Sample records for gmti radar system

  1. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  2. GMTI MIMO radar

    E-print Network

    Bliss, Daniel W., Jr.

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) extensions to radar systems enable a number of advantages compared to traditional approaches. These advantages include improved angle estimation and target detection. In this paper, ...

  3. MIMO Radar Waveform Constraints for GMTI

    E-print Network

    Forsythe, Keith W.

    Ground moving-target indication (GMTI) provides both an opportunity and challenge for coherent multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar. MIMO techniques can improve a radar's angle estimation and the minimum detectable ...

  4. MIMO GMTI radar with multipath clutter suppression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Granger Hickman; Jeffrey L. Krolik

    2010-01-01

    This paper address ground-moving target indicator (GMTI) radar operation in the presence of strong multipath spread-Doppler clutter (SDC). Spacetime adaptive processing (STAP) for single-input-single-output (SIMO) radar is designed to mitigate direct-path SDC which leaks into the sidelobes of a moving radar platform. However, multipath SDC often returns via the receiver mainlobe and cannot be suppressed in a SIMO radar without

  5. MIMO Radar Waveform Constraints for GMTI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. W. Forsythe; D. W. Bliss

    2010-01-01

    Ground moving-target indication (GMTI) provides both an opportunity and challenge for coherent multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar. MIMO techniques can improve a radar's angle estimation and the minimum detectable velocity (MDV) for a target. However, the challenge of clutter mitigation places significant constraints on MIMO radar waveforms. In this paper, the loss of target return because of clutter mitigation (signal-to-noise ratio

  6. Performance limits for exo-clutter Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2010-09-01

    The performance of a Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. It is often difficult to 'get your arms around' the problem of ascertaining achievable performance limits, and yet those limits exist and are dictated by physics. This report identifies and explores those limits, and how they depend on hardware system parameters and environmental conditions. Ultimately, this leads to a characterization of parameters that offer optimum performance for the overall GMTI radar system. While the information herein is not new to the literature, its collection into a single report hopes to offer some value in reducing the 'seek time'.

  7. Array configurations and space-time adaptive processing for spaceborne distributed GMTI radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Zhang; Yunhua Zhang; Xueyan Kang

    2009-01-01

    Ground moving target indication (GMTI) is an important, challenging application of space-based distributed aperture radars. Due to the large baseline of the sparse array, the main beam clutter Doppler spread can be reduced and minimum detectable velocity (MDV) can be improved. The cost is the blind zone problem introduced by spatial ambiguities and the grating lobes due to undersampling in

  8. Gmti Motion Compensation

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-07-20

    Movement of a GMTI radar during a coherent processing interval over which a set of radar pulses are processed may cause defocusing of a range-Doppler map in the video signal. This problem may be compensated by varying waveform or sampling parameters of each pulse to compensate for distortions caused by variations in viewing angles from the radar to the target.

  9. Bistatic SAR using illumination from a tethered Ground Moving Target Indication Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark E Davis; Robert Kapfer

    2009-01-01

    In order to limit the ground clutter obscuration of very slow moving targets, ground moving target indication (GMTI) radars can be operated from stationary platforms. These systems generally cannot detect stationary targets for surface target surveillance. However, by using a small unmanned air vehicle (UAV) as a bistatic adjunct to GMTI system, a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image can be

  10. GMTI processing using back projection.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-07-01

    Backprojection has long been applied to SAR image formation. It has equal utility in forming the range-velocity maps for Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar processing. In particular, it overcomes the problem of targets migrating through range resolution cells.

  11. Airborne array aperture UWB UHF radar-motivation and system considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans Hellsten; Lars M. H. Ulander

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the necessity, feasibility and technology of FOPEN GMTI. It argues that this functionality may be one mode in a multi-function UWB UHF system, which jointly possesses the capabilities for air target MTI and high resolution FOPEN SAR. The radar platform may be a UAV or an aircraft, whereas it is proposed to use the push boom type

  12. Airborne array aperture UWB UHF radar-motivation and system considerations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Hellsten; L. M. H. Ulander

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the necessity, feasibility, and technology of FOPEN GMTI. It argues that this functionality may be one mode in a multi-function UWB UHF system, which jointly possesses the capabilities for air target MTI and high resolution FOPEN SAR. The radar platform may be a UAV or an aircraft, whereas, we propose to use the push boom type of

  13. Dismount modeling and detection from small aperture moving radar platforms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. K. Hersey; W. L. Melvin; E. Culpepper

    2008-01-01

    Future advanced radar systems must detect targets of diminishing radar cross section (RCS) at low radial velocity, in demanding clutter and interference environments. Presently, a deficiency in radar detection performance exists between the capabilities of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for fixed target indication and space-time adaptive processing (STAP) for ground moving target indication (GMTI) of targets with low ground track

  14. MIMO radar angle-doppler imaging via iterative space-time adaptive processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming Xue; Xumin Zhu; Jian Li; Duc Vu; Petre Stoica

    2009-01-01

    We consider using multi-input multi-output (MIMO) radar to improve the ground moving target indication (GMTI) performance, especially for slowly moving targets, for airborne surveillance systems. The increased virtual aperture afforded by MIMO radar systems enables many advantages, including enhanced spatial resolution, improved parameter identifiability and better performance for GMTI. To obviate the need of secondary data for space-time adaptive processing

  15. MTE ground station testbed-a battlefield awareness asset for GMTI exploitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert L. Popp; Nils R. Sandell; Bruce L. Johnson

    1999-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to describe the moving target exploitation (MTE) ground station testbed-a battlefield awareness asset based on the Army's common ground station (CGS) whose primary capability is the exploitation of ground moving target indicator (GMTI) radar data. In this paper, we describe the core GMTI and high range resolution (HRR) exploitation capabilities to be integrated into

  16. Differential Geometry Measures of Nonlinearity for Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) Filtering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahendra Mallick; B. F. La Scala

    2005-01-01

    The ground moving target indicator (GMTI) radar is widely used to detect, geolocate, track, and classify ground-moving targets in all weather, day-night, and cluttered conditions. The measurements of a GMTI radar are slant range, azimuth, and range-rate or Doppler. These measurements are nonlinear functions of the target state. Until recently, a quantitative measure of the degree of nonlinearity (DoN) for

  17. The Influence of Target Micromotion on SAR and GMTI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiang Li; Bin Deng; Yuliang Qin; Hongqiang Wang; Yanpeng Li

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of typical target micromotions on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, azimuth resolution limit, SAR\\/ground moving target indication (GMTI), and MTI. According to the micromotion periods contained in the coherent processing interval, a new range model expansion and a generalized paired echo principle are proposed and applied to underlie the analysis. Several new kinds of image

  18. Spatial voting with data modeling for behavior based tracking and discrimination of human from fauna from GMTI radar tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a novel method of using ground track indicators in conjunction with our Spatial Voting (SV) algorithm and data fusing Data Models to distinguish target types from motion signatures alone. We simulate 3 different types of behaviors: rabbit, coyote, and human. We then apply SV to combine individual position reports obtained via radar track indicators into object tracks that are then characterized using the methods shown in this paper. The features obtained from this characterization are then used as input into a Data Model equation classifier or a look-up table classifier to label the track behavior as either rabbit, coyote, or human. Our results and methods show promise and are presented here.

  19. Effect of wind turbine micro-Doppler on SAR and GMTI signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Rajan; Ling, Hao

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a modeling study to examine the interference effect of microDopplers caused by offshore wind farms on airborne sensors operating in the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and ground moving target indicator (GMTI) modes. The modeling is carried out by generating CAD instantiations of the dynamic wind turbine and using the high-frequency electromagnetic code Xpatch to perform the scattering calculations. Artifacts in the resulting SAR and GMTI signatures are evaluated for interference with tracking of boats in coastal waters. Results of signal filtering algorithms to reduce the dynamic turbine clutter in both SAR images and GMTI displays are presented.

  20. Clutter in the GMTI range-velocity map.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-04-01

    Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar maps echo data to range and range-rate, which is a function of a moving target's velocity and its position within the antenna beam footprint. Even stationary clutter will exhibit an apparent motion spectrum and can interfere with moving vehicle detections. Consequently it is very important for a radar to understand how stationary clutter maps into radar measurements of range and velocity. This mapping depends on a wide variety of factors, including details of the radar motion, orientation, and the 3-D topography of the clutter.

  1. Expectation maximization applied to GMTI convoy tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Wolfgang

    2002-08-01

    Collectively moving ground targets are typical of a military ground situation and have to be treated as separate aggregated entities. For a long-range ground surveillance application with airborne GMTI radar we inparticular address the task of track maintenance for ground moving convoys consisting of a small number of individual vehicles. In the proposed approach the identity of the individual vehicles within the convoy is no longer stressed. Their kinematical state vectors are rather treated as internal degrees of freedom characterizing the convoy, which is considered as a collective unit. In this context, the Expectation Maximization technique (EM), originally developed for incomplete data problems in statistical inference and first applied to tracking applications by STREIT et al. seems to be a promising approach. We suggest to embed the EM algorithm into a more traditional Bayesian tracking framework for dealing with false or unwanted sensor returns. The proposed distinction between external and internal data association conflicts (i.e. those among the convoy vehicles) should also enable the application of sequential track extraction techniques introduced by Van Keuk for aircraft formations, providing estimates of the number of the individual convoy vehicles involved. Even with sophisticated signal processing methods (STAP: Space-Time Adaptive Processing), ground moving vehicles can well be masked by the sensor specific clutter notch (Doppler blinding). This physical phenomenon results in interfering fading effects, which can well last over a longer series of sensor updates and therefore will seriously affect the track quality unless properly handled. Moreover, for ground moving convoys the phenomenon of Doppler blindness often superposes the effects induced by the finite resolution capability of the sensor. In many practical cases a separate modeling of resolution phenomena for convoy targets can therefore be omitted, provided the GMTI detection model is used. As an illustration we consider the contribution of the proposed GMTI sensor model to the problem of early recognition of a stopping convoy.

  2. The Earth rotation effect on a LEO L-band GMTI SBR and mitigation strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Zulch; Mark Davis; Larry Adzima; Robert Hancock; Sid Theis

    2004-01-01

    Space based radars (SBR) have been used to accomplish a number of civilian and military missions. Most recently, SBR concepts have been considered to perform ground moving target indication (GMTI) radar modes. Unlike airborne surveillance platforms, SBR clutter returns are affected by the high satellite velocity and Earth rotation. The phenomenology of the Earth's rotation, and its impact on clutter

  3. Simultaneous SAR and GMTI using ATI/DPCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Ross; Best, Matthew; Farrell, Sean

    2014-06-01

    In previous work, we presented GMTI detection and geo-location results from the AFRL Gotcha challenge data set, which was collected using a 3-channel, X-band, circular SAR system. These results were compared against GPS truth for a scripted vehicle target. The algorithm used for this analysis is known as ATI/DPCA, which is a hybrid of along-track interferometry (ATI) and the displaced phase center antenna (DPCA) technique. In the present paper the use of ATI/DPCA is extended in order to detect and geo-locate all observable moving targets in the Gotcha challenge data, including both the scripted movers and targets of opportunity. In addition, a computationally efficient SAR imaging technique is presented, appropriate for short integration times, which is used for computing an image of the scene of interest using the same pulses of data used for the GMTI processing. The GMTI detections are then overlaid on the SAR image to produce a simultaneous SAR/GMTI map.

  4. Noncooperative rendezvous radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fire control radar system was developed, assembled, and modified. The baseline system and modified angle tracking system are described along with the performance characteristics of the baseline and modified systems. Proposed changes to provide additional techniques for radar evaluation are presented along with flight test data.

  5. Radar Imaging Systems Joseph Charpentier

    E-print Network

    Radar Imaging Systems Joseph Charpentier Department of Computing Sciences Villanova University types of radar imaging systems; synthetic aperture radar (SAR), through-the-wall radar, and digital holographic near field radar. Each system surveyed experiments that improved the quality of the resulting

  6. Performance Analysis of a Space-Based GMTI Radar System Using Separated Spacecraft Interferometry

    E-print Network

    Troy L. Hacker, Raymond J. Sedwick, and David W. Miller May 2000 SERC #2-2000 This report is based on the unaltered thesis of Troy L. Hacker submitted to the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics in partial Interferometry by TROY L. HACKER Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics on May 24, 2000

  7. Threat radar system simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L.

    The capabilities, requirements, and goals of radar emitter simulators are discussed. Simulators are used to evaluate competing receiver designs, to quantify the performance envelope of a radar system, and to model the characteristics of a transmitted signal waveform. A database of candidate threat systems is developed and, in concert with intelligence data on a given weapons system, permits upgrading simulators to new projected threat capabilities. Four currently available simulation techniques are summarized, noting the usefulness of developing modular software for fast controlled-cost upgrades of simulation capabilities.

  8. An application of space-time adaptive processing to airborne and spaceborne monostatic and bistatic radar systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard James Czernik

    2010-01-01

    A challenging problem faced by Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radars on both airborne and spaceborne platforms is the ability to detect slow moving targets due the presence of non-stationary and heterogeneous ground clutter returns. Space-Time Adaptive Processing techniques process both the spatial signals from an antenna array as well as radar pulses simultaneously to aid in mitigating this clutter

  9. The impact of internal clutter motion on a sample matrix inversion space-time adaptive processing algorithm and the GMTI minimum detectable velocity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard J. Czernik; John J. SantaPietro

    2010-01-01

    A MATLAB simulation was constructed to better study the effects of internal clutter motion on a notional X band monostatic airborne radar employing a ground moving target indicator (GMTI) algorithm to detect slow velocity targets of low radar cross section. A sample matrix inversion (SMI) fully adapted post-Doppler space-time processor (tapered and untapered) was utilized and the internal clutter motion

  10. Systems and Methods for Radar Data Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunch, Brian (Inventor); Szeto, Roland (Inventor); Miller, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A radar information processing system is operable to process high bandwidth radar information received from a radar system into low bandwidth radar information that may be communicated to a low bandwidth connection coupled to an electronic flight bag (EFB). An exemplary embodiment receives radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth; processes the received radar information into processed radar information, the processed radar information configured for communication over a connection operable at a second bandwidth, the second bandwidth lower than the first bandwidth; and communicates the radar information from a radar system, the radar information communicated from the radar system at a first bandwidth.

  11. An application of space-time adaptive processing to airborne and spaceborne monostatic and bistatic radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, Richard James

    A challenging problem faced by Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radars on both airborne and spaceborne platforms is the ability to detect slow moving targets due the presence of non-stationary and heterogeneous ground clutter returns. Space-Time Adaptive Processing techniques process both the spatial signals from an antenna array as well as radar pulses simultaneously to aid in mitigating this clutter which has an inherent Doppler shift due to radar platform motion, as well as spreading across Angle-Doppler space attributable to a variety of factors. Additional problems such as clutter aliasing, widening of the clutter notch, and range dependency add additional complexity when the radar is bistatic in nature, and vary significantly as the bistatic radar geometry changes with respect to the targeted location. The most difficult situation is that of a spaceborne radar system due to its high velocity and altitude with respect to the earth. A spaceborne system does however offer several advantages over an airborne system, such as the ability to cover wide areas and to provide access to areas denied to airborne platforms. This dissertation examines both monostatic and bistatic radar performance based upon a computer simulation developed by the author, and explores the use of both optimal STAP and reduced dimension STAP architectures to mitigate the modeled clutter returns. Factors such as broadband jamming, wind, and earth rotation are considered, along with their impact on the interference covariance matrix, constructed from sample training data. Calculation of the covariance matrix in near real time based upon extracted training data is computer processor intensive and reduced dimension STAP architectures relieve some of the computation burden. The problems resulting from extending both monostatic and bistatic radar systems to space are also simulated and studied.

  12. Consistency of stochastic context-free grammars and application to stochastic parsing of GMTI tracker data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam

    2012-06-01

    Conventional trackers provide the human operator with estimated target tracks. It is desirable to make higher level inference of the target behaviour/intent (e.g., trajectory inference) in an automated manner. One such approach is to use stochastic context-free grammars and the Earley-Stoelcke parsing algorithm. The problem of inference is reformulated as one of parsing. In this paper, the consistency of stochastic context-free grammars is reviewed. Some examples illustrating the constraints on SCFGs due to consistency are presented, including a toy SCFG that has been used to successfully parse real GMTI radar data.

  13. A Bayesian framework with an auxiliary particle filter for GMTI-based ground vehicle tracking aided by domain knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Liu, Cunjia; Chen, Wen-hua; Chambers, Jonathon

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we propose a new ground moving target indicator (GMTI) radar based ground vehicle tracking method which exploits domain knowledge. Multiple state models are considered and a Monte-Carlo sampling based algorithm is preferred due to the manoeuvring of the ground vehicle and the non-linearity of the GMTI measurement model. Unlike the commonly used algorithms such as the interacting multiple model particle filter (IMMPF) and bootstrap multiple model particle filter (BS-MMPF), we propose a new algorithm integrating the more efficient auxiliary particle filter (APF) into a Bayesian framework. Moreover, since the movement of the ground vehicle is likely to be constrained by the road, this information is taken as the domain knowledge and applied together with the tracking algorithm for improving the tracking performance. Simulations are presented to show the advantages of both the new algorithm and incorporation of the road information by evaluating the root mean square error (RMSE).

  14. Multiplatform GMTI tracking for surveillance and reconnaissance coalition environments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Popp; Harold Maney; Jon Jones

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to describe several recent applications of multi-platform ground moving target indicator (GMTI) tracking technology for surveillance and reconnaissance coalition environments. As part of the U.S. Air Force's 1999 Joint Expeditionary Force experiment (JEFX), we demonstrated (in stand-alone mode) GMTI tracking technology for a simulated ground target scenario consisting of 20,000+ military and civilian ground

  15. An Approach to Ground Moving Target Indication Using Multiple Resolutions of Multilook Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    E-print Network

    Akers, Geoffrey

    2009-12-15

    Ground moving target indication (GMTI) using multiple resolutions of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images to estimate the clutter scattering statistics is shown to outperform conventional sample matrix inversion space-time ...

  16. Obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Carlos E. (Livermore, CA); Zumstein, James E. (Livermore, CA); Chang, John T. (Danville, CA); Leach, Jr.. Richard R. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2006-12-12

    An obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system for the detection, tracking, and imaging of an individual, animal, or object comprising a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units that produce a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object, and a processing system for said set of return radar signals for detection, tracking, and imaging of the individual, animal, or object. The system provides a radar video system for detecting and tracking an individual, animal, or object by producing a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object with a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units, and processing said set of return radar signals for detecting and tracking of the individual, animal, or object.

  17. Mars Radar Observations with the Goldstone Solar System Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Jurgens, R. F.; Larsen, K. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Slade, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) has successfully collected radar echo data from Mars over the past 30 years. As such, the GSSR has played a role as a specific mission element within Mars exploration. The older data provided local elevation information for Mars, along with radar scattering information with global resolution. Since the upgrade to the 70-m Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna at Goldstone completed in 1986, Mars data has been collected during all but the 1997 Mars opposition. Radar data, and non-imaging delay-Doppler data in particular, requires significant data processing to extract elevation, reflectivity and roughness of the reflecting surface. The spatial resolution of these experiments is typically some 20 km in longitude by some 150 km in latitude. The interpretation of these parameters while limited by the complexities of electromagnetic scattering, do provide information directly relevant to geophysical and geomorphic analyses of Mars. The usefulness of radar data for Mars exploration has been demonstrated in the past. Radar data were critical in assessing the Viking Lander 1 site as well as, more recently, the Pathfinder landing site. In general, radar data have not been available to the Mars exploration community at large. A project funded initially by the Mars Exploration Directorate Science Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and later funded by NASA's Mars Data Analysis Program has reprocessed to a common format a decade's worth of raw GSSR Mars delay-Doppler data in aid of landing site characterization for the Mars Program. These data will soon be submitted to the Planetary Data System (PDS). The radar data used were obtained between 1988 and 1995 by the GSSR, and comprise some 63 delay-Doppler radar tracks. Of these, 15 have yet to be recovered from old 9-track tapes, and some of the data may be permanently lost.

  18. Monitoring by holographic radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Crocco, Lorenzo; Affinito, Antonio; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, radar technology represents a significant opportunity to collect useful information for the monitoring and conservation of critical infrastructures. Radar systems exploit the non-invasive interaction between the matter and the electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies. Such an interaction allows obtaining images of the region under test from which one can infer the presence of potential anomalies such as deformations, cracks, water infiltrations, etc. This information turns out to be of primary importance in practical scenarios where the probed structure is in a poor state of preservation and renovation works must be planned. In this framework, the aim of this contribution is to describe the potentialities of the holographic radar Rascan 4/4000, a holographic radar developed by Remote Sensing Laboratory of Bauman Moscow State Technical University, as a non-destructive diagnostic tool capable to provide, in real-time, high resolution subsurface images of the sounded structure [1]. This radar provides holograms of hidden anomalies from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered signal and a reference signal. The performance of the holographic radar is appraised by means of several experiments. Preliminary tests concerning the imaging below the floor and inside wood structures are carried out in controlled conditions at the Electromagnetic Diagnostic Laboratory of IREA-CNR. After, with reference to bridge monitoring for security aim, the results of a measurement campaign performed on the Musmeci bridge are presented [2]. Acknowledgments This research has been performed in the framework of the "Active and Passive Microwaves for Security and Subsurface imaging (AMISS)" EU 7th Framework Marie Curie Actions IRSES project (PIRSES-GA-2010-269157). REFERENCES [1] S. Ivashov, V. Razevig, I. Vasilyev, A. Zhuravlev, T. Bechtel, L. Capineri, The holographic principle in subsurface radar technology, International Symposium to Commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the Invention of Holography, Springfield, Massachusetts USA, October 27-29, pp. 183-197, 2008. [2] I. Catapano, L. Crocco, A. F. Morabito, F. Soldovieri, "Tomographic imaging of holographic GPR data for non-invasive structural assessment: the Musmeci bridge investigation", Nondestructive testing and evaluation, vol. 27, pp. 229-237, 2012.

  19. THE DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS OF SCANNED PATTERN INTERFEROMETRIC RADAR

    E-print Network

    THE DEVELOPMENT AND ANALYSIS OF SCANNED PATTERN INTERFEROMETRIC RADAR Karen Marais and Raymond J of Scanned Pattern Interferometric Radar by Karen Marais Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ABSTRACT A method of performing space based GMTI using radar

  20. Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renzetti, N. A.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of the Goldstone Solar System Radar is the investigation of solar system bodies by means of Earth-based radar. Targets of primary interest include the Galilean moons, Saturn's rings and moons, and Earth-approaching asteroids and comets. Planets are also of interest, particularly Mercury and the planets to which NASA has not yet planned spacecraft visits. Based on a history of solid achievement, including the definition of the Astronomical Unit, imaging and topography of Mars, Venus, and Mercury, and contributions to the general theory of relativity, the program will continue to support flight project requirements and its primary objectives. The individual target objectives are presented, and information on the following topics are presented in tabular form: Deep Space Network support, compatibility tests, telemetry, command, and tracking support responsibility.

  1. Enhanced Weather Radar (EWxR) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronfeld, Kevin M. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    An airborne weather radar system, the Enhanced Weather Radar (EWxR), with enhanced on-board weather radar data processing was developed and tested. The system features additional weather data that is uplinked from ground-based sources, specialized data processing, and limited automatic radar control to search for hazardous weather. National Weather Service (NWS) ground-based Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) information is used by the EWxR system to augment the on-board weather radar information. The system will simultaneously display NEXRAD and on-board weather radar information in a split-view format. The on-board weather radar includes an automated or hands-free storm-finding feature that optimizes the radar returns by automatically adjusting the tilt and range settings for the current altitude above the terrain and searches for storm cells near the atmospheric 0-degree isotherm. A rule-based decision aid was developed to automatically characterize cells as hazardous, possibly-hazardous, or non-hazardous based upon attributes of that cell. Cell attributes are determined based on data from the on-board radar and from ground-based radars. A flight path impact prediction algorithm was developed to help pilots to avoid hazardous weather along their flight plan and their mission. During development the system was tested on the NASA B757 aircraft and final tests were conducted on the Rockwell Collins Sabreliner.

  2. Radar tracking system development

    E-print Network

    Chin, Yue Hann

    2005-01-01

    The Airborne Seeker Test Bed (ASTB) is an airborne sensor testing platform operated by the Tactical Defense Systems group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. The Instrumentation Head (IH) is a primary sensor on the ASTB. It is a ...

  3. A new system model for radar polarimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    The validity of the 2 x 2 receive R and transmit T model for radar polarimeter systems, first proposed by Zebker et al. (1987), is questioned. The model is found to be invalid for many practical realizations of radar polarimeters, which can lead to significant errors in the calibration of polarimetric radar images. A more general model is put forward, which addresses the system defects which cause the 2 x 2 model to break down. By measuring one simple parameter from a polarimetric active radar calibration (PARC), it is possible to transform the scattering matrix measurements made by a radar polarimeter to a format compatible with a 2 x 2 R and T matrix model. Alternatively, the PARC can be used to verify the validity of the 2 x 2 model for any polarimetric radar system. Recommendations for the use of PARCs in polarimetric calibration and to measure the orientation angle of the horizontal (H) and vertical (V) coordinate system are also presented.

  4. 29 CFR 1915.85 - Vessel radar and communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vessel radar and communication systems. 1915.85...Working Conditions § 1915.85 Vessel radar and communication systems. (a) The employer shall service each vessel's radar and communication systems in...

  5. 29 CFR 1915.85 - Vessel radar and communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vessel radar and communication systems. 1915.85...Working Conditions § 1915.85 Vessel radar and communication systems. (a) The employer shall service each vessel's radar and communication systems in...

  6. 29 CFR 1915.85 - Vessel radar and communication systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vessel radar and communication systems. 1915.85...Working Conditions § 1915.85 Vessel radar and communication systems. (a) The employer shall service each vessel's radar and communication systems in...

  7. ISAT - innovative space-based-radar antenna technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph Guerci; E. Jaska

    2003-01-01

    ISAT is the innovative space-based-radar antenna technology program of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The goal of the ISAT program is to develop antenna technology to enable tactical grade space-based GMTI (ground moving target indicator) radar - particularly from higher (-10,000 km) orbits which facilitate constellations with fewer satellites.

  8. Radar Studies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Irwin I.

    1996-01-01

    We aid in a study of the solar system by means of ground-based radar. We have concentrated on (1) developing the ephemerides needed to acquire radar data at Arecibo Observatory and (2) analyzing the resultant data to: test fundamental laws of gravitation; determine the size, shape, topography, and spin vectors of the targets; and study the surface properties of these objects, through their scattering law and polarization characteristics.

  9. Radar Studies in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaprio, Irwin I.

    1998-01-01

    We aid in study of the solar system by means of ground-based radar. We have concentrated on: (1) developing the ephemerides needed to acquire radar data at Arecibo Observatory and (2) analyzing the resultant data to: test fundamental laws of gravitation; determine the size , shape, topography, and spin vectors of the targets; and study the surface properties of these objects, through their scattering law and polarization characteristics. We are engaged in radar observations of asteroids and comets, both as systematically planned targets and as "targets of opportunity." In the course of the program, we have prepared ephemerides for about 80 asteroids and three comets, and the radar observations have been made or attempted at the Arecibo Observatory, in most cases successfully, and in some cases on more than one apparition. The results of these observations have included echo spectra for the targets and, in some cases, delay - Doppler images and measurements of the total round-trip delay to the targets. Perhaps the most dramatic of these results are the images obtained for asteroids (4179) Toutatis and 1989PB (Castalia), which were revealed to be double-lobed objects by the radar images. Besides these direct results, the radar observations have furnished information on the sizes and shapes of the targets through analysis of the Doppler width of the echoes as a function of time, and on the surface properties (such as composition, bulk density, and roughness) through analysis of the reflectivity and of the polarization state of the echoes. We have also refined the orbits of the observed asteroids as a result of the Doppler (and in some cases delay) measurements from the radar observations. Although the orbits of main-belt asteroids accessible to ground-based radar are quite well known from the available optical data, some near-Earth objects have been seen by radar very soon after their optical discovery (for example, 199OMF, just eight days after discovery). In such cases. the radar results ensure that the object in question can be anticipated and identified at the next apparition. We have also participated in radar studies of the terrestrial planets. The results of these studies have included both planetary topography profiles from the analysis of round-trip delays to points along the target Doppler equator and determinations of the target spin state. The latter is of special interest in the case of Venus, which is very close to, but not on, a multi-body spin-orbit resonance such that Venus rotates 12 times for every 8 Earth orbits and 13 Venus orbits. As a result, Venus presents nearly the same face toward Earth at each inferior conjunction. Our latest results confirm that the spin state of Venus is slightly off the resonance. The delay measurements from planetary 2 ranging have also been used in combination with other types of range data in testing general relativity with increasing accuracy. We have also been engaged in radar studies of planetary satellites. Using our ephemerides, Arecibo made radar observations of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter and of Mars' satellite Phobos during the favorable opposition seasons (1988-1992 for Jupiter and 1990 for Mars). An attempt was also made to observe Deimos, but without detecting an echo. In 1997, an attempt was made to observe Saturn's satellite Titan, using the newly upgraded Arecibo radar system for transmitting and the Goldstone radar for receiving, but no echo was detected. The study of satellites by radar is in many ways similar to that of asteroids. The results from these observations have included characterization of the surface properties from the reflectivity and polarization ratio, as well as (in the case of the large satellites of Jupiter) the variation of reflectivity with incidence angle.

  10. Urban Flood Warning Systems using Radar Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, N.; Bedient, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    There have been an increasing number of urban areas that rely on weather radars to provide accurate precipitation information for flood warning purposes. As non-structural tools, radar-based flood warning systems can provide accurate and timely warnings to the public and private entities in urban areas that are prone to flash floods. The wider spatial and temporal coverage from radar increases flood warning lead-time when compared to rain and stream gages alone. The Third Generation Rice and Texas Medical Center (TMC) Flood Alert System (FAS3) has been delivering warning information with 2 to 3 hours of lead time and a R2 value of 93% to facility personnel in a readily understood format for more than 50 events in the past 15 years. The current FAS utilizes NEXRAD Level II radar rainfall data coupled with a real-time hydrologic model (RTHEC-1) to deliver warning information. The system has a user-friendly dashboard to provide rainfall maps, Google Maps based inundation maps, hydrologic predictions, and real-time monitoring at the bayou. This paper will evaluate its reliable performance during the recent events occurring in 2012 and 2013 and the development of a similar radar-based flood warning system for the City of Sugar Land, Texas. Having a significant role in the communication of flood information, FAS marks an important step towards the establishment of an operational and reliable flood warning system for flood-prone urban areas.

  11. Radar Performance Improvement. Angle Tracking Modification to Fire Control Radar System for Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The AN/APQ-153 fire control radar modified to provide angle tracking was evaluated for improved performance. The frequency agile modifications are discussed along with the range-rate improvement modifications, and the radar to computer interface. A parametric design and comparison of noncoherent and coherent radar systems are presented. It is shown that the shuttle rendezvous range and range-rate requirements can be made by a Ku-Band noncoherent pulse radar.

  12. Multiple object tracking radar - System engineering considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegall, Ralph L.

    The Multiple Object Tracking Radar (MOTR) is being developed to meet projected range needs into the next century. This paper addresses several important implementation trade-offs that confronted the system designers of this modern phased-array radar. A brief description of MOTR is given. The basic system requirements are stated with the constraints imposed on the design by economics, applicable standards, and the range environment. Major system trade-offs, including hardware/software balance, data processor implementation, nth time ranging on multiple targets, and phased-array antenna architecture, are covered in some detail. In addition, several aspects of software architecture and processing are discussed: the PRF processing philosophy, Cartesian coordinate target filtering, and methods of data correction. Several radar variants desired by the range community are noted.

  13. The instrumental principles of MST radars and incoherent scatter radars and the configuration of radar system hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettger, Juergen

    1989-01-01

    The principle of pulse modulation used in the case of coherent scatter radars (MST radars) is discussed. Coherent detection and the corresponding system configuration is delineated. Antenna requirements and design are outlined and the phase-coherent transmitter/receiver system is described. Transmit/receive duplexers, transmitters, receivers, and quadrature detectors are explained. The radar controller, integrator, decoder and correlator design as well as the data transfer and the control and monitoring by the host computer are delineated. Typical operation parameters of some well-known radars are summarized.

  14. System capability of air traffic control radar beacon system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. K. Shaw; A. A. Simolunas

    1970-01-01

    The air traffic control radar beacon system problems and solutions to these problems are discussed. Residual problems, their extent, and their impact on future systems are described. The results of a system model are related to the possible fixes.

  15. Analysis of waveforms for bistatic radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreborn, U.

    1994-06-01

    The transmitter and receiver of Bistatic Radar Systems are located at different positions. It is therefore possible to transmit and receive simultaneously. This opens up the possibility of using continuous wave (CW) signals. This report shows how traditional pulse compression codes can be analyzed and enhanced, when adjusted to CW, with special attention paid to elude detection.

  16. Optical signal processing in Radar systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sylvie Tonda-Goldstein; Daniel Dolfi; Aymeric Monsterleet; Stéphane Formont; Jean Chazelas; Jean-Pierre Huignard

    2006-01-01

    Opto-electronic components and their performances are well suited to be integrated in radar systems. In this paper, two optical architectures illustrate functions that are specific to optical processing of microwave signals, i.e., time-delay-based processing and arbitrary waveform generation of large frequency bandwidth signals.

  17. Laser radar system for obstacle avoidance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karlheinz Bers; Karl R. Schulz; Walter Armbruster

    2005-01-01

    The threat of hostile surveillance and weapon systems require military aircraft to fly under extreme conditions such as low altitude, high speed, poor visibility and incomplete terrain information. The probability of collision with natural and man-made obstacles during such contour missions is high if detection capability is restricted to conventional vision aids. Forward-looking scanning laser radars which are build by

  18. Space-time adaptive processing for space based radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. K. Schuman; P. G. Li; W. Szczepanski; J. Graham

    2004-01-01

    Spaced-based radar space-time adaptive processing (STAP) in a heterogeneous clutter environment is addressed. An efficient Kalman Filter implementation of the normalized form of the parametric adaptive matched filter (NPAMF) is introduced and shown to perform well against a detailed, ground moving target indication (GMTI) simulation. The number of secondary data range cells required by NPAMF is much smaller than the

  19. Tracking system for photon-counting laser radar

    E-print Network

    Chang, Joshua TsuKang

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to build the tracking system for a photon-counting laser radar specifically a laser radar that has the ability to perform direct and coherent detection measurement at low signal levels with ...

  20. Design of a cylindrical near field system for RADAR antennas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fernando Martin Jimenez; Sara Burgos Martinez; Manuel Sierra Castaner; Jose Luis Besada Sanmartinn

    2006-01-01

    A cylindrical near field measurement system for huge L-band RADAR antennas has been designed, and it is under construction. The cylindrical near field system consists of a 17 meters tower (15.5 meters linear scanning), placed at a distance between 4 and 7 meters from the centre of the RADAR antenna. The RADAR antenna is placed on its azimuth positioner, and

  1. A system model and inversion for synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mehrdad Soumekh

    1992-01-01

    A system model and its corresponding inversion for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging are presented. The system model incorporates the spherical nature of a radar's radiation pattern at far field. The inverse method based on this model performs a spatial Fourier transform (Doppler processing) on the recorded signals with respect to the available coordinates of a translational radar (SAR) or

  2. Goldstone Solar System Radar Waveform Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Patawaran, Ferze D.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    Due to distances and relative motions among the transmitter, target object, and receiver, the time-base between any transmitted and received signal will undergo distortion. Pre-distortion of the transmitted signal to compensate for this time-base distortion allows reception of an undistorted signal. In most radar applications, an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) would be used to store the pre-calculated waveform and then play back this waveform during transmission. The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR), however, has transmission durations that exceed the available memory storage of such a device. A waveform generator capable of real-time pre-distortion of a radar waveform to a given time-base distortion function is needed. To pre-distort the transmitted signal, both the baseband radar waveform and the RF carrier must be modified. In the GSSR, this occurs at the up-conversion mixing stage to an intermediate frequency (IF). A programmable oscillator (PO) is used to generate the IF along with a time-varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the RF carrier. This serves as the IF input to the waveform generator where it is mixed with a baseband radar waveform whose time-base has been distorted to match the given time-base distortion function producing the modulated IF output. An error control feedback loop is used to precisely control the time-base distortion of the baseband waveform, allowing its real-time generation. The waveform generator produces IF modulated radar waveforms whose time-base has been pre-distorted to match a given arbitrary function. The following waveforms are supported: continuous wave (CW), frequency hopped (FH), binary phase code (BPC), and linear frequency modulation (LFM). The waveform generator takes as input an IF with a time varying phase component that matches the time-base distortion of the carrier. The waveform generator supports interconnection with deep-space network (DSN) timing and frequency standards, and is controlled through a 1 Gb/s Ethernet UDP/IP interface. This real-time generation of a timebase distorted radar waveform for continuous transmission in a planetary radar is a unique capability.

