Solar System Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Jurgens, R. F.; Larsen, K. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Slade, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) has successfully collected radar echo data from Mars over the past 30 years. As such, the GSSR has played a role as a specific mission element within Mars exploration. The older data provided local elevation information for Mars, along with radar scattering information with global resolution. Since the upgrade to the 70-m Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna at Goldstone completed in 1986, Mars data has been collected during all but the 1997 Mars opposition. Radar data, and non-imaging delay-Doppler data in particular, requires significant data processing to extract elevation, reflectivity and roughness of the reflecting surface. The spatial resolution of these experiments is typically some 20 km in longitude by some 150 km in latitude. The interpretation of these parameters while limited by the complexities of electromagnetic scattering, do provide information directly relevant to geophysical and geomorphic analyses of Mars. The usefulness of radar data for Mars exploration has been demonstrated in the past. Radar data were critical in assessing the Viking Lander 1 site as well as, more recently, the Pathfinder landing site. In general, radar data have not been available to the Mars exploration community at large. A project funded initially by the Mars Exploration Directorate Science Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and later funded by NASA's Mars Data Analysis Program has reprocessed to a common format a decade's worth of raw GSSR Mars delay-Doppler data in aid of landing site characterization for the Mars Program. These data will soon be submitted to the Planetary Data System (PDS). The radar data used were obtained between 1988 and 1995 by the GSSR, and comprise some 63 delay-Doppler radar tracks. Of these, 15 have yet to be recovered from old 9-track tapes, and some of the data may be permanently lost.

  7. Monitoring by holographic radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Crocco, Lorenzo; Affinito, Antonio; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, radar technology represents a significant opportunity to collect useful information for the monitoring and conservation of critical infrastructures. Radar systems exploit the non-invasive interaction between the matter and the electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies. Such an interaction allows obtaining images of the region under test from which one can infer the presence of potential anomalies such as deformations, cracks, water infiltrations, etc. This information turns out to be of primary importance in practical scenarios where the probed structure is in a poor state of preservation and renovation works must be planned. In this framework, the aim of this contribution is to describe the potentialities of the holographic radar Rascan 4/4000, a holographic radar developed by Remote Sensing Laboratory of Bauman Moscow State Technical University, as a non-destructive diagnostic tool capable to provide, in real-time, high resolution subsurface images of the sounded structure [1]. This radar provides holograms of hidden anomalies from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered signal and a reference signal. The performance of the holographic radar is appraised by means of several experiments. Preliminary tests concerning the imaging below the floor and inside wood structures are carried out in controlled conditions at the Electromagnetic Diagnostic Laboratory of IREA-CNR. After, with reference to bridge monitoring for security aim, the results of a measurement campaign performed on the Musmeci bridge are presented [2]. Acknowledgments This research has been performed in the framework of the "Active and Passive Microwaves for Security and Subsurface imaging (AMISS)" EU 7th Framework Marie Curie Actions IRSES project (PIRSES-GA-2010-269157). REFERENCES [1] S. Ivashov, V. Razevig, I. Vasilyev, A. Zhuravlev, T. Bechtel, L. Capineri, The holographic principle in subsurface radar technology, International Symposium to Commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the Invention of Holography, Springfield, Massachusetts USA, October 27-29, pp. 183-197, 2008. [2] I. Catapano, L. Crocco, A. F. Morabito, F. Soldovieri, "Tomographic imaging of holographic GPR data for non-invasive structural assessment: the Musmeci bridge investigation", Nondestructive testing and evaluation, vol. 27, pp. 229-237, 2012.

  8. THE DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS OF SCANNED PATTERN INTERFEROMETRIC RADAR

    E-print Network

    THE DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS OF SCANNED PATTERN INTERFEROMETRIC RADAR Karen Marais and Raymond J of Scanned Pattern Interferometric Radar by Karen Marais Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ABSTRACT A method of performing space based GMTI using radar

  9. Enhanced Weather Radar (EWxR) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronfeld, Kevin M. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    An airborne weather radar system, the Enhanced Weather Radar (EWxR), with enhanced on-board weather radar data processing was developed and tested. The system features additional weather data that is uplinked from ground-based sources, specialized data processing, and limited automatic radar control to search for hazardous weather. National Weather Service (NWS) ground-based Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) information is used by the EWxR system to augment the on-board weather radar information. The system will simultaneously display NEXRAD and on-board weather radar information in a split-view format. The on-board weather radar includes an automated or hands-free storm-finding feature that optimizes the radar returns by automatically adjusting the tilt and range settings for the current altitude above the terrain and searches for storm cells near the atmospheric 0-degree isotherm. A rule-based decision aid was developed to automatically characterize cells as hazardous, possibly-hazardous, or non-hazardous based upon attributes of that cell. Cell attributes are determined based on data from the on-board radar and from ground-based radars. A flight path impact prediction algorithm was developed to help pilots to avoid hazardous weather along their flight plan and their mission. During development the system was tested on the NASA B757 aircraft and final tests were conducted on the Rockwell Collins Sabreliner.

  10. Penn State Radar Systems: Implementation and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, J. V.; Seal, R.; Sorbello, R.; Kuyeng, K.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Software Defined Radio/Radar (SDR) platforms have become increasingly popular as researchers, hobbyists, and military seek more efficient and cost-effective means for radar construction and operation. SDR platforms, by definition, utilize a software-based interface for configuration in contrast to traditional, hard-wired platforms. In an effort to provide new and improved radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable, portable, and more cost effective. This paper will describe the design and implementation of two low-cost radar systems and their deployment in ionospheric research at both low and mid-latitudes. One radar has been installed near Penn State campus, University Park, Pennsylvania (77.97°W, 40.70°N), to make continuous meteor observations and mid-latitude plasma irregularities. The second radar is being installed in Huancayo (12.05°S, -75.33°E), Peru, which is capable of detecting E and F region plasma irregularities as well as meteor reflections. In this paper, we examine and compare the diurnal and seasonal variability of specular, non- specular, and head-echoes collected with these two new radar systems and discuss sampling biases of each meteor observation technique. We report our current efforts to validate and calibrate these radar systems with other VHF radars such as Jicamarca and SOUSY. We also present the general characteristics of continuous measurements of E-region and F-region coherent echoes using these modern radar systems and compare them with coherent radar events observed at other geographic mid-latitude radar stations.

  11. 29 CFR 1915.85 - Vessel radar and communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vessel radar and communication systems. 1915.85...Working Conditions § 1915.85 Vessel radar and communication systems. (a) The employer shall service each vessel's radar and communication systems in...

  12. 29 CFR 1915.85 - Vessel radar and communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vessel radar and communication systems. 1915.85...Working Conditions § 1915.85 Vessel radar and communication systems. (a) The employer shall service each vessel's radar and communication systems in...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.85 - Vessel radar and communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vessel radar and communication systems. 1915.85...Working Conditions § 1915.85 Vessel radar and communication systems. (a) The employer shall service each vessel's radar and communication systems in...

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AEROSPACE AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS 1 MIMO-MC Radar: A MIMO Radar Approach

    E-print Network

    Bajwa, Waheed U.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AEROSPACE AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS 1 MIMO-MC Radar: A MIMO Radar Approach Based. Petropulu, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--In a typical MIMO radar scenario, transmit nodes transmit orthogonal, leads to target detection and parameter estimation. In MIMO radars with compressive sensing (MIMO- CS

  15. Radar Studies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Irwin I.

    1996-01-01

    We aid in a study of the solar system by means of ground-based radar. We have concentrated on (1) developing the ephemerides needed to acquire radar data at Arecibo Observatory and (2) analyzing the resultant data to: test fundamental laws of gravitation; determine the size, shape, topography, and spin vectors of the targets; and study the surface properties of these objects, through their scattering law and polarization characteristics.

  16. 78 FR 68861 - Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems... and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids, mapping systems and related software by reason... products, including GPS devices, navigation and display systems, radar systems, navigational aids,...

  17. Radar Studies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaprio, Irwin I.

    1998-01-01

    We aid in study of the solar system by means of ground-based radar. We have concentrated on: (1) developing the ephemerides needed to acquire radar data at Arecibo Observatory and (2) analyzing the resultant data to: test fundamental laws of gravitation; determine the size , shape, topography, and spin vectors of the targets; and study the surface properties of these objects, through their scattering law and polarization characteristics. We are engaged in radar observations of asteroids and comets, both as systematically planned targets and as "targets of opportunity." In the course of the program, we have prepared ephemerides for about 80 asteroids and three comets, and the radar observations have been made or attempted at the Arecibo Observatory, in most cases successfully, and in some cases on more than one apparition. The results of these observations have included echo spectra for the targets and, in some cases, delay - Doppler images and measurements of the total round-trip delay to the targets. Perhaps the most dramatic of these results are the images obtained for asteroids (4179) Toutatis and 1989PB (Castalia), which were revealed to be double-lobed objects by the radar images. Besides these direct results, the radar observations have furnished information on the sizes and shapes of the targets through analysis of the Doppler width of the echoes as a function of time, and on the surface properties (such as composition, bulk density, and roughness) through analysis of the reflectivity and of the polarization state of the echoes. We have also refined the orbits of the observed asteroids as a result of the Doppler (and in some cases delay) measurements from the radar observations. Although the orbits of main-belt asteroids accessible to ground-based radar are quite well known from the available optical data, some near-Earth objects have been seen by radar very soon after their optical discovery (for example, 199OMF, just eight days after discovery). In such cases. the radar results ensure that the object in question can be anticipated and identified at the next apparition. We have also participated in radar studies of the terrestrial planets. The results of these studies have included both planetary topography profiles from the analysis of round-trip delays to points along the target Doppler equator and determinations of the target spin state. The latter is of special interest in the case of Venus, which is very close to, but not on, a multi-body spin-orbit resonance such that Venus rotates 12 times for every 8 Earth orbits and 13 Venus orbits. As a result, Venus presents nearly the same face toward Earth at each inferior conjunction. Our latest results confirm that the spin state of Venus is slightly off the resonance. The delay measurements from planetary 2 ranging have also been used in combination with other types of range data in testing general relativity with increasing accuracy. We have also been engaged in radar studies of planetary satellites. Using our ephemerides, Arecibo made radar observations of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter and of Mars' satellite Phobos during the favorable opposition seasons (1988-1992 for Jupiter and 1990 for Mars). An attempt was also made to observe Deimos, but without detecting an echo. In 1997, an attempt was made to observe Saturn's satellite Titan, using the newly upgraded Arecibo radar system for transmitting and the Goldstone radar for receiving, but no echo was detected. The study of satellites by radar is in many ways similar to that of asteroids. The results from these observations have included characterization of the surface properties from the reflectivity and polarization ratio, as well as (in the case of the large satellites of Jupiter) the variation of reflectivity with incidence angle.

  18. Urban Flood Warning Systems using Radar Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, N.; Bedient, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    There have been an increasing number of urban areas that rely on weather radars to provide accurate precipitation information for flood warning purposes. As non-structural tools, radar-based flood warning systems can provide accurate and timely warnings to the public and private entities in urban areas that are prone to flash floods. The wider spatial and temporal coverage from radar increases flood warning lead-time when compared to rain and stream gages alone. The Third Generation Rice and Texas Medical Center (TMC) Flood Alert System (FAS3) has been delivering warning information with 2 to 3 hours of lead time and a R2 value of 93% to facility personnel in a readily understood format for more than 50 events in the past 15 years. The current FAS utilizes NEXRAD Level II radar rainfall data coupled with a real-time hydrologic model (RTHEC-1) to deliver warning information. The system has a user-friendly dashboard to provide rainfall maps, Google Maps based inundation maps, hydrologic predictions, and real-time monitoring at the bayou. This paper will evaluate its reliable performance during the recent events occurring in 2012 and 2013 and the development of a similar radar-based flood warning system for the City of Sugar Land, Texas. Having a significant role in the communication of flood information, FAS marks an important step towards the establishment of an operational and reliable flood warning system for flood-prone urban areas.

  19. The instrumental principles of MST radars and incoherent scatter radars and the configuration of radar system hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettger, Juergen

    1989-01-01

    The principle of pulse modulation used in the case of coherent scatter radars (MST radars) is discussed. Coherent detection and the corresponding system configuration is delineated. Antenna requirements and design are outlined and the phase-coherent transmitter/receiver system is described. Transmit/receive duplexers, transmitters, receivers, and quadrature detectors are explained. The radar controller, integrator, decoder and correlator design as well as the data transfer and the control and monitoring by the host computer are delineated. Typical operation parameters of some well-known radars are summarized.

  20. 29 CFR 1915.85 - Vessel radar and communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Working Conditions § 1915.85 Vessel radar and communication systems. (a) The employer shall service each vessel's radar and communication systems in accordance with 29 CFR 1915.89, Control of Hazardous Energy... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vessel radar and communication systems. 1915.85...

  1. 29 CFR 1915.85 - Vessel radar and communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Working Conditions § 1915.85 Vessel radar and communication systems. (a) The employer shall service each vessel's radar and communication systems in accordance with 29 CFR 1915.89, Control of Hazardous Energy... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vessel radar and communication systems. 1915.85...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.85 - Vessel radar and communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Working Conditions § 1915.85 Vessel radar and communication systems. (a) The employer shall service each vessel's radar and communication systems in accordance with 29 CFR 1915.89, Control of Hazardous Energy... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vessel radar and communication systems. 1915.85...

  3. Earth Penetration Radar Imaging System (EPRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-08-01

    The Earth Penetration Radar Imaging System (EPRIS) has been developed and has the capability to detect and locate buried mines, buried ordnance delivered by precision munitions, buried drums, buried waste/contaminants, and geological structures/features. The detected objects or features are mapped in three dimensions with high resolution. This information is then available for integration into a site characterization study. The EPRIS is a significant improvement in non-intrusive sensing and imaging capability. This phase of the EPRIS development has been extremely successful. Coleman Research Corporation (CRC) has implemented significant advances in technology into the EPRIS equipment. The frequency stepped radar sensor design has a very wide dynamic signal range and improved sensitivity over currently available equipment. The two- and three-dimensional image processing algorithms allow high-resolution placement and sizing of buried objects and/or features. The discussions related to the analog-to-digital converter and the spiral antenna, define the source of the dynamic range capability realized by EPRIS. The processing for this new radar makes use of unique synthetic aperature imaging (SAI) algorithms developed by CRC for frequency stepped radar systems. The SAI algorithms are necessary to obtain excellent spatial resolution on objects buried up to seven meters. The sensor signal processing represents a significant improvement in imaging systems. The CRC test facility permitted tests on objects buried up to 2.44 meters.

  4. Goldstone Solar System Radar Waveform Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    Due to distances and relative motions among the transmitter, target object, and receiver, the time-base between any transmitted and received signal will undergo distortion. Pre-distortion of the transmitted signal to compensate for this time-base distortion allows reception of an undistorted signal. In most radar applications, an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) would be used to store the pre-calculated waveform and then play back this waveform during transmission. The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), however, has transmission durations that exceed the available memory storage of such a device. A waveform generator capable of real-time pre-distortion of a radar waveform to a given time-base distortion function is needed. To pre-distort the transmitted signal, both the baseband radar waveform and the RF carrier must be modified. In the GSSR, this occurs at the up-conversion mixing stage to an intermediate frequency (IF). A programmable oscillator (PO) is used to generate the IF along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the RF carrier. This serves as the IF input to the waveform generator where it is mixed with a baseband radar waveform whose time-base has been distorted to match the given time-base distortion function producing the modulated IF output. An error control feedback loop is used to precisely control the time-base distortion of the baseband waveform, allowing its real-time generation. The waveform generator produces IF modulated radar waveforms whose time-base has been pre-distorted to match a given arbitrary function. The following waveforms are supported: continuous wave (CW), frequency hopped (FH), binary phase code (BPC), and linear frequency modulation (LFM). The waveform generator takes as input an IF with a time varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier. The waveform generator supports interconnection with deep-space network (DSN) timing and frequency standards, and is controlled through a 1 Gb/s Ethernet UDP/IP interface. This real-time generation of a timebase distorted radar waveform for continuous transmission in a planetary radar is a unique capability.

  5. Analysis of a combined FMCW pulse radar system for Side Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, R.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical and practical feasibility study for the development of an FMCW radar, combining features of FMCW and pulse radars was performed for application as SLAR for Earth observation. Design approaches were compared. Simulations with a network analyzer and an intermediate frequency system are presented. The simulation results are similar to a FMCW processed radar signal. A method to simulate the radar system at microwave frequencies is discussed. A block diagram of the final system is given. Noise behavior and transmitter power are discussed.

  6. Analysis of Radar Detection Probabilities in Time Division Duplexed Systems

    E-print Network

    Duffy, Ken

    Analysis of Radar Detection Probabilities in Time Division Duplexed Systems Brad W. Zarikoff broadband radios share spectrum with radar users, and is implemented by the basestation or basestation/subscriber combination. This work looks at the likelihood that a radar pulse burst can be detected in a time

  7. The 94 GHz MMW imaging radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alon, Yair; Ulmer, Lon

    1993-01-01

    The 94 GHz MMW airborne radar system that provides a runway image in adverse weather conditions is now undergoing tests at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). This system, which consists of a solid state FMCW transceiver, antenna, and digital signal processor, has an update rate of 10 times per second, 0.35x azimuth resolution and up to 3.5 meter range resolution. The radar B scope (range versus azimuth) image, once converted to C scope (elevation versus azimuth), is compatible with the standard TV presentation and can be displayed on the Head Up Display (HUD) or Head Down Display (HDD) to aid the pilot during landing and takeoff in limited visibility conditions.

  8. Laser Docking System Radar flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, Harry O.

    1986-01-01

    Flight experiments to verify the Laser Docking System Radar are discussed. The docking requirements are summarized, and the breadboarded hardware is described, emphasizing the two major scanning concepts being utilized: a mechanical scanning technique employing galvanometer beamsteerers and an electronic scanning technique using an image dissector. The software simulations used to apply hardware solutions to the docking requirements are briefly discussed, the tracking test bed is described, and the objectives of the flight experiment are reviewed.

  9. A radar data processing and enhancement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. F.; Wrin, J. W.; James, R.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the space position data processing system of the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range. The system is installed at the Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center. This operational radar data system (RADATS) provides simultaneous data processing for multiple data inputs and tracking and antenna pointing outputs while performing real-time monitoring, control, and data enhancement functions. Experience in support of the space shuttle and aeronautical flight research missions is described, as well as the automated calibration and configuration functions of the system.

  10. Laser radar in a system perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl; Kamerman, Gary; Steinvall, Ove

    2011-06-01

    As a result of recent achievements in the field of laser radars, new options are available for their operation as system components. In addition to complementing and cross-checking one another, system components can generate new synergetic values. In this article, we address various roles and functions that laser radar may perform in a complete system context. Special attention is paid to range-gated imaging ladars operating in conjunction with infrared 2D sensors providing target recognition/identification at long distances and under adverse conditions of natural illumination. The multi- or hyper-spectral features of passive IR or visible sensors may be complemented by multispectral, broadband, tunable or switchable 3D imaging ladar in order to exploit the differences in target reflectance and absorption. This option opens another possibility for multi-spectral, mid-IR ladar to differentiate targets of various types, or to enhance the visualization potential and to facilitate the scene description with small targets like mines or mine-like objects. The recently discovered specificity of Raman scattering in the perturbed sea water makes the long-standing efforts in submarine wake detection more viable. Furthermore, the combination of microwave radar and laser radar, when amplified with new achievements in the fourth generation dual-mode imaging sensors, creates the possibility of single payload configurations suitable for small platforms. Emphasis is also made of the efficiency of Doppler velocimetry for precise vehicle navigation, such as for advance cruise missile control or autonomous landing. Finally, recent advances in coherent micro-ladars for optical coherence tomography now permit the reconstruction of time resolved 3D (i.e., 4D) dynamics of blood flow in heart vessels.

  11. Radar altimetry systems cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escoe, D.; Heuring, F. T.; Denman, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    This report discusses the application and cost of two types of altimeter systems (spaceborne (satellite and shuttle) and airborne) to twelve user requirements. The overall design of the systems defined to meet these requirements is predicated on an unconstrained altimetry technology; that is, any level of altimeter or supporting equipment performance is possible.

  12. Detecting and mitigating wind turbine clutter for airspace radar systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results. PMID:24385880

  13. Radar systems for the water resources mission, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Claassen, J. P.; Erickson, R. L.; Fong, R. K. T.; Hanson, B. C.; Komen, M. J.; Mcmillan, S. B.; Parashar, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    The state of the art determination was made for radar measurement of: soil moisture, snow, standing and flowing water, lake and river ice, determination of required spacecraft radar parameters, study of synthetic-aperture radar systems to meet these parametric requirements, and study of techniques for on-board processing of the radar data. Significant new concepts developed include the following: scanning synthetic-aperture radar to achieve wide-swath coverage; single-sideband radar; and comb-filter range-sequential, range-offset SAR processing. The state of the art in radar measurement of water resources parameters is outlined. The feasibility for immediate development of a spacecraft water resources SAR was established. Numerous candidates for the on-board processor were examined.

  14. Study to investigate and evaluate means of optimizing the radar function. [systems engineering of pulse radar for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The investigations for a rendezvous radar system design and an integrated radar/communication system design are presented. Based on these investigations, system block diagrams are given and system parameters are optimized for the noncoherent pulse and coherent pulse Doppler radar modulation types. Both cooperative (transponder) and passive radar operation are examined including the optimization of the corresponding transponder design for the cooperative mode of operation.

  15. Multi-Antenna Radar Systems for Doppler Rain Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen; Tanelli, Simone; Siqueira, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Use of multiple-antenna radar systems aboard moving high-altitude platforms has been proposed for measuring rainfall. The basic principle of the proposed systems is a variant of that of along-track interferometric synthetic-aperture radar systems used previously to measure ocean waves and currents.

  16. Seasat-A Synthetic Aperture Radar - Radar system implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Laderman, A.

    1976-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) onboard the Seasat-A satellite will conduct a number of experiments involving deep ocean waves, coastal wave patterns, polar ice and land forms. The SAR will have a 25 m by 25 m resolution over a swath of 100 km width centered about 300 km to the right of the spacecraft track. The SAR's high data rate limits operations to times when Seasat-A is in view of a few ground stations with special SAR receiving equipment. However, the SAR will collect much useful data about deep ocean and coastal waves in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans; about ice in the Northwest Atlantic, in the Great Lakes and off the coast of Alaska; and about land over much of the United States and Canada.

  17. A FMCW Radar Ranging Device for the Teleoperator Maneuvering System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, M. W.

    1983-01-01

    A frequency-modulated continuous wave radar system is under development in the Communications Systems Branch of the Information and Electronic Systems Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center. The radar unit is being designed for use on the teleoperator maneuvering system. Its function is to provide millimeter-level accuracy in range and range rate measurements out to a range of thirty meters. This will facilitate soft docking with accuracy. This report is an updating of previous developments reported on this system. An innovation in the system is the utilization of a standard reference signal generated by shunting a portion of the radar energy into a shorted coaxial delay line. The regular radar target return signal is constantly compared with the reference signal to provide internal error compensation. Within a five meter range, a limit imposed by present laboratory dimensions, the radar system exhibits reliable accuracy with range error less than 0.2%.

  18. 76 FR 67017 - Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ...Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems...foreign manufacturers of airport avian radar systems that meet the requirements of...

  19. Radar systems for a polar mission, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Claassen, J. P.; Erickson, R. L.; Fong, R. K. T.; Komen, M. J.; Mccauley, J.; Mcmillan, S. B.; Parashar, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    The application of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in monitoring and managing earth resources is examined. Synthetic aperture radars form a class of side-looking airborne radar, often referred to as coherent SLAR, which permits fine-resolution radar imagery to be generated at long operating ranges by the use of signal processing techniques. By orienting the antenna beam orthogonal to the motion of the spacecraft carrying the radar, a one-dimensional imagery ray system is converted into a two-dimensional or terrain imaging system. The radar's ability to distinguish - or resolve - closely spaced transverse objects is determined by the length of the pulse. The transmitter components receivers, and the mixer are described in details.

  20. Reconfigurable Data Acquisition System for Weather Radar Applications

    E-print Network

    Tessier, Russell

    is distributed to the end-user in real-time for timely and accurate detection of imminent weather disasters and distribution system for weather radar applications that meets these needs is described in this paper. This FPGAReconfigurable Data Acquisition System for Weather Radar Applications Rishi Khasgiwale, Luko Krnan

  1. Knowledge-aided GMTI in a Bayesian framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, Michael; Potter, Lee C.

    2015-05-01

    Traditional ground moving target indicator (GMTI) processing attempts to separate moving objects in the scene from stationary clutter. Techniques such as space-time adaptive processing (STAP) require the use of an unknown covariance matrix of the interference (clutter, jamming, and thermal noise) that must be estimated from the remaining data not currently under test. Many problems exist with estimating the interference covariance including: heterogeneous, contaminated, and/or limited training data. There are many existing techniques for obtaining an interference covariance matrix estimate, most of which incorporate some kind of prior knowledge to improve the estimate. We propose a Bayesian framework that estimates both clutter and movers on a range-by- range basis without the explicit estimation of an interference covariance matrix. The approach incorporates the knowledge of an approximate digital elevation map (DEM), platform kinematics (platform velocity, crab angle, and antenna spacings), and the belief that movers are sparse in the scene. Computation using this Bayesian model is enabled by recent algorithm developments for fast inference on linear mixing models. The signal model and required processing steps are detailed. We test our approach using the KASSPER I dataset and compare the results to other current approaches.

  2. 29. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, data processing system ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, data processing system area; data processor maintenance and operations center, showing data processing consoles - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  3. Radome effects on coherent change detection radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Dubbert, Dale F.; Burns, Bryan L.; Hensley, William H.

    2015-05-01

    A radome, or radar dome, protects a radar system from exposure to the elements. Unfortunately, radomes can affect the radiation pattern of the enclosed antenna. The co-design of a platform's radome and radar is ideal to mitigate any deleterious effects of the radome. However, maintaining structural integrity and other platform flight requirements, particularly when integrating a new radar onto an existing platform, often limits radome electrical design choices. Radars that rely heavily on phase measurements such as monopulse, interferometric, or coherent change detection (CCD) systems require particular attention be paid to components, such as the radome, that might introduce loss and phase variations as a function of the antenna scan angle. Material properties, radome wall construction, overall dimensions, and shape characteristics of a radome can impact insertion loss and phase delay, antenna beamwidth and sidelobe level, polarization, and ultimately the impulse response of the radar, among other things, over the desired radar operating parameters. The precision-guided munitions literature has analyzed radome effects on monopulse systems for well over half a century. However, to the best of our knowledge, radome-induced errors on CCD performance have not been described. The impact of radome material and wall construction, shape, dimensions, and antenna characteristics on CCD is examined herein for select radar and radome examples using electromagnetic simulations.

  4. Noninvasive biosignal detection radar system using circular polarization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee-Hoon; Hwang, Jung Man; Choi, Dong Hyuk; Park, Seong-Ook

    2009-05-01

    This paper proposes an integrated hypersensitive Doppler radar system through a circular polarization characteristic. Through the idea of a reverse sense of rotation when the reflecting surface is perfectly conducting, it is shown that the detecting property of the system can be effectively improved by using antennas that have a reverse polarization. This bistatic radar system can be used in noninvasively sensing biosignals such as respiration and heart rates with the periodic movement of skin and muscle near the heart. The operating frequency of the system is in the X-band and the radar size is 95 x50 x13 mm(3). PMID:19369168

  5. The 3D laser radar vision processor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebok, T. M.

    1990-01-01

    Loral Defense Systems (LDS) developed a 3D Laser Radar Vision Processor system capable of detecting, classifying, and identifying small mobile targets as well as larger fixed targets using three dimensional laser radar imagery for use with a robotic type system. This processor system is designed to interface with the NASA Johnson Space Center in-house Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever robot program and provide to it needed information so it can fetch and grasp targets in a space-type scenario.

  6. Laser radar system for obstacle avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bers, Karlheinz; Schulz, Karl R.; Armbruster, Walter

    2005-09-01

    The threat of hostile surveillance and weapon systems require military aircraft to fly under extreme conditions such as low altitude, high speed, poor visibility and incomplete terrain information. The probability of collision with natural and man-made obstacles during such contour missions is high if detection capability is restricted to conventional vision aids. Forward-looking scanning laser radars which are build by the EADS company and presently being flight tested and evaluated at German proving grounds, provide a possible solution, having a large field of view, high angular and range resolution, a high pulse repetition rate, and sufficient pulse energy to register returns from objects at distances of military relevance with a high hit-and-detect probability. The development of advanced 3d-scene analysis algorithms had increased the recognition probability and reduced the false alarm rate by using more readily recognizable objects such as terrain, poles, pylons, trees, etc. to generate a parametric description of the terrain surface as well as the class, position, orientation, size and shape of all objects in the scene. The sensor system and the implemented algorithms can be used for other applications such as terrain following, autonomous obstacle avoidance, and automatic target recognition. This paper describes different 3D-imaging ladar sensors with unique system architecture but different components matched for different military application. Emphasis is laid on an obstacle warning system with a high probability of detection of thin wires, the real time processing of the measured range image data, obstacle classification und visualization.

  7. Signal Processing System for the CASA Integrated Project I Radars

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Nitin; Chandrasekar, V.; Junyent, Francesc

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the waveform design space and signal processing system for dual-polarization Doppler weather radar operating at X band. The performance of the waveforms is presented with ground clutter suppression capability and mitigation of range velocity ambiguity. The operational waveform is designed based on operational requirements and system/hardware requirements. A dual Pulse Repetition Frequency (PRF) waveform was developed and implemented for the first generation X-band radars deployed by the Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA). This paper presents an evaluation of the performance of the waveforms based on simulations and data collected by the first-generation CASA radars during operations.

  8. Ultrawideband radar imaging system for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari, H.M.; Liu, W.; Hranilovic, S.; Deen, M.J.

    2006-05-15

    Ultrawideband (UWB) (3-10 GHz) radar imaging systems offer much promise for biomedical applications such as cancer detection because of their good penetration and resolution characteristics. The underlying principle of UWB cancer detection is a significant contrast in dielectric properties, which is estimated to be greater than 2:1 between normal and cancerous tissue, compared to a few-percent contrast in radiographic density exploited by x rays. This article presents a feasibility study of the UWB imaging of liver cancer tumors, based on the frequency-dependent finite difference time domain method. The reflection, radiation, and scattering properties of UWB pulses as they propagate through the human body are studied. The reflected and back-scattered electromagnetic energies from cancer tumors inside the liver are also investigated. An optimized, ultrawideband antenna was designed for near field operation, allowing for the reduction of the air-skin interface. It will be placed on the fat-liver tissue phantom with a malignant tumor stimulant. By performing an incremental scan over the phantom and removing early time artifacts, including reflection from the antenna ends, images based on the back-scattered signal from the tumor can be constructed. This research is part of our effort to develop a UWB cancer detection system with good detection and localization properties.

  9. Radar systems for the water resources mission, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Claassen, J. P.; Erickson, R. L.; Fong, R. K. T.; Hanson, B. C.; Komen, M. J.; Mcmillan, S. B.; Parashar, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    The application of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in monitoring and managing earth resources was examined. The function of spaceborne radar is to provide maps and map imagery to be used for earth resource and oceanographic applications. Spaceborne radar has the capability of mapping the entire United States regardless of inclement weather; however, the imagery must have a high degree of resolution to be meaningful. Attaining this resolution is possible with the SAR system. Imagery of the required quality must first meet mission parameters in the following areas: antenna patterns, azimuth and range ambiguities, coverage, and angle of incidence.

  10. CEEN-4940/8946-002 Special Topics: Introduction to Antennas and Radar Systems, Fall 2008

    E-print Network

    Yang, Yaoqing "Lamar"

    . Antennas for RFID 11. Antenna temperature, remote sensing and radar cross section 12. Propagation of radarCEEN-4940/8946-002 Special Topics: Introduction to Antennas and Radar Systems, Fall 2008 Instructor Course Description: This course will provide an introduction to antenna designs and Radar Systems

  11. Spaceborne Doppler Precipitation Radar: System Configurations and Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of the global distribution of the vertical velocity of precipitation is important in in the study of energy transportation in the atmosphere, the climate and weather. Such knowledge can only be directly acquired with the use of spaceborne Doppler precipitation radars. Although the high relative speed of the radar with respect to the rainfall particles introduces significant broadening in the Doppler spectrum, recent studies have shown that the average vertical velocity can be measured to acceptable accuracy levels by appropriate selection of radar parameters. Furthermore, methods to correct for specific errors arising from NUBF effects and pointing uncertainties have recently been developed. In this paper we will present the results of the trade studies on the performances of a spaceborne Doppler radar with different system parameters configurations.

  12. Bistatic radar sea state monitoring system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruck, G. T.; Krichbaum, C. K.; Everly, J. O.

    1975-01-01

    Remote measurement of the two-dimensional surface wave height spectrum of the ocean by the use of bistatic radar techniques was examined. Potential feasibility and experimental verification by field experiment are suggested. The required experimental hardware is defined along with the designing, assembling, and testing of several required experimental hardware components.

  13. 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Beamforming for Radar

    E-print Network

    Kepner, Jeremy

    © 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Beamforming for Radar Systems on COTS Heterogeneous ComputingHeterogeneous Computing PlatformsPlatforms Jeffrey A. Rudin Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. High Performance Embedded Computing (HPEC) Conference September 23, 2003 #12;2© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Outline

  14. Solid-State Cloud Radar System (CRS) Upgrade and Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLinden, Matt; Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Lihua; Racette, Paul; Coon, Michael; Venkatesh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The recent decade has brought rapid development in solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) technology. This has enabled the use of solid-state precipitation radar in place of high-power and high-voltage systems such as those that use Klystron or Magnetron transmitters. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has recently completed a comprehensive redesign of the 94 gigahertz Cloud Radar System (CRS) to incorporate a solid-state transmitter. It is the first cloud radar to achieve sensitivity comparable to that of a high-voltage transmitter using solid-state. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Cloud Radar System (CRS) is a 94 gigahertz Doppler radar that flies on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The upgraded CRS system utilizes a state-of-the-art solid-state 94 gigahertz power amplifier with a peak transmit power of 30 watts. The modernized CRS system is detailed here with data results from its deployment during the 2014 Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEX).

  15. Development of land based radar polarimeter processor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronke, C. W.; Blanchard, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    The processing subsystem of a land based radar polarimeter was designed and constructed. This subsystem is labeled the remote data acquisition and distribution system (RDADS). The radar polarimeter, an experimental remote sensor, incorporates the RDADS to control all operations of the sensor. The RDADS uses industrial standard components including an 8-bit microprocessor based single board computer, analog input/output boards, a dynamic random access memory board, and power supplis. A high-speed digital electronics board was specially designed and constructed to control range-gating for the radar. A complete system of software programs was developed to operate the RDADS. The software uses a powerful real time, multi-tasking, executive package as an operating system. The hardware and software used in the RDADS are detailed. Future system improvements are recommended.

  16. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Richard L.; Clark, Robert B.; Simonson, Dana L.; Slotwinski, Anthony R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  17. Mutual Coupling and Compensation in FMCW MIMO Radar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Christian M.; Feger, Reinhard; Wagner, Christoph; Stelzer, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with mutual coupling, its effects and the compensation thereof in frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) array radar systems. Starting with a signal model we introduce mutual coupling and its primary sources in FMCW MIMO systems. We also give a worst-case boundary of the effects that mutual coupling can have on the side lobe level of an array. A method of dealing with and compensating for these effects is covered in this paper and verified by measurements from a 77-GHz FMCW radar system.

  18. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.B.; Simonson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  19. THz impulse radar for biomedical sensing: nonlinear system behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. R.; Sung, Shijun; Grundfest, W. S.; Taylor, Z. D.

    2014-03-01

    The THz impulse radar is an "RF-inspired" sensor system that has performed remarkably well since its initial development nearly six years ago. It was developed for ex vivo skin-burn imaging, and has since shown great promise in the sensitive detection of hydration levels in soft tissues of several types, such as in vivo corneal and burn samples. An intriguing aspect of the impulse radar is its hybrid architecture which combines the high-peak-power of photoconductive switches with the high-responsivity and -bandwidth (RF and video) of Schottky-diode rectifiers. The result is a very sensitive sensor system in which the post-detection signal-to-noise ratio depends super-linearly on average signal power up to a point where the diode is "turned on" in the forward direction, and then behaves quasi-linearly beyond that point. This paper reports the first nonlinear systems analysis done on the impulse radar using MATLAB.

  20. 78. View of radar systems technical publication library, transmitter building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. View of radar systems technical publication library, transmitter building no. 102, second floor. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  1. Design of a Radar Based Space Situational Awareness System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebschwager, T.; Neff, T.; Suess, I. H.; Foerstner, I. R.

    2013-09-01

    Existing SSA-Networks in most cases consist of sensors which originally were not designed for the purpose of detecting or tracking space debris and active satellites. Furthermore there are different kinds of sensors in use which makes it even more complicated to handle all generated data. Therefore it is reasonable to create a network consisting of homogenous sensors, which means sensors of the same type (like radar or optical) and with the same output format of the data. Technologies that are available for detection and tracking of objects (e.g. optical sensors or radar) will be discussed. Focal point will be on operational availability, reliability and obtainable accuracy. It will be shown that Phased Array Radars are the most reasonable technology to be used while creating a sensor network consisting of homogenous sensors. This paper entails to present a proposal for a network of Phased Array Radars configured for this purpose. The system is intended to detect and track objects that are at least as small as objects that can currently be found in the US SSN catalogue. Furthermore potential hazards in different orbits will be evaluated and discussed to optimize the system on these areas. The system is supposed to be able to create an own object catalogue. Therefore perseverative tracking and required capacity will also be considered. On the basis of these considerations the paper shows how to lay-up such a radar-system starting from scratch. Criteria for detection and tracking of objects will be determined. This part of the work contains aspects like choosing the frequency band or tracking-frequencies for different sizes of objects. In the next step the locations for the sensors will be chosen. Based on thoughts about infrastructure it is plausible to place the radar systems on existing observation sites. By analyzing simulations with different numbers of sensors and / or locations several feasible approaches for such a Space Situational Awareness Network will be presented in this paper.

  2. Knowledge-based signal processing for radar ESM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, J.; Cussons, S.; Feltham, A.

    1990-10-01

    Radar electronic support measures (ESM) systems perform the functions of threat detection and area surveillance to determine the identity and bearing of surrounding radar emitters. Automatic ESM systems incorporate a passive receiver to measure the parameters of detected radar pulses and an automatic processor to rapidly sort pulses and identify the emitters. Current processors use algorithmic processing methods which are inflexible and do not fully utilize available sources of a priori information. The paper discusses the role of knowledge-based processing methods and how they may be applied to the key ESM signal-processing functions of deinterleaving, merge and emitter identification. ESM processors are required to sort input pulse data streams exceeding one million pulses per second and minimize the reporting latency of new emitters. The paper further discusses the requirements to achieve real-time operation of knowledge-based ESM processing techniques.

  3. New super-resolution ranging technique for FMCW radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testar, Miquel; Stirling-Gallacher, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Range resolution enhancement techniques, or so called super-resolution ranging techniques, are a significant breakthrough in short-range radar imaging. Improving range resolution in a robust stable manner enables a target to be peeled in finer layers and/or the RF specifications of the radar system to be relaxed, which has clear effects on performance improvement and cost reduction. For a radar system using the frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) technique and traditional frequency domain techniques for reception, the range resolution is limited by the bandwidth of the transmitted wave. In this paper we propose and investigate a new super-resolution ranging technique. Multiple key performance characteristics including, minimum distinguishable distance between targets, accuracy in absolute positioning and stability in low SNR environments were evaluated using statistical simulations and real measured data. The presented results show that the proposed technique yields improved performance.

  4. Development of a Low-Cost UAV Doppler Radar Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuble, Joseph; Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Gerry

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the design of a low cost unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) doppler radar data system is presented. The topics include: 1) Science and Mission Background; 2) Radar Requirements and Specs; 3) Radar Realization: RF System; 4) Processing of RF Signal; 5) Data System Design Process; 6) Can We Remove the DSP? 7) Determining Approximate Speed Requirements; 8) Radar Realization: Data System; 9) Data System Operation; and 10) Results.

  5. A comparison of spatial sampling techniques enabling first principles modeling of a synthetic aperture RADAR imaging platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartley, Michael; Goodenough, Adam; Brown, Scott; Kauffman, Russel P.

    2010-04-01

    Simulation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery may be approached in many different ways. One method treats a scene as a radar cross section (RCS) map and simply evaluates the radar equation, convolved with a system impulse response to generate simulated SAR imagery. Another approach treats a scene as a series of primitive geometric shapes, for which a closed form solution for the RCS exists (such as boxes, spheres and cylinders), and sums their contribution at the antenna level by again solving the radar equation. We present a ray-tracing approach to SAR image simulation that treats a scene as a series of arbitrarily shaped facetized objects, each facet potentially having a unique radio frequency optical property and time-varying location and orientation. A particle based approach, as compared to a wave based approach, presents a challenge for maintaining coherency of sampled scene points between pulses that allows the reconstruction of an exploitable image from the modeled complex phase history. We present a series of spatial sampling techniques and their relative success at producing accurate phase history data for simulations of spotlight, stripmap and SAR-GMTI collection scenarios.

  6. 76 FR 35176 - Operation of Radar Systems in the 76-77 GHz Band

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ...that vehicular radar systems operating at either the current or proposed limits would cause harmful interference to radio astronomy equipment. Accordingly, the Commission believes that there is no need to restrict vehicular radar systems based on...

  7. Methods And System Suppressing Clutter In A Gain-Block, Radar-Responsive Tag System

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Axline, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-04-18

    Methods and systems reduce clutter interference in a radar-responsive tag system. A radar transmits a series of linear-frequency-modulated pulses and receives echo pulses from nearby terrain and from radar-responsive tags that may be in the imaged scene. Tags in the vicinity of the radar are activated by the radar's pulses. The tags receive and remodulate the radar pulses. Tag processing reverses the direction, in time, of the received waveform's linear frequency modulation. The tag retransmits the remodulated pulses. The radar uses a reversed-chirp de-ramp pulse to process the tag's echo. The invention applies to radar systems compatible with coherent gain-block tags. The invention provides a marked reduction in the strength of residual clutter echoes on each and every echo pulse received by the radar. SAR receiver processing effectively whitens passive-clutter signatures across the range dimension. Clutter suppression of approximately 14 dB is achievable for a typical radar system.

  8. Update on the NASA ER-2 Doppler radar system (EDOP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Dod, Louis R.; Miller, Lee; Craner, Michael; Vandemark, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    An update on the development status of EDOP, a dual-beam Doppler weather radar to be flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, is presented. The EDOP system is an X-band Doppler radar with a dual-beam configuration in the ER-2 nose, such that one beam is nadir pointing and the other at an angle of 35 deg forward of the nadir. The dual beams, as used on ELDORA, directed at, e.g., 20 deg fore and aft of the normal to the fuselage, require only a linear rather than L-shaped flight pattern to compute air motions. On the ER-2, EDOP will essentially map out high-resolution time-height sections of reflectivity and vertical hydrometeor velocity from the nadir beam. Flying EDOP with other ground-based and airborne radars will also provide a more complete picture of the overall 3D precipitation and hydrometeor structure of storms.

  9. Radar simulation and physical modeling of time diversity satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capsoni, Carlo; D'Amico, Michele; Nebuloni, Roberto

    2009-08-01

    Satellite telecommunication systems that make use of frequencies higher than 10 GHz can experience strong attenuation due to rain. One of the countermeasures that can be adopted is time diversity. In this paper the performance of the time diversity technique is investigated through both radar simulation and modeling. We first exploit an extensive database of radar maps of precipitation collected in northern Italy to generate synthetic time series of attenuation; the performance of the time diversity technique is evaluated for different frequencies and elevation angles. The same analysis is then performed using the ExCell attenuation prediction model, whose input parameters are elevation, frequency and polarization of the Earth terminal, and the "effective" rainfall rate. The model-predicted diversity gain is found to agree well with that obtained through radar simulation, demonstrating that the performance of the time diversity technique can be evaluated from the time series of rain rate, acquired by a rain gauge.

  10. Feasibility study of a microwave radar system for agricultural inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Okelo-Odongo, S.

    1994-10-03

    The feasibility of an impulse radar system for agricultural inspection is investigated. This system would be able to quickly determine the quality of foodstuffs that are passed through the system. A prototype was designed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and this report discusses it`s evaluation. A variety of apples were used to test the system and preliminary data suggests that this technology holds promise for successful application on a large scale in food processing plants.

  11. A Userfriendly System for Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Classification based on Grayscale Distributional Properties and Context

    E-print Network

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    A User­friendly System for Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Classification based on Grayscale and classification of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. This system, unlike most of its competitors, allows, system. 1 Introduction Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are gen­ erated by either airborne

  12. 76 FR 67017 - Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. DOT. ACTION: Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems... waivers to foreign manufacturers of airport avian radar systems that meet the requirements of FAA...

  13. X-band Radar System for Detecting Heart and Respiration Rates

    E-print Network

    Park, Seong-Ook

    X-band Radar System for Detecting Heart and Respiration Rates Jee-Hoon Lee, Yun-Taek Im, and Seong an X-band Doppler radar system to detect heart and respiration of human far away. Through the idea polarization. This bistatic radar system can be used in non-invasively sensing bio signals such as respiration

  14. Antenna dimensions of synthetic aperture radar systems on satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    Design of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for a satellite must take into account the limitation in weight and dimensions of the antenna. The lower limits of the antenna area are derived from the conditions of unambiguity of the SAR system. This result is applied to estimate the antenna requirements for SARs on satellites in circular orbits of various altitudes around Earth and Venus.

  15. Asynchronous Compressive Sensing in Radar Systems , Samuel Palermo

    E-print Network

    Palermo, Sam

    Asynchronous Compressive Sensing in Radar Systems Jun Zhou 1 , Samuel Palermo 1 , Brian M. Sadler 2 from oversampling is reduced by using compressive sensing (CS) in the digital domain. Moreover, compressive sensing, continuous-time ternary encoding, part-time randomization, time-delay accuracy. I

  16. Upgraded Doppler Rayleigh Lidar and Comparisonswith Stratospheric Radar: 1: Observations Following Initial System Modifications

    E-print Network

    Cho, John Y. N.

    Upgraded Doppler Rayleigh Lidar and Comparisonswith Stratospheric Radar: 1: Observations Following and aerosol layers with complementary stratosphere/troposphere (ST) radar wind profiles. These observationsfollowedthe initial stage of a Doppler Rayleigh lidar system upgrade. These initial observations were made

  17. Doppler radar sensor positioning in a fall detection system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Popescu, Mihail; Ho, K C; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Falling is a common health problem for more than a third of the United States population over 65. We are currently developing a Doppler radar based fall detection system that already has showed promising results. In this paper, we study the sensor positioning in the environment with respect to the subject. We investigate three sensor positions, floor, wall and ceiling of the room, in two experimental configurations. Within each system configuration, subjects performed falls towards or across the radar sensors. We collected 90 falls and 341 non falls for the first configuration and 126 falls and 817 non falls for the second one. Radar signature classification was performed using a SVM classifier. Fall detection performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curves (AUCs) for each sensor deployment. We found that a fall is more likely to be detected if the subject is falling toward or away from the sensor and a ceiling Doppler radar is more reliable for fall detection than a wall mounted one. PMID:23365879

  18. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Technical requirements for vehicular radar... DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.515 Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a..., changing gears, or engaging a turn signal. (b) The UWB bandwidth of a vehicular radar system...

  19. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technical requirements for vehicular radar... DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.515 Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a..., changing gears, or engaging a turn signal. (b) The UWB bandwidth of a vehicular radar system...

  20. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Technical requirements for vehicular radar... DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.515 Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a..., changing gears, or engaging a turn signal. (b) The UWB bandwidth of a vehicular radar system...

  1. 78 FR 19063 - Airworthiness Approval for Aircraft Forward-Looking Windshear and Turbulence Radar Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... Turbulence Radar Systems AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Request for comment... approval for aircraft forward-looking windshear and turbulence radar systems. The planned advisory circular..., Airborne Weather Radar Equipment. The objective is to leverage the installation specific guidance from...

  2. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Technical requirements for vehicular radar... DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.515 Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a..., changing gears, or engaging a turn signal. (b) The UWB bandwidth of a vehicular radar system...

  3. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Technical requirements for vehicular radar... DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.515 Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a..., changing gears, or engaging a turn signal. (b) The UWB bandwidth of a vehicular radar system...

  4. Radio Aurora Explorer: Mission science and radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcivan, H.; Cutler, J. W.

    2012-04-01

    The Radio Aurora Explorer (RAX) satellite is the first of several satellites funded under the NSF CubeSat-based Space Weather and Atmospheric Research Program. RAX is a ground-to-space bi-static radar remote sensing experiment designed to measure and understand the causes of meter-scale ionospheric irregularities. Also known as field-aligned irregularities (FAI), such non-thermal, coherent fluctuations of electron density occur in response to strong ionospheric flows or plasma density gradients during geomagnetic disturbances and are considered a space weather concern due to disruption to communication and navigation signals. The RAX CubeSat was launched in November 2010 and conducted a single experiment in coordination with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar. Due to geophysical inactivity, e.g., lack of strong ionospheric electric fields and low ionospheric densities, no FAI were expected or observed. However, the radar receiver payload operation was successfully demonstrated, including the capability to sense signals as low as -110 dBm, the capability of transmitter-receiver synchronization and accurate ranging, processing of 1.2 GB of raw radar data on board in less than 1 hour, and the downlink of the science results within three-four passes. Analysis of the payload data shows that the noise level is sufficiently low. Although the interference level is a concern, it does not appear to significantly limit the measurements. Toward the end of December 2010, the solar power system gradually degraded and the mission terminated in early February 2011 after prolonged loss of contact with the satellite. Meanwhile, RAX II was launched in October 2011 to a polar orbit. This paper describes the RAX science and radar system and presents the results from the first experiment conducted.

  5. System-on-chip based Doppler radar occupancy sensor.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Ehsan; Song, Chenyan; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    System-on-Chip (SoC) based Doppler radar occupancy sensor is developed through non contact detection of respiratory signals. The radio was developed using off the shelf low power RF CC2530 SoC chip by Texas Instruments. In order to save power, the transmitter sends signal intermittently at 2.405 GHz. Reflected pulses are demodulated, and the baseband signals are processed to recover periodic motion. The system was tested both with mechanical target and a human subject. In both cases Doppler radar detected periodic motion closely matched the actual motion, and it has been shown that an SoC based system can be used for subject detection. PMID:22254705

  6. Random Noise Monopulse Radar System for Covert Tracking of Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ram M.

    2002-07-01

    The University of Nebraska is currently developing a unique monopulse radar concept based on the use of random noise signal for covert tracking applications. This project is funded by the Missile Defense Agency (MDA). The advantage of this system over conventional frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) or short pulse systems is its covertness resulting from the random waveform's immunity from interception and jamming. The system integrates a novel heterodyne correlation receiver with conventional monopulse architecture. Based on the previous work such as random noise interferometry, a series of theoretical analysis and simulations were conducted to examine the potential performance of this monopulse system. Furthermore, a prototype system is under development to exploit practical design aspects of phase comparison angle measurement. It is revealed that random noise monopulse radar can provide the same function as traditional monopulse radar, i.e., implement range and angular estimation and tracking in real time. The bandwidth of random noise signal can be optimized to achieve the best range resolution as well as the angular accuracy.

  7. Charge-coupled device data processor for an airborne imaging radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, W. E. (inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Processing of raw analog echo data from synthetic aperture radar receiver into images on board an airborne radar platform is discussed. Processing is made feasible by utilizing charge-coupled devices (CCD). CCD circuits are utilized to perform input sampling, presumming, range correlation and azimuth correlation in the analog domain. These radar data processing functions are implemented for single-look or multiple-look imaging radar systems.

  8. Considerations for integration of a physiological radar monitoring system with gold standard clinical sleep monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aditya; Baboli, Mehran; Gao, Xiaomeng; Yavari, Ehsan; Padasdao, Bryson; Soll, Bruce; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Lubecke, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A design for a physiological radar monitoring system (PRMS) that can be integrated with clinical sleep monitoring systems is presented. The PRMS uses two radar systems at 2.45 GHz and 24 GHz to achieve both high sensitivity and high resolution. The system can acquire data, perform digital processing and output appropriate conventional analog outputs with a latency of 130 ms, which can be recorded and displayed by a gold standard sleep monitoring system, along with other standard sensor measurements. PMID:24110139

  9. Transponder-Aided Joint Calibration and Synchronization Compensation for Distributed Radar Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High-precision radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation must be provided for distributed radar system due to separate transmitters and receivers. This paper proposes a transponder-aided joint radiometric calibration, motion compensation and synchronization for distributed radar remote sensing. As the transponder signal can be separated from the normal radar returns, it is used to calibrate the distributed radar for radiometry. Meanwhile, the distributed radar motion compensation and synchronization compensation algorithms are presented by utilizing the transponder signals. This method requires no hardware modifications to both the normal radar transmitter and receiver and no change to the operating pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The distributed radar radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation require only one transponder, but the motion compensation requires six transponders because there are six independent variables in the distributed radar geometry. Furthermore, a maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the transponder signal parameters. The proposed methods are verified by simulation results. PMID:25794158

  10. Streamflow Measurement Using A Riversonde Uhf Radar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, C.; Barrick, D.; Lilleboe, P.; Cheng, R.

    Initial field tests have been performed to evaluate the performance of a RiverSonde streamflow measurement system. The tests were conducted at a concrete-lined canal and a natural river in central California during June, 2000. The RiverSonde is a UHF radar operating near 350 MHz and is based on a modified SeaSonde system normally used to measure ocean surface currents in salt water using lower frequencies (5­25 MHz). The RiverSonde uses energy scattered by Bragg-resonant 0.5 m water waves and does not require any sensors in the water. Water velocity is calculated by observing the Doppler shift of the scattered radar energy and comparing that with the Doppler shift expected from resonant waves in still water. The radar has sufficient resolution to allow the estimation of a velocity profile across the width of the river. The antennas consisted of a 2-element transmitting antenna and a 3-element receiving antenna. The transmitting antenna provided broad illumination of the water surface, and MUSIC direction finding was used to determine the arrival direction of the re- flected radar energy. The transmitting and receiving antennas were placed on opposite banks to reduce the signal intensity variation across the channel. A chirp frequency sweep was used to determine range. Transmitted power was under 1 W, and the max- imum range was a few hundred meters. Range resolution was on the order of 10 m, and velocity resolution was about 2.5 cm/s. Extensive in-situ surface truth measurements were performed by personnel from the United States Geological Survey. The instruments included current meters suspended at various depths from a small boat positioned at several locations across the channel, video tracking of many floaters (tennis balls) on the water surface, an optical flow meter, and anemometer wind measurements. Typical water velocities were about 40 cm/s, and RMS velocity differences between the radar and in-situ measurements were 6­18% of the mean flow, with similar differences among the various in-situ velocity measurements. Total volume flow was estimated using in-situ bottom sounders for water depth, and volume flow differences between radar and in-situ measurements were less than 10%.

  11. GEOS-2 C-band radar system project. Marine study using C-band radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    One of the secondary objectives of the GEOS-2 C-band Systems Project is to study the feasibility of using geodetic satellites to both evaluate shipborne instrumentation and to determine ship positions in broad ocean areas. The purpose of this task is to determine whether shipborne C-band radar tracking, in conjunction with ground based tracking, is sufficiently accurate to provide instrumentation evaluation and ship position estimates. Data from several Apollo tracking ships, in particular the USNS Vanguard, was made available for this effort. A series of tests, using the USNS Vanguard, were carried out in the Port Canaveral and Bahama Acoustic Transponder Array Areas. The major portion of the analyses reported are the result of preliminary investigations using the data from these tests.

  12. Experimental 0.22 THz Stepped Frequency Radar System for ISAR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Mei Yan; Zhang, Cun Lin; Zhao, Ran; Zhao, Yue Jin

    2014-09-01

    High resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging is demonstrated by using a 0.22 THz stepped-frequency (SF) imaging radar system. The synthesis bandwidth of the terahertz (THz) SF radar is 12 GHz, which are beneficial for high resolution imaging. The resolution of ISAR image can reach centimeter-scale with the use of Range-Doppler algorithm (RDA). Results indicate that high resolution ISAR imaging is realized by using 0.22THz SF radar coupled with turntable scanning, which can provide foundations for further research on high-resolution radar image in the THz band.

  13. The effect of radar transmitter noise on system performance in clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, D.

    1980-12-01

    The generation and characteristics of the noise and spurious modulations which may be found on the output of a radar transmitter are discussed. Simple clutter-cancelling systems and the general class of filter-bank radar are considered. The pulse-Doppler radar is examined in detail with attention to the problem of clutter rejections in the range-ambiguous mode of operation. A hypothetical radar requirement is analyzed to show how the radar requirement is translated into a specification for the spectral noise of the transmitter. Measures such as pulse compression and receiver limiting are also discussed.

  14. An expert system for shuttle and satellite radar tracker scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Paul

    1988-01-01

    This expert system automates and optimizes radar tracker selection for shuttle missions. The expert system is written in the FORTRAN and C languages on an HP9000. It is portable to any UNIX machine having both ANSI-77 FORTRAN and C language compilers. It is a rule based expert system that selects tracking stations from the S-band and C-band radar stations and the TDRSS east and TDRSS west satellites under a variety of conditions. The expert system was prototyped on the Symbolics in the Automated Reasoning Tool (ART) and ZetaLisp. After the prototype demonstrated an acceptable automation of the process of selecting tracking stations to support the orbit determination requirements of Shuttle missions, the basic ART rules of the prototype were ported to the HP9000 computer using the CLIPS language. CLIPS is a forward-chaining rule-based expert system language written in C. Prior to the development of this expert system the selection process was a tedious manual process and expensive in terms of human resources. Manual tracking station selection required from 1 to 2 man weeks per mission; whereas the expert system can complete the selection process in about 2 hours.

  15. Mapping tree root systems with ground-penetrating radar.

    PubMed

    Hruska, Jiri; Cermák, Jan; Sustek, Svatopluk

    1999-02-01

    A ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technique was used to study the three-dimensional distribution of root systems of large (DBH = 14 to 35 cm) oak trees (Quercus petraea (Mattusch.) Liebl.) in relatively dry, luvisoil on loamy deluvium and weathered granodiorite. We used a pulse EKKO 1000 GPR system, a profile grid of 0.25 x 0.25 meters, at 0.05 m intervals, and a signal frequency of 450 MHz, to assure resolution of about 3 cm in both directions (further increases in resolution up to 1 cm are possible with the system). Coarse root density was 6.5 m m(-2) of stand area and 3.3 m m(-3) of soil volume. Maximum rooting depth of the experimental oaks was 2 m, and the root ground plan was significantly larger (about 1.5 times) than the crown ground plan. Based on earlier studies of Quercus robur L. from floodplain forests, where the extent of the root systems was much smaller (root ground plan:crown ground plan ratio of 0.6), we conclude that the high root ground plan:crown ground plan ratio indicates less favorable conditions of water supply at the experimental site than in the floodplain forest. The ground-penetrating radar system is noninvasive and allows relatively rapid and repeated measurements of the distribution of coarse root systems of trees. PMID:12651592

  16. The Space-Based Calibration of Optical Systems and HF Radars Using the Precision Expandable Radar Calibration Sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P.

    The Precision Expandable Radar Calibration Sphere (PERCS) is designed to provide a relatively simple target in space that can be used to determine the operational parameters of both ground Imaging systems and HF radars. PERCS is a 10 meter diameter wire frame in low earth orbit with corner cube reflectors placed at 60 or more vertices around the wire frame. For optical system calibration, PERCS will provide precisely spaced reflection points on the vertices of a large polyhedron. For HF radar calibration, PERCS will have a known radar cross section that is independent of observation direction within 0.5 dB. Laser satellite tracking will provide accurate orbital position and velocity of PERCS. The PERCS will orbit at 600 km altitude in a high inclination. Because of the wire frame construction, atmospheric drag will be low and the large spherical structure is expected to be available for more than five years. The PERCS satellite will be launched in a stowed configuration that has less than one meter in diameter. After launch, the PERCS will expand to a diameter of almost 10 meters. Hoberman Sphere technology will be used to produce a stable wire-frame to act as a radar scatter target. The sphere is based on a truncated icosahedron commonly known in chemistry as a "buckyball". The 60 vertices (V60) are hinged to be joined to 90 rigid segments. Each segment is hinged so that the PERCS can be folded into a compact package for launch.

  17. Ambiguities in spaceborne synthetic aperture radar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, F. K.; Johnson, W. T. K.

    1983-01-01

    An examination of aspects of spaceborne SAR time delay and Doppler ambiguities has led to the formulation of an accurate method for the evaluation of the ratio of ambiguity intensities to that of the signal, which has been applied to the nominal SAR system on Seasat. After discussing the variation of this ratio as a function of orbital latitude and attitude control error, it is shown that the detailed range migration-azimuth phase history of an ambiguity is different from that of a signal, so that the images of ambiguities are dispersed. Seasat SAR dispersed images are presented, and their dispersions are eliminated through an adjustment of the processing parameters. A method is also presented which uses a set of multiple pulse repetition sequences to determine the Doppler centroid frequency absolute values for SARs with high carrier frequencies and poor attitude measurements.

  18. Solid state coherent laser radar wind-field measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffaker, Robert M.; Reveley, Paul A.

    1997-05-01

    Diode-pumped solid-state pulsed coherent laser radar systems have recently been developed at Coherent Technologies, Inc., for the remote measurement of atmospheric wind fields. Flash- lamp pumped systems have been utilized since 1990 for obtaining wind field measurements. These flash-lamp pumped lidar systems have been applied to wind profiling, aircraft wake vortex measurements, airport wind shear and gust front monitoring, and military cargo air drops and many other applications. The diode-pumped coherent lidar systems currently available are capable of near turnkey operation. The Tm:YAG laser transceivers operate at 2.02 microns with output pulse energies of 1 t 10 mJ with PRFs of 1,000 to 100 Hz respectively. Range resolution of 30 - 75 m are typical. A real-time lidar signal processor has also been developed for collecting and analyzing laser radar (lidar) data. The signal processor is based on a commercial PC architecture and offers a real-time data acquisition, analysis, display, recording and playback environment. Wind measurements and overall system performance results are presented. Wind measurement performance, for a variety of applications, are presented using the flashlamp and diode pumped coherent lidars including measured wind profiles from ground and on aircraft, wake vortex tracking results, and example flows over mountain terrain.

  19. A videoSAR mode for the x-band wideband experimental airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damini, A.; Balaji, B.; Parry, C.; Mantle, V.

    2010-04-01

    DRDC has been involved in the development of airborne SAR systems since the 1980s. The current system, designated XWEAR (X-band Wideband Experimental Airborne Radar), is an instrument for the collection of SAR, GMTI and maritime surveillance data at long ranges. VideoSAR is a land imaging mode in which the radar is operated in the spotlight mode for an extended period of time. Radar data is collected persistently on a target of interest while the aircraft is either flying by or circling it. The time span for a single circular data collection can be on the order of 30 minutes. The spotlight data is processed using synthetic apertures of up to 60 seconds in duration, where consecutive apertures can be contiguous or overlapped. The imagery is formed using a back-projection algorithm to a common Cartesian grid. The DRDC VideoSAR mode noncoherently sums the images, either cumulatively, or via a sliding window of, for example, 5 images, to generate an imagery stream presenting the target reflectivity as a function of viewing angle. The image summation results in significant speckle reduction which provides for increased image contrast. The contrast increases rapidly over the first few summed images and continues to increase, but at a lesser rate, as more images are summed. In the case of cumulative summation of the imagery, the shadows quickly become filled in. In the case of a sliding window, the summation introduces a form of persistence into the VideoSAR output analogous to the persistence of analog displays from early radars.

  20. A DDS and PLL-based X-band FMCW Radar System

    E-print Network

    Park, Seong-Ook

    A DDS and PLL-based X-band FMCW Radar System Yun-Taek Im, Jee-Hoon Lee, and Seong-Ook Park source, and the PLL is controlled by it. The bandwidth and the sweep time of the FMCW radar system a target range, and the range resolution is less than 0.25 m. Keywords-FMCW;radar;DDS;PLL I. INTRODUCTION

  1. A novel ultra-wideband 80 GHz FMCW radar system for contactless monitoring of vital signs.

    PubMed

    Siying Wang; Pohl, Antje; Jaeschke, Timo; Czaplik, Michael; Kony, Marcus; Leonhardt, Steffen; Pohl, Nils

    2015-08-01

    In this paper an ultra-wideband 80 GHz FMCW-radar system for contactless monitoring of respiration and heart rate is investigated and compared to a standard monitoring system with ECG and CO(2) measurements as reference. The novel FMCW-radar enables the detection of the physiological displacement of the skin surface with submillimeter accuracy. This high accuracy is achieved with a large bandwidth of 10 GHz and the combination of intermediate frequency and phase evaluation. This concept is validated with a radar system simulation and experimental measurements are performed with different radar sensor positions and orientations. PMID:26737409

  2. The Goldstone solar system radar: A science instrument for planetary research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorsky, J. D.; Renzetti, N. A.; Fulton, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) station at NASA's Deep Space Communications Complex in California's Mojave Desert is described. A short chronological account of the GSSR's technical development and scientific discoveries is given. This is followed by a basic discussion of how information is derived from the radar echo and how the raw information can be used to increase understanding of the solar system. A moderately detailed description of the radar system is given, and the engineering performance of the radar is discussed. The operating characteristics of the Arcibo Observatory in Puerto Rico are briefly described and compared with those of the GSSR. Planned and in-process improvements to the existing radar, as well as the performance of a hypothetical 128-m diameter antenna radar station, are described. A comprehensive bibliography of referred scientific and engineering articles presenting results that depended on data gathered by the instrument is provided.

  3. A Portable Low-Power Harmonic Radar System and Conformal Tag for Insect Tracking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harmonic radar systems provide an effective modality for tracking insect behavior. This paper presents a harmonic radar system proposed to track the migration of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB). The system offers a unique combination of portability, low power and small tag design. It is comprised of a...

  4. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. (a) The UWB bandwidth of an imaging system...

  5. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. (a) The UWB bandwidth of an imaging system...

  6. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. (a) The UWB bandwidth of an imaging system...

  7. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. (a) The UWB bandwidth of an imaging system...

  8. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. (a) The UWB bandwidth of an imaging system...

  9. MARA (Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter) system documentation. Volume 1: MARA system requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L. (editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter (MARA), a flexible airborne radar remote sensing facility developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is discussed. This volume describes the scientific justification for the development of the instrument and the translation of these scientific requirements into instrument design goals. Values for key instrument parameters are derived to accommodate these goals, and simulations and analytical models are used to estimate the developed system's performance.

  10. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.B.; Gallman, P.G.; Slotwinski, A.R.; Wagner, K.; Weaver, S.; Xu, Jieping

    1996-12-31

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution.

  11. The Goldstone Solar System Radar: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, M. A.; Benner, L. A.; Teitelbaum, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) primarily uses the 70-m antenna at Goldstone — DSS -14 — for tracking, telemetry, and commanding National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacecraft. However, for a small percentage of its time DSS-14 also provides NASA with the only fully steerable, high-power ground-based radar in the world. The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) has been used extensively for high-resolution radar ranging and imaging of planetary and small-body targets, including more than 160 asteroids, four comets, the Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, the Galilean satellites, Titan, and small orbital debris. The GSSR operates at a wavelength of 3.5 cm with a typical transmitter power of 450 kW, and provides radar imagery, surface topography, rotational information, and ice distribution on this wide variety of solar system objects. The bulk of current GSSR work centers on radar imaging, astrometry, and characterization of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). GSSR has discovered binary and ternary NEAs (six to date); contact binary NEAs, and NEAs in non-principal axis rotation states. The GSSR has observed the following small-body mission targets: 4 Vesta (Dawn), 433 Eros (NEAR-Shoemaker), 25143 Itokawa (Hayabusa), 101955 1999 RQ36 (OSIRIS-REx), and 4179 Toutatis (Chang'e 2). Recently the highest range resolution improved by a factor of five from 18.75 meters to 3.75 meters. The first major application of this resolution increase was with imaging of 400-meter-diameter (308635) 2005 YU55 during the asteroid's 0.85 lunar distance flyby in November 2011. The images placed tens of thousands of pixels on the asteroid, and even revealed small surface boulders. The limitation to ~4-meter range resolution is driven by the bandwidth of the transmitter. However, by using chirp waveforms and klystrons with ~150 MHz bandwidth, the range resolution could be as fine as 1-meter. JPL is exploring methods of transmitting such wider bandwidths and potentially reaching 1-meter range resolution. The GSSR currently provides nearly encounter-quality imaging of NEAs a few times each year, and the potential exists for future imaging of even higher quality. Two main avenues exist to becoming a user of the GSSR. Successful proposers to the Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) solicitations from the Planetary Science Division in the NASA Science Mission Directorate make up the majority of GSSR users. GSSR users also come via successful proposals to observing calls from the National Science Foundation for use of their Green Bank Telescope or the Extended Very Large Array that require 3.5-cm radar illumination of targets for primary science goals. In addition, any DSN-supported flight project can request GSSR observations that advance the goals of their mission. GSSR supports a wide community of scientists at many institutions. The research described above was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  12. GeoSAR: A Radar Terrain Mapping System for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas; vanZyl, Jakob; Hensley, Scott; Reis, James; Munjy, Riadh; Burton, John; Yoha, Robert

    2000-01-01

    GeoSAR Geographic Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a new 3 year effort to build a unique, dual-frequency, airborne Interferometric SAR for mapping of terrain. This is being pursued via a Consortium of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., and the California Department of Conservation. The airborne portion of this system will operate on a Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft outfitted with P- and X-band Interferometric SARs. The ground portions of this system will be a suite of Flight Planning Software, an IFSAR Processor and a Radar-GIS Workstation. The airborne P-band and X-band radars will be constructed by JPL with the goal of obtaining foliage penetration at the longer P-band wavelengths. The P-band and X-band radar will operate at frequencies of 350 Mhz and 9.71 Ghz with bandwidths of either 80 or 160 Mhz. The airborne radars will be complemented with airborne laser system for measuring antenna positions. Aircraft flight lines and radar operating instructions will be computed with the Flight Planning Software The ground processing will be a two-step step process. First, the raw radar data will be processed into radar images and interferometer derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Second, these radar images and DEMs will be processed with a Radar GIS Workstation which performs processes such as Projection Transformations, Registration, Geometric Adjustment, Mosaicking, Merging and Database Management. JPL will construct the IFSAR Processor and Calgis, Inc. will construct the Radar GIS Workstation. The GeoSAR Project was underway in November 1996 with a goal of having the radars and laser systems fully integrated onto the Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft in early 1999. Then, Engineering Checkout and Calibration-Characterization Flights will be conducted through November 1999. The system will be completed at the end of 1999 and ready for routine operations in the year 2000.

  13. Aspects of VHF radars illustrated by the example of an experimental system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuschel, H.

    1989-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the long wavelength radar concept are illustrated taking as an example the detection of low flying targets such as helicopters and cruise missiles. The choice of the optimum frequency is always a tradeoff between the task related capabilities and deficiences of the chosen frequency range. Antenna configurations, wave propagation effects such as diffraction, target radar cross section in the resonance region and echo signature of a hovering helicopter are considered for VHF radar system concepts. The experimental system Lara (large wavelength radar) is introduced as a demonstration model.

  14. Design and implementation of a noise radar tomographic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmuth, Mark A.; Shin, Hee Jung; Narayanan, Ram M.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2015-05-01

    A hardware system has been developed to perform ultrawideband (UWB) noise radar tomography over the 3-5 GHz frequency range. The system utilizes RF hardware to transmit multiple independent and identically distributed UWB random noise waveforms. A 3-5 GHz band-limited signal is generated using an arbitrary waveform generator and the waveform is then amplified and transmitted through a horn antenna. A linear scanner with a single antenna is used in place of an antenna array to collect backscatter. The backscatter is collected from the transmission of each waveform and reconstructed to form an image. The images that result from each scan are averaged to produce a single tomographic image of the target. After background subtraction, the scans are averaged to improve the image quality. The experimental results are compared to the theoretical predictions. The system is able to successfully image metallic and dielectric cylinders of different cross sections.

  15. Generalized radar/radiometry imaging problems

    E-print Network

    Paper Generalized radar/radiometry imaging problems Ivan Prudyus, Sviatoslav Voloshynovskiy, Andriy- ing simulation based on radar, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and radiometry systems are presented systems, synthetic aperture radar, spatio-temporal imaging. 1. Introduction Resolution of radar

  16. A study of the performance of airborne laser radar systems and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beng, J. Coyne

    Helium-neon, neodymium (YAG), and CO2 laser radar systems are reviewed. Laser properties and hazards are discussed. Modulation techniques; optical detectors; beam steering; and signal processing are considered. System losses; atmospheric propagation; noise sources; and optical clutter are described. Laser radar range equations are analyzed. Applications including ranging, airborne surveillance and reconnaissance, wind velocity measurement, terrain following, and obstacle avoidance are treated.

  17. The Design and Development of a Hybrid RF/Laser Radar System for Measuring Changes in

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    the limitation of using high peak transmit power, we have developed a hybrid RF/Laser radar that uses lower peak transmit power and higher PRF. RF pulse compression is used to improve system performance further. ReceiverThe Design and Development of a Hybrid RF/Laser Radar System for Measuring Changes in Ice Surface

  18. Second annual progress report of the Millimeter Wave Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Pazmany, A.L.; Sekelsky, S.M.; McIntosh, R.E.

    1992-06-07

    The Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) is a single antenna, two frequency (33 GHz and 95 GHz) polarimetric radar which is currently under the development at the University of Massachusetts (UMASS). This system will be capable of making four dimensional Doppler and polarimetric measurements of clouds. This report gives details about the status of the various subsystems under development and discusses current research activities.

  19. Radar vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykin, Simon

    The novel idea called radar vision is introduced. The goal of radar vision is to make radar into an intelligent remote-sensing device that is capable of cognition of the surrounding environment. The attributes of radar as an electromagnetic sensor are reviewed, and the possibility of radar learning from the environment is discussed. The issues of time and knowledge processing and the incorporation of feedback are addressed. The facilities in place at McMaster University for research into the development and perfection of a radar vision system are described. The IPIX radar and the systolic-based computing machinery, which play critical and complementary roles, are described. The IPIX radar permits the collection and invaluable real-life data on the ocean environment and radar targets of interest under varying conditions. The systolic-radar computing machinery processes this database in near real time and computes the neural-network-based algorithms that are designed to perform the different functions of radar vision.

  20. Wuhan Atmosphere Radio Exploration (WARE) radar: System design and online winds measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengyu, Zhao; Chen, Zhou; Haiyin, Qing; Guobin, Yang; Yuannong, Zhang; Gang, Chen; Yaogai, Hu

    2013-05-01

    The basic configuration of the Wuhan MST (mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere) radar, which was designed and constructed by the School of Electronic Information, Wuhan University, is preliminarily described in this paper. The Wuhan MST radar operates at very high frequency (VHF) band (53.8 MHz) by observing the real-time characteristics of turbulence and the wind field vector in the height range of 3.5-90 km (not including 25-60 km) with high temporal and height resolutions. This all-solid-state, all-coherent pulse Doppler radar is China's first independent development of an MST radar focusing on atmospheric observation. The subsystems of the Wuhan MST radar include an antenna system, a feeder line system, all-solid-state radar transmitters, digital receivers, a beam control system, a signal processing system, a data processing system, a product generation system, and a user terminal. Advanced radar technologies are used, including highly reliable all-solid-state transmitters, low-noise large dynamic range digital receivers, an active phased array, high-speed digital signal processing, and real-time graphic terminals. This paper describes the design and implementation of the radar. Preliminary online wind measurements and results of the comparison to simultaneous observations by a GPS rawinsonde are presented as well.

  1. Application of Radar Data to Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanZyl, Jakob J.

    2000-01-01

    The field of synthetic aperture radar changed dramatically over the past decade with the operational introduction of advance radar techniques such as polarimetry and interferometry. Radar polarimetry became an operational research tool with the introduction of the NASA/JPL AIRSAR system in the early 1980's, and reached a climax with the two SIR-C/X-SAR flights on board the space shuttle Endeavour in April and October 1994. Radar interferometry received a tremendous boost when the airborne TOPSAR system was introduced in 1991 by NASA/JPL, and further when data from the European Space Agency ERS-1 radar satellite became routinely available in 1991. Several airborne interferometric SAR systems are either currently operational, or are about to be introduced. Radar interferometry is a technique that allows one to map the topography of an area automatically under all weather conditions, day or night. The real power of radar interferometry is that the images and digital elevation models are automatically geometrically resampled, and could be imported into GIS systems directly after suitable reformatting. When combined with polarimetry, a technique that uses polarization diversity to gather more information about the geophysical properties of the terrain, a very rich multi-layer data set is available to the remote sensing scientist. This talk will discuss the principles of radar interferometry and polarimetry with specific application to the automatic categorization of land cover. Examples will include images acquired with the NASA/JPL AIRSAR/TOPSAR system in Australia and elsewhere.

  2. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...applicant for authority to use a Doppler Radar or Inertial Navigation System must...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...applicant for authority to use a Doppler Radar or Inertial Navigation System must...

  4. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...applicant for authority to use a Doppler Radar or Inertial Navigation System must...

  5. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation... OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request... Radar or Inertial Navigation System must submit a request for evaluation of the system to the...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation... OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request... Radar or Inertial Navigation System must submit a request for evaluation of the system to the...

  7. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation... OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request... Radar or Inertial Navigation System must submit a request for evaluation of the system to the...

  8. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation... OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request... Radar or Inertial Navigation System must submit a request for evaluation of the system to the...

  9. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation... OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request... Radar or Inertial Navigation System must submit a request for evaluation of the system to the...

  10. A survey of airborne radar systems for deployment on a High Altitude Powered Platform (HAPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Leung, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    A survey was conducted to find out the system characteristics of commercially available and unclassified military radars suitable for deployment on a stationary platform. A total of ten domestic and eight foreign manufacturers of the radar systems were identified. Questionnaires were sent to manufacturers requesting information concerning the system characteristics: frequency, power used, weight, volume, power radiated, antenna pattern, resolution, display capabilities, pulse repetition frequency, and sensitivity. A literature search was also made to gather the system characteristics information. Results of the survey are documented and comparisons are made among available radar systems.

  11. Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing by a Multiple Scale Neural System for Boundary and Surface

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing by a Multiple Scale Neural System for Boundary and Surface Representation Stephen Grossberg 1 , Ennio Mingolla 2 , and James Williamson 3 Department of Cognitive and Neural containing range data gathered by a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor. The boundary and surface

  12. 77 FR 48097 - Operation of Radar Systems in the 76-77 GHz Band

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... (NPRM), 77 FR 35176, June 16, 2011, in which it sought public comment on proposed amendments to Sec. Sec... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 15 Operation of Radar Systems in the 76-77 GHz Band AGENCY: Federal Communications... the in- motion and not-in-motion distinction for vehicular radars, and instead adopting new...

  13. A system for the real-time display of radar and video images of targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, W. W.; Burnside, W. D.

    1990-01-01

    Described here is a software and hardware system for the real-time display of radar and video images for use in a measurement range. The main purpose is to give the reader a clear idea of the software and hardware design and its functions. This system is designed around a Tektronix XD88-30 graphics workstation, used to display radar images superimposed on video images of the actual target. The system's purpose is to provide a platform for tha analysis and documentation of radar images and their associated targets in a menu-driven, user oriented environment.

  14. Performance of the NASA Airborne Radar with the Windshear Database for Forward-Looking Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, George F.; Britt, Charles L.

    1996-01-01

    This document describes the simulation approach used to test the performance of the NASA airborne windshear radar. An explanation of the actual radar hardware and processing algorithms provides an understanding of the parameters used in the simulation program. This report also contains a brief overview of the NASA airborne windshear radar experimental flight test results. A description of the radar simulation program shows the capabilities of the program and the techniques used for certification evaluation. Simulation of the NASA radar is comprised of three steps. First, the choice of the ground clutter data must be made. The ground clutter is the return from objects in or nearby an airport facility. The choice of the ground clutter also dictates the aircraft flight path since ground clutter is gathered while in flight. The second step is the choice of the radar parameters and the running of the simulation program which properly combines the ground clutter data with simulated windshear weather data. The simulated windshear weather data is comprised of a number of Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS) model results. The final step is the comparison of the radar simulation results to the known windshear data base. The final evaluation of the radar simulation is based on the ability to detect hazardous windshear with the aircraft at a safe distance while at the same time not displaying false alerts.

  15. High Resolution Radar Detection of Individual Raindrops in Natural Cloud Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J.; Flatau, P. J.; Harasti, P. R.; Yates, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    A high resolution C-band Doppler radar previously used to detect debris shed during space shuttle missions is shown to have the capability to determine the properties of individual raindrops in the free atmosphere. This is accomplished through a combination of the radar's narrow (0.22 degree) beamwidth, a range resolution as fine as 0.5m, and extremely high 3MW power. These attributes lead to exceptionally small radar pulse volumes (as low as 14m3 at the radar's minimum 2km range) and allow the radar to detect individual drops that exceed 0.5mm in diameter. As the radar transmits both a higher (0.5m) and lower (37m) range resolution waveform every other pulse, a unique opportunity arise to examine both the bulk radar reflectivity and individual particle properties at the same time. The larger individual drops detected by the radar appear in the radar data as bright, nearly linear, reflectivity "streaks" against the more uniform background reflectivity field generated by the population of smaller drops. These streaks can then be examined to infer the properties of the particles directly such as their size, fall velocity, concentration, and potentially other properties such as naturally occurring drop oscillations. Examples of the bulk and individual particle properties for several "streaks" associated with a deep convective system are examined. Additional high-resolution studies of the circulation fields associated with a shallow altocumulus layer and a long-lived radar reflectivity bright band associated with the melting layer within a meso-convective cloud system reveal new details of the internal circulation features associated with these phenomena.

  16. A combined quality-control methodology in Ebro Delta (NE Spain) high frequency radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, P.; Piedracoba, S.; Soto-Navarro, J.; Alvarez-Fanjul, E.

    2015-08-01

    Ebro River Delta is a relevant marine protected area in the western Mediterranean. In order to promote the conservation of its ecosystem and support operational decision making in this sensitive area, a three site standard-range (13.5 MHz) CODAR SeaSonde High Frequency (HF) radar was deployed in 2013. Since there is a growing demand for reliable HF radar surface current measurements, the main goal of this work is to present a combined quality control methodology. Firstly, one year-long (2014) real-time web monitoring of nonvelocity-based diagnostic parameters is conducted in order to infer both radar site status and HF radar system performance. Signal-to-noise ratio at the monopole exhibited a consistent monthly evolution although some abrupt decreases (below 10 dB), occasionally detected in June for one of the radar sites, impacted negatively on the spatiotemporal coverage of total current vectors. It seemed to be a sporadic episode since radar site overall performance was found to be robust during 2014. Secondly, a validation of HF radar data with independent in situ observations from a moored current meter was attempted for May-October 2014. The accuracy assessment of radial and total vectors revealed a consistently high agreement. The directional accuracy of the HF radar was rated at better than 8°. The correlation coefficient and RMSE values emerged in the ranges 0.58-0.83 and 4.02-18.31 cm s-1, respectively. The analysis of the monthly averaged current maps for 2014 showed that the HF radar properly represented basic oceanographic features previously reported, namely: the predominant southwestward flow, the coastal clockwise eddy confined south of Ebro Delta mouth or the Ebro River impulsive-type freshwater discharge. Future works should include the use of verified HF radar data for the rigorous skill assessment of operational ocean circulation systems currently running in Ebro estuarine region like MyOcean IBI.

  17. Estimation of Microphysical and Radiative Parameters of Precipitating Cloud Systems Using mm-Wavelength Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.

    2009-03-01

    A remote sensing approach is described to retrieve cloud and rainfall parameters within the same precipitating system. This approach is based on mm-wavelength radar signal attenuation effects which are observed in a layer of liquid precipitation containing clouds and rainfall. The parameters of ice clouds in the upper part of startiform precipitating systems are then retrieved using the absolute measurements of radar reflectivity. In case of the ground-based radar location, these measurements are corrected for attenuation in the intervening layer of liquid hydrometers.

  18. Radar based Ground Level Reconstruction Utilizing a Hypocycloid Antenna Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Christoph; Musch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution we introduce a novel radar positioning system. It makes use of a mathematical curve, called hypocycloid, for a slanting movement of the radar antenna. By means of a planetary gear, a ball, and a universal joint as well as a stepping motor, a two dimensional positioning is provided by a uniaxial drive shaft exclusively. The fundamental position calculation and different signal processing algorithms are presented. By means of an 80 GHz FMCW radar system we performed several measurements on objects with discrete heights as well as on objects with continuous surfaces. The results of these investigations are essential part of this contribution and are discussed in detail.

  19. RADAR Based Collision Avoidance for Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Allistair A.

    Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) have become increasingly prevalent and will represent an increasing percentage of all aviation. These unmanned aircraft are available in a wide range of sizes and capabilities and can be used for a multitude of civilian and military applications. However, as the number of UAS increases so does the risk of mid-air collisions involving unmanned aircraft. This dissertation aims to present one possible solution for addressing the mid-air collision problem in addition to increasing the levels of autonomy of UAS beyond waypoint navigation to include preemptive sensor-based collision avoidance. The presented research goes beyond the current state of the art by demonstrating the feasibility and providing an example of a scalable, self-contained, RADAR-based, collision avoidance system. The technology described herein can be made suitable for use on a miniature (Maximum Takeoff Weight < 10kg) UAS platform. This is of paramount importance as the miniature UAS field has the lowest barriers to entry (acquisition and operating costs) and consequently represents the most rapidly increasing class of UAS.

  20. Quasi-orthogonal wideband radar waveforms based on chaotic systems

    E-print Network

    Willsey, Matt (Matt S.)