  3. RADAR SYSTEMS FOR INFRASTRUCTURES DIAGNOSTICS: A REVIEW Ilaria Catapano, Antonio Affinito, Lorenzo Crocco, Francesco Soldovieri

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RADAR SYSTEMS FOR INFRASTRUCTURES DIAGNOSTICS: A REVIEW Ilaria Catapano, Antonio Affinito, Lorenzo assessing the reconstruction capabilities of two different radar systems for subsurface imaging and civil engineering monitoring and diagnostics. In fact, Ground Penetrating Radar and Holographic Radar are well

  4. Twin VHF radar for european space situation awareness system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Istvan Balajti

    2012-01-01

    The efficient space surveillance system in the current state of radar technology must be addressed in a cost-effective way. Consequently, a new twin VHF band radar concept with increased technical capabilities could partially take over these challenges. This article would like to draw the reader's attention to the potential benefits of VHF radar signal fusion, which can be extended for

  5. Influences of weather phenomena on automotive laser radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasshofer, R. H.; Spies, M.; Spies, H.

    2011-07-01

    Laser radar (lidar) sensors provide outstanding angular resolution along with highly accurate range measurements and thus they were proposed as a part of a high performance perception system for advanced driver assistant functions. Based on optical signal transmission and reception, laser radar systems are influenced by weather phenomena. This work provides an overview on the different physical principles responsible for laser radar signal disturbance and theoretical investigations for estimation of their influence. Finally, the transmission models are applied for signal generation in a newly developed laser radar target simulator providing - to our knowledge - worldwide first HIL test capability for automotive laser radar systems.

  6. The 94 GHz MMW imaging radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alon, Yair; Ulmer, Lon

    1993-01-01

    The 94 GHz MMW airborne radar system that provides a runway image in adverse weather conditions is now undergoing tests at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). This system, which consists of a solid state FMCW transceiver, antenna, and digital signal processor, has an update rate of 10 times per second, 0.35x azimuth resolution and up to 3.5 meter range resolution. The radar B scope (range versus azimuth) image, once converted to C scope (elevation versus azimuth), is compatible with the standard TV presentation and can be displayed on the Head Up Display (HUD) or Head Down Display (HDD) to aid the pilot during landing and takeoff in limited visibility conditions.

  7. Laser radar in a system perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molebny, Vasyl; Kamerman, Gary; Steinvall, Ove

    2011-06-01

    As a result of recent achievements in the field of laser radars, new options are available for their operation as system components. In addition to complementing and cross-checking one another, system components can generate new synergetic values. In this article, we address various roles and functions that laser radar may perform in a complete system context. Special attention is paid to range-gated imaging ladars operating in conjunction with infrared 2D sensors providing target recognition/identification at long distances and under adverse conditions of natural illumination. The multi- or hyper-spectral features of passive IR or visible sensors may be complemented by multispectral, broadband, tunable or switchable 3D imaging ladar in order to exploit the differences in target reflectance and absorption. This option opens another possibility for multi-spectral, mid-IR ladar to differentiate targets of various types, or to enhance the visualization potential and to facilitate the scene description with small targets like mines or mine-like objects. The recently discovered specificity of Raman scattering in the perturbed sea water makes the long-standing efforts in submarine wake detection more viable. Furthermore, the combination of microwave radar and laser radar, when amplified with new achievements in the fourth generation dual-mode imaging sensors, creates the possibility of single payload configurations suitable for small platforms. Emphasis is also made of the efficiency of Doppler velocimetry for precise vehicle navigation, such as for advance cruise missile control or autonomous landing. Finally, recent advances in coherent micro-ladars for optical coherence tomography now permit the reconstruction of time resolved 3D (i.e., 4D) dynamics of blood flow in heart vessels.

  8. Helicopter-borne GPR Systems for Geological Applications A Comparison between Pulse Radar and Stepped Frequency Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dieter Eisenburger; Volkmar Damm; Harald Lentz

    From October 8 th to 23 rd , 2000, a helicopter-borne radar measurement campaign has been carried out at the Careser Glacier in the Italian Alps. Main objectives were to provide radar profiles of the glacier and to obtain a comparison of the performances of a pulsed radar system and a novel stepped frequency radar. Since the weather conditions did

  9. Radar altimetry systems cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escoe, D.; Heuring, F. T.; Denman, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    This report discusses the application and cost of two types of altimeter systems (spaceborne (satellite and shuttle) and airborne) to twelve user requirements. The overall design of the systems defined to meet these requirements is predicated on an unconstrained altimetry technology; that is, any level of altimeter or supporting equipment performance is possible.

  10. Detecting and Mitigating Wind Turbine Clutter for Airspace Radar Systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results. PMID:24385880

  11. Detecting and mitigating wind turbine clutter for airspace radar systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized that a wind turbine has a large radar cross-section (RCS) and, due to the movement of the blades, the wind turbine will generate a Doppler frequency shift. This scattering behavior may cause severe interferences on existing radar systems including static ground-based radars and spaceborne or airborne radars. To resolve this problem, efficient techniques or algorithms should be developed to mitigate the effects of wind farms on radars. Herein, one transponder-based mitigation technique is presented. The transponder is not a new concept, which has been proposed for calibrating high-resolution imaging radars. It modulates the radar signal in a manner that the retransmitted signals can be separated from the scene echoes. As wind farms often occupy only a small area, mitigation processing in the whole radar operation will be redundant and cost inefficient. Hence, this paper uses a transponder to determine whether the radar is impacted by the wind farms. If so, the effects of wind farms are then mitigated with subsequent Kalman filtering or plot target extraction algorithms. Taking airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and pulse Doppler radar as the examples, this paper provides the corresponding system configuration and processing algorithms. The effectiveness of the mitigation technique is validated by numerical simulation results. PMID:24385880

  12. Radar systems for the water resources mission, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Claassen, J. P.; Erickson, R. L.; Fong, R. K. T.; Hanson, B. C.; Komen, M. J.; Mcmillan, S. B.; Parashar, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    The state of the art determination was made for radar measurement of: soil moisture, snow, standing and flowing water, lake and river ice, determination of required spacecraft radar parameters, study of synthetic-aperture radar systems to meet these parametric requirements, and study of techniques for on-board processing of the radar data. Significant new concepts developed include the following: scanning synthetic-aperture radar to achieve wide-swath coverage; single-sideband radar; and comb-filter range-sequential, range-offset SAR processing. The state of the art in radar measurement of water resources parameters is outlined. The feasibility for immediate development of a spacecraft water resources SAR was established. Numerous candidates for the on-board processor were examined.

  13. Study to investigate and evaluate means of optimizing the radar function. [systems engineering of pulse radar for the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The investigations for a rendezvous radar system design and an integrated radar/communication system design are presented. Based on these investigations, system block diagrams are given and system parameters are optimized for the noncoherent pulse and coherent pulse Doppler radar modulation types. Both cooperative (transponder) and passive radar operation are examined including the optimization of the corresponding transponder design for the cooperative mode of operation.

  14. Multi-Antenna Radar Systems for Doppler Rain Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen; Tanelli, Simone; Siqueira, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Use of multiple-antenna radar systems aboard moving high-altitude platforms has been proposed for measuring rainfall. The basic principle of the proposed systems is a variant of that of along-track interferometric synthetic-aperture radar systems used previously to measure ocean waves and currents.

  15. Advanced meteor radar installed at Tirupati: System details and comparison with different radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Eswaraiah, S.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Kosalendra, E.; Kishore Kumar, K.; Sathish Kumar, S.; Patil, P. T.; Gurubaran, S.

    2014-11-01

    An advanced meteor radar, viz, Sri Venkateswara University (SVU) meteor radar (SVU MR) operating at 35.25 MHz, was installed at Sri Venkateswara University (SVU), Tirupati (13.63°N, 79.4°E), India, in August 2013 for continuous observations of horizontal winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). This manuscript describes the purpose of the meteor radar, system configuration, measurement techniques, its data products, and operating parameters, as well as a comparison of measured mean winds in the MLT with contemporary radars over the Indian region. It is installed close to the Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar to fill the region between 85 and 100 km where this radar does not measure winds. The present radar provides additional information due to its high meteor detection rate, which results in accurate wind information from 70 to 110 km. As a first step, we made a comparison of SVU MR-derived horizontal winds in the MLT region with those measured by similar and different (MST and MF radars) techniques over the Indian region, as well as model (horizontal wind model 2007) data sets. The comparison showed an exquisite agreement between the overlapping altitudes (82-98 km) of different radars. Zonal winds compared very well, as did the meridional winds. The observed discrepancies and limitations in the wind measurement are discussed in the light of different measuring techniques and the effects of small-scale processes like gravity waves. This new radar is expected to play an important role in our understanding of the vertical and lateral coupling of different regions of the atmosphere that will be possible when measurements from nearby locations are combined.

  16. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. 15.515 Section 15.515... Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a) Operation under... (b) The UWB bandwidth of a vehicular radar system operating under the...

  17. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. 15.515 Section 15.515... Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a) Operation under... (b) The UWB bandwidth of a vehicular radar system operating under the...

  18. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. 15.515 Section 15.515... Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a) Operation under... (b) The UWB bandwidth of a vehicular radar system operating under the...

  19. 76 FR 67017 - Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ...Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...Notice to Manufacturers of Airport Avian Radar Systems...foreign manufacturers of airport avian radar systems that meet the requirements of...

  20. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. 15.515 Section 15.515... Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a) Operation under... (b) The UWB bandwidth of a vehicular radar system operating under the...

  1. 47 CFR 15.515 - Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. 15.515 Section 15.515... Technical requirements for vehicular radar systems. (a) Operation under... (b) The UWB bandwidth of a vehicular radar system operating under the...

  2. Radar systems for a polar mission, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Claassen, J. P.; Erickson, R. L.; Fong, R. K. T.; Komen, M. J.; Mccauley, J.; Mcmillan, S. B.; Parashar, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    The application of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in monitoring and managing earth resources is examined. Synthetic aperture radars form a class of side-looking airborne radar, often referred to as coherent SLAR, which permits fine-resolution radar imagery to be generated at long operating ranges by the use of signal processing techniques. By orienting the antenna beam orthogonal to the motion of the spacecraft carrying the radar, a one-dimensional imagery ray system is converted into a two-dimensional or terrain imaging system. The radar's ability to distinguish - or resolve - closely spaced transverse objects is determined by the length of the pulse. The transmitter components receivers, and the mixer are described in details.

  3. Data Acquisition System for Doppler Radar Vital-Sign Monitor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander M. Vergara; Victor M. Lubecke

    2007-01-01

    Automatic gain control (AGC) units increase the dynamic range of a system to compensate for the limited dynamic range of analog to digital converters. This problem is compounded in wireless systems in which large changes in signal strength are effects of a changing environment. These issues are evident in the direct-conversion Doppler radar vital- sign monitor. Utilizing microwave radar signals

  4. Can OTH Radar Help Tsunami Warning Systems ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Occhipinti, G.; Roland, L.; Lognonné, P.

    2008-12-01

    A series of ionospheric anomalies following the Sumatra tsunami has been reported in the scientific literature (e.g., Liu et al. 2006; DasGupta et al. 2006; Occhipinti et al. 2006). Similar anomalies were also observed after the tsunamigenic earthquake in Peru in 2001 (Artru et al., 2005) and after the recent earthquakes in Sumatra and Chile in 2007. All these anomalies show the signature in the ionosphere of tsunami-generated internal gravity waves (IGW) propagating in the neutral atmosphere over oceanic regions. Most of these ionospheric anomalies are deterministic and reproducible by numerical modeling (Occhipinti et al., 2006, 2008) via the ocean/neutral atmosphere/ionosphere coupling mechanism. In addition, the numerical modeling supplies useful helps in the estimation of expected anomalies to explore and identify new techniques to detect the tsunami signature in the ionosphere, other then GPS and altimeters. Here we present an overview of the physical coupling mechanism highlighting the advantage of OTH radar in the tsunami detection by ionospheric sounding. The large coverage of OTH radar and its sensitivity to plasma anomalies can open new perspectives in the future oceanic monitoring and tsunami warning system. [Artru et al., 2005] Geophys. J. Int., 160, 2005 [DasGupta et al., 2006] Earth Planet. Space, 35, 929-959. [Liu et al., 2006] J. Geophys. Res., 111, A05303. [Occhipinti et al., 2006] Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L20104, 2006 [Occhipinti et al., 2008] Geophys. J. Int., 173, 3, 753-1135, 2008.

  5. A very wide frequency band pulsed/IF radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. N.; Burnside, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A pulsed/IF radar for compact range radar cross section measurements has been developed which converts RF returns to a fixed IF, so that amplification and grating may be performed at one frequency. This permits the use of components which have optimal performance at this frequency which results in a corresponding improvement in performance. Sensitivity and dynamic range are calculated for this system and compared with our old radar, and the effect of pulse width on clutter level is also studied. Sensitivity and accuracy tests are included to verify the performance of the radar.

  6. Weather Radar Control System Seidu Ibrahim; Advisor: Eric J. Knapp

    E-print Network

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Weather Radar Control System Seidu Ibrahim; Advisor: Eric J. Knapp Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Massachusetts, Amherst Abstract Weather radar is an important part of the national infrastructure that is used in producing forecasts and issuing hazardous weather warnings. Traditional weather

  7. MIMO radar systems Permanent members: F. Nadal, P. Jardin.

    E-print Network

    Baudoin, Geneviève

    . These systems can increase the radar resolution, the number of targets that can be identified the possibility of sending the transmitted power towards the directions of multiple targets (Figure 1). To date, most of the work on MIMO radar has been performed assuming the signals are narrowband. We started our

  8. Reconfigurable Data Acquisition System for Weather Radar Applications

    E-print Network

    Tessier, Russell

    , Amherst MA Abstract-- Tornado, hazardous weather and flood detection radars demand high-throughput, high-based system has been successfully integrated with a radar optimized for tornado detection and deployed for the prediction of tornados and other extreme weather events. The processed data must be made available to the end

  9. Analytical and computer model of a Doppler weather radar system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryan K. Hersey; Mark A. Richards; James H. McClellan

    2002-01-01

    With advances in Doppler weather radar, severe storm and tornado detection has improved greatly. However, the resolution limitations of deployed radar systems can still limit severe storm detection. In the case of larger tornadoes, characteristic abrupt changes in wind direction can usually be detected between adjacent range-angle bins. However for smaller tornadoes, the rotating cell may be contained within one

  10. 29. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, data processing system ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, data processing system area; data processor maintenance and operations center, showing data processing consoles - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  11. The 3D laser radar vision processor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebok, T. M.

    1990-01-01

    Loral Defense Systems (LDS) developed a 3D Laser Radar Vision Processor system capable of detecting, classifying, and identifying small mobile targets as well as larger fixed targets using three dimensional laser radar imagery for use with a robotic type system. This processor system is designed to interface with the NASA Johnson Space Center in-house Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Retriever robot program and provide to it needed information so it can fetch and grasp targets in a space-type scenario.

  12. Advanced Meteor radar at Tirupati: System details and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Sundararaman, Sathishkumar; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Eethamakula, Kosalendra; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.

    An advanced meteor radar viz., Enhanced Meteor Detection Radar (EMDR) operating at 35.25 MHz is installed at Sri Venkateswara University (SVU), Tirupati (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India, in the month of August 2013. Present communication describes the need for the meteor radar at present location, system description, its measurement techniques, its variables and comparison of measured mean winds with contemporary radars over the Indian region. The present radar site is selected to fill the blind region of Gadanki (13.5oN, 79.2oE) MST radar, which covers mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region (70-110 km). By modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements, this radar is capable of providing accurate wind information between 70 and 110 km unlike other similar radars. Height covering region is extended by increasing the meteor counting capacity by modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements and hence its wind estimation limits extended below and above of 80 and 100 km, respectively. In the present study, we also made comparison of horizontal winds in the MLT region with those measured by similar and different (MST and MF radars) techniques over the Indian region including the model (HWM 07) data sets. The comparison showed a very good agreement between the overlapping altitudes (82-98 km) of different radars. Zonal winds compared very well as that of meridional winds. The observed discrepancies and limitations in the wind measurement are discussed. This new radar is expected to play important role in understanding the vertical and lateral coupling by forming a unique local network.

  13. Laser radar system for obstacle avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bers, Karlheinz; Schulz, Karl R.; Armbruster, Walter

    2005-09-01

    The threat of hostile surveillance and weapon systems require military aircraft to fly under extreme conditions such as low altitude, high speed, poor visibility and incomplete terrain information. The probability of collision with natural and man-made obstacles during such contour missions is high if detection capability is restricted to conventional vision aids. Forward-looking scanning laser radars which are build by the EADS company and presently being flight tested and evaluated at German proving grounds, provide a possible solution, having a large field of view, high angular and range resolution, a high pulse repetition rate, and sufficient pulse energy to register returns from objects at distances of military relevance with a high hit-and-detect probability. The development of advanced 3d-scene analysis algorithms had increased the recognition probability and reduced the false alarm rate by using more readily recognizable objects such as terrain, poles, pylons, trees, etc. to generate a parametric description of the terrain surface as well as the class, position, orientation, size and shape of all objects in the scene. The sensor system and the implemented algorithms can be used for other applications such as terrain following, autonomous obstacle avoidance, and automatic target recognition. This paper describes different 3D-imaging ladar sensors with unique system architecture but different components matched for different military application. Emphasis is laid on an obstacle warning system with a high probability of detection of thin wires, the real time processing of the measured range image data, obstacle classification und visualization.

  14. Calibration of polarimetric radar systems with good polarization isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, Kamal; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.; Tassoudji, M. Ali

    1990-01-01

    A practical technique is proposed for calibrating single-antenna polarimetric radar systems using a metal sphere plus any second target with a strong cross-polarized radar cross section. This technique assumes perfect isolation between antenna ports. It is shown that all magnitudes and phases (relative to one of the like-polarized linear polarization configurations) of the radar transfer function can be calibrated without knowledge of the scattering matrix of the second target. Comparison of the values measured (using this calibration technique) for a tilted cylinder at X-band with theoretical values shows agreement within + or - 0.3 dB in magnitude and + or - 5 degrees in phase. The radar overall cross-polarization isolation was 25 dB. The technique is particularly useful for calibrating a radar under field conditions, because it does not require the careful alignment of calibration targets.

  15. Ultrawideband radar imaging system for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari, H.M.; Liu, W.; Hranilovic, S.; Deen, M.J. [ECE Department, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2006-05-15

    Ultrawideband (UWB) (3-10 GHz) radar imaging systems offer much promise for biomedical applications such as cancer detection because of their good penetration and resolution characteristics. The underlying principle of UWB cancer detection is a significant contrast in dielectric properties, which is estimated to be greater than 2:1 between normal and cancerous tissue, compared to a few-percent contrast in radiographic density exploited by x rays. This article presents a feasibility study of the UWB imaging of liver cancer tumors, based on the frequency-dependent finite difference time domain method. The reflection, radiation, and scattering properties of UWB pulses as they propagate through the human body are studied. The reflected and back-scattered electromagnetic energies from cancer tumors inside the liver are also investigated. An optimized, ultrawideband antenna was designed for near field operation, allowing for the reduction of the air-skin interface. It will be placed on the fat-liver tissue phantom with a malignant tumor stimulant. By performing an incremental scan over the phantom and removing early time artifacts, including reflection from the antenna ends, images based on the back-scattered signal from the tumor can be constructed. This research is part of our effort to develop a UWB cancer detection system with good detection and localization properties.

  16. Ground-based millimeter wave cloud profiling radar system (CPRS)

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, R.E.; Pazmany, A.L.; Mead, J.B.

    1991-08-01

    The proposed Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) is a two frequency (35 GHz, 95 GHz) polarimetric radar with a single reflector-lens antenna. The system will be used to perform three dimensional Doppler and polarimetric measurements on clouds. The various subsystems are currently being developed and this report gives technical details about the status of these subsystems. This report also updates other research activities. 7 figs.

  17. Ground-based millimeter wave Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, R. E.; Pazmany, A. L.; Mead, J. B.

    1991-08-01

    The proposed Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) is a two frequency (35 GHz, 95 GHz) polarimetric radar with a single reflector-lens antenna. The system will be used to perform three dimensional Doppler and polarimetric measurements on clouds. The various subsystems are currently being developed and this report gives technical details about the status of these subsystems. This report also updates other research activities.

  18. Extraction of phase nonlinearities from an FM radar system

    E-print Network

    Weigel, Henry Samuel

    1986-01-01

    EXTRACTION OF PHASE NONLINEARITIES FROM AN FM RADAR SYSTEM A Thesis by HENRY SAMUEL WEIGEL IV Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 19B6 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering EXTRACTION OF PHASE NONLINEARITIES FROM AN FM RADAR SYSTEM A Thesis by HENRY SAMUEL WEIGEL IV Approved as to style and content by: Dr. R. W. Newton (Co-Chairman of Committee) D . B. R. Jean (Co...

  19. Height Target Estimation in a Three Positioned Radar System Christo Kabakchiev, Ivan Garvanov, Vladimir Kyovtorov

    E-print Network

    Borissova, Daniela

    108 Height Target Estimation in a Three Positioned Radar System Christo Kabakchiev, Ivan Garvanov. The three-positioned radar system sensibility versus radar accuracy or versus the geometrical parameters of the 50's the interest in the three-positioned radar systems is raised again. This interest grows rapidly

  20. A land based radar polarimeter processing system

    E-print Network

    Kronke, Chester William

    1984-01-01

    for the RDADS iSBC-80/24 Processor. 10 Processor Port Assignments for IFC Interface . 11 IFC Channel Assignments 12 IFC Control Channel (2) Signals. 24 25 26 27 30 30 32 34 35 40 43 43 FIGURE LIST OF FIGURES Page 1 Elevation Angle for Radar... the use of transfer switches that have a single level sensitive control input. The radar head numbers specified in Table 2 were used during 25 TABLE 2 Cal/Op Control Port Signal Assignments Port EB Bit Assignment Head I Cal/Op Control 0 Head I Cal...

  1. 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Beamforming for Radar

    E-print Network

    Kepner, Jeremy

    © 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Beamforming for Radar Systems on COTS Heterogeneous ComputingHeterogeneous Computing PlatformsPlatforms Jeffrey A. Rudin Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. High Performance Embedded Computing (HPEC) Conference September 23, 2003 #12;2© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Outline

  2. An Acoustic / Radar System for Automated Detection, Localization, and Classification of

    E-print Network

    Maher, Robert C.

    1 An Acoustic / Radar System for Automated Detection, Localization, and Classification of Birds signal processing and classification DeTect, Inc. ­Bird Detection Radar, signal processing, radar data SPVA D/C/L CRH D/C/L Radar D/C/L ESM D/C/L IR D/C/L Shipboard Organic Sensors UAV Sensors Video D

  3. Persistent GMTI surveillance: theoretical performance bounds and some experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam; Damini, Anthony; Wang, Kai

    2010-04-01

    In certain operational radar modes, slow ground moving targets are detected over several processing intervals using space-time adaptive processing. This enables use of Bayesian filtering and smoothing algorithms for estimation of time-varying moving target parameters. In this paper, some Bayesian filtering algorithms are investigated. The Cra?er-Rao bounds based on subsets of radar measurements (range, angle and Doppler) are derived for typical maneuvering targets and compared against simulated results from Bayesian filters. The performance is also evaluated using real data obtained from DRDC Ottawa's XWEAR radar.

  4. Development of land based radar polarimeter processor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronke, C. W.; Blanchard, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    The processing subsystem of a land based radar polarimeter was designed and constructed. This subsystem is labeled the remote data acquisition and distribution system (RDADS). The radar polarimeter, an experimental remote sensor, incorporates the RDADS to control all operations of the sensor. The RDADS uses industrial standard components including an 8-bit microprocessor based single board computer, analog input/output boards, a dynamic random access memory board, and power supplis. A high-speed digital electronics board was specially designed and constructed to control range-gating for the radar. A complete system of software programs was developed to operate the RDADS. The software uses a powerful real time, multi-tasking, executive package as an operating system. The hardware and software used in the RDADS are detailed. Future system improvements are recommended.

  5. A fully photonics-based coherent radar system.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Paolo; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Serafino, Giovanni; Capria, Amerigo; Pinna, Sergio; Onori, Daniel; Porzi, Claudio; Scaffardi, Mirco; Malacarne, Antonio; Vercesi, Valeria; Lazzeri, Emma; Berizzi, Fabrizio; Bogoni, Antonella

    2014-03-20

    The next generation of radar (radio detection and ranging) systems needs to be based on software-defined radio to adapt to variable environments, with higher carrier frequencies for smaller antennas and broadened bandwidth for increased resolution. Today's digital microwave components (synthesizers and analogue-to-digital converters) suffer from limited bandwidth with high noise at increasing frequencies, so that fully digital radar systems can work up to only a few gigahertz, and noisy analogue up- and downconversions are necessary for higher frequencies. In contrast, photonics provide high precision and ultrawide bandwidth, allowing both the flexible generation of extremely stable radio-frequency signals with arbitrary waveforms up to millimetre waves, and the detection of such signals and their precise direct digitization without downconversion. Until now, the photonics-based generation and detection of radio-frequency signals have been studied separately and have not been tested in a radar system. Here we present the development and the field trial results of a fully photonics-based coherent radar demonstrator carried out within the project PHODIR. The proposed architecture exploits a single pulsed laser for generating tunable radar signals and receiving their echoes, avoiding radio-frequency up- and downconversion and guaranteeing both the software-defined approach and high resolution. Its performance exceeds state-of-the-art electronics at carrier frequencies above two gigahertz, and the detection of non-cooperating aeroplanes confirms the effectiveness and expected precision of the system. PMID:24646997

  6. A fully photonics-based coherent radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghelfi, Paolo; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Serafino, Giovanni; Capria, Amerigo; Pinna, Sergio; Onori, Daniel; Porzi, Claudio; Scaffardi, Mirco; Malacarne, Antonio; Vercesi, Valeria; Lazzeri, Emma; Berizzi, Fabrizio; Bogoni, Antonella

    2014-03-01

    The next generation of radar (radio detection and ranging) systems needs to be based on software-defined radio to adapt to variable environments, with higher carrier frequencies for smaller antennas and broadened bandwidth for increased resolution. Today's digital microwave components (synthesizers and analogue-to-digital converters) suffer from limited bandwidth with high noise at increasing frequencies, so that fully digital radar systems can work up to only a few gigahertz, and noisy analogue up- and downconversions are necessary for higher frequencies. In contrast, photonics provide high precision and ultrawide bandwidth, allowing both the flexible generation of extremely stable radio-frequency signals with arbitrary waveforms up to millimetre waves, and the detection of such signals and their precise direct digitization without downconversion. Until now, the photonics-based generation and detection of radio-frequency signals have been studied separately and have not been tested in a radar system. Here we present the development and the field trial results of a fully photonics-based coherent radar demonstrator carried out within the project PHODIR. The proposed architecture exploits a single pulsed laser for generating tunable radar signals and receiving their echoes, avoiding radio-frequency up- and downconversion and guaranteeing both the software-defined approach and high resolution. Its performance exceeds state-of-the-art electronics at carrier frequencies above two gigahertz, and the detection of non-cooperating aeroplanes confirms the effectiveness and expected precision of the system.

  7. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.B.; Simonson, D.L. [and others

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  8. THz impulse radar for biomedical sensing: nonlinear system behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. R.; Sung, Shijun; Grundfest, W. S.; Taylor, Z. D.

    2014-03-01

    The THz impulse radar is an "RF-inspired" sensor system that has performed remarkably well since its initial development nearly six years ago. It was developed for ex vivo skin-burn imaging, and has since shown great promise in the sensitive detection of hydration levels in soft tissues of several types, such as in vivo corneal and burn samples. An intriguing aspect of the impulse radar is its hybrid architecture which combines the high-peak-power of photoconductive switches with the high-responsivity and -bandwidth (RF and video) of Schottky-diode rectifiers. The result is a very sensitive sensor system in which the post-detection signal-to-noise ratio depends super-linearly on average signal power up to a point where the diode is "turned on" in the forward direction, and then behaves quasi-linearly beyond that point. This paper reports the first nonlinear systems analysis done on the impulse radar using MATLAB.

  9. A 449 MHz modular wind profiler radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindseth, Bradley James

    This thesis presents the design of a 449 MHz radar for wind profiling, with a focus on modularity, antenna sidelobe reduction, and solid-state transmitter design. It is one of the first wind profiler radars to use low-cost LDMOS power amplifiers combined with spaced antennas. The system is portable and designed for 2-3 month deployments. The transmitter power amplifier consists of multiple 1-kW peak power modules which feed 54 antenna elements arranged in a hexagonal array, scalable directly to 126 elements. The power amplifier is operated in pulsed mode with a 10% duty cycle at 63% drain efficiency. The antenna array is designed to have low sidelobes, confirmed by measurements. The radar was operated in Boulder, Colorado and Salt Lake City, Utah. Atmospheric wind vertical and horizontal components at altitudes between 200m and 4km were calculated from the collected atmospheric return signals. Sidelobe reduction of the antenna array pattern is explored to reduce the effects of ground or sea clutter. Simulations are performed for various shapes of compact clutter fences for the 915-MHz beam-steering Doppler radar and the 449-MHz spaced antenna interferometric radar. It is shown that minimal low-cost hardware modifications to existing compact ground planes of 915-MHz beam-steering radar allow for reduction of sidelobes of up to 5dB. The results obtained on a single beam-steering array are extended to the 449 MHz triple hexagonal array spaced antenna interferometric radar. Cross-correlation, transmit beamwidth, and sidelobe levels are evaluated for various clutter fence configurations and array spacings. The resulting sidelobes are as much as 10 dB below those without a clutter fence and can be incorporated into existing and future 915 and 449 MHz wind profiler systems with minimal hardware modifications.

  10. POTENTIALITIES OF USRP-BASED SOFTWARE DEFINED RADAR SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    modulated or phase coded, and to perform multiple functions. The adoption of a Software Defined Radio system] as hardware base, and GNU Radio, an open source software-defined radio project, as a software toolPOTENTIALITIES OF USRP-BASED SOFTWARE DEFINED RADAR SYSTEMS Sandra Costanzo1, *, Francesco

  11. Probabilistic and fuzzy information fusion applied to radar system ranking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurent Lecornu; Renaud Debon; Wojciech Komorniczak; Basel Solaiman

    2003-01-01

    The decision making systems make use of heterogeneous information to identify an object class or a target, which are affected by various kinds of imperfection. First, information issued from measures (radar measures, images) of an observation is represented by X variables. Generally, on these X variables, each class can be described through a probability distribution function. These decision systems also

  12. 78. View of radar systems technical publication library, transmitter building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. View of radar systems technical publication library, transmitter building no. 102, second floor. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  13. Knowledge-based signal processing for radar ESM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, J.; Cussons, S.; Feltham, A.

    1990-10-01

    Radar electronic support measures (ESM) systems perform the functions of threat detection and area surveillance to determine the identity and bearing of surrounding radar emitters. Automatic ESM systems incorporate a passive receiver to measure the parameters of detected radar pulses and an automatic processor to rapidly sort pulses and identify the emitters. Current processors use algorithmic processing methods which are inflexible and do not fully utilize available sources of a priori information. The paper discusses the role of knowledge-based processing methods and how they may be applied to the key ESM signal-processing functions of deinterleaving, merge and emitter identification. ESM processors are required to sort input pulse data streams exceeding one million pulses per second and minimize the reporting latency of new emitters. The paper further discusses the requirements to achieve real-time operation of knowledge-based ESM processing techniques.

  14. Multifunctional millimeter-wave radar system for helicopter safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshi, Darren S.; Case, Timothy J.; McKitterick, John B.; Bui, Long Q.

    2012-06-01

    A multi-featured sensor solution has been developed that enhances the operational safety and functionality of small airborne platforms, representing an invaluable stride toward enabling higher-risk, tactical missions. This paper demonstrates results from a recently developed multi-functional sensor system that integrates a high performance millimeter-wave radar front end, an evidence grid-based integration processing scheme, and the incorporation into a 3D Synthetic Vision System (SVS) display. The front end architecture consists of a w-band real-beam scanning radar that generates a high resolution real-time radar map and operates with an adaptable antenna architecture currently configured with an interferometric capability for target height estimation. The raw sensor data is further processed within an evidence grid-based integration functionality that results in high-resolution maps in the region surrounding the platform. Lastly, the accumulated radar results are displayed in a fully rendered 3D SVS environment integrated with local database information to provide the best representation of the surrounding environment. The integrated system concept will be discussed and initial results from an experimental flight test of this developmental system will be presented. Specifically, the forward-looking operation of the system demonstrates the system's ability to produce high precision terrain mapping with obstacle detection and avoidance capability, showcasing the system's versatility in a true operational environment.

  15. Methods And System Suppressing Clutter In A Gain-Block, Radar-Responsive Tag System

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Axline, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-04-18

    Methods and systems reduce clutter interference in a radar-responsive tag system. A radar transmits a series of linear-frequency-modulated pulses and receives echo pulses from nearby terrain and from radar-responsive tags that may be in the imaged scene. Tags in the vicinity of the radar are activated by the radar's pulses. The tags receive and remodulate the radar pulses. Tag processing reverses the direction, in time, of the received waveform's linear frequency modulation. The tag retransmits the remodulated pulses. The radar uses a reversed-chirp de-ramp pulse to process the tag's echo. The invention applies to radar systems compatible with coherent gain-block tags. The invention provides a marked reduction in the strength of residual clutter echoes on each and every echo pulse received by the radar. SAR receiver processing effectively whitens passive-clutter signatures across the range dimension. Clutter suppression of approximately 14 dB is achievable for a typical radar system.

  16. The NASA/JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Yunling; Kim,Yunjin; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we will briefly describe the instrument characteristics, the evolution of various radar modes, the instrument performance and improvement in the knowledge of the positioning and attitude information of the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This system operates in the fully polarimetric mode in the P, L, and C band simultaneously or in the interferometric mode in both the L and C band simultaneously. We also summarize the progress of the data processing effort, especially in the interferometry processing and we address the issue of processing and calibrating the cross-track interferometry data.

  17. A Portable Low-Power Harmonic Radar System and Conformal Tag for Insect Tracking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dimitris Psychoudakis; William Moulder; Chi-Chih Chen; Heping Zhu; John L. Volakis

    2008-01-01

    Harmonic radar systems provide an effective modality for tracking insect behavior. This letter presents a harmonic radar system proposed to track the migration of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB). The system offers a unique combination of portability, low power and small tag design. It is comprised of a compact radar unit and a passive RF tag for mounting on the

  18. Feasibility study of a microwave radar system for agricultural inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Okelo-Odongo, S.

    1994-10-03

    The feasibility of an impulse radar system for agricultural inspection is investigated. This system would be able to quickly determine the quality of foodstuffs that are passed through the system. A prototype was designed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and this report discusses it`s evaluation. A variety of apples were used to test the system and preliminary data suggests that this technology holds promise for successful application on a large scale in food processing plants.