    2007-01-01

    With the development of A/D converters possessing sufficiently high sampling rates, it is now feasible to use arbitrary, wideband waveforms in radar applications. Large sets of quasi-orthogonal, wideband waveforms can be ...

  1. Comparing the Convective Structure and Microphysics in Two Sahelian Mesoscale Convective Systems: Radar Observations and CRM Simulations

    E-print Network

    Rutledge, Steven

    modeling framework. Simulated system convective structure and microphysics are compared to radar with observations, though a secondary convective burst is not well represented. Despite these biases, the radar). Analysis of ground-based radar data at continental, coastal, and maritime locations revealed that regional

  2. The RADAR Test Methodology: Evaluating a Multi-Task Machine Learning System with Humans in the Loop

    E-print Network

    The RADAR Test Methodology: Evaluating a Multi-Task Machine Learning System with Humans in the Loop-HCII-06-102 Abstract The RADAR project involves a collection of machine learning research thrusts the impact of learning when used by a human user. Three conditions (conventional tools, Radar without

  3. Earth resources shuttle imaging radar. [systems analysis and design analysis of pulse radar for earth resources information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A report is presented on a preliminary design of a Synthetic Array Radar (SAR) intended for experimental use with the space shuttle program. The radar is called Earth Resources Shuttle Imaging Radar (ERSIR). Its primary purpose is to determine the usefulness of SAR in monitoring and managing earth resources. The design of the ERSIR, along with tradeoffs made during its evolution is discussed. The ERSIR consists of a flight sensor for collecting the raw radar data and a ground sensor used both for reducing these radar data to images and for extracting earth resources information from the data. The flight sensor consists of two high powered coherent, pulse radars, one that operates at L and the other at X-band. Radar data, recorded on tape can be either transmitted via a digital data link to a ground terminal or the tape can be delivered to the ground station after the shuttle lands. A description of data processing equipment and display devices is given.

  4. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 15.515 Section 15.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.515 Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a) Operation under...

  5. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.509 Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems....

  6. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.509 Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems....

  7. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 15.515 Section 15.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.515 Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a) Operation under...

  8. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.509 Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems....

  9. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 15.515 Section 15.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.515 Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a) Operation under...

  10. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.509 Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems....

  11. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 15.515 Section 15.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.515 Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a) Operation under...

  12. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.509 Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems....

  13. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 15.515 Section 15.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.515 Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a) Operation under...

  14. On some problems of the implementation of moving target indication systems in smooth scanning radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damgov, V.; Karamishev, A.

    The paper is dedicated to the problem for selection of passive noise correlation function form and the influence of antenna scanning on the improvement factor assessments of moving target indication systems in smoothly scanning radars.

  15. Target adaptive radar, propagation medium adaptive communication systems, present day methodology and future perspectives. A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjessing, D. T.

    1980-08-01

    With recent advances in radio science and growing interest in environmental monitoring, remote sensing based on electromagnetic waves became an important field of study. Using a radar system in which the illuminating frequency can be controlled by a computer system and likewise the receiving system can be matched to the backscattered signal, a system which adapts itself both to the transmission medium and to a target of special interest can be designed. From information theory it is well known that the more information one requires, the wider must the bandwidth of the communication channel be. In terms of radar terminology, the more information we require about the target, the more widebanded must the illuminating radar wave be. The radar wave must pass through the intervening propagation medium with a minimum of distortion, and at the same time, upon reflection by the object of interest give optimum information about this object.

  16. Active noise suppression in phased-array radars using an antijamming optical beam-forming system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbyfill, Michael E.; Rudd, Mark A.; Mack, J. L.; Walge, Ernst K.; Lutsko, Jeffrey M.; Andrews, Harold G., II; Berinato, Robert J.; Zari, Michael C.; Budge, Mervin C.; Williams, Kyle W.

    1995-06-01

    We present the continuing development of an anti-jamming optical beamformer (AJOB) at Rome Laboratory's Photonics Division. Developments include live radar tests and new system designs. The purpose of the AJOB system is the cancellation of multipath jamming interference in advanced surveillance radars. AJOB is a multichannel adaptive optical system which performs cancellation of multiple wideband (10 MHz) interference sources in the presence of multipath. The live radar test consisted of using a downconverted 80 MHz received signal from the main and subarrays of a C-band radar to correlate jamming signals produced by stationary jammers. The correlation parameters fed a tapped delay line filter to form an estimate of the noise, which was subtracted from the main antenna signal. For the scenarios tested, the long integration time for the correlation data provided accurate estimates of the jammer delays, and therefore single-step convergence was achieved.

  17. RA-2 radar altimeter: instrument operation concept and system performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resti, A.; Idler, S.; Provvedi, F.; Zelli, C.

    1996-02-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has awared a contract to DAIMLER-BENZ Aerospace, Dornier to fly on ENVISAT-1 mission the Radar Altimeter RA-2 developed by Alenia Spazio SpA. RA-2 is a nadir pointing pulse limited radar altimeter operating at two frequencies: 13.575 Ghz (Ku-band) and 3.2 Ghz (S-band). Its key feature is represented by a new on board signal processing algorithm (Model Free Tracker-MFT) able to autonomously detect, acquire, lock-on and track the earliest part of the radar echoes at Ku band from ocean, ice and land surfaces without interruption, irrespective of sudden changes in surface characteristics and elevation. The radar echo samples collected at Ku-band are processed by the MFT algorithm to adjust the radar resolution and receiver gain to values which allow the proper sampling of the earliest part of the radar echo. Four resolutions are available corresponding to the transmitted pulse bandwidth of 320, 80, 20 MHz and CW pulse. The radar echo samples at S-band are collected at fixed resolution corresponding to a transmitted pulse bandwidth of 160 Mhz. They are processed on ground to remove from the height measurement performed at Ku-band the bias error introduced by the propagation through the ionosphere. Point Target Responce (PTR) measurements are also collected at every transmission without interrupting the tracking to monitor the variation of the parameters which have been calibrated on ground. To assess validity of the design, a series of simulation runs over a variety of simulated test scenarios, representing typical operative conditions as tracking over mountains, ice regions, wet lands, have been performed.

  18. Sea Clutter Reduction and Target Enhancement by Neural Networks in a Marine Radar System

    PubMed Central

    Vicen-Bueno, Raúl; Carrasco-Álvarez, Rubén; Rosa-Zurera, Manuel; Nieto-Borge, José Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The presence of sea clutter in marine radar signals is sometimes not desired. So, efficient radar signal processing techniques are needed to reduce it. In this way, nonlinear signal processing techniques based on neural networks (NNs) are used in the proposed clutter reduction system. The developed experiments show promising results characterized by different subjective (visual analysis of the processed radar images) and objective (clutter reduction, target enhancement and signal-to-clutter ratio improvement) criteria. Moreover, a deep study of the NN structure is done, where the low computational cost and the high processing speed of the proposed NN structure are emphasized. PMID:22573993

  19. FMCW radar for the sense function of sense and avoid systems onboard UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itcia, Eric; Wasselin, Jean-Philippe; Mazuel, Sébastien; Otten, Matern; Huizing, Albert

    2013-10-01

    Rockwell Collins France (RCF) radar department is currently developing, in close collaboration with TNO in The Hague, The Netherlands, a Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar sensor dedicated to Obstacle Warning function and potentially to air traffic detection. The sensor combines flood light illumination and digital beam forming to accommodate demanding detection and coverage requirements. Performances have been evaluated in flight tests and results prove that such a radar sensor is a good candidate for the Sense Function of Sense and Avoid Systems onboard UAV.

  20. Autonomous system for initializing synthetic aperture radar seeker acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, P.C.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described of guiding a missile having an active seeker including a synthetic aperture radar operating in a squint mode to a target aircraft having a search radar therein the maximum range of active seeker acquisition being within said missile's maneuver capability to intercept, and the maximum range of active seeker acquisition not exceeding the capability of the active seeker, said method comprising the steps of: launching said missile in response to detection of the search radar; implementing a passive seeker mode of operation to passively guide said missile towards said target aircraft in a manner to avoid detection of said missile by said target aircraft; transferring from said passive seeker mode to an active seeker mode in response to detected shutdown of said search radar; maneuvering said missile to execute a turn angle away from said target aircraft such that the search field of said synthetic aperture radar sweeps through an entire target uncertainty volume, said turn angle being within a first preselected limit and a second preselected limit such that said target aircraft does not cross over said missile's terminal flight path; and intercepting said target aircraft within a lethal range of said missile.

  1. Dual-Frequency Airborne Scanning Rain Radar Antenna System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Ziad A.; Green, Ken

    2004-01-01

    A compact, dual-frequency, dual-polarization, wide-angle-scanning antenna system has been developed as part of an airborne instrument for measuring rainfall. This system is an upgraded version of a prior single-frequency airborne rain radar antenna system and was designed to satisfy stringent requirements. One particularly stringent combination of requirements is to generate two dual-polarization (horizontal and vertical polarizations) beams at both frequencies (13.405 and 35.605 GHz) in such a way that the beams radiated from the antenna point in the same direction, have 3-dB angular widths that match within 25 percent, and have low sidelobe levels over a wide scan angle at each polarization-and-frequency combination. In addition, the system is required to exhibit low voltage standing-wave ratios at both frequencies. The system (see figure) includes a flat elliptical scanning reflector and a stationary offset paraboloidal reflector illuminated by a common-aperture feed system that comprises a corrugated horn with four input ports one port for each of the four frequency-and-polarization combinations. The feed horn is designed to simultaneously (1) under-illuminate the reflectors 35.605 GHz and (2) illuminate the reflectors with a 15-dB edge taper at 13.405 GHz. The scanning mirror is rotated in azimuth to scan the antenna beam over an angular range of 20 in the cross-track direction for wide swath coverage, and in elevation to compensate for the motion of the aircraft. The design of common-aperture feed horn makes it possible to obtain the required absolute gain and low side-lobe levels in wide-angle beam scanning. The combination of the common-aperture feed horn with the small (0.3) focal-length-to-diameter ratio of the paraboloidal reflector makes it possible for the overall system to be compact enough that it can be mounted on a DC-8 airplane.

  2. System concept and analysis of an Artificial Ionospheric Mirror (AIM) radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Robert D.; Stewart, Clayton V.; Wallace, Tom; Lallement, Pierre; Koert, Peter

    1990-08-01

    Recognition of performance limitations associated with traditional skywave over-the-horizon (OTH) high frequency (HF) radars has led a number of investigators to propose the creation of an Artificial Ionospheric Mirror (AIM) in the upper atmosphere, in order to reflect ground-based radar signals for OTH surveillance. The AIM is produced by beaming sufficient electromagnetic power to the lower ionosphere (around 70 km) to enhance the in situ ionization level to 10(exp 7) to 10(exp 8) electrons/cu cm, thereby providing an ionized layer capable of reflecting radar frequencies of 30 to 90 MHz. This paper presents a baseline AIM system concept and an associated performance evaluation, based upon the relevant ionization and propagation physics and in the context of air surveillance for the cruise missile threat. Results of the subject study indicate that a system using this concept would both complement and enhance the performance of the existing skywave OTH radars.

  3. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  4. Standoff concealed weapon detection using a 350 GHz radar imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2010-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is currently developing a 350 GHz, active, wideband, three-dimensional, radar imaging system to evaluate the feasibility of active sub-mm imaging for standoff concealed weapon detection. The prototype radar imaging system is based on a wideband, heterodyne, frequency-multiplier-based transceiver system coupled to a quasi-optical focusing system and high-speed rotating conical scanner. The wideband operation of this system provides accurate ranging information, and the images obtained are fully three-dimensional. Recent improvements to the system include increased imaging speed using improved balancing techniques, wider bandwidth, and image display techniques.

  5. High-resolution imaging using a wideband MIMO radar system with two distributed arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dang-wei; Ma, Xiao-yan; Chen, A-Lei; Su, Yi

    2010-05-01

    Imaging a fast maneuvering target has been an active research area in past decades. Usually, an array antenna with multiple elements is implemented to avoid the motion compensations involved in the inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging. Nevertheless, there is a price dilemma due to the high level of hardware complexity compared to complex algorithm implemented in the ISAR imaging system with only one antenna. In this paper, a wideband multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar system with two distributed arrays is proposed to reduce the hardware complexity of the system. Furthermore, the system model, the equivalent array production method and the imaging procedure are presented. As compared with the classical real aperture radar (RAR) imaging system, there is a very important contribution in our method that the lower hardware complexity can be involved in the imaging system since many additive virtual array elements can be obtained. Numerical simulations are provided for testing our system and imaging method. PMID:20051345

  6. The effect of ionospheric reflected noise on the performance of an orbital-debris radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Dennis F.

    1991-01-01

    An orbital-debris radar system was designed to detect the presence of small objects in low earth orbit by reflecting radio waves off the objects. The author provides a rigorous derivation of the ionospheric reflected noise power and provides an integration over the complete pulse period. Free electrons and ions contained in the ionosphere cause incoherent scatter of the radar signal. This ionospheric reflection tends to increase the noise at the terrestrial radar receiver. A parameter called the ionospheric scattering cross section per unit volume, which is a function of altitude, is useful for computing the power of the ionospheric reflection signal. The Doppler frequency speed of the ionospheric reflected signal is a function of altitude also. The ionospheric noise of a 9-GHz orbital-debris radar receiver is computed using these concepts. Annual and diurnal variations of the noise are included.

  7. Space shuttle Ku-band integrated rendezvous radar/communications system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of work performed on the Space Shuttle Ku-Band Integrated Rendezvous Radar/Communications System Study. The recommendations and conclusions are included as well as the details explaining the results. The requirements upon which the study was based are presented along with the predicted performance of the recommended system configuration. In addition, shuttle orbiter vehicle constraints (e.g., size, weight, power, stowage space) are discussed. The tradeoffs considered and the operation of the recommended configuration are described for an optimized, integrated Ku-band radar/communications system. Basic system tradeoffs, communication design, radar design, antenna tradeoffs, antenna gimbal and drive design, antenna servo design, and deployed assembly packaging design are discussed. The communications and radar performance analyses necessary to support the system design effort are presented. Detailed derivations of the communications thermal noise error, the radar range, range rate, and angle tracking errors, and the communications transmitter distortion parameter effect on crosstalk between the unbalanced quadriphase signals are included.

  8. Comparing Goldstone Solar System Radar Earth-based Observations of Mars with Orbital Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Larsen, K. W.; Jurgens, R. F.; Slade, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) has collected a self-consistent set of delay-Doppler near-nadir radar echo data from Mars since 1988. Prior to the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) global topography for Mars, these radar data provided local elevation information, along with radar scattering information with global coverage. Two kinds of GSSR Mars delay-Doppler data exist: low 5 km x 150 km resolution and, more recently, high (5 to 10 km) spatial resolution. Radar data, and non-imaging delay-Doppler data in particular, requires significant data processing to extract elevation, reflectivity and roughness of the reflecting surface. Interpretation of these parameters, while limited by the complexities of electromagnetic scattering, provide information directly relevant to geophysical and geomorphic analyses of Mars. In this presentation we want to demonstrate how to compare GSSR delay-Doppler data to other Mars datasets, including some idiosyncracies of the radar data. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  9. Impulse radar imaging system for concealed object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podd, F. J. W.; David, M.; Iqbal, G.; Hussain, F.; Morris, D.; Osakue, E.; Yeow, Y.; Zahir, S.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Electromagnetic systems for imaging concealed objects at checkpoints typically employ radiation at millimetre and terahertz frequencies. These systems have been shown to be effective and provide a sufficiently high resolution image. However there are difficulties and current electromagnetic systems have limitations particularly in accurately differentiating between threat and innocuous objects based on shape, surface emissivity or reflectivity, which are indicative parameters. In addition, water has a high absorption coefficient at millimetre wavelength and terahertz frequencies, which makes it more difficult for these frequencies to image through thick damp clothing. This paper considers the potential of using ultra wideband (UWB) in the low gigahertz range. The application of this frequency band to security screening appears to be a relatively new field. The business case for implementing the UWB system has been made financially viable by the recent availability of low-cost integrated circuits operating at these frequencies. Although designed for the communication sector, these devices can perform the required UWB radar measurements as well. This paper reports the implementation of a 2 to 5 GHz bandwidth linear array scanner. The paper describes the design and fabrication of transmitter and receiver antenna arrays whose individual elements are a type of antipodal Vivaldi antenna. The antenna's frequency and angular response were simulated in CST Microwave Studio and compared with laboratory measurements. The data pre-processing methods of background subtraction and deconvolution are implemented to improve the image quality. The background subtraction method uses a reference dataset to remove antenna crosstalk and room reflections from the dataset. The deconvolution method uses a Wiener filter to "sharpen" the returned echoes which improves the resolution of the reconstructed image. The filter uses an impulse response reference dataset and a signal-to-noise parameter to determine how the frequencies contained in the echo dataset are normalised. The chosen image reconstruction algorithm is based on the back-projection method. The algorithm was implemented in MATLAB and uses a pre-calculated sensitivity matrix to increase the computation speed. The results include both 2D and 3D image datasets. The 3D datasets were obtained by scanning the dual sixteen element linear antenna array over the test object. The system has been tested on both humans and mannequin test objects. The front surface of an object placed on the human/mannequin torso is clearly visible, but its presence is also seen from a tell-tale imaging characteristic. This characteristic is caused by a reduction in the wave velocity as the electromagnetic radiation passes through the object, and manifests as an indentation in the reconstructed image that is readily identifiable. The prototype system has been shown to easily detect a 12 mm x 30 mm x70 mm plastic object concealed under clothing.

  10. Radar observations of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska: Initial deployment of a transportable Doppler radar system for volcano-monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoblitt, R. P.; Schneider, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The rapid detection of explosive volcanic eruptions and accurate determination of eruption-column altitude and ash-cloud movement are critical factors in the mitigation of volcanic risks to aviation and in the forecasting of ash fall on nearby communities. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a transportable Doppler radar during the precursory stage of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, and it provided valuable information during subsequent explosive events. We describe the capabilities of this new monitoring tool and present data that it captured during the Redoubt eruption. The volcano-monitoring Doppler radar operates in the C-band (5.36 cm) and has a 2.4-m parabolic antenna with a beam width of 1.6 degrees, a transmitter power of 330 watts, and a maximum effective range of 240 km. The entire disassembled system, including a radome, fits inside a 6-m-long steel shipping container that has been modified to serve as base for the antenna/radome, and as a field station for observers and other monitoring equipment. The radar was installed at the Kenai Municipal Airport, 82 km east of Redoubt and about 100 km southwest of Anchorage. In addition to an unobstructed view of the volcano, this secure site offered the support of the airport staff and the City of Kenai. A further advantage was the proximity of a NEXRAD Doppler radar operated by the Federal Aviation Administration. This permitted comparisons with an established weather-monitoring radar system. The new radar system first became functional on March 20, roughly a day before the first of nineteen explosive ash-producing events of Redoubt between March 21 and April 4. Despite inevitable start-up problems, nearly all of the events were observed by the radar, which was remotely operated from the Alaska Volcano Observatory office in Anchorage. The USGS and NEXRAD radars both detected the eruption columns and tracked the directions of drifting ash clouds. The USGS radar scanned a 45-degree sector centered on the volcano while NEXRAD scanned a full 360 degrees. The sector strategy scanned the volcano more frequently than the 360-degree strategy. Consequently, the USGS system detected event onset within less than a minute, while the NEXRAD required about 4 minutes. The observed column heights were as high as 20 km above sea level and compared favorably to those from NEXRAD. NEXRAD tracked ash clouds to greater distances than the USGS system. This experience shows that Doppler radar is a valuable complement to traditional seismic and satellite monitoring of explosive eruptions.

  11. Acquisition and use of Orlando, Florida and Continental Airbus radar flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eide, Michael C.; Mathews, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse is developing a lookdown pulse Doppler radar for production as the sensor and processor of a forward looking hazardous windshear detection and avoidance system. A data collection prototype of that product was ready for flight testing in Orlando to encounter low level windshear in corroboration with the FAA-Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR). Airborne real-time processing and display of the hazard factor were demonstrated with TDWR facilitated intercepts and penetrations of over 80 microbursts in a three day period, including microbursts with hazard factors in excess of .16 (with 500 ft. PIREP altitude loss) and the hazard factor display at 6 n.mi. of a visually transparent ('dry') microburst with TDWR corroborated outflow reflectivities of +5 dBz. Range gated Doppler spectrum data was recorded for subsequent development and refinement of hazard factor detection and urban clutter rejection algorithms. Following Orlando, the data collection radar was supplemental type certified for in revenue service on a Continental Airlines Airbus in an automatic and non-interferring basis with its ARINC 708 radar to allow Westinghouse to confirm its understanding of commercial aircraft installation, interface realities, and urban airport clutter. A number of software upgrades, all of which were verified at the Receiver-Transmitter-Processor (RTP) hardware bench with Orlando microburst data to produce desired advanced warning hazard factor detection, included some preliminary loads with automatic (sliding window average hazard factor) detection and annunciation recording. The current (14-APR-92) configured software is free from false and/or nuisance alerts (CAUTIONS, WARNINGS, etc.) for all take-off and landing approaches, under 2500 ft. altitude to weight-on-wheels, into all encountered airports, including Newark (NJ), LAX, Denver, Houston, Cleveland, etc. Using the Orlando data collected on hazardous microbursts, Westinghouse has developed a lookdown pulse Doppler radar product with signal and data processing algorithms which detect realistic microburst hazards and has demonstrated those algorithms produce no false alerts (or nuisance alerts) in urban airport ground moving vehicle (GMTI) and/or clutter environments.

  12. On the Use of Low-Cost Radar Networks for Collision Warning Systems Aboard Dumpers

    PubMed Central

    González-Partida, José-Tomás; León-Infante, Francisco; Blázquez-García, Rodrigo; Burgos-García, Mateo

    2014-01-01

    The use of dumpers is one of the main causes of accidents in construction sites, many of them with fatal consequences. These kinds of work machines have many blind angles that complicate the driving task due to their large size and volume. To guarantee safety conditions is necessary to use automatic aid systems that can detect and locate the different objects and people in a work area. One promising solution is a radar network based on low-cost radar transceivers aboard the dumper. The complete system is specified to operate with a very low false alarm rate to avoid unnecessary stops of the dumper that reduce its productivity. The main sources of false alarm are the heavy ground clutter, and the interferences between the radars of the network. This article analyses the clutter for LFM signaling and proposes the use of Offset Linear Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (OLFM-CW) as radar signal. This kind of waveform can be optimized to reject clutter and self-interferences. Jointly, a data fusion chain could be used to reduce the false alarm rate of the complete radar network. A real experiment is shown to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system. PMID:24577521

  13. System Concepts for the Advanced Post-TRMM Rainfall Profiling Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Smith, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    Global rainfall is the primary distributor of latent heat through atmospheric circulation. The recently launched Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite is dedicated to advance our understanding of tropical precipitation patterns and their implications on global climate and its change. The Precipitation Radar (PR) aboard the satellite is the first radar ever flown in space and has provided. exciting, new data on the 3-D rain structures for a variety of scientific uses. However, due to the limited mission lifetime and the dynamical nature of precipitation, the TRMM PR data acquired cannot address all the issues associated with precipitation, its related processes, and the long-term climate variability. In fact, a number of new post-TRMM mission concepts have emerged in response to the recent NASA's request for new ideas on Earth science missions at the post 2002 era. This paper will discuss the system concepts for two advanced, spaceborne rainfall profiling radars. In the first portion of this paper, we will present a system concept for a second-generation spaceborne precipitation radar for operations at the Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The key PR-2 electronics system will possess the following capabilities: (1) A 13.6/35 GHz dual frequency radar electronics that has Doppler and dual-polarization capabilities. (2) A large but light weight, dual-frequency, wide-swath scanning, deployable antenna. (3) Digital chirp generation and the corresponding on-board pulse compression scheme. This will allow a significant improvement on rain signal detection without using the traditional, high-peak-power transmitters and without sacrificing the range resolution. (4) Radar electronics and algorithm to adaptively scan the antenna so that more time can be spent to observe rain rather than clear air. and (5) Built-in flexibility on the radar parameters and timing control such that the same radar can be used by different future rain missions. This will help to reduce the overall instrument development costs. In the second portion of this paper, we will present a system concept for a geostationary rainfall monitoring radar for operations at the geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). In particular, the science requirements, the observational strategy, the instrument design, and the required technologies will be discussed.

  14. Support of imaging radar for the shuttle system and subsystem definition study, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An orbital microwave imaging radar system suggested for use in conjunction with the space shuttle is presented. Several applications of the system are described, including agriculture, meteorology, terrain analysis, various types of mapping, petroleum and mineral exploration, oil spill detection and sea and lake ice monitoring. The design criteria, which are based on the requirements of the above applications, are discussed.

  15. Capability of patch antennas in a portable harmonic radar system to track insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring technologies are needed to track insects and gain a better understanding of their behavior, population, migration and movement. A portable microwave harmonic-radar tracking system that utilizes antenna miniaturization techniques was investigated to achieve this goal. The system mainly con...

  16. Primary propulsion of electrothermal, ion and chemical systems for space-based radar orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Staiger, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An orbit transfer mission concept has been studied for a Space-Based Radar (SBR) where 40 kW required for radar operation is assumed available for orbit transfer propulsion. Arcjet, pulsed electrothermal (PET), ion, and storable chemical systems are considered for the primary propulsion. Transferring two SBR per shuttle flight to 1112 km/60 deg using electrical propulsion systems offers an increased payload at the expense of increased trip time, up to 2000 kg each, which may be critical for survivability. Trade offs between payload mass, transfer time, launch site, inclination, and height of parking orbits are presented.

  17. Design and analysis of an FMCW radar system for vehicle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Nicholas; Hong, Lang; Roy, Arunesh

    2011-09-01

    Frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar have become common place in many roadside trac and on board vehicle safety systems. The accuracy in these systems is based on the underlying calibration of these sensors, which can be a time consuming and costly process. In our approach, using an uncalibrated commercial- o-the-shelf (COTS) radar sensor, vehicles were monitored along a roadside. A moving target indication (MTI) technique is used to reduce background clutter with thresholding and CFAR techniques used for signal detection. These detections are fed into an extended Kalman lter, and using dierent association approaches, the results are compared to GPS ground truth.

  18. SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar). Earth observing system. Volume 2F: Instrument panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The scientific and engineering requirements for the Earth Observing System (EOS) imaging radar are provided. The radar is based on Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C), and would include three frequencies: 1.25 GHz, 5.3 GHz, and 9.6 GHz; selectable polarizations for both transmit and receive channels; and selectable incidence angles from 15 to 55 deg. There would be three main viewing modes: a local high-resolution mode with typically 25 m resolution and 50 km swath width; a regional mapping mode with 100 m resolution and up to 200 km swath width; and a global mapping mode with typically 500 m resolution and up to 700 km swath width. The last mode allows global coverage in three days. The EOS SAR will be the first orbital imaging radar to provide multifrequency, multipolarization, multiple incidence angle observations of the entire Earth. Combined with Canadian and Japanese satellites, continuous radar observation capability will be possible. Major applications in the areas of glaciology, hydrology, vegetation science, oceanography, geology, and data and information systems are described.

  19. A User-friendly System for Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Classi cation based on Grayscale Distributional Properties and Context

    E-print Network

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    A User-friendly System for Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Classi cation based on Grayscale Aperture Radar SAR images. This system, unlike most of its competitors, allows a careful modeling Distributional Properties and Context Alejandro C. Frery1 Corina da C. F. Yanasse2 Pedro R. Vieira3 Sidnei J. S

  20. Network connectivity paradigm for the large data produced by weather radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenzi, Diego; Bechini, Renzo; Boraso, Rodolfo; Cremonini, Roberto; Fratianni, Simona

    2014-05-01

    The traffic over Internet is constantly increasing; this is due in particular to social networks activities but also to the enormous exchange of data caused especially by the so-called "Internet of Things". With this term we refer to every device that has the capability of exchanging information with other devices on the web. In geoscience (and, in particular, in meteorology and climatology) there is a constantly increasing number of sensors that are used to obtain data from different sources (like weather radars, digital rain gauges, etc.). This information-gathering activity, frequently, must be followed by a complex data analysis phase, especially when we have large data sets that can be very difficult to analyze (very long historical series of large data sets, for example), like the so called big data. These activities are particularly intensive in resource consumption and they lead to new computational models (like cloud computing) and new methods for storing data (like object store, linked open data, NOSQL or NewSQL). The weather radar systems can be seen as one of the sensors mentioned above: it transmit a large amount of raw data over the network (up to 40 megabytes every five minutes), with 24h/24h continuity and in any weather condition. Weather radar are often located in peaks and in wild areas where connectivity is poor. For this reason radar measurements are sometimes processed partially on site and reduced in size to adapt them to the limited bandwidth currently available by data transmission systems. With the aim to preserve the maximum flow of information, an innovative network connectivity paradigm for the large data produced by weather radar system is here presented. The study is focused on the Monte Settepani operational weather radar system, located over a wild peak summit in north-western Italy.

  1. Identification of inner parameters in laser radar measuring system through system error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhengchun; Zhang, Shujie; Wei, Yongfei; Hong, Maisheng

    2008-10-01

    This paper concerns the study of error modeling and inner parameter identification of 3D laser radar measuring system (LRMS) equipped with 2D laser sensor and electric servo motor, for the potential application of on-site measurement of the heavy forging object with temperature as high as 1000°C Firstly the physical and geometric model of 3D laser radar measuring system is presented. Detail discussion about the deterministic error and random error of the measuring system is conducted. Consequently the discipline of the deterministic error and the variation laws of random errors are achieved by the nonlinear equations set through the coordinate transformation. Finally based on the above discuss the identification method of inner geometrical parameter of the measuring system is presented by using the local linearization for nonlinear equations with Tailor Series Expansion Formula and the Least Square Algorithm. Therefore its measuring accuracy has been improved significantly. The results show this calibration method is helpful to the similar application of other measuring systems.

  2. Validation of the radiation pattern of the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renkwitz, T.; Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Stober, G.; Rapp, M.

    2012-09-01

    In 2009/2010 the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) installed a new powerful VHF radar on the island Andřya in Northern Norway (69.30° N, 16.04° E). The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) allows studies with high spatial and temporal resolution in the troposphere/lower stratosphere and in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere of the Arctic atmosphere. The monostatic radar is operated at 53.5 MHz with an active phased array antenna consisting of 433 Yagi antennas. Each individual antenna is connected to its own transceiver with independent phase control and a scalable power output of up to 2 kW, which implies high flexibility of beam forming and beam steering. During the design phase of MAARSY several model studies have been carried out in order to estimate the radiation pattern for various combinations of beam forming and steering. However, parameters like mutual coupling, active impedance and ground parameters have an impact on the radiation pattern, but can hardly be measured. Hence, experiments need to be designed to verify the model results. For this purpose, the radar has occasionally been used in passive mode, monitoring the noise power received from both distinct cosmic noise sources like e.g. Cassiopeia A and Cygnus A, and the diffuse cosmic background noise. The analysis of the collected dataset enables us to verify beam forming and steering attempts. These results document the current status of the radar during its development and provide valuable information for further improvement.

  3. Assessment of human respiration patterns via noncontact sensing using Doppler multi-radar system.

    PubMed

    Gu, Changzhan; Li, Changzhi

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory patterns at chest and abdomen are associated with both physical and emotional states. Accurate measurement of the respiratory patterns provides an approach to assess and analyze the physical and emotional states of the subject persons. Not many research efforts have been made to wirelessly assess different respiration patterns, largely due to the inaccuracy of the conventional continuous-wave radar sensor to track the original signal pattern of slow respiratory movements. This paper presents the accurate assessment of different respiratory patterns based on noncontact Doppler radar sensing. This paper evaluates the feasibility of accurately monitoring different human respiration patterns via noncontact radar sensing. A 2.4 GHz DC coupled multi-radar system was used for accurate measurement of the complete respiration patterns without any signal distortion. Experiments were carried out in the lab environment to measure the different respiration patterns when the subject person performed natural breathing, chest breathing and diaphragmatic breathing. The experimental results showed that accurate assessment of different respiration patterns is feasible using the proposed noncontact radar sensing technique. PMID:25785310

  4. Assessment of Human Respiration Patterns via Noncontact Sensing Using Doppler Multi-Radar System

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Changzhan; Li, Changzhi

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory patterns at chest and abdomen are associated with both physical and emotional states. Accurate measurement of the respiratory patterns provides an approach to assess and analyze the physical and emotional states of the subject persons. Not many research efforts have been made to wirelessly assess different respiration patterns, largely due to the inaccuracy of the conventional continuous-wave radar sensor to track the original signal pattern of slow respiratory movements. This paper presents the accurate assessment of different respiratory patterns based on noncontact Doppler radar sensing. This paper evaluates the feasibility of accurately monitoring different human respiration patterns via noncontact radar sensing. A 2.4 GHz DC coupled multi-radar system was used for accurate measurement of the complete respiration patterns without any signal distortion. Experiments were carried out in the lab environment to measure the different respiration patterns when the subject person performed natural breathing, chest breathing and diaphragmatic breathing. The experimental results showed that accurate assessment of different respiration patterns is feasible using the proposed noncontact radar sensing technique. PMID:25785310

  5. Design of integrated ship monitoring system using SAR, RADAR, and AIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chan-Su; Kim, Tae-Ho; Hong, Danbee; Ahn, Hyung-Wook

    2013-06-01

    When we talk about for the ship detection, identification and its classification, we need to go for the wide area of monitoring and it may be possible only through satellite based monitoring approach which monitors and covers coastal as well as the oceanic zone. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been widely used to detect targets of interest with the advantage of the operating capability in all weather and luminance free condition (Margarit and Tabasco, 2011). In EU waters, EMSA(European Maritime Safety Agency) is operating the SafeSeaNet and CleanSeaNet systems which provide the current positions of all ships and oil spill monitoring information in and around EU waters in a single picture to Member States using AIS, LRIT and SAR images. In many countries, a similar system has been developed and the key of the matter is to integrate all available data. This abstract describes the preliminary design concept for an integration system of RADAR, AIS and SAR data for vessel traffic monitoring. SAR sensors are used to acquire image data over large coverage area either through the space borne or airborne platforms in UTC. AIS reports should be also obtained on the same date as of the SAR acquisition for the purpose to perform integration test. Land-based RADAR can provide ships positions detected and tracked in near real time. In general, SAR are used to acquire image data over large coverage area, AIS reports are obtained from ship based transmitter, and RADAR can monitor continuously ships for a limited area. In this study, we developed individual ship monitoring algorithms using RADAR(FMCW and Pulse X-band), AIS and SAR(RADARSAT-2 Full-pol Mode). We conducted field experiments two times for displaying the RADAR, AIS and SAR integration over the Pyeongtaek Port, South Korea.

  6. Measurement data preprocessing in a radar-based system for monitoring of human movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawski, Roman Z.; Mi?kina, Andrzej; Bajurko, Pawe? R.

    2015-02-01

    The importance of research on new technologies that could be employed in care services for elderly people is highlighted. The need to examine the applicability of various sensor systems for non-invasive monitoring of the movements and vital bodily functions, such as heart beat or breathing rhythm, of elderly persons in their home environment is justified. An extensive overview of the literature concerning existing monitoring techniques is provided. A technological potential behind radar sensors is indicated. A new class of algorithms for preprocessing of measurement data from impulse radar sensors, when applied for elderly people monitoring, is proposed. Preliminary results of numerical experiments performed on those algorithms are demonstrated.

  7. Feasibility Study and Design of a Wearable System-on-a-Chip Pulse Radar for Contactless Cardiopulmonary Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zito, Domenico; Pepe, Domenico; Neri, Bruno; Zito, Fabio; De Rossi, Danilo; Lanatŕ, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    A new system-on-a-chip radar sensor for next-generation wearable wireless interface applied to the human health care and safeguard is presented. The system overview is provided and the feasibility study of the radar sensor is presented. In detail, the overall system consists of a radar sensor for detecting the heart and breath rates and a low-power IEEE 802.15.4 ZigBee radio interface, which provides a wireless data link with remote data acquisition and control units. In particular, the pulse radar exploits 3.1–10.6 GHz ultra-wideband signals which allow a significant reduction of the transceiver complexity and then of its power consumption. The operating principle of the radar for the cardiopulmonary monitoring is highlighted and the results of the system analysis are reported. Moreover, the results obtained from the building-blocks design, the channel measurement, and the ultra-wideband antenna realization are reported. PMID:18389068

  8. Along-track interferometry for simultaneous SAR and GMTI: application to Gotcha challenge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Ross W.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes several alternative techniques for detecting and localizing slowly-moving targets in cultural clutter using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. Here, single-pass data is jointly processed from two or more receive channels which are spatially offset in the along-track direction. We concentrate on two clutter cancelation methods known as the displaced phase center antenna (DPCA) technique and along-track SAR interferometry (AT-InSAR). Unlike the commonly-used space-time adaptive processing (STAP) techniques, both DPCA and AT-InSAR tend to perform well in the presence of non-homogeneous urban or mountainous clutter. We show, mathematically, the striking similarities between DPCA and AT-InSAR. Furthermore, we demonstrate using experimental SAR data that these two techniques yield complementary information, which can be combined into a "hybrid" technique that incorporates the advantages of each for significantly better performance. Results are generated using the Gotcha challenge data, acquired using a three-channel X-band spotlight SAR system.

  9. A System for Distributing Real-Time Customized (NEXRAD-Radar) Geosciences Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Satpreet; McWhirter, Jeff; Krajewski, Witold; Kruger, Anton; Goska, Radoslaw; Seo, Bongchul; Domaszczynski, Piotr; Weber, Jeff

    2010-05-01

    Hydrometeorologists and hydrologists can benefit from (weather) radar derived rain products, including rain rates and accumulations. The Hydro-NEXRAD system (HNX1) has been in operation since 2006 at IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering at The University of Iowa. It provides rapid and user-friendly access to such user-customized products, generated using archived Weather Surveillance Doppler Radar (WSR-88D) data from the NEXRAD weather radar network in the United States. HNX1 allows researchers to deal directly with radar-derived rain products, without the burden of the details of radar data collection, quality control, processing, and format conversion. A number of hydrologic applications can benefit from a continuous real-time feed of customized radar-derived rain products. We are currently developing such a system, Hydro-NEXRAD 2 (HNX2). HNX2 collects real-time, unprocessed data from multiple NEXRAD radars as they become available, processes them through a user-configurable pipeline of data-processing modules, and then publishes processed products at regular intervals. Modules in the data processing pipeline encapsulate algorithms such as non-meteorological echo detection, range correction, radar-reflectivity-rain rate (Z-R) conversion, advection correction, merging products from multiple radars, and grid transformations. HNX2's implementation presents significant challenges, including quality-control, error-handling, time-synchronization of data from multiple asynchronous sources, generation of multiple-radar metadata products, distribution of products to a user base with diverse needs and constraints, and scalability. For content management and distribution, HNX2 uses RAMADDA (Repository for Archiving, Managing and Accessing Diverse Data), developed by the UCAR/Unidata Program Center in the Unites States. RAMADDA allows HNX2 to publish products through automation and gives users multiple access methods to the published products, including simple web-browser based access, and OpenDAP access. The latter allows a user to set up automation at his/her end, and fetch new data from HNX2 at regular intervals. HNX2 uses a two-dimensional metadata structure called a mosaic for managing metadata of the rain products. Currently, HNX2 is in pre-production state and is serving near real-time rain-rate map data-products for individual radars and merged data-products from seven radars covering the state of Iowa in the United States. These products then drive a rainfall-runoff model called CUENCAS, which is used as part of the Iowa Flood Center (housed at The University of Iowa) real-time flood forecasting system. We are currently developing a generalized scalable framework that will run on inexpensive hardware and will provide products for basins anywhere in the continental United States.

  10. Development of an Ultra-Wideband Radar System for Vehicle Detection at Railway Crossings

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    a video detection system in a test at a crossing in Maywood, Illinois. If the test is successful According to statistics compiled during 1994 by the Federal Railroad Administration, 610 people were killed in this application include buried inductive loops, video cameras, and traditional radar. Buried inductive loop

  11. Flexible end-to-end system design for synthetic aperture radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaugg, Evan C.; Edwards, Matthew C.; Bradley, Joshua P.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents ARTEMIS, Inc.'s approach to development of end-to-end synthetic aperture radar systems for multiple applications and platforms. The flexible design of the radar and the image processing tools facilitates their inclusion in a variety of application-specific end-to-end systems. Any given application comes with certain requirements that must be met in order to achieve success. A concept of operation is defined which states how the technology is used to meet the requirements of the application. This drives the design decisions. Key to adapting our system to multiple applications is the flexible SlimSAR radar system, which is programmable on-the-fly to meet the imaging requirements of a wide range of altitudes, swath-widths, and platform velocities. The processing software can be used for real-time imagery production or post-flight processing. The ground station is adaptable, and the radar controls can be run by an operator on the ground, on-board the aircraft, or even automated as part of the aircraft autopilot controls. System integration takes the whole operation into account, seeking to flawlessly work with data links and on-board data storage, aircraft and payload control systems, mission planning, and image processing and exploitation. Examples of applications are presented including using a small unmanned aircraft at low altitude with a line of sight data link, a long-endurance UAV maritime surveillance mission with on-board processing, and a manned ground moving target indicator application with the radar using multiple receive channels.

  12. Shuttle orbiter KU-band radar/communications system design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An expanded introduction is presented which addresses the in-depth nature of the tasks and indicates continuity of the reported effort and results with previous work and related contracts, and the two major modes of operation which exist in the Ku-band system, namely, the radar mode and the communication mode, are described. The Ku-band radar system is designed to search for a target in a designated or undesignated mode, then track the detected target, which might be cooperative (active) or passive, providing accurate, estimates of the target range, range rate, angle and angle rate to enable the orbiter to rendezvous with this target. The radar mode is described along with a summary of its predicted performance. The principal sub-unit that implements the radar function is the electronics assembly 2(EA-2). The relationship of EA-2 to the remainder of the Ku-band system is shown. A block diagram of EA-2 is presented including the main command and status signals between EA-2 and the other Ku-band units.

  13. Data Acquisition System for Multi-Frequency Radar Flight Operations Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leachman, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    A three-channel data acquisition system was developed for the NASA Multi-Frequency Radar (MFR) system. The system is based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) industrial PC (personal computer) and two dual-channel 14-bit digital receiver cards. The decimated complex envelope representations of the three radar signals are passed to the host PC via the PCI bus, and then processed in parallel by multiple cores of the PC CPU (central processing unit). The innovation is this parallelization of the radar data processing using multiple cores of a standard COTS multi-core CPU. The data processing portion of the data acquisition software was built using autonomous program modules or threads, which can run simultaneously on different cores. A master program module calculates the optimal number of processing threads, launches them, and continually supplies each with data. The benefit of this new parallel software architecture is that COTS PCs can be used to implement increasingly complex processing algorithms on an increasing number of radar range gates and data rates. As new PCs become available with higher numbers of CPU cores, the software will automatically utilize the additional computational capacity.

  14. Decision making for urban drainage systems under uncertainty caused by weather radar rainfall measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qiang; Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei

    2015-04-01

    With the rapidly growth of urbanization and population, the decision making for managing urban flood risk has been a significant issue for most large cities in China. A high-quality measurement of rainfall at small temporal but large spatial scales is of great importance to urban flood risk management. Weather radar rainfall, with its advantage of short-term predictability and high spatial and temporal resolutions, has been widely applied in the urban drainage system modeling. It is recognized that weather radar is subjected to many uncertainties and many studies have been carried out to quantify these uncertainties in order to improve the quality of the rainfall and the corresponding outlet flow. However, considering the final action in urban flood risk management is the decision making such as flood warning and whether to build or how to operate a hydraulics structure, some uncertainties of weather radar may have little or significant influence to the final results. For this reason, in this study, we aim to investigate which characteristics of the radar rainfall are the significant ones for decision making in urban flood risk management. A radar probabilistic quantitative rainfall estimated scheme is integrated with an urban flood model (Storm Water Management Model, SWMM) to make a decision on whether to warn or not according to the decision criterions. A number of scenarios with different storm types, synoptic regime and spatial and temporal correlation are designed to analyze the relationship between these affected factors and the final decision. Based on this, parameterized radar probabilistic rainfall estimation model is established which reflects the most important elements in the decision making for urban flood risk management.

  15. Radar Observations of Convective Systems from a High-Altitude Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G.; Geerts, B.; Tian, L.

    1999-01-01

    Reflectivity data collected by the precipitation radar on board the tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, orbiting at 350 km altitude, are compared to reflectivity data collected nearly simultaneously by a doppler radar aboard the NASA ER-2 flying at 19-20 km altitude, i.e. above even the deepest convection. The TRMM precipitation radar is a scanning device with a ground swath width of 215 km, and has a resolution of about a4.4 km in the horizontal and 250 m in the vertical (125 m in the core swath 48 km wide). The TRMM radar has a wavelength of 217 cm (13.8 GHz) and the Nadir mirror echo below the surface is used to correct reflectivity for loss by attenuation. The ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP) has two antennas, one pointing to the nadir, 34 degrees forward. The forward pointing beam receives both the normal and the cross-polarized echos, so the linear polarization ratio field can be monitored. EDOP has a wavelength of 3.12 cm (9.6 GHz), a vertical resolution of 37.5 m and a horizontal along-track resolution of about 100 m. The 2-D along track airflow field can be synthesized from the radial velocities of both beams, if a reflectivity-based hydrometer fall speed relation can be assumed. It is primarily the superb vertical resolution that distinguishes EDOP from other ground-based or airborne radars. Two experiments were conducted during 1998 into validate TRMM reflectivity data over convection and convectively-generated stratiform precipitation regions. The Teflun-A (TEXAS-Florida Underflight) experiment, was conducted in April and May and focused on mesoscale convective systems mainly in southeast Texas. TEFLUN-B was conducted in August-September in central Florida, in coordination with CAMEX-3 (Convection and Moisture Experiment). The latter was focused on hurricanes, especially during landfall, whereas TEFLUN-B concentrated on central; Florida convection, which is largely driven and organized by surface heating and ensuing sea breeze circulations. Both TEFLUN-A and B were amply supported by surface data, in particular a dense raingauge network, a polarization radar, wind profilers, a mobile radiosonde system, a cloud physics aircraft penetrating the overflown storms, and a network of 10 cm Doppler radars(WSR-88D). This presentation will show some preliminary comparisons between TRMM, EDOP, and WSR-88D reflectivity fields in the case of an MCS, a hurricane, and less organized convection in central Florida. A validation of TRMM reflectivity is important, because TRMM's primary objective is to estimate the rainfall climatology with 35 degrees of the equator. Rainfall is estimated from the radar reflectivity, as well from TRMM's Microwave Imager, which measures at 10.7, 19.4, 21.3, 37, and 85.5 GHz over a broader swath (78 km). While the experiments lasted about three months the cumulative period of near simultaneous observations of storms by ground-based, airborne and space borne radars is only about an hour long. Therefore the comparison is case-study-based, not climatological. We will highlight fundamental differences in the typical reflectivity profiles in stratiform regions of MCS's, Florida convection and hurricanes and will explain why Z-R relationships based on ground-based radar data for convective systems over land should be different from those for hurricanes. These catastrophically intense rainfall from hurricane Georges in Hispaniola and from Mitch in Honduras highlights the importance of accurate Z-R relationships, It will be shown that a Z-R relationship that uses the entire reflectivity profile (rather than just a 1 level) works much better in a variety of cases, making an adjustment of the constants for different precipitation system categories redundant.

  16. Linearization using Digital Predistortion of a High-Speed, Pulsed, Radio Frequency Power Amplifier for VHF Radar Depth-Sounder Systems

    E-print Network

    Player, Kevin

    2010-03-29

    Depth-sounding radar systems provide the scientific data that are useful in modeling polar ice sheets and predicting sea-level rise. These radars are typically deployed on crewed aircraft; however, crewed missions over polar regions are difficult...

  17. The 94 GHz Cloud Radar System on a NASA ER-2 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Racette, Paul E.; Tian, Lin; Zenker, Ed

    2003-01-01

    The 94-GHz (W-band) Cloud Radar System (CRS) has been developed and flown on a NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft. The CRS is a fully coherent, polarimeteric Doppler radar that is capable of detecting clouds and precipitation from the surface up to the aircraft altitude in the lower stratosphere. The radar is especially well suited for cirrus cloud studies because of its high sensitivity and fine spatial resolution. This paper describes the CRS motivation, instrument design, specifications, calibration, and preliminary data &om NASA s Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) field campaign. The unique combination of CRS with other sensors on the ER-2 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study cloud radiative effects on the global energy budget. CRS observations are being used to improve our knowledge of atmospheric scattering and attenuation characteristics at 94 GHz, and to provide datasets for algorithm implementation and validation for the upcoming NASA CloudSat mission that will use a 94-GHz spaceborne cloud radar to provide the first direct global survey of the vertical structure of cloud systems.

  18. Tristatic observations of meteors using the 930 MHz European Incoherent Scatter radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, Diego; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta; Wannberg, Gudmund; Westman, Assar; HäGgströM, Ingemar; Meisel, David D.

    2002-11-01

    We report results from the first tristatic measurements of radar meteors obtained during 17 November 1997 and 1998, using the UHF (930 MHz) European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) radar system. The observing technique utilized for these observations was first reported by [1998a]. This system consists of three 32-m parabolic antennae located in northern Scandinavia. Since EISCAT observes mostly meteor head echoes, a general characteristic of high-power/large-aperture radars, direct Doppler velocity (±1 km/s) determinations are possible. In addition, using the technique reported here, absolute geocentric meteor velocity and good radiant information (±5°) are deduced for those meteors that are detected simultaneously by all three receivers. An overview of the methodology and a summary of the results obtained so far are reported in this work. We compare the results obtained using this method with those reported by previous large-aperture meteor radar work at lower frequencies and find general agreement. EISCAT detects mainly sporadic particles extending the fast daily sporadic micrometeor storms first suggested by [2000b] and [2001] to submillimeter particles. To the best of our knowledge, these observations represent the first of their kind and prove EISCAT to be a crucial instrument for the study of extraterrestrial particles entering the Earth's atmosphere, in particular at very high geocentric latitudes and high geocentric speeds.

  19. An Airborne Radar System for High-Resolution Mapping of Internal Layers P. Kanagaratnam, R. Eakin and S.P. Gogineni

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    An Airborne Radar System for High-Resolution Mapping of Internal Layers P. Kanagaratnam, R. Eakin and S.P. Gogineni The University of Kansas, Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory 2335 Irving Hill the use of high- resolution radars for mapping of near-surface internal layers and generating continuous

  20. MMW radar enhanced vision systems: the Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) and Radar-Enhanced Vision System (REVS) are rotary and fixed wing enhanced flight vision systems that enable safe flight operations in degraded visual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Jack; Schneider, John; Cariani, Pete

    2013-05-01

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has developed rotary and fixed wing millimeter wave radar enhanced vision systems. The Helicopter Autonomous Landing System (HALS) is a rotary-wing enhanced vision system that enables multi-ship landing, takeoff, and enroute flight in Degraded Visual Environments (DVE). HALS has been successfully flight tested in a variety of scenarios, from brown-out DVE landings, to enroute flight over mountainous terrain, to wire/cable detection during low-level flight. The Radar Enhanced Vision Systems (REVS) is a fixed-wing Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) undergoing prototype development testing. Both systems are based on a fast-scanning, threedimensional 94 GHz radar that produces real-time terrain and obstacle imagery. The radar imagery is fused with synthetic imagery of the surrounding terrain to form a long-range, wide field-of-view display. A symbology overlay is added to provide aircraft state information and, for HALS, approach and landing command guidance cuing. The combination of see-through imagery and symbology provides the key information a pilot needs to perform safe flight operations in DVE conditions. This paper discusses the HALS and REVS systems and technology, presents imagery, and summarizes the recent flight test results.

  1. Clutter suppression interferometry system design and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chad; Deming, Ross; Gunther, Jake

    2015-05-01

    Clutter suppression interferometry (CSI) has received extensive attention due to its multi-modal capability to detect slow-moving targets, and concurrently form high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from the same data. The ability to continuously augment SAR images with geo-located ground moving target indicators (GMTI) provides valuable real-time situational awareness that is important for many applications. CSI can be accomplished with minimal hardware and processing resources. This makes CSI a natural candidate for applications where size, weight and power (SWaP) are constrained, such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and small satellites. This paper will discuss the theory for optimal CSI system configuration focusing on sparse time-varying transmit and receive array manifold due to SWaP considerations. The underlying signal model will be presented and discussed as well as the potential benefits that a sparse time-varying transmit receive manifold provides. The high-level processing objectives will be detailed and examined on simulated data. Then actual SAR data collected with the Space Dynamic Laboratory (SDL) FlexSAR radar system will be analyzed. The simulated data contrasted with actual SAR data helps illustrate the challenges and limitations found in practice vs. theory. A new novel approach incorporating sparse signal processing is discussed that has the potential to reduce false- alarm rates and improve detections.

  2. Phase modulating the Urbana radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrington, L. J., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation of a switched phase modulation system for the Urbana Radar System are discussed. The system is implemented and demonstrated using a simple procedure. The radar system and circuits are described and analyzed.

  3. Parallel processing in a host plus multiple array processor system for radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkan, B. Z.

    1983-01-01

    Host plus multiple array processor architecture is demonstrated to yield a modular, fast, and cost-effective system for radar processing. Software methodology for programming such a system is developed. Parallel processing with pipelined data flow among the host, array processors, and discs is implemented. Theoretical analysis of performance is made and experimentally verified. The broad class of problems to which the architecture and methodology can be applied is indicated.

  4. Radar systems for a polar mission, volume 3, appendices A-D, S, T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Claassen, J. P.; Erickson, R. L.; Fong, R. K. T.; Hanson, B. C.; Komen, M. J.; Mcmillan, S. B.; Parashar, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    Success is reported in the radar monitoring of such features of sea ice as concentration, floe size, leads and other water openings, drift, topographic features such as pressure ridges and hummocks, fractures, and a qualitative indication of age and thickness. Scatterometer measurements made north of Alaska show a good correlation with a scattering coefficient with apparent thickness as deduced from ice type analysis of stereo aerial photography. Indications are that frequencies from 9 GHz upward seem to be better for sea ice radar purposes than the information gathered at 0.4 GHz by a scatterometer. Some information indicates that 1 GHz is useful, but not as useful as higher frequencies. Either form of like-polarization can be used and it appears that cross-polarization may be more useful for thickness measurement. Resolution requirements have not been fully established, but most of the systems in use have had poorer resolution than 20 meters. The radar return from sea ice is found to be much different than that from lake ice. Methods to decrease side lobe levels of the Fresnel zone-plate processor and to decrease the memory requirements of a synthetic radar processor are discussed.

  5. Auroral ion acoustic wave enhancement observed with a radar interferometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlatter, N. M.; Belyey, V.; Gustavsson, B.; Ivchenko, N.; Whiter, D.; Dahlgren, H.; Tuttle, S.; Grydeland, T.

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of naturally enhanced ion acoustic line (NEIAL) echoes obtained with a five-antenna interferometric imaging radar system are presented. The observations were conducted with the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT) radar on Svalbard and the EISCAT Aperture Synthesis Imaging receivers (EASI) installed at the radar site. Four baselines of the interferometer are used in the analysis. Based on the coherence estimates derived from the measurements, we show that the enhanced backscattering region is of limited extent in the plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. Previously it has been argued that the enhanced backscatter region is limited in size; however, here the first unambiguous observations are presented. The size of the enhanced backscatter region is determined to be less than 900 × 500 m, and at times less than 160 m in the direction of the longest antenna separation, assuming the scattering region to have a Gaussian scattering cross section in the plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. Using aperture synthesis imaging methods volumetric images of the NEIAL echo are obtained showing the enhanced backscattering region to be aligned with the geomagnetic field. Although optical auroral emissions are observed outside the radar look direction, our observations are consistent with the NEIAL echo occurring on field lines with particle precipitation.

  6. MICROPROCESSOR-BASED DATA-ACQUISITION SYSTEM FOR A BOREHOLE RADAR.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Jerry A.; Wright, David L.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient microprocessor-based system is described that permits real-time acquisition, stacking, and digital recording of data generated by a borehole radar system. Although the system digitizes, stacks, and records independently of a computer, it is interfaced to a desktop computer for program control over system parameters such as sampling interval, number of samples, number of times the data are stacked prior to recording on nine-track tape, and for graphics display of the digitized data. The data can be transferred to the desktop computer during recording, or it can be played back from a tape at a latter time. Using the desktop computer, the operator observes results while recording data and generates hard-copy graphics in the field. Thus, the radar operator can immediately evaluate the quality of data being obtained, modify system parameters, study the radar logs before leaving the field, and rerun borehole logs if necessary. The system has proven to be reliable in the field and has increased productivity both in the field and in the laboratory.

  7. GEOS-2 C-band radar system project. Spectral analysis as related to C-band radar data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Work performed on spectral analysis of data from the C-band radars tracking GEOS-2 and on the development of a data compaction method for the GEOS-2 C-band radar data is described. The purposes of the spectral analysis study were to determine the optimum data recording and sampling rates for C-band radar data and to determine the optimum method of filtering and smoothing the data. The optimum data recording and sampling rate is defined as the rate which includes an optimum compromise between serial correlation and the effects of frequency folding. The goal in development of a data compaction method was to reduce to a minimum the amount of data stored, while maintaining all of the statistical information content of the non-compacted data. A digital computer program for computing estimates of the power spectral density function of sampled data was used to perform the spectral analysis study.

  8. Radar Target Tracking Viterbi vs. IMM appeared in IEEE Trans. on Aerospace and Electronic Systems, Vol. 27, No. 3, pp. 550563, May 1991

    E-print Network

    Averbuch, Amir

    Radar Target Tracking ­ Viterbi vs. IMM appeared in IEEE Trans. on Aerospace and Electronic Systems and the Interacting Multiple Model algorithms, applied to radar tracking and detection, are investigated and compared, multifilters, radar tracking, Viterbi algorithm. I. INTRODUCTION Maneuvering targets are modeled

  9. A W-Band MMIC Radar System for Remote Detection of Vital Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Sebastian; Ayhan, Serdal; Scherr, Steffen; Massler, Hermann; Tessmann, Axel; Leuther, Arnulf; Ambacher, Oliver; Zwick, Thomas; Kallfass, Ingmar

    2012-12-01

    In medical and personal health systems for vital sign monitoring, contact-free remote detection is favourable compared to wired solutions. For example, they help to avoid severe pain, which is involved when a patient with burned skin has to be examined. Continuous wave (CW) radar systems have proven to be good candidates for this purpose. In this paper a monolithic millimetre-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) based CW radar system operating in the W-band (75-110 GHz) at 96 GHz is presented. The MMIC components are custom-built and make use of 100 nm metamorphic high electron mobility transistors (mHEMTs). The radar system is employing a frequency multiplier-by-twelve MMIC and a receiver MMIC both packaged in split-block modules. They allow for the determination of respiration and heartbeat frequency of a human target sitting in 1 m distance. The analysis of the measured data is carried out in time and frequency domain and each approach is shown to have its advantages and drawbacks.

  10. Improving Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging in High Loss Environments by Coordinated System Development, Data Processing, Numerical Modeling, & Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, David L.

    2004-12-01

    Improving Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging in High Loss Environments by Coordinated System Development, Data Processing, Numerical Modeling, and Visualization Methods with Applications to Site Characterization EMSP Project 86992 Progress Report as of 9/2004.

  11. Radar Observations of Convective System Variability in Relationship to African Easterly Waves during the 2006 AMMA Special Observing Period

    E-print Network

    Williams, Earle R.

    A radar-based analysis of the structure, motion, and rainfall variability of westward-propagating squall-line mesoscale convective systems (SLMCSs) in Niamey, Niger, during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities ...

  12. Analyzing the connectivity potential of landscape geomorphic systems: a radar remote sensing and GIS approach, Estufa Canyon, Texas, USA 

    E-print Network

    Ibrahim, ElSayed Ali Hermas

    2005-11-01

    . The landscape gradient, which is extracted from the Digital Elevation Model (DEM), and the surface roughness, which is extracted from radar images, are used to analyze the connectivity potential of geomorphic systems in the landscape. Integration...

  13. Cloud and Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Martin; Höller, Hartmut; Schmidt, Kersten

    Precipitation or weather radar is an essential tool for research, diagnosis, and nowcasting of precipitation events like fronts or thunderstorms. Only with weather radar is it possible to gain insights into the three-dimensional structure of thunderstorms and to investigate processes like hail formation or tornado genesis. A number of different radar products are available to analyze the structure, dynamics and microphysics of precipitation systems. Cloud radars use short wavelengths to enable detection of small ice particles or cloud droplets. Their applications differ from weather radar as they are mostly orientated vertically, where different retrieval techniques can be applied.

  14. A study of an orbital radar mapping mission to Venus. Volume 2: Configuration comparisons and systems evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Configuration comparisons and systems evaluation for the orbital radar mapping mission of the planet Venus are discussed. Designs are recommended which best satisfy the science objectives of the Venus radar mapping concept. Attention is given to the interaction and integration of those specific mission-systems recommendations with one another, and the final proposed designs are presented. The feasibility, cost, and scheduling of these configurations are evaluated against assumptions of reasonable state-of-the-art growth and space funding expectations.

  15. Analysis of Random Radar Networks

    E-print Network

    Adve, Raviraj

    , detection using distributed radar apertures has received renewed attention. Such a system avails of geometry in distributed radar systems. We first analyze unistatic systems with a single receiver selected of a noise-limited distributed radar system. This notion allows a system designer to evaluate the trade

  16. Radar vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haykin, Simon

    1989-09-01

    This paper describes work undertaken at the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) at McMaster University on a radar-based intelligent remote sensing device that is capable of developing an understanding or cognition of the surrounding environment. The proposed system has three levels of processing: (1) low level vision will perform preprocessing on incoming data; (2) intermediate level vision will perform feature extraction and target tracking; and (3) high level vision will perform knowledge processing for the purpose of target interpretation. A feedback link from this latter stage allows the radar to be automatically reconfigured for a different look at the target. Interactive probing of the potential target will continue until target recognition occurs. A sophisticated coherent cross polarizing radar with pulse compression capabilities, IPIX, has been developed and successfully tested in an ice infested marine environment off Newfoundland. Image analysis for IPIX is implemented on a Warp systolic machine, a highly parallel processor designed for vision research. A comparison between radar and human vision systems is provided.

  17. Noncontact screening system with two microwave radars for the diagnosis of sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Masayuki; Ueki, Katsuhiko; Tojima, Hirokazu; Matsui, Takemi

    2013-01-01

    There were two key problems in applying Doppler radar to a diagnosis system for sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. The first is noise associated with body movements and the second is the body positions in bed and the changes of the sleeping posture. We focused on the changes of the amplitude of the radar output signal corresponding to the changes in the tidal volume, and proposed a method of detecting the change of the respiratory amplitude value without the influence of body position in bed. In addition, we challenged the detection of the apnea-hypopnea event confirmed by accompanied rise of heart rates. To increase the accuracy of heart rate measurement, we propose a new automatic gain control and a real-time radar-output channel selection method based on a spectrum shape analysis. A prototype of the system was set up at a sleep disorder center in a hospital and field tests were carried out with eight subjects. Despite the subjects engaging in frequent body movements while sleeping, the system was quite effective in the diagnosis of sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (the correlation coefficient r = 0.98). PMID:24110122

  18. The EDOP radar system on the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heymsfield, G.M.; Bidwell, S.W.; Caylor, I.J.; Ameen, S.; Nicholson, S.; Boncyk, W.; Miller, L.; Vandemark, D.; Racette, P.E.; Dod, L.R.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft that emulates a satellite view of precipitation systems carries a variety of passive and active (lidar) remote sensing instruments. A new Doppler weather radar system at X band (9.6 GHz) called the ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP) has been developed and flown on the ER-2 aircraft. EDOP is a fully coherent Doppler weather radar with fixed nadir and forward pointing (33?? off nadir) beams that map out Doppler winds and reflectivities in the vertical plane along the aircraft motion vector. Doppler winds from the two beams can be used to derive vertical and along-track air motions. In addition, the forward beam provides linear depolarization measurements that are useful in discriminating microphysical characteristics of the precipitation. This paper deals with a general description of the EDOP instrument including the measurement concept, the system configuration and hardware, and recently obtained data examples from the instrument. The combined remote sensing package on the ER-2, along with EDOP, provides a unique platform for simulating spaceborne remote sensing of precipitation.

  19. Improved resistive-vee dipole based arbitrary polarization antenna system for ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sustman, James W.; Scott, Waymond R.

    2014-05-01

    A broadband arbitrary polarization antenna system for ground penetrating radar applications is modified to improve its performance. The antenna system uses four, crossed, resistive-vee dipole (RVD) antennas operating bistaticly to measure the simultaneous transmission and reception of multiple polarizations. The RVD has low self clutter, low radar cross section and wideband performance. The RVD is a linearly polarized antenna, but other polarizations can be synthesized through the use of two orthogonal RVDs to transmit or receive orthogonal field components. The antenna system is able to distinguish rotationally symmetric and linear targets with its ability to transmit and receive both senses of circular polarization. For example, linear targets such as wires or pipes can be identified by even scattering of both senses of circular polarization. The RVDs in the previous RVD-based CP (circularly polarized) antenna were not designed for CP synthesis. The shape and resistive profile of the RVD were modified to improve dual CP performance. The design of the RVD was optimized through simulation to improve CP synthesis and forward gain, while maintaining low self clutter, low radar cross section, and wide bandwidth. Additional simulations demonstrate that the improvements to the RVD may help to correctly discriminate targets based on their geometries.

  20. HiVision millimeter-wave radar for enhanced vision systems in civil and military transport aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirkl, Martin; Tospann, Franz-Jose

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents a guideline to meet the requirements of forward looking sensors of an enhanced vision system for both military and civil transport aircraft. It gives an update of a previous publication with special respect to airborne application. For civil transport aircraft an imaging mm-wave radar is proposed as the vision sensor for an enhanced vision system. For military air transport an additional high-performance weather radar should be combined with the mm-wave radar to enable advanced situation awareness, e.g. spot-SAR or air to air operation. For tactical navigation the mm-wave radar is useful due to its ranging capabilities. To meet these requirements the HiVision radar was developed and tested. It uses a robust concept of electronic beam steering and will meet the strict price constraints of transport aircraft. Advanced image processing and high frequency techniques are currently developed to enhance the performance of both the radar image and integration techniques. The advantages FMCW waveform even enables a sensor with low probability of intercept and a high resistance against jammer. The 1997 highlight will be the optimizing of the sensor and flight trials with an enhanced radar demonstrator.

  1. The Total Lightning and Radar Characteristics of Two Mesoscale Convective Systems Over Houston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, C. L.; Carey, L. D.; Ely, B. L.; Orville, R. E.

    2006-12-01

    The electrical and lightning properties of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) have been the focus of many research studies, with much of the past attention focusing on cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning in relation to storm structure. With the recent deployment of the Texas A&M University (TAMU) Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network in Houston, Texas, the three-dimensional properties of total (i.e., CG and intracloud [IC]) lightning may be readily observed in a sub-tropical, coastal and urban environment. In our study, LDAR VHF lightning source data were used in conjunction with National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) ground flash data and the Houston (KHGX) Weather Surveillance Radar - 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) to provide insight into the electrical nature and lightning structure of a leading line trailing stratiform (LLTS) MCS on 31 October 2005 and a bow echo MCS on 21 April 2006 that passed within range of the Houston LDAR network. For example, contoured frequency by altitude diagrams (CFADs) of radar reflectivity and rain totals were calculated within selected stratiform and convective regions for each radar volume scan as the MCSs evolved over the course of two hours. The slope (i.e., height vs. line-normal distance) of the VHF source distribution rearward of the convective line evolved during the observed lifecycle of the LLTS MCS. During the early stages, flashes originating in the convective line or transition zone traveled horizontally backward into the developing stratiform region with little or no downward slope. As the system matured, these flashes propagated with a more pronounced downward slope into the stratiform region toward the radar bright band. Preliminary radar analysis suggests that the intensity of stratiform region precipitation, including the bright band, played an important role in the changing slope of the lightning and inferred charge structure. CFADs show an increase in the frequency of high dBZ values (>30 dBZ), mean reflectivity profile, and rain totals over the selected stratiform region as the lightning began to slope downward and backward. The bow echo case showed a similar increase in intensity of the stratiform precipitation with time. In our study, we will present a complete analysis of total lightning flash structure for both cases along with a corresponding investigation of radar properties, and NLDN CG flash location, rate, peak currents, and polarity.

  2. An X-band radar system for bathymetry and wave field analysis in a harbour area.

    PubMed

    Ludeno, Giovanni; Reale, Ferdinando; Dentale, Fabio; Carratelli, Eugenio Pugliese; Natale, Antonio; Soldovieri, Francesco; Serafino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Marine X-band radar based systems are well tested to provide information about sea state and bathymetry. It is also well known that complex geometries and non-uniform bathymetries provide a much bigger challenge than offshore scenarios. In order to tackle this issue a retrieval method is proposed, based on spatial partitioning of the data and the application of the Normalized Scalar Product (NSP), which is an innovative procedure for the joint estimation of bathymetry and surface currents. The strategy is then applied to radar data acquired around a harbour entrance, and results show that the reconstructed bathymetry compares well with ground truth data obtained by an echo-sounder campaign, thus proving the reliability of the whole procedure. The spectrum thus retrieved is then analysed to show the evidence of reflected waves from the harbour jetties, as confirmed by chain of hydrodynamic models of the sea wave field. The possibility of using a land based radar to reveal sea wave reflection is entirely new and may open up new operational applications of the system. PMID:25594601

  3. An X-Band Radar System for Bathymetry and Wave Field Analysis in a Harbour Area

    PubMed Central

    Ludeno, Giovanni; Reale, Ferdinando; Dentale, Fabio; Carratelli, Eugenio Pugliese; Natale, Antonio; Soldovieri, Francesco; Serafino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Marine X-band radar based systems are well tested to provide information about sea state and bathymetry. It is also well known that complex geometries and non-uniform bathymetries provide a much bigger challenge than offshore scenarios. In order to tackle this issue a retrieval method is proposed, based on spatial partitioning of the data and the application of the Normalized Scalar Product (NSP), which is an innovative procedure for the joint estimation of bathymetry and surface currents. The strategy is then applied to radar data acquired around a harbour entrance, and results show that the reconstructed bathymetry compares well with ground truth data obtained by an echo-sounder campaign, thus proving the reliability of the whole procedure. The spectrum thus retrieved is then analysed to show the evidence of reflected waves from the harbour jetties, as confirmed by chain of hydrodynamic models of the sea wave field. The possibility of using a land based radar to reveal sea wave reflection is entirely new and may open up new operational applications of the system. PMID:25594601

  4. Microphysical processes observed by X band polarimetric radars during the evolution of storm systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Troemel, Silke; Simmer, Clemens

    2014-05-01

    Polarimetric radars are now widely used for characterizing storm systems since they offer significant information for the improvement for atmospheric models and numerical weather prediction. Their observations allow a detailed insight into macro- and micro-physical processes during the spatial and temporal evolution of storm systems. In the frame of the initiative for High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2), which focuses on improving the accuracy of climate models in relation to cloud and precipitation processes, the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) was designed to provide a critical model evaluation at scales covered by Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models, which in turn will be used to better understand sub-grid variability and microphysical properties and processes parameterized by larger scale models. Three X-band polarimetric radars deployed in Bonn (BoXPol) and in the vicinity of Juelich (JuXPol and KiXPol), Germany, were operated together with other instruments during the HOPE campaign, in order to obtain a holistic view of precipitation systems covering both macro- and microscopic processes. Given the variability of polarimetric moments observed by polarimetric radars, the corresponding microphysical processes occurring during the development of storm cells thus can be inferred accordingly. This study focuses on the microscopic processes of storm systems which were observed by RHI (range-height indicator) scans of the three X band radars. The two frequently observed microphysical processes during the HOPE campaign, coalescence and differential sedimentation, will be shown, and the evolution of droplet size distributions (DSDs) will be also analyzed. The associated DSDs which are retrieved using radar measured polarimetric moments are further verified by the polarimetric forward operator where the assumptions of non-spherical hydrometeors have been embedded. The results indicate that the estimated DSDs from the tested retrieval algorithms are in consistency with the identified microphysical processes although discrepancies still exist. Together with the analysis from the macroscopic perspective which quantifies macroscopic structures of storm cells like height, intensity and temporal change of brightband, a holistic view of the development of storm systems will be provided.

  5. Enhancements to the RADAR User Location and Tracking System

    E-print Network

    Karp, Brad

    and devices so users can effectively interact with their surroundings e.g. ­ Printing a document ­ Locating Alarm Location System ­ Daedalus Project ­ 3D-iD RF Tag System Merits: increased range Demerits: · Continuous user tracking · Environmental profiling · Extension of basic NNSS algorithm to a 3D space

  6. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, J.; Holmes, J.; Huth, G. K.; Iwasaki, R.; Maronde, R.; Polydoros, A.; Weber, C.; Broad, P.

    1980-01-01

    Tasks performed in an examination and critique of a Ku-band radar communications system for the shuttle orbiter are reported. Topics cover: (1) Ku-band high gain antenna/widebeam horn design evaluation; (2) evaluation of the Ku-band SPA and EA-1 LRU software; (3) system test evaluation; (4) critical design review and development test evaluation; (5) Ku-band bent pipe channel performance evaluation; (6) Ku-band LRU interchangeability analysis; and (7) deliverable test equipment evaluation. Where discrepancies were found, modifications and improvements to the Ku-band system and the associated test procedures are suggested.

  7. Radar-based Flood Warning System for Houston, Texas and Its Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, N.; Bedient, P.

    2009-12-01

    Houston has a long history of flooding problems as a serious nature. For instance, Houstonians suffered from severe flood inundation during Tropical Storm Allison in 2001 and Hurricane Ike in 2008. Radar-based flood warning systems as non-structural tools to provide accurate and timely warnings to the public and private entities are greatly needed for urban areas prone to flash floods. Fortunately, the advent of GIS, radar-based rainfall estimation using NEXRAD, and real-time delivery systems on the internet have allowed flood alert systems to provide important advanced warning of impending flood conditions. Thus, emergency personnel can take proper steps to mitigate against catastrophic losses. The Rice and Texas Medical Center (TMC) Flood Alert System (FAS2) has been delivering warning information with 2 to 3 hours of lead time to facility personnel in a readily understood format for more than 40 events since 1997. The system performed well during these major rainfall events with R square value of 93%. The current system has been improved by incorporating a new hydraulic prediction tool - FloodPlain Map Library (FPML). The FPML module aims to provide visualized information such as floodplain maps and water surface elevations instead of just showing hydrographs in real time based on NEXRAD radar rainfall data. During Hurricane Ike (September, 2008), FAS2 successfully provided precise and timely flood warning information to TMC with the peak flow difference of 3.6% and the volume difference of 5.6%; timing was excellent for this double-peaked event. With the funding from the Texas Department of Transportation, a similar flood warning system has been developed at a critical transportation pass along Highway 288 in Houston, Texas. In order to enable emergency personnel to begin flood preparation with as much lead time as possible, FAS2 is being used as a prototype to develop warning system for other flood-prone areas such as City of Sugar Land.

  8. Noise analysis for near-field 3D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-05-01

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for demanding security applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit performance in several ways. Practical imaging systems can employ arrays with low gain antennas and relatively large signal distribution networks that have substantial losses which limit transmit power and increase the effective noise figure of the receiver chain, resulting in substantial thermal noise. Phase noise can also limit system performance. The signal coupled from transmitter to receiver is much larger than expected target signals. Phase noise from this coupled signal can set the system noise floor if the oscillator is too noisy. Frequency modulated continuous wave (FM-CW) radar transceivers used in short range systems are relatively immune to the effects of the coupled phase noise due to range correlation effects. This effect can reduce the phase-noise floor such that it is below the thermal noise floor for moderate performance oscillators. Phase noise is also manifested in the range response around bright targets, and can cause smaller targets to be obscured. Noise in synthetic aperture imaging systems is mitigated by the processing gain of the system. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  9. The design of laser radar data acquisition system based on LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dalong; Han, Shaokun; Cao, Jingya; Xia, Wenze; Wang, Liang

    2015-08-01

    Lidar has been widely used in areas of ranging and imaging. To be able to perform real-time control of the entire system, this article designed a lidar data acquisition system based on LabVIEW and the PC system allows real-time display for data acquired by lidar system. Through the serial port, the PC system can adjust part of the laser radar system parameters, such as frequency, APD (Avalanche Photo Diode) bias, the echo threshold, etc in real-time. In this way, we achieve the instruction communication between the PC system and the lidar. In addition, the PC system can also acquire data from the lidar through the Ethernet. Through the practical test, the PC system can successfully acquire and display the echo signal measured by lidar system in real-time, and function of parameter adjustment is also very sensitive.

  10. Standoff concealed weapon detection using a 350-GHz radar imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Valdez, Patrick L. J.

    2010-04-01

    The sub-millimeter (sub-mm) wave frequency band from 300 - 1000 GHz is currently being developed for standoff concealed weapon detection imaging applications. This frequency band is of interest due to the unique combination of high resolution and clothing penetration. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is currently developing a 350 GHz, active, wideband, three-dimensional, radar imaging system to evaluate the feasibility of active sub-mm imaging for standoff detection. Standoff concealed weapon and explosive detection is a pressing national and international need for both civilian and military security, as it may allow screening at safer distances than portal screening techniques. PNNL has developed a prototype active wideband 350 GHz radar imaging system based on a wideband, heterodyne, frequency-multiplier-based transceiver system coupled to a quasi-optical focusing system and high-speed rotating conical scanner. This prototype system operates at ranges up to 10+ meters, and can acquire an image in 10 - 20 seconds, which is fast enough to scan cooperative personnel for concealed weapons. The wideband operation of this system provides accurate ranging information, and the images obtained are fully three-dimensional. During the past year, several improvements to the system have been designed and implemented, including increased imaging speed using improved balancing techniques, wider bandwidth, and improved image processing techniques. In this paper, the imaging system is described in detail and numerous imaging results are presented.

  11. A millimetre-wave MIMO radar system for threat detection in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, A. J.; Guetlein, J.; Bertl, S.; Detlefsen, J.

    2012-10-01

    The European Defence Agency (EDA) engages countermeasures against Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) by funding several scientific programs on threat awareness, countermeasures IEDs or land-mine detection, in which this work is only one of numerous projects. The program, denoted as Surveillance in an urban environment using mobile sensors (SUM), covers the idea of equipping one or more vehicles of a patrol or a convoy with a set of sensors exploiting different physical principles in order to gain detailed insights of the road situation ahead. In order to give an added value to a conventional visual camera system, measurement data from an infra-red (IR) camera, a radiometer and a millimetre-wave radar are fused with data from an optical image and are displayed on a human-machine-interface (HMI) which shall assist the vehicle's co-driver to identify suspect objects or persons on or next to the road without forcing the vehicle to stop its cruise. This paper shall especially cover the role of the millimetre-wave radar sensor and its different operational modes. Measurement results are discussed. It is possible to alter the antenna mechanically which gives two choices for a field of view and angular resolution trade-off. Furthermore a synthetic aperture radar mode is possible and has been tested successfully. MIMO radar principles like orthogonal signal design were exploited tofrom a virtual array by 4 transmitters and 4 receivers. In joint evaluation, it was possible to detect e.g. grenade shells under cardboard boxes or covered metal barrels which were invisible for optical or infra-red detection.

  12. REVIEW ARTICLE Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    REVIEW ARTICLE Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Christopher T. Allen Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory University of Kansas Abstract. This paper provides a brief review of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (In

  13. Evaluating a Radar-Based, Non Contact Streamflow Measurement System in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Mason, Robert R.; Costa, John E.; Plant, William J.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Haeni, F. Peter; Melcher, Nick B.; Keller, William C.; Hayes, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Accurate measurement of flow in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California, is vital to a wide range of Federal and State agencies, environmental interests, and water contractors. The U.S. Geological Survey uses a conventional stage-discharge rating technique to determine flows at Vernalis. Since the flood of January 1997, the channel has scoured and filled as much as 20 feet in some sections near the measurement site resulting in an unstable stage-discharge rating. In response to recent advances in measurement techniques and the need for more accurate measurement methods, the Geological Survey has undertaken a technology demonstration project to develop and deploy a radar-based streamflow measuring system on the bank of the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California. The proposed flow-measurement system consists of a ground-penetrating radar system for mapping channel geometries, a microwave radar system for measuring surface velocities, and other necessary infrastructure. Cross-section information derived from ground penetrating radar provided depths similar to those measured by other instruments during the study. Likewise, surface-velocity patterns and magnitudes measured by the pulsed Doppler radar system are consistent with near surface current measurements derived from acoustic velocity instruments. Since the ratio of surface velocity to mean velocity falls to within a small range of theoretical value, using surface velocity as an index velocity to compute river discharge is feasable. Ultimately, the non-contact radar system may be used to make continuous, near-real-time flow measurements during high and medium flows. This report documents the data collected between April 14, 2002 and May 17, 2002 for the purposes of testing this radar based system. Further analyses of the data collected during this field effort will lead to further development and improvement of the system.

  14. In-Service Evaluation of the Turbulence Auto-PIREP System and Enhanced Turbulence Radar Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Jason B.; Buck, Bill K.; Robinson, Paul A.; Ryan, Tim

    2007-01-01

    From August 2003 to December 2006, In-Service Evaluations (ISE) of the Turbulence Auto-PIREP System (TAPS) and Enhanced Turbulence (E-Turb) Radar, technologies developed in NASA's Turbulence Prediction and Warning System (TPAWS) element of its Aviation Safety and Security Program (AvSSP), were conducted. NASA and AeroTech Research established an industry team comprising AeroTech, Delta Air Lines, Rockwell Collins, and ARINC to conduct the ISEs. The technologies were installed on Delta aircraft and their effectiveness was evaluated in day-to-day operations. This report documents the establishment and conduct of the ISEs and presents results and feedback from various users.

  15. Predictability of heavy sub-hourly precipitation amounts for a weather radar based nowcasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Joan; Berenguer, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Heavy precipitation events and subsequent flash floods are one of the most dramatic hazards in many regions such as the Mediterranean basin as recently stressed in the HyMeX (HYdrological cycle in the Mediterranean EXperiment) international programme. The focus of this study is to assess the quality of very short range (below 3 hour lead times) precipitation forecasts based on weather radar nowcasting system. Specific nowcasting amounts of 10 and 30 minutes generated with a nowcasting technique (Berenguer et al 2005, 2011) are compared against raingauge observations and also weather radar precipitation estimates observed over Catalonia (NE Spain) using data from the Meteorological Service of Catalonia and the Water Catalan Agency. Results allow to discuss the feasibility of issuing warnings for different precipitation amounts and lead times for a number of case studies, including very intense convective events with 30minute precipitation amounts exceeding 40 mm (Bech et al 2005, 2011). As indicated by a number of verification scores single based radar precipitation nowcasts decrease their skill quickly with increasing lead times and rainfall thresholds. This work has been done in the framework of the Hymex research programme and has been partly funded by the ProFEWS project (CGL2010-15892). References Bech J, N Pineda, T Rigo, M Aran, J Amaro, M Gayŕ, J Arús, J Montanyŕ, O van der Velde, 2011: A Mediterranean nocturnal heavy rainfall and tornadic event. Part I: Overview, damage survey and radar analysis. Atmospheric Research 100:621-637 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosres.2010.12.024 Bech J, R Pascual, T Rigo, N Pineda, JM López, J Arús, and M Gayŕ, 2007: An observational study of the 7 September 2005 Barcelona tornado outbreak. Natural Hazards and Earth System Science 7:129-139 http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/nhess-7-129-2007 Berenguer M, C Corral, R Sa0nchez-Diezma, D Sempere-Torres, 2005: Hydrological validation of a radar based nowcasting technique. Journal of Hydrometeorology 6: 532-549 http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/JHM433.1 Berenguer M, D Sempere, G Pegram, 2011: SBMcast - An ensemble nowcasting technique to assess the uncertainty in rainfall forecasts by Lagrangian extrapolation. Journal of Hydrology 404: 226-240 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2011.04.033

  16. Automated Target Recognition Using Passive Radar and Coordinated Flight Models

    E-print Network

    Lanterman, Aaron

    approach to ATR compares the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of targets detected by a passive radar system, Passive Radar, Coordinated Flight Model, Radar Cross Section 1. INTRODUCTION Passive radar systems which if the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of the targets vary "slowly" with small changes in these components

  17. Radar system components to detect small and fast objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hülsmann, Axel; Zech, Christian; Klenner, Mathias; Tessmann, Axel; Leuther, Arnulf; Lopez-Diaz, Daniel; Schlechtweg, Michael; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Small and fast objects, for example bullets of caliber 5 to 10 mm, fired from guns like AK-47, can cause serious problems to aircrafts in asymmetric warfare. Especially slow and big aircrafts, like heavy transport helicopters are an easy mark of small caliber hand fire weapons. These aircrafts produce so much noise, that the crew is not able to recognize an attack unless serious problems occur and important systems of the aircraft fail. This is just one of many scenarios, where the detection of fast and small objects is desirable. Another scenario is the collision of space debris particles with satellites.