  19. The Ground System of the SHAllow RADar (SHARAD) Experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Alberti; D. Biccari; B. Bortone; C. Caramiello; C. Catallo; A. Croce; S. Dinardo; E. Flamini; M. Guelfi; A. Masdea; S. Mattei; R. Orosei; C. Papa; G. Pica; G. Picardi; G. Salzillo; M. R. Santovito; R. Seu

    2007-01-01

    A primary scope of Mars exploration is the research of underground water. Knowledge of water and ice quantity and distribution has enourmous impacts on our understanding on gelogic, hydrologic and climate evolution of Mars and of its origin. To this aim, high resolution observations of geophysical parameters can address these items expecially when conducted by means of penetrating radar systems

  20. Recent developments and recommendations for improving harmonic radar tracking systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nazifa Tahir; Graham Brooker

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents some recent developments in harmonic radar tracking systems. These are widely used for monitoring and tracking of low flying insects like honey bees, butterflies, snail and carabid beetles, and come under the category of individual marking techniques and use harmonic range detection or range finding for tracking insects tagged with harmonic transponders. In most cases the transponder

  1. Antenna dimensions of synthetic aperture radar systems on satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    Design of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for a satellite must take into account the limitation in weight and dimensions of the antenna. The lower limits of the antenna area are derived from the conditions of unambiguity of the SAR system. This result is applied to estimate the antenna requirements for SARs on satellites in circular orbits of various altitudes around Earth and Venus.

  2. "A Functional Design and System Architecture of a Control System for a Weather Radar"

    E-print Network

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    "A Functional Design and System Architecture of a Control System for a Weather Radar" Seidu Ibrahim Faculty Mentor: Eric Knapp Weather radars operate by transmitting pulses of very high microwave energy antenna scan, a three dimensional view of the surrounding atmosphere is created. Traditional weather

  3. A MIMO Radar System Approach to Target Hana Godrich, Alexander M. Haimovich, and Rick S. Blum

    E-print Network

    Haimovich, Alexander

    1 A MIMO Radar System Approach to Target Tracking Hana Godrich, Alexander M. Haimovich, and Rick S performnace of MIMO radar systems with distributed antennas and non-coherent processing is studied of the radars geometric layout and the target location on tracking accuracies is analyzed. The impact

  4. Radar based rainfall forecast for sewage systems control.

    PubMed

    Aspegren, H; Bailly, C; Mpé, A; Bazzurro, N; Morgavi, A; Prem, E; Jensen, N E

    2001-01-01

    There has been an increasing demand for accurate rainfall forecast in urban areas from the water industry. Current forecasting systems provided mainly by meteorological offices are based on large-scale prediction and are not well suited for this application. In order to devise a system especially designed for the dynamic management of a sewerage system the "RADAR" project was launched. The idea of this project was to provide a short-term small-scale prediction of rain based on radar images. The prediction methodology combines two methods. An extrapolation method based on a sophisticated cross correlation of images is optimised by a neural network technique. Three different application sites in Europe have been used to validate the system. PMID:11379159

  5. Streamflow Measurement Using A Riversonde Uhf Radar System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Teague; D. Barrick; P. Lilleboe; R. Cheng

    2002-01-01

    Initial field tests have been performed to evaluate the performance of a RiverSonde streamflow measurement system. The tests were conducted at a concrete-lined canal and a natural river in central California during June, 2000. The RiverSonde is a UHF radar operating near 350 MHz and is based on a modified SeaSonde system normally used to measure ocean surface currents in

  6. System-on-chip based Doppler radar occupancy sensor.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Ehsan; Song, Chenyan; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    System-on-Chip (SoC) based Doppler radar occupancy sensor is developed through non contact detection of respiratory signals. The radio was developed using off the shelf low power RF CC2530 SoC chip by Texas Instruments. In order to save power, the transmitter sends signal intermittently at 2.405 GHz. Reflected pulses are demodulated, and the baseband signals are processed to recover periodic motion. The system was tested both with mechanical target and a human subject. In both cases Doppler radar detected periodic motion closely matched the actual motion, and it has been shown that an SoC based system can be used for subject detection. PMID:22254705

  7. HF radar in French Mediterranean Sea: an element of MOOSE Mediterranean Ocean Observing System on Environment

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    HF radar in French Mediterranean Sea: an element of MOOSE Mediterranean Ocean Observing System), the Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography is operating HF radars on the North Western Mediterranean coast of HF radars is to provide synoptic observation as sea surface current map every hour and over long

  8. The NASA/JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yun-Jin; Lou, Yun-Ling; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/JPL airborne SAR (AIRSAR) system operates in the fully polarimetric mode at P-, L- and C-band simultaneously or in the interferometric mode in both L- and C-band simultaneously. The system became operational in late 1987 and flew its first mission aboard a DC-8 aircraft operated by NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Since then, the AIRSAR has flown missions every year and acquired images in North, Central and South America, Europe and Australia. In this paper, we will briefly describe the instrument characteristics, the evolution of the various radar modes, the instrument performance, and improvement in the knowledge of the positioning and attitude information of the radar. In addition, we will summarize the progress of the data processing effort especially in the interferometry processing. Finally, we will address the issue of processing and calibrating the cross-track interferometry (XTI) data.

  9. System-on-Chip based Doppler radar occupancy sensor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ehsan Yavari; Chenyan Song; Victor Lubecke; Olga Boric-Lubecke

    2011-01-01

    System-on-Chip (SoC) based Doppler radar occupancy sensor is developed through non contact detection of respiratory signals. The radio was developed using off the shelf low power RF CC2530 SoC chip by Texas Instruments. In order to save power, the transmitter sends signal intermittently at 2.405 GHz. Reflected pulses are demodulated, and the baseband signals are processed to recover periodic motion.

  10. Transponder-Aided Joint Calibration and Synchronization Compensation for Distributed Radar Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High-precision radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation must be provided for distributed radar system due to separate transmitters and receivers. This paper proposes a transponder-aided joint radiometric calibration, motion compensation and synchronization for distributed radar remote sensing. As the transponder signal can be separated from the normal radar returns, it is used to calibrate the distributed radar for radiometry. Meanwhile, the distributed radar motion compensation and synchronization compensation algorithms are presented by utilizing the transponder signals. This method requires no hardware modifications to both the normal radar transmitter and receiver and no change to the operating pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The distributed radar radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation require only one transponder, but the motion compensation requires six transponders because there are six independent variables in the distributed radar geometry. Furthermore, a maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the transponder signal parameters. The proposed methods are verified by simulation results. PMID:25794158

  11. Transponder-aided joint calibration and synchronization compensation for distributed radar systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2015-01-01

    High-precision radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation must be provided for distributed radar system due to separate transmitters and receivers. This paper proposes a transponder-aided joint radiometric calibration, motion compensation and synchronization for distributed radar remote sensing. As the transponder signal can be separated from the normal radar returns, it is used to calibrate the distributed radar for radiometry. Meanwhile, the distributed radar motion compensation and synchronization compensation algorithms are presented by utilizing the transponder signals. This method requires no hardware modifications to both the normal radar transmitter and receiver and no change to the operating pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The distributed radar radiometric calibration and synchronization compensation require only one transponder, but the motion compensation requires six transponders because there are six independent variables in the distributed radar geometry. Furthermore, a maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the transponder signal parameters. The proposed methods are verified by simulation results. PMID:25794158

  12. The Ground System of the SHAllow RADar (SHARAD) Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, G.; Biccari, D.; Bortone, B.; Caramiello, C.; Catallo, C.; Croce, A.; Dinardo, S.; Flamini, E.; Guelfi, M.; Masdea, A.; Mattei, S.; Orosei, R.; Papa, C.; Pica, G.; Picardi, G.; Salzillo, G.; Santovito, M. R.; Seu, R.

    A primary scope of Mars exploration is the research of underground water. Knowledge of water and ice quantity and distribution has enourmous impacts on our understanding on gelogic, hydrologic and climate evolution of Mars and of its origin. To this aim, high resolution observations of geophysical parameters can address these items expecially when conducted by means of penetrating radar systems orbiting around the planet, due to their intrinsic capabilities to detect underground water/ice. In this framework, SHARAD (SHAllow RADar) on-board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) assumes a key role within Mars exploration activities. SHARAD is a wideband radar sounder transmitting at a centre frequency of 20 MHz within 15-25 MHz spectral range. SHARAD has been launched on August '05 and will start its nominal observation phase from November '06. To guarantee its operations, commands and data analysis and processing, the SHARAD Ground Data System (GDS) has been designed and developped. SHARADA GDS is a ground system equipped with ad-hoc sw tools to allow instrument operations and data processing during the two-year mission duration. The present paper is focused on SHARAD GDS description of its architecture and of instrument planning, commanding and data processing sofwtare tools.

  13. Subband-domain signal processing for radar array systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinkin, Daniel V.; Pulsone, Nicholas B.

    1999-11-01

    Subband-domain algorithms provide an attractive technique for wideband radar array processing. The subband-domain approach decomposes a received wideband signal into a set of narrowband signals. While the number of processing threads in the system increases, the narrowband signals within each subband can be sampled at a correspondingly slower rate. Therefore, the data rate at the input is similar to that at the output of the subband processor. There are several advantages to the subbanding method. It can simplify typical radar algorithms such as adaptive beamforming and equalization by the virtue of reducing subband signal bandwidth, thereby potentially reducing the computational complexity over an equivalent tapped-delay line approach. It also allows for a greater parallelization of the processing task, hence enabling the use of slower and less power consuming hardware. In order to evaluate the validity of the subbanding approach, it is compared with conventional processing methods. This paper focuses on adaptive beamforming and pulse compression performance for a wideband radar system. The performance of an adaptive beamformer is given for a polyphase filter based subband approach and is measured against narrowband processing. SINR loss curves and beampatterns for a subband system are presented. Design criteria for subband polyphase filter processing that minimizes signal distortion are provided and the distortion is characterized. Finally subband- domain pulse compression is demonstrated and compared with the conventional approach.

  14. Streamflow Measurement Using A Riversonde Uhf Radar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, C.; Barrick, D.; Lilleboe, P.; Cheng, R.

    Initial field tests have been performed to evaluate the performance of a RiverSonde streamflow measurement system. The tests were conducted at a concrete-lined canal and a natural river in central California during June, 2000. The RiverSonde is a UHF radar operating near 350 MHz and is based on a modified SeaSonde system normally used to measure ocean surface currents in salt water using lower frequencies (5­25 MHz). The RiverSonde uses energy scattered by Bragg-resonant 0.5 m water waves and does not require any sensors in the water. Water velocity is calculated by observing the Doppler shift of the scattered radar energy and comparing that with the Doppler shift expected from resonant waves in still water. The radar has sufficient resolution to allow the estimation of a velocity profile across the width of the river. The antennas consisted of a 2-element transmitting antenna and a 3-element receiving antenna. The transmitting antenna provided broad illumination of the water surface, and MUSIC direction finding was used to determine the arrival direction of the re- flected radar energy. The transmitting and receiving antennas were placed on opposite banks to reduce the signal intensity variation across the channel. A chirp frequency sweep was used to determine range. Transmitted power was under 1 W, and the max- imum range was a few hundred meters. Range resolution was on the order of 10 m, and velocity resolution was about 2.5 cm/s. Extensive in-situ surface truth measurements were performed by personnel from the United States Geological Survey. The instruments included current meters suspended at various depths from a small boat positioned at several locations across the channel, video tracking of many floaters (tennis balls) on the water surface, an optical flow meter, and anemometer wind measurements. Typical water velocities were about 40 cm/s, and RMS velocity differences between the radar and in-situ measurements were 6­18% of the mean flow, with similar differences among the various in-situ velocity measurements. Total volume flow was estimated using in-situ bottom sounders for water depth, and volume flow differences between radar and in-situ measurements were less than 10%.

  15. A GMTI method via comparing two consecutive phase difference maps of the same target area for small UAVs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhonghai Wang; Erik P. Blasch; Khanh Pham; Genshe Chen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a Ground moving target indication (GMTI) method based on the analysis of the two phase difference maps (PDM) of the same target scene obtained by one antenna phase center on a slow moving platform. For small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) only one antenna is available to detect moving targets. Using a single antenna and the

  16. Robust radar detection of GMTI targets with STAP D. M. Carrington and Dr. P. G. Kealey

    E-print Network

    Haddadi, Hamed

    Q Malvern and University College London Abstract: Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) is used in Ground processing can be performed either before Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) (pre-Doppler) or after FFT (post the adaptive filter correctly, resulting in the null being formed at the wrong Doppler, when compared

  17. Airborne GMTI experiment based on multi-channel synthetic aperture radar using space time adaptive processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhiwei Yang; Guisheng Liao; Shun He; Cao Zeng

    The non-ideal conditions of real-world detection environments, such as beam-pattern mismatch, non-ideal sensor geometry, receiver channel imbalance and clutter heterogeneity, can preclude the performance described in much of the theoretical STAP literature. For the purpose of overcoming those problems, a new target detection and location approach with low complexity is proposed. This presented algorithm is performed in three stages, i.e.

  18. Mapping tree root systems with ground-penetrating radar.

    PubMed

    Hruska, Jiri; Cermák, Jan; Sustek, Svatopluk

    1999-02-01

    A ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technique was used to study the three-dimensional distribution of root systems of large (DBH = 14 to 35 cm) oak trees (Quercus petraea (Mattusch.) Liebl.) in relatively dry, luvisoil on loamy deluvium and weathered granodiorite. We used a pulse EKKO 1000 GPR system, a profile grid of 0.25 x 0.25 meters, at 0.05 m intervals, and a signal frequency of 450 MHz, to assure resolution of about 3 cm in both directions (further increases in resolution up to 1 cm are possible with the system). Coarse root density was 6.5 m m(-2) of stand area and 3.3 m m(-3) of soil volume. Maximum rooting depth of the experimental oaks was 2 m, and the root ground plan was significantly larger (about 1.5 times) than the crown ground plan. Based on earlier studies of Quercus robur L. from floodplain forests, where the extent of the root systems was much smaller (root ground plan:crown ground plan ratio of 0.6), we conclude that the high root ground plan:crown ground plan ratio indicates less favorable conditions of water supply at the experimental site than in the floodplain forest. The ground-penetrating radar system is noninvasive and allows relatively rapid and repeated measurements of the distribution of coarse root systems of trees. PMID:12651592

  19. A noncoherent radar system approach for through-the-wall imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Fauzia; Amin, Moeness G.

    2005-05-01

    A noncoherent through-the-wall radar system approach, based on trilateration technique, is presented. This approach involves multiple independent monostatic radar units and as such, provides flexibility in positioning the units with various stand-off distances and inter-element spacing. We demonstrate the proposed noncoherent system approach in an indoor environment using both simulated and real data. The results show that the radar is able to detect and locate multiple targets behind walls.

  20. A FMCW Radar Acquisition and Process System Based on LabVIEW

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhang Da-Biao; Zhao Zeng-rong; Bai Ran

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a acquisition and process system for frequency modulation continuous wave (FMCW) radar. The procedure is designed by LabVIEW7.0. The system adopts FMCW radar sensor and high-quality data acquisition card. The intermediate frequency (IF) signal of the FMCW radar can be collected in time. The intermediate frequency, distance and velocity forward vehicle can be calculated by an improved

  1. A review of CFAR detection techniques in radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, A.; Studer, F. A.

    1986-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the problem of achieving constant false alarm rate (CFAR) operation in radar systems and the techniques used for this purpose. First, the characteristics of noncoherent clutter in both space and time domains are assessed. Attention is then focused on the two main approaches to CFAR detection, spatial adaptive thresholding and temporal adaptive thresholding. For each approach, a number of currently used techniques are reviewed. Performance evaluation and comparison between the two classes of devices also are considered. Other CFAR techniques based on coherent processing are outlined and discussed.

  2. The Goldstone solar system radar: A science instrument for planetary research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorsky, J. D.; Renzetti, N. A.; Fulton, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) station at NASA's Deep Space Communications Complex in California's Mojave Desert is described. A short chronological account of the GSSR's technical development and scientific discoveries is given. This is followed by a basic discussion of how information is derived from the radar echo and how the raw information can be used to increase understanding of the solar system. A moderately detailed description of the radar system is given, and the engineering performance of the radar is discussed. The operating characteristics of the Arcibo Observatory in Puerto Rico are briefly described and compared with those of the GSSR. Planned and in-process improvements to the existing radar, as well as the performance of a hypothetical 128-m diameter antenna radar station, are described. A comprehensive bibliography of referred scientific and engineering articles presenting results that depended on data gathered by the instrument is provided.

  3. X-band Radar System for Detecting Heart and Respiration Rates

    E-print Network

    Park, Seong-Ook

    an X-band Doppler radar system to detect heart and respiration of human far away. Through the idea and heart rates with the periodic movement of skin and muscle near the heart. Keywords-heart rate; X. The Basic Concept of the System The configuration of X-band Doppler radar system is shown in Figure 1

  4. A Portable Low-Power Harmonic Radar System and Conformal Tag for Insect Tracking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harmonic radar systems provide an effective modality for tracking insect behavior. This paper presents a harmonic radar system proposed to track the migration of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB). The system offers a unique combination of portability, low power and small tag design. It is comprised of a...

  5. MARA (Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter) system documentation. Volume 1: MARA system requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L. (editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter (MARA), a flexible airborne radar remote sensing facility developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is discussed. This volume describes the scientific justification for the development of the instrument and the translation of these scientific requirements into instrument design goals. Values for key instrument parameters are derived to accommodate these goals, and simulations and analytical models are used to estimate the developed system's performance.

  6. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.B.; Gallman, P.G.; Slotwinski, A.R. [Coleman Research Corp., Springfield, VA (United States); Wagner, K.; Weaver, S.; Xu, Jieping [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution.

  7. Radar system on a large autonomous vehicle for personnel avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvious, Jerry; Wellman, Ron; Tahmoush, Dave; Clark, John

    2010-04-01

    The US Army Research Laboratory designed, developed and tested a novel switched beam radar system operating at 76 GHz for use in a large autonomous vehicle to detect and identify roadway obstructions including slowly-moving personnel. This paper discusses the performance requirements for the system to operate in an early collision avoidance mode to a range of 150 meters and at speeds of over 20 m/s. We report the measured capabilities of the system to operate in these modes under various conditions, such as rural and urban environments, and on various terrains, such as asphalt and grass. Finally, we discuss the range-Doppler map processing capabilities that were developed to correct for platform motion and identify roadway vehicles and personnel moving at 1 m/s or more along the path of the system.

  8. The Goldstone Solar System Radar: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, M. A.; Benner, L. A.; Teitelbaum, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) primarily uses the 70-m antenna at Goldstone — DSS -14 — for tracking, telemetry, and commanding National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacecraft. However, for a small percentage of its time DSS-14 also provides NASA with the only fully steerable, high-power ground-based radar in the world. The Goldstone Solar System Radar (GSSR) has been used extensively for high-resolution radar ranging and imaging of planetary and small-body targets, including more than 160 asteroids, four comets, the Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, the Galilean satellites, Titan, and small orbital debris. The GSSR operates at a wavelength of 3.5 cm with a typical transmitter power of 450 kW, and provides radar imagery, surface topography, rotational information, and ice distribution on this wide variety of solar system objects. The bulk of current GSSR work centers on radar imaging, astrometry, and characterization of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). GSSR has discovered binary and ternary NEAs (six to date); contact binary NEAs, and NEAs in non-principal axis rotation states. The GSSR has observed the following small-body mission targets: 4 Vesta (Dawn), 433 Eros (NEAR-Shoemaker), 25143 Itokawa (Hayabusa), 101955 1999 RQ36 (OSIRIS-REx), and 4179 Toutatis (Chang'e 2). Recently the highest range resolution improved by a factor of five from 18.75 meters to 3.75 meters. The first major application of this resolution increase was with imaging of 400-meter-diameter (308635) 2005 YU55 during the asteroid's 0.85 lunar distance flyby in November 2011. The images placed tens of thousands of pixels on the asteroid, and even revealed small surface boulders. The limitation to ~4-meter range resolution is driven by the bandwidth of the transmitter. However, by using chirp waveforms and klystrons with ~150 MHz bandwidth, the range resolution could be as fine as 1-meter. JPL is exploring methods of transmitting such wider bandwidths and potentially reaching 1-meter range resolution. The GSSR currently provides nearly encounter-quality imaging of NEAs a few times each year, and the potential exists for future imaging of even higher quality. Two main avenues exist to becoming a user of the GSSR. Successful proposers to the Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) solicitations from the Planetary Science Division in the NASA Science Mission Directorate make up the majority of GSSR users. GSSR users also come via successful proposals to observing calls from the National Science Foundation for use of their Green Bank Telescope or the Extended Very Large Array that require 3.5-cm radar illumination of targets for primary science goals. In addition, any DSN-supported flight project can request GSSR observations that advance the goals of their mission. GSSR supports a wide community of scientists at many institutions. The research described above was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  9. GeoSAR: A Radar Terrain Mapping System for the New Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas; vanZyl, Jakob; Hensley, Scott; Reis, James; Munjy, Riadh; Burton, John; Yoha, Robert

    2000-01-01

    GeoSAR Geographic Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a new 3 year effort to build a unique, dual-frequency, airborne Interferometric SAR for mapping of terrain. This is being pursued via a Consortium of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., and the California Department of Conservation. The airborne portion of this system will operate on a Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft outfitted with P- and X-band Interferometric SARs. The ground portions of this system will be a suite of Flight Planning Software, an IFSAR Processor and a Radar-GIS Workstation. The airborne P-band and X-band radars will be constructed by JPL with the goal of obtaining foliage penetration at the longer P-band wavelengths. The P-band and X-band radar will operate at frequencies of 350 Mhz and 9.71 Ghz with bandwidths of either 80 or 160 Mhz. The airborne radars will be complemented with airborne laser system for measuring antenna positions. Aircraft flight lines and radar operating instructions will be computed with the Flight Planning Software The ground processing will be a two-step step process. First, the raw radar data will be processed into radar images and interferometer derived Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Second, these radar images and DEMs will be processed with a Radar GIS Workstation which performs processes such as Projection Transformations, Registration, Geometric Adjustment, Mosaicking, Merging and Database Management. JPL will construct the IFSAR Processor and Calgis, Inc. will construct the Radar GIS Workstation. The GeoSAR Project was underway in November 1996 with a goal of having the radars and laser systems fully integrated onto the Calgis Gulfstream-II aircraft in early 1999. Then, Engineering Checkout and Calibration-Characterization Flights will be conducted through November 1999. The system will be completed at the end of 1999 and ready for routine operations in the year 2000.

  10. Generalized radar/radiometry imaging problems

    E-print Network

    Genève, Université de

    Paper Generalized radar/radiometry imaging problems Ivan Prudyus, Sviatoslav Voloshynovskiy, Andriy- ing simulation based on radar, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and radiometry systems are presented systems, synthetic aperture radar, spatio-temporal imaging. 1. Introduction Resolution of radar

  11. Second annual progress report of the Millimeter Wave Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Pazmany, A.L.; Sekelsky, S.M.; McIntosh, R.E.

    1992-06-07

    The Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) is a single antenna, two frequency (33 GHz and 95 GHz) polarimetric radar which is currently under the development at the University of Massachusetts (UMASS). This system will be capable of making four dimensional Doppler and polarimetric measurements of clouds. This report gives details about the status of the various subsystems under development and discusses current research activities.

  12. The EDOP Radar System on the High-Altitude NASA ER2 Aircraft

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald M. Heymsfield; Steven W. Bidwell; I. Jeff Caylor; Syed Ameen; Shaun Nicholson; Wayne Boncyk; Lee Miller; Doug Vandemark; Paul E. Racette; Louis R. Dod

    1996-01-01

    The NASA ER-2 high-altitude ( 20 km) aircraft that emulates a satellite view of precipitation systems carries a variety of passive and active ( lidar ) remote sensing instruments. A new Doppler weather radar system at X band ( 9.6 GHz ) called the ER-2 Doppler radar ( EDOP ) has been developed and flown on the ER-2 aircraft. EDOP

  13. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication... § 15.509 Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. (a) The UWB bandwidth of...

  14. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication... § 15.509 Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. (a) The UWB bandwidth of...

  15. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication... § 15.509 Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. (a) The UWB bandwidth of...

  16. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication... § 15.509 Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. (a) The UWB bandwidth of...

  17. 47 CFR 15.509 - Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. 15.509 Section 15.509 Telecommunication... § 15.509 Technical requirements for ground penetrating radars and wall imaging systems. (a) The UWB bandwidth of...

  18. Performance analysis of pulse Doppler digital radars with application to the Shuttle Ku-band system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alem, W. K.; Weber, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A pulse Doppler digital radar is one of the primary components of the Ku-band integrated radar and communication equipment on the Space Shuttle. The performance of the Ku-band rendezvous radar to be used on the Space Shuttle is analyzed in four parts. First an overall functional block diagram description is presented to illustrate the signal processing in the detection and the tracking modes. The detection capabilities and limitations of the radar are investigated taking all of the system losses into account. A new unified analysis of digital radar tracking loops is developed which takes into consideration the effects of a scintillating target and receiver front end noise. The behavior of the radar is discussed in the presence of thermal noise, amplitude scintillation, and target glint.

  19. Wuhan Atmosphere Radio Exploration (WARE) radar: System design and online winds measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengyu, Zhao; Chen, Zhou; Haiyin, Qing; Guobin, Yang; Yuannong, Zhang; Gang, Chen; Yaogai, Hu

    2013-05-01

    The basic configuration of the Wuhan MST (mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere) radar, which was designed and constructed by the School of Electronic Information, Wuhan University, is preliminarily described in this paper. The Wuhan MST radar operates at very high frequency (VHF) band (53.8 MHz) by observing the real-time characteristics of turbulence and the wind field vector in the height range of 3.5-90 km (not including 25-60 km) with high temporal and height resolutions. This all-solid-state, all-coherent pulse Doppler radar is China's first independent development of an MST radar focusing on atmospheric observation. The subsystems of the Wuhan MST radar include an antenna system, a feeder line system, all-solid-state radar transmitters, digital receivers, a beam control system, a signal processing system, a data processing system, a product generation system, and a user terminal. Advanced radar technologies are used, including highly reliable all-solid-state transmitters, low-noise large dynamic range digital receivers, an active phased array, high-speed digital signal processing, and real-time graphic terminals. This paper describes the design and implementation of the radar. Preliminary online wind measurements and results of the comparison to simultaneous observations by a GPS rawinsonde are presented as well.

  20. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...applicant for authority to use a Doppler Radar or Inertial Navigation System must...

  1. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...applicant for authority to use a Doppler Radar or Inertial Navigation System must...

  2. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...applicant for authority to use a Doppler Radar or Inertial Navigation System must...

  3. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 121 - Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS): Request for Evaluation; Equipment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...G Appendix G to Part 121—Doppler Radar and Inertial Navigation System (INS...applicant for authority to use a Doppler Radar or Inertial Navigation System must...

  4. Application of Radar Data to Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanZyl, Jakob J.

    2000-01-01

    The field of synthetic aperture radar changed dramatically over the past decade with the operational introduction of advance radar techniques such as polarimetry and interferometry. Radar polarimetry became an operational research tool with the introduction of the NASA/JPL AIRSAR system in the early 1980's, and reached a climax with the two SIR-C/X-SAR flights on board the space shuttle Endeavour in April and October 1994. Radar interferometry received a tremendous boost when the airborne TOPSAR system was introduced in 1991 by NASA/JPL, and further when data from the European Space Agency ERS-1 radar satellite became routinely available in 1991. Several airborne interferometric SAR systems are either currently operational, or are about to be introduced. Radar interferometry is a technique that allows one to map the topography of an area automatically under all weather conditions, day or night. The real power of radar interferometry is that the images and digital elevation models are automatically geometrically resampled, and could be imported into GIS systems directly after suitable reformatting. When combined with polarimetry, a technique that uses polarization diversity to gather more information about the geophysical properties of the terrain, a very rich multi-layer data set is available to the remote sensing scientist. This talk will discuss the principles of radar interferometry and polarimetry with specific application to the automatic categorization of land cover. Examples will include images acquired with the NASA/JPL AIRSAR/TOPSAR system in Australia and elsewhere.

  5. Small battery operated unattended radar sensor for security systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Thomas J.; Brady, Stephen; Raines, Robert

    2013-06-01

    McQ has developed, tested, and is supplying to Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) customers a new radar sensor. This radar sensor is designed for short range target detection and classification. The design emphasis was to have low power consumption, totally automated operation, a very high probability of detection coupled with a very low false alarm rate, be able to locate and track targets, and have a price compatible with the UGS market. The radar sensor complements traditional UGS sensors by providing solutions for scenarios that are difficult for UGS. The design of this radar sensor and the testing are presented in this paper.

  6. A survey of airborne radar systems for deployment on a High Altitude Powered Platform (HAPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Leung, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    A survey was conducted to find out the system characteristics of commercially available and unclassified military radars suitable for deployment on a stationary platform. A total of ten domestic and eight foreign manufacturers of the radar systems were identified. Questionnaires were sent to manufacturers requesting information concerning the system characteristics: frequency, power used, weight, volume, power radiated, antenna pattern, resolution, display capabilities, pulse repetition frequency, and sensitivity. A literature search was also made to gather the system characteristics information. Results of the survey are documented and comparisons are made among available radar systems.

  7. Intent Inference and Syntactic Tracking with GMTI Measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alex Wang; Vikram Krishnamurthy; Bhashyam Balaji

    2011-01-01

    In conventional target tracking systems, human operators use the estimated target tracks to make higher level inference of the target behaviour\\/intent. The work presented here develops syntactic filtering algorithms that assist human operators by extracting spatial patterns from target tracks to identify suspicious\\/anomalous spatial trajectories. The targets’ spatial trajectories are modeled by a stochastic context free grammar (SCFG) and a

  8. Analysis on Rank of Channel Matrix for Monostatic MIMO Radar System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yong Wu; Jun Tang; Yingning Peng

    2006-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar has shown its great potential on. combating with target fades by averaging the target RCSs on many decorrelated channels, and hence significantly improves the system performance. The amount of decorrelated channels is mathematically represented by the rank of channel matrix. In this paper, an analysis on the rank of channel matrix for monostatic MIMO radar is

  9. Towards contrast enhanced breast imaging using ultra-wideband microwave radar system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Klemm; J. Leendertz; D. Gibbins; I. J. Craddock; A. Preece; R. Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present numerical results of contrast-enhanced breast imaging using ultra-wideband microwave radar system. Due to low contrast in electrical properties between dense breast tissues and malignant tissues, tumor detection using microwave might be extremely challenging. To overcome this problem, we propose here a radar imaging technique based on a localized contrast enhancement. Our results show that microwave

  10. A traffic radar verification system based on GPS–Doppler technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soledad Torres-Guijarro; Esteban Vázquez-Fernández; Miguel Seoane-Seoane; J. Alfonso Mondaray-Zafrilla

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a traffic radar verification system based on the GPS–Doppler technology is described. An speedometer boarded in the target vehicle estimates its speed from the Doppler variation of the GPS satellites signals, and transmits it via radio to the police vehicle, where the radar to verify is located. In order to automate the procedure and be more effective,

  11. Wearable system-on-a-chip UWB radar for contact-less cardiopulmonary monitoring: present status.

    PubMed

    Zito, D; Pepe, D; Mincica, M; Zito, F; De Rossi, D; Lanata, A; Scilingo, E P; Tognetti, A

    2008-01-01

    The present status of the project aimed at the realization of an innovative wearable system-on-chip UWB radar for the cardiopulmonary monitoring is presented. The overall system consists of a wearable wireless interface including a fully integrated UWB radar for the detection of the heart beat and breath rates, and a IEEE 802.15.4 ZigBee low-power radio interface. The principle of operation of the UWB radar for the monitoring of the heart wall is summarized. With respect to the prior art, this paper reports the results of the experimental characterization of the intra-body channel loss, which has been carried out successfully in order to validate the theoretical model employed for the radar system analysis. Moreover, the main building blocks of the radar have been manufactured in 90 nm CMOS technology by ST-Microelectronics and the relevant performance are resulted in excellent agreement with those expected by post-layout simulations. PMID:19163907

  12. Pediatric nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is rarely reported: a RADAR report

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Beatrice; Saddleton, Elise; Laumann, Anne E.; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Raisch, Dennis W.; McKoy, June M.; Belknap, Steven; Bull, Christian; Haryani, Anand; Cowper, Shawn E.; Abu-Alfa, Ali K.; Miller, Frank H.; Godinez-Puig, Victoria; Dharnidharka, Vikas R.; West, Dennis P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a fibrosing disorder associated with exposure to gadolinium-based contrast agents in people with severely compromised renal function. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the reported number of cases of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in children using three distinct publicly available data sources. Materials and methods We conducted systematic searches of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS), the International Center for Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Research (ICNSFR) registry and published literature from January 1997 through September 2012. We contacted authors of individual published cases to obtain follow-up data. Data sets were cross-referenced to eliminate duplicate reporting. Results We identified 23 children with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Seventeen had documented exposure to gadolinium-based contrast agents. Six children had been reported in both the FAERS and the literature, four in the FAERS and the ICNSFR registry and five in all three data sources. Conclusion Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis has been rarely reported in children. Although rules related to confidentiality limit the ability to reconcile reports, active pharmaco-vigilance using RADAR (Research on Adverse Drug events And Reports) methodology helped in establishing the number of individual pediatric cases within the three major data sources. PMID:24057195

  13. Simulation of synthetic aperture radar 2: Simulating SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) using the advanced visual technology system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert L. Ferguson; John Ellis; Steven R. French; Jeanne Ball; Lisa Spencer; Herbert H. Bell; Peter M. Crane

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Visual Technology System (AVTS) computer image generator was modified to produce highly accurate simulations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) reflectively and elevation effects that can be precisely correlated with corresponding visual and infrared imagery. The resulting SAR snapshot is a plan view of the selected patch area with the field-of-view corresponding to a selected scale of 0.65, 1.3,

  14. A Digital Array Radar with a Hierarchical System Architecture Caleb Fulton, Patrick Clough, Vijay Pai, and William Chappell

    E-print Network

    A Digital Array Radar with a Hierarchical System Architecture Caleb Fulton, Patrick Clough, Vijay -- A digital array radar system prototype is pre sented that makes use of a hierarchical digital backend for future radars that fully embrace the concept of lowcost inte gration in a panelized platform

  15. An experimental 0.2 THz stepped frequency radar system for the target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Bangze; Liang, Meiyan; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhao, Yuejin

    2012-12-01

    Compared with traditional microwave and millimeter wave radars, Terahertz radar has wide signal bandwidth and a very narrow antenna beam, which is beneficial to the realization of high resolution imaging. And as an instantaneous narrowband and synthetic wideband waveform, stepped frequency radar signal has been widely exploited in many applications, since it allows high range resolution with modest requirements of the system bandwidth. As an instantaneous narrowband and synthetic wideband waveform, stepped frequency radar signal has been widely exploited in many applications, since it allows high range resolution with modest requirements of the system bandwidth. This paper presents the design of a 0.2THz stepped frequency imaging radar system with operating bandwidth of 12 GHz, thus, a theoretical range resolution below 1.25 cm. The simulation of the system is implemented by using system design parameters. An experimental trial has been performed, and one-dimensional range profile of the stationary target is obtained by Imaging Experiment using THz radar. Results show that the THz radar imaging system could achieve the target detection and centimeter-level range resolution.

  16. A system for the real-time display of radar and video images of targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, W. W.; Burnside, W. D.

    1990-01-01

    Described here is a software and hardware system for the real-time display of radar and video images for use in a measurement range. The main purpose is to give the reader a clear idea of the software and hardware design and its functions. This system is designed around a Tektronix XD88-30 graphics workstation, used to display radar images superimposed on video images of the actual target. The system's purpose is to provide a platform for tha analysis and documentation of radar images and their associated targets in a menu-driven, user oriented environment.

  17. Hardware implementation of a high-performance programmable digital processing system for radar proximity fuze

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Di Wu; Zhang'e Ma; Xiutan Wang; Hainan Diao

    2001-01-01

    A new type of digital processing system for a radar proximity fuze is described. By utilizing high-speed real-time digital signal processing devices and a special FFT processor, a high-performance system has been developed which provides digital signal processing for a radar proximity fuze. Reasonable overall architecture and programmable processors used in this system notably improve its programmability and scalability. This

  18. Performance of the NASA Airborne Radar with the Windshear Database for Forward-Looking Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, George F.; Britt, Charles L.

    1996-01-01

    This document describes the simulation approach used to test the performance of the NASA airborne windshear radar. An explanation of the actual radar hardware and processing algorithms provides an understanding of the parameters used in the simulation program. This report also contains a brief overview of the NASA airborne windshear radar experimental flight test results. A description of the radar simulation program shows the capabilities of the program and the techniques used for certification evaluation. Simulation of the NASA radar is comprised of three steps. First, the choice of the ground clutter data must be made. The ground clutter is the return from objects in or nearby an airport facility. The choice of the ground clutter also dictates the aircraft flight path since ground clutter is gathered while in flight. The second step is the choice of the radar parameters and the running of the simulation program which properly combines the ground clutter data with simulated windshear weather data. The simulated windshear weather data is comprised of a number of Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS) model results. The final step is the comparison of the radar simulation results to the known windshear data base. The final evaluation of the radar simulation is based on the ability to detect hazardous windshear with the aircraft at a safe distance while at the same time not displaying false alerts.

  19. Radar based Ground Level Reconstruction Utilizing a Hypocycloid Antenna Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Christoph; Musch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution we introduce a novel radar positioning system. It makes use of a mathematical curve, called hypocycloid, for a slanting movement of the radar antenna. By means of a planetary gear, a ball, and a universal joint as well as a stepping motor, a two dimensional positioning is provided by a uniaxial drive shaft exclusively. The fundamental position calculation and different signal processing algorithms are presented. By means of an 80 GHz FMCW radar system we performed several measurements on objects with discrete heights as well as on objects with continuous surfaces. The results of these investigations are essential part of this contribution and are discussed in detail.

  20. Measurement of lake ice thickness with a short-pulse radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; Mueller, R. A.; Schertler, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of lake ice thickness were made during March 1975 at the Straits of Mackinac by using a short-pulse radar system aboard an all-terrain vehicle. These measurements were compared with ice thicknesses determined with an auger. Over 25 sites were explored which had ice thicknesses in the range 29 to 60 cm. The maximum difference between radar and auger measurements was less than 9.8 percent. The magnitude of the error was less than + or - 3.5 cm. The NASA operating short-pulse radar system used in monitoring lake ice thickness from an aircraft is also described.

  1. The RADAR Test Methodology: Evaluating a Multi-Task Machine Learning System with Humans in the Loop

    E-print Network

    The RADAR Test Methodology: Evaluating a Multi-Task Machine Learning System with Humans in the Loop-HCII-06-102 Abstract The RADAR project involves a collection of machine learning research thrusts the impact of learning when used by a human user. Three conditions (conventional tools, Radar without

  2. Ionospheric and auroral clutter models for HF surface wave and over-the-horizon radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravan, M.; Riddolls, R. J.; Adve, R. S.

    2012-01-01

    The detection performance of high frequency surface wave radar (HFSWR) and high frequency over-the-horizon radar (OTHR) systems is heavily influenced by the presence of radar clutter. In HFSWR systems, the clutter has its origins in vertical-incidence ionospheric reflections, whereas in OTHR systems, the origin is Bragg backscatter from plasma structures in the auroral zone. This paper models the spreading of the radar clutter signal in the Doppler and angle-of-arrival domains that arises from forward-scattering effects as the radar pulse propagates through regions of ionospheric plasma irregularities. The models use a geometric optics approach to determine the power spectrum of the radar signal phase. This power spectrum is then used to simulate three-dimensional space-time-range radar data cubes. The accuracy of the models is tested by comparing the simulated data to measured data cubes. As an application, the data are then used to evaluate the performance of the newly developed fast fully adaptive (FFA) space-time adaptive processing (STAP) scheme to improve the extraction of target echoes from a clutter background.

  3. Guided radar system for arc detection: Initial results at DIIID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, S. M.; Maggiora, R.; Goulding, R. H.; Moore, J. A.; Pinsker, R. I.; Nagy, A.

    2014-02-01

    A guided radar arc detection and localization system has been designed, fabricated, installed in the feed line to one of the resonant loops on the 285/300 FW antenna, and successfully tested during vacuum conditioning. The system injects a train of binary phase-modulated pulses at a carrier frequency of 25 MHz up-shifted to around 450MHz into the main high power transmission line connected to the antenna through a septate coupler and a circulator. The pulses are reflected by arcs, and the time delay provides the distance to the arc. The reflected signals are analyzed in real time, with a time response sufficient to provide active arc detection as well as localization. RF pulses have been injected into the antenna at a power level of up to 650kW. The arc location was varied by either puffing gas into the vacuum vessel, in which case arcs always occurred in the antenna, or injecting RF without a gas puff, in which case the arcs almost always occurred in the transmission line feeding the antenna. The localization obtained during these initial tests had a relatively low resolution of about 2 m, but arcs occurring inside or outside the antenna could clearly be differentiated and corresponded with the expected location. The septate coupler proved fully compatible with the antenna feed and matching network and improved performance significantly in comparison to the use of directional couplers.

  4. Quasi-orthogonal wideband radar waveforms based on chaotic systems

    E-print Network

    Willsey, Matt (Matt S.)

    2007-01-01

    With the development of A/D converters possessing sufficiently high sampling rates, it is now feasible to use arbitrary, wideband waveforms in radar applications. Large sets of quasi-orthogonal, wideband waveforms can be ...

  5. 77 FR 48097 - Operation of Radar Systems in the 76-77 GHz Band

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ...airport service vehicles and taxiways and to improve debris detection on the runways...sensors used as vehicle radar systems and...foreign object debris detection on runways and for...well as service vehicles on taxiways...

  6. Comparisons between Canadian prairie MF radars, FPI (green and OH lines) and UARS HRDI systems

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Studies, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 5E2 2 Space Physics Research Lab., University related to the in¯uence of gravity waves (GW) upon the optical and radar systems, each of which have

  7. Earth resources shuttle imaging radar. [systems analysis and design analysis of pulse radar for earth resources information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A report is presented on a preliminary design of a Synthetic Array Radar (SAR) intended for experimental use with the space shuttle program. The radar is called Earth Resources Shuttle Imaging Radar (ERSIR). Its primary purpose is to determine the usefulness of SAR in monitoring and managing earth resources. The design of the ERSIR, along with tradeoffs made during its evolution is discussed. The ERSIR consists of a flight sensor for collecting the raw radar data and a ground sensor used both for reducing these radar data to images and for extracting earth resources information from the data. The flight sensor consists of two high powered coherent, pulse radars, one that operates at L and the other at X-band. Radar data, recorded on tape can be either transmitted via a digital data link to a ground terminal or the tape can be delivered to the ground station after the shuttle lands. A description of data processing equipment and display devices is given.

  8. The MU radar with an active phased array system 1. Antenna and power amplifiers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shoichiro Fukao; Toru Sato; Toshitaka Tsuda; Susumu Kato; Koichiro Wakasugi; Tsuneichi Makihira

    1985-01-01

    The MU (middle and upper atmosphere) radar of Japan is a 46.5-MHz pulse-modulated monostatic Doppler radar with an active phased array system. The nominal beam width is 3.6 ø and the peak radiation power is 1 MW with maximum average power of 50 kW. The system is composed of 475 crossed three-subelement yagi antennas and an equivalent number of solid

  9. S-band radar calibration test of the Lightning Detection and Ranging system (LDAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poehler, H. A.

    1978-01-01

    A calibration and an accuracy assessment of the Lightning Detection and Ranging System (LDAR) were attempted through a simultaneous track of an S Band radar transponder and a lightning simulator carried by the NASA 6 airplane on a test flight. Included in the report are the results of the calibration test, error analyses of the radar, and the LDAR systems, and recommendations for future calibration tests.

  10. RADAR: An In-Building RF-based User Location and Tracking System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paramvir Bahl; Venkata N. Padmanabhan

    2000-01-01

    The proliferation of mobile computing devices and local-area wireless networks has fostered a growing interest in location-aware systems and services. In this paper we present RADAR, a radio-frequency (RF) based system for locating and tracking users inside buildings. RADAR operates by recording and processing signal strength information at multiple base stations positioned to provide overlapping coverage in the area of

  11. Radar, satellite, and lightning characteristics of select mesoscale convective systems in Texas

    E-print Network

    Toracinta, Ernest Richard

    1995-01-01

    RADAR, SATELLITE, AND LIGHTNING CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECT MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS IN TEXAS A Thesis by ERNEST RICHARD TORACINTA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1995 Major Subject: Meteorology RADAR, SATELLITE, AND LIGHTNING CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECT MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS IN TEXAS A Thesis by ERNEST RICHARD TORACINTA Submitted to Texas A...

  12. The development of two-dimensional target images from ultrawideband radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Donald L.; Steinberg, Bernard D.

    1992-05-01

    The development of ultrawideband radar systems has led to the production of echo waveforms with high resolution in range. The Valley Forge Research Center has studied the problem of extending this capability by adding the angular dimension to produce a 2-D image of the radar target. The system currently in use combines adaptive beamforming (ABF) phased array processing with a UWB radar to provide high resolution images of a variety of target configurations. The images were produced using the dominant scatterer ABF algorithm developed at VFRC over the past two decades. The tests were conducted at three frequencies (S, X and Ku bands) in order to allow diversity techniques to enhance the image quality. The formation of a monostatic synthetic aperture array with a 1 GHz bandwidth radar set allows the system to achieve a resolution of 15 cm. This permits fine detail to be observed on images of targets such as cars and trucks. Several examples are presented.

  13. Active noise suppression in phased-array radars using an antijamming optical beam-forming system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbyfill, Michael E.; Rudd, Mark A.; Mack, J. L.; Walge, Ernst K.; Lutsko, Jeffrey M.; Andrews, Harold G., II; Berinato, Robert J.; Zari, Michael C.; Budge, Mervin C.; Williams, Kyle W.

    1995-06-01

    We present the continuing development of an anti-jamming optical beamformer (AJOB) at Rome Laboratory's Photonics Division. Developments include live radar tests and new system designs. The purpose of the AJOB system is the cancellation of multipath jamming interference in advanced surveillance radars. AJOB is a multichannel adaptive optical system which performs cancellation of multiple wideband (10 MHz) interference sources in the presence of multipath. The live radar test consisted of using a downconverted 80 MHz received signal from the main and subarrays of a C-band radar to correlate jamming signals produced by stationary jammers. The correlation parameters fed a tapped delay line filter to form an estimate of the noise, which was subtracted from the main antenna signal. For the scenarios tested, the long integration time for the correlation data provided accurate estimates of the jammer delays, and therefore single-step convergence was achieved.

  14. FMCW radar for the sense function of sense and avoid systems onboard UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itcia, Eric; Wasselin, Jean-Philippe; Mazuel, Sébastien; Otten, Matern; Huizing, Albert

    2013-10-01

    Rockwell Collins France (RCF) radar department is currently developing, in close collaboration with TNO in The Hague, The Netherlands, a Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar sensor dedicated to Obstacle Warning function and potentially to air traffic detection. The sensor combines flood light illumination and digital beam forming to accommodate demanding detection and coverage requirements. Performances have been evaluated in flight tests and results prove that such a radar sensor is a good candidate for the Sense Function of Sense and Avoid Systems onboard UAV.

  15. Sea Clutter Reduction and Target Enhancement by Neural Networks in a Marine Radar System

    PubMed Central

    Vicen-Bueno, Raúl; Carrasco-Álvarez, Rubén; Rosa-Zurera, Manuel; Nieto-Borge, José Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The presence of sea clutter in marine radar signals is sometimes not desired. So, efficient radar signal processing techniques are needed to reduce it. In this way, nonlinear signal processing techniques based on neural networks (NNs) are used in the proposed clutter reduction system. The developed experiments show promising results characterized by different subjective (visual analysis of the processed radar images) and objective (clutter reduction, target enhancement and signal-to-clutter ratio improvement) criteria. Moreover, a deep study of the NN structure is done, where the low computational cost and the high processing speed of the proposed NN structure are emphasized. PMID:22573993

  16. Dual-Frequency Airborne Scanning Rain Radar Antenna System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Ziad A.; Green, Ken

    2004-01-01

    A compact, dual-frequency, dual-polarization, wide-angle-scanning antenna system has been developed as part of an airborne instrument for measuring rainfall. This system is an upgraded version of a prior single-frequency airborne rain radar antenna system and was designed to satisfy stringent requirements. One particularly stringent combination of requirements is to generate two dual-polarization (horizontal and vertical polarizations) beams at both frequencies (13.405 and 35.605 GHz) in such a way that the beams radiated from the antenna point in the same direction, have 3-dB angular widths that match within 25 percent, and have low sidelobe levels over a wide scan angle at each polarization-and-frequency combination. In addition, the system is required to exhibit low voltage standing-wave ratios at both frequencies. The system (see figure) includes a flat elliptical scanning reflector and a stationary offset paraboloidal reflector illuminated by a common-aperture feed system that comprises a corrugated horn with four input ports one port for each of the four frequency-and-polarization combinations. The feed horn is designed to simultaneously (1) under-illuminate the reflectors 35.605 GHz and (2) illuminate the reflectors with a 15-dB edge taper at 13.405 GHz. The scanning mirror is rotated in azimuth to scan the antenna beam over an angular range of 20 in the cross-track direction for wide swath coverage, and in elevation to compensate for the motion of the aircraft. The design of common-aperture feed horn makes it possible to obtain the required absolute gain and low side-lobe levels in wide-angle beam scanning. The combination of the common-aperture feed horn with the small (0.3) focal-length-to-diameter ratio of the paraboloidal reflector makes it possible for the overall system to be compact enough that it can be mounted on a DC-8 airplane.

  17. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  18. New Cloud Science from the New ARM Cloud Radar Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiscombe, W. J.

    2010-12-01

    The DOE ARM Program is deploying over $30M worth of scanning polarimetric Doppler radars at its four fixed and two mobile sites, with the object of advancing cloud lifecycle science, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interaction science, by a quantum leap. As of 2011, there will be 13 scanning radar systems to complement its existing array of profiling cloud radars: C-band for precipitation, X-band for drizzle and precipitation, and two-frequency radars for cloud droplets and drizzle. This will make ARM the world’s largest science user of, and largest provider of data from, ground-based cloud radars. The philosophy behind this leap is actually quite simple, to wit: dimensionality really does matter. Just as 2D turbulence is fundamentally different from 3D turbulence, so observing clouds only at zenith provides a dimensionally starved, and sometimes misleading, picture of real clouds. In particular, the zenith view can say little or nothing about cloud lifecycle and the second indirect effect, nor about aerosol-precipitation interactions. It is not even particularly good at retrieving the cloud fraction (no matter how that slippery quantity is defined). This talk will review the history that led to this development and then discuss the aspirations for how this will propel cloud-aerosol-precipitation science forward. The step by step plan for translating raw radar data into information that is useful to cloud and aerosol scientists and climate modelers will be laid out, with examples from ARM’s recent scanning cloud radar deployments in the Azores and Oklahoma . In the end, the new systems should allow cloud systems to be understood as 4D coherent entities rather than dimensionally crippled 2D or 3D entities such as observed by satellites and zenith-pointing radars.

  19. Space shuttle Ku-band integrated rendezvous radar/communications system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of work performed on the Space Shuttle Ku-Band Integrated Rendezvous Radar/Communications System Study. The recommendations and conclusions are included as well as the details explaining the results. The requirements upon which the study was based are presented along with the predicted performance of the recommended system configuration. In addition, shuttle orbiter vehicle constraints (e.g., size, weight, power, stowage space) are discussed. The tradeoffs considered and the operation of the recommended configuration are described for an optimized, integrated Ku-band radar/communications system. Basic system tradeoffs, communication design, radar design, antenna tradeoffs, antenna gimbal and drive design, antenna servo design, and deployed assembly packaging design are discussed. The communications and radar performance analyses necessary to support the system design effort are presented. Detailed derivations of the communications thermal noise error, the radar range, range rate, and angle tracking errors, and the communications transmitter distortion parameter effect on crosstalk between the unbalanced quadriphase signals are included.

  20. Acquisition and use of Orlando, Florida and Continental Airbus radar flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eide, Michael C.; Mathews, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse is developing a lookdown pulse Doppler radar for production as the sensor and processor of a forward looking hazardous windshear detection and avoidance system. A data collection prototype of that product was ready for flight testing in Orlando to encounter low level windshear in corroboration with the FAA-Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR). Airborne real-time processing and display of the hazard factor were demonstrated with TDWR facilitated intercepts and penetrations of over 80 microbursts in a three day period, including microbursts with hazard factors in excess of .16 (with 500 ft. PIREP altitude loss) and the hazard factor display at 6 n.mi. of a visually transparent ('dry') microburst with TDWR corroborated outflow reflectivities of +5 dBz. Range gated Doppler spectrum data was recorded for subsequent development and refinement of hazard factor detection and urban clutter rejection algorithms. Following Orlando, the data collection radar was supplemental type certified for in revenue service on a Continental Airlines Airbus in an automatic and non-interferring basis with its ARINC 708 radar to allow Westinghouse to confirm its understanding of commercial aircraft installation, interface realities, and urban airport clutter. A number of software upgrades, all of which were verified at the Receiver-Transmitter-Processor (RTP) hardware bench with Orlando microburst data to produce desired advanced warning hazard factor detection, included some preliminary loads with automatic (sliding window average hazard factor) detection and annunciation recording. The current (14-APR-92) configured software is free from false and/or nuisance alerts (CAUTIONS, WARNINGS, etc.) for all take-off and landing approaches, under 2500 ft. altitude to weight-on-wheels, into all encountered airports, including Newark (NJ), LAX, Denver, Houston, Cleveland, etc. Using the Orlando data collected on hazardous microbursts, Westinghouse has developed a lookdown pulse Doppler radar product with signal and data processing algorithms which detect realistic microburst hazards and has demonstrated those algorithms produce no false alerts (or nuisance alerts) in urban airport ground moving vehicle (GMTI) and/or clutter environments.

  1. A Ground Penetrating Radar Experiment along the Warm Springs Valley Fault System, Western Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Depolo; M. L. O'Neal

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey of several fault traces from the Warm Springs Valley fault system in western Nevada. Several trenches have been excavated along the southern part of the fault system, in an ideal setting to experiment with GPR. Our survey was conducted with a pulseEKKO 100 GPR system, using a 1000v transmitter, at an antenna

  2. Performance of a digital signal processor with impulse noise suppression (meteor radar detection system appl.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. S. L. Keay; J. E. Butler; J. A. Kennewell

    1976-01-01

    Scanning systems which produce records of electromagnetic input signals are usually subject to random impulse interference which may seriously degrade the records. An impulse noise suppressor employing digital techniques has been developed which has general applicability to such systems and which has been employed with success in a meteor radar installation and a thermal infrared scanning system. The results of

  3. Calibration considerations in a large bistatic angle airborne radar system for ground clutter measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Anthony; F. Stremler; M. Wicks

    1988-01-01

    Calibration considerations and the performance analysis of an L-band airborne clutter measurement system are discussed. The measurement system is designed to collect simultaneous bistatic and monostatic clutter measurements in support of the hybrid bistatic radar (HBR) system. The analysis techniques used to define the experiment geometry and resulting resolution cells, calibration considerations, and the impact on the ability to determine

  4. Future Trends in Automotive Radar \\/ Imaging Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Wenger

    1998-01-01

    There is a growing interest of car manufacturers in sensors monitoring the car's surrounding area in order to improve safety systems from mere crash survival to crash prediction or prevention by early detection of hazardous situations. Therefore radar sensors have been intensively investigated for many years. A large variety of radar based vehicular sensors have been developed. Narrow-beam radars are

  5. Impulse radar imaging system for concealed object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podd, F. J. W.; David, M.; Iqbal, G.; Hussain, F.; Morris, D.; Osakue, E.; Yeow, Y.; Zahir, S.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Electromagnetic systems for imaging concealed objects at checkpoints typically employ radiation at millimetre and terahertz frequencies. These systems have been shown to be effective and provide a sufficiently high resolution image. However there are difficulties and current electromagnetic systems have limitations particularly in accurately differentiating between threat and innocuous objects based on shape, surface emissivity or reflectivity, which are indicative parameters. In addition, water has a high absorption coefficient at millimetre wavelength and terahertz frequencies, which makes it more difficult for these frequencies to image through thick damp clothing. This paper considers the potential of using ultra wideband (UWB) in the low gigahertz range. The application of this frequency band to security screening appears to be a relatively new field. The business case for implementing the UWB system has been made financially viable by the recent availability of low-cost integrated circuits operating at these frequencies. Although designed for the communication sector, these devices can perform the required UWB radar measurements as well. This paper reports the implementation of a 2 to 5 GHz bandwidth linear array scanner. The paper describes the design and fabrication of transmitter and receiver antenna arrays whose individual elements are a type of antipodal Vivaldi antenna. The antenna's frequency and angular response were simulated in CST Microwave Studio and compared with laboratory measurements. The data pre-processing methods of background subtraction and deconvolution are implemented to improve the image quality. The background subtraction method uses a reference dataset to remove antenna crosstalk and room reflections from the dataset. The deconvolution method uses a Wiener filter to "sharpen" the returned echoes which improves the resolution of the reconstructed image. The filter uses an impulse response reference dataset and a signal-to-noise parameter to determine how the frequencies contained in the echo dataset are normalised. The chosen image reconstruction algorithm is based on the back-projection method. The algorithm was implemented in MATLAB and uses a pre-calculated sensitivity matrix to increase the computation speed. The results include both 2D and 3D image datasets. The 3D datasets were obtained by scanning the dual sixteen element linear antenna array over the test object. The system has been tested on both humans and mannequin test objects. The front surface of an object placed on the human/mannequin torso is clearly visible, but its presence is also seen from a tell-tale imaging characteristic. This characteristic is caused by a reduction in the wave velocity as the electromagnetic radiation passes through the object, and manifests as an indentation in the reconstructed image that is readily identifiable. The prototype system has been shown to easily detect a 12 mm x 30 mm x70 mm plastic object concealed under clothing.

  6. Radar electronic warfare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, August, Jr.

    An overview of radar and electronic warfare is given. Definitions, common terms, and principles of radar and electronic warfare, and simple analyses of interactions between radar systems and electronic countermeasures (ECM) are presented. Electronic counter-countermeasure and electronic support measures are discussed. Background material in mathematics, electromagnetics, and probability necessary for an understanding of radar and electronic warfare is given and radar tracking models are examined. The effects of various ECM emissions on radar systems are analyzed, including discussion of active ECM and angle scanning systems, angle measurement in monopulse, and automatic gain control.

  7. Automotive radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohling, Hermann

    2004-07-01

    Radar networks for automtovie short-range applications (up to 30m) based on powerful but inexpensive 24GHz high range resolution pulse or FMCW radar systems have been developed at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg. The described system has been integrated in to an experimental vehicle and tested in real street environment. This paper considers the general network design, the individual pulse or FMCW radar sensors, the network signal processing scheme, the tracking procedure and possible automotive applications, respectively. Object position estimation is accomplished by the very precise range measurement of each individual sensor and additional trilateration procedures. The paper concludes with some results obtained in realistic traffic conditions with multiple target situations using 24 GHz radar network.

  8. MIMO radar, SIMO radar, and IFIR radar: a P. P. Vaidyanathan and Piya Pal

    E-print Network

    Vaidyanathan, P. P.

    MIMO radar, SIMO radar, and IFIR radar: a comparison P. P. Vaidyanathan and Piya Pal Dept and SIMO radar systems for the case where the transmitter and receiver are collocated. The simplicity of the application allows one to see clearly where the advantages of MIMO radar come from, and what the tradeoffs are

  9. Weather Radar and Instrumentation: Laboratory Modules

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These 16 radar education modules, developed for the Weather Radar and Instrumentation Curriculum at the University of Oklahoma, provide hands-on instruction for beginning, intermediate, or advanced students to learn about radar systems, especially weather radar. Topics include hardware, weather radar, adaptive systems, advanced hydrometeors, applications of weather radar, and atmospheric interpretations. The modules may be downloaded.

  10. On the Use of Low-Cost Radar Networks for Collision Warning Systems Aboard Dumpers

    PubMed Central

    González-Partida, José-Tomás; León-Infante, Francisco; Blázquez-García, Rodrigo; Burgos-García, Mateo

    2014-01-01

    The use of dumpers is one of the main causes of accidents in construction sites, many of them with fatal consequences. These kinds of work machines have many blind angles that complicate the driving task due to their large size and volume. To guarantee safety conditions is necessary to use automatic aid systems that can detect and locate the different objects and people in a work area. One promising solution is a radar network based on low-cost radar transceivers aboard the dumper. The complete system is specified to operate with a very low false alarm rate to avoid unnecessary stops of the dumper that reduce its productivity. The main sources of false alarm are the heavy ground clutter, and the interferences between the radars of the network. This article analyses the clutter for LFM signaling and proposes the use of Offset Linear Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (OLFM-CW) as radar signal. This kind of waveform can be optimized to reject clutter and self-interferences. Jointly, a data fusion chain could be used to reduce the false alarm rate of the complete radar network. A real experiment is shown to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed system. PMID:24577521

  11. Radar-Derived Shape Model of Near-Earth Binary Asteroid System (285263) 1998 QE2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springmann, Alessondra; Taylor, Patrick A.; Nolan, Michael C.; Howell, Ellen S.; Brozovi?, Marina; Benner, Lance A.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Busch, Michael W.; Margot, Jean-Luc; Lee, Clement; Jao, Joseph S.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2014-11-01

    We report on shape modeling of binary asteroid 1998 QE2, a 3.2-km asteroid with a 800-m moon. We observed this asteroid with both Arecibo Observatory planetary radar (2380 MHz, 12.6 cm) and Goldstone Solar System Radar (8560 MHz, 3.5 cm) between May 31-Jun 9, 2013. The close approach on May 31, 2013 (0.039 au) presented an outstanding opportunity for radar delay-Doppler imaging with resolutions as fine as 7.5 m of both objects. The extensive radar dataset was used for shape modeling of both components. Our SHAPE 3D modeling software (Hudson, 1993 and Magri et al., 2007) uses a constrained, weighted least-squares minimization procedure to invert radar delay-Doppler images.The rotation rate of the primary, 4.749 ± 0.002 h, was well constrained from optical lightcurves (P. Pravec, pers. comm.) and rotates prograde as determined from radar data. The primary is roughly spheroidal, showing prominent concavities and surface features, with effective diameter 3.2 ± 0.3 km.The secondary is irregularly shaped, with an effective diameter of 800 ± 80 m and significant elongation. The radar data suggest it is tidally locked, with an orbital period of 31.31 ± 0.01 h hours and a semi-major orbital axis of 6.2 ± 0.1 km. The orbit is approximately circular (e < 0.01), which is typical of most near-Earth asteroid binary system orbits. We estimate a preliminary density for the primary of 0.7 ± 0.2 g/cm^3. The low density is consistent with a "rubble pile" structure.

  12. Support of imaging radar for the shuttle system and subsystem definition study, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An orbital microwave imaging radar system suggested for use in conjunction with the space shuttle is presented. Several applications of the system are described, including agriculture, meteorology, terrain analysis, various types of mapping, petroleum and mineral exploration, oil spill detection and sea and lake ice monitoring. The design criteria, which are based on the requirements of the above applications, are discussed.

  13. Capability of patch antennas in a portable harmonic radar system to track insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring technologies are needed to track insects and gain a better understanding of their behavior, population, migration and movement. A portable microwave harmonic-radar tracking system that utilizes antenna miniaturization techniques was investigated to achieve this goal. The system mainly con...

  14. Radar velocity-measuring system design and computation algorithm based on ARM processor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi Zeng; Jianmin Xu; Deng Peng

    2010-01-01

    The real-time monitoring of vehicles velocity has become essential for traffic safety. Therefore, in order to improve the method of monitoring the velocity of vehicles on road, this paper has designed a new radar velocity-measuring system which is based on ARM processor. This system is based on Doppler principle and spectral estimation algorithm, in its hardware design part, and it

  15. Development of an Ultra-Wideband Radar System for Vehicle Detection at Railway Crossings

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    Development of an Ultra-Wideband Radar System for Vehicle Detection at Railway Crossings Stephen P in a railway crossing. Once fully developed, the detection performance of the system is to be compared against the loop the impedance changes and this change is sensed. Most railways companies prefer not to use buried

  16. Space Shuttle thermal protection system inspection by 3D imaging laser radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James C. Lamoreux; James D. Siekierski; J. P. N. Carter

    2004-01-01

    NASA has developed a sensor suite to inspect the Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System while the Shuttle is flying in orbit. When the Space Shuttle returns to flight, it will carry a 3D Imaging Laser Radar as part of the sensor suite to observe the Thermal Protection System and indicate any damages that may need to be repaired before return

  17. Primary propulsion of electrothermal, ion and chemical systems for space-based radar orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Staiger, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An orbit transfer mission concept has been studied for a Space-Based Radar (SBR) where 40 kW required for radar operation is assumed available for orbit transfer propulsion. Arcjet, pulsed electrothermal (PET), ion, and storable chemical systems are considered for the primary propulsion. Transferring two SBR per shuttle flight to 1112 km/60 deg using electrical propulsion systems offers an increased payload at the expense of increased trip time, up to 2000 kg each, which may be critical for survivability. Trade offs between payload mass, transfer time, launch site, inclination, and height of parking orbits are presented.

  18. Primary propulsion of electrothermal, ion, and chemical systems for space-based radar orbit transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S.-Y.; Staiger, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An orbit transfer mission concept has been studied for a Space-Based Radar (SBR) where 40 kW required for radar operation is assumed available for orbit transfer propulsion. Arcjet, pulsed electrothermal (PET), ion, and storable chemical systems are considered for the primary propulsion. Transferring two SBR per shuttle flight to 1112 km/60 deg using eiectrical propulsion systems offers an increased payload at the expense of increased trip time, up to 2000 kg each, which may be critical for survivability. Trade offs between payload mass, transfer time, launch site, inclination, and height of parking orbits are presented.

  19. SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar). Earth observing system. Volume 2F: Instrument panel report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The scientific and engineering requirements for the Earth Observing System (EOS) imaging radar are provided. The radar is based on Shuttle Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C), and would include three frequencies: 1.25 GHz, 5.3 GHz, and 9.6 GHz; selectable polarizations for both transmit and receive channels; and selectable incidence angles from 15 to 55 deg. There would be three main viewing modes: a local high-resolution mode with typically 25 m resolution and 50 km swath width; a regional mapping mode with 100 m resolution and up to 200 km swath width; and a global mapping mode with typically 500 m resolution and up to 700 km swath width. The last mode allows global coverage in three days. The EOS SAR will be the first orbital imaging radar to provide multifrequency, multipolarization, multiple incidence angle observations of the entire Earth. Combined with Canadian and Japanese satellites, continuous radar observation capability will be possible. Major applications in the areas of glaciology, hydrology, vegetation science, oceanography, geology, and data and information systems are described.

  20. Digital multi-channel high resolution phase locked loop for surveillance radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, Mohamed; Shaaban, Shawky; Abou-El-Nadar, Usama M.; Hafez, Alaa El-Din Sayed

    This paper present a multi-channel, high resolution, fast lock phase locked loop (PLL) for surveillance radar applications. Phase detector based PLLs are simple to design, suffer no systematic phase error, and can run at the highest speed. Reducing loop gain can proportionally improve jitter performance, but also reduces locking time and pull-in range. The proposed system is based on digital process and control the error signal to the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) adaptively to control its gain in order to achieve fast lock times while improving in lock jitter performance. Under certain circumstances the design also improves the frequency agility capability of the radar system. The results show a fast lock, high resolution PLL with transient time less than 10 µ sec which is suitable to radar applications.

  1. MMIC technology for microwave radar and communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naster, R. J.

    1983-02-01

    Technologies for constructing monolithic microwave ICs (MMIC) are described, along with the market needs driving their development. Direct broadcast satellites (DBS), beamforming radars, and communications satellites all require MMICs to meet performance criteria and weight and cost constraints. MMICs are currently manufactured from bulk Si, with bipolar transistors, SOS, and As, the highest performance chips thus far realized. The operating characteristics of MMICs include self-contained cascadable building blocks with multiple transistor structures such as Darlington pairs to reduce functional variations. Further descriptions are presented of SOS MMIC amplifiers, MMIC compatible switches, and device design cost considerations at frequencies below 3 GHz.

  2. Vertical profiles of radar reflectivity of convective cells in tropical and mid-latitude mesoscale convective systems

    E-print Network

    Lutz, Kurt Reed

    1992-01-01

    in Tropical and Mid-latitude Mesoscale Convective Systems. (December 1992) Kurt Reed Lutz, B. S. , Central Michigan University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Edward J. Zipser This study uses ref lectivity data from Doppler radars to construct vertical... VITA 107 109 113 LIST OF TABLES Table Page I Radar characteristics of the CP-3 and CP-4 Doppler radars as used in PRE-STORM and the NOAA/TOGA Doppler radar at Darwin, Australia . 2 Examples of the effect of range on the vertical resolution...

  3. Considerations for a Radar System to Detect an Ocean Underneath the Icy Shell of Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Thorsten; Gogineni, Prasad; Green, James; Cooper, John; Fung, Shing; Taylor, William; Benson, Robert; Reinisch, Bodo; Song, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The detection of an ocean underneath Europa is one of the primary objectives of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission. An orbiting surface penetrating radar has the potential of providing that measurement thus yielding information regarding the possibility of life support on Europa. Radars in the MHz range have successfully monitored the kilometer-deep ice shelves of Greenland and Antarctica, including the detection of Lake Vostok (and others) below an ice sheet thickness of about 4 km. The performance of a radar system orbiting Europa will be subject to several potential complications and unknowns. Besides ionospheric dispersion and the actual depth of the ocean, which is estimated between 2 and 30 km, major unknowns affecting radar performance are the temperature profile, the amount of salt and other impurities within the ice crust as well as the surface roughness. These impurities can in part be produced at the highly irradiated surface by magnetospheric interactions and transported downward into the ice crust by geologic processes. The ionospheric interference must also be modeled from effects of these interactions on production of the thin neutral atmosphere and subsequent ionization of the neutrals. We investigated these uncertainties through radar simulations using different surface and ice characteristics over a frequency range from 10 to 50 MHz. The talk will present results from these simulations discussing potential limitations.

  4. Validation of the radiation pattern of the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renkwitz, T.; Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Stober, G.; Rapp, M.

    2012-09-01

    In 2009/2010 the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) installed a new powerful VHF radar on the island Andøya in Northern Norway (69.30° N, 16.04° E). The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) allows studies with high spatial and temporal resolution in the troposphere/lower stratosphere and in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere of the Arctic atmosphere. The monostatic radar is operated at 53.5 MHz with an active phased array antenna consisting of 433 Yagi antennas. Each individual antenna is connected to its own transceiver with independent phase control and a scalable power output of up to 2 kW, which implies high flexibility of beam forming and beam steering. During the design phase of MAARSY several model studies have been carried out in order to estimate the radiation pattern for various combinations of beam forming and steering. However, parameters like mutual coupling, active impedance and ground parameters have an impact on the radiation pattern, but can hardly be measured. Hence, experiments need to be designed to verify the model results. For this purpose, the radar has occasionally been used in passive mode, monitoring the noise power received from both distinct cosmic noise sources like e.g. Cassiopeia A and Cygnus A, and the diffuse cosmic background noise. The analysis of the collected dataset enables us to verify beam forming and steering attempts. These results document the current status of the radar during its development and provide valuable information for further improvement.