  18. Through-the-Wall Localization of a Moving Target by Two Independent Ultra Wideband (UWB) Radar Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kocur, Dušan; Švecová, Mária; Rov?áková, Jana

    2013-01-01

    In the case of through-the-wall localization of moving targets by ultra wideband (UWB) radars, there are applications in which handheld sensors equipped only with one transmitting and two receiving antennas are applied. Sometimes, the radar using such a small antenna array is not able to localize the target with the required accuracy. With a view to improve through-the-wall target localization, cooperative positioning based on a fusion of data retrieved from two independent radar systems can be used. In this paper, the novel method of the cooperative localization referred to as joining intersections of the ellipses is introduced. This method is based on a geometrical interpretation of target localization where the target position is estimated using a properly created cluster of the ellipse intersections representing potential positions of the target. The performance of the proposed method is compared with the direct calculation method and two alternative methods of cooperative localization using data obtained by measurements with the M-sequence UWB radars. The direct calculation method is applied for the target localization by particular radar systems. As alternative methods of cooperative localization, the arithmetic average of the target coordinates estimated by two single independent UWB radars and the Taylor series method is considered. PMID:24021968

  19. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  20. Abstract of Doctoral Dissertation in "Engineering and Public Policy, EPP" Gray-Space Spectrum Sharing with Cellular Systems and Radars, and Policy

    E-print Network

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    with a broadband hotspot service, or a cellular system using shared spectrum to supplement its dedicated spectrum Sharing with Cellular Systems and Radars, and Policy Implications Author: Rathapon Saruthirathanaworakun mechanisms are proposed for two different types of primary system: cellular systems, and rotating radars

  1. Surface current patterns in the Ibiza Channel with the use of High Frequency (HF) Radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lana, Arancha; Fernández, Vicente; Troupin, Charles; Pascual, Ananda; Orfila, Alejandro; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2014-05-01

    The Ibiza Channel located between the East Coast of the Iberian Peninsula, and the West Coast of Ibiza, at the Balearic Islands, is a well-known biodiversity hot spot. This area is relevant due to the interaction of water masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean - ascending through the Iberian Peninsula coast - with the older Atlantic waters descending from the Gulf of Lion. In 2012, the installation of Coastal HF Radar in the area provides valuable information for the study of the surface transport along the channel. The Coastal HF Radar operates since June 2012, and provides hourly surface current maps with a spatial resolution of approximately 3 km and a range reaching up to 70 km offshore. The instrument forms part of a monitoring multi-platform system, which is completed with satellite-derived data, gliders, modelling and fixed and lagrangian buoys. All HF Radar data are processed with standard quality control methods. Drifter velocity obtained from lagrangian buoys for two oceanographic campaigns, satellite-derived data and currentmeter data from a fixed buoy in the Ibiza Channel are used to validate the HF Radar data. All surface current data are used to perform a spectrum analysis in order to show the physical processes, at the main temporal periods. The contribution of the different temporal scales to the total Kinetic Energy has been analysed for the first time at different seasonal intervals. This served to evaluate the energetic importance of the different components of the surface currents. The inertial currents have a lower contribution to the total KE during winter, compared with the summer period. Besides, the spatial distribution of the inertial component to the total KE varies seasonally, and according to the bathymetry of the area. The low-pass (sub-inertial) filtered HF Radar currents show a predominant northern current during the summer months in the channel, and a mean southern current during the winter period. These results are discussed and related with the external forcing, and bathymetry distribution, according to coastal or open ocean data.

  2. Search and target acquisition radar for short range air defence systems: A new threat environment - A new solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winnberg, J. O.

    A new radar sensor designed to meet the demands of the future threat environment of air defense systems and to serve as search and target acquisition radar in short range air defense systems is presented. The design makes use of several technology advances, such as planar array phase controlled antenna, solid state transmitters, frequency agility combined with Doppler processing, and a multimode software-controlled signal processing. The development of the threat environment is briefly considered, and the consequential requirements for the air defense system are investigated. The general principles and design of the radar are addressed, and the data and performance of the system, as calculated and as verified with a prototype system, are presented.

  3. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  4. The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System: improved capabilities and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latteck, Ralph; Stober, Gunter; Singer, Werner; Renkwitz, Toralf; Strelnikova, Irina; Chau, Jorge L.; Sommer, Svenja; Schult, Carsten

    In 2011 the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Kühlungsborn completed the installation of the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) on the North-Norwegian island Andoya. MAARSY allows classical beam swinging operation as well as experiments with simultaneous multiple beams and the use of interferometric applications for improved studies of the Arctic atmosphere from the troposphere up to the lower thermosphere with high spatio-temporal resolution. Observations of polar mesosphere echoes have been carried out continuously to study their characterizes and occurrence during summer and winter time. Results from multi-beam experiments conducted during various campaigns to investigate the horizontal structures of mesospheric echoes indicate that the underlying structures and processes reveal a high spatial variability. Sophisticated wind analysis methods such as an extended velocity azimuth display have been applied to retrieve additional parameters from the wind field, e.g. horizontal divergence, vertical velocity, stretching and shearing deformation. HPLA radar systems as MAARSY can detect reflections from plasma irregularities around meteoroids called meteor-head echoes. The interferometric capabilities of MAARSY permit the determination of the meteor trajectories within the radar beam with high accuracy. The received data are used to gain information about entry velocities, source radiants, observation heights and other meteoroid parameters. In September 2013 the upgrade of the MAARSY antenna array to circular polarization was completed allowing the system to perform incoherent scatter observations of the D and E region. We present a description of new capabilities of MAARSY and show observational results obtained during campaigns over a period of 3 years of operation.

  5. Digital Terrestrial Video Broadcast Interference Suppression in Forward-Looking Ground Penetrating Radar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rial, F. I.; Mendez-Rial, Roi; Lawadka, Lukasz; Gonzalez-Huici, Maria A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we show how radio frequency interference (RFI) generated by digital video broadcasting terrestrial and digital audio broadcasting transmitters can be an important noise source for forward-looking ground penetrating radar (FLGPR) systems. Even in remote locations the average interference power sometimes exceeds ultra-wideband signals by many dB, becoming the limiting factor in the system sensitivity. The overall problem of RFI and its impact in GPR systems is briefly described and several signal processing approaches to removal of RFI are discussed. These include spectral estimation and coherent subtraction algorithms and various filter approaches which have been developed and applied by the research community in similar contexts. We evaluate the performance of these methods by simulating two different scenarios submitted to real RFI acquired with a FLGPR system developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR), (GER). The effectiveness of these algorithms in removing RFI is presented using some performance indices after suppression.

  6. Aeronomy report no. 74: The Urbana meteor-radar system; design, development, and first observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, G. C.; Geller, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The design, development, and first observations of a high power meteor-radar system located near Urbana, Illinois are described. The roughly five-fold increase in usable echo rate compared to other facilities, along with automated digital data processing and interferometry measurement of echo arrival angles, permits unsurpassed observations of tidal structure and shorter period waves. Such observations are discussed. The technique of using echo decay rates to infer density and scale height and the method of inferring wind shear from radial acceleration are examined. An original experiment to test a theory of the Delta-region winter anomaly is presented.

  7. Microprocessor realizations of range and range-rate filters in radar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, D.; Aronhime, P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of digital radar range-rate filters on a microprocessor-based system. A range-rate filter processes a digitized noisy range signal to recover smoothed range data and its derivative, range rate. Two filter designs are implemented. Considerations aiding their efficient operation on an 8-bit microprocessor are discussed. The filters are subjected to a noisy range input signal of known variance, and the associated output signals are statistically analysed to determine noise-rejection characteristics. These results are compared to analytical predictions.

  8. Location detection and tracking of moving targets by a 2D IR-UWB radar system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van-Han; Pyun, Jae-Young

    2015-01-01

    In indoor environments, the Global Positioning System (GPS) and long-range tracking radar systems are not optimal, because of signal propagation limitations in the indoor environment. In recent years, the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) technology has become a possible solution for object detection, localization and tracking in indoor environments, because of its high range resolution, compact size and low cost. This paper presents improved target detection and tracking techniques for moving objects with impulse-radio UWB (IR-UWB) radar in a short-range indoor area. This is achieved through signal-processing steps, such as clutter reduction, target detection, target localization and tracking. In this paper, we introduce a new combination consisting of our proposed signal-processing procedures. In the clutter-reduction step, a filtering method that uses a Kalman filter (KF) is proposed. Then, in the target detection step, a modification of the conventional CLEAN algorithm which is used to estimate the impulse response from observation region is applied for the advanced elimination of false alarms. Then, the output is fed into the target localization and tracking step, in which the target location and trajectory are determined and tracked by using unscented KF in two-dimensional coordinates. In each step, the proposed methods are compared to conventional methods to demonstrate the differences in performance. The experiments are carried out using actual IR-UWB radar under different scenarios. The results verify that the proposed methods can improve the probability and efficiency of target detection and tracking. PMID:25808773

  9. Location Detection and Tracking of Moving Targets by a 2D IR-UWB Radar System

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van-Han; Pyun, Jae-Young

    2015-01-01

    In indoor environments, the Global Positioning System (GPS) and long-range tracking radar systems are not optimal, because of signal propagation limitations in the indoor environment. In recent years, the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) technology has become a possible solution for object detection, localization and tracking in indoor environments, because of its high range resolution, compact size and low cost. This paper presents improved target detection and tracking techniques for moving objects with impulse-radio UWB (IR-UWB) radar in a short-range indoor area. This is achieved through signal-processing steps, such as clutter reduction, target detection, target localization and tracking. In this paper, we introduce a new combination consisting of our proposed signal-processing procedures. In the clutter-reduction step, a filtering method that uses a Kalman filter (KF) is proposed. Then, in the target detection step, a modification of the conventional CLEAN algorithm which is used to estimate the impulse response from observation region is applied for the advanced elimination of false alarms. Then, the output is fed into the target localization and tracking step, in which the target location and trajectory are determined and tracked by using unscented KF in two-dimensional coordinates. In each step, the proposed methods are compared to conventional methods to demonstrate the differences in performance. The experiments are carried out using actual IR-UWB radar under different scenarios. The results verify that the proposed methods can improve the probability and efficiency of target detection and tracking. PMID:25808773

  10. Collaborative Observations of Near-Earth Asteroids with the Goldstone and Arecibo Radar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Goldstone (70-m diameter, 8560 MHz/X band) and Arecibo (305-m diameter, 2380 MHz/S band) solar system radars have long worked independently, yet in tandem, to observe near-Earth asteroids as they make close flybys of Earth. The complementary nature of each site's strengths, Goldstone's maneuverability (and, recently, higher spatial resolution) and Arecibo's higher nominal output power and unmatched collecting area, allow for better constraints on sizes, shapes, spin states, and surface properties of near-Earth asteroids than either system can provide on its own. Here, we will discuss a handful of objects observed with both facilities, including binary asteroids (285263) 1998 QE2 and (153958) 2002 AM31 and contact-binary asteroid (192642) 1999 RD32, and describe how the complementary nature of the Goldstone and Arecibo radars has enhanced our knowledge of these small bodies. The importance of collaboration between Goldstone and Arecibo will only increase in the future as we look to expand the use of high-resolution bistatic observations of near-Earth asteroids, where both sites simultaneously observe a target. Observations this past June during the close flyby of 2014 HQ124 (Benner et al., this meeting) demonstrated reception at Arecibo of a 40-MHz bandwidth (3.75-m resolution), X-band transmission from Goldstone. Future capabilities of the Deep Space Network (Busch et al., this meeting), such as the 80-MHz (1.875-m resolution) radar on the Goldstone 34-m dish, will benefit greatly from the sensitivity of Arecibo's large aperture.

  11. An Ultra-Wideband Radar System for Through-the-Wall Imaging using a Mobile Robot

    E-print Network

    , rescue missions in collapsed buildings, and target feature extraction. While narrowband Doppler radar Doppler radar in the millimeter- wave or infrared spectrum has been shown to provide good resolution to Doppler radar for through-the-wall imaging: UWB compensates for the significant drop in center frequency

  12. Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    KB Widener; K Johnson

    2005-01-30

    The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

  13. Hybrid optical/electronic signal processor for laser radar signals in fire control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findley, George B., Jr.; Anderson, Christopher S.; Townley, S. K.; Pascale, Michael J.; Watson, Lee V.; Jenkinson, Howard A.

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid optical/electronic signal processor for laser radar signals in fire control applications. The breadboard system being developed consists of three subsystems: (1) a signal generator producing target-representative signals, (2) the signal processor consisting of a radiometric channel and a Doppler channel, and (3) a data acquisition, analysis, and display subsystem. The radiometric channel provides target ladar cross section (LCS) resolved in crossrange, while the Doppler channel provides target radial velocity, also resolved in crossrange. Data from the two channels is fused and processed within the data analysis subsystem. Results are to be displayed in near real-time. The breadboard system will be used to demonstrate the capabilities of hybrid signal processor technology and to investigate processing laser radar returns for noncooperative target recognition, target orientation determination, and target trajectory estimation functions. It is anticipated that these functions will enhance the effectiveness of advanced fire control systems in future helicopters and ground vehicles.

  14. HERMES: a high-speed radar imaging system for inspection of bridge decks

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-10-26

    Corrosion of rebar in concrete bridges causes subsurface cracks and is a major cause of structural degradation that necessitates repair or replacement. Early detection of corrosion effects can limit the location and extent of necessary repairs, while providing long-term information about the infrastructure status. Most current detection methods, however, are destructive of the road surface and require closing or restricting traffic while the tests are performed. A ground-penetrating radar imaging system has been designed and developed that will perform the nondestructive evaluation of road-bed cracking at traffic speeds; i.e., without the need to restrict traffic flow. The first-generation system (called the HERMES bridge inspector), consists of an offset-linear array of 64 impulse radar transceivers and associated electronics housed in a trailer. Computers in the trailer and in the towing vehicle control the data acquisition, processing, and display. Cross-road resolution is three centimeters at up to 30 cm in depth, while down-road resolution depends on speed; 3 cm below 20 mph up to 8 cm at 50 mph. A two-meter- wide path is inspected on each pass over the roadway. This paper, describes the design of this system, shows preliminary results, and lays out its deployment schedule.

  15. The application of digital signal processing techniques to a teleoperator radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujol, A.

    1982-01-01

    A digital signal processing system was studied for the determination of the spectral frequency distribution of echo signals from a teleoperator radar system. The system consisted of a sample and hold circuit, an analog to digital converter, a digital filter, and a Fast Fourier Transform. The system is interfaced to a 16 bit microprocessor. The microprocessor is programmed to control the complete digital signal processing. The digital filtering and Fast Fourier Transform functions are implemented by a S2815 digital filter/utility peripheral chip and a S2814A Fast Fourier Transform chip. The S2815 initially simulates a low-pass Butterworth filter with later expansion to complete filter circuit (bandpass and highpass) synthesizing.

  16. Shuttle synthetic aperture radar implementation study, volume 1. [flight instrument and ground data processor system for collecting raw imaged radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlis, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    Results of an implementation study for a synthetic aperture radar for the space shuttle orbiter are described. The overall effort was directed toward the determination of the feasibility and usefulness of a multifrequency, multipolarization imaging radar for the shuttle orbiter. The radar is intended for earth resource monitoring as well as oceanographic and marine studies.

  17. Trilateration-based localization algorithm for ADS-B radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Shih

    Rapidly increasing growth and demand in various unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have pushed governmental regulation development and numerous technology research advances toward integrating unmanned and manned aircraft into the same civil airspace. Safety of other airspace users is the primary concern; thus, with the introduction of UAV into the National Airspace System (NAS), a key issue to overcome is the risk of a collision with manned aircraft. The challenge of UAV integration is global. As automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) system has gained wide acceptance, additional exploitations of the radioed satellite-based information are topics of current interest. One such opportunity includes the augmentation of the communication ADS-B signal with a random bi-phase modulation for concurrent use as a radar signal for detecting other aircraft in the vicinity. This dissertation provides detailed discussion about the ADS-B radar system, as well as the formulation and analysis of a suitable non-cooperative multi-target tracking method for the ADS-B radar system using radar ranging techniques and particle filter algorithms. In order to deal with specific challenges faced by the ADS-B radar system, several estimation algorithms are studied. Trilateration-based localization algorithms are proposed due to their easy implementation and their ability to work with coherent signal sources. The centroid of three most closely spaced intersections of constant-range loci is conventionally used as trilateration estimate without rigorous justification. In this dissertation, we address the quality of trilateration intersections through range scaling factors. A number of well-known triangle centers, including centroid, incenter, Lemoine point (LP), and Fermat point (FP), are discussed in detail. To the author's best knowledge, LP was never associated with trilateration techniques. According our study, LP is proposed as the best trilateration estimator thanks to the desirable property that the total distance to three triangle edges is minimized. It is demonstrated through simulation that LP outperforms centroid localization without additional computational load. In addition, severe trilateration scenarios such as two-intersection cases are considered in this dissertation, and enhanced trilateration algorithms are proposed. Particle filter (PF) is also discussed in this dissertation, and a simplified resampling mechanism is proposed. In addition, the low-update-rate measurement due to the ADS-B system specification is addressed in order to provide acceptable estimation results. Supplementary particle filter (SPF) is proposed to takes advantage of the waiting time before the next measurement is available and improves the estimation convergence rate and estimation accuracy. While PF suffers from sample impoverishment, especially when the number of particles is not sufficiently large, SPF allows the particles to redistribute to high likelihood areas over iterations using the same measurement information, thereby improving the estimation performance.

  18. On the combined use of radar systems for multi-scale imaging of transport infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, I.; Bavusi, M.; Loperte, A.; Crocco, L.; Soldovieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) systems are worth to be considered as in situ non invasive diagnostic tools capable of assessing stability and integrity of transport infrastructures. As a matter of fact, by exploiting the interactions among probing electromagnetic waves and hidden objects, they provide images of the inner status of the spatial region under test from which infer risk factors, such as deformations and oxidization of the reinforcement bars as well as water infiltrations, crack and air gaps. With respect to the assessment of concrete infrastructures integrity, the reconstruction capabilities of GPR systems have been widely investigated [1,2]. However, the demand for diagnostic tools capable of providing detailed and real time information motivates the design and the performance evaluation of novel technologies and data processing methodologies aimed not only to effectively detect hidden anomalies but also to estimate their geometrical features. In this framework, this communication aims at investigating the advantages offered by the joint use of two GPR systems both of them equipped with a specific tomographic imaging approach. The first considered system is a time domain GPR equipped with a 1.5GHz shielded antenna, which is suitable for quick and good resolution surveys of the shallower layers of the structure. As second system, the holographic radar Rascan-4/4000 [3,4] is taken into account, due to its capability of providing holograms of hidden targets from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered field and a reference signal. The imaging capabilities of both the GPR tools are enhanced by means of model based data processing approaches, which afford the imaging as a linear inverse scattering problem. Mathematical details on the inversion strategies will be provided at the conference. The combined use of the above GPR systems allows to perform multi-resolution surveys of the region under test, whose aim is, first of all, to detect hidden anomalies and then to provide a high resolution image of their geometrical features. Therefore, reliable and efficient diagnostic surveys devoted to state the healthy state of a structure can be scheduled. Numerical examples and on field validations assessing the achievable reconstruction capabilities will be provided at the conference. [1] D. J. Daniels, Ground Penetrating Radar, in IEE Radar, Sonar and Navigation Series 15, London, U.K.: IEE, 2004. [2] M. Proto, M. Bavusi, R. Bernini et al., Transport Infrastructure Surveillance and Monitoring by Electromagnetic Sensing: The ISTIMES Project, Sensors, vol.10, n.12, pp.10620-10639, 2010. [3] S. Ivashov, I. A. Vasiliev, T. D. Bechtel, C. Snapp, Comparison between impulse and holographic subsurface radar for NDT of space vehicle structural materials, Progress In Electromagnetic Research, vol.3, pp.658-661, 2004. [4] I. Catapano. L. Crocco, A. F. Morabito, F. Soldovieri, Tomographic imaging of holographic GPR data for non-invasive structural assessment: the Musmeci Bridge investigation, submitted to Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation Acknowledgement The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement no 225663.

  19. Utilization of AN/APS-94 side-looking airborne radar systems in search and rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmer, S. R.; Nash, L.; Hover, G. L.; Mazour, T. J.

    1982-04-01

    Since September 1978, side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) detection data have been gathered in conjunction with visual detection experiments conducted by the U.S.C.G. R&D Center. These are part of a series of experiments designed to improve search planning guidance contained in the National Search and Rescue Manual. HC-130 aircraft, equipped with either the Airborne Oil Surveillance system (AOSS) or SLAR/radar image processor (SLAR/RIP) configuration of the AN/APS-94C or D SLAR, conducted controlled searches for life rafts, small boats, and 41-to 95-foot Coast Guard vessels. Through the use of a microwave tracking system and SLAR data, the positions of searchers and targets were accurately reconstructed to facilitate the verification of detections on SLAR films or video tape. These data were used to evaluate the effects of environmental and controllable parameters on SLAR detection of the various target types. Of the 12 parameters investigated, target size/composition, search altitude, swell height, wind speed, and humidity/precipitation were found to have a significant influence on SLAR detection performance. Sweep widths for SLAR search and recommendations for SLAR utilization in SAR missions are included. In addition, recommendations for future SLAR evaluation are made.

  20. Radar systems for the water resources mission. Volume 4: Appendices E-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Claassen, J. P.; Erickson, R. L.; Fong, R. K. T.; Hanson, B. C.; Komen, M. J.; Mcmillan, S. B.; Parashar, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    The use of a scanning antenna beam for a synthetic aperture system was examined. When the resolution required was modest, the radar did not use all the time the beam was passing a given point on the ground to build a synthetic aperture, so time was available to scan the beam to other positions and build several images at different ranges. The scanning synthetic-aperture radar (SCANSAR) could achieve swathwidths of well over 100 km with modest antenna size. Design considerations for a SCANSAR for hydrologic parameter observation are presented. Because of the high sensitivity to soil moisture at angles of incidence near vertical, a 7 to 22 deg swath was considered for that application. For snow and ice monitoring, a 22 to 37 deg scan was used. Frequencies from X-band to L-band were used in the design studies, but the proposed system operated in C-band at 4.75 GHz. It achieved an azimuth resolution of about 50 meters at all angles, with a range resolution varying from 150 meters at 7 deg to 31 meters at 37 deg. The antenna required an aperture of 3 x 4.16 meters, and the average transmitter power was under 2 watts.

  1. REVS: a radar-based enhanced vision system for degraded visual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brailovsky, Alexander; Bode, Justin; Cariani, Pete; Cross, Jack; Gleason, Josh; Khodos, Victor; Macias, Gary; Merrill, Rahn; Randall, Chuck; Rudy, Dean

    2014-06-01

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has developed an enhanced vision system utilizing fast-scanning 94 GHz radar technology to provide three-dimensional measurements of an aircraft's forward external scene topography. This threedimensional data is rendered as terrain imagery, from the pilot's perspective, on a Head-Up Display (HUD). The image provides the requisite "enhanced vision" to continue a safe approach along the flight path below the Decision Height (DH) in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) that would otherwise be cause for a missed approach. Terrain imagery is optionally fused with digital elevation model (DEM) data of terrain outside the radar field of view, giving the pilot additional situational awareness. Flight tests conducted in 2013 show that REVS™ has sufficient resolution and sensitivity performance to allow identification of requisite visual references well above decision height in dense fog. This paper provides an overview of the Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) concept, of the technology underlying REVS, and a detailed discussion of the flight test results.

  2. Mean winds of the upper middle atmosphere (60-110 km): A global distribution from radar systems (M.F., METEOR, VHF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, A. H.; Meek, C. E.; Massebeuf, M.; Fellous, J. L.; Elford, W. G.; Vincent, R. A.; Craig, R. L.; Roper, R. G.; Avery, S.; Balsley, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    Since the development of the last CIRA in 1972, the number of radars providing winds in the upper middle atmosphere has increased significantly. These systems fill the data gap between 60 km and 110 km. The radars include medium frequency (MF) radars or partial reflection systems giving data from 60/70 to 100/110 km; meteor radars, 80 to 110 km, and M.S.T. radars operating as meteor radars. Data from 12 locations are shown, which represent a good Northern Hemispheric (NH) North American chain, an Oceanian chain which is mainly in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), and some Western Europe data. Generally tidal oscillations have been removed from days or groups of days, and the remaining mean winds and longer period oscillations plotted as height-time contours. Composite cross sections from the years 1978 to 1982 were formed where possible so that only the major temporal features remain.

  3. A System Concept for the Advanced Post-TRMM Rainfall Profiling Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Smith, Eric A.

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric latent heating field is fundamental to all modes of atmospheric circulation and upper mixed layer circulations of the ocean. The key to understanding the atmospheric heating process is understanding how and where precipitation occurs. The principal atmospheric processes which link precipitation to atmospheric circulation include: (1) convective mass fluxes in the form of updrafts and downdrafts; (2) microphysical. nucleation and growth of hydrometeors; and (3) latent heating through dynamical controls on the gravitation-driven vertical mass flux of precipitation. It is well-known that surface and near-surface rainfall are two of the key forcing functions on a number of geophysical parameters at the surface-air interface. Over ocean, rainfall variation contributes to the redistribution of water salinity, sea surface temperature, fresh water supply, and marine biology and eco-system. Over land, rainfall plays a significant role in rainforest ecology and chemistry, land hydrology and surface runoff. Precipitation has also been closely linked to a number of atmospheric anomalies and natural hazards that occur at various time scales, including hurricanes, cyclones, tropical depressions, flash floods, droughts, and most noticeable of all, the El Ninos. From this point of view, the significance of global atmospheric precipitation has gone far beyond the science arena - it has a far-reaching impact on human's socio-economic well-being and sustenance. These and many other science applications require the knowledge of, in a global basis, the vertical rain structures, including vertical motion, rain intensity, differentiation of the precipitating hydrometeors' phase state, and the classification of mesoscale physical structure of the rain systems. The only direct means to obtain such information is the use of a spaceborne profiling radar. It is important to mention that the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) have made a great stride forward towards this ultimate goal. The Precipitation Radar (PR) aboard the TRMM satellite is the first ever spaceborne radar dedicated to three-dimensional, global precipitation measurements over the tropics and the subtropics, as well as the detailed synopsis of a wide range of tropical rain storm systems. In only twelve months since launch, the PR, together with other science instruments abroad the satellite have already provided unprecedented insights into the rainfall systems. It is anticipated the a lot more exciting and important rain observations would be made by TRMM throughout its mission duration. While TRMM has provided invaluable data to the user community, it is only the first step towards advancing our knowledge on rain processes and its contributions to climate variability. It is envisioned that a TRMM follow-on mission is needed in such a way to capitalize on the pioneering information provided by TRMM, and its instrument capability must be extended beyond TRMM in such a way to fully address the key science questions from microphysical to climatic time scale. In fact, a number of new and innovative mission concepts have recently put forth for this purpose. Almost all of these new concepts have suggested the utility of a more advanced, high-resolution, Doppler-enabled, vertical profiling radar that can provide multi-parameter observations of precipitation. In this paper, a system concept for a second- gene ration precipitation radar (PR-2) which addresses the above requirements will be described.

  4. The PROUST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, F.; Glass, M.; Ney, R.; Petitdidier, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar called PROUST works at 935 MHz using the same klystron and antenna as the coherent-scatter radar. The use of this equipment for ST work has required some important modifications of the transmitting system and the development of receiving, data processing and acquisition (1984,1985) equipment. The modifications are discussed.

  5. THE REGIONAL AND DIURNAL VARIABILITY OF THE VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF PRECIPITATION SYSTEMS IN AFRICA, BASED ON TRMM PRECIPITATION RADAR DATA

    E-print Network

    Geerts, Bart

    to describe the regional, diurnal, and seasonal variations of the vertical structure of precipitation systemsP3A.6 THE REGIONAL AND DIURNAL VARIABILITY OF THE VERTICAL STRUCTURE OF PRECIPITATION SYSTEMS IN AFRICA, BASED ON TRMM PRECIPITATION RADAR DATA Bart Geerts1 and Teferi Dejene University of Wyoming 1

  6. High-temperature superconductivity for avionic electronic warfare and radar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    The electronic warfare (EW) and radar communities expect to be major beneficiaries of the performance advantages high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) has to offer over conventional technology. Near term upgrades to system hardware can be envisioned using extremely small, high Q, microwave filters and resonators; compact, wideband, low loss, microwave delay and transmission lines; as well as, wideband, low loss, monolithic microwave integrated circuit phase shifters. The most dramatic impact will be in the far term, using HTS to develop new, real time threat identification and response strategy receiver/processing systems designed to utilize the unique high frequency properties of microwave and ultimately digital HTS. To make superconductivity practical for operational systems, however, technological obstacles need to be overcome. Compact cryogenically cooled subsystems with exceptional performance able to withstand rugged operational environments for long periods of time need to be developed.

  7. Analysis of the tolerance of compressive noise radar systems to multiplicative perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastry, Mahesh C.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2014-05-01

    Compressive noise radar imaging involves the inversion of a linear system using l1-based sparsity constraints. This linear system is characterized by the circulant system matrix generated by the transmit waveform. The imaging problem is solved using convex optimization. The characterization of imaging performance in the presence of additive noise and other random perturbations remains an important open problem. Computational studies designed to be generalizable suggest that uncertainties related to multiplicative noise adversely affect detection performance. Multiplicative noise occurs when the recorded transmit waveform is an inaccurate version of the actual transmitted signal. The actual transmit signal leaving the antenna is treated as the signal. If the recorded version is considered as a noisy version of this signal, then, generalizable numerical experiments show that the signal to noise ratio of the recorded signal should be greater than about 35 dB for accurate signal recovery.

  8. Interseismic deformation of the Shahroud fault system (NE Iran) from space-borne radar interferometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Z.; Pathier, E.; Walker, R. T.; Walpersdorf, A.; Tavakoli, F.; Nankali, H.; Sedighi, M.; Doin, M.-P.

    2015-07-01

    The Shahroud fault system is a major active structure in the Alborz range of NE Iran whose slip rate is not well constrained despite its potential high seismic hazard. In order to constrain the slip rate of the eastern Shahroud fault zone, we use space-borne synthetic aperture radar interferometry with both ascending and descending Envisat data to determine the rate of interseismic strain accumulation across the system. We invert the slip rate from surface velocity measurements using a half-space elastic dislocation model. The modeling results are consistent with a left-lateral slip rate of 4.75 ± 0.8 mm/yr on the Abr and Jajarm, strands of the Shahroud fault, with a 10 ± 4 km locking depth. This is in good agreement with the 4-6 mm/yr of left-lateral displacement rate accumulated across the total Shahroud fault system obtained from GPS measurements.

  9. 78 FR 41036 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... Communication Systems 40 General Atomics Lynx (exportable) Synthetic Aperture Radar/Ground Moving Target... (exportable) Synthetic Aperture Radar/Ground Moving Target Indicator (SAR/GMTI) Systems 40 AN/DAS-1 Multi...-Optical/Infrared (EO/ IR), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), and laser designators. The MQ-9 systems...

  10. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  11. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  12. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  13. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  14. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  15. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL..., Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7...

  16. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL..., Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7...

  17. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL..., Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7...

  18. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL..., Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7...

  19. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz. 15.252 Section 15.252 Telecommunication FEDERAL..., Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7...

  20. Characterization of Adolescent Prescription Drug Abuse and Misuse Using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS[R]) System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zosel, Amy; Bartelson, Becki Bucher; Bailey, Elise; Lowenstein, Steven; Dart, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the characteristics and health effects of adolescent (age 13-19 years) prescription drug abuse and misuse using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS[R])) System. Method: Secondary analysis of data collected from RADARS System participating poison centers was performed. Data for all…

  1. Nonlinear filtering for tracking large objects in radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenewald, John H.; Musick, Stanton H.

    2005-05-01

    Detecting and tracking a moving ground target in radar imagery is a challenge intensified by clutter, sensor anomalies, and the substantial signature variations that occur when a target's aspect angle changes rapidly. In its GMTI mode, a radar produces range-Doppler images that contain both kinematic reports and shape features. An HRR signature, when formed as the Fourier transform of the range-Doppler image across its Doppler dimension, becomes a derived measurement and an alternative source of identity information. Although HRR signatures can vary enormously with even small changes in target aspect, such signatures were vital for associating kinematic reports to tracks in this work. This development started with video phase history (VPH) data recorded from a live experiment involving a GMTI radar viewing a single moving target. Since the target could appear anywhere in the range-Doppler image derived from the VPH data, the goal was to localize it in a small range-Doppler "chip" that could be extracted and used in subsequent research. Although the clutter in any given VPH frame generally caused false chips to be formed in the full range-Doppler image, at most one chip contained the target. The most effective approach for creating any chip is to ensure that the object is present in the return from each pulse that contributes to that chip, and to correct any phase distortions arising from range gate changes. Processing constraints dictated that the algorithm for target chip extraction be coded in MATLAB with a time budget of a few seconds per frame. Furthermore, templates and shape models to describe the target were prohibited. This paper describes the nonlinear filtering approach used to reason over multiple frames of VPH data. This nonlinear approach automatically detects and segments potential targets in the range-Doppler imagery, and then extracts kinematic and shape features that are tracked over multiple data frames to ensure that the real target is in the declared chip. The algorithm described was used successfully to process over 84,000 frames of real data without human assistance.

  2. Estimating Reservoir Inflow Using RADAR Forecasted Precipitation and Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, J.; Choi, C.

    2014-12-01

    Rainfall observation and forecasting using remote sensing such as RADAR(Radio Detection and Ranging) and satellite images are widely used to delineate the increased damage by rapid weather changeslike regional storm and flash flood. The flood runoff was calculated by using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system, the data driven models and MAPLE(McGill Algorithm for Precipitation Nowcasting by Lagrangian Extrapolation) forecasted precipitation data as the input variables.The result of flood estimation method using neuro-fuzzy technique and RADAR forecasted precipitation data was evaluated by comparing it with the actual data.The Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy method was applied to the Chungju Reservoir basin in Korea. The six rainfall events during the flood seasons in 2010 and 2011 were used for the input data.The reservoir inflow estimation results were comparedaccording to the rainfall data used for training, checking and testing data in the model setup process. The results of the 15 models with the combination of the input variables were compared and analyzed. Using the relatively larger clustering radius and the biggest flood ever happened for training data showed the better flood estimation in this study.The model using the MAPLE forecasted precipitation data showed better result for inflow estimation in the Chungju Reservoir.

  3. High-level multifunction radar simulation for studying the performance of multisensor data fusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizing, Albert G.; Bosse, Eloi

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents the basic requirements for a simulation of the main capabilities of a shipborne MultiFunction Radar (MFR) that can be used in conjunction with other sensor simulations in scenarios for studying Multi Sensor Data Fusion (MSDF) systems. This simulation is being used to support an ongoing joint effort (Canada - The Netherlands) in the development of MSDF testbeds. This joint effort is referred as Joint-FACET (Fusion Algorithms & Concepts Exploration Testbed), a highly modular and flexible series of applications that is capable of processing both real and synthetic input data. The question raised here is how realistic should the sensor simulations be to trust the MSDF performance assessment? A partial answer to this question is that at least, the dominant perturbing effects on sensor detection (true or false) are sufficiently represented. Following this philosophy, the MFR model, presented here, takes into account sensor's design parameters and external environmental effects such as clutter, propagation and jamming. Previous radar simulations capture most of these dominant effects. In this paper the emphasis is on an MFR scheduler which is the key element that needs to be added to the previous simulations to represent the MFR capability to search and track a large number of targets and at the same time support a large number of (semi-active) surface-to-air missiles (SAM) for the engagement of multiple hostile targets.

  4. Bi-Static Radar Observations Of The Ionosphere: Results from the NRAO/LL/MIT 150 to 1700 MHz System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, G. I.

    2006-08-01

    Introduction: We report on the design and construction of a unique low- frequency, wide-bandwidth system for study of the Earths Ionosphere. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratory and NRAO are collaborating to study turbulent properties of the Earth's Ionosphere through the technique of Bi-Static Radar observations of spacecraft. Methods: Lincoln Laboratory generates schedules for spacecraft tracking that are automatically transferred and executed by NRAO in Green Bank. The radar tracking system at Millstone, MA transmits radar signals toward spacecraft. In Green Bank, the spacecraft are also tracked and reflected signals captured. Disk packs are sent daily to Lincoln Laboratory for analysis. Four frequency bands, each 70 MHz wide, are simultaneously sampled, allowing study of the Ionosphere over a large range of frequencies. Results: We have demonstrated full automatic operation of the facility. The control system is based on exchange of files that are placed on the internet, allowing easy monitoring of the proper operation of the system by all collaborators. Discussion: The construction phase of the system is complete and the first results of the bi-static radar observations are presented. We plan further upgrades to the system sensitivity and will initiate low frequency mapping and monitoring observations

  5. Binary selectable detector holdoff circuit: Design, testing, and application. [to laser radar data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadrmas, K. A.

    1973-01-01

    A very high speed switching circuit, part of a laser radar data acquisition system, has been designed and tested. The primary function of this circuit was to provide computer controlled switching of photodiode detector preamplifier power supply voltages, typically less than plus or minus 20 volts, in approximately 10 nanoseconds. Thus, in actual use, detector and/or detector preamplifier damage can be avoided as a result of sudden extremely large values of backscattered radiation being detected, such as might be due to short range, very thin atmospheric dust layers. Switching of the power supply voltages was chosen over direct switching the photodiode detector input to the preamplifier, based on system noise considerations. Also, the circuit provides a synchronized trigger pulse output for triggering devices such as the Biomation Model 8100 100 MHz analog to digital converter.

  6. The System and Implementation Aspects of the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, R.; Biccari, D.; Bombaci, O.; Gurnett, D.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Kirchner, D.; Picardi, G.; Plaut, J.; Safaeinili, A.

    2001-01-01

    MARSIS is a radar sounder operating in the HF frequency range to sound the surface of Mars, which will operate from the ESA Mars Express spacecraft. It is scheduled for launch from Baikonour, Russia in June 2003 and arrives in orbit around Mars in early 2004 for a two-year mission. This system is the result of an international collaboration between NASA, the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and European Space Agency (ESA). The MARSIS instrument is a 17 Kilogram total mass sounder consisting of a 40 meter tip-to-tip dipole antenna, a 7 meter long monopole antenna and the electronics module. This design of MARSIS is a tradeoff between the expected penetration into the Martian subsurface that is proportional to the wavelength of the system and the desire to operate at a short wavelength in order to minimize the effects of the ionosphere. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Non-invasive respiration rate estimation using ultra-wideband distributed cognitive radar system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay Soon; Kim, Yongmin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Leyman, A Rahim; Thi, Lin Lin

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that remote monitoring of pulmonary activity can be achieved using ultra-wideband (UWB) systems, which shows promise in home healthcare, rescue, and security applications. In this paper, a geometry-based statistical channel model is developed for simulating the reception of UWB signals in the indoor propagation environment. This model enables replication of time-varying multipath profiles due to the displacement of a human chest. Subsequently, a UWB distributed cognitive radar system (UWB-DCRS) is developed for the robust detection of chest cavity motion and the accurate estimation of respiration rate. The analytical framework can serve as a basis in the planning and evaluation of future measurement programs. PMID:17945609

  8. Single-element diffractive optical system for real-time processing of synthetic aperture radar data.

    PubMed

    Roux, F S

    1995-08-10

    I present an optical system for the polar formatting of data in a spotlight-mode synthetic aperture radar. This system is implemented with only one diffractive optical element (DOE). Previously such a DOE could not be produced because the phase of the required transmission function of the DOE does not obey the continuity condition, which is a prerequisite for the conventional implementation of such optical transforms. Here I show how a DOE can be produced to perform the complete polar-formatting transform by incorporating branch-point phase singularities in the transmission function of the DOE. The computation of the transmission function is shown, and numerically computed diffraction patterns obtained from this DOE are also shown. PMID:21052349

  9. Design of hybrid optical delay line for automotive radar test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Byung-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Li, Ye; Park, Chang-In; Choi, Young-Wan

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, hybrid optical delay line (HODL) which is demanded on automotive radar test system (RTS) is proposed and demonstrated. HODL is composed with coaxial cable in short delay time (< 32 nsec) and optical fiber in long delay time (>= 32 nsec) which are considering the volume, loss and frequency characteristics. Also, the optical transceiver that has the bandwidth of 1 GHz is designed for frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW). Experimental results show that the S21 is +/- 0.5 dB in the optical transceiver and +/- 1.7 dB in the whole system at 3.7 GHz ~ 4.7 GHz. The resolution of delay time is 1 ns and the delay flatness is +/- 0.23 ns.

  10. Road safety alerting system with radar and GPS cooperation in a VANET environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Amilcare Francesco; Sottile, Cesare; De Rango, Floriano; Voznak, Miroslav

    2014-05-01

    New applications in wireless environments are increasing and keeping even more interests from the developer companies and researchers. In particular, in these last few years the government and institutional organization for road safety spent a lot of resources and money to promote Vehicular Ad-Hoc Network (VANET) technology, also car manufactures are giving a lot of contributions on this field as well. In our paper, we propose an innovative system to increase road safety, matching the requests of the market allowing a cooperation between on-board devices. The vehicles are equipped with On Board Unit (OBU) and On Board Radar Unit (OBRU), which can spread alerting messages around the network regarding warning and dangerous situations exploiting IEEE802.llp standard. Vehicles move along roads observing the environment, traffic and road conditions, and vehicles parameters as well. These information can be elaborated and shared between neighbors, Road Side Unit (RSU)s and, of course, with Internet, allowing inter-system communications exploiting an Road Traffic Manager (RTM). Radar systems task it the detection of the environment in order to increase the knowledge of current conditions of the roads, for example it is important to identify obstacles, road accidents, dangerous situations and so on. Once detected exploiting onboard devices, such as Global Position System (GPS) receiver it is possible to know the exact location of the caught event and after a data elaboration the information is spread along the network. Once the drivers are advised, they can make some precautionary actions such as reduction of traveling speed or modification of current road path. In this work the routing algorithms, which have the main goal to rapidly disseminate information, are also been investigated.

  11. Wave parameters comparisons between High Frequency (HF) radar system and an in situ buoy: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Maria; Alonso-Martirena, Andrés; Agostinho, Pedro; Sanchez, Jorge; Ferrer, Macu; Fernandes, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The coastal zone is an important area for the development of maritime countries, either in terms of recreation, energy exploitation, weather forecasting or national security. Field measurements are in the basis of understanding how coastal and oceanic processes occur. Most processes occur over long timescales and over large spatial ranges, like the variation of mean sea level. These processes also involve a variety of factors such as waves, winds, tides, storm surges, currents, etc., that cause huge interference on such phenomena. Measurement of waves have been carried out using different techniques. The instruments used to measure wave parameters can be very different, i.e. buoys, ship base equipment like sonar and satellites. Each equipment has its own advantage and disadvantage depending on the study subject. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the behaviour of a different technology available and presently adopted in wave measurement. In the past few years the measurement of waves using High Frequency (HF) Radars has had several developments. Such a method is already established as a powerful tool for measuring the pattern of surface current, but its use in wave measurements, especially in the dual arrangement is recent. Measurement of the backscatter of HF radar wave provides the raw dataset which is analyzed to give directional data of surface elevation at each range cell. Buoys and radars have advantages, disadvantages and its accuracy is discussed in this presentation. A major advantage with HF radar systems is that they are unaffected by weather, clouds or changing ocean conditions. The HF radar system is a very useful tool for the measurement of waves over a wide area with real-time observation, but it still lacks a method to check its accuracy. The primary goal of this study was to show how the HF radar system responds to high energetic variations when compared to wave buoy data. The bulk wave parameters used (significant wave height, period and direction) were obtained during 2013 and 2014 from one 13.5 MHz CODAR SeaSonde radar station from Hydrographic Institute, located in Espichel Cape (Portugal). These data were compared with those obtained from one wave buoy Datawell Directional Waverider, also from Hydrographic Institute, moored inbound Sines (Portugal) at 100 m depth. For this first approach, was assumed that all the waves are in a deep water situation. Results showed that during high energetic periods, the HF radar system revealed a good correlation with wave buoy data following the bulk wave parameters gradient variations.

  12. Spaceborne laser radar.

    PubMed

    Flom, T

    1972-02-01

    Laser radar systems are being developed to acquire and track targets in applications such as the rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft. To search effectively for and locate a target using a narrow laser beam, a scanning system is needed. This paper describes a scan technique whereby a narrow laser beam is synchronously scanned with an equally narrow receiver field-of-view without the aid of mechanical gimbals. Equations are developed in order to examine the maximum acquisition and tracking rates, and the maximum target range for a scanning laser radar system. A recently built prototype of a small, lightweight, low-power-consuming scanning laser radar is described. PMID:20111497

  13. Advantages to Geoscience and Disaster Response from QuakeSim Implementation of Interferometric Radar Maps in a GIS Database System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jay; Donnellan, Andrea; Glasscoe, Margaret; Fox, Geoffrey; Wang, Jun; Pierce, Marlon; Ma, Yu

    2015-08-01

    High-resolution maps of earth surface deformation are available in public archives for scientific interpretation, but are primarily available as bulky downloads on the internet. The NASA uninhabited aerial vehicle synthetic aperture radar (UAVSAR) archive of airborne radar interferograms delivers very high resolution images (approximately seven meter pixels) making remote handling of the files that much more pressing. Data exploration requiring data selection and exploratory analysis has been tedious. QuakeSim has implemented an archive of UAVSAR data in a web service and browser system based on GeoServer (http://geoserver.org). This supports a variety of services that supply consistent maps, raster image data and geographic information systems (GIS) objects including standard earthquake faults. Browsing the database is supported by initially displaying GIS-referenced thumbnail images of the radar displacement maps. Access is also provided to image metadata and links for full file downloads. One of the most widely used features is the QuakeSim line-of-sight profile tool, which calculates the radar-observed displacement (from an unwrapped interferogram product) along a line specified through a web browser. Displacement values along a profile are updated to a plot on the screen as the user interactively redefines the endpoints of the line and the sampling density. The profile and also a plot of the ground height are available as CSV (text) files for further examination, without any need to download the full radar file. Additional tools allow the user to select a polygon overlapping the radar displacement image, specify a downsampling rate and extract a modest sized grid of observations for display or for inversion, for example, the QuakeSim simplex inversion tool which estimates a consistent fault geometry and slip model.

  14. Temporal and structural evolution of a tropical monsoon cloud system: A case study using X-band radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Das, Subrata; Deshpande, Sachin M.; Shankar Das, Siddarth; Konwar, Mahen; Chakravarty, Kaustav; Kalapureddy, Madhu Chandra Reddy

    2015-10-01

    A mobile X-band (~9.535 GHz) dual-polarization Doppler weather radar system was operated at a tropical site Pune (18.5386°N, 73.8089°E, 582 m AMSL) by the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, India for observing monsoon clouds. The measurement site was on the leeward (eastern) side of the Western Ghats (WG). This study focuses on the horizontal and vertical structure of monsoon precipitating clouds and its temporal evolution as observed by the X-band radar on August 27, 2011. The radar reflectivity factor (Z, dBZ) is used as a proxy for measure of intensity of cloud system. Result shows that the radar reflectivity has a strong temporal variation in the vertical, with a local peak occurring in the afternoon hours. Relatively shallow structure during the late night and early morning hours is noticed. The observed cloud tops were reached up to 8 km heights with reflectivity maxima of about 35 dBZ at ?5 km. The spatial and vertical evolution of radar reflectivity is consistent with the large-scale monsoon circulation. The variations in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from the Kalpana-1 satellite and vertical velocity and cloud-mixing ratio from the Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis data are also analyzed. As direct observations of clouds using radars are sparse over the Indian region, the results presented here would be useful to understand the processes related to cloud and precipitation formation in the tropical environment.

  15. Millimeter-Wave Concurrent Dual-Band BiCMOS RFIC Transmitter for Radar and Communication Systems 

    E-print Network

    Huynh, Cuong Phu Minh 1976-

    2012-11-21

    capabilities of producing very narrow and tunable RF pulses with extremely RF leakage and working concurrently in dual bands at 24.5 and 35 GHz was designed. Capability of generating narrow and tunable RF pulses allows the radar system to flexibly work at high...

  16. The orbital distribution of radar-detected meteoroids of the Solar system dust cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galligan, D. P.; Baggaley, W. J.

    2004-09-01

    The radar meteoroid orbit data set obtained from the AMOR facility in Christchurch, New Zealand (longitude 172°39' E, latitude 43°34' S) between 1995 May and 1999 October contains ~5 × 105 high-quality meteor records. The system was very sensitive compared with previous surveys, with a limiting radio magnitude of +14 corresponding to a 3 × 10-10 kg meteoroid mass limit (40-?m diameter) being achieved. This data set is here examined to determine and remove biases inherent in the radar method. The fully corrected meteoroid orbital distribution at 1 au from the Sun is derived. This distribution replaces a previous, much used, orbital distribution produced by the earlier Harvard Radio Meteor Program (HRMP). Anomalies have been found in the original debiasing of the latter which strongly favoured meteoroids observed at low speeds. Three forms of output orbital element distributions have been produced in the present study. To aid comparisons, these forms are identical to those produced by the HRMP: the `directly observed' output is that with no corrections applied, the `atmospheric' sample is corrected for all in-atmosphere effects, which includes electromagnetic wave propagation and ionospheric effects and the influence of the particular form of the radar system, and the `space sample' is additionally corrected for collision probability with the Earth. The space sample has rather higher eccentricity and larger semimajor axis length orbits than directly observed by AMOR. Its inclination distribution shows a general decrease in number with inclination: with a peak at ~20° and few meteors at inclinations very close to the ecliptic; a small population remains from the original ~50 per cent of orbits in retrograde orientations. Comparison with the original HRMP space distributions shows little agreement, however the revised HRMP orbital element distributions of Taylor and Elford compares well. The higher number of orbits in the AMOR data set and the uncertainty involved in re-reducing the older HRMP data shows a strong direction for the use of the AMOR as a standard.

  17. Radar, Insect Population Ecology, and Pest Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, C. R. (editor); Wolf, W. (editor); Klassen, W. (editor)

    1979-01-01

    Discussions included: (1) the potential role of radar in insect ecology studies and pest management; (2) the potential role of radar in correlating atmospheric phenomena with insect movement; (3) the present and future radar systems; (4) program objectives required to adapt radar to insect ecology studies and pest management; and (5) the specific action items to achieve the objectives.

  18. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  19. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  20. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  1. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  2. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph (b) of this section, all self... radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted at the primary operating station....

  3. Sensitive radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meer, David E.

    Prospective sensitive radar technologies with sensors operating at both RF and laser frequencies will enhance target detection, localization, classification, identification, and tracking capabilities. Ultrawideband radars operating at lower frequencies promise to detect stealthy targets and furnish simpler, lower cost, more reliable radars which can perform many of the functions of current high resolution radars. High resolution RF sensors for real-time recognition of noncooperative targets will be critical in future engagements, allowing detection of targets hidden in folliage. Laser radar technology will have its greatest impact in cruise missile and robotic vehicle navigation.

  4. Advantages to Geoscience and Disaster Response from the QuakeSim Implementation of Interferometric Radar Maps in a GIS Database System.

    E-print Network

    a cross section are updated to a plot on the screen as the user interactively redefines the endpoints Radar Maps in a GIS Database System. Jay Parker (1), Andrea Donnellan (1), Margaret Glasscoe (1, Bloomington, IN 47408, USA © 2013. All rights reserved. Short title: Advantages from Implementation of Radar

  5. Surface current observations using high frequency radar and its assimilation into the New York Harbor Observing and Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    A surface current observation system based on high-frequency (HF) radar (CODAR) has been constructed for Raritan Bay, NJ; and the New York Bight (NYB) Apex. The availability of surface current data measured using HF radar in real-time over a synoptic scale makes it appropriate for data assimilation (DA). The present work is an attempt to validate HF radar data in the NYB Apex and to develop a practical, but still nearly optimal, method to assimilate HF radar data into an estuarine and coastal ocean circulation model in a tidally-dominated region of NY/NJ Harbor Estuary and the NYB Apex. This model, forced by an extensive real-time observational network, is called the New York Harbor Observing and Prediction System (NYHOPS). A nudging or Newtonian damping scheme is developed to assimilate HF radar data. A nudging parameter is introduced into the equations of motion which affects the model dynamics. The data is imparted to neighboring (three-dimensional) grid points via model dynamics. The effectiveness of HF radar DA is studied by computing the DA skill based on mean square error. A positive DA skill (0 -- 100%) represents an improvement in the model performance by HF radar DA. The HF radar data validation study showed a reasonable comparison between HF radar surface currents and near-surface in-situ currents obtained from one out of the two moorings. HF radar DA experiments focused on both the hindcasting as well as forecast capabilities of the NYHOPS model with respect to three regions; inner-shelf region (0 -- 30 m), mid-shelf (30 -- 90m), and outer-shelf (90 -- 120 m). For the inner-NJ shelf region, based on NYHOPS model hindcasts, a 40 day long DA study using HF radar data in Raritan Bay and the NYB Apex region yielded a DA skill of +22% for near-surface currents (with respect to mooring data), and +53% and +38% for near-surface temperature and salinity (with respect to Glider/fixed sensor data). Based on NYHOPS model forecasts, for the inner-NJ shelf region, another 120 days long DA study using HF radar data in the NYB region yielded a DA skill of +11% for near-surface currents (with respect to mooring data), and +10% and +16% for near-surface temperature and salinity (with respect to Glider/fixed sensor data). The DA skill for temperature and salinity is higher in the inner-NJ shelf (0 -- 30m) region and decreases steadily towards mid-NJ shelf (30 -- 90m) and outer-NJ shelf (90 -- 120m) regions. The nudging scheme is found to be robust and efficient for the NYHOPS model with minimum computational burden.

  6. Designing a Multichannel Sense-and-Avoid Radar for Small UASs

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    (FMCW) collision-avoidance radar for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UASs). This radar system is being ........................................................................................................................ 9 1.2.1 Pulse and FMCW Radar Characteristics................................................................................... 10 1.3 FMCW Radar Theory

  7. Equatorial MU Radar project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Hashiguchi, H.; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University (RISH) has been studying the atmosphere by using radars. The first big facility was the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar installed in Shiga, Japan in 1984. This is one of the most powerful and multi-functional radar, and is successful of revealing importance of atmospheric waves for the dynamical vertical coupling processes. The next big radar was the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) installed at Kototabang, West Sumatra, Indonesia in 2001. The EAR was operated under close collaboration with LAPAN (Indonesia National Institute for Aeronautics and Space), and conducted the long-term continuous observations of the equatorial atmosphere/ionosphere for more than 10 years. The MU radar and the EAR are both utilized for inter-university and international collaborative research program for long time. National Institute for Polar Research (NIPR) joined EISCAT Scientific Association together with Nagoya University, and developed the PANSY radar at Syowa base in Antarctica as a joint project with University of Tokyo. These are the efforts of radar study of the atmosphere/ionosphere in the polar region. Now we can find that Japan holds a global network of big atmospheric/ionospheric radars. The EAR has the limitation of lower sensitivity compared with the other big radars shown above. RISH now proposes a plan of Equatorial MU Radar (EMU) that is to establish the MU-radar class radar next to the EAR. The EMU will have an active phased array antenna with the 163m diameter and 1055 cross-element Yagis. Total output power of the EMU will be more than 500kW. The EMU can detect turbulent echoes from the mesosphere (60-80km). In the ionosphere incoherent-scatter observations of plasma density, drift, and temperature would be possible. Multi-channel receivers will realize radar-imaging observations. The EMU is one of the key facilities in the project "Study of coupling processes in the solar-terrestrial system" for Master Plan 2014 of the Science Council of Japan (SCJ). We show the EMU project and its science in the presentation.

  8. High Power mm-Wave Transmitter System for Radar or Telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stride, S. L.; McMaster, R. L.; Pogorzelski, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Future NASA deep space missions able to provide tens of kilo-watts of spacecraft DC power, make it feasible to employ high power RF telecommunications systems. Traditional flight systems (e.g., Cassini), constrained by limited DC power, used a single high-gain 4m Cassegrain reflector fed by a single lower power (20W) transmitter. Increased available DC power means that high power (1000 W) transmitters can be used. Rather than continue building traditional single-transmitter systems it now becomes feasible to engineer and build multi-element active arrays that can illuminate a dish. Illuminating a 2m dish with a spherical wavefront from an offset 1kW active array can provide sufficient ERP (Effective Radiated Power) when compared to a larger Cassegrain dish. Such a system has the advantage of lower mass, lower volume, improved reliability, less stringent pointing requirements, lower cost and risk. We propose to design and build a prototype Ka-band transmit antenna with an active sub-array using 125W TWTAs. The system could be applied to a telecommunications downlink or radar transmitter used for missions such as JIMO.

  9. A study of Radar Cross Section (RCS) characteristics and their application in future weapon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluggage, W. A.

    The sum of components technique was used to calculate the radar cross section (RCS) of a Canberra B2 aircraft. The theoretical result obtained by using simple shapes to model the aircraft were compared with practical results. It is found that this technique can be used to give a quick order of magnitude estimation of a target's RCS. However, the major drawback of this technique is that it cannot predict the rapid changes in RCS which result from a small change in aspect angle. Trends in radar guided weapons, the effects of aircraft shape on the overall RCS of a weapons platform, and reduction of aircraft RCS by appropriate shaping are discussed. Methods, including radar absorption, radar absorbing materials, impedance loading, and active cancellation, which can be used to reduce an aircraft's radar signature and the associated penalties are reviewed.

  10. The Utility and Validity of Kinematic GPS Positioning for the Geosar Airborne Terrain Mapping Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Adam; Hensley, Scott; Chapin, Elaine; Kroger, Peter; Hussain, Mushtaq; Allred, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    GeoSAR is an airborne, interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) system for terrain mapping, currently under development by a consortium including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., a California mapping sciences company, and the California Department of Conservation (CaIDOC), with funding provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Topographic Engineering Center (TEC) and the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). IFSAR data processing requires high-accuracy platform position and attitude knowledge. On 9 GeoSAR, these are provided by one or two Honeywell Embedded GPS Inertial Navigation Units (EGI) and an Ashtech Z12 GPS receiver. The EGIs provide real-time high-accuracy attitude and moderate-accuracy position data, while the Ashtech data, post-processed differentially with data from a nearby ground station using Ashtech PNAV software, provide high-accuracy differential GPS positions. These data are optimally combined using a Kalman filter within the GeoSAR motion measurement software, and the resultant position and orientation information are used to process the dual frequency (X-band and P-band) radar data to generate high-accuracy, high -resolution terrain imagery and digital elevation models (DEMs). GeoSAR requirements specify sub-meter level planimetric and vertical accuracies for the resultant DEMS. To achieve this, platform positioning errors well below one meter are needed. The goal of GeoSAR is to obtain 25 cm or better 3-D positions from the GPS systems on board the aircraft. By imaging a set of known point target corner-cube reflectors, the GeoSAR system can be calibrated. This calibration process yields the true position of the aircraft with an uncertainty of 20- 50 cm. This process thus allows an independent assessment of the accuracy of our GPS-based positioning systems. We will present an overview of the GeoSAR motion measurement system, focusing on the use of GPS and the blending of position data from the various systems. We will present the results of our calibration studies that relate to the accuracy the GPS positioning. We will discuss the effects these positioning, errors have on the resultant DEM products and imagery.

  11. Aircraft radar antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, Helmut E.

    1987-04-01

    Many changes have taken place in airborne radar antennas since their beginnings over forty years ago. A brief historical review of the advances in technology is presented, from mechanically scanned reflectors to modern multiple function phased arrays. However, emphasis is not on history but on the state-of-the-art technology and trends for future airborne radar systems. The status of rotating surveillance antennas is illustrated by the AN/APY-1 Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) slotted waveguide array, which achieved a significant breakthrough in sidelobe suppression. Gimballed flat plate arrays in nose radomes are typified by the AN/APG-66 (F-16) antenna. Multifunction phased arrays are presented by the Electronically Agile Radar (EAR) antenna, which has achieved significant advances in performance versatility and reliability. Trends toward active aperture, adaptive, and digital beamforming arrays are briefly discussed. Antennas for future aircraft radar systems must provide multiple functions in less aperture space, and must perform more reliably.

  12. Evaluating and managing Cold War era historic properties : the cultural significance of U.S. Air Force defensive radar systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Whorton, M.

    1999-01-20

    Aircraft and later missile radar early warning stations played an important role in the Cold War. They are associated with important technological, social, political, and military themes of the Cold War and are worthy of preservation. The scope and scale of these systems make physical preservation impractical, but the U.S. Air Force program of historical evaluation and documentation of these systems will provide valuable information to future generations studying this historic period.

  13. Radar cross-sectional study using noise radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundorfer, A. P.; Siddiqui, J. Y.; Antar, Y. M. M.

    2015-05-01

    A noise radar system is proposed with capabilities to measure and acquire the radar cross-section (RCS) of targets. The proposed system can cover a noise bandwidth of near DC to 50 GHz. The noise radar RCS measurements were conducted for selective targets like spheres and carpenter squares with and without dielectric bodies for a noise band of 400MHz-5000MHz. The bandwidth of operation was limited by the multiplier and the antennae used.

  14. Research on high precision timing system based on FPGA non scanning imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yanbo; Han, Shaokun; Wang, Liang; Ma, Yayun

    2015-08-01

    The article introduced the system structure and imaging principle of no three-dimensional imaging laser radar. This paper used the XC7K325T XILINX chip of KINTEX 7 series and used temporal interpolation method to measure distance. Rough side used PLL multiplier 400MHZ, which reached 2.5ns time accuracy. This method used a thin chip delay chains carry resources to reach 50ps accuracy and greatly improved the accuracy of the timing of imaging. Application technique used a delay line in APD array imaging system, such that each channel distance accuracy greatly improved. Echo signal by photoelectric conversion is completed by APD array detector, and designed by the impedance amplifier and other analog signal processing circuit. FPGA signal processing circuit is to complete the back-end processing, which is the timing function. FPGA array timer clock is to achieve coarse portion through timing, and delay line technique for measuring the length of time a non-integer multiple of the period of the laser pulse emission and the moment of reception, each stage of the delay units delay accuracy of sub ns magnitude, so as to achieve precision measuring part timers. With the above device was close imaging experiments, obtaining the 5 × 5 pixel imaging test results, presented to further improve system accuracy improved method.

  15. Development of a noncontact and long-term respiration monitoring system using microwave radar for hibernating black bear.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Matsui, Takemi; Kawahara, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Shinji

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a prototype system for noncontact, noninvasive and unconstrained vital sign monitoring using microwave radar and to use the system to measure the respiratory rate of a Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) during hibernation for ensuring the bear's safety. Ueno Zoological Gardens in Tokyo planned to help the Japanese black bear (female, approximately 2 years of age) going into hibernation. The prototype system has a microwave Doppler radar antenna (10-GHz frequency, approximately 7 mW output power) for measuring motion of the body surface caused by respiratory activity without making contact with the body. Monitoring using this system was conducted from December 2006 to April 2007. As a result, from December 18, 2006, to March 17, 2007, similar behaviors reported by earlier studies were observed, such as sleeping with curled up posture and not eating, urinating or defecating. During this hibernation period and also around the time of hibernation, the prototype system continuously measured cyclic oscillations. The presence of cyclic vibrations at 8-sec intervals (about 7 bpm) was confirmed by the system before she entered hibernation on December 3, 2006. The respiratory rate gradually decreased, and during the hibernation period the respiratory rate was extremely low at approximately 2 bpm with almost no change. The results show that motion on the body surface caused by respiratory activity can be measured without touching the animal's body. Thus, the microwave radar employed here can be utilized as an aid in observing vital signs of animals. PMID:19504598

  16. Fractional-N PLL based FMCW sweep generator for an 80 GHz radar system with 24.5 GHz bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, T.; Bredendiek, C.; Vogt, M.; Pohl, N.

    2012-09-01

    A phase-locked loop (PLL) based frequency synthesizer capable of generating highly linear broadband frequency sweeps as signal source of a high resolution 80 GHz FMCW radar system is presented. The system achieves a wide output range of 24.5 GHz starting from 68 GHz up to 92.5 GHz. High frequencies allow the use of small antennas for small antenna beam angles. The wide bandwidth results in a radar system with a very high range resolution of below 1.5 cm. Furthermore, the presented synthesizer provides a very low phase noise performance of -80 dBc/Hz at 80 GHz carrier frequency and 10 kHz offset, which enables high precision distance measurements with low range errors. This is achieved by using two nested phase-looked loops with high order loop filters. The use of a fractional PLL divider and a high phase frequency discriminator (PFD) frequency assures an excellent ramp linearity.

  17. A coherent FM laser radar based system for remote metrology in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, R.E.; Burgess, T.W.; Menon, M.M.; Slotwinski, A.; Sebastian, R.

    1995-12-31

    The plasma facing surfaces in ITER must be aligned to millimeter accuracy with respect to the magnetic flux surfaces to prevent impurity influx into the plasma and to avoid component damage. Checking of in-vessel component alignment during initial assembly, operation, and subsequent maintenance is anticipated. A fully remote metrology system is necessary, particularly since major remote operations such as shield blanket exchange and divertor cassette replacement are planned. The metrology system must be compatible with the ITER in-vessel environment of high gamma radiation ({approximately} 10{sup 6} R/hr), super-clean ultra-high-vacuum ({approximately} 10{sup {minus}8} Torr), and elevated temperature ({approximately}200 C). A fast scanning rate is required since the plasma facing surface in ITER is very large ({approximately} 1,500 m{sup 2}). A coherent FM laser radar based metrology system, developed by Coleman Research Corporation, is being adopted to accomplish this task. Conceptually, this metrology system consists of a compact (few cm{sup 3}) remotely deployed laser transceiver optics module, linked through fiber optics to the laser source and imaging units that are located outside the biological shield. Range measurements conducted on a variety of surfaces using the system have yielded sub-millimeter accuracy. Therefore, the technique will easily meet the precision requirement for the ITER application. Computer simulations have been carried out to determine the optimum number of units required for complete mapping of the plasma facing surfaces. Most in-vessel components of the system appear to be radiation hardenable and vacuum compatible. Details of the system and developments required to make it fully compatible for ITER metrology application will be elaborated.

  18. Determination of the effectiveness of commercial-off-the-shelf radar in the cuing of unmanned aerial vehicle pan-tilt-zoom camera systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Patrick Joseph

    This study examined the use of low-cost commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radar in support of the cuing of pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) optical payload systems. Cancellation of the U.S. Navy's vertical take off and landing (VTOL) unmanned aerial vehicle (VTUAV) program left the Navy without a UAV with radar sensor capability. Using a UAV PTZ optical payload and a COTS radar, this study collected specific time difference measurements between PTZ optical payload searches without radar cuing and searches with radar cuing. In every test run conducted, searches with radar cuing reduced PTZ optical payload detection time. The study showed that a low-cost COTS radar mounted on a small UAV can meet some of the radar requirements lost with cancellation of the VTUAV program. The study results could have a direct impact on myriad of U.S. Navy and other U.S. government surveillance requirements, especially the monitoring of U.S. coastal waters in support of homeland security goals and objectives.

  19. Synthetic aperture radar for a crop information system: A multipolarization and multitemporal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yifang

    Acquisition of timely information is a critical requirement for successful management of an agricultural monitoring system. Crop identification and crop-area estimation can be done fairly successfully using satellite sensors operating in the visible and near-infrared (VIR) regions of the spectrum. However, data collection can be unreliable due to problems of cloud cover at critical stages of the growing season. The all-weather capability of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery acquired from satellites provides data over large areas whenever crop information is required. At the same time, SAR is sensitive to surface roughness and should be able to provide surface information such as tillage-system characteristics. With the launch of ERS-1, the first long-duration SAR system became available. The analysis of airborne multipolarization SAR data, multitemporal ERS-1 SAR data, and their combinations with VIR data, is necessary for the development of image-analysis methodologies that can be applied to RADARSAT data for extracting agricultural crop information. The overall objective of this research is to evaluate multipolarization airborne SAR data, multitemporal ERS-1 SAR data, and combinations of ERS-1 SAR and satellite VIR data for crop classification using non-conventional algorithms. The study area is situated in Norwich Township, an agricultural area in Oxford County, southern Ontario, Canada. It has been selected as one of the few representative agricultural 'supersites' across Canada at which the relationships between radar data and agriculture are being studied. The major field crops are corn, soybeans, winter wheat, oats, barley, alfalfa, hay, and pasture. Using airborne C-HH and C-HV SAR data, it was found that approaches using contextual information, texture information and per-field classification for improving agricultural crop classification proved to be effective, especially the per-field classification method. Results show that three of the four best per-field classification accuracies (\\ K=0.91) are achieved using combinations of C-HH and C-VV SAR data. This confirms the strong potential of multipolarization data for crop classification. The synergistic effects of multitemporal ERS-1 SAR and Landsat TM data are evaluated for crop classification using an artificial neural network (ANN) approach. The results show that the per-field approach using a feed-forward ANN significantly improves the overall classification accuracy of both single-date and multitemporal SAR data. Using the combination of TM3,4,5 and Aug. 5 SAR data, the best per-field ANN classification of 96.8% was achieved. It represents an 8.5% improvement over a single TM3,4,5 classification alone. Using multitemporal ERS-1 SAR data acquired during the 1992 and 1993 growing seasons, the radar backscatter characteristics of crops and their underlying soils are analyzed. The SAR temporal backscatter profiles were generated for each crop type and the earliest times of the year for differentiation of individual crop types were determined. Orbital (incidence-angle) effects were also observed on all crops. The average difference between the two orbits was about 3 dB. Thus attention should be given to the local incidence-angle effects when using ERS-1 SAR data, especially when comparing fields from different scenes or different areas within the same scene. Finally, early- and mid-season multitemporal SAR data for crop classification using sequential-masking techniques are evaluated, based on the temporal backscatter profiles. It was found that all crops studied could be identified by July 21.

  20. Cross-term free based bistatic radar system using sparse least squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevimli, R. Akin; Cetin, A. Enis

    2015-05-01

    Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR) systems use illuminators of opportunity, such as FM, TV, and DAB broadcasts. The most common illuminator of opportunity used in PBR systems is the FM radio stations. Single FM channel based PBR systems do not have high range resolution and may turn out to be noisy. In order to enhance the range resolution of the PBR systems algorithms using several FM channels at the same time are proposed. In standard methods, consecutive FM channels are translated to baseband as is and fed to the matched filter to compute the range-Doppler map. Multichannel FM based PBR systems have better range resolution than single channel systems. However superious sidelobe peaks occur as a side effect. In this article, we linearly predict the surveillance signal using the modulated and delayed reference signal components. We vary the modulation frequency and the delay to cover the entire range-Doppler plane. Whenever there is a target at a specific range value and Doppler value the prediction error is minimized. The cost function of the linear prediction equation has three components. The first term is the real-part of the ordinary least squares term, the second-term is the imaginary part of the least squares and the third component is the l2-norm of the prediction coefficients. Separate minimization of real and imaginary parts reduces the side lobes and decrease the noise level of the range-Doppler map. The third term enforces the sparse solution on the least squares problem. We experimentally observed that this approach is better than both the standard least squares and other sparse least squares approaches in terms of side lobes. Extensive simulation examples will be presented in the final form of the paper.

  1. Development of a Climatology of Vertically Complete Wind Profiles from Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, Robert, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of space vehicle loads and trajectories during design requires a large sample of wind profiles at the altitudes where winds affect the vehicle. Traditionally, this altitude region extends from near 8-14 km to address maximum dynamic pressure upon ascent into space, but some applications require knowledge of measured wind profiles at lower altitudes. Such applications include crew capsule pad abort and plume damage analyses. Two Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) systems exist at the United States Air Force (USAF) Eastern Range and at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kennedy Space Center. The 50-MHz DRWP provides wind profiles every 3-5 minutes from roughly 2.5-18.5 km, and five 915-MHz DRWPs provide wind profiles every 15 minutes from approximately 0.2-3.0 km. Archived wind profiles from all systems underwent rigorous quality control (QC) processes, and concurrent measurements from the QC'ed 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives were spliced into individual profiles that extend from about 0.2-18.5 km. The archive contains combined profiles from April 2000 to December 2009, and thousands of profiles during each month are available for use by the launch vehicle community. This paper presents the details of the QC and splice methodology, as well as some attributes of the archive.

  2. DRAINAGE PIPE DETECTOR: GROUND PENETRATING RADAR SHOWS PROMISE IN LOCATING BURIED SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the more frustrating problems confronting farmers and land improvement contractors in the Midwestern United States involves locating buried agricultural drainage pipes. Conventional geophysical methods, particularly ground penetrating radar (GPR), presently being used for environmental and co...

  3. A Tower-based Prototype VHF/UHF Radar for Subsurface Sensing: System Description and Data Inversion Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam, Mahta; Pierce, Leland; Tabatabaeenejad, Alireza; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of subsurface characteristics such as permittivity variations and layering structure could provide a breakthrough in many terrestrial and planetary science disciplines. For Earth science, knowledge of subsurface and subcanopy soil moisture layers can enable the estimation of vertical flow in the soil column linking surface hydrologic processes with that in the subsurface. For planetary science, determining the existence of subsurface water and ice is regarded as one of the most critical information needs for the study of the origins of the solar system. The subsurface in general can be described as several near-parallel layers with rough interfaces. Each homogenous rough layer can be defined by its average thickness, permittivity, and rms interface roughness assuming a known surface spectral distribution. As the number and depth of layers increase, the number of measurements needed to invert for the layer unknowns also increases, and deeper penetration capability would be required. To nondestructively calculate the characteristics of the rough layers, a multifrequency polarimetric radar backscattering approach can be used. One such system is that we have developed for data prototyping of the Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (MOSS) mission concept. A tower-mounted radar makes backscattering measurements at VHF, UHF, and L-band frequencies. The radar is a pulsed CW system, which uses the same wideband antenna to transmit and receive the signals at all three frequencies. To focus the beam at various incidence angles within the beamwidth of the antenna, the tower is moved vertically and measurements made at each position. The signals are coherently summed to achieve focusing and image formation in the subsurface. This requires an estimate of wave velocity profiles. To solve the inverse scattering problem for subsurface velocity profile simultaneously with radar focusing, we use an iterative technique based on a forward numerical solution of the layered rough surface problem. The layers are each defined in terms of a small number of unknown distributions as given above. An a priori estimate of the solution is first assumed, based on which the forward problem is solved for the backscattered measurements. This is compared with the measured data and using iterative techniques an update to the solution for the unknowns is calculated. The process continues until convergence is achieved. Numerical results will be shown using actual radar data acquired with the MOSS tower radar system in Arizona in Fall 2003, and compared with in-situ measurements.

  4. The NASA radar entomology program at Wallops Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    NASA contribution to radar entomology is presented. Wallops Flight Center is described in terms of its radar systems. Radar tracking of birds and insects was recorded from helicopters for airspeed and vertical speed.

  5. Radar cross-section measurements and simulation of a tethered satellite. The small expendable deployer system end-mass payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin L.; Fralick, Dion T.; Vedeler, Erik

    1995-01-01

    The first Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS-1), a tethered satellite system, was developed by NASA and launched March 29, 1993 as a secondary payload on a United State Air Force (USAF) Delta-2 launch vehicle. The SEDS-1 successfully deployed an instrumented end-mass payload (EMP) on a 20-km nonconducting tether from the second stage of the Delta 2. This paper describes the effort of NASA Langley Research Center's Antenna and Microwave Research Branch to provide assistance to the SEDS Investigators Working Group (IWG) in determining EMP dynamics by analyzing the mission radar skin track data. The radar cross section measurements taken and simulations done for this study are described and comparisons of the measured data with the simulated data for the EMP at 6 GHz are presented.

  6. 51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner building 105 from upper catwalk level showing emanating waveguides from upper switch (upper one-fourth of photograph) and emanating waveguides from lower radar scanner switch in vertical runs. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. Non-contact screening system with two microwave radars in the diagnosis of sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Masayuki; Ueki, Katsuhiko; Kurita, Akira; Tojima, Hirokazu; Matsui, Takemi

    2013-01-01

    There are two key problems in applying Doppler radar to a diagnosis system for sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. The first is noise associated with body movement and the second is the body position in bed and the change of the sleeping posture. We propose a new automatic gain control and a real-time radar-output channel selection method which is based on a spectrum shape analysis. There are three types of sleep apnea: central sleep apnea, obstructive sleep apnea and mixed sleep apnea. In this paper we paid attention to the obstructive sleep apnea and attempted to detect the disorder of corrugated shape compared with usual breathing or the paradoxical movement of the reversed phase with chest and abdominal radar signals. A prototype of the system was set up at a sleep disorder center in a hospital and field tests were carried out with eight subjects. Despite the subjects engaging in frequent body movements while sleeping, the system was quite effective in the diagnosis of sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (r=0.98). PMID:23920557

  8. MIDAS-W: a workstation-based incoherent scatter radar data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. M.; Erickson, P. J.; Gorczyca, A. M.; Grydeland, T.

    2000-09-01

    The Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter Data Acquisition System (MIDAS) is based on an abstract model of an incoherent scatter radar. This model is implemented in a hierarchical software system, which serves to isolate hardware and low-level software implementation details from higher levels of the system. Inherent in this is the idea that implementation details can easily be changed in response to technological advances. MIDAS is an evolutionary system, and the MIDAS hardware has, in fact, evolved while the basic software model has remained unchanged. From the earliest days of MIDAS, it was realized that some functions implemented in specialized hardware might eventually be implemented by software in a general-purpose computer. MIDAS-W is the realization of this concept. The core component of MIDAS-W is a Sun Microsystems UltraSparc 10 workstation equipped with an Ultrarad 1280 PCI bus analog to digital (A/D) converter board. In the current implementation, a 2.25 MHz intermediate frequency (IF) is bandpass sampled at 1 µs intervals and these samples are multicast over a high-speed Ethernet which serves as a raw data bus. A second workstation receives the samples, converts them to filtered, decimated, complex baseband samples and computes the lag-profile matrix of the decimated samples. Overall performance is approximately ten times better than the previous MIDAS system, which utilizes a custom digital filtering module and array processor based correlator. A major advantage of MIDAS-W is its flexibility. A portable, single-workstation data acquisition system can be implemented by moving the software receiver and correlator programs to the workstation with the A/D converter. When the data samples are multicast, additional data processing systems, for example for raw data recording, can be implemented simply by adding another workstation with suitable software to the high-speed network. Testing of new data processing software is also greatly simplified, because a workstation with the new software can be added to the network without impacting the production system. MIDAS-W has been operated in parallel with the existing MIDAS-1 system to verify that incoherent scatter measurements by the two systems agree. MIDAS-W has also been used in a high-bandwidth mode to collect data on the November, 1999, Leonid meteor shower.

  9. Installation of a Permanent Doppler Radar Monitoring System at Colima Volcano, Mexico, and its use for Eruption Cloud Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharff, L.; Hort, M. K.; Varley, N. R.; Herzog, M.

    2011-12-01

    In February 2007 we installed a standalone Doppler radar monitoring station at Colima volcano, Mexico. During that time, a new episode of dome growth was underway with daily Vulcanian eruptive events occurring. These were continuously recorded with the Doppler radar. In December 2008 we upgraded the monitoring station with a second Doppler radar, a network video camera, and a direct WLAN connection to the 28.5km distant Colima University, which allows us to remotely reconfigure the whole system in times of volcanic crises. A custom made data logger collects and stores all data at the station before transmitting data in packages to the office. The entire system is powered by solar panels. The camera is triggered by the Doppler radar that is aimed at the vent. In case an eruption is detected, the camera switches from taking pictures at arbitrary intervals to continuous video recording until the end of the eruption. Similarly the Doppler radar switches to a high sampling rate (15Hz). In 2007 we recorded 92 events during six months with durations of 20 to 200 seconds. The velocity spectra clearly show two regimes: (a) buoyant updraft with 20 to 60 seconds of constant velocities and a maximum of 20 m/s (vertical) and (b) series of pulses of intense jetting where every pulse lasts about 20s and starts with vertical velocities up to 85 m/s (measured ~75m above vent). Our deployment at Colima volcano is the first investigation of Vulcanian eruption column dynamics using Doppler radar. The data provide particle velocities and a proxy of the particles mass ~75m above the vent, which allows us to define the activity status in near real time during an eruption. Here we focus on the dynamic processes during the early stages of eruption cloud formation. Using (1) a simple ballistic model for particle transport and (2) the active tracer high-resolution atmospheric model (ATHAM) we model the first 100 m of cloud formation in 2D (axis-symmetric) and 3D. We constrain the initial conditions for both models trying to reproduce the dynamics measured by the radars. For this comparison synthetic Doppler radar data are calculated from the numerical models by converting particle properties (size, velocity, and backscatter-efficiency) into synthetic velocity spectra. First results show that pure ballistic transport of particles in a gas jet cannot reproduce the measured spectra. Eruption clouds are a major hazard to aviation. Hence real-time tracking and forecasting of ash clouds are increasingly important tasks in volcanology. In-situ measurements of the dynamics inside the developing cloud are needed to constrain the input parameters of the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center's (VAAC) numerical ash cloud dispersion models. Our aim is to directly deduce the initial conditions for an eruption column model or ash dispersal model from the radar data in near-real time.

  10. Shuttle orbiter radar cross-sectional analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; James, R.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and model simulation studies on signal to noise levels and shuttle radar cross section are described. Pre-mission system calibrations, system configuration, and postmission system calibration of the tracking radars are described. Conversion of target range, azimuth, and elevation into radar centered east north vertical position coordinates are evaluated. The location of the impinging rf energy with respect to the target vehicles body axis triad is calculated. Cross section correlation between the two radars is presented.

  11. Characterization of Mesoscale Convective Systems by Means of Composite Radar Reflectivity Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geerts, Bart

    1998-01-01

    A mesoscale convective system (MCS) is broadly defined as a cloud and precipitation system of mesoscale dimensions (often too large for most aircraft to circumnavigate) with deep-convective activity concentrated in at least part of the MCS, or present during part of its evolution. A large areal fraction of MCSs is stratiform in nature, yet estimates from MCSs over the Great Plains, the Southeast, and tropical waters indicate that at least half of the precipitation is of convective origin. The presence of localized convection is important, because within convective towers cloud particles and hydrometeors are carried upward towards the cloud top. Ice crystals then move over more stratiform regions, either laterally, or through in situ settling over decaying and spreading convection. These ice crystals then grow to precipitation-size particles in mid- to upper tropospheric mesoscale updrafts. The convective portion of a MCS is often a more or less continuous line of thunderstorms, and may be either short-lived or long-lived. Geerts (1997) presents a preliminary climatology of MCSs in the southeastern USA, using just one year of composite digital radar reflectivity data. In this study MCSs are identified and characterized by means of visual inspection of animated images. A total of 398 MCSs were identified. In the warm season MCSs were found to be about twice as frequent as in the cold season. The average lifetime and maximum length of MCSs are 9 hours, and 350 km, respectively, but some MCSs are much larger and more persistent. In the summer months small and short-lived MCSs are relatively more common, whereas in winter larger and longer-lived systems occur more frequently. MCSs occur more commonly in the afternoon, in phase with thunderstorm activity, but the amplitude of the diurnal cycle is small compared to that of observed thunderstorms. It is estimated that in the Southeast more than half of all precipitation and severe weather results from MCSs.

  12. Use of the X-Band Radar to Support the Detection of In-Flight Icing Hazards by the NASA Icing Remote Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serke, David J.; Politovich, Marcia K.; Reehorst, Andrew L.; Gaydos, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The Alliance Icing Research Study-II (AIRS-II) field program was conducted near Montreal, Canada during the winter of 2003. The NASA Icing Remote Detection System (NIRSS) was deployed to detect in-flight icing hazards and consisted of a vertically pointing multichannel radiometer, a ceilometer and an x-band cloud radar. The radiometer was used to derive atmospheric temperature soundings and integrated liquid water, while the ceilometer and radar were used only to define cloud boundaries. The purpose of this study is to show that the radar reflectivity profiles from AIRS-II case studies could be used to provide a qualitative icing hazard.

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS, VOL. 8, NO. 2, JUNE 2007 245 Vehicle Classification Based on the Radar

    E-print Network

    -modulated continuous wave (FMCW) and noise-correlation radar units combined with continuous-wave (CW) Doppler sensors Classification Based on the Radar Measurement of Height Profiles Ildar Urazghildiiev, Rolf Ragnarsson, Pierre by a microwave (MW) radar sensor. We show that if the radar sensor satisfies certain requirements, then a precise

  14. A prototype of radar-drone system for measuring the surface flow velocity at river sites and discharge estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moramarco, Tommaso; Alimenti, Federico; Zucco, Graziano; Barbetta, Silvia; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Brocca, Luca; Mezzanotte, Paolo; Rosselli, Luca; Orecchini, Giulia; Virili, Marco; Valigi, Paolo; Ciarfuglia, Thomas; Pagnottelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Discharge estimation at a river site depends on local hydraulic conditions identified by recording water levels. In fact, stage monitoring is straightforward and relatively inexpensive compared with the cost necessary to carry out flow velocity measurements which are, however, limited to low flows and constrained by the accessibility of the site. In this context the mean flow velocity is hard to estimate for high flow, affecting de-facto the reliability of discharge assessment for extreme events. On the other hand, the surface flow velocity can be easily monitored by using radar sensors allowing to achieve a good estimate of discharge by exploiting the entropy theory applied to rivers hydraulic (Chiu,1987). Recently, a growing interest towards the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UVA), henceforth drone, for topographic applications is observed and considering their capability drones may be of a considerable interest for the hydrological monitoring and in particular for streamflow measurements. With this aim, for the first time, a miniaturized Doppler radar sensor, operating at 24 GHz, will be mounted on a drone to measure the surface flow velocity in rivers. The sensor is constituted by a single-board circuit (i.e. is a fully planar circuits - no waveguides) with the antenna on one side and the front-end electronic on the other side (Alimenti et al., 2007). The antenna has a half-power beam width of less than 10 degrees in the elevation plane and a gain of 13 dBi. The radar is equipped with a monolithic oscillator and transmits a power of about 4 mW at 24 GHz. The sensor is mounted with an inclination of 45 degrees with respect to the drone flying plane and such an angle is considered in recovering the surface speed of the water. The drone is a quadricopter that has more than 30 min, flying time before recharging the battery. Furthermore its flying plan can be scheduled with a suitable software and is executed thanks to the on-board sensors (GPS, accelerometers, altimeter, camera) and artificial intelligence. Finally it has more than 0.3 kg payload that can be used for further instruments. With respect to the conventional approach, that uses radar sensors on fixed locations, the system prototype composed of drone and Doppler radar is more flexible and would allow carrying out velocity measurements obtaining the whole transverse surface velocity profile during high flow and for inaccessible river sites as well. This information represents the boundary condition of the entropy model (Moramarco et al. 2004) able to turn the surface velocity in discharge, known the geometry of the river site. Nowadays the prototype is being implemented and the Doppler radar sensor is tested in a static way, i.e. the flow velocity accuracy is determined in real-case situations by comparing the sensor output with that of conventional instruments. The first flying test is planned shortly in some river sites of Tiber River in central Italy and based on the surface velocity survey the capability of the radar-drone prototype will be tested and the benefit in discharge assessment by using the entropy model will be verified. Alimenti, F., Placentino, F., Battistini, A., Tasselli, G., Bernardini, W., Mezzanotte, P., Rascio, D., Palazzari, V., Leone, S., Scarponi, A., Porzi, N., Comez, M. and Roselli, L. (2007). "A Low-Cost 24GHz Doppler Radar Sensor for Traffic Monitoring Implemented in Standard Discrete-Component Technology". Proceedings of the 2007 European Radar Conference (EuRAD 2007), pp. 162-165, Munich, Germany, 10-12 October 2007 Chiu, C. L. (1987). "Entropy and probability concepts in hydraulics". J. Hydr. Engrg., ASCE, 113(5), 583-600. Moramarco, T., Saltalippi, C., Singh, V.P.(2004). "Estimation of mean velocity in natural channels based on Chiu's velocity distribution equation", Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, 9 (1), pp. 42-50

  15. Radar network communication through sensing of frequency hopping

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, Farid; Nekoogar, Faranak

    2013-05-28

    In one embodiment, a radar communication system includes a plurality of radars having a communication range and being capable of operating at a sensing frequency and a reporting frequency, wherein the reporting frequency is different than the sensing frequency, each radar is adapted for operating at the sensing frequency until an event is detected, each radar in the plurality of radars has an identification/location frequency for reporting information different from the sensing frequency, a first radar of the radars which senses the event sends a reporting frequency corresponding to its identification/location frequency when the event is detected, and all other radars in the plurality of radars switch their reporting frequencies to match the reporting frequency of the first radar upon detecting the reporting frequency switch of a radar within the communication range. In another embodiment, a method is presented for communicating information in a radar system.