  5. Assessment of Human Respiration Patterns via Noncontact Sensing Using Doppler Multi-Radar System.

    PubMed

    Gu, Changzhan; Li, Changzhi

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory patterns at chest and abdomen are associated with both physical and emotional states. Accurate measurement of the respiratory patterns provides an approach to assess and analyze the physical and emotional states of the subject persons. Not many research efforts have been made to wirelessly assess different respiration patterns, largely due to the inaccuracy of the conventional continuous-wave radar sensor to track the original signal pattern of slow respiratory movements. This paper presents the accurate assessment of different respiratory patterns based on noncontact Doppler radar sensing. This paper evaluates the feasibility of accurately monitoring different human respiration patterns via noncontact radar sensing. A 2.4 GHz DC coupled multi-radar system was used for accurate measurement of the complete respiration patterns without any signal distortion. Experiments were carried out in the lab environment to measure the different respiration patterns when the subject person performed natural breathing, chest breathing and diaphragmatic breathing. The experimental results showed that accurate assessment of different respiration patterns is feasible using the proposed noncontact radar sensing technique. PMID:25785310

  6. Design of integrated ship monitoring system using SAR, RADAR, and AIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chan-Su; Kim, Tae-Ho; Hong, Danbee; Ahn, Hyung-Wook

    2013-06-01

    When we talk about for the ship detection, identification and its classification, we need to go for the wide area of monitoring and it may be possible only through satellite based monitoring approach which monitors and covers coastal as well as the oceanic zone. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been widely used to detect targets of interest with the advantage of the operating capability in all weather and luminance free condition (Margarit and Tabasco, 2011). In EU waters, EMSA(European Maritime Safety Agency) is operating the SafeSeaNet and CleanSeaNet systems which provide the current positions of all ships and oil spill monitoring information in and around EU waters in a single picture to Member States using AIS, LRIT and SAR images. In many countries, a similar system has been developed and the key of the matter is to integrate all available data. This abstract describes the preliminary design concept for an integration system of RADAR, AIS and SAR data for vessel traffic monitoring. SAR sensors are used to acquire image data over large coverage area either through the space borne or airborne platforms in UTC. AIS reports should be also obtained on the same date as of the SAR acquisition for the purpose to perform integration test. Land-based RADAR can provide ships positions detected and tracked in near real time. In general, SAR are used to acquire image data over large coverage area, AIS reports are obtained from ship based transmitter, and RADAR can monitor continuously ships for a limited area. In this study, we developed individual ship monitoring algorithms using RADAR(FMCW and Pulse X-band), AIS and SAR(RADARSAT-2 Full-pol Mode). We conducted field experiments two times for displaying the RADAR, AIS and SAR integration over the Pyeongtaek Port, South Korea.

  7. Feasibility Study and Design of a Wearable System-on-a-Chip Pulse Radar for Contactless Cardiopulmonary Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zito, Domenico; Pepe, Domenico; Neri, Bruno; Zito, Fabio; De Rossi, Danilo; Lanatà, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    A new system-on-a-chip radar sensor for next-generation wearable wireless interface applied to the human health care and safeguard is presented. The system overview is provided and the feasibility study of the radar sensor is presented. In detail, the overall system consists of a radar sensor for detecting the heart and breath rates and a low-power IEEE 802.15.4 ZigBee radio interface, which provides a wireless data link with remote data acquisition and control units. In particular, the pulse radar exploits 3.1–10.6 GHz ultra-wideband signals which allow a significant reduction of the transceiver complexity and then of its power consumption. The operating principle of the radar for the cardiopulmonary monitoring is highlighted and the results of the system analysis are reported. Moreover, the results obtained from the building-blocks design, the channel measurement, and the ultra-wideband antenna realization are reported. PMID:18389068

  8. Measurement data preprocessing in a radar-based system for monitoring of human movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawski, Roman Z.; Mi?kina, Andrzej; Bajurko, Pawe? R.

    2015-02-01

    The importance of research on new technologies that could be employed in care services for elderly people is highlighted. The need to examine the applicability of various sensor systems for non-invasive monitoring of the movements and vital bodily functions, such as heart beat or breathing rhythm, of elderly persons in their home environment is justified. An extensive overview of the literature concerning existing monitoring techniques is provided. A technological potential behind radar sensors is indicated. A new class of algorithms for preprocessing of measurement data from impulse radar sensors, when applied for elderly people monitoring, is proposed. Preliminary results of numerical experiments performed on those algorithms are demonstrated.

  9. Feature discrimination and detection probability in synthetic aperture radar imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipes, R. G.; Butman, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Images obtained using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems can only represent the intensities of resolution cells in the scene of interest probabilistically since radar receiver noise and Rayleigh scattering of the transmitted radiation are always present. Consequently, when features to be identified differ only by their contribution to the mean power of the radar return, discrimination can be treated by detection theory. In this paper, we develop a 'sufficient statistic' for discriminating between competing features and compare it with some suboptimal methods frequently used. Discrimination is measured by probability of detection error and depends on number of samples or 'looks', signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and ratio of mean power returns from the competing features. Our results show discrimination and image quality rapidly saturate with SNR (very small improvement for SNR not less than 10 dB) but continue to improve with increasing number of looks.

  10. CEEN-4940/8946-002 Special Topics: Introduction to Antennas and Radar Systems, Fall 2008

    E-print Network

    Yang, Yaoqing "Lamar"

    as basic antenna arrays (uniform linear array: ULA and uniform circular array: UCA). Antenna applications. The electric dipole and thin linear antenna 6. The loop antennas 7. End-fire antennas: The Helical beam antennaCEEN-4940/8946-002 Special Topics: Introduction to Antennas and Radar Systems, Fall 2008 Instructor

  11. Instruments and Methods An integrated lightweight ice-penetrating radar system

    E-print Network

    Flowers, Gwenn

    for ground-based surveys that employs off-the-shelf hardware integrated with custom-designed software of continuous operation, weighs antenna housing. The system design is flexible. HARDWARE 2.1. Transmitter and antennas We use a monopulse radar transmitter based on the design of Narod

  12. Obstacle awareness and collision avoidance radar sensor system for low-altitude flying smart UAV

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Young K Kwag; Jung W Kang

    2004-01-01

    In This work, the critical requirement for obstacle awareness and avoidance is assessed with the compliance of the equivalent level of safety regulation, and then the collision avoidance sensor system is presented with the key design parameters for the requirement of the smart unmanned aerial vehicle in low-altitude flight. Based on the assessment of various sensors, small-sized radar sensor is

  13. Optimization of the interperiod processing of signals with clutter rejection in an incoherent radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, A. Z.

    1981-12-01

    An energy criterion was used to optimize an algorithm for clutter rejection in an incoherent radar system. Explicit formulas are obtained for the weight vector and the efficiency of the algorithm, and attention is given to the conditions under which these formulas can be applied to signal processing in the postdetector channel.

  14. An autonomous, non-cooperative, wide-area traffic monitoring system using space-based radar (TRAMRAD)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Hounam; S. Baumgartner; K. H. Bethke; M. Gabele; E. Kemptner; D. Klement; G. Krieger; G. Rode; K. Wagel

    2005-01-01

    To meet the challenges of ever increasing road traffic and the associated economic and sociological impacts, new techniques and technologies for better traffic management are needed. The TRAMRAD project (Traffic Monitoring with space-based Radar) aims to profit from research and development in earth observation and advances in radar remote sensing techniques to define a future space-based sensor system for the

  15. Properties of Tropical Convection Observed by Millimeter-Wave Radar Systems GRAEME L. STEPHENS AND NORMAN B. WOOD

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Properties of Tropical Convection Observed by Millimeter-Wave Radar Systems GRAEME L. STEPHENS by zenith-pointing surface radars observing tropical convection associated with various phases of activity. It was shown, for example, in a histogram regime analysis that the MWR data produce statistics on convection

  16. Using a P2P architecture for voice and radar transportation in critical command and control systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. de Barros Barrete; E. T. Yano

    2010-01-01

    The Brazilian air traffic service is constituted by a civil and a military organization, which provide tracking (radar), voice and data communication (VHF, UHF and HF) services, through an integrated network. To optimize the management of its air traffic system, Brazil divides the airspace into four independent Regional Centers. In each of these regions, the existing sensors (radars and radios)

  17. Last printed 3/16/2004 3:01 PM High-Frequency (Light) Borehole-Radar System

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    -writer and blank disks. 4) Control unit batteries, 12v adapter, battery chargers, fast chargers for antennas Geoscience Packing List 1) Radar control unit (Ramac surface GPR system) (Old or New CU2 is O.K.). 2) Laptop forks (2-3) with safety lines. 18) Surface radar antenna control electronics and radiating elements

  18. Eye-safe coherent laser radar system at 2.1 microns using Tm,Ho:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Hale, Charley P.; Magee, James R.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Huffaker, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    An eye-safe pulsed coherent laser radar has been developed by using single-frequency Tm,Ho:YAG lasers and heterodyne detection. Returns from a mountainside located 145 km from the laser radar system and the measurement of wind velocity to ranges exceeding 20 km have been demonstrated with transmitted pulse energies of 22 mJ.

  19. Data Acquisition System for Multi-Frequency Radar Flight Operations Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leachman, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    A three-channel data acquisition system was developed for the NASA Multi-Frequency Radar (MFR) system. The system is based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) industrial PC (personal computer) and two dual-channel 14-bit digital receiver cards. The decimated complex envelope representations of the three radar signals are passed to the host PC via the PCI bus, and then processed in parallel by multiple cores of the PC CPU (central processing unit). The innovation is this parallelization of the radar data processing using multiple cores of a standard COTS multi-core CPU. The data processing portion of the data acquisition software was built using autonomous program modules or threads, which can run simultaneously on different cores. A master program module calculates the optimal number of processing threads, launches them, and continually supplies each with data. The benefit of this new parallel software architecture is that COTS PCs can be used to implement increasingly complex processing algorithms on an increasing number of radar range gates and data rates. As new PCs become available with higher numbers of CPU cores, the software will automatically utilize the additional computational capacity.

  20. Shuttle orbiter KU-band radar/communications system design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An expanded introduction is presented which addresses the in-depth nature of the tasks and indicates continuity of the reported effort and results with previous work and related contracts, and the two major modes of operation which exist in the Ku-band system, namely, the radar mode and the communication mode, are described. The Ku-band radar system is designed to search for a target in a designated or undesignated mode, then track the detected target, which might be cooperative (active) or passive, providing accurate, estimates of the target range, range rate, angle and angle rate to enable the orbiter to rendezvous with this target. The radar mode is described along with a summary of its predicted performance. The principal sub-unit that implements the radar function is the electronics assembly 2(EA-2). The relationship of EA-2 to the remainder of the Ku-band system is shown. A block diagram of EA-2 is presented including the main command and status signals between EA-2 and the other Ku-band units.

  1. Radar Observations of Convective Systems from a High-Altitude Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G.; Geerts, B.; Tian, L.

    1999-01-01

    Reflectivity data collected by the precipitation radar on board the tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, orbiting at 350 km altitude, are compared to reflectivity data collected nearly simultaneously by a doppler radar aboard the NASA ER-2 flying at 19-20 km altitude, i.e. above even the deepest convection. The TRMM precipitation radar is a scanning device with a ground swath width of 215 km, and has a resolution of about a4.4 km in the horizontal and 250 m in the vertical (125 m in the core swath 48 km wide). The TRMM radar has a wavelength of 217 cm (13.8 GHz) and the Nadir mirror echo below the surface is used to correct reflectivity for loss by attenuation. The ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP) has two antennas, one pointing to the nadir, 34 degrees forward. The forward pointing beam receives both the normal and the cross-polarized echos, so the linear polarization ratio field can be monitored. EDOP has a wavelength of 3.12 cm (9.6 GHz), a vertical resolution of 37.5 m and a horizontal along-track resolution of about 100 m. The 2-D along track airflow field can be synthesized from the radial velocities of both beams, if a reflectivity-based hydrometer fall speed relation can be assumed. It is primarily the superb vertical resolution that distinguishes EDOP from other ground-based or airborne radars. Two experiments were conducted during 1998 into validate TRMM reflectivity data over convection and convectively-generated stratiform precipitation regions. The Teflun-A (TEXAS-Florida Underflight) experiment, was conducted in April and May and focused on mesoscale convective systems mainly in southeast Texas. TEFLUN-B was conducted in August-September in central Florida, in coordination with CAMEX-3 (Convection and Moisture Experiment). The latter was focused on hurricanes, especially during landfall, whereas TEFLUN-B concentrated on central; Florida convection, which is largely driven and organized by surface heating and ensuing sea breeze circulations. Both TEFLUN-A and B were amply supported by surface data, in particular a dense raingauge network, a polarization radar, wind profilers, a mobile radiosonde system, a cloud physics aircraft penetrating the overflown storms, and a network of 10 cm Doppler radars(WSR-88D). This presentation will show some preliminary comparisons between TRMM, EDOP, and WSR-88D reflectivity fields in the case of an MCS, a hurricane, and less organized convection in central Florida. A validation of TRMM reflectivity is important, because TRMM's primary objective is to estimate the rainfall climatology with 35 degrees of the equator. Rainfall is estimated from the radar reflectivity, as well from TRMM's Microwave Imager, which measures at 10.7, 19.4, 21.3, 37, and 85.5 GHz over a broader swath (78 km). While the experiments lasted about three months the cumulative period of near simultaneous observations of storms by ground-based, airborne and space borne radars is only about an hour long. Therefore the comparison is case-study-based, not climatological. We will highlight fundamental differences in the typical reflectivity profiles in stratiform regions of MCS's, Florida convection and hurricanes and will explain why Z-R relationships based on ground-based radar data for convective systems over land should be different from those for hurricanes. These catastrophically intense rainfall from hurricane Georges in Hispaniola and from Mitch in Honduras highlights the importance of accurate Z-R relationships, It will be shown that a Z-R relationship that uses the entire reflectivity profile (rather than just a 1 level) works much better in a variety of cases, making an adjustment of the constants for different precipitation system categories redundant.

  2. The MDA MicroSatellite Target System (MTS) for DoD Radar Calibration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason Guarnieri; Greg Hegemann; Greg Spanjers; James Winter; Martin Tolliver; Jeff Summers; Greg Cord

    2007-01-01

    The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) Advanced Systems Directorate (MDA\\/DV) is developing the MicroSatellite Target System (MTS) to research and develop the technologies necessary to build relatively inexpensive microsatellites for calibration of terrestrial radar. MTS-1 is designed to simulate reentry vehicle (RV) dynamics using the spacecraft (SC) Attitude Control System (ACS). The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Space Vehicles Directorate is

  3. An Airborne Radar System for High-Resolution Mapping of Internal Layers P. Kanagaratnam, R. Eakin and S.P. Gogineni

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    An Airborne Radar System for High-Resolution Mapping of Internal Layers P. Kanagaratnam, R. Eakin and S.P. Gogineni The University of Kansas, Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory 2335 Irving Hill the use of high- resolution radars for mapping of near-surface internal layers and generating continuous

  4. The 94 GHz Cloud Radar System on a NASA ER-2 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Racette, Paul E.; Tian, Lin; Zenker, Ed

    2003-01-01

    The 94-GHz (W-band) Cloud Radar System (CRS) has been developed and flown on a NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft. The CRS is a fully coherent, polarimeteric Doppler radar that is capable of detecting clouds and precipitation from the surface up to the aircraft altitude in the lower stratosphere. The radar is especially well suited for cirrus cloud studies because of its high sensitivity and fine spatial resolution. This paper describes the CRS motivation, instrument design, specifications, calibration, and preliminary data &om NASA s Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) field campaign. The unique combination of CRS with other sensors on the ER-2 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study cloud radiative effects on the global energy budget. CRS observations are being used to improve our knowledge of atmospheric scattering and attenuation characteristics at 94 GHz, and to provide datasets for algorithm implementation and validation for the upcoming NASA CloudSat mission that will use a 94-GHz spaceborne cloud radar to provide the first direct global survey of the vertical structure of cloud systems.

  5. Investigation of laser radar systems based on mid-infrared semiconductor lasers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam Rybaltowski

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the possibility of utilizing mid-infrared semiconductor lasers in systems of optical remote sensing with range resolution, called laser radar or lidar. The main subject investigated in this dissertation is two-fold: firstly, an analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and related maximum sensing range calculations in this type of lidar based on available system components, and---secondly---improvements in

  6. Parallel processing in a host plus multiple array processor system for radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkan, B. Z.

    1983-01-01

    Host plus multiple array processor architecture is demonstrated to yield a modular, fast, and cost-effective system for radar processing. Software methodology for programming such a system is developed. Parallel processing with pipelined data flow among the host, array processors, and discs is implemented. Theoretical analysis of performance is made and experimentally verified. The broad class of problems to which the architecture and methodology can be applied is indicated.

  7. Radar systems for a polar mission, volume 3, appendices A-D, S, T

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Claassen, J. P.; Erickson, R. L.; Fong, R. K. T.; Hanson, B. C.; Komen, M. J.; Mcmillan, S. B.; Parashar, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    Success is reported in the radar monitoring of such features of sea ice as concentration, floe size, leads and other water openings, drift, topographic features such as pressure ridges and hummocks, fractures, and a qualitative indication of age and thickness. Scatterometer measurements made north of Alaska show a good correlation with a scattering coefficient with apparent thickness as deduced from ice type analysis of stereo aerial photography. Indications are that frequencies from 9 GHz upward seem to be better for sea ice radar purposes than the information gathered at 0.4 GHz by a scatterometer. Some information indicates that 1 GHz is useful, but not as useful as higher frequencies. Either form of like-polarization can be used and it appears that cross-polarization may be more useful for thickness measurement. Resolution requirements have not been fully established, but most of the systems in use have had poorer resolution than 20 meters. The radar return from sea ice is found to be much different than that from lake ice. Methods to decrease side lobe levels of the Fresnel zone-plate processor and to decrease the memory requirements of a synthetic radar processor are discussed.

  8. MICROPROCESSOR-BASED DATA-ACQUISITION SYSTEM FOR A BOREHOLE RADAR.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Jerry A.; Wright, David L.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient microprocessor-based system is described that permits real-time acquisition, stacking, and digital recording of data generated by a borehole radar system. Although the system digitizes, stacks, and records independently of a computer, it is interfaced to a desktop computer for program control over system parameters such as sampling interval, number of samples, number of times the data are stacked prior to recording on nine-track tape, and for graphics display of the digitized data. The data can be transferred to the desktop computer during recording, or it can be played back from a tape at a latter time. Using the desktop computer, the operator observes results while recording data and generates hard-copy graphics in the field. Thus, the radar operator can immediately evaluate the quality of data being obtained, modify system parameters, study the radar logs before leaving the field, and rerun borehole logs if necessary. The system has proven to be reliable in the field and has increased productivity both in the field and in the laboratory.

  9. General configuration and site specific surveys for the EISCAT_3D incoherent radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjulin, A.; Vanhainen, L.-G.; Mann, I.

    2012-04-01

    EISCAT_3D a the next-generation incoherent scatter radar for the study of the atmosphere and geospace environment. It will be a distributed phased-array facility built in modular fashion from a few tens of thousands up to a hundred thousand individual antenna elements. The system will be located in northern Scandinavia and has a planned start of operations in 2015. Since EISCAT_3D is planned to be a multistatic system, the basic geometric configuration of the locations of the sites will have a certain impact on the quality of the measurements. Here we have studied the merit of different constellations of the transmitting and receiver stations of the radar system. We have also performed surveys of potential sites for the antenna arrays. We discuss the criteria for choosing specific locations of the sites, and show the results of the surveys in terms of factors such as the local geography, radio environment and access to infrastructure.

  10. Limitations of the Luneburg lens as a calibration target for a dual-antenna radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racette, Paul E.; Forster, Richard R.; Moore, Richard K.

    1991-01-01

    The Luneburg lens, which is commonly used to calibrate radar scatterometers, may not be appropriate for calibration of dual-antenna systems. Theory and results from measurements of the Luneburg lens reradiation pattern indicate that gross errors may be incurred when using the lens to calibrate a dual-antenna system. Measurements of the reradiation pattern indicate that special attention must be paid to the angular separation of the antennas when using the lens to calibrate a dual-antenna radar system. The angular separation of the antennas must be less than the half-power beamwidth of the lens to ensure accurate repeatable measurements. A formula for estimating the half-power beamwidth is given.

  11. Radar Observations of Convective System Variability in Relationship to African Easterly Waves during the 2006 AMMA Special Observing Period

    E-print Network

    Williams, Earle R.

    A radar-based analysis of the structure, motion, and rainfall variability of westward-propagating squall-line mesoscale convective systems (SLMCSs) in Niamey, Niger, during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities ...

  12. Analyzing the connectivity potential of landscape geomorphic systems: a radar remote sensing and GIS approach, Estufa Canyon, Texas, USA

    E-print Network

    Ibrahim, ElSayed Ali Hermas

    2005-11-01

    . The landscape gradient, which is extracted from the Digital Elevation Model (DEM), and the surface roughness, which is extracted from radar images, are used to analyze the connectivity potential of geomorphic systems in the landscape. Integration...

  13. Improving Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging in High Loss Environments by Coordinated System Development, Data Processing, Numerical Modeling, & Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, David L.

    2004-12-01

    Improving Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging in High Loss Environments by Coordinated System Development, Data Processing, Numerical Modeling, and Visualization Methods with Applications to Site Characterization EMSP Project 86992 Progress Report as of 9/2004.

  14. A W-Band MMIC Radar System for Remote Detection of Vital Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Sebastian; Ayhan, Serdal; Scherr, Steffen; Massler, Hermann; Tessmann, Axel; Leuther, Arnulf; Ambacher, Oliver; Zwick, Thomas; Kallfass, Ingmar

    2012-12-01

    In medical and personal health systems for vital sign monitoring, contact-free remote detection is favourable compared to wired solutions. For example, they help to avoid severe pain, which is involved when a patient with burned skin has to be examined. Continuous wave (CW) radar systems have proven to be good candidates for this purpose. In this paper a monolithic millimetre-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) based CW radar system operating in the W-band (75-110 GHz) at 96 GHz is presented. The MMIC components are custom-built and make use of 100 nm metamorphic high electron mobility transistors (mHEMTs). The radar system is employing a frequency multiplier-by-twelve MMIC and a receiver MMIC both packaged in split-block modules. They allow for the determination of respiration and heartbeat frequency of a human target sitting in 1 m distance. The analysis of the measured data is carried out in time and frequency domain and each approach is shown to have its advantages and drawbacks.

  15. Simulation of airborne radar observations of precipitating systems at various frequency bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louf, Valentin; Pujol, Olivier; Riedi, Jérôme

    2013-05-01

    The choice of the microwave frequency is of considerable importance for precipitating system observations by airborne radar. Currently, these radars operate at X-band (f = 10 GHz), although other frequency bands, may be used jointly or not. Since the measured reflectivity Zm is f-depending, different physical information about precipitating systems could be obtained. Herein, a comparison of reflectivity fields at different frequency bands is presented. A realistic and flexible model of precipitating systems is presented and simulations of airborne radar observations are performed. Simulated reflectivity fields are degraded as/increases because of Mie effects and microwave attenuation. At S, C and X-bands, attenuation is weak and Mie effects slightly increase the backscattered signal such that they can compensate attenuation at X and Ku bands. The Ka and W-bands suffer from a strong attenuation and significant Mie effects which seriously alter Zm-fields. For a squall line, the closer convective tower hides the farther ones, which is problematic for a pilot to estimate hazard at long distance. In addition, because hail is the main meteorological hazard for civil aviation, hail-rain discrimination is discussed and clarified for convective systems. It appears that S, C, and X-bands are the best ones, but the significant size of antenna used is prohibitive. Higher frequencies are more difficult to use on civil aviation due to high ambiguities and a too strongly attenuated microwave signal.

  16. Comparative of signal processing techniques for micro-Doppler signature extraction with automotive radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Hervas, Berta; Maile, Michael; Flores, Benjamin C.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, the automotive industry has experienced an evolution toward more powerful driver assistance systems that provide enhanced vehicle safety. These systems typically operate in the optical and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum and have demonstrated high efficiency in collision and risk avoidance. Microwave radar systems are particularly relevant due to their operational robustness under adverse weather or illumination conditions. Our objective is to study different signal processing techniques suitable for extraction of accurate micro-Doppler signatures of slow moving objects in dense urban environments. Selection of the appropriate signal processing technique is crucial for the extraction of accurate micro-Doppler signatures that will lead to better results in a radar classifier system. For this purpose, we perform simulations of typical radar detection responses in common driving situations and conduct the analysis with several signal processing algorithms, including short time Fourier Transform, continuous wavelet or Kernel based analysis methods. We take into account factors such as the relative movement between the host vehicle and the target, and the non-stationary nature of the target's movement. A comparison of results reveals that short time Fourier Transform would be the best approach for detection and tracking purposes, while the continuous wavelet would be the best suited for classification purposes.

  17. Embedded DSP-based telehealth radar system for remote in-door fall detection.

    PubMed

    Garripoli, Carmine; Mercuri, Marco; Karsmakers, Peter; Jack Soh, Ping; Crupi, Giovanni; Vandenbosch, Guy A E; Pace, Calogero; Leroux, Paul; Schreurs, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth systems and applications are extensively investigated nowadays to enhance the quality-of-care and, in particular, to detect emergency situations and to monitor the well-being of elderly people, allowing them to stay at home independently as long as possible. In this paper, an embedded telehealth system for continuous, automatic, and remote monitoring of real-time fall emergencies is presented and discussed. The system, consisting of a radar sensor and base station, represents a cost-effective and efficient healthcare solution. The implementation of the fall detection data processing technique, based on the least-square support vector machines, through a digital signal processor and the management of the communication between radar sensor and base station are detailed. Experimental tests, for a total of 65 mimicked fall incidents, recorded with 16 human subjects (14 men and two women) that have been monitored for 320 min, have been used to validate the proposed system under real circumstances. The subjects' weight is between 55 and 90 kg with heights between 1.65 and 1.82 m, while their age is between 25 and 39 years. The experimental results have shown a sensitivity to detect the fall events in real time of 100% without reporting false positives. The tests have been performed in an area where the radar's operation was not limited by practical situations, namely, signal power, coverage of the antennas, and presence of obstacles between the subject and the antennas. PMID:25291803

  18. A digital demodulation scheme for use in a high dynamic range radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, Glen; Haslam, George

    Digital demodulation is a technique whereby the positive frequency component of a narrowband signal is translated to baseband by digital means. With this technique, the dynamic range of some radar systems can be greatly increased. A digital demodulation scheme suitable for an airborne radar system is described, and some of the major design issues in its implementation are analyzed. The demodulation process first involves downconversion of the signal to an intermediate frequency (IF), filtering the resulting signal to reduce its frequency sidelobes, mixing the filtered signal to a second IF, digitizing the second IF signal, and filtering the digital signal with a lowpass finite impulse response filter. An expression for the optimal filter is derived, maximizing the ratio of the positive frequency clutter power to the negative frequency clutter plus noise power. Simulated input and output spectra are shown. The simulation results were validated by a simple experiment.

  19. A 77 GHz SiGe power amplifier for potential applications in automotive radar systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ullrich R. Pfeiffer; Scott K. Reynolds; Brian A. Floyd

    2004-01-01

    We present the performance of a 77 GHz power amplifier for potential applications directed towards automotive radar systems. The circuit was fabricated in a SiGe bipolar preproduction technology. A balanced two-stage common emitter circuit topology was used to achieve 6.1 dB of power gain at 77 GHz and 11.6 dBm output power at 1dB compression. The power amplifier uses a

  20. A microjet array cooling system for thermal management of active radars and high-brightness LEDs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheng Liu; Tim Lin; Xiaobing Luo; Mingxiang Chen; Xiaoping Jiang

    2006-01-01

    Advancement in high heat thermal management technology and its successful integration into emerging GaN-based amplifiers is imperative to meet the long-term requirement of future X-band radar systems. It is also known that the efficiency and reliability of light emitting diode (LED) strongly rely on successful thermal management due to its inherit low junction temperature in the LED chip. In this

  1. The EDOP radar system on the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heymsfield, G.M.; Bidwell, S.W.; Caylor, I.J.; Ameen, S.; Nicholson, S.; Boncyk, W.; Miller, L.; Vandemark, D.; Racette, P.E.; Dod, L.R.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft that emulates a satellite view of precipitation systems carries a variety of passive and active (lidar) remote sensing instruments. A new Doppler weather radar system at X band (9.6 GHz) called the ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP) has been developed and flown on the ER-2 aircraft. EDOP is a fully coherent Doppler weather radar with fixed nadir and forward pointing (33?? off nadir) beams that map out Doppler winds and reflectivities in the vertical plane along the aircraft motion vector. Doppler winds from the two beams can be used to derive vertical and along-track air motions. In addition, the forward beam provides linear depolarization measurements that are useful in discriminating microphysical characteristics of the precipitation. This paper deals with a general description of the EDOP instrument including the measurement concept, the system configuration and hardware, and recently obtained data examples from the instrument. The combined remote sensing package on the ER-2, along with EDOP, provides a unique platform for simulating spaceborne remote sensing of precipitation.

  2. High resolution system for upper air (troposphere) wind and temperature profile measurements. [meteorological radar/Jimsphere system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, D. W.; Vaughan, W. W.

    1973-01-01

    The Jimsphere/Jimsonde system is described and some possible applications of the system for air-sea interface measurements are presented. As space vehicles became larger and more sophisticated, an improved method for obtaining wind profile data had to be found. To satisfy this need the FPS-16 radar/Jimsphere system was developed. The Jimsphere is an aluminized mylar spherical balloon, two meters in diameter. The balloon is under superpressure, and is tracked with a high precision radar system. The development of this detailed wind profile system was started in 1963, and the present design was established in 1964. To improve the system, a program was initiated in 1965 to obtain high resolution temperature data simultaneously with the wind profile data.

  3. An X-band radar system for bathymetry and wave field analysis in a harbour area.

    PubMed

    Ludeno, Giovanni; Reale, Ferdinando; Dentale, Fabio; Carratelli, Eugenio Pugliese; Natale, Antonio; Soldovieri, Francesco; Serafino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Marine X-band radar based systems are well tested to provide information about sea state and bathymetry. It is also well known that complex geometries and non-uniform bathymetries provide a much bigger challenge than offshore scenarios. In order to tackle this issue a retrieval method is proposed, based on spatial partitioning of the data and the application of the Normalized Scalar Product (NSP), which is an innovative procedure for the joint estimation of bathymetry and surface currents. The strategy is then applied to radar data acquired around a harbour entrance, and results show that the reconstructed bathymetry compares well with ground truth data obtained by an echo-sounder campaign, thus proving the reliability of the whole procedure. The spectrum thus retrieved is then analysed to show the evidence of reflected waves from the harbour jetties, as confirmed by chain of hydrodynamic models of the sea wave field. The possibility of using a land based radar to reveal sea wave reflection is entirely new and may open up new operational applications of the system. PMID:25594601

  4. An X-Band Radar System for Bathymetry and Wave Field Analysis in a Harbour Area

    PubMed Central

    Ludeno, Giovanni; Reale, Ferdinando; Dentale, Fabio; Carratelli, Eugenio Pugliese; Natale, Antonio; Soldovieri, Francesco; Serafino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Marine X-band radar based systems are well tested to provide information about sea state and bathymetry. It is also well known that complex geometries and non-uniform bathymetries provide a much bigger challenge than offshore scenarios. In order to tackle this issue a retrieval method is proposed, based on spatial partitioning of the data and the application of the Normalized Scalar Product (NSP), which is an innovative procedure for the joint estimation of bathymetry and surface currents. The strategy is then applied to radar data acquired around a harbour entrance, and results show that the reconstructed bathymetry compares well with ground truth data obtained by an echo-sounder campaign, thus proving the reliability of the whole procedure. The spectrum thus retrieved is then analysed to show the evidence of reflected waves from the harbour jetties, as confirmed by chain of hydrodynamic models of the sea wave field. The possibility of using a land based radar to reveal sea wave reflection is entirely new and may open up new operational applications of the system. PMID:25594601

  5. Microphysical processes observed by X band polarimetric radars during the evolution of storm systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Troemel, Silke; Simmer, Clemens

    2014-05-01

    Polarimetric radars are now widely used for characterizing storm systems since they offer significant information for the improvement for atmospheric models and numerical weather prediction. Their observations allow a detailed insight into macro- and micro-physical processes during the spatial and temporal evolution of storm systems. In the frame of the initiative for High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2), which focuses on improving the accuracy of climate models in relation to cloud and precipitation processes, the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) was designed to provide a critical model evaluation at scales covered by Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models, which in turn will be used to better understand sub-grid variability and microphysical properties and processes parameterized by larger scale models. Three X-band polarimetric radars deployed in Bonn (BoXPol) and in the vicinity of Juelich (JuXPol and KiXPol), Germany, were operated together with other instruments during the HOPE campaign, in order to obtain a holistic view of precipitation systems covering both macro- and microscopic processes. Given the variability of polarimetric moments observed by polarimetric radars, the corresponding microphysical processes occurring during the development of storm cells thus can be inferred accordingly. This study focuses on the microscopic processes of storm systems which were observed by RHI (range-height indicator) scans of the three X band radars. The two frequently observed microphysical processes during the HOPE campaign, coalescence and differential sedimentation, will be shown, and the evolution of droplet size distributions (DSDs) will be also analyzed. The associated DSDs which are retrieved using radar measured polarimetric moments are further verified by the polarimetric forward operator where the assumptions of non-spherical hydrometeors have been embedded. The results indicate that the estimated DSDs from the tested retrieval algorithms are in consistency with the identified microphysical processes although discrepancies still exist. Together with the analysis from the macroscopic perspective which quantifies macroscopic structures of storm cells like height, intensity and temporal change of brightband, a holistic view of the development of storm systems will be provided.

  6. METR 4624--Radar Meteorology SPRING 2014

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4624--Radar Meteorology SPRING 2014 Dr. Michael I. Biggerstaff; drdoppler@ou.edu (best method Principles of weather radar and storm observations including: radar system design, em wave propagation, radar&Q, moments of the power spectrum, ground clutter, attenuation, rainfall measurements using radar reflectivity

  7. METR 4624--Radar Meteorology SPRING 2012

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    METR 4624--Radar Meteorology SPRING 2012 Dr. Michael I. Biggerstaff; drdoppler@ou.edu (best method Principles of weather radar and storm observations including: radar system design, em wave propagation, radar&Q, moments of the power spectrum, ground clutter, attenuation, rainfall measurements using radar reflectivity

  8. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, J.; Holmes, J.; Huth, G. K.; Iwasaki, R.; Maronde, R.; Polydoros, A.; Weber, C.; Broad, P.

    1980-01-01

    Tasks performed in an examination and critique of a Ku-band radar communications system for the shuttle orbiter are reported. Topics cover: (1) Ku-band high gain antenna/widebeam horn design evaluation; (2) evaluation of the Ku-band SPA and EA-1 LRU software; (3) system test evaluation; (4) critical design review and development test evaluation; (5) Ku-band bent pipe channel performance evaluation; (6) Ku-band LRU interchangeability analysis; and (7) deliverable test equipment evaluation. Where discrepancies were found, modifications and improvements to the Ku-band system and the associated test procedures are suggested.

  9. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation. Deliverable test equipment evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maronde, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The Ku-band test equipment, known as the Deliverable System Test equipment (DSTE), is reviewed and evaluated. The DSTE is semiautomated and computer programs were generated for 14 communication mode tests and 17 radar mode tests. The 31 test modules provide a good cross section of tests with which to exercise the Ku-band system; however, it is very limited when being used to verify Ku-band system performance. More detailed test descriptions are needed, and a major area of concern is the DSTE sell-off procedure which is inadequate.

  10. Low Earth Orbit objects tracking and orbit determination from ground-based phased array radar systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Massimo Sciotti; Piermario Besso; Tim Flohrer; Holger Krag

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based phased array radar observations of Low Earth Orbit objects are addressed in this paper. Radar resources and radar data processing techniques are analysed with the aim of assessing the overall accuracy in orbit determination and propagation as a function of radar design trade-off parameters. The presented analysis is based on end-to-end simulation of both radar and orbital data processing

  11. Enhancements to the RADAR User Location and Tracking System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anand Balachandran; Venkata N. Padmanabhan

    2000-01-01

    We address the problem of locating users inside buildings using a radio-frequency (RF) wireless LAN. A previous paper presented the basic design and a limited evaluation of a user-location system we have developed. In this paper, we analyze shortcomings of the basic system, and develop and evaluate solutions to address these shortcomings. Additionally, we describe several new enhancements, including a

  12. Data reduction programs for a laser radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, F. F.; Copeland, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The listing and description of software routines which were used to analyze the analog data obtained from LIDAR - system are given. All routines are written in FORTRAN - IV on a HP - 1000/F minicomputer which serves as the heart of the data acquisition system for the LIDAR program. This particular system has 128 kilobytes of highspeed memory and is equipped with a Vector Instruction Set (VIS) firmware package, which is used in all the routines, to handle quick execution of different long loops. The system handles floating point arithmetic in hardware in order to enhance the speed of execution. This computer is a 2177 C/F series version of HP - 1000 RTE-IVB data acquisition computer system which is designed for real time data capture/analysis and disk/tape mass storage environment.