  16. APPLICATION OF SENSOR SCHEDULING CONCEPTS TO RADAR

    E-print Network

    Nehorai, Arye

    Chapter 10 APPLICATION OF SENSOR SCHEDULING CONCEPTS TO RADAR William Moran University of Melbourne time illustrating the ideas on sensor schedul- ing in a specific context: that of a radar system. A typical pulse radar system operates by illuminating a scene with a short pulse of electromagnetic energy

  17. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface...

  18. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface...

  19. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface...

  20. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface...

  1. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping COAST GUARD... MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface...

  2. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Axline, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  3. Cyclostationary Approach for Heart and Respiration Rates Monitoring with Body Movement Cancellation Using Radar Doppler System

    E-print Network

    Kazemi, Somayeh; Amindavar, Hamidreza; Li, Changzhi

    2013-01-01

    Heart and respiration rate measurement using Doppler radar is a non-contact and non-obstructive way for remote thorough-clothing monitoring of vital signs. The modulated back-scattered radar signal in the presence of high noise and interference is non-stationary with hidden periodicities, which cannot be detected by ordinary Fourier analysis. In this paper we propose a cyclostationary approach for such signals and show that by using non-linear transformation and then Fourier analysis of the radar signal, the hidden periodicities can be accurately obtained. Numerical results show that the vital signs can be extracted as cyclic frequencies, independent of SNR and without any filtering or phase unwrapping.

  4. Cognitive processing for nonlinear radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martone, Anthony; Ranney, Kenneth; Hedden, Abigail; Mazzaro, Gregory; McNamara, David

    2013-05-01

    An increasingly cluttered electromagnetic environment (EME) is a growing problem for radar systems. This problem is becoming critical as the available frequency spectrum shrinks due to growing wireless communication device usage and changing regulations. A possible solution to these problems is cognitive radar, where the cognitive radar learns from the environment and intelligently modifies the transmit waveform. In this paper, a cognitive nonlinear radar processing framework is introduced where the main components of this framework consist of spectrum sensing processing, target detection and classification, and decision making. The emphasis of this paper is to introduce a spectrum sensing processing technique that identifies a transmit-receive frequency pair for nonlinear radar. It will be shown that the proposed technique successfully identifies a transmit-receive frequency pair for nonlinear radar from data collected from the EME.

  5. Maritime surveillance with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and automatic identification system (AIS) onboard a microsatellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, E. H.; Zee, R. E.; Fotopoulos, G.

    2012-11-01

    New developments in small spacecraft capabilities will soon enable formation-flying constellations of small satellites, performing cooperative distributed remote sensing at a fraction of the cost of traditional large spacecraft missions. As part of ongoing research into applications of formation-flight technology, recent work has developed a mission concept based on combining synthetic aperture radar (SAR) with automatic identification system (AIS) data. Two or more microsatellites would trail a large SAR transmitter in orbit, each carrying a SAR receiver antenna and one carrying an AIS antenna. Spaceborne AIS can receive and decode AIS data from a large area, but accurate decoding is limited in high traffic areas, and the technology relies on voluntary vessel compliance. Furthermore, vessel detection amidst speckle in SAR imagery can be challenging. In this constellation, AIS broadcasts of position and velocity are received and decoded, and used in combination with SAR observations to form a more complete picture of maritime traffic and identify potentially non-cooperative vessels. Due to the limited transmit power and ground station downlink time of the microsatellite platform, data will be processed onboard the spacecraft. Herein we present the onboard data processing portion of the mission concept, including methods for automated SAR image registration, vessel detection, and fusion with AIS data. Georeferencing in combination with a spatial frequency domain method is used for image registration. Wavelet-based speckle reduction facilitates vessel detection using a standard CFAR algorithm, while leaving sufficient detail for registration of the filtered and compressed imagery. Moving targets appear displaced from their actual position in SAR imagery, depending on their velocity and the image acquisition geometry; multiple SAR images acquired from different locations are used to determine the actual positions of these targets. Finally, a probabilistic inference model combines the SAR target data with transmitted AIS data, taking into account nearest-neighbor position matches and uncertainty models of each observation.

  6. 78 FR 19063 - Airworthiness Approval for Aircraft Forward-Looking Windshear and Turbulence Radar Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ...functionalities in Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C63d, Airborne Weather Radar Equipment...addressed as additional functionality added to TSO-C63c, Airborne Weather and Ground Mapping...function issue papers. With the publication of TSO-C63d, which added the...

  7. Investigation of laser radar systems based on mid-infrared semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybaltowski, Adam

    This dissertation deals with the possibility of utilizing mid-infrared semiconductor lasers in systems of optical remote sensing with range resolution, called laser radar or lidar. The main subject investigated in this dissertation is two-fold: firstly, an analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and related maximum sensing range calculations in this type of lidar based on available system components, and---secondly---improvements in the Random-Modulation Continuous-Wave (RM-CW) lidar technique to better utilize available mid-infrared semiconductor lasers. As far as the SNR analysis is concerned, an appropriate framework has been constructed to analyze post-demodulation noise in mid-infrared direct-detection RM-CW lidar. It is based on a generalization of the Wiener-Khintchine theorem; noise is assumed to be additive, stationary, and have an arbitrary power spectrum. This is in contrast to the SNR analysis in the literature on this subject, which is inadequate for mid-infrared RM-CW lidar as it only considers Poissonian fluctuations of the number of detected photons. In addition to regular SNR analysis, the framework derived in this dissertation allows treatment of singularities such as demodulation with an unbalanced sequence in 1/f noise. To calculate maximum lidar sensing range, the following detection limits have been considered: signal shot noise, background blackbody radiation shot noise based on the Background-Limited Photodetection (BLIP) detectivity limit, and minimum-size detector noise given by diffraction-limited focusing. The latter is found to be of greatest practical interest. Furthermore, a lidar figure of merit has been introduced, and all quantities related to lidar performance and its detection limits have been presented graphically. Since pseudo-random sequences discussed in the literature have been found highly non-optimal for most applications of RM-CW lidar, a framework for the construction of new pseudo-random sequences of desired correlation properties has been introduced. As an example, a new pseudo-random sequence has been devised, and shown to have significantly improved and nearly-ideal signal and noise properties. Also, a novel scheme of continuous-wave Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) using only one transmitter and one receiver has been proposed, which combined with its minimal baseband signal modulation requirements should lead to greatly simplified and improved practical chemical-sensing lidar. The results of this dissertation prove the feasibility of mid-infrared semiconductor laser based lidar in many important applications, and provide an analytical framework to advance their practical realization. The most immediate applications of this work are expected in remote detection of noxious airborne biological and chemical substances, and in automobile collision avoidance systems.

  8. Development of a GPS-aided motion measurement, pointing, and stabilization system for a Synthetic Aperture Radar. [Global Positioning System (GPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, J.R.; Kohler, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    An advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Motion Compensation System has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system includes a miniaturized high accuracy ring laser gyro inertial measurement unit, a three axis gimbal pointing and stabilization assembly, a differential Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation aiding system, and a pilot guidance system. The system provides several improvements over previous SNL motion compensation systems and is capable of antenna stabilization to less than 0.01 degrees RMS and absolute position measurement to less than 5.0 meters RMS. These accuracies have been demonstrated in recent flight testing aboard a DHC-6-300 Twin Otter'' aircraft.

  9. Spaceborne laser radar.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, T.

    1972-01-01

    Development of laser systems to acquire and track targets in applications such as the rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft. A scan technique is described whereby a narrow laser beam is simultaneously scanned with an equally narrow receiver field-of-view without the aid of mechanical gimbals. Equations are developed in order to examine the maximum acquisition and tracking rates, and the maximum target range for a scanning laser radar system. A recently built prototype of a small, lightweight, low-power-consuming scanning laser radar is described.

  10. 78 FR 68861 - Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ...Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems...certain navigation products, including GPS devices, navigation and display systems...certain navigation products, including GPS devices, navigation and display...

  11. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  12. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  13. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  14. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  15. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  16. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  17. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  18. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  19. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  20. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  1. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  2. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  3. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  4. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  5. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  6. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  7. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  8. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  9. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  10. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  11. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  12. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  13. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  14. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  15. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  16. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40 Shipping COAST GUARD... Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for...

  17. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the pilothouse....

  18. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40 Shipping COAST GUARD... Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for...

  19. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40 Shipping COAST GUARD... Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for...

  20. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping COAST GUARD... Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and (b) Facilities on...

  1. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping COAST GUARD... Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and (b) Facilities on...

  2. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  3. EISCAT Radar School, Kiruna, 2005 Outrigger in

    E-print Network

    EISCAT Radar School, Kiruna, 2005 LOFAR Outrigger in Scandinavia Physics in Space Programme LOFAR Centre, Växjö University #12;Bo Thidé EISCAT Radar School, Kiruna,, 20052 LOFAR Low Frequency Array (10 radio system for space radio #12;Bo Thidé EISCAT Radar School, Kiruna,, 20053 Hydrogen radiates at 1420

  4. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  5. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  6. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping COAST GUARD... Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and (b) Facilities on...

  7. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping COAST GUARD... Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and (b) Facilities on...

  8. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40 Shipping COAST GUARD... Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for...

  9. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the pilothouse....

  10. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the pilothouse....

  11. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping COAST GUARD... Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and (b) Facilities on...

  12. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  13. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the pilothouse....

  14. 46 CFR 130.310 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar. 130.310 Section 130.310 Shipping COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Navigational Equipment § 130.310 Radar. Each vessel of 100 or more gross tons must be fitted with a general marine radar in the pilothouse....

  15. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40 Shipping COAST GUARD... Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels of 1,600 gross tons and over in ocean or coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation. Facilities for...

  16. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  17. Radar reflection off extensive air showers

    E-print Network

    Stasielak, J; Bertaina, M; Blümer, J; Chiavassa, A; Engel, R; Haungs, A; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Krömer, O; Ludwig, M; Mathys, S; Neunteufel, P; Pekala, J; Rautenberg, J; Riegel, M; Roth, M; Salamida, F; Schieler, H; Šmída, R; Unger, M; Weber, M; Werner, F; Wilczy?ski, H; Wochele, J

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting extensive air showers by the radar technique. Considering a bistatic radar system and different shower geometries, we simulate reflection of radio waves off the static plasma produced by the shower in the air. Using the Thomson cross-section for radio wave reflection, we obtain the time evolution of the signal received by the antennas. The frequency upshift of the radar echo and the power received are studied to verify the feasibility of the radar detection technique.

  18. Late Tertiary and Quaternary river systems of the eastern Sahara as mapped on shuttle radar and LANDSAT images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, J. F.; Breed, C. S.; Schaber, G. G.

    1985-01-01

    SIR-A pictures of the Eastern Sahara show segments of what are interpreted as relics of once major Tertiary and Quaternary stream valleys. These previously unmapped features have a dark to very dark radar response and are generally concealed below a thin cover of flat to slightly undulating deposits, mostly of eolian origin. In most of the 150 pits and trenches we have studied to date, unconsolidated surface deposits range from a few centimeters to about a meter thick. The SIR-A system was able to "see through" this loose, dry material, to a depth of about a meter or two.

  19. Detection of 3D tree root systems using high resolution ground penetration radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altdorff, D.; Honds, M.; Botschek, J.; Van Der Kruk, J.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of root systems and its distribution are important for biomass estimation as well as for the prevention of subsurface distribution network damages. Ground penetration radar (GPR) is a promising technique that enables a non-invasive imaging of tree roots. Due to the polarisation-dependent reflection coefficients and complicated three-dimensional root structure, accurate measurements with perpendicularly polarized antennas are needed. In this study, we show GPR data from two planes and one chestnut at two locations with different soil conditions. Perpendicular 10 x 10 cm grid measurements were made with a shielded 250 MHz antenna in combination with a high precision self-tracking laser theodolite that provides geo-referenced traces with a spatial resolution of ~ 2 cm. After selecting potential root hyperbolas within the perpendicular GPR profiles, the corresponding three-dimensional coordinates were extracted and visualized in planar view to reveal any linear structure that indicates a possible tree root. The coordinates of the selected linear structures were projected back to the surface by means of the laser-theodolite to indicate the locations for groundtruthing. Additionally, we interpolated the measured data into a 3D cube where time slices confirmed the locations of linear reflection events. We validated the indicated predictions by excavation of the soil with a suction dredge. Subsequent georeferencing of the true root distribution and comparison with the selected linear events showed that the approach was able to identify the precise position of roots with a diameter between 3 and 10 cm and a depth of up to 70 cm. However, not all linear events were roots; also mouse channels were found in these depths, since they also generate GPR hyperbolas aligned in linear structures. Roots at a second location at depths of 1 to 1.20 m did not generate identifiable hyperboles, which was probably due to an increased electrical conductivity below 86 cm depth. The demonstrated approach is a promising tool for semi-linear root detection, whereas advanced 3D processing and migration is needed for more complicated root structures.

  20. Extended target recognition in cognitive radar networks.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yimin; Meng, Huadong; Liu, Yimin; Wang, Xiqin

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of adaptive waveform design for extended target recognition in cognitive radar networks. A closed-loop active target recognition radar system is extended to the case of a centralized cognitive radar network, in which a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) framework is employed. Using Doppler velocities measured by multiple radars, the target aspect angle for each radar is calculated. The joint probability of each target hypothesis is then updated using observations from different radar line of sights (LOS). Based on these probabilities, a minimum correlation algorithm is proposed to adaptively design the transmit waveform for each radar in an amplitude fluctuation situation. Simulation results demonstrate performance improvements due to the cognitive radar network and adaptive waveform design. Our minimum correlation algorithm outperforms the eigen-waveform solution and other non-cognitive waveform design approaches. PMID:22163464

  1. Millimeter wave radar system on a rotating platform for combined search and track functionality with SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulenbacher, Uwe; Rech, Klaus; Sedlmeier, Johannes; Pratisto, Hans; Wellig, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Ground based millimeter wave radar sensors offer the potential for a weather-independent automatic ground surveillance at day and night, e.g. for camp protection applications. The basic principle and the experimental verification of a radar system concept is described, which by means of an extreme off-axis positioning of the antenna(s) combines azimuthal mechanical beam steering with the formation of a circular-arc shaped synthetic aperture (SA). In automatic ground surveillance the function of search and detection of moving ground targets is performed by means of the conventional mechanical scan mode. The rotated antenna structure designed as a small array with two or more RX antenna elements with simultaneous receiver chains allows to instantaneous track multiple moving targets (monopulse principle). The simultaneously operated SAR mode yields areal images of the distribution of stationary scatterers. For ground surveillance application this SAR mode is best suited for identifying possible threats by means of change detection. The feasibility of this concept was tested by means of an experimental radar system comprising of a 94 GHz (W band) FM-CW module with 1 GHz bandwidth and two RX antennas with parallel receiver channels, placed off-axis at a rotating platform. SAR mode and search/track mode were tested during an outdoor measurement campaign. The scenery of two persons walking along a road and partially through forest served as test for the capability to track multiple moving targets. For SAR mode verification an image of the area composed of roads, grassland, woodland and several man-made objects was reconstructed from the measured data.

  2. New scattering modes for studying plasma instabilities with a HF radar system

    SciTech Connect

    Hanuise, C.; Crochet, M.

    1980-07-01

    Electron density irregularities and associated plasma instabilities in the equatorial electrojet are usually studied by looking at the direct backscattering signal. New scattering modes have been observed with a HF radar. In the first one, backscatter in the E layer occurs after reflection in the F layer. In the other one, it is possible to study simultaneously different irregularity wavelengths and to observe quasi-horizontal plasma irregularities.

  3. Optimization of a 50 MHz Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave Radar system for the study of auroral E-region coherent backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, G. W.; Hussey, G. C.

    2010-12-01

    A 50 MHz Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar system has been developed at the University of Saskatchewan to provide excellent spatial and temporal resolution measurements of auroral E-region plasma processes. An undesirable feature of the otherwise highly effective FMCW system is the introduction of ambiguous spectral information, due to spectral ghosting, for scattering events in which multiple radar echoes are detected. The use of two Linearly Frequency Modulated (LFM) waveforms which extract the range and Doppler frequency information from the radar echoes, is the source of a data association problem, causing the spectral ghosting feature. An alternative frequency coded-CW radar waveform with noise-like properties is investigated as a replacement for the LFM waveforms. The proposed waveform, which is known as a composite Costas waveform, maintains the spatial and temporal resolutions of the FMCW system and prevents data association problems. The implementation of the proposed waveform with state-of-the-art signal generation hardware presents opportunities for the development of a coded-CW mono-static radar system for auroral E-region studies.

  4. Modelling the performance of USV manoeuvring and target tracking: an approach using frequency modulated continuous wave radar rotary system.

    PubMed

    Onunka, Chiemela; Nnadozie, Remigius Chidozie

    2013-12-01

    The performance of frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar in tracking targets is presented and analysed. Obstacle detection, target tracking and radar target tracking performance models are developed and were used to investigate and to propose ways of improving the autonomous motion of unmanned surface vehicle (USV). Possible factors affecting the performance of FMCW radar in tracking targets are discussed and analysed. PMID:23853743

  5. The gust-front detection and wind-shift algorithms for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermes, Laurie G.; Witt, Arthur; Smith, Steven D.; Klingle-Wilson, Diana; Morris, Dale; Stumpf, Gregory J.; Eilts, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) system was primarily designed to address the operational needs of pilots in the avoidance of low-altitude wind shears upon takeoff and landing at airports. One of the primary methods of wind-shear detection for the TDWR system is the gust-front detection algorithm. The algorithm is designed to detect gust fronts that produce a wind-shear hazard and/or sustained wind shifts. It serves the hazard warning function by providing an estimate of the wind-speed gain for aircraft penetrating the gust front. The gust-front detection and wind-shift algorithms together serve a planning function by providing forecasted gust-front locations and estimates of the horizontal wind vector behind the front, respectively. This information is used by air traffic managers to determine arrival and departure runway configurations and aircraft movements to minimize the impact of wind shifts on airport capacity. This paper describes the gust-front detection and wind-shift algorithms to be fielded in the initial TDWR systems. Results of a quantitative performance evaluation using Doppler radar data collected during TDWR operational demonstrations at the Denver, Kansas City, and Orlando airports are presented. The algorithms were found to be operationally useful by the FAA airport controllers and supervisors.

  6. Detection of aquifer system compaction and land subsidence using interferometric synthetic aperture radar, Antelope Valley, Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, D.L.; Hudnut, K.W.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Phillips, S.P.; Peltzer, G.; Rogez, F.; Rosen, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has great potential to detect and quantify land subsidence caused by aquifer system compaction. InSAR maps with high spatial detail and resolution of range displacement (??10 mm in change of land surface elevation) were developed for a groundwater basin (~103 km2) in Antelope Valley, California, using radar data collected from the ERS-1 satellite. These data allow comprehensive comparison between recent (1993-1995) subsidence patterns and those detected historically (1926-1992) by more traditional methods. The changed subsidence patterns are generally compatible with recent shifts in land and water use. The InSAR-detected patterns are generally consistent with predictions based on a coupled model of groundwater flow and aquifer system compaction. The minor inconsistencies may reflect our imperfect knowledge of the distribution and properties of compressible sediments. When used in conjunction with coincident measurements of groundwater levels and other geologic information, InSAR data may be useful for constraining parameter estimates in simulations of aquifer system compaction.

  7. 1.06-um optically addressable liquid crystal spatial light modulator for an HV target of the indoor laser radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hideo; Yamamoto, Yoshinov; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Iwata, Mitsuru; Nishiyama, Eiji; Matsuda, Toyonori; Watanabe, Masanobu

    2000-05-01

    Research and development project of an indoor laser radar communication system has been going on to establish one of wireless communication network environments. In the project, corner-reflecting laser communicating target `the Hyper Versatile (HV) target', is used for a free-space laser data communication with low power consumption and for accurate position detection of the target. Reflective-type Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator (LC SLM) is a possible attractive component of the HV target to solve the above subjects. The indoor laser radar system should operate at eye-safe wavelength region, however, no infrared operating SLM has been released because conventional SLMs have been designed and manufactured only for visible light operations. In this paper, infrared (1.06 micrometers ) operating Parallel Aligned nematic Liquid-crystal Spatial Light Modulator (PAL- SLM) is described for an application for the indoor laser radar system. Characteristics of the SLM and numerical simulations for corner-reflecting operations are indicated.

  8. 46 CFR 28.400 - Radar and depth sounding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar and depth sounding devices. 28.400 Section 28.400... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.400 Radar and depth sounding devices. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a general marine radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted...

  9. 46 CFR 28.400 - Radar and depth sounding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar and depth sounding devices. 28.400 Section 28.400... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.400 Radar and depth sounding devices. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a general marine radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted...

  10. 46 CFR 28.400 - Radar and depth sounding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar and depth sounding devices. 28.400 Section 28.400... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.400 Radar and depth sounding devices. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a general marine radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted...

  11. 46 CFR 28.400 - Radar and depth sounding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar and depth sounding devices. 28.400 Section 28.400... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.400 Radar and depth sounding devices. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a general marine radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted...

  12. 46 CFR 28.400 - Radar and depth sounding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar and depth sounding devices. 28.400 Section 28.400... Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.400 Radar and depth sounding devices. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a general marine radar system for surface navigation with a radar screen mounted...

  13. Instantaneous Radar Polarimetry with Multiple Dually-polarized Antennas

    E-print Network

    Nehorai, Arye

    1 Instantaneous Radar Polarimetry with Multiple Dually-polarized Antennas A. R. Calderbank,1 S. D radar systems are capable of simultaneously transmitting and receiving in two orthogonal polarizations. Instantaneous radar polarimetry exploits both polarization modes of a dually-polarized radar transmitter

  14. Radar SLAM using visual features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callmer, Jonas; Törnqvist, David; Gustafsson, Fredrik; Svensson, Henrik; Carlbom, Pelle

    2011-12-01

    A vessel navigating in a critical environment such as an archipelago requires very accurate movement estimates. Intentional or unintentional jamming makes GPS unreliable as the only source of information and an additional independent supporting navigation system should be used. In this paper, we suggest estimating the vessel movements using a sequence of radar images from the preexisting body-fixed radar. Island landmarks in the radar scans are tracked between multiple scans using visual features. This provides information not only about the position of the vessel but also of its course and velocity. We present here a navigation framework that requires no additional hardware than the already existing naval radar sensor. Experiments show that visual radar features can be used to accurately estimate the vessel trajectory over an extensive data set.

  15. The spatial and temporal variability of the vertical structure of precipitation systems in Africa, based on TRMM precipiation radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Fasil; Dejene Demissie, Teferi; Sharma, Rishi

    2014-05-01

    Five years of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 2A25 radar reflectivity profiles and derived surface rain rates are used to describe the vertical structure of precipitation systems in boreal and austral summer rainy seasons in Africa. The continent is divided into several climatologically rather homogenous regions and those regions are characterized and contrasted. To place the composite reflectivity profiles in context, they are also contrasted against TRMM 2A25 observations over the Amazon. Precipitation systems tend to be deeper and more intense in all of tropical Africa than in the Amazon, and shallow warm-rain events are less common. Storms, in all African regions, are characterized by high echo tops, high hydro-meteor loading aloft, little indication of a radar bright band maximum at the freezing level, and evidence for low-level evaporation. The diurnal modulation is regionally variable. The amplitude of the diurnal cycle of the mean echo top height decreases from the arid margins of the zenithal rain region toward the equatorial region, and is smallest in the Amazon. A secondary predawn (0000-0600 LT) maximum occurs in the Congo, in terms of rainfall frequency, rainfall intensity, and echo tops. The difference between all African regions and the Amazon, and the relatively smaller differences between regions in Africa, can be understood in terms of the climatological humidity, CAPE, and low-level shear values.

  16. The regional and diurnal variability of the vertical structure of precipitation systems in Africa, based on TRMM precipitation radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Yonas; Dejene Demissie, Teferi; D'Odorico, Paolo; Sharma, Rishi

    2013-04-01

    Five years of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 2A25 radar reflectivity profiles and derived surface rain rates are used to describe the vertical structure of precipitation systems in boreal and austral summer rainy seasons in Africa. The continent is divided into several climatologically rather homogenous regions and those regions are characterized and contrasted. To place the composite reflectivity profiles in context, they are also contrasted against TRMM 2A25 observations over the Amazon. Precipitation systems tend to be deeper and more intense in all of tropical Africa than in the Amazon, and shallow warm-rain events are less common. Storms, in all African regions, are characterized by high echo tops, high hydro-meteor loading aloft, little indication of a radar bright band maximum at the freezing level, and evidence for low-level evaporation. The diurnal modulation is regionally variable. The amplitude of the diurnal cycle of the mean echo top height decreases from the arid margins of the zenithal rain region toward the equatorial region, and is smallest in the Amazon. A secondary predawn (0000-0600 LT) maximum occurs in the Congo, in terms of rainfall frequency, rainfall intensity, and echo tops. The difference between all African regions and the Amazon, and the relatively smaller differences between regions in Africa, can be understood in terms of the climatological humidity, CAPE, and low-level shear values.

  17. The impact of reflectivity correction and accounting for raindrop size distribution variability to improve precipitation estimation by weather radar for an extreme low-land mesoscale convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, Pieter; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-11-01

    Between 25 and 27 August 2010 a long-duration mesoscale convective system was observed above the Netherlands, locally giving rise to rainfall accumulations exceeding 150 mm. Correctly measuring the amount of precipitation during such an extreme event is important, both from a hydrological and meteorological perspective. Unfortunately, the operational weather radar measurements were affected by multiple sources of error and only 30% of the precipitation observed by rain gauges was estimated. Such an underestimation of heavy rainfall, albeit generally less strong than in this extreme case, is typical for operational weather radar in The Netherlands. In general weather radar measurement errors can be subdivided into two groups: (1) errors affecting the volumetric reflectivity measurements (e.g. ground clutter, radar calibration, vertical profile of reflectivity) and (2) errors resulting from variations in the raindrop size distribution that in turn result in incorrect rainfall intensity and attenuation estimates from observed reflectivity measurements. A stepwise procedure to correct for the first group of errors leads to large improvements in the quality of the estimated precipitation, increasing the radar rainfall accumulations to about 65% of those observed by gauges. To correct for the second group of errors, a coherent method is presented linking the parameters of the radar reflectivity-rain rate (Z - R) and radar reflectivity-specific attenuation (Z - k) relationships to the normalized drop size distribution (DSD). Two different procedures were applied. First, normalized DSD parameters for the whole event and for each precipitation type separately (convective, stratiform and undefined) were obtained using local disdrometer observations. Second, 10,000 randomly generated plausible normalized drop size distributions were used for rainfall estimation, to evaluate whether this Monte Carlo method would improve the quality of weather radar rainfall products. Using the disdrometer information, the best results were obtained in case no differentiation between precipitation type (convective, stratiform and undefined) was made, increasing the event accumulations to more than 80% of those observed by gauges. For the randomly optimized procedure, radar precipitation estimates further improve and closely resemble observations in case one differentiates between precipitation type. However, the optimal parameter sets are very different from those derived from disdrometer observations. It is therefore questionable if single disdrometer observations are suitable for large-scale quantitative precipitation estimation, especially if the disdrometer is located relatively far away from the main rain event, which was the case in this study. In conclusion, this study shows the benefit of applying detailed error correction methods to improve the quality of the weather radar product, but also confirms the need to be cautious using locally obtained disdrometer measurements.

  18. Description and demonstration of the new Middle and Upper atmosphere Radar imaging system: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D imaging of troposphere and stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassenpflug, G.; Yamamoto, M.; Luce, H.; Fukao, S.

    2008-04-01

    The Middle and Upper atmosphere Radar (MUR) was upgraded in March 2004 for radar imaging capability with 5 frequencies across a 1 MHz bandwidth and 25 digital receivers. Although digitization introduces problems of its own, the uniformity of digitization is a great benefit over the analogue system in place before. This increased reliability will help make the new system an important component of long-term atmospheric science programs. We demonstrate 3-D imaging with Capon's method, which can provide information about structure morphology. In addition, we demonstrate an experimental 0.5 ?s pulse mode and compare this to Capon method imaging results.

  19. Paleodrainages of the Eastern Sahara - The radar rivers revisited (SIR-A/B implications for a mid-tertiary Trans-African drainage system)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, J. F.; Breed, C. S.; Schaber, G. G.; Mchugh, W. P.; Haynes, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The images obtained by the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR)-A and -B systems over the southwestern Egypt and northwestern Sudan were coregistered with the Landsat images and the existing maps to aid in extrapolations of the buried paleodrainages ('radar rivers'), first discovered by SIR-A. Field observations explain the radar responses of three types of radar rivers, RR-1 (broad, aggraded valleys filled with alluvium), RR-2 (braided channels inset in the RR-1 valleys), and RR-3 (narrow, long, bedrock-incised channels). A generalized model of the radar rivers, based on field studies and regional geologic relations, shows inferred changes in river regimen since the large valleys were established during the later Paleogene-early Neogene. It is suggested that a former Trans-African master stream system may have flowed from headwaters in the Red Sea Hills southwestward across North Africa, discharging into the Atlantic at the Paleo-Niger delta, prior to the Neogene domal uplifts and building of volcanic edifices across the paths of these ancient watercourses.

  20. Steps Toward Real-Time Atmospheric Phase Fluctuation Correction for a High Resolution Radar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, Grant R.; Geldzahler, Barry; Birr, Rick; Brown, Robert; Hoblitzell, Richard; Grant, Kevin; Miller, Michael; Woods, Gary; Archuleta, Arby; Ciminera, Michael; Cornish, Timothy; davarian, faramaz; kocz, jonathan; lee, dennis; Morabito, David Dominic; Soriano, Melissa; Tsao, Philip; Vilnrotter, Victor; Jakeman-Flores, Hali; Ott, melanie; Thomes, W. Joe; Soloff, Jason; NASA Kennedy Space Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA Johnson Space Flight Center, Metropolitan State University of Denver

    2016-01-01

    NASA is pursuing a demonstration of coherent uplink arraying at 7.145-7.190 GHz (X-band) and 30-31 GHz (Ka-band) using three 12m diameter COTS antennas separated by 60m at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, with the goal of a high-power, high-resolution radar array that employs real-time correction for tropospheric phase fluctuation. The major uses for this array will be (a) observations of Near Earth Objects, (b) detection and tracking of orbital debris, (c) high power emergency uplink capability for spacecraft, and (d) radio science experiments.

  1. Research relative to weather radar measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul L.

    1992-01-01

    Research relative to weather radar measurement techniques, which involves some investigations related to measurement techniques applicable to meteorological radar systems in Thailand, is reported. A major part of the activity was devoted to instruction and discussion with Thai radar engineers, technicians, and meteorologists concerning the basic principles of radar meteorology and applications to specific problems, including measurement of rainfall and detection of wind shear/microburst hazards. Weather radar calibration techniques were also considered during this project. Most of the activity took place during two visits to Thailand, in December 1990 and February 1992.

  2. L-band radar scattering from grass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chauhan, N.; O'Neill, P.; Le Vine, D.; Lang, R.; Khadr, N.

    1992-01-01

    A radar system based on a network analyzer has been developed to study the backscatter from vegetation. The radar is operated at L-band. Radar measurements of a grass field were made in 1991. The radar returns from the grass were measured at three incidence angles. Ground truth and canopy parameters such as blade and stem dimensions, moisture content of the grass and the soil, and blade and stem density, were measured. These parameters are used in a distorted Born approximation model to compute the backscatter coefficients from the grass layer. The model results are compared with the radar data.

  3. Contaminants in a soil-plant-lemming food chain system at a military radar site in the Canadian Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Dushenko, W.T.; Bright, D.A.; Grundy, S.L.; Reimer, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    Environmental assessment and impact studies have been conducted at Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line and other radar sites across the Canadian Arctic and Labrador, as well as Arctic background locations since 1989. Some of the major contaminants found in soils and plants in the vicinity of the stations include PCBs and inorganic elements such as lead, copper and zinc. The impact of these contaminants at higher levels of the food chain were examined using a soil-plant-lemming system in a sewage outfall (containing high soil concentrations of contaminants) and background areas at a radar site located at Cambridge Bay, NWT. Concentrations of PCBs in tissue samples from the sewage outfall were all significantly larger than background values with averages, in some cases, differing by an order of magnitude or more. Although the average PCB concentration declines from soils (average 1,600 ppb) to plants (average 9.3 ppb) in the outfall, plant-herbivore food chain biomagnification is indicated by a 6.5 fold increase in PCB concentration between whole lemming tissues (average 61 ppb) and plants. Levels in liver tissue were double this value (123 ppb) being comparable to values reported for predators of this species. The implications of these levels are discussed in terms of ecosystem toxicity using congener specific analysis.

  4. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation: High gain antenna/widebeam horn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, R.; Dodds, J. G.; Broad, P.

    1979-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the high gain antenna reflector and feed elements are described. Deficiencies in the sum feed are discussed, and lack of atmospheric venting is posed as a potential problem area. The measured RF performance of the high gain antenna is examined and the high sidelobe levels measured are related to the physical characteristics of the antenna. An examination of the attributes of the feed which might be influenced by temperature extremes shows that the antenna should be insensitive to temperature variations. Because the feed support bipod structure is considered a significant contributor to the high sidelobe levels measured in the azimuth plane, pod relocation, material changes, and shaping are suggested as improvements. Alternate feed designs are presented to further improve system performance. The widebeam horn and potential temperature effects due to the polarizer are discussed as well as in the effects of linear polarization on TDRS acquisition, and the effects of circular polarization on radar sidelobe avoidance. The radar detection probability is analyzed as a function of scan overlap and target range.

  5. Using X-band Weather Radar Measurements to Monitor the Integrity of Digital Elevation Models for Synthetic Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steve; UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Sayre, Jonathon

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) provide pilots with displays of stored geo-spatial data representing terrain, obstacles, and cultural features. As comprehensive validation is impractical, these databases typically have no quantifiable level of integrity. Further, updates to the databases may not be provided as changes occur. These issues limit the certification level and constrain the operational context of SVS for civil aviation. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of using a realtime monitor to bound the integrity of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) by using radar altimeter measurements during flight. This paper describes an extension of this concept to include X-band Weather Radar (WxR) measurements. This enables the monitor to detect additional classes of DEM errors and to reduce the exposure time associated with integrity threats. Feature extraction techniques are used along with a statistical assessment of similarity measures between the sensed and stored features that are detected. Recent flight-testing in the area around the Juneau, Alaska Airport (JNU) has resulted in a comprehensive set of sensor data that is being used to assess the feasibility of the proposed monitor technology. Initial results of this assessment are presented.

  6. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Jordan, Jay D. (Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Theodore J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-03

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  7. A study on spatial structure of urban system in the Northern China Plain based on radar remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinyuan; Wu, Li; Mei, Changqing; Ruan, Zhengzheng; Liu, Li; Bai, Enliang

    2008-10-01

    Differing from optical remote sensing image, radar remote sensing image can be used to extract more useful information, and its application is becoming widespread in a variety of fields. Based on the central place theory, the spatial structure of urban system in the Northern China Plain is studied by using Radarsat ScanSAR mosaic image. The results show that: (1) Radarsat ScanSAR data are suitable for automatic extraction of building-up areas and has meaningful potential for urban geographic study. (2) The urban system in the Northern China Plain, which is deeply influenced by physical factors, especially hydrographic factors, can be divided into five categories: urban system of equal distance between central places on fluvial fan region at Mt.Taihangshan; hexagonal urban system in central part of Hebei flood plain; pentagonal urban system in the Yellow River fluvial fan; quadrilateral urban system in the vicinity of Huaihe River system; and scattered new towns in the places of rolling hills in central and southern areas of Shandong Province. (3) An evolution model of central place system from hexagon to pentagon and quadrangle influenced by river is suggested. (4) No matter hexagonal or pentagonal urban systems, this study has demonstrated that there are good relationship between the distance structure model of the central place and the real-life instance.

  8. Electromagnetic approaches to wall characterization, wall mitigation, and antenna design for through-the-wall radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thajudeen, Christopher

    Through-the-wall imaging (TWI) is a topic of current interest due to its wide range of public safety, law enforcement, and defense applications. Among the various available technologies such as, acoustic, thermal, and optical imaging, which can be employed to sense and image targets of interest, electromagnetic (EM) imaging, in the microwave frequency bands, is the most widely utilized technology and has been at the forefront of research in recent years. The primary objectives for any Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging (TWRI) system are to obtain a layout of the building and/or inner rooms, detect if there are targets of interest including humans or weapons, determine if there are countermeasures being employed to further obscure the contents of a building or room of interest, and finally to classify the detected targets. Unlike conventional radar scenarios, the presence of walls, made of common construction materials such as brick, drywall, plywood, cinder block, and solid concrete, adversely affects the ability of any conventional imaging technique to properly image targets enclosed within building structures as the propagation through the wall can induce shadowing effects on targets of interest which may result in image degradation, errors in target localization, and even complete target masking. For many applications of TWR systems, the wall ringing signals are strong enough to mask the returns from targets not located a sufficient distance behind the wall, beyond the distance of the wall ringing, and thus without proper wall mitigation, target detection becomes extremely difficult. The results presented in this thesis focus on the development of wall parameter estimation, and intra-wall and wall-type characterization techniques for use in both the time and frequency domains as well as analysis of these techniques under various real world scenarios such as reduced system bandwidth scenarios, various wall backing scenarios, the case of inhomogeneous walls, presence of ground reflections, and situations where they may be applied to the estimation of the parameters associated with an interior wall. It is demonstrated through extensive computer simulations and laboratory experiments that, by proper exploitation of the electromagnetic characteristics of walls, one can efficiently extract the constitutive parameters associated with unknown wall(s) as well as to characterize and image the intra-wall region. Additionally, it is possible, to a large extent, to remove the negative wall effects, such as shadowing and incorrect target localization, as well as to enhance the imaging and classification of targets behind walls. In addition to the discussion of post processing the radar data to account for wall effects, the design of antenna elements used for transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) operations in TWR radars is also discussed but limited to antennas for mobile, handheld, or UAV TWR systems which impose design requirements such as low profiles, wide operational bands, and in most cases lend themselves to fabrication using surface printing techniques. A new class of wideband antennas, formed though the use of printed metallic paths in the form of Peano and Hilbert space-filling curves (SFC) to provide top-loading properties that miniaturize monopole antenna elements, has been developed for applications in conformal and/or low profile antennas systems, such as mobile platforms for TWRI and communication systems. Additionally, boresight gain enhancements of a stair-like antenna geometry, through the addition of parasitic self-similar patches and gate like ground plane structures, are presented.

  9. Methods for FMCW radar map georeferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaud, Marion; Rouveure, Raphaël; Faure, Patrice; Monod, Marie-Odile

    2013-10-01

    In a context of mobile environment mapping, a vehicle-based radar system, K2Pi, has been developed. A mapping of the environment is carried out from the radar datasets. Given the specificities of radar maps, the main problem at this stage is to find a method to georeference these maps. This article proposes three radar map georeferencing methods. The first method is a typical manual selection of a set of control point pairs. The second method consists of matching the relative trajectory computed by a specific radar algorithm with a trajectory recorded from absolute DGPS recording. Finally, the third method, inspired by the image-to-image approach, is based on Fourier-Mellin transform which automatically registers the radar map with respect to a georeferenced aerial photograph. Successfully tested on radar datasets, this method could be applied to many other types of data.

  10. All-optical bandwidth-tailorable radar

    E-print Network

    Zou, Weiwen; Long, Xin; Zhang, Siteng; Cui, Yuanjun; Chen, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Radar has been widely used in military, security, and rescue. Metamaterial cloak is employed in stealth targets to evade radar detection. Hence modern radar should be reconfigurable at multi-bands for detecting stealth targets, which might be realized based on microwave photonics. Here, we demonstrate an all-optical bandwidth-tailorable radar architecture. It is a coherent system utilizing one mode-locked laser for both signal generation and reception. Heterodyning of two individually filtered optical pulses that are pre-chirped via wavelength-to-time mapping generates wideband linearly-chirped radar signal. The working bands can be flexibly tailored with desired bandwidth at user-preferred carrier frequency. After modulated onto the pre-chirped optical pulse, radar echoes are time-stretched and frequency-compressed by several times. The digitization becomes much easier without loss of detection ability. We believe that the demonstration can innovate the radar's architecture with ultra-high range resolution.

  11. Regional and Diurnal Variability of the Vertical Structure of Precipitation Systems in Africa Based on Spaceborne Radar Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Bart; Dejene, Teferi

    2005-04-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 2A25 radar reflectivity profiles and derived surface rain rates are used to describe the vertical structure of precipitation systems in Africa. Five years of data are used in both the boreal and austral summer rainy seasons. A number of climate regions are isolated and compared. To place the composite reflectivity profiles in context, they are contrasted against TRMM 2A25 observations over the Amazon.In all of tropical Africa, precipitation systems tend to be deeper and more intense than in the Amazon, and shallow warm-rain events are less common. In all African regions, but especially in the Sahel and northern Savanna, storms are characterized by high echo tops, high hydrometeor loading aloft, little indication of a radar brightband maximum at the freezing level, and evidence for low-level evaporation.Storms in Africa are generally most common, and deepest, in the late afternoon, and weaker shallow systems are relatively more common around noon. The diurnal modulation is regionally variable. The amplitude of the diurnal cycle of the mean echo top height decreases from the arid margins of the zenithal rain region toward the equatorial region, and is smallest in the Amazon. A secondary predawn (0000-0600 LT) maximum occurs in the Congo, in terms of rainfall frequency, rainfall intensity, and echo tops. The storm intensity indicators generally peak a few hours later in the Sahel and northern Savanna than in other regions in Africa.The difference between all African regions and the Amazon, and the relatively smaller differences between regions in Africa, can be understood in terms of the climatological humidity, CAPE, and low-level shear values.