  13. Detection of aquifer system compaction and land subsidence using interferometric synthetic aperture radar, Antelope Valley, Mojave Desert, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Galloway; K. W. Hudnut; S. E. Ingebritsen; S. P. Phillips; G. Peltzer; F. Rogez; P. A. Rosen

    1998-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has great potential to detect and quantify land subsidence caused by aquifer system compaction. InSAR maps with high spatial detail and resolution of range displacement (610 mm in change of land surface elevation) were developed for a groundwater basin (;103 km2) in Antelope Valley, California, using radar data collected from the ERS-1 satellite. These data

  14. Detection sensitivity and power consumption vs. operation modes using system-on-chip based Doppler radar occupancy sensor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chenyan Song; Ehsan Yavari; Aditya Singh; Olga Boric-Lubecke; Victor Lubecke

    2012-01-01

    A low cost, low power Doppler radar occupancy sensor is developed by building a customized passive sensor node into a low power System-on-Chip (SoC) CC2530 RF transceiver. Experiment on the periodic moving mechanic target illustrates that this SoC based Doppler radar sensor is able to accurately detect the motion of the target under CW, modulated CW and packet operation modes.

  15. Detection of aquifer system compaction and land subsidence using interferometric synthetic aperture radar, Antelope Valley, Mojave Desert, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Galloway; K. W. Hudnut; S. E. Ingebritsen; S. P. Phillips; G. Peltzer; F. Rogez; P. A. Rosen

    1998-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has great potential to detect and quantify land subsidence caused by aquifer system compaction. InSAR maps with high spatial detail and resolution of range displacement (±10 mm in change of land surface elevation) were developed for a groundwater basin (?103 km2) in Antelope Valley, California, using radar data collected from the ERS-1 satellite. These data

  16. Detection of aquifer system compaction and land subsidence using interferometric synthetic aperture radar, Antelope Valley, Mojave Desert, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Galloway; K. W. Hudnut; S. E. Ingebritsen; S. P. Phillips; G. Peltzer; F. Rogez; P. A. Rosen

    1998-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has great potential to detect and quantify land subsidence caused by aquifer system compaction. InSAR maps with high spatial detail and resolution of range displacement (+\\/-10 mm in change of land surface elevation) were developed for a groundwater basin (~103km2) in Antelope Valley, California, using radar data collected from the ERS-1 satellite. These data allow

  17. Design considerations for high-power VHF radar transceivers: The Poker Flat MST radar phase control system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. L. Ecklund; P. E. Johnson

    1983-01-01

    Sixty-four separate 50-kW peak-power transmitters are distributed throughout the 200 x 200 meter Poker Flat MST radar antenna array. The relative phase of each transmitter is automatically controlled by a 64-channel unit located in the main building at the edge of the antenna. The phase control unit is described. In operation the RF pulse from a transmitter coupler is power

  18. REVIEW ARTICLE Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    REVIEW ARTICLE Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Christopher T. Allen Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory University of Kansas Abstract. This paper provides a brief review of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (In

  19. Standoff concealed weapon detection using a 350-GHz radar imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Valdez, Patrick L. J.

    2010-04-01

    The sub-millimeter (sub-mm) wave frequency band from 300 - 1000 GHz is currently being developed for standoff concealed weapon detection imaging applications. This frequency band is of interest due to the unique combination of high resolution and clothing penetration. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is currently developing a 350 GHz, active, wideband, three-dimensional, radar imaging system to evaluate the feasibility of active sub-mm imaging for standoff detection. Standoff concealed weapon and explosive detection is a pressing national and international need for both civilian and military security, as it may allow screening at safer distances than portal screening techniques. PNNL has developed a prototype active wideband 350 GHz radar imaging system based on a wideband, heterodyne, frequency-multiplier-based transceiver system coupled to a quasi-optical focusing system and high-speed rotating conical scanner. This prototype system operates at ranges up to 10+ meters, and can acquire an image in 10 - 20 seconds, which is fast enough to scan cooperative personnel for concealed weapons. The wideband operation of this system provides accurate ranging information, and the images obtained are fully three-dimensional. During the past year, several improvements to the system have been designed and implemented, including increased imaging speed using improved balancing techniques, wider bandwidth, and improved image processing techniques. In this paper, the imaging system is described in detail and numerous imaging results are presented.

  20. Ground-based measurements of inflight antenna patterns for imaging radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Pedro; Lentz, Harald; Zink, Manfred; Heel, Franz

    1992-11-01

    An approach is presented on how to determine the inflight antenna pattern in the cross-track direction for air- and spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. In the 1991 Oberpfaffenhofen DC-8/E-SAR calibration campaign there was a good opportunity to test ground-based measurement equipment comprising 18 precision calibration receivers and nine polarimetric active radar calibrators (PARC's), all operating in C-band. These devices were designed and manufactured by the Institute of Navigation at the University of Stuttgart (INS). These instruments are capable of handling various pulse lengths, PRF's, and have a very high dynamic range. Together with precise internal clocks, these instruments are suitable for recording the actual radar transmit pulse shape for the later evaluation of the desired inflight antenna pattern. Lining up these devices in the cross-track direction, each receiver yields an azimuth cut of the three-dimensional antenna pattern. The elevation pattern was then obtained by time correlation of these azimuth cuts. Further results concerning pulse shapes, squint angles, and H-V pattern misalignment are presented.

  1. Evaluating a Radar-Based, Non Contact Streamflow Measurement System in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Mason, Robert R.; Costa, John E.; Plant, William J.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Haeni, F. Peter; Melcher, Nick B.; Keller, William C.; Hayes, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Accurate measurement of flow in the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California, is vital to a wide range of Federal and State agencies, environmental interests, and water contractors. The U.S. Geological Survey uses a conventional stage-discharge rating technique to determine flows at Vernalis. Since the flood of January 1997, the channel has scoured and filled as much as 20 feet in some sections near the measurement site resulting in an unstable stage-discharge rating. In response to recent advances in measurement techniques and the need for more accurate measurement methods, the Geological Survey has undertaken a technology demonstration project to develop and deploy a radar-based streamflow measuring system on the bank of the San Joaquin River at Vernalis, California. The proposed flow-measurement system consists of a ground-penetrating radar system for mapping channel geometries, a microwave radar system for measuring surface velocities, and other necessary infrastructure. Cross-section information derived from ground penetrating radar provided depths similar to those measured by other instruments during the study. Likewise, surface-velocity patterns and magnitudes measured by the pulsed Doppler radar system are consistent with near surface current measurements derived from acoustic velocity instruments. Since the ratio of surface velocity to mean velocity falls to within a small range of theoretical value, using surface velocity as an index velocity to compute river discharge is feasable. Ultimately, the non-contact radar system may be used to make continuous, near-real-time flow measurements during high and medium flows. This report documents the data collected between April 14, 2002 and May 17, 2002 for the purposes of testing this radar based system. Further analyses of the data collected during this field effort will lead to further development and improvement of the system.

  2. High-temperature superconductivity for avionic electronic warfare and radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    The electronic warfare (EW) and radar communities expect to be major beneficiaries of the performance advantages high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) has to offer over conventional technology. Near term upgrades to system hardware can be envisioned using extremely small, high Q, microwave filters and resonators; compact, wideband, low loss, microwave delay and transmission lines; as well as, wideband, low loss, monolithic microwave integrated circuit phase shifters. The most dramatic impact will be in the far term, using HTS to develop new, real time threat identification and response strategy receiver/processing systems designed to utilize the unique high frequency properties of microwave and ultimately digital HTS.

  3. In-Service Evaluation of the Turbulence Auto-PIREP System and Enhanced Turbulence Radar Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Jason B.; Buck, Bill K.; Robinson, Paul A.; Ryan, Tim

    2007-01-01

    From August 2003 to December 2006, In-Service Evaluations (ISE) of the Turbulence Auto-PIREP System (TAPS) and Enhanced Turbulence (E-Turb) Radar, technologies developed in NASA's Turbulence Prediction and Warning System (TPAWS) element of its Aviation Safety and Security Program (AvSSP), were conducted. NASA and AeroTech Research established an industry team comprising AeroTech, Delta Air Lines, Rockwell Collins, and ARINC to conduct the ISEs. The technologies were installed on Delta aircraft and their effectiveness was evaluated in day-to-day operations. This report documents the establishment and conduct of the ISEs and presents results and feedback from various users.

  4. A digital system to produce imagery from SAR data. [Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a digital processing algorithm and its associated system design for producing images from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. The proposed system uses the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach to perform the two-dimensional correlation process. The range migration problem, which is often a major obstacle to efficient processing, can be alleviated by approximating the locus of echoes from a point target by several linear segments. SAR data corresponding to each segment is correlated separately, and the results are coherently summed to produce full-resolution images. This processing approach exhibits greatly improved computation efficiency relative to conventional digital processing methods.

  5. A Dual Polarization, Active, Microstrip Antenna for an Orbital Imaging Radar System Operating at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.; Huang, John

    1999-01-01

    A highly successful Earth orbiting synthetic antenna aperture radar (SAR) system, known as the SIR-C mission, was carried into orbit in 1994 on a U.S. Shuttle (Space Transportation System) mission. The radar system was mounted in the cargo bay with no need to fold, or in any other way reduce the size of the antennas for launch. Weight and size were not limited for the L-Band, C-Band, and X-Band radar systems of the SIR-C radar imaging mission; the set of antennas weighed 10,500 kg, the L-Band antenna having the major share of the weight. This paper treats designing an L-Band antenna functionally similar to that used for SIR-C, but at a fraction of the cost and at a weight in the order of 250 kg. Further, the antenna must be folded to fit into the small payload shroud of low cost booster rocket systems. Over 31 square meters of antenna area is required. This low weight, foldable, electronic scanning antenna is for the proposed LightSAR radar system which is to be placed in Earth orbit on a small, dedicated space craft at the lowest possible cost for an efficient L-Band radar imaging system. This LightSAR spacecraft radar is to be continuously available for at least five operational years, and have the ability to map or repeat-map any area on earth within a few days of any request. A microstrip patch array, with microstrip transmission lines heavily employed in the aperture and in the corporate feed network, was chosen as the low cost approach for this active dual-polarization, 80 MHz (6.4%) bandwidth antenna design.

  6. A Dual Polarization, Active, Microstrip Antenna for an Orbital Imaging Radar System Operating at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.; Huang, John

    2000-01-01

    A highly successful Earth orbiting synthetic antenna aperture radar (SAR) system, known as the SIR-C mission, was carried into orbit in 1994 on a U.S. Shuttle (Space Transportation System) mission. The radar system was mounted in the cargo bay with no need to fold, or in any other way reduce the size of the antennas for launch. Weight and size were not limited for the L-Band, C-Band, and X-Band radar systems of the SIR-C radar imaging mission; the set of antennas weighed 10,500 kg, the L-Band antenna having the major share of the weight. This paper treats designing an L-Band antenna functionally similar to that used for SIR-C, but at a fraction of the cost and at a weight in the order of 250 kg. Further, the antenna must be folded to fit into the small payload shroud of low cost booster rocket systems. Over 31 square meters of antenna area is required. This low weight, foldable, electronic scanning antenna is for the proposed LightSAR radar system which is to be placed in Earth orbit on a small, dedicated space craft at the lowest possible cost for an efficient L- Band radar imaging system. This LightSAR spacecraft radar is to be continuously available for at least five operational years, and have the ability to map or repeat-map any area on earth within a few days of any request. A microstrip patch array, with microstrip transmission lines heavily employed in the aperture and in the corporate feed network, was chosen as the low cost approach for this active dual-polarization, 80 MHz (6.4%) bandwidth antenna design.

  7. Plastic mine detecting radar system using complex-valued self-organizing map that deals with multiple-frequency interferometric images.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takahiro; Hirose, Akira

    2004-01-01

    Ground penetrating radars (GPR's) have been often applied to underground object imaging. However, conventional radar systems do not work sufficiently to detect anti-personnel plastic landmines. We propose a novel radar imaging system, which processes adaptively interferometric front-end data obtained at multiple-frequency points. The system deals with interferometric images using complex-valued self-organizing map (C-SOM). We demonstrate a successful visualization of a plastic mine buried near the ground surface. PMID:15555861

  8. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M. [Environmental Research Inst. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  9. CHIRP Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernfeld, M.

    1984-04-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the concept of a combination of the clinical procedure of reconstruction tomography with the radar processing for linear FM pulse compression. An approach based on such a combination is to be employed to map radar backscatter energy. Radar systems employing pulse compression of linear frequency modulated (CHIRP) pulses are considered along with the inversion formula employed by reconstruction tomography. The conventional system enabling radar backscatter mapping is based on pulse-Doppler radar which basically incorporates range-gated spectrum analysis. CHIRP Doppler radar represents a potential alternative. Advantages are related to an absence of requirements to maintain coherence from pulse to pulse, and the suppression of interference due to second-time-around signals. Raabe (1976) has discussed an application involving the imaging of the wakes of reentering space vehicles.

  10. Phase correction system for automatic focusing of synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Eichel, Paul H. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Placitas, NM); Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A phase gradient autofocus system for use in synthetic aperture imaging accurately compensates for arbitrary phase errors in each imaged frame by locating highlighted areas and determining the phase disturbance or image spread associated with each of these highlight areas. An estimate of the image spread for each highlighted area in a line in the case of one dimensional processing or in a sector, in the case of two-dimensional processing, is determined. The phase error is determined using phase gradient processing. The phase error is then removed from the uncorrected image and the process is iteratively performed to substantially eliminate phase errors which can degrade the image.

  11. High pulse rate high resolution optical radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.; Burns, R. H.; Chi, K. (inventors)

    1973-01-01

    The system is composed of an optical cavity with a laser and a mode locking means to build up an optical pulse. An optical switch is also provided within the cavity to convert the polarization of the optical pulse generated within the cavity. The optical switch comprises an electro-optical crystal driven by a time delayed driver circuit which is triggered by a coincident signal made from an optical pulse signal and a gating pulse signal. The converted optical pulse strikes a polarization sensitive prism and is deflected out of the cavity toward the pending target in the form of a pulse containing most of the optical energy generated by the laser in the pulse build-up period. After striking the target, the reflected energy is picked up by a transceiver with the total travel time of the pulse being recorded.

  12. In-flight detection of errors for enhanced aircraft flight safety and vertical accuracy improvement using digital terrain elevation data with an inertial navigation system, global positioning system and radar altimeter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Anthony Gray

    1999-01-01

    This dissertation discusses integration architectures using digital terrain elevation data (DTED) with an inertial navigation system (INS), a global positioning system (GPS) and a radar altimeter. Two integration architectures are considered: DTED with INS, GPS and radar altimeter for aircraft vertical accuracy improvement during the final approach; and DTED with kinematic GPS (KGPS) and a radar altimeter for enhanced aircraft

  13. Surface current patterns in the Ibiza Channel with the use of High Frequency (HF) Radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lana, Arancha; Fernández, Vicente; Troupin, Charles; Pascual, Ananda; Orfila, Alejandro; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2014-05-01

    The Ibiza Channel located between the East Coast of the Iberian Peninsula, and the West Coast of Ibiza, at the Balearic Islands, is a well-known biodiversity hot spot. This area is relevant due to the interaction of water masses coming from the Atlantic Ocean - ascending through the Iberian Peninsula coast - with the older Atlantic waters descending from the Gulf of Lion. In 2012, the installation of Coastal HF Radar in the area provides valuable information for the study of the surface transport along the channel. The Coastal HF Radar operates since June 2012, and provides hourly surface current maps with a spatial resolution of approximately 3 km and a range reaching up to 70 km offshore. The instrument forms part of a monitoring multi-platform system, which is completed with satellite-derived data, gliders, modelling and fixed and lagrangian buoys. All HF Radar data are processed with standard quality control methods. Drifter velocity obtained from lagrangian buoys for two oceanographic campaigns, satellite-derived data and currentmeter data from a fixed buoy in the Ibiza Channel are used to validate the HF Radar data. All surface current data are used to perform a spectrum analysis in order to show the physical processes, at the main temporal periods. The contribution of the different temporal scales to the total Kinetic Energy has been analysed for the first time at different seasonal intervals. This served to evaluate the energetic importance of the different components of the surface currents. The inertial currents have a lower contribution to the total KE during winter, compared with the summer period. Besides, the spatial distribution of the inertial component to the total KE varies seasonally, and according to the bathymetry of the area. The low-pass (sub-inertial) filtered HF Radar currents show a predominant northern current during the summer months in the channel, and a mean southern current during the winter period. These results are discussed and related with the external forcing, and bathymetry distribution, according to coastal or open ocean data.

  14. Spatial-spectral processing for imaging systems: Multibeam RF imaging and radar systems using spectral hole burning materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braker, Benjamin M.

    Systems which form many spatial beams (beamformers) for the RF and microwave spectral bands output either a few simultaneous spatial beams across a wide bandwidth---using true-time-delay beamformers---or many simultaneous spatial beams across a moderate bandwidth---using digital aperture synthesis imagers. The simultaneous spatial beams in true-time-delay beamformers require parallel hardware while digital aperture synthesis imagers requires both high speed digitizers and huge digital processors. Moreover; each output beam is typically processed further by a spectrum analyzer or a radar processor. Simultaneous formation and processing of all spatial beams is intractable for wide bandwidths and many beams. This dissertation develops and demonstrates a new class of photonic processing architectures which form and process many simultaneous, wide bandwidth spatial beams. These photonic architectures modulate RF signals from an emulated array of antennas onto an array of coherent optical carriers. I show the theory, the methods, and the results for systems which use Fourier optics and spectral hole burning (SHB) crystals; the demonstrated applications are: wideband RF imaging, Doppler radar, and multi-static radar applications. Proof-of-concept results show 20-beam RF images across a 1 GHz bandwidth and 20-beam radar correlations across bandwidths up to 150 MHz, but these systems can be scaled to process antenna arrays with thousands of beams across bandwidths up to 20 GHz. While these systems can process wide bandwidths for large antenna arrays, I also show an analysis that claims these systems can offer sensitivity levels comparable to other digital or analog beamformers.

  15. The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System: improved capabilities and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latteck, Ralph; Stober, Gunter; Singer, Werner; Renkwitz, Toralf; Strelnikova, Irina; Chau, Jorge L.; Sommer, Svenja; Schult, Carsten

    In 2011 the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Kühlungsborn completed the installation of the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) on the North-Norwegian island Andoya. MAARSY allows classical beam swinging operation as well as experiments with simultaneous multiple beams and the use of interferometric applications for improved studies of the Arctic atmosphere from the troposphere up to the lower thermosphere with high spatio-temporal resolution. Observations of polar mesosphere echoes have been carried out continuously to study their characterizes and occurrence during summer and winter time. Results from multi-beam experiments conducted during various campaigns to investigate the horizontal structures of mesospheric echoes indicate that the underlying structures and processes reveal a high spatial variability. Sophisticated wind analysis methods such as an extended velocity azimuth display have been applied to retrieve additional parameters from the wind field, e.g. horizontal divergence, vertical velocity, stretching and shearing deformation. HPLA radar systems as MAARSY can detect reflections from plasma irregularities around meteoroids called meteor-head echoes. The interferometric capabilities of MAARSY permit the determination of the meteor trajectories within the radar beam with high accuracy. The received data are used to gain information about entry velocities, source radiants, observation heights and other meteoroid parameters. In September 2013 the upgrade of the MAARSY antenna array to circular polarization was completed allowing the system to perform incoherent scatter observations of the D and E region. We present a description of new capabilities of MAARSY and show observational results obtained during campaigns over a period of 3 years of operation.

  16. Microprocessor realizations of range and range-rate filters in radar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, D.; Aronhime, P.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of digital radar range-rate filters on a microprocessor-based system. A range-rate filter processes a digitized noisy range signal to recover smoothed range data and its derivative, range rate. Two filter designs are implemented. Considerations aiding their efficient operation on an 8-bit microprocessor are discussed. The filters are subjected to a noisy range input signal of known variance, and the associated output signals are statistically analysed to determine noise-rejection characteristics. These results are compared to analytical predictions.

  17. Aeronomy report no. 74: The Urbana meteor-radar system; design, development, and first observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, G. C.; Geller, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The design, development, and first observations of a high power meteor-radar system located near Urbana, Illinois are described. The roughly five-fold increase in usable echo rate compared to other facilities, along with automated digital data processing and interferometry measurement of echo arrival angles, permits unsurpassed observations of tidal structure and shorter period waves. Such observations are discussed. The technique of using echo decay rates to infer density and scale height and the method of inferring wind shear from radial acceleration are examined. An original experiment to test a theory of the Delta-region winter anomaly is presented.

  18. Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    KB Widener; K Johnson

    2005-01-30

    The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

  19. Location Detection and Tracking of Moving Targets by a 2D IR-UWB Radar System.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van-Han; Pyun, Jae-Young

    2015-01-01

    In indoor environments, the Global Positioning System (GPS) and long-range tracking radar systems are not optimal, because of signal propagation limitations in the indoor environment. In recent years, the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) technology has become a possible solution for object detection, localization and tracking in indoor environments, because of its high range resolution, compact size and low cost. This paper presents improved target detection and tracking techniques for moving objects with impulse-radio UWB (IR-UWB) radar in a short-range indoor area. This is achieved through signal-processing steps, such as clutter reduction, target detection, target localization and tracking. In this paper, we introduce a new combination consisting of our proposed signal-processing procedures. In the clutter-reduction step, a filtering method that uses a Kalman filter (KF) is proposed. Then, in the target detection step, a modification of the conventional CLEAN algorithm which is used to estimate the impulse response from observation region is applied for the advanced elimination of false alarms. Then, the output is fed into the target localization and tracking step, in which the target location and trajectory are determined and tracked by using unscented KF in two-dimensional coordinates. In each step, the proposed methods are compared to conventional methods to demonstrate the differences in performance. The experiments are carried out using actual IR-UWB radar under different scenarios. The results verify that the proposed methods can improve the probability and efficiency of target detection and tracking. PMID:25808773

  20. Measuring the wavefront distortion of a phased-array laser radar by using a real-time optoelectronic measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chunyan; Wu, Jian

    2009-11-01

    A real-time optoelectronic measurement system is proposed to measure the wavefront distortions of scanning beams of a phased-array laser radar. This measurement system includes electric control rotating and translating platforms and a cyclic radial shearing interferometer(CRSI). CRSI is an effective interferometry to mesure the laser wavefront. A inversion algorithm is used to precisely reconstruct wavefront phase distribution from interferograms generated by the CRSI. An actual experiment of laser wavefront distortion measurement is implemented successfully. The experimental results show that this optoelectromic measurement system can measure laser wavefront distortion of a phased-array laser radar in accuracy and in real time.

  1. The problem of regime summaries of the data from radar observations. [for cloud system identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divinskaya, B. S.; Salman, Y. M.

    1975-01-01

    Peculiarities of the radar information about clouds are examined in comparison with visual data. An objective radar classification is presented and the relation of it to the meteorological classification is shown. The advisability of storage and summarization of the primary radar data for regime purposes is substantiated.

  2. HERMES: a high-speed radar imaging system for inspection of bridge decks

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.

    1996-10-26

    Corrosion of rebar in concrete bridges causes subsurface cracks and is a major cause of structural degradation that necessitates repair or replacement. Early detection of corrosion effects can limit the location and extent of necessary repairs, while providing long-term information about the infrastructure status. Most current detection methods, however, are destructive of the road surface and require closing or restricting traffic while the tests are performed. A ground-penetrating radar imaging system has been designed and developed that will perform the nondestructive evaluation of road-bed cracking at traffic speeds; i.e., without the need to restrict traffic flow. The first-generation system (called the HERMES bridge inspector), consists of an offset-linear array of 64 impulse radar transceivers and associated electronics housed in a trailer. Computers in the trailer and in the towing vehicle control the data acquisition, processing, and display. Cross-road resolution is three centimeters at up to 30 cm in depth, while down-road resolution depends on speed; 3 cm below 20 mph up to 8 cm at 50 mph. A two-meter- wide path is inspected on each pass over the roadway. This paper, describes the design of this system, shows preliminary results, and lays out its deployment schedule.

  3. The application of digital signal processing techniques to a teleoperator radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujol, A.

    1982-01-01

    A digital signal processing system was studied for the determination of the spectral frequency distribution of echo signals from a teleoperator radar system. The system consisted of a sample and hold circuit, an analog to digital converter, a digital filter, and a Fast Fourier Transform. The system is interfaced to a 16 bit microprocessor. The microprocessor is programmed to control the complete digital signal processing. The digital filtering and Fast Fourier Transform functions are implemented by a S2815 digital filter/utility peripheral chip and a S2814A Fast Fourier Transform chip. The S2815 initially simulates a low-pass Butterworth filter with later expansion to complete filter circuit (bandpass and highpass) synthesizing.

  4. Performance metric development for a group state estimator in airborne UHF GMTI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elwell, Ryan A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of evaluation metrics for group state estimator (GSE, i.e. group tracking) algorithms. Key differences between group tracker metrics and individual tracker metrics are the method used for track-to-truth association and the characterization of group raid size. Another significant contribution of this work is the incorporation of measured radar performance in assessing tracker performance. The result of this work is a set of measures of performance derived from canonical individual target tracker metrics, extended to characterize the additional information provided by a group tracker. The paper discusses additional considerations in group tracker evaluation, including the definition of a group and group-to-group confusion. Metrics are computed on real field data to provide examples of real-world analysis, demonstrating an approach which provides characterization of group tracker performance, independent of the sensor's performance.

  5. On the combined use of radar systems for multi-scale imaging of transport infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, I.; Bavusi, M.; Loperte, A.; Crocco, L.; Soldovieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) systems are worth to be considered as in situ non invasive diagnostic tools capable of assessing stability and integrity of transport infrastructures. As a matter of fact, by exploiting the interactions among probing electromagnetic waves and hidden objects, they provide images of the inner status of the spatial region under test from which infer risk factors, such as deformations and oxidization of the reinforcement bars as well as water infiltrations, crack and air gaps. With respect to the assessment of concrete infrastructures integrity, the reconstruction capabilities of GPR systems have been widely investigated [1,2]. However, the demand for diagnostic tools capable of providing detailed and real time information motivates the design and the performance evaluation of novel technologies and data processing methodologies aimed not only to effectively detect hidden anomalies but also to estimate their geometrical features. In this framework, this communication aims at investigating the advantages offered by the joint use of two GPR systems both of them equipped with a specific tomographic imaging approach. The first considered system is a time domain GPR equipped with a 1.5GHz shielded antenna, which is suitable for quick and good resolution surveys of the shallower layers of the structure. As second system, the holographic radar Rascan-4/4000 [3,4] is taken into account, due to its capability of providing holograms of hidden targets from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered field and a reference signal. The imaging capabilities of both the GPR tools are enhanced by means of model based data processing approaches, which afford the imaging as a linear inverse scattering problem. Mathematical details on the inversion strategies will be provided at the conference. The combined use of the above GPR systems allows to perform multi-resolution surveys of the region under test, whose aim is, first of all, to detect hidden anomalies and then to provide a high resolution image of their geometrical features. Therefore, reliable and efficient diagnostic surveys devoted to state the healthy state of a structure can be scheduled. Numerical examples and on field validations assessing the achievable reconstruction capabilities will be provided at the conference. [1] D. J. Daniels, Ground Penetrating Radar, in IEE Radar, Sonar and Navigation Series 15, London, U.K.: IEE, 2004. [2] M. Proto, M. Bavusi, R. Bernini et al., Transport Infrastructure Surveillance and Monitoring by Electromagnetic Sensing: The ISTIMES Project, Sensors, vol.10, n.12, pp.10620-10639, 2010. [3] S. Ivashov, I. A. Vasiliev, T. D. Bechtel, C. Snapp, Comparison between impulse and holographic subsurface radar for NDT of space vehicle structural materials, Progress In Electromagnetic Research, vol.3, pp.658-661, 2004. [4] I. Catapano. L. Crocco, A. F. Morabito, F. Soldovieri, Tomographic imaging of holographic GPR data for non-invasive structural assessment: the Musmeci Bridge investigation, submitted to Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation Acknowledgement The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement no 225663.

  6. Trilateration-based localization algorithm for ADS-B radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Shih

    Rapidly increasing growth and demand in various unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) have pushed governmental regulation development and numerous technology research advances toward integrating unmanned and manned aircraft into the same civil airspace. Safety of other airspace users is the primary concern; thus, with the introduction of UAV into the National Airspace System (NAS), a key issue to overcome is the risk of a collision with manned aircraft. The challenge of UAV integration is global. As automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) system has gained wide acceptance, additional exploitations of the radioed satellite-based information are topics of current interest. One such opportunity includes the augmentation of the communication ADS-B signal with a random bi-phase modulation for concurrent use as a radar signal for detecting other aircraft in the vicinity. This dissertation provides detailed discussion about the ADS-B radar system, as well as the formulation and analysis of a suitable non-cooperative multi-target tracking method for the ADS-B radar system using radar ranging techniques and particle filter algorithms. In order to deal with specific challenges faced by the ADS-B radar system, several estimation algorithms are studied. Trilateration-based localization algorithms are proposed due to their easy implementation and their ability to work with coherent signal sources. The centroid of three most closely spaced intersections of constant-range loci is conventionally used as trilateration estimate without rigorous justification. In this dissertation, we address the quality of trilateration intersections through range scaling factors. A number of well-known triangle centers, including centroid, incenter, Lemoine point (LP), and Fermat point (FP), are discussed in detail. To the author's best knowledge, LP was never associated with trilateration techniques. According our study, LP is proposed as the best trilateration estimator thanks to the desirable property that the total distance to three triangle edges is minimized. It is demonstrated through simulation that LP outperforms centroid localization without additional computational load. In addition, severe trilateration scenarios such as two-intersection cases are considered in this dissertation, and enhanced trilateration algorithms are proposed. Particle filter (PF) is also discussed in this dissertation, and a simplified resampling mechanism is proposed. In addition, the low-update-rate measurement due to the ADS-B system specification is addressed in order to provide acceptable estimation results. Supplementary particle filter (SPF) is proposed to takes advantage of the waiting time before the next measurement is available and improves the estimation convergence rate and estimation accuracy. While PF suffers from sample impoverishment, especially when the number of particles is not sufficiently large, SPF allows the particles to redistribute to high likelihood areas over iterations using the same measurement information, thereby improving the estimation performance.

  7. Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relationships for radar hydrology Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(4), 615627 (2001) EGS

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Raindrop size distributions and radar reflectivity-rain rate relationships for radar hydrology 615 reflectivity­rain rate relationships for radar hydrology* Remko Uijlenhoet1 Sub-department Water Resources factor Z (mm6 m-3 ) to rain rate R (mm h-1 ) is a crucial step in the hydrological application of weather

  8. Shuttle synthetic aperture radar implementation study, volume 1. [flight instrument and ground data processor system for collecting raw imaged radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlis, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    Results of an implementation study for a synthetic aperture radar for the space shuttle orbiter are described. The overall effort was directed toward the determination of the feasibility and usefulness of a multifrequency, multipolarization imaging radar for the shuttle orbiter. The radar is intended for earth resource monitoring as well as oceanographic and marine studies.

  9. Radar systems for the water resources mission. Volume 4: Appendices E-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Claassen, J. P.; Erickson, R. L.; Fong, R. K. T.; Hanson, B. C.; Komen, M. J.; Mcmillan, S. B.; Parashar, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    The use of a scanning antenna beam for a synthetic aperture system was examined. When the resolution required was modest, the radar did not use all the time the beam was passing a given point on the ground to build a synthetic aperture, so time was available to scan the beam to other positions and build several images at different ranges. The scanning synthetic-aperture radar (SCANSAR) could achieve swathwidths of well over 100 km with modest antenna size. Design considerations for a SCANSAR for hydrologic parameter observation are presented. Because of the high sensitivity to soil moisture at angles of incidence near vertical, a 7 to 22 deg swath was considered for that application. For snow and ice monitoring, a 22 to 37 deg scan was used. Frequencies from X-band to L-band were used in the design studies, but the proposed system operated in C-band at 4.75 GHz. It achieved an azimuth resolution of about 50 meters at all angles, with a range resolution varying from 150 meters at 7 deg to 31 meters at 37 deg. The antenna required an aperture of 3 x 4.16 meters, and the average transmitter power was under 2 watts.

  10. REVS: a radar-based enhanced vision system for degraded visual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brailovsky, Alexander; Bode, Justin; Cariani, Pete; Cross, Jack; Gleason, Josh; Khodos, Victor; Macias, Gary; Merrill, Rahn; Randall, Chuck; Rudy, Dean

    2014-06-01

    Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has developed an enhanced vision system utilizing fast-scanning 94 GHz radar technology to provide three-dimensional measurements of an aircraft's forward external scene topography. This threedimensional data is rendered as terrain imagery, from the pilot's perspective, on a Head-Up Display (HUD). The image provides the requisite "enhanced vision" to continue a safe approach along the flight path below the Decision Height (DH) in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) that would otherwise be cause for a missed approach. Terrain imagery is optionally fused with digital elevation model (DEM) data of terrain outside the radar field of view, giving the pilot additional situational awareness. Flight tests conducted in 2013 show that REVS™ has sufficient resolution and sensitivity performance to allow identification of requisite visual references well above decision height in dense fog. This paper provides an overview of the Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) concept, of the technology underlying REVS, and a detailed discussion of the flight test results.

  11. Experimental Evaluation of Adaptive Beamforming Methods and Interference Models for High Frequency Over-the-Horizon Radar Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Fabrizio; D. A. Gray; M. D. Turley

    2003-01-01

    This paper experimentally evaluates the interference cancellation performance of different adaptive beamforming schemes applicable to high frequency (HF) over-the-horizon (OTH) radar systems. Such systems are known to receive multipath and diffusely scattered radio frequency interference produced as a result of reflection from the stratified, dynamic and spatially inhomogeneous ionospheric propagation medium. Apart from quantifying the effectiveness of operational adaptive beamformers

  12. The potential of bistatic HF surface wave radar system for the surveillance of water-entry area along coastline

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Leong

    2006-01-01

    A bistatic\\/monostatic HF surface wave radar (HFSWR) experiment was conducted using both the transmit and receive systems of the HFSWR at Cape Race, Newfoundland and the receive system of the HFSWR at Cape Bonavista, Newfoundland. While the HFSWR at Cape Race operated in the monostatic mode, the transmitter at Cape Race and the receiver at Cape Bonavista were synchronized via

  13. Tomographic data developed using the ABEM RAMAC borehole radar system at the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, G.A.; Barker, D.L.; Molnar, S. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-02-18

    The ABEM RAMAC borehole radar system was run as part of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration for Sandia National Laboratories at Kirtland AFB. Tomograms were created between three test boreholes-UCAP No. 1, UCAP No. 2, and UCAP No. 3. These tomograms clearly delineate areas of amplitude attenuation and residual time of arrival or slowness differences. Plots for slowness were made using both the maximum and minimum of the first arrival pulse. The data demonstrates that the ABEM RAMAC 60-MHz pulse sampling radar system can be used to collect usable data in a highly conductive environment.

  14. A System Concept for the Advanced Post-TRMM Rainfall Profiling Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Smith, Eric A.

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric latent heating field is fundamental to all modes of atmospheric circulation and upper mixed layer circulations of the ocean. The key to understanding the atmospheric heating process is understanding how and where precipitation occurs. The principal atmospheric processes which link precipitation to atmospheric circulation include: (1) convective mass fluxes in the form of updrafts and downdrafts; (2) microphysical. nucleation and growth of hydrometeors; and (3) latent heating through dynamical controls on the gravitation-driven vertical mass flux of precipitation. It is well-known that surface and near-surface rainfall are two of the key forcing functions on a number of geophysical parameters at the surface-air interface. Over ocean, rainfall variation contributes to the redistribution of water salinity, sea surface temperature, fresh water supply, and marine biology and eco-system. Over land, rainfall plays a significant role in rainforest ecology and chemistry, land hydrology and surface runoff. Precipitation has also been closely linked to a number of atmospheric anomalies and natural hazards that occur at various time scales, including hurricanes, cyclones, tropical depressions, flash floods, droughts, and most noticeable of all, the El Ninos. From this point of view, the significance of global atmospheric precipitation has gone far beyond the science arena - it has a far-reaching impact on human's socio-economic well-being and sustenance. These and many other science applications require the knowledge of, in a global basis, the vertical rain structures, including vertical motion, rain intensity, differentiation of the precipitating hydrometeors' phase state, and the classification of mesoscale physical structure of the rain systems. The only direct means to obtain such information is the use of a spaceborne profiling radar. It is important to mention that the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) have made a great stride forward towards this ultimate goal. The Precipitation Radar (PR) aboard the TRMM satellite is the first ever spaceborne radar dedicated to three-dimensional, global precipitation measurements over the tropics and the subtropics, as well as the detailed synopsis of a wide range of tropical rain storm systems. In only twelve months since launch, the PR, together with other science instruments abroad the satellite have already provided unprecedented insights into the rainfall systems. It is anticipated the a lot more exciting and important rain observations would be made by TRMM throughout its mission duration. While TRMM has provided invaluable data to the user community, it is only the first step towards advancing our knowledge on rain processes and its contributions to climate variability. It is envisioned that a TRMM follow-on mission is needed in such a way to capitalize on the pioneering information provided by TRMM, and its instrument capability must be extended beyond TRMM in such a way to fully address the key science questions from microphysical to climatic time scale. In fact, a number of new and innovative mission concepts have recently put forth for this purpose. Almost all of these new concepts have suggested the utility of a more advanced, high-resolution, Doppler-enabled, vertical profiling radar that can provide multi-parameter observations of precipitation. In this paper, a system concept for a second- gene ration precipitation radar (PR-2) which addresses the above requirements will be described.

  15. Determination of the effectiveness of commercial-off-the-shelf radar in the cuing of unmanned aerial vehicle pan-tilt-zoom camera systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Joseph Ford

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the use of low-cost commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radar in support of the cuing of pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) optical payload systems. Cancellation of the U.S. Navy's vertical take off and landing (VTOL) unmanned aerial vehicle (VTUAV) program left the Navy without a UAV with radar sensor capability. Using a UAV PTZ optical payload and a COTS radar, this study collected

  16. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  17. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  18. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  19. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  20. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29...Additional Provisions § 15.252 Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and...

  1. Characterization of Adolescent Prescription Drug Abuse and Misuse Using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS[R]) System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zosel, Amy; Bartelson, Becki Bucher; Bailey, Elise; Lowenstein, Steven; Dart, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the characteristics and health effects of adolescent (age 13-19 years) prescription drug abuse and misuse using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS[R])) System. Method: Secondary analysis of data collected from RADARS System participating poison centers was performed. Data for all…

  2. Nonlinear filtering for tracking large objects in radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenewald, John H.; Musick, Stanton H.

    2005-05-01

    Detecting and tracking a moving ground target in radar imagery is a challenge intensified by clutter, sensor anomalies, and the substantial signature variations that occur when a target's aspect angle changes rapidly. In its GMTI mode, a radar produces range-Doppler images that contain both kinematic reports and shape features. An HRR signature, when formed as the Fourier transform of the range-Doppler image across its Doppler dimension, becomes a derived measurement and an alternative source of identity information. Although HRR signatures can vary enormously with even small changes in target aspect, such signatures were vital for associating kinematic reports to tracks in this work. This development started with video phase history (VPH) data recorded from a live experiment involving a GMTI radar viewing a single moving target. Since the target could appear anywhere in the range-Doppler image derived from the VPH data, the goal was to localize it in a small range-Doppler "chip" that could be extracted and used in subsequent research. Although the clutter in any given VPH frame generally caused false chips to be formed in the full range-Doppler image, at most one chip contained the target. The most effective approach for creating any chip is to ensure that the object is present in the return from each pulse that contributes to that chip, and to correct any phase distortions arising from range gate changes. Processing constraints dictated that the algorithm for target chip extraction be coded in MATLAB with a time budget of a few seconds per frame. Furthermore, templates and shape models to describe the target were prohibited. This paper describes the nonlinear filtering approach used to reason over multiple frames of VPH data. This nonlinear approach automatically detects and segments potential targets in the range-Doppler imagery, and then extracts kinematic and shape features that are tracked over multiple data frames to ensure that the real target is in the declared chip. The algorithm described was used successfully to process over 84,000 frames of real data without human assistance.

  3. The System and Implementation Aspects of the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, R.; Biccari, D.; Bombaci, O.; Gurnett, D.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Kirchner, D.; Picardi, G.; Plaut, J.; Safaeinili, A.

    2001-01-01

    MARSIS is a radar sounder operating in the HF frequency range to sound the surface of Mars, which will operate from the ESA Mars Express spacecraft. It is scheduled for launch from Baikonour, Russia in June 2003 and arrives in orbit around Mars in early 2004 for a two-year mission. This system is the result of an international collaboration between NASA, the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and European Space Agency (ESA). The MARSIS instrument is a 17 Kilogram total mass sounder consisting of a 40 meter tip-to-tip dipole antenna, a 7 meter long monopole antenna and the electronics module. This design of MARSIS is a tradeoff between the expected penetration into the Martian subsurface that is proportional to the wavelength of the system and the desire to operate at a short wavelength in order to minimize the effects of the ionosphere. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Spatial and diurnal variation of precipitation systems over Asia observed by the TRMM Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Masafumi; Nakamura, Kenji

    2005-03-01

    The spatial and diurnal variation of rainfall over Asia was investigated using the spaceborne radar data for four seasons during 1998-2003. The regional variation of the prevailing precipitation systems most closely associated with the maximum hourly rainfall was shown by examining the fine spatial distribution of rainfall amount and scale-based precipitation systems. Small precipitation systems (<102 km2) occurred most frequently around early afternoon over most land. The south facing slopes of the Himalayas, especially south of Mount Everest and the upper portion of the Brahmaputra valley, is the most obvious region of the daytime genesis of the convective systems over the Asian landmass. Over the Tibetan Plateau the occurrence of the small systems was larger than over inland India and the foothills. Large systems (>104 km2) developed mostly in the evening over nearly flat landmasses. Wide-spread systems with intense rain pixels developed over the foothills of the Himalayas in late night-early morning period, which was distinct from the daytime convection. Over ocean, in addition to the morning signature, spatially inhomogeneous and systematic characteristics were evident over the offshore region, for example, around the maritime continent. Large systems, which are strongly associated with terrain, have a great influence on the total number of rain pixels and the total amount of rainfall. For 86% of the region where large system is dominant the time of maximum rainfall is within 3 hours of the time of maximum rainfall for large systems.

  5. Design considerations for high-power VHF radar transceivers: The Poker Flat MST radar phase control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.; Johnson, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Sixty-four separate 50-kW peak-power transmitters are distributed throughout the 200 x 200 meter Poker Flat MST radar antenna array. The relative phase of each transmitter is automatically controlled by a 64-channel unit located in the main building at the edge of the antenna. The phase control unit is described. In operation the RF pulse from a transmitter coupler is power divided and compared with the phase reference in a mixer. The mixer output is low-pass filtered and sampled near the center of the resulting video pulse by an amplifying sample-and-hold integrated circuit. Phase control is effected by maintaining the mixer output pulse near zero volts by amplifying the sample-and-hold output which then drives the voltage-controlled phase shifter in the direction to null the mixer output. The voltage-controlled shifter achieves over 360 deg phase shift in the range from 0.7 to 24 volts. When the voltage into the shifter tracks to either voltage limit the wrap-around control resets the voltage so that the shifter is always operating within its control range.

  6. Road safety alerting system with radar and GPS cooperation in a VANET environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Amilcare Francesco; Sottile, Cesare; De Rango, Floriano; Voznak, Miroslav

    2014-05-01

    New applications in wireless environments are increasing and keeping even more interests from the developer companies and researchers. In particular, in these last few years the government and institutional organization for road safety spent a lot of resources and money to promote Vehicular Ad-Hoc Network (VANET) technology, also car manufactures are giving a lot of contributions on this field as well. In our paper, we propose an innovative system to increase road safety, matching the requests of the market allowing a cooperation between on-board devices. The vehicles are equipped with On Board Unit (OBU) and On Board Radar Unit (OBRU), which can spread alerting messages around the network regarding warning and dangerous situations exploiting IEEE802.llp standard. Vehicles move along roads observing the environment, traffic and road conditions, and vehicles parameters as well. These information can be elaborated and shared between neighbors, Road Side Unit (RSU)s and, of course, with Internet, allowing inter-system communications exploiting an Road Traffic Manager (RTM). Radar systems task it the detection of the environment in order to increase the knowledge of current conditions of the roads, for example it is important to identify obstacles, road accidents, dangerous situations and so on. Once detected exploiting onboard devices, such as Global Position System (GPS) receiver it is possible to know the exact location of the caught event and after a data elaboration the information is spread along the network. Once the drivers are advised, they can make some precautionary actions such as reduction of traveling speed or modification of current road path. In this work the routing algorithms, which have the main goal to rapidly disseminate information, are also been investigated.

  7. Radar Entomology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    0000-00-00

    Radar tracking used to profile insect migration, mating and flight patterns. Many links to various pages include current workers in radar entomology, historical uses of the technology, and many images.

  8. Radar principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Toru

    1989-01-01

    Discussed here is a kind of radar called atmospheric radar, which has as its target clear air echoes from the earth's atmosphere produced by fluctuations of the atmospheric index of refraction. Topics reviewed include the vertical structure of the atmosphere, the radio refractive index and its fluctuations, the radar equation (a relation between transmitted and received power), radar equations for distributed targets and spectral echoes, near field correction, pulsed waveforms, the Doppler principle, and velocity field measurements.

  9. Advantages to Geoscience and Disaster Response from QuakeSim Implementation of Interferometric Radar Maps in a GIS Database System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jay; Donnellan, Andrea; Glasscoe, Margaret; Fox, Geoffrey; Wang, Jun; Pierce, Marlon; Ma, Yu

    2014-07-01

    High-resolution maps of earth surface deformation are available in public archives for scientific interpretation, but are primarily available as bulky downloads on the internet. The NASA uninhabited aerial vehicle synthetic aperture radar (UAVSAR) archive of airborne radar interferograms delivers very high resolution images (approximately seven meter pixels) making remote handling of the files that much more pressing. Data exploration requiring data selection and exploratory analysis has been tedious. QuakeSim has implemented an archive of UAVSAR data in a web service and browser system based on GeoServer (http://geoserver.org). This supports a variety of services that supply consistent maps, raster image data and geographic information systems (GIS) objects including standard earthquake faults. Browsing the database is supported by initially displaying GIS-referenced thumbnail images of the radar displacement maps. Access is also provided to image metadata and links for full file downloads. One of the most widely used features is the QuakeSim line-of-sight profile tool, which calculates the radar-observed displacement (from an unwrapped interferogram product) along a line specified through a web browser. Displacement values along a profile are updated to a plot on the screen as the user interactively redefines the endpoints of the line and the sampling density. The profile and also a plot of the ground height are available as CSV (text) files for further examination, without any need to download the full radar file. Additional tools allow the user to select a polygon overlapping the radar displacement image, specify a downsampling rate and extract a modest sized grid of observations for display or for inversion, for example, the QuakeSim simplex inversion tool which estimates a consistent fault geometry and slip model.

  10. Electro-optical and radar systems for disaster management: lessons and perspectives from India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, V. S.; Srivastava, S. K.; Bandyopadhayay, S.; Manikiam, B.

    2006-12-01

    Using conjunctively electro-optical and radar systems has been a part of India's Earth Observation (EO) strategy for disaster management. To address the gaps in the operational systems of disaster management, increasingly improved quality of information in terms of spatial scale, temporal scale and all weather capability mapping are called for and the EO satellites have accordingly been configured. For example, CCD camera (1 km spatial resolution) in GEO orbiting INSAT satellites, which work in conjunction with polar orbiting IRS WiFS (188 m spatial resolution) for real time coarse observations of the events such as forest fire, floods etc is in operation. To address the subtle features associated with agricultural drought, Resourcesat has been configured with Advanced WiFS having 55 m spatial, 5 days repetativitity, 740 km swath and 10 bits radiometry. It is a unique mission with variety of payloads viz., AWiFS, LISS 4 (5.8 m multi-spectral; 22 days repetativitity) and PAN from the same platform. The Digital Elevation Models (DEM) emanating from Cartosat are providing valuable inputs to characterize geo-physical terrain vulnerability. Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT), with all weather capability mission, is yet another mission configured for disaster management. Taking into account the flood dynamics as well as the river basin parameters, RISAST is being configured with multiparametric C-band SAR with 5 imaging modes; 1-2 m spatial resolution; 224 km swath; 7 days repetitivity and 8 bits quantizations. Integrating these capabilities, space based Disaster Management Support (DMS) systems, in India, has been built upon committing EO enabled products and services for disaster reduction on operational basis.

  11. Volumetric analysis of a New England barrier system using ground-penetrating-radar and coring techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Heteren, S.; FitzGerald, D.M.; Barber, D.C.; Kelley, J.T.; Belknap, D.F.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-penetrating-radar (GPR) profiles calibrated with core data allow accurate assessments of coastal barrier volumes. We applied this procedure successfully to the barrier system along Saco Bay, Maine (USA), as part of a sediment-budget study that focused on present-day sand volumes in various coastal, shoreface, and inner-shelf lith-osomes, and on sand fluxes that have affected the volume or distribution of sand in these sediment bodies through time. On GPR profiles, the components of the barrier lithosome are readily differentiated from other facies, except where the radar signal is attenuated by brackish or salty groundwater. Significant differences between dielectric properties of the barrier lithosome and other units commonly result in strong boundary reflectors. The mostly sandy barrier sediments allow deep penetration of GPR waves, in contrast to finer-grained strata and till-covered bedrock. Within the Saco Bay barrier system, 22 ??3 x 106 m3 of sediment are unevenly distributed. Two-thirds of the total barrier volume is contained within the northern and southern ends of the study area, in the Pine Point spit and the Ferry Beach/Goosefare complex, respectively. The central area around Old Orchard Beach is locally covered by only a thin veneer of barrier sand, averaging <3 m, that unconformably overlies shallow pre-Holocene facies. The prominence of barrier-spit facies and the distribution pattern of back-barrier sediments indicate that a high degree of segmentation, governed by antecedent topography, has affected the development of the Saco Bay barrier system. The present-day configuration of the barrier and back-barrier region along Saco Bay, however, conceals much of its early compartmentalized character.

  12. Regional and Diurnal Variability of the Vertical Structure of Precipitation Systems in Africa Based on Spaceborne Radar Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bart Geerts; Teferi Dejene

    2005-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 2A25 radar reflectivity profiles and derived surface rain rates are used to describe the vertical structure of precipitation systems in Africa. Five years of data are used in both the boreal and austral summer rainy seasons. A number of climate regions are isolated and compared. To place the composite reflectivity profiles in context, they

  13. Application of multitemporal ERS-2 synthetic aperture radar in delineating rice cropping systems in the Mekong River Delta, Vietnam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soo Chin Liew; Suan-Pheng Kam; To-Phuc Tuong; Ping Chen; Vo Quang Minh; Hock Lim

    1998-01-01

    The authors report the use of multitemporal ERS-2 satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images in delineating and mapping areas under different rice cropping systems in the Mekong River Delta, Vietnam. Change index maps were generated from seven images acquired between May and December 1996. Using a 3-dB threshold, the pixels in each change index (CI) map were classified into one

  14. MAARSY -The Middle Atmosphere ALOMAR Radar System: Motivation, system description, observation strategies and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latteck, Ralph; Singer, Werner; Stober, Gunter; Renkwitz, Toralf; Zecha, Marius; Rapp, Markus

    The Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics is building a new MST-Radar (MAARSY) at the Andoya Rocket Range in Northern Norway. The scientific objective of MAARSY is the investigation of horizontal and vertical structures in the Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere and in the Mesosphere/Lower Thermosphere with a high vertical and horizontal resolution. The VHF radar operates at 53.5 MHz and reaches a peak power of 866 kW for the complete aperture. The complete aperture can be used to form a narrow (3.4° ) and freely steerable (<30° from zenith) radar beam or to create several independent steerable beams. This is achieved by connecting each of the 433 Yagi antennas to its own transceiver. Each transceiver provides a maximum power of 2kW and can be separately controlled in both phase and transmitted power. This flexibility allows us to perform a variety of experiments comprising classical Doppler-Beam-Swinging and Full Correlation Analysis, and more advanced methods such as interferometric techniques and different vertical and horizontal scanning modes with up to 50 beam positions. The installation of MAARSY started in 2009 and the full extension is scheduled for spring 2011. We present first results obtained with an initial expansion stage of MAARSY during spring and early summer 2010.

  15. Radar, Insect Population Ecology, and Pest Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, C. R. (editor); Wolf, W. (editor); Klassen, W. (editor)

    1979-01-01

    Discussions included: (1) the potential role of radar in insect ecology studies and pest management; (2) the potential role of radar in correlating atmospheric phenomena with insect movement; (3) the present and future radar systems; (4) program objectives required to adapt radar to insect ecology studies and pest management; and (5) the specific action items to achieve the objectives.

  16. Doppler Radar Technology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource provides an introduction to the function and uses of the The National Weather Service's (NWS) Weather Surveillance Doppler Radar (WSR-88D). Topics include the components of the system, an overview of the products and overlays the system creates, and some example images with captions explaining what is being shown. There are also links to radar meteorology tutorials and to information on training to use the system and interpret its imagery.

  17. Millimeter-wavelength cloud measurements taken with the polarimetric cloud profiling radar system

    SciTech Connect

    Sekelsky, S.M.; McIntosh, R.E. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This paper reviews hardware for the Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) and presents dual-frequency measurements that illustrate how CPRS reflectivity data may be used for cloud particle sizing. Reflectivity data show Mie scattering in the ice region, melting layer, and rain region of a stratiform cloud with light, broken precipitation. Measurements of Ze{sub 95} and Ze{sub 33} with and without precipitation show that differential attenuation is low and does not dominate the reflectivity differences. A theoretical model of Ze{sub 95} - Ze{sub 33} versus mean particle diameter for monodisperse and Gaussian size distributions of water droplets is presented to illustrate the concept of particle sizing using dual-wavelength reflectivity data.

  18. Dynamic calibration and compensation of a 3-D laser radar scanning system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.D. (Perceptron, Inc., Farmington Hills, MI (United States)); Ni, J. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    LIDAR (laser radar) is used to measure three-dimensional (3-D) object positions. It produces a range and an intensity image of the measured object and relies on the range image to determine the 3-D positions of the object. But, the range image is frequently corrupted with noise. A dynamic calibration method has been established to improve the LIDAR accuracy based on a polynomial calibration model and an autoregressive moving average (ARV) calibration model. Experimental results show that the measurements errors of the LIDAR system have been reduced from 163 counts to 18 counts after compensation using the polynomial calibration model and that the errors have been further reduced to 11 counts with the ARV model.

  19. Ground penetrating detection using miniaturized radar system based on solid state microwave sensor.

    PubMed

    Yao, B M; Fu, L; Chen, X S; Lu, W; Guo, H; Gui, Y S; Hu, C-M

    2013-12-01

    We propose a solid-state-sensor-based miniaturized microwave radar technique, which allows a rapid microwave phase detection for continuous wave operation using a lock-in amplifier rather than using expensive and complicated instruments such as vector network analyzers. To demonstrate the capability of this sensor-based imaging technique, the miniaturized system has been used to detect embedded targets in sand by measuring the reflection for broadband microwaves. Using the reconstruction algorithm, the imaging of the embedded target with a diameter less than 5 cm buried in the sands with a depth of 5 cm or greater is clearly detected. Therefore, the sensor-based approach emerges as an innovative and cost-effective way for ground penetrating detection. PMID:24387449

  20. Radar applications overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspan, Marshall

    1996-06-01

    During the fifty years since its initial development as a means of providing early warning of airborne attacks against allied countries during World War II, radar systems have developed to the point of being highly mobile and versatile systems capable of supporting a wide variety of remote sensing applications. Instead of being tied to stationary land-based sites, radar systems have found their way into highly mobile land vehicles as well as into aircraft, missiles, and ships of all sizes. Of all these applications, however, the most exciting revolution has occurred in the airborne platform arena where advanced technology radars can be found in all shapes and sizes...ranging from the large AWACS and Joint STARS long range surveillance and targeting systems to small millimeter wave multi-spectral sensors on smart weapons that can detect and identify their targets through the use of highly sophisticated digital signal processing hardware and software. This paper presents an overview of these radar applications with the emphasis on modern airborne sensors that span the RF spectrum. It will identify and describe the factors that influence the parameters of low frequency and ultra wide band radars designed to penetrate ground and dense foliage environments and locate within them buried mines, enemy armor, and other concealed or camouflaged weapons of war. It will similarly examine the factors that lead to the development of airborne radar systems that support long range extended endurance airborne surveillance platforms designed to detect and precision-located both small high speed airborne threats as well as highly mobile time critical moving and stationary surface vehicles. The mission needs and associated radar design impacts will be contrasted with those of radar systems designed for high maneuverability rapid acquisition tactical strike warfare platforms, and shorter range cued air-to-surface weapons with integral smart radar sensors.

  1. STAP II - Advanced concepts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Goldstein; M. Picciolo

    2008-01-01

    Space-time adaptive processing (STAP) is an advanced signal processing methodology for the Ground Moving Target Indication (GMTI) mode of airborne and space borne surveillance radar systems. It is used to mitigate motion-induced spread-Doppler clutter that interferes with the echo from ground targets. The course will develop and clearly illustrate the GMTI problem from first principles, showing the need for STAP

  2. 78 FR 19063 - Airworthiness Approval for Aircraft Forward-Looking Windshear and Turbulence Radar Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ...functionalities in Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C63d, Airborne Weather Radar Equipment. The objective is to leverage the installation...as additional functionality added to TSO-C63c, Airborne Weather and Ground Mapping Pulsed Radars. The FAA and industry...

  3. An FPGA-based data acquisition system for a 95 GHz W-band radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Petronino; Ray Bambha; James Carswell; W. Burleson

    1997-01-01

    We describe a 95 GHz radar for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The radar measures vertical profiles of the reflectivity and Doppler velocity of clouds, which are then telemetered to the ground for storage. Telemetry bandwidth requires that substantial real-time data processing be done on the UAV in a low-power (less than 100 watts) and small size (less than 1

  4. A velocity dealiasing scheme for C-band weather radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; He, Guangxin; Zou, Xiaolei; Ray, Peter Sawin

    2014-01-01

    A dealiasing algorithm for radar radial velocity observed by C-band Doppler radars is presented as an extension of an existing S-band dealiasing algorithm. This has operational significance in that many portable and many commercial broadcast radars, as well as approximately one half of the Chinese weather radar network (CINRAD), are C-band radars. With a wavelength of about 5 cm, the Nyquist interval of C-band radars is just about one half that of S-band radars (wavelength of about 10 cm) and thus has more velocity folding. The proposed algorithm includes seven modules to remove noisy data, find the starting radials, dealias velocities, and apply least squares error checking in both the radial and azimuth directions. The proposed velocity dealiasing method was applied to one widespread rain case and three strong convective cases from radars operating in China. It was found that, on average, 92.95% of the aliased radial velocity data could be correctly de-aliased by the algorithm, resulting in 96.65% of the data being valid.

  5. Detection and classification results for an impulse radar mine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericsson, Anders; Gustafsson, Anders

    1997-07-01

    At Sweden's Defence Research Establishment, FOA, a hand-held mine detection device is under development. The system is based on impulse radar technique, which due to its large band width, has shown to be an effective means to find objects buried shallow in the ground. Working with radar technique gives an obvious advantage compared to e.g., metal detectors when searching for plastic mines, or when the search is performed in an area highly contaminated with metal fragments or when the soil itself is rich of ferrite. The paper concentrates on detection and classification of minelike objects from measurements in an indoor testing environment. The focus is on evaluating how methods, partly already successfully proven, work in a 'difficult' environment, namely extremely dry sand. The result shows that metal objects and a stone that was used as object, are fairly easy to detect and to classify correct. The fact that the stone is classifiable, means that the false alarm rate can be reduced. It is also possible to detect a nylon cylinder, but here is the result quite sensitive to parameters of the detection algorithm. This is due to that the permittivity of the sand in the experiment is extremely low and close to the one for nylon. For the same reason, a non-metallic AP mine is not detectable or classifiable in the dry sand. The results indicate that even thought he methods work in more normal environments, other detection and classification algorithms than the presented ones have to be used in extreme cases like this one, in order ensure the function of the device.

  6. The Utility and Validity of Kinematic GPS Positioning for the Geosar Airborne Terrain Mapping Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Adam; Hensley, Scott; Chapin, Elaine; Kroger, Peter; Hussain, Mushtaq; Allred, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    GeoSAR is an airborne, interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) system for terrain mapping, currently under development by a consortium including NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Calgis, Inc., a California mapping sciences company, and the California Department of Conservation (CaIDOC), with funding provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Topographic Engineering Center (TEC) and the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). IFSAR data processing requires high-accuracy platform position and attitude knowledge. On 9 GeoSAR, these are provided by one or two Honeywell Embedded GPS Inertial Navigation Units (EGI) and an Ashtech Z12 GPS receiver. The EGIs provide real-time high-accuracy attitude and moderate-accuracy position data, while the Ashtech data, post-processed differentially with data from a nearby ground station using Ashtech PNAV software, provide high-accuracy differential GPS positions. These data are optimally combined using a Kalman filter within the GeoSAR motion measurement software, and the resultant position and orientation information are used to process the dual frequency (X-band and P-band) radar data to generate high-accuracy, high -resolution terrain imagery and digital elevation models (DEMs). GeoSAR requirements specify sub-meter level planimetric and vertical accuracies for the resultant DEMS. To achieve this, platform positioning errors well below one meter are needed. The goal of GeoSAR is to obtain 25 cm or better 3-D positions from the GPS systems on board the aircraft. By imaging a set of known point target corner-cube reflectors, the GeoSAR system can be calibrated. This calibration process yields the true position of the aircraft with an uncertainty of 20- 50 cm. This process thus allows an independent assessment of the accuracy of our GPS-based positioning systems. We will present an overview of the GeoSAR motion measurement system, focusing on the use of GPS and the blending of position data from the various systems. We will present the results of our calibration studies that relate to the accuracy the GPS positioning. We will discuss the effects these positioning, errors have on the resultant DEM products and imagery.

  7. Evaluating and managing Cold War era historic properties : the cultural significance of U.S. Air Force defensive radar systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Whorton, M.

    1999-01-20

    Aircraft and later missile radar early warning stations played an important role in the Cold War. They are associated with important technological, social, political, and military themes of the Cold War and are worthy of preservation. The scope and scale of these systems make physical preservation impractical, but the U.S. Air Force program of historical evaluation and documentation of these systems will provide valuable information to future generations studying this historic period.

  8. A class of frequency hop codes with nearly ideal characteristics for use in multiple-access spread-spectrum communications and radar and sonar systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Svetislav V. Maric; Edward L. Titlebaum

    1992-01-01

    The problem of constructing frequency hop codes for use in multiuser communication systems such as multiple-access spread-spectrum communications and multiuser radar and sonar systems is addressed. Previous frequency hopping techniques are reviewed. The construction of a new family of frequency hopping codes called hyperbolic frequency hop codes is given. The concepts of multiple-access spread-spectrum communication systems and multiuser radar and

  9. Technology: Photonics illuminates the future of radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Jason D.

    2014-03-01

    The first implementation of a fully photonics-based coherent radar system shows how photonic methods for radio-frequency signal generation and measurement may facilitate the development of software-defined radar systems. See Letter p.341

  10. A microwave measurement system for metallic object detection using swept-frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Tian, Gui Y.; Bowring, Nicholas; Rezgui, Nacer

    2008-10-01

    Guns and knives have become a significant threat to public safety. Recently, a variety of techniques based on Electromagnetics (EM) have been used for their detection. For example, walk-through metal detection has been used in airports; X-ray and THz detection systems have been used for luggage screening. Different EM frequencies for metallic object detection have demonstrated different merits. This paper reports on a 1-14 GHz swept-frequency radar system for metallic object detection using reflection configuration. The swept frequency response and resonant frequency behaviour of a number of metallic objects, in terms of position, object shape, rotation and multiple objects have been tested and analysed. The system working from 1 to 14 GHz has been set up to implement sensing of metal items at a standoff distance of more than 1 meter. Through a series of experimental investigations, it can be found that the optical depths derived from the Fourier Transform of the power spectrum profile is in close relation with the relative location of the metallic object. The cross correlation between coherence-polarisation and cross-polarisation RF returns can be used to distinguish different objects. Therefore the optical depth and the cross correlation can be used as useful features for metallic object detection and characterisation in this portion of the microwave frequency spectrum.

  11. Determination of the effectiveness of commercial-off-the-shelf radar in the cuing of unmanned aerial vehicle pan-tilt-zoom camera systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Patrick Joseph

    This study examined the use of low-cost commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radar in support of the cuing of pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) optical payload systems. Cancellation of the U.S. Navy's vertical take off and landing (VTOL) unmanned aerial vehicle (VTUAV) program left the Navy without a UAV with radar sensor capability. Using a UAV PTZ optical payload and a COTS radar, this study collected specific time difference measurements between PTZ optical payload searches without radar cuing and searches with radar cuing. In every test run conducted, searches with radar cuing reduced PTZ optical payload detection time. The study showed that a low-cost COTS radar mounted on a small UAV can meet some of the radar requirements lost with cancellation of the VTUAV program. The study results could have a direct impact on myriad of U.S. Navy and other U.S. government surveillance requirements, especially the monitoring of U.S. coastal waters in support of homeland security goals and objectives.

  12. The GeoSAR program: Development of a commercially viable 3-D radar terrain mapping system

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, R.G. [Decision-Science Applications, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Davis, M. [Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    GeoSAR is joint development between the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) and the California Department of Conservation (CA DOC) to determine the technical and economic viability of an airborne interferometric and foliage penetration synthetic aperture radar for mapping terrain and man made objects in geographical areas obscured by foliage, urban buildings, and other concealments. The two core technology elements of this program are Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) and Foliage Penetration Radar (FOPEN). These technologies have been developed by NASA and ARPA, principally for defense applications.

  13. A coherent FM laser radar based system for remote metrology in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, R.E.; Burgess, T.W.; Menon, M.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Slotwinski, A.; Sebastian, R. [Coleman Research Corp., Springfield, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The plasma facing surfaces in ITER must be aligned to millimeter accuracy with respect to the magnetic flux surfaces to prevent impurity influx into the plasma and to avoid component damage. Checking of in-vessel component alignment during initial assembly, operation, and subsequent maintenance is anticipated. A fully remote metrology system is necessary, particularly since major remote operations such as shield blanket exchange and divertor cassette replacement are planned. The metrology system must be compatible with the ITER in-vessel environment of high gamma radiation ({approximately} 10{sup 6} R/hr), super-clean ultra-high-vacuum ({approximately} 10{sup {minus}8} Torr), and elevated temperature ({approximately}200 C). A fast scanning rate is required since the plasma facing surface in ITER is very large ({approximately} 1,500 m{sup 2}). A coherent FM laser radar based metrology system, developed by Coleman Research Corporation, is being adopted to accomplish this task. Conceptually, this metrology system consists of a compact (few cm{sup 3}) remotely deployed laser transceiver optics module, linked through fiber optics to the laser source and imaging units that are located outside the biological shield. Range measurements conducted on a variety of surfaces using the system have yielded sub-millimeter accuracy. Therefore, the technique will easily meet the precision requirement for the ITER application. Computer simulations have been carried out to determine the optimum number of units required for complete mapping of the plasma facing surfaces. Most in-vessel components of the system appear to be radiation hardenable and vacuum compatible. Details of the system and developments required to make it fully compatible for ITER metrology application will be elaborated.

  14. Synthetic aperture radar for a crop information system: A multipolarization and multitemporal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yifang

    Acquisition of timely information is a critical requirement for successful management of an agricultural monitoring system. Crop identification and crop-area estimation can be done fairly successfully using satellite sensors operating in the visible and near-infrared (VIR) regions of the spectrum. However, data collection can be unreliable due to problems of cloud cover at critical stages of the growing season. The all-weather capability of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery acquired from satellites provides data over large areas whenever crop information is required. At the same time, SAR is sensitive to surface roughness and should be able to provide surface information such as tillage-system characteristics. With the launch of ERS-1, the first long-duration SAR system became available. The analysis of airborne multipolarization SAR data, multitemporal ERS-1 SAR data, and their combinations with VIR data, is necessary for the development of image-analysis methodologies that can be applied to RADARSAT data for extracting agricultural crop information. The overall objective of this research is to evaluate multipolarization airborne SAR data, multitemporal ERS-1 SAR data, and combinations of ERS-1 SAR and satellite VIR data for crop classification using non-conventional algorithms. The study area is situated in Norwich Township, an agricultural area in Oxford County, southern Ontario, Canada. It has been selected as one of the few representative agricultural 'supersites' across Canada at which the relationships between radar data and agriculture are being studied. The major field crops are corn, soybeans, winter wheat, oats, barley, alfalfa, hay, and pasture. Using airborne C-HH and C-HV SAR data, it was found that approaches using contextual information, texture information and per-field classification for improving agricultural crop classification proved to be effective, especially the per-field classification method. Results show that three of the four best per-field classification accuracies (\\ K=0.91) are achieved using combinations of C-HH and C-VV SAR data. This confirms the strong potential of multipolarization data for crop classification. The synergistic effects of multitemporal ERS-1 SAR and Landsat TM data are evaluated for crop classification using an artificial neural network (ANN) approach. The results show that the per-field approach using a feed-forward ANN significantly improves the overall classification accuracy of both single-date and multitemporal SAR data. Using the combination of TM3,4,5 and Aug. 5 SAR data, the best per-field ANN classification of 96.8% was achieved. It represents an 8.5% improvement over a single TM3,4,5 classification alone. Using multitemporal ERS-1 SAR data acquired during the 1992 and 1993 growing seasons, the radar backscatter characteristics of crops and their underlying soils are analyzed. The SAR temporal backscatter profiles were generated for each crop type and the earliest times of the year for differentiation of individual crop types were determined. Orbital (incidence-angle) effects were also observed on all crops. The average difference between the two orbits was about 3 dB. Thus attention should be given to the local incidence-angle effects when using ERS-1 SAR data, especially when comparing fields from different scenes or different areas within the same scene. Finally, early- and mid-season multitemporal SAR data for crop classification using sequential-masking techniques are evaluated, based on the temporal backscatter profiles. It was found that all crops studied could be identified by July 21.

  15. A Tower-based Prototype VHF/UHF Radar for Subsurface Sensing: System Description and Data Inversion Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam, Mahta; Pierce, Leland; Tabatabaeenejad, Alireza; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of subsurface characteristics such as permittivity variations and layering structure could provide a breakthrough in many terrestrial and planetary science disciplines. For Earth science, knowledge of subsurface and subcanopy soil moisture layers can enable the estimation of vertical flow in the soil column linking surface hydrologic processes with that in the subsurface. For planetary science, determining the existence of subsurface water and ice is regarded as one of the most critical information needs for the study of the origins of the solar system. The subsurface in general can be described as several near-parallel layers with rough interfaces. Each homogenous rough layer can be defined by its average thickness, permittivity, and rms interface roughness assuming a known surface spectral distribution. As the number and depth of layers increase, the number of measurements needed to invert for the layer unknowns also increases, and deeper penetration capability would be required. To nondestructively calculate the characteristics of the rough layers, a multifrequency polarimetric radar backscattering approach can be used. One such system is that we have developed for data prototyping of the Microwave Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (MOSS) mission concept. A tower-mounted radar makes backscattering measurements at VHF, UHF, and L-band frequencies. The radar is a pulsed CW system, which uses the same wideband antenna to transmit and receive the signals at all three frequencies. To focus the beam at various incidence angles within the beamwidth of the antenna, the tower is moved vertically and measurements made at each position. The signals are coherently summed to achieve focusing and image formation in the subsurface. This requires an estimate of wave velocity profiles. To solve the inverse scattering problem for subsurface velocity profile simultaneously with radar focusing, we use an iterative technique based on a forward numerical solution of the layered rough surface problem. The layers are each defined in terms of a small number of unknown distributions as given above. An a priori estimate of the solution is first assumed, based on which the forward problem is solved for the backscattered measurements. This is compared with the measured data and using iterative techniques an update to the solution for the unknowns is calculated. The process continues until convergence is achieved. Numerical results will be shown using actual radar data acquired with the MOSS tower radar system in Arizona in Fall 2003, and compared with in-situ measurements.