  12. The FlySafe project: How weather radars can improve the en-route bird strike warning system. Hans van Gasteren1,2

    E-print Network

    Graaf, Martin de

    1 The FlySafe project: How weather radars can improve the en-route bird strike warning system. Hans Graaf3 and Willem Bouten1 In civil aviation the majority of bird strikes occur below 1000 ft, thus civil bird strikes predominantly occur on and around aerodromes. In military aviation, however, the problem

  13. Cockpit weather radar display demonstrator and ground-to-air sferics telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickum, J. D.; Mccall, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The results of two methods of obtaining timely and accurate severe weather presentations in the cockpit are detailed. The first method described is a course up display of uplinked weather radar data. This involves the construction of a demonstrator that will show the feasibility of producing a course up display in the cockpit of the NASA simulator at Langley. A set of software algorithms was designed that could easily be implemented, along with data tapes generated to provide the cockpit simulation. The second method described involves the uplinking of sferic data from a ground based 3M-Ryan Stormscope. The technique involves transfer of the data on the CRT of the Stormscope to a remote CRT. This sferic uplink and display could also be included in an implementation on the NASA cockpit simulator, allowing evaluation of pilot responses based on real Stormscope data.

  14. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP. Volume 30: International School on Atmospheric Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukao, Shoichiro (editor)

    1989-01-01

    Broad, tutorial coverage is given to the technical and scientific aspects of mesosphere stratosphere troposphere (MST) meteorological radar systems. Control issues, signal processing, atmospheric waves, the historical aspects of radar atmospheric dynamics, incoherent scatter radars, radar echoes, radar targets, and gravity waves are among the topics covered.

  15. An Integrated Navigation System using GPS Carrier Phase for Real-Time Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, J. Rick; Kim, Theodore J.; Kohler, Stewart M.

    1999-06-24

    A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires accu- rate measurement of the motion of the imaging plat- form to produce well-focused images with minimal absolute position error. The motion measurement (MoMeas) system consists of a inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a P-code GPS receiver that outputs corrected ephemeris, L1 & L2 pseudoranges, and L1 & L2 carrier phase measurements. The unknown initial carrier phase biases to the GPS satellites are modeled as states in an extended Kalman filter and the resulting integrated navigation solution has po- sition errors that change slowly with time. Position error drifts less than 1- cm/sec have been measured from the SAR imagery for various length apertures.

  16. The development of a power spectral density processor for C and L band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. A., III; Chladek, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A real-time signal processor was developed for the NASA/JSC L-and C-band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems. The purpose of the effort was to reduce ground data processing costs. Conversion of two quadrature channels of data (like and cross polarized) was made to obtain Power Spectral Density (PSD) values. A chirp-z transform (CZT) approach was used to filter the Doppler return signal and improved high frequency and angular resolution was realized. The processors have been tested with record signals and excellent results were obtained. CZT filtering can be readily applied to scatterometers operating at other wavelengths by altering the sample frequency. The design of the hardware and software and the results of the performance tests are described in detail.

  17. Inverse problems arising in different synthetic aperture radar imaging systems and a general Bayesian approach for them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sha; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Li, Xiang; Mao, Junjie

    2011-03-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging systems are nowadays very common technics of imaging in remote sensing and environment survey. There are different acquisition modes: spotlight, stripmap, scan; different geometries: mono-, bi- and multi-static; and varieties of specific applications: interferometric SAR (InSAR), polarimetric SAR etc. In this paper, first a common inverse problem framework for all of them is given, and then basics of SAR imaging and the classical deterministic inversion methods are presented. Aiming at overcoming the inadequacies of deterministic methods, a general probabilistic Bayesian estimation method is pioneered for solving image reconstruction problems. In particular, two priors which simply allow the automated determination of the hyperparameters in a Type-II likelihood framework are considered. Finally, the performances of the proposed methods on synthetic data.

  18. Characterization of Adolescent Prescription Drug Abuse and Misuse Using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS®) System

    PubMed Central

    Zosel, Amy; Bartelson, Becki Bucher; Bailey, Elise; Lowenstein, Steven; Dart, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the characteristics and health effects of adolescent (age 13–19 years) prescription drug abuse and misuse using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS®) System. Method Secondary analysis of data collected from RADARS System participating poison centers was performed. Data for all intentional exposures from 2007 through 2009 were used to describe adolescent prescription opioid (oxycodone, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, morphine, methadone, buprenorphine, and tramadol) and stimulant (methylphenidate and amphetamines) exposures. Results A total of 16,209 intentional adolescent exposures to prescription drugs were identified, 68% to opioids and 32% to stimulants. The mean age was 16.6 years (SD ± 1.7 years). Slightly more than half (52.4%) of drug mentions involved females. The five most frequently misused or abused drugs were hydrocodone (32%), amphetamines (18%), oxycodone (15%), methylphenidate (14%), and tramadol (11%). Of all exposures, 38%were classified as suspected suicidal. Of adolescents who intentionally exposed themselves to prescription drugs, 30% were treated in a health care facility, 2,792 of whom were admitted to the hospital, including 1,293 to the intensive care unit. A total of 17.2% of intentional exposures were associated with no effect, 38.9% minor effects, 23.3% moderate effects, 3.6% major effects, and 0.1% were associated with death. Oxycodone and methadone were associated with the most deaths. No deaths were associated with exposures to stimulants. Conclusions Prescription drug misuse and abuse poses an important health problem and results in thousands of hospitalizations of adolescents per year. Further work is needed to develop focused interventions and educational programs to prevent prescription drug abuse and misuse by adolescents. PMID:23357446

  19. Agricultural and hydrological applications of radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1976-01-01

    Program objectives, covering a wide range of disciplines and activities in radar remote sensing, include radar systems development and analysis, data processing and display, and data interpretation in geology, geography and oceanography. Research was focused on the evaluation of radar remote sensing applications in hydrology and agriculture based on data acquired with the Microwave Active Spectrometer (MAS) system. The title, author(s) and abstract of each of the 62 technical reports generated under this contract are appended.

  20. The NASA Polarimetric Radar (NPOL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Wolff, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of the NASA NPOL S-band dual-polarimetric radar are presented including its operating characteristics, field configuration, scanning capabilities and calibration approaches. Examples of precipitation science data collections conducted using various scan types, and associated products, are presented for different convective system types and previous field campaign deployments. Finally, the NASA NPOL radar location is depicted in its home base configuration within the greater Wallops Flight Facility precipitation research array supporting NASA Global Precipitation Measurement Mission ground validation.

  1. A combined QC methodology in Ebro Delta HF radar system: real time web monitoring of diagnostic parameters and offline validation of current data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, Pablo; Piedracoba, Silvia; Soto-Navarro, Javier; Ruiz, Maria Isabel; Alvarez Fanjul, Enrique

    2015-04-01

    Over recent years, special attention has been focused on the development of protocols for near real-time quality control (QC) of HF radar derived current measurements. However, no agreement has been worldwide achieved to date to establish a standardized QC methodology, although a number of valuable international initiatives have been launched. In this context, Puertos del Estado (PdE) aims to implement a fully operational HF radar network with four different Codar SeaSonde HF radar systems by means of: - The development of a best-practices robust protocol for data processing and QC procedures to routinely monitor sites performance under a wide variety of ocean conditions. - The execution of validation works with in-situ observations to assess the accuracy of HF radar-derived current measurements. The main goal of the present work is to show this combined methodology for the specific case of Ebro HF radar (although easily expandable to the rest of PdE radar systems), deployed to manage Ebro River deltaic area and promote the conservation of an important aquatic ecosystem exposed to a severe erosion and reshape. To this aim, a web interface has been developed to efficiently monitor in real time the evolution of several diagnostic parameters provided by the manufacturer (CODAR) and used as indicators of HF radar system health. This web, updated automatically every hour, examines sites performance on different time basis in terms of: - Hardware parameters: power and temperature. - Radial parameters, among others: Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), number of radial vectors provided by time step, maximum radial range and bearing. - Total uncertainty metrics provided by CODAR: zonal and meridional standard deviations and covariance between both components. - Additionally, a widget embedded in the web interface executes queries against PdE database, providing the chance to compare current time series observed by Tarragona buoy (located within Ebro HF radar spatial domain) and those measured by the closest radar grid point. A thorough analysis of the temporal evolution of the aforementioned parameters allows to define the standard thresholds for each site within which they are considered to be running optimally. In contrast, a site performance could be categorized as sub-optimal if an erratic and/or anomalous behavior is persistently detected in radial parameters values, related to a significant discrepancy from the mean and clearly outside the limits defined by the associated standard deviations. Consequently, a three colored-based alert system is activated according to each site's current status: green (OK), yellow (acceptable, but issue detected) and red (KO). Since this approach is constrained by the fact that it can not state the intrinsic quality of surface current data, a complementary validation analysis is required: HF radar-derived radial and total vectors are compared with observations from a current meter installed in Tarragona buoy. This validation, conducted for the entire 2014, aims to complete the proposed methodology through the exploration of the existence of bearing errors and the evaluation of intrinsic uncertainties related to HF radar technology by means of objective quality indicators.

  2. A Method to Merge WSR-88D Data with ARM SGP Millimeter Cloud Radar Data by Studying Deep Convective Systems

    E-print Network

    Dong, Xiquan

    A Method to Merge WSR-88D Data with ARM SGP Millimeter Cloud Radar Data by Studying Deep Convective MMCR reflectivities were then merged with the WSR- 88D data to fill in the gaps during the heavy precipitation periods. This merged dataset provides a more complete radar reflectivity profile for studying

  3. State-space adjustment of radar rainfall and skill score evaluation of stochastic volume forecasts in urban drainage systems.

    PubMed

    Löwe, Roland; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Rasmussen, Michael R; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Merging of radar rainfall data with rain gauge measurements is a common approach to overcome problems in deriving rain intensities from radar measurements. We extend an existing approach for adjustment of C-band radar data using state-space models and use the resulting rainfall intensities as input for forecasting outflow from two catchments in the Copenhagen area. Stochastic grey-box models are applied to create the runoff forecasts, providing us with not only a point forecast but also a quantification of the forecast uncertainty. Evaluating the results, we can show that using the adjusted radar data improves runoff forecasts compared with using the original radar data and that rain gauge measurements as forecast input are also outperformed. Combining the data merging approach with short-term rainfall forecasting algorithms may result in further improved runoff forecasts that can be used in real time control. PMID:23925186

  4. High-resolution vertical imaging of the troposphere and lower stratosphere using the new MU radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, H.; Hassenpflug, G.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.

    2006-05-01

    In the present paper, a new application of the range imaging technique called Frequency Interferometry Imaging (FII) or Range Imaging (RIM), performed in April 2005, is shown using the new 46.5-MHz Middle and Upper (MU) atmosphere radar system (Shigaraki, Japan). Height-time images of brightness distribution have been computed at the highest resolution ever obtained for imaging with VHF radars in the troposphere and, for the very first time, in the lower stratosphere, up to about 22 km. The images were produced by processing signals obtained with an initial range-resolution of ?r=150 m and five equally-spaced frequencies within ?f=1.0 MHz, with the adaptive Capon method. These values represent an improvement of a factor 2 over all the previous published experiments at VHF, which were performed with ?r=300 m and ?f=0.5 MHz. The Capon images present realistic and self-consistent features, and reveal many more organized structures than the height-time SNR plots at the initial range-resolution. For example, the Capon images show persistent enhanced brightness layers significantly thinner than 150 m in the stratosphere, which are impossible to track with the standard single-frequency mode owing to a lack of range resolution. These observations thus support the idea of strong stratification even at vertical scales much smaller than 100 m, as suggested by recent high-resolution temperature observations by balloons (Dalaudier et al., 1994). We also present comparisons of Capon images with patterns obtained from the dual-FDI technique and two parametric methods (the MUSIC algorithm and the newly-introduced Maximum Entropy Method based on an auto-regressive (AR) model). The comparisons confirm the insufficiencies of the dual-FDI technique and indicate that parametric methods such as MEM and the MUSIC algorithm can help to validate the Capon images when the parametric methods provide similar patterns.

  5. The Southern Argentina Agile MEteor Radar Orbital System (SAAMER-OS): An Initial Sporadic Meteoroid Orbital Survey in the Southern Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Close, S.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Swarnalingam, N.; Murphy, A.; O'Connor, D.; Vandepeer, B.; Fuller, B.; Fritts, D. C.; Brunini, C.

    2015-08-01

    We present an initial survey in the southern sky of the sporadic meteoroid orbital environment obtained with the Southern Argentina Agile MEteor Radar (SAAMER) Orbital System (OS), in which over three-quarters of a million orbits of dust particles were determined from 2012 January through 2015 April. SAAMER-OS is located at the southernmost tip of Argentina and is currently the only operational radar with orbit determination capability providing continuous observations of the southern hemisphere. Distributions of the observed meteoroid speed, radiant, and heliocentric orbital parameters are presented, as well as those corrected by the observational biases associated with the SAAMER-OS operating parameters. The results are compared with those reported by three previous surveys performed with the Harvard Radio Meteor Project, the Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar, and the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, and they are in agreement with these previous studies. Weighted distributions for meteoroids above the thresholds for meteor trail electron line density, meteoroid mass, and meteoroid kinetic energy are also considered. Finally, the minimum line density and kinetic energy weighting factors are found to be very suitable for meteroid applications. The outcomes of this work show that, given SAAMER’s location, the system is ideal for providing crucial data to continuously study the South Toroidal and South Apex sporadic meteoroid apparent sources.

  6. Radar interferometer calibration of the EISCAT Svalbard Radar and a additional receiver station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlatter, N. M.; Grydeland, T.; Ivchenko, N.; Belyey, V.; Sullivan, J.; La Hoz, C.; Blixt, M.

    2013-12-01

    The EISCAT Svalbard Radar has two parabolic dishes. In order to attempt to implement radar aperture synthesis imaging methods three smaller, passive receive array antennas were built. Several science goals for this new receiver system exist, the primary of which is to study so called naturally enhanced ion acoustic lines. In order to compare radar aperture synthesis imaging results with measurements from optical imagers, calibration of the radar interferometer system is necessary. In this work we present the phase calibration of the EISCAT Svalbard interferometer including one array antenna. The calibration was done using the coherent scatter from satellites passing through the radar beam. Optical signatures of the satellite transits provide accurate position for the satellites. Using transits of a number of satellites sufficient for mapping the radar beam, the interferometric cross-phase was fitted within the radar beam. The calibration technique presented in this work will be applied to all antenna pairs of the antenna configuration for future interferometry studies.

  7. Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar in Bridge Health Monitoring Using Different Frequency Antennae Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alani, A.; Kilic, G.; Aboutalebi, M.

    2012-04-01

    Inspection and assessment of bridge structures within the context of health monitoring of structures as well as the life cycle of structures is of paramount importance for structural engineers and bridge owners. No doubt the early detection of structural defects in particular internal structural elements such as bridge deck delamination, formation of cracks and corrosion of rebar will enable engineers to remedy the imperfection and prolong the serviceability of the structure. Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) have proved to be effective in detecting such imperfections if utilised correctly. This paper presents and discusses the applications of GPR in assessing the structural integrity of a heavily used bridge in a town centre position (Pentagon Road Bridge, Chatham, Kent, UK) using different antennae in terms of frequency and method of application (2 GHz and 200-600 MHz GPR antennae). The paper focuses on the effectiveness of using the 'correct' tool and data processing in terms of better understanding possible structural defects. Processing, interpretation and analysis of collected data were supported by GRED software, with three-dimensional scanning capabilities. Reported results illustrate the effectiveness of GPR mapping providing valuable information regarding the positions of rebar (upper and lower reinforcement), unknown structural features as well as possible moisture ingress within the structure. The results also demonstrate a possible phenomenon in identifying the presence of moisture within the bridge deck confirming a similar finding in an earlier case (Forth Road Bridge in Scotland). Keywords: Bridge; Structure; Health Monitoring; Moisture Ingress.

  8. Advanced Borehole Radar for Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar is a useful tool for monitoring the hydrogeological environment. We have developed GPR systems which can be applied to these purposes, and we will demonstrate examples borehole radar measurements. In order to have longer radar detection range, frequency lower than100MHz has been normally adopted in borehole radar. Typical subsurface fractures of our interests have a few mm aperture and radar resolution is much poorer than a few cm in this frequency range. We are proposing and demonstrating to use radar polarimetry to solve this problem. We have demonstrated that a full-polarimetry borehole radar can be used for characterization of subsurface fractures. Together with signal processing for antenna characteristic compensation to equalize the signal by a dipole antenna and slot antennas, we could demonstrate that polarimetric borehole radar can estimate the surface roughness of subsurface fractures, We believe the surface roughness is closely related to water permeability through the fractures. We then developed a directional borehole radar, which uses optical field sensor. A dipole antenna in a borehole has omni-directional radiation pattern, and we cannot get azimuthal information about the scatterers. We use multiple dipole antennas set around the borehole axis, and from the phase differences, we can estimate the 3-diemnational orientation of subsurface structures. We are using optical electric field sensor for receiver of borehole radar. This is a passive sensor and connected only with optical fibers and does not require any electric power supply to operate the receiver. It has two major advantages; the first one is that the receiver can be electrically isolated from other parts, and wave coupling to a logging cable is avoided. Then, secondary, it can operate for a long time, because it does not require battery installed inside the system. It makes it possible to set sensors in fixed positions to monitor the change of environmental conditions for a long period. We demonstrated this idea using cross- hole borehole radar measurement. We think this method is useful for detecting any changes in hydrogeological situations, which will be useful for subsurface storage such as LNG and nuclear waste.

  9. All-digital radar architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo A.

    2014-10-01

    All digital radar architecture requires exclude mechanical scan system. The phase antenna array is necessarily large because the array elements must be co-located with very precise dimensions and will need high accuracy phase processing system for aggregate and distribute T/R modules data to/from antenna elements. Even phase array cannot provide wide field of view. New nature inspired all digital radar architecture proposed. The fly's eye consists of multiple angularly spaced sensors giving the fly simultaneously thee wide-area visual coverage it needs to detect and avoid the threats around him. Fly eye radar antenna array consist multiple directional antennas loose distributed along perimeter of ground vehicle or aircraft and coupled with receiving/transmitting front end modules connected by digital interface to central processor. Non-steering antenna array allows creating all-digital radar with extreme flexible architecture. Fly eye radar architecture provides wide possibility of digital modulation and different waveform generation. Simultaneous correlation and integration of thousands signals per second from each point of surveillance area allows not only detecting of low level signals ((low profile targets), but help to recognize and classify signals (targets) by using diversity signals, polarization modulation and intelligent processing. Proposed all digital radar architecture with distributed directional antenna array can provide a 3D space vector to the jammer by verification direction of arrival for signals sources and as result jam/spoof protection not only for radar systems, but for communication systems and any navigation constellation system, for both encrypted or unencrypted signals, for not limited number or close positioned jammers.

  10. Study of 11 September 2004 hailstorm event using radar identification of 2-D systems and 3-D cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperuelo, M.; Llasat, M. C.; López, L.; García-Ortega, E.; Sánchez, J. L.

    2006-03-01

    The most important hail event recorded in the region of the Ebro Valley (NE Spain) in 2004 was the 11 September episode. Large hailstones (some of them with a diameter of over 30 mm) caused important damages in agriculture and properties. The hail event affected an area of 3848 ha and was caused by several multicellular systems. The aim of this paper is the analysis of the associated convective structures using the meteorological radar as well as the MM5 mesoscale model, thermodynamic data and a hailpad network. To achieve this end, the new hailstorm analysis tool RHAP (Rainfall events and Hailstorms Analysis Program) has been applied. It identifies tracks and characterises precipitation systems and convective cells, taking into account 2-D and 3-D structures. The event has also been studied with the TITAN software (Thunderstorm Identification, Tracking, Analysis and Nowcasting) in an attempt to compare both methods. Results show that the episode had a strong convective activity with CAPE values over 4000 J/kg and with hail-forming cells characterised by VIL (Vertical Integrated Liguid) exceeding 40 kg/m2, VILD (VIL density) over 4 g/m3, HP (Hail Probability) of 100% and SHP (Severe Hail Probability) of over 75%. The hail cells evolved into multicellular systems that lasted between 70 and 90 min. Finally, the comparison of RHAP and TITAN has shown significant correlations between methods.

  11. An analysis of radar estimated precipitation to rain gauge measurements 

    E-print Network

    Gleason, Byron Edward

    1997-01-01

    different case events. These events were classified into one of three weather system classifications. The classifications were based on two criteria, synoptic conditions and the storms radar signature. Radar data were collected from five levels above...

  12. An MSK Radar Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2012-01-01

    The minimum-shift-keying (MSK) radar waveform is formed by periodically extending a waveform that separately modulates the in-phase and quadrature- phase components of the carrier with offset pulse-shaped pseudo noise (PN) sequences. To generate this waveform, a pair of periodic PN sequences is each passed through a pulse-shaping filter with a half sinusoid impulse response. These shaped PN waveforms are then offset by half a chip time and are separately modulated on the in-phase and quadrature phase components of an RF carrier. This new radar waveform allows an increase in radar resolution without the need for additional spectrum. In addition, it provides self-interference suppression and configurable peak sidelobes. Compared strictly on the basis of the expressions for delay resolution, main-lobe bandwidth, effective Doppler bandwidth, and peak ambiguity sidelobe, it appears that bi-phase coded (BPC) outperforms the new MSK waveform. However, a radar waveform must meet certain constraints imposed by the transmission and reception of the modulation, as well as criteria dictated by the observation. In particular, the phase discontinuity of the BPC waveform presents a significant impediment to the achievement of finer resolutions in radar measurements a limitation that is overcome by using the continuous phase MSK waveform. The phase continuity, and the lower fractional out-of-band power of MSK, increases the allowable bandwidth compared with BPC, resulting in a factor of two increase in the range resolution of the radar. The MSK waveform also has been demonstrated to have an ambiguity sidelobe structure very similar to BPC, where the sidelobe levels can be decreased by increasing the length of the m-sequence used in its generation. This ability to set the peak sidelobe level is advantageous as it allows the system to be configured to a variety of targets, including those with a larger dynamic range. Other conventionally used waveforms that possess an even greater spectral efficiency than the MSK waveform, such as linear frequency modulation (LFM) and Costas frequency hopping, have a fixed peak sidelobe level that is therefore not configurable, and can be exceeded by high contrast targets. Furthermore, in the case of a multistatic experiment observing a target in motion, self-interference from the transmitter to the receiver is mitigated by the MSK waveform. Waveforms that have delay Doppler coupling, such as LFM, provide no such protection.

  13. Multi-static Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Formation

    E-print Network

    Yazici, Birsen

    -static radar are less effective against distributed radar systems [3], [4]. Finally, multi-static measurementsMulti-static Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Formation V. P. Krishnan Department of Electrical, Systems and Computer Engineering Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 Email

  14. Varying FM Rates in Adaptive Processing for Distributed Radar Apertures

    E-print Network

    Adve, Raviraj

    to the application of target detection for a distributed radar aperture system in the presence of noise and clutter detection for a distributed radar aperture system in the presence of noise and clutter. CruciallyVarying FM Rates in Adaptive Processing for Distributed Radar Apertures Earnest Lock and Raviraj S

  15. Spectrum Sharing with Rotating Radar: Implications for Cognitive Radio Rendezvous

    E-print Network

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Spectrum Sharing with Rotating Radar: Implications for Cognitive Radio Rendezvous Jeffrey D. Poston measurements of an actual radar system, this paper studies how an ad hoc network of cognitive radios lacking in time & frequency. Even prior work specifically on sharing with radar systems typically proposes

  16. The impact of reflectivity correction and conversion methods to improve precipitation estimation by weather radar for an extreme low-land Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, Pieter; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    Between 25 and 27 August 2010 a long-duration mesoscale convective system was observed above the Netherlands. For most of the country this led to over 15 hours of near-continuous precipitation, which resulted in total event accumulations exceeding 150 mm in the eastern part of the Netherlands. Such accumulations belong to the largest sums ever recorded in this country and gave rise to local flooding. Measuring precipitation by weather radar within such mesoscale convective systems is known to be a challenge, since measurements are affected by multiple sources of error. For the current event the operational weather radar rainfall product only estimated about 30% of the actual amount of precipitation as measured by rain gauges. In the current presentation we will try to identify what gave rise to such large underestimations. In general weather radar measurement errors can be subdivided into two different groups: 1) errors affecting the volumetric reflectivity measurements taken, and 2) errors related to the conversion of reflectivity values in rainfall intensity and attenuation estimates. To correct for the first group of errors, the quality of the weather radar reflectivity data was improved by successively correcting for 1) clutter and anomalous propagation, 2) radar calibration, 3) wet radome attenuation, 4) signal attenuation and 5) the vertical profile of reflectivity. Such consistent corrections are generally not performed by operational meteorological services. Results show a large improvement in the quality of the precipitation data, however still only ~65% of the actual observed accumulations was estimated. To further improve the quality of the precipitation estimates, the second group of errors are corrected for by making use of disdrometer measurements taken in close vicinity of the radar. Based on these data the parameters of a normalized drop size distribution are estimated for the total event as well as for each precipitation type separately (convective, stratiform and undefined). These are then used to obtain coherent parameter sets for the radar reflectivity-rainfall rate (Z-R) and radar reflectivity-attenuation (Z-k) relationship, specifically applicable for this event. By applying a single parameter set to correct for both sources of errors, the quality of the rainfall product improves further, leading to >80% of the observed accumulations. However, by differentiating between precipitation type no better results are obtained as when using the operational relationships. This leads to the question: how representative are local disdrometer observations to correct large scale weather radar measurements? In order to tackle this question a Monte Carlo approach was used to generate >10000 sets of the normalized dropsize distribution parameters and to assess their impact on the estimated precipitation amounts. Results show that a large number of parameter sets result in improved precipitation estimated by the weather radar closely resembling observations. However, these optimal sets vary considerably as compared to those obtained from the local disdrometer measurements.

  17. Fundamental Radar Properties: Hidden Variables in Spacetime

    E-print Network

    Andrew K. Gabriel

    2001-10-12

    A derivation of the properties of pulsed radiative imaging systems is presented with examples drawn from conventional, synthetic aperture, and interferometric radar. A geometric construction of the space and time components of a radar observation yields a simple underlying structural equivalence between many of the properties of radar, including resolution, range ambiguity, azimuth aliasing, signal strength, speckle, layover, Doppler shifts, obliquity and slant range resolution, finite antenna size, atmospheric delays, and beam and pulse limited configurations. The same simple structure is shown to account for many interferometric properties of radar - height resolution, image decorrelation, surface velocity detection, and surface deformation measurement. What emerges is a simple, unified description of the complex phenomena of radar observations. The formulation comes from fundamental physical concepts in relativistic field theory, of which the essential elements are presented. In the terminology of physics, radar properties are projections of hidden variables - curved worldlines from a broken symmetry in Minkowski spacetime - onto a time-serial receiver.

  18. Microwave radar detection of gas pipeline leaks.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Kanareykin, D. B.; Asanov, V. D; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A. C.

    2002-10-02

    We are developing a microwave radar sensing and imaging system to detect and locate gas leaks in natural gas pipelines. The underlying detection principle is radar backscattering from the index-of-refraction inhomogeneities introduced by the dispersion of methane in air. An essential first step in the development effort is modeling to estimate the radar cross section. This paper describes the modeling results and the experimental efforts underway to validate the model. For the case of leaks from small holes in a pressurized gas pipeline, we modeled the gas dynamics of the leak jet to determine the plume geometry and the variation of methane concentration in air as a function of distance from the leak source. From the static and dynamic changes in the index of refraction in the turbulent plume, the radar backscatter cross sections were calculated. The results show that the radar cross sections of the leak plumes should be detectable by special-purpose radars.

  19. Space-Time-Waveform Adaptive Processing for Frequency Diverse Distributed Radar Apertures

    E-print Network

    Adve, Raviraj

    nature of frequency diverse distributed apertures. I. INTRODUCTION Surveillance radar systems operate systems, these apertures could be many thou- sands of wavelengths apart. The distributed radar operates discusses a waveform diverse multistatic radar. Consider a distributed radar system comprising N-apertures

  20. Scanning-Pencil-Beam Radar Scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, David G.; Freilich, Michael H.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Noon, Don E.

    1992-01-01

    SCANSCAT conceptual scanning radar scatterometer placed in nearly polar orbit around Earth at altitude of 705 km aboard Spacecraft B of NASA's Earth Observing System. Measures radar backscattering from surface of ocean. Data processed on ground into normalized radar-backscattering cross sections, then processed into velocities of winds near surface of ocean by use of empirical mathematical model of relationship between normalized backscattering cross section, wind vector at scanned spot, and angle of incidence and azimuth angle of radar beam. Accuracy and coverage exceeds those of fan-beam scatterometer. Modified versions of scanning plan useful in laser inspection of surface finishes on machined parts.

  1. Balancing radar receiver channels with commutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.

    2015-05-01

    The trend in high-performance ground-surveillance radar systems is towards employing multiple receiver channels of data. Often, key to performance is the ability to achieve and maintain balance between the radar channels. This can be quite problematic for high-performance radar modes. It is shown that commutation of radar receiver channels can be employed to facilitate channel balancing. Commutation is the switching, trading, toggling, or multiplexing of the channels between signal paths. Commutation allows modulating the imbalance energy away from the balanced energy in Doppler, where it can be mitigated with filtering.

  2. Impacts of Mobile Radar and Telecommunications Sys-tems on Earth Remote Sensing in the 22-27 GHz Range

    E-print Network

    Ruf, Christopher

    Impacts of Mobile Radar and Telecommunications Sys- tems on Earth Remote Sensing in the 22-27 GHz between IEEE Standards and International TelecommunicationsUnion (ITU) regulations. II. SATELLITE BASED

  3. The evolution of total lightning and radar reflectivity characteristics of two mesoscale convective systems over Houston, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Hodapp, Charles Lee

    2009-05-15

    and a developing stratiform region and radar bright band. The intensification of stratiform region precipitation, including the bright band, is thought to play an important role in stratiform lightning structure, charge structure, and total lightning...

  4. A satellite-based radar wind sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xin, Weizhuang

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to investigate the application of Doppler radar systems for global wind measurement. A model of the satellite-based radar wind sounder (RAWS) is discussed, and many critical problems in the designing process, such as the antenna scan pattern, tracking the Doppler shift caused by satellite motion, and backscattering of radar signals from different types of clouds, are discussed along with their computer simulations. In addition, algorithms for measuring mean frequency of radar echoes, such as the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) estimator, the covariance estimator, and the estimators based on autoregressive models, are discussed. Monte Carlo computer simulations were used to compare the performance of these algorithms. Anti-alias methods are discussed for the FFT and the autoregressive methods. Several algorithms for reducing radar ambiguity were studied, such as random phase coding methods and staggered pulse repitition frequncy (PRF) methods. Computer simulations showed that these methods are not applicable to the RAWS because of the broad spectral widths of the radar echoes from clouds. A waveform modulation method using the concept of spread spectrum and correlation detection was developed to solve the radar ambiguity. Radar ambiguity functions were used to analyze the effective signal-to-noise ratios for the waveform modulation method. The results showed that, with suitable bandwidth product and modulation of the waveform, this method can achieve the desired maximum range and maximum frequency of the radar system.

  5. Aseismic Slip Events along the Southern San Andreas Fault System Captured by Radar Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P

    2001-10-01

    A seismic slip is observed along several faults in the Salton Sea and southernmost Landers rupture zone regions using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data spanning different time periods between 1992 and 1997. In the southernmost Landers rupture zone, projecting south from the Pinto Mountain Fault, sharp discontinuities in the interferometric phase are observed along the sub-parallel Burnt Mountain and Eureka Peak Faults beginning three months after the Landers earthquake and is interpreted to be post-Landers after-slip. Abrupt phase offsets are also seen along the two southernmost contiguous 11 km Durmid Hill and North Shore segments of the San Andreas Fault with an abrupt termination of slip near the northern end of the North Shore Segment. A sharp phase offset is seen across 20 km of the 30 km-long Superstition Hills Fault before phase decorrelation in the Imperial Valley along the southern 10 km of the fault prevents coherent imaging by InSAR. A time series of deformation interferograms suggest most of this slip occurred between 1993 and 1995 and none of it occurred between 1992 and 1993. A phase offset is also seen along a 5 km central segment of the Coyote Creek fault that forms a wedge with an adjoining northeast-southwest trending conjugate fault. Most of the slip observed on the southern San Andreas and Superstition Hills Faults occurred between 1993 and 1995--no slip is observed in the 92-93 interferograms. These slip events, especially the Burnt Mountain and Eureka Peak events, are inferred to be related to stress redistribution from the June, 1992 M{sub w} = 7.3 Landers earthquake. Best-fit elastic models of the San Andreas and Superstition Hills slip events suggest source mechanisms with seismic moments over three orders of magnitude larger than a maximum possible summation of seismic moments from all seismicity along each fault segment during the entire 4.8-year time interval spanned by the InSAR data. Aseismic moment releases of this magnitude (equivalent to M{sub w} = 5.3 and 5.6 events on the Superstition Hills and San Andreas Faults respectively) are hitherto unknown and have not been captured previously by any geodetic technique.

  6. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Neil

    1986-01-01

    In June of 1985 the Project Initiation Agreement was signed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications for the Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project (SIR). The thrust of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project is to continue the evolution of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) science and technology developed during SEASAT, SIR-A and SIR-B missions to meet the needs of the Earth Observing System (EOS) in the mid 1990's. As originally formulated, the Project plans were for a reflight of the SIR-B in 1987, the development of a new SAR, SIR-C, for missions in mid 1989 and early 1990, and the upgrade of SIR-C to EOS configuration with a qualification flight aboard the shuttle in the 1993 time frame (SIR-D). However, the loss of the shuttle Challenger has delayed the first manifest for SIR to early 1990. This delay prompted the decision to drop SIR-B reflight plans and move ahead with SIR-C to more effectively utilize this first mission opportunity. The planning for this project is discussed.

  7. A 77 GHz Transceiver for Automotive Radar System Using a120nm In AlAs/In GaAs Metamorphic HEMTs

    E-print Network

    Kwon, Youngwoo

    -mail:ykwon@snu.ac.kr) Abstract -- In this work, we demonstrate a compact 77GHz single-chip transceiver for an automotive radarB at 77GHz with 12.3dBm output power. The single-chip transceiver demonstrated 9.3dBm output power been reported [1]-[3]. Compared with multiple-chip-module configuration, single-chip systems are more

  8. GSFC short pulse radar, JONSWAP-75

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Walton, W. T.; Eckerman, J.; Kutz, R. L.; Dombrowski, M.; Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    In September 1975, the Goddard Space Flight Center operated a short pulse radar during ocean wave measuring experiments off the coast of West Germany in the North Sea. The experiment was part of JONSWAP-75. The radar system and operations during the experiment are described along with examples of data.

  9. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40ş. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  10. Radar Cuts Subsoil Survey Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R.; Glaccum, R.

    1984-01-01

    Soil features located with minimum time and labor. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system supplements manual and mechanical methods in performing subsurface soil survey. Mobile system obtains graphic profile of soil discontinuities and interfaces as function of depth. One or two test borings necessary to substantiate soil profile. GPR proves useful as reconnaissance tool.

  11. Compression Waveforms for Non-Coherent Radar Uri Peer and Nadav Levanon

    E-print Network

    Levanon, Nadav

    is not required, in direct- detection laser radar systems and in ultra wide band (UWB) radar. NonCompression Waveforms for Non-Coherent Radar Uri Peer and Nadav Levanon Tel Aviv University P. O, required for coherent pulse compression. NCPC can be used in simple radar systems where Doppler information

  12. MIMO Radar with Frequency Diversity Jun Jason Zhang and Antonia Papandreou-Suppappola

    E-print Network

    Nehorai, Arye

    MIMO Radar with Frequency Diversity Jun Jason Zhang and Antonia Papandreou-Suppappola Department@asu.edu Abstract-- We propose a new multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) radar system with colocated antennas. The proposed MIMO radar system results in a radar array with frequency-division multiplexing that can also

  13. ARRA-funded Cloud Radar Development for the Department of Energy's ARM Climate Research Facility

    E-print Network

    ARRA-funded Cloud Radar Development for the Department of Energy's ARM Climate Research Facility six dual frequency cloud radar systems. These radars will be used by the Atmospheric Radiation on the effects of clouds and precipitation on the climate. Four cloud radar systems will be permanently installed

  14. GLACIER MONITORING SYSTEM IN COLOMBIA - complementing glaciological measurements with laser-scanning and ground-penetrating radar surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Jorge; Micheletti, Natan; Rabatel, Antoine; Mölg, Nico; Zemp, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Colombia (South America) has six small glaciers (total glacierized area of 45 Km2); their geographical location, close to zero latitude, makes them very sensitive to climate changes. An extensive monitoring program is being performed since 2006 on two glaciers, with international cooperation supports. This presentation summarizes the results of glacier changes in Colombia and includes the latest results obtained within the CATCOS Project - Phase 1 (Capacity Building and Twinning for Climate Observing Systems) signed between Colombia and Switzerland, and within the Joint Mixte Laboratory GREAT-ICE (IRD - France), with the application of LiDAR technology and GPR-based ice thickness measurements at Conejeras Glacier. Conejeras Glacier (Lat. N. 4° 48' 56"; Long. W. 75° 22' 22"; Alt. Max. 4915m.; Alt. Min. 4730m. Area 0.2 Km2) is located on the north-western side of Santa Isabel Volcano. This glacier belongs to global glacier monitoring network of the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS-ID: 2721). The surface mass balance is calculated monthly using the direct glaciological method. Between April 2006 and May 2014, Conejeras Glacier showed a cumulative loss of -21 m w.e. The CATCOS Project allowed to improve the glacier monitoring system in Colombia with two main actions: (1) a terrestrial laser scanner survey (RIEGL VZ-6000 terrestrial laser scanner, property of Universities of Lausanne and Fribourg); and (2) ice thickness measurements (Blue System Integration Ltd. Ice Penetrating Radar of property of IRD). The terrestrial laser-scanning survey allowed to realize an accurate digital terrain model of the glacier surface with 13 million points and a decimetric resolution. Ice thickness measurements showed an average glacier thickness of 22 meters and a maximum of 52 meters.

  15. Development of a practicable non-contact bedside autonomic activation monitoring system using microwave radars and its clinical application in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takemi; Yoshida, Yuto; Kagawa, Masayuki; Kubota, Masayuki; Kurita, Akira

    2013-06-01

    We developed a practicable, non-contact, autonomic activation monitoring system using microwave radars without imposing any stress on monitored individuals. Recently, the rapid increase in the aging population has raised concerns in developed countries. Thus, hospitals and care facilities will need to perform long-term health monitoring of elderly patients. The system allows monitoring of geriatric autonomic dysfunctions caused by chronic diseases, such as diabetes or myocardial infarction (MI), while measuring vital signs in non-contact way. The system measures heart rate variability (HRV) of elderly people in bed using dual, 24-GHz, compact microwave radars attached beneath the bed mattress. HRV parameters (LF, HF, and LF/HF) were determined from the cardiac peak-to-peak intervals, which were detected by radars using the maximum entropy method. We tested the system on 15 elderly people with and without diabetes or MI (72-99 years old) from 7:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. at a special nursing home in Tokyo. LF/HF obtained by the system correlated significantly (R = 0.89; p < 0.01) with those obtained by Holter electrocardiography (ECG). Diabetic subjects showed significantly lower LF (radar) than non-diabetic (119.8 ± 57.8 for diabetic, 405.9 ± 112.6 for non-diabetic, p < 0.01). HF (radar) of post-MI subjects was significantly lower than that of non-MI (219.7 ± 131.7 for post-MI and 580.0 ± 654.6 for non-MI, p < 0.05). Previous studies using conventional ECG reveal that diabetic neuropathy decreases LF, and also MI causes parasympathetic attenuation which leads to HF reduction. Our study showed that average SDNN of post-MI patients is smaller than 50 ms which is known to have high mortality. The non-contact autonomic activation monitoring system allows a long-term health management especially during sleeping hours for elderly people at healthcare facilities. PMID:23463161

  16. 1796 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 62, NO. 7, APRIL 1, 2014 Sub-Nyquist Radar via Doppler Focusing

    E-print Network

    Eldar, Yonina

    of a monostatic pulse-Doppler radar transceiver trying to detect targets sparsely populated in the radar in a pulse-Doppler radar system, using sub-Nyquist sampling rates. The radar is a single transceiver1796 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 62, NO. 7, APRIL 1, 2014 Sub-Nyquist Radar via

  17. Space Radar Image of Long Island Optical/Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This pair of images of the Long Island, New York region is a comparison of an optical photograph (top) and a radar image (bottom), both taken in darkness in April 1994. The photograph at the top was taken by the Endeavour astronauts at about 3 a.m. Eastern time on April 20, 1994. The image at the bottom was acquired at about the same time four days earlier on April 16,1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) system aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Both images show an area approximately 100 kilometers by 40 kilometers (62 miles by 25 miles) that is centered at 40.7 degrees North latitude and 73.5 degrees West longitude. North is toward the upper right. The optical image is dominated by city lights, which are particularly bright in the densely developed urban areas of New York City located on the left half of the photo. The brightest white zones appear on the island of Manhattan in the left center, and Central Park can be seen as a darker area in the middle of Manhattan. To the northeast (right) of the city, suburban Long Island appears as a less densely illuminated area, with the brightest zones occurring along major transportation and development corridors. Since radar is an active sensing system that provides its own illumination, the radar image shows a great amount of surface detail, despite the night-time acquisition. The colors in the radar image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In this image, the water surface - the Atlantic Ocean along the bottom edge and Long Island Sound shown at the top edge - appears red because small waves at the surface strongly reflect the horizontally transmitted and received L-band radar signal. Networks of highways and railroad lines are clearly visible in the radar image; many of them can also be seen as bright lines i the optical image. The runways of John F. Kennedy International Airport appear as a dark rectangle in Jamaica Bay on the left side of the image. Developed areas appear generally as bright green and orange, while agricultural, protected and undeveloped areas appear darker blue or purple. This contrast can be seen on the barrier islands along the south coast of Long Island, which are heavily developed in the Rockaway and Long Beach areas south and east of Jamaica Bay, but further to the east, the islands are protected and undeveloped.

  18. 46 CFR 28.400 - Radar and depth sounding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar and depth sounding devices. 28.400...16 Individuals on Board § 28.400 Radar and depth sounding devices. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a general marine radar system for surface navigation with a...

  19. 46 CFR 28.400 - Radar and depth sounding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar and depth sounding devices. 28.400...16 Individuals on Board § 28.400 Radar and depth sounding devices. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a general marine radar system for surface navigation with a...

  20. 46 CFR 28.400 - Radar and depth sounding devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar and depth sounding devices. 28.400...16 Individuals on Board § 28.400 Radar and depth sounding devices. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a general marine radar system for surface navigation with a...