  16. Development of a Climatology of Vertically Complete Wind Profiles from Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbre, Robert, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of space vehicle loads and trajectories during design requires a large sample of wind profiles at the altitudes where winds affect the vehicle. Traditionally, this altitude region extends from near 8-14 km to address maximum dynamic pressure upon ascent into space, but some applications require knowledge of measured wind profiles at lower altitudes. Such applications include crew capsule pad abort and plume damage analyses. Two Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) systems exist at the United States Air Force (USAF) Eastern Range and at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Kennedy Space Center. The 50-MHz DRWP provides wind profiles every 3-5 minutes from roughly 2.5-18.5 km, and five 915-MHz DRWPs provide wind profiles every 15 minutes from approximately 0.2-3.0 km. Archived wind profiles from all systems underwent rigorous quality control (QC) processes, and concurrent measurements from the QC'ed 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives were spliced into individual profiles that extend from about 0.2-18.5 km. The archive contains combined profiles from April 2000 to December 2009, and thousands of profiles during each month are available for use by the launch vehicle community. This paper presents the details of the QC and splice methodology, as well as some attributes of the archive.

  17. Partially Adaptive Phased Array Fed Cylindrical Reflector Technique for High Performance Synthetic Aperture Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Z.; Hilland, J.

    2001-01-01

    Spaceborne microwave radar instruments demand a high-performance antenna with a large aperature to address key science themes such as climate variations and predictions and global water and energy cycles.

  18. DRAINAGE PIPE DETECTOR: GROUND PENETRATING RADAR SHOWS PROMISE IN LOCATING BURIED SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the more frustrating problems confronting farmers and land improvement contractors in the Midwestern United States involves locating buried agricultural drainage pipes. Conventional geophysical methods, particularly ground penetrating radar (GPR), presently being used for environmental and co...

  19. Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Doppler Radar System for Heart and Respiratory Rate Measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy D. Droitcour; Olga Boric-Lubecke; Gregory T. A. Kovacs

    2009-01-01

    A CMOS Doppler radar sensor has been developed and used to measure motion due to heart and respiration. The quadrature direct-conversion radar transceiver has been fully integrated in 0.25-mum CMOS, the baseband analog signal conditioning has been developed on a printed circuit board, and digital signal processing has been performed in Matlab. The theoretical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived based

  20. System architectures and algorithms for radar imaging by MIMO-SAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. H. G. Ender; J. Klare

    2009-01-01

    The multi-input \\/ multi-output (MIMO) principle is well known for communication applications, whereas at least the name dasiaMIMOpsila is relatively new for radar applications. Nevertheless, the principle has been analyzed and used in a few examples since the early 80s or even before. A MIMO-radar is characterised by a number N of transmitting and a number M of receiving antennas

  1. Addition of video to telemetry tracking system upgrades spatial data to radar quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Fournier; Arthur Sullivan

    1988-01-01

    A growing number of flight test operations require precision spatial position data in conjunction with telemetry data reception, in areas where no optical or radar support is available. Off-the-shelf technologies have accordingly been combined to upgrade the angle-output data accuracy of telemetry trackers to the level of precision radars. A TV boresight camera and video tracking-error detector, in conjunction with

  2. Radar cross-section measurements and simulation of a tethered satellite. The small expendable deployer system end-mass payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin L.; Fralick, Dion T.; Vedeler, Erik

    1995-01-01

    The first Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS-1), a tethered satellite system, was developed by NASA and launched March 29, 1993 as a secondary payload on a United State Air Force (USAF) Delta-2 launch vehicle. The SEDS-1 successfully deployed an instrumented end-mass payload (EMP) on a 20-km nonconducting tether from the second stage of the Delta 2. This paper describes the effort of NASA Langley Research Center's Antenna and Microwave Research Branch to provide assistance to the SEDS Investigators Working Group (IWG) in determining EMP dynamics by analyzing the mission radar skin track data. The radar cross section measurements taken and simulations done for this study are described and comparisons of the measured data with the simulated data for the EMP at 6 GHz are presented.

  3. 51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. View of upper radar scanner switch in radar scanner building 105 from upper catwalk level showing emanating waveguides from upper switch (upper one-fourth of photograph) and emanating waveguides from lower radar scanner switch in vertical runs. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. Simulated KWAJEX Convective Systems Using a 2D and 3D Cloud Resolving Model and Their Comparisons with Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne

    2003-01-01

    The 1999 Kwajalein Atoll field experiment (KWAJEX), one of several major TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) field experiments, has successfully obtained a wealth of information and observation data on tropical convective systems over the western Central Pacific region. In this paper, clouds and convective systems that developed during three active periods (Aug 7-12, Aug 17-21, and Aug 29-Sep 13) around Kwajalein Atoll site are simulated using both 2D and 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) models. Based on numerical results, the clouds and cloud systems are generally unorganized and short lived. These features are validated by radar observations that support the model results. Both the 2D and 3D simulated rainfall amounts and their stratiform contribution as well as the heat, water vapor, and moist static energy budgets are examined for the three convective episodes. Rainfall amounts are quantitatively similar between the two simulations, but the stratiform contribution is considerably larger in the 2D simulation. Regardless of dimension, fo all three cases, the large-scale forcing and net condensation are the two major physical processes that account for the evolution of the budgets with surface latent heat flux and net radiation solar and long-wave radiation)being secondary processes. Quantitative budget differences between 2D and 3D as well as between various episodes will be detailed.Morover, simulated radar signatures and Q1/Q2 fields from the three simulations are compared to each other and with radar and sounding observations.

  5. Shuttle orbiter radar cross-sectional analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. W.; James, R.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and model simulation studies on signal to noise levels and shuttle radar cross section are described. Pre-mission system calibrations, system configuration, and postmission system calibration of the tracking radars are described. Conversion of target range, azimuth, and elevation into radar centered east north vertical position coordinates are evaluated. The location of the impinging rf energy with respect to the target vehicles body axis triad is calculated. Cross section correlation between the two radars is presented.

  6. Transmitter and receiver antenna gain analysis for laser radar and communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, B. J.; Degnan, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive and fairly self-contained study of centrally obscured optical transmitting and receiving antennas is presented and is intended for use by the laser radar and communication systems designer. The material is presented in a format which allows the rapid and accurate evaluation of antenna gain. The Fresnel approximation to scalar wave theory is reviewed and the antenna analysis proceeds in terms of the power gain. Conventional range equations may then be used to calculate the power budget. The transmitter calculations, resulting in near and far field antenna gain patterns, assumes the antenna is illuminated by a laser operating in the fundamental cavity mode. A simple equation is derived for matching the incident source distribution to a general antenna configuration for maximum on-axis gain. An interpretation of the resultant gain curves allows a number of auxiliary design curves to be drawn which display the losses in antenna gain due to pointing errors and the cone angle of the outgoing beam as a function of antenna size and central obscuration. The use of telescope defocusing as an approach to spreading the beam for target acquisition is compared to some alternate methods.

  7. Development of an ultra wide band microwave radar based footwear scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezgui, Nacer Ddine; Bowring, Nicholas J.; Andrews, David A.; Harmer, Stuart W.; Southgate, Matthew J.; O'Reilly, Dean

    2013-10-01

    At airports, security screening can cause long delays. In order to speed up screening a solution to avoid passengers removing their shoes to have them X-ray scanned is required. To detect threats or contraband items hidden within the shoe, a method of screening using frequency swept signals between 15 to 40 GHz has been developed, where the scan is carried out whilst the shoes are being worn. Most footwear is transparent to microwaves to some extent in this band. The scans, data processing and interpretation of the 2D image of the cross section of the shoe are completed in a few seconds. Using safe low power UWB radar, scattered signals from the shoe can be observed which are caused by changes in material properties such as cavities, dielectric or metal objects concealed within the shoe. By moving the transmission horn along the length of the shoe a 2D image corresponding to a cross section through the footwear is built up, which can be interpreted by the user, or automatically, to reveal the presence of concealed threat within the shoe. A prototype system with a resolution of 6 mm or less has been developed and results obtained for a wide range of commonly worn footwear, some modified by the inclusion of concealed material. Clear differences between the measured images of modified and unmodified shoes are seen. Procedures for enhancing the image through electronic image synthesis techniques and image processing methods are discussed and preliminary performance data presented.

  8. Use of the X-Band Radar to Support the Detection of In-Flight Icing Hazards by the NASA Icing Remote Sensing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serke, David J.; Politovich, Marcia K.; Reehorst, Andrew L.; Gaydos, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The Alliance Icing Research Study-II (AIRS-II) field program was conducted near Montreal, Canada during the winter of 2003. The NASA Icing Remote Detection System (NIRSS) was deployed to detect in-flight icing hazards and consisted of a vertically pointing multichannel radiometer, a ceilometer and an x-band cloud radar. The radiometer was used to derive atmospheric temperature soundings and integrated liquid water, while the ceilometer and radar were used only to define cloud boundaries. The purpose of this study is to show that the radar reflectivity profiles from AIRS-II case studies could be used to provide a qualitative icing hazard.

  9. Examination of Hurricane Dennis using Airborne Radar and Microwave Radiometric Data During the Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, F. J.; Guimond, S. R.; Miller, S.; Hawkins, J.

    2006-12-01

    During the Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) experiment in July 2005, the NASA ER-2 and NOAA P-3 aircraft performed several well-coordinated overpasses over Hurricane Dennis in the Caribbean Sea. We present observations and analysis of aircraft radar and microwave radiometric data from the ER-2 Dopper Radar (EDOP) and its companion Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR), to examine the evolution of the hurricane radial winds, vertical winds and vertical relative vorticity. The vertical temperature and moisture structure of the hurricane were also examined using Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) data from overpasses of the NOAA satellites. The data are presented in a combined fashion to show the evolution of the hurricane's warm core, and how environmental, dynamic and microphysical factors may influence the vortex and its ability to focus heating in the horizontal at various stages of development.

  10. Development of a passive VHF radar system using software-defined radio for equatorial plasma instability studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuysuz, B.; Urbina, J.; Lind, F. D.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, a bistatic passive radar receiver system named "Coherent-scatter Atmospheric Passive Radar Imager (CAPRI)" is described. It is primarily designed to study the dynamics of the upper atmosphere by utilizing "transmitters of opportunity" as the RF target illuminators. CAPRI is constructed using the open source software-defined radio toolkit, GNU Radio, to meet the signal processing requirements in combination with the open source hardware, Universal Software Radio Peripheral 2, for data acquisition. The resultant system is highly flexible, and we present the details of the design as well as a performance analysis. CAPRI will be deployed in Peru, near the magnetic equator, for long-term operations in the area. FM stations near Lima, Peru, will be utilized with the targets of interest being the equatorial electrojet and the spread F. The results will then be compared to the Jicamarca Unattended Long-term investigations of the Ionosphere and Atmosphere (JULIA) radar data, and CAPRI will be used to improve the simultaneous time and spatial coverage in the region in a more cost-effective manner.

  11. Radar network communication through sensing of frequency hopping

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, Farid; Nekoogar, Faranak

    2013-05-28

    In one embodiment, a radar communication system includes a plurality of radars having a communication range and being capable of operating at a sensing frequency and a reporting frequency, wherein the reporting frequency is different than the sensing frequency, each radar is adapted for operating at the sensing frequency until an event is detected, each radar in the plurality of radars has an identification/location frequency for reporting information different from the sensing frequency, a first radar of the radars which senses the event sends a reporting frequency corresponding to its identification/location frequency when the event is detected, and all other radars in the plurality of radars switch their reporting frequencies to match the reporting frequency of the first radar upon detecting the reporting frequency switch of a radar within the communication range. In another embodiment, a method is presented for communicating information in a radar system.

  12. Microwave systems design for high-performance moving target indicators in radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrell, Perry A.

    1991-05-01

    Clutter cancellation of 65 dB and better is directly proportional to good radar stability, and since many hardware areas produce instabilities at various levels, the architecture of a radar requires special design considerations to support this high stability. The noise character and generation methods of these instabilities in the various hardware areas are described, and design solutions are given to eliminate them. Microwave delay line, a reliable, accurate method of measuring radar stability in L- and S-band radars, is described. The longest microwave delay line available for use at L-band and S-band frequencies is a 15-microsec sapphire bulk acoustic wave (BAW) delay line. For higher-frequency radars, smaller delays must be used to keep the insertion loss down to a usable level. The question is raised as to the adequacy of this delay time to provide sufficient visibility for stability measurements of the stable noise. For transmitter measurements, it is adequate for the more common pulse widths, which are less than 15 microsec. For LO measurements, the analysis shows that this delay does provide sufficient decorrelation for accurate LO noise measurements.

  13. A pulse Doppler radar using reconfigurable computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Sumeen; M. Mobien; M. I. Siddiqi

    2003-01-01

    In a variety of signal processing applications, nowadays, the use of radar for advanced control has become a necessity, e.g., navigational systems, aircraft, automobiles and other sensing devices. A normal microprocessor based radar signal processor eats a lot of processing power and time so we have proposed the implementation of a dynamically reconfigurable pulsed Doppler radar in a mixed system

  14. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C. (Albuquerque, NM); Axline, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  15. On wave radar measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Feld, Graham; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-08-01

    The SAAB REX WaveRadar sensor is widely used for platform-based wave measurement systems by the offshore oil and gas industry. It offers in situ surface elevation wave measurements at relatively low operational costs. Furthermore, there is adequate flexibility in sampling rates, allowing in principle sampling frequencies from 1 to 10 Hz, but with an angular microwave beam width of 10° and an implied ocean surface footprint in the order of metres, significant limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution might be expected. Indeed there are reports that the accuracy of the measurements from wave radars may not be as good as expected. We review the functionality of a WaveRadar using numerical simulations to better understand how WaveRadar estimates compare with known surface elevations. In addition, we review recent field measurements made with a WaveRadar set at the maximum sampling frequency, in the light of the expected functionality and the numerical simulations, and we include inter-comparisons between SAAB radars and buoy measurements for locations in the North Sea.

  16. On wave radar measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Feld, Graham; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The SAAB REX WaveRadar sensor is widely used for platform-based wave measurement systems by the offshore oil and gas industry. It offers in situ surface elevation wave measurements at relatively low operational costs. Furthermore, there is adequate flexibility in sampling rates, allowing in principle sampling frequencies from 1 to 10 Hz, but with an angular microwave beam width of 10° and an implied ocean surface footprint in the order of metres, significant limitations on the spatial and temporal resolution might be expected. Indeed there are reports that the accuracy of the measurements from wave radars may not be as good as expected. We review the functionality of a WaveRadar using numerical simulations to better understand how WaveRadar estimates compare with known surface elevations. In addition, we review recent field measurements made with a WaveRadar set at the maximum sampling frequency, in the light of the expected functionality and the numerical simulations, and we include inter-comparisons between SAAB radars and buoy measurements for locations in the North Sea.

  17. Australian Weather Watch Radar Home Page

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology's Weather Watch Radar website provides up-to-date radar images of the locations of rain in Australia in relation to local features such as coast lines. The newly developed Loops provide four consecutive radar images so that users can view how the weather has been changing in the last forty to fifty minutes. The website provides radar images of past cyclone events as well as updates on severe weather throughout Australia. Those interested in radar systems can discover how the weather radars work and how to interpret the maps. [RME

  18. Proposed experiment to detect air showers with the Jicamarca radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, T.; Chapin, E.; Gorham, P.; Saltzberg, D.

    2001-07-01

    When an extremely high energy particle interacts in the atmosphere, the collision induces a multiplicative cascade of charged particles, which grows exponentially until the energy per secondary degrades enough to dissipate in ionization of the surrounding air. During this process the compact cloud of energetic secondary particles travels 10-20 km through the atmosphere, leaving a column of ionization behind it. This ionized column quickly recombines, but for a period of order 0.1 ms it is highly reflective at frequencies below 100 MHz. This ionization trail, which is comparable in ionization density to that of a micro-meteor, should be clearly detectable using standard radar methods. We propose radar measurements using the facilities operated by Cornell University and the Instituto Geofisico del Peru (IGP) at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory near Lima, Peru. This facility's primary instrument is 49.92 MHz incoherent scatter radar, transmitting up to 1.5 MW of pulse power. .

  19. Cyclostationary Approach for Heart and Respiration Rates Monitoring with Body Movement Cancellation Using Radar Doppler System

    E-print Network

    Kazemi, Somayeh; Amindavar, Hamidreza; Li, Changzhi

    2013-01-01

    Heart and respiration rate measurement using Doppler radar is a non-contact and non-obstructive way for remote thorough-clothing monitoring of vital signs. The modulated back-scattered radar signal in the presence of high noise and interference is non-stationary with hidden periodicities, which cannot be detected by ordinary Fourier analysis. In this paper we propose a cyclostationary approach for such signals and show that by using non-linear transformation and then Fourier analysis of the radar signal, the hidden periodicities can be accurately obtained. Numerical results show that the vital signs can be extracted as cyclic frequencies, independent of SNR and without any filtering or phase unwrapping.

  20. Maritime surveillance with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and automatic identification system (AIS) onboard a microsatellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, E. H.; Zee, R. E.; Fotopoulos, G.

    2012-11-01

    New developments in small spacecraft capabilities will soon enable formation-flying constellations of small satellites, performing cooperative distributed remote sensing at a fraction of the cost of traditional large spacecraft missions. As part of ongoing research into applications of formation-flight technology, recent work has developed a mission concept based on combining synthetic aperture radar (SAR) with automatic identification system (AIS) data. Two or more microsatellites would trail a large SAR transmitter in orbit, each carrying a SAR receiver antenna and one carrying an AIS antenna. Spaceborne AIS can receive and decode AIS data from a large area, but accurate decoding is limited in high traffic areas, and the technology relies on voluntary vessel compliance. Furthermore, vessel detection amidst speckle in SAR imagery can be challenging. In this constellation, AIS broadcasts of position and velocity are received and decoded, and used in combination with SAR observations to form a more complete picture of maritime traffic and identify potentially non-cooperative vessels. Due to the limited transmit power and ground station downlink time of the microsatellite platform, data will be processed onboard the spacecraft. Herein we present the onboard data processing portion of the mission concept, including methods for automated SAR image registration, vessel detection, and fusion with AIS data. Georeferencing in combination with a spatial frequency domain method is used for image registration. Wavelet-based speckle reduction facilitates vessel detection using a standard CFAR algorithm, while leaving sufficient detail for registration of the filtered and compressed imagery. Moving targets appear displaced from their actual position in SAR imagery, depending on their velocity and the image acquisition geometry; multiple SAR images acquired from different locations are used to determine the actual positions of these targets. Finally, a probabilistic inference model combines the SAR target data with transmitted AIS data, taking into account nearest-neighbor position matches and uncertainty models of each observation.

  1. 78 FR 68861 - Certain Navigation Products, Including GPS Devices, Navigation and Display Systems, Radar Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ...Navigational Aids, Mapping Systems and Related Software; Institution of Investigation Pursuant...navigational aids, mapping systems and related software by reason of infringement of certain...navigational aids, mapping systems and related software by reason of infringement of one or...

  2. The System And Implementation Aspect Of The Mars Advanced Radar For Subsurface And Ionosphere Sounding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Picardi; D. Biccari; R. Seu; J. J. Plaut; W. T. K. Johnson; R. L. Jordan; A. Safaenili; K. Wheeler; A. Gurnett; D. Kirchner; R. Orosei; F. Provvedi; O. Bombaci; E. Zampolini

    2002-01-01

    MARSIS, a low frequency nadir looking sounding radar, payload of the Mars Express mission ,is currently under development by a team of Italian and US researchers and industrial partners; its primary scientific objective is to map the distribution of water, both liquid and solid, in the upper portions of the crust of Mars. Detection of such reservoirs of water will

  3. Numerical study of a low permeability microporous heat sink for cooling phased-array radar systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Weber

    1996-01-01

    Microporous media is being used to develop an improved forced convection cold plate device for removing waste heat from high frequency phased-array radar apertures. The waste heat, generated by transmit and receive microwave functions mounted in separate electronic modules, is conducted to the surfaces of a thin rectangular enclosure (cold plate) through which coolant flows. The performance of the phased-array

  4. Arctangent Demodulation With DC Offset Compensation in Quadrature Doppler Radar Receiver Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Byung-Kwon Park; Olga Boric-Lubecke; Victor M. Lubecke

    2007-01-01

    Direct-conversion microwave Doppler radar can be used to detect cardiopulmonary activity at a distance. One challenge for such detection in single channel receivers is demodulation sensitivity to target position, which can be overcome by using a quadrature receiver. This paper presents a mathematical analysis and experimental results demonstrating the effectiveness of arctangent demodulation in quadrature receivers. A particular challenge in

  5. A combined analogue and digital pulse compression system using large time bandwidth product signals for use in synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbole, Pushkar E.

    1989-07-01

    Pulse compression, widely used in modern radar systems, has the advantage in that it allows the use of long duration low-power pulses which facilitate low-power transmission. A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) pulse compression system able to compress very large time bandwidth product signals while still retaining high dynamic range capability and flexibility would be very advantageous. The possibility of implementing the compression in two stages is investigated, in which the first stage compression processing is done by an analog device followed by digital techniques in the second stage. Various signal coding methods were evaluated to determine those most suitable to the two-stage process, and various means of implementing the second stage were compared. A two-stage pulse compression system was then designed and built to generate arbitrarily coded expanded pulses with bandwidths in excess of 200 MHz. Its performance was evaluated in the presence of tone, noise, and jamming. It was shown that the two-stage pulse compression system exhibited greater resistance to quantizer saturation than a comparable digital system. The processing effort required to implement the compression using a digital adaptive matched filter was found to be slightly less than double that of a basic pulse compression system.

  6. CURRENT APPLICATIONS OF IMAGING RADAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Inggs; R. T. Lord; WG VII

    This paper discusses the current status of imaging radar systems deployed on spacecraft and airborne platforms, such as aircraft and unmanned airborne vehicles (UAVs). Imaging radar technology has advanced considerably over the last twenty years, and the user can now be fairly certain of finding a sensor ideal for a specifi c application. The objective of the paper is to

  7. Decorrelation in interferometric radar echoes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Howard A. Zebker; John Villasensor

    1992-01-01

    A radar interferometric technique for topographic mapping of surfaces, implemented utilizing a single synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system in a nearly repeating orbit, is discussed. The authors characterize the various sources contributing to the echo correlation statistics, and isolate the term which most closely describes surficial change. They then examine the application of this approach to topographic mapping of vegetated

  8. Development of a GPS-aided motion measurement, pointing, and stabilization system for a Synthetic Aperture Radar. [Global Positioning System (GPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, J.R.; Kohler, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    An advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Motion Compensation System has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system includes a miniaturized high accuracy ring laser gyro inertial measurement unit, a three axis gimbal pointing and stabilization assembly, a differential Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation aiding system, and a pilot guidance system. The system provides several improvements over previous SNL motion compensation systems and is capable of antenna stabilization to less than 0.01 degrees RMS and absolute position measurement to less than 5.0 meters RMS. These accuracies have been demonstrated in recent flight testing aboard a DHC-6-300 Twin Otter'' aircraft.

  9. Multiline radar scan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, S.

    1977-01-01

    Scanning scheme is more efficient than conventional scanning. Originally designed for optical radar in space vehicles, scheme may also find uses in site-surveillance security systems and in other industrial applications. It should be particularly useful when system must run on battery energy, as would be case in power outages.

  10. Radar and Acoustic Study of Lightning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. Holmes; E. W. Szymanski; S. J. Szymanski; C. B. Moore

    1980-01-01

    During 1975 and 1976 an FPS-18 radar with a 10.9-cm wavelength was used to study lightning in thunderclouds over Langmuir Laboratory in central New Mexico. The radar antenna beam was pointed at a thundercloud, and then held fixed for extended periods. With this system radar echoes from 156 lightning flashes were detected at altitudes ranging from 5 to 14 km

  11. Autonomous deployment of the UAVSAR radar instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Vines; R. Chao

    2010-01-01

    The UAVSAR program was formed to provide repeat pass radar interferometry on an uninhabited aircraft platform. The UAVSAR imaging radar system is housed in an external unpressurized pod that may be attached to an Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV), although initial flight tests were performed aboard a Gulfstream-III aircraft with flight test personnel on-board. Since the radar science missions are to

  12. UAV Collision Avoidance Radar - Build and Test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin J. Shannon; Ashoka Halappa; Ian D. Longstaff

    This paper describes an experimental radar and data recording system designed to provide the 'sense and avoid' capability required by UAV's to fly in uncontrolled airspace. The radar incorporates the MIMO technique, forming multiple staring beams giving wide angular protection. Algorithms for detection in clutter, tracking, and miss-distance estimation for this radar have been developed, based on synthesised data only,

  13. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  14. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  15. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  16. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  17. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  18. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  19. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  20. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  1. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  2. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  3. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  4. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  5. Synthetic aperture radar calibration using reference reflectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Gray; P. W. Vachon; C. E. Livingstone; T. I. Lukowski

    1990-01-01

    A simple expression for the terrain backscatter coefficient is derived in terms of the integrated power of an adjacent known radar reflector in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image. It is shown that this technique for SAR image calibration is independent of the radar system focus or partial coherence and thereby possesses an important advantage over the usual technique, which

  6. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  7. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  8. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  9. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  10. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169...Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design...

  11. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  12. 46 CFR 121.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radars. 121.404 Section 121.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 121.404 Radars. (a) Except as allowed by paragraph...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  13. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  14. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  15. EISCAT Radar School, Kiruna, 2005 Outrigger in

    E-print Network

    EISCAT Radar School, Kiruna, 2005 LOFAR Outrigger in Scandinavia Physics in Space Programme LOFAR Centre, Växjö University #12;Bo Thidé EISCAT Radar School, Kiruna,, 20052 LOFAR Low Frequency Array (10 radio system for space radio #12;Bo Thidé EISCAT Radar School, Kiruna,, 20053 Hydrogen radiates at 1420

  16. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  17. 46 CFR 108.717 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar. 108.717 Section 108.717 Shipping...Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.717 Radar. Each self-propelled unit of 1...coastwise service must have— (a) A marine radar system for surface navigation; and...

  18. 46 CFR 167.40-40 - Radar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar. 167.40-40 Section 167.40-40...Equipment Requirements § 167.40-40 Radar. All mechanically propelled vessels...coastwise service must be fitted with a marine radar system for surface navigation....

  19. 46 CFR 184.404 - Radars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radars. 184.404 Section 184.404 Shipping... Navigation Equipment § 184.404 Radars. (a) A vessel must be fitted with...Commission (FCC) type accepted general marine radar system for surface navigation with...

  20. Spaceborne radar remote sensing: Applications and techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Elachi

    1988-01-01

    The operation and applications of spaceborne radars for terrestrial and planetary remote sensing are described in an introduction for advanced students and practicing scientists. Chapters are devoted to imaging radars, wave-surface interactions and geoscientific applications, real- and synthetic-aperture radars, end-to-end system design, SAR data processing, altimeters, and scatterometers. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, photographs, and sample radar images are provided.

  1. Iterative Adaptive Approaches to MIMO Radar Imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Roberts; Petre Stoica; Jian Li; Tarik Yardibi; Firooz A. Sadjadi

    2010-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar can achieve superior performance through waveform diversity over conventional phased-array radar systems. When a MIMO radar transmits orthogonal waveforms, the reflected signals from scatterers are linearly independent of each other. Therefore, adaptive receive filters, such as Capon and amplitude and phase estimation (APES) filters, can be directly employed in MIMO radar applications. High levels of noise

  2. Advanced simulation of eye-safe imaging laser radar for range estimation, system comparison, and design process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schael, Ulrich; Rothe, Hendrik

    2003-05-01

    The development of eye-safe, imaging, scannerless laser radar systems based on gated viewing with a range of some hundred meters is difficult due to the lack of fast and amplifiable detector arrays for wavelengths in the near infrared (NIR). Nevertheless, one basic approach is to gate an InGaAs-FPA-camera with an electro-optical modulator (EOM) in the range of about 30 ns to achieve a sufficient resolution of depth. The laser radar works with a Nd:YAG-OPO laser of 1574 nm wavelength, 7 ns pulse length, and 25 Hz pulse frequency. Because of the EOM in conjunction with an adapted lens design and the resolution of 128 by 128 pixels FPA, the main interest is object detection. This requires imaging with optimized system performance to reach further target distances. In this paper, we present the simulation of the current system. Comparison of simulation data with indoor measurements is shown by the calculation of range images from a sequence of range slices. We discuss advantages of this simulation for range estimation, system comparison and design process.

  3. Theoretical investigation of the applicability of a dual-frequency radar system to the study of convective liquid precipitation

    E-print Network

    Von, Vernon Mow Hing

    1963-01-01

    given by n(a3 = Csa' eXP(-(, cl) f99] Best (5) has summarized the work of many investigators and arrived at an average distribution of the form n(g =- 8 a 'exp(-. Ca, ') [100] Spilhaus (32) has offered a general distribution for all rains based...THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE APPLICABILITY OF A DUAL-FREQUENCY RADAR SYSTEM TO THE STUDY OF CONVECTIVE LIQUID PRECIPITATION A Thesis By VERNON M. H. VON Captain, USAF Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical...

  4. Survey of Chinese radars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. L. Johnston

    1995-01-01

    Open information on about 200 Chinese radars including earlier radars is now available. By number of model types China is an important radar country. This Chinese radar survey paper shows that Chinese radars cover a wide spectrum of civilian and military applications. Chinese civilian radars include air-borne weather avoidance\\/navigation, air traffic control (ASR, ARSR, GCA, SSR), harbor surveillance, industrial applications,

  5. Extended Target Recognition in Cognitive Radar Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yimin; Meng, Huadong; Liu, Yimin; Wang, Xiqin

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of adaptive waveform design for extended target recognition in cognitive radar networks. A closed-loop active target recognition radar system is extended to the case of a centralized cognitive radar network, in which a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) framework is employed. Using Doppler velocities measured by multiple radars, the target aspect angle for each radar is calculated. The joint probability of each target hypothesis is then updated using observations from different radar line of sights (LOS). Based on these probabilities, a minimum correlation algorithm is proposed to adaptively design the transmit waveform for each radar in an amplitude fluctuation situation. Simulation results demonstrate performance improvements due to the cognitive radar network and adaptive waveform design. Our minimum correlation algorithm outperforms the eigen-waveform solution and other non-cognitive waveform design approaches. PMID:22163464

  6. German Radar Observation Shuttle Experiment (ROSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleber, A. J.; Hartl, P.; Haydn, R.; Hildebrandt, G.; Konecny, G.; Muehlfeld, R.

    1984-01-01

    The success of radar sensors in several different application areas of interest depends on the knowledge of the backscatter of radar waves from the targets of interest, the variance of these interaction mechanisms with respect to changing measurement parameters, and the determination of the influence of he measuring systems on the results. The incidence-angle dependency of the radar cross section of different natural targets is derived. Problems involved by the combination of data gained with different sensors, e.g., MSS-, TM-, SPOTand SAR-images are analyzed. Radar cross-section values gained with ground-based radar spectrometers and spaceborne radar imaging, and non-imaging scatterometers and spaceborne radar images from the same areal target are correlated. The penetration of L-band radar waves into vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces is analyzed.

  7. Millimeter wave radar system on a rotating platform for combined search and track functionality with SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulenbacher, Uwe; Rech, Klaus; Sedlmeier, Johannes; Pratisto, Hans; Wellig, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Ground based millimeter wave radar sensors offer the potential for a weather-independent automatic ground surveillance at day and night, e.g. for camp protection applications. The basic principle and the experimental verification of a radar system concept is described, which by means of an extreme off-axis positioning of the antenna(s) combines azimuthal mechanical beam steering with the formation of a circular-arc shaped synthetic aperture (SA). In automatic ground surveillance the function of search and detection of moving ground targets is performed by means of the conventional mechanical scan mode. The rotated antenna structure designed as a small array with two or more RX antenna elements with simultaneous receiver chains allows to instantaneous track multiple moving targets (monopulse principle). The simultaneously operated SAR mode yields areal images of the distribution of stationary scatterers. For ground surveillance application this SAR mode is best suited for identifying possible threats by means of change detection. The feasibility of this concept was tested by means of an experimental radar system comprising of a 94 GHz (W band) FM-CW module with 1 GHz bandwidth and two RX antennas with parallel receiver channels, placed off-axis at a rotating platform. SAR mode and search/track mode were tested during an outdoor measurement campaign. The scenery of two persons walking along a road and partially through forest served as test for the capability to track multiple moving targets. For SAR mode verification an image of the area composed of roads, grassland, woodland and several man-made objects was reconstructed from the measured data.

  8. An airport wind shear detection and warning system using Doppler radar: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J.; Blick, E. F.; Elmore, K. L.

    1981-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to determine whether ground based Doppler radar could measure the wind along the path of an approaching aircraft with sufficient accuracy to predict aircraft performance. Forty-three PAR approaches were conducted, with 16 examined in detail. In each, Doppler derived longitudinal winds were compared to aircraft measured winds; in approximately 75 percent of the cases, the Doppler and aircraft winds were in acceptable agreement. In the remaining cases, errors may have been due to a lack of Doppler resolution, a lack of co-location of the two sampling volumes, the presence of eddy or vortex like disturbances within the pulse volume, or the presence of point targets in antenna side lobes. It was further concluded that shrouding techniques would have reduced the side lobe problem. A ground based Doppler radar operating in the optically clear air, provides the appropriate longitudinal winds along an aircraft's intended flight path.

  9. The gust-front detection and wind-shift algorithms for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermes, Laurie G.; Witt, Arthur; Smith, Steven D.; Klingle-Wilson, Diana; Morris, Dale; Stumpf, Gregory J.; Eilts, Michael D.

    1993-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) system was primarily designed to address the operational needs of pilots in the avoidance of low-altitude wind shears upon takeoff and landing at airports. One of the primary methods of wind-shear detection for the TDWR system is the gust-front detection algorithm. The algorithm is designed to detect gust fronts that produce a wind-shear hazard and/or sustained wind shifts. It serves the hazard warning function by providing an estimate of the wind-speed gain for aircraft penetrating the gust front. The gust-front detection and wind-shift algorithms together serve a planning function by providing forecasted gust-front locations and estimates of the horizontal wind vector behind the front, respectively. This information is used by air traffic managers to determine arrival and departure runway configurations and aircraft movements to minimize the impact of wind shifts on airport capacity. This paper describes the gust-front detection and wind-shift algorithms to be fielded in the initial TDWR systems. Results of a quantitative performance evaluation using Doppler radar data collected during TDWR operational demonstrations at the Denver, Kansas City, and Orlando airports are presented. The algorithms were found to be operationally useful by the FAA airport controllers and supervisors.

  10. Detection of aquifer system compaction and land subsidence using interferometric synthetic aperture radar, Antelope Valley, Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, D.L.; Hudnut, K.W.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Phillips, S.P.; Peltzer, G.; Rogez, F.; Rosen, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has great potential to detect and quantify land subsidence caused by aquifer system compaction. InSAR maps with high spatial detail and resolution of range displacement (??10 mm in change of land surface elevation) were developed for a groundwater basin (~103 km2) in Antelope Valley, California, using radar data collected from the ERS-1 satellite. These data allow comprehensive comparison between recent (1993-1995) subsidence patterns and those detected historically (1926-1992) by more traditional methods. The changed subsidence patterns are generally compatible with recent shifts in land and water use. The InSAR-detected patterns are generally consistent with predictions based on a coupled model of groundwater flow and aquifer system compaction. The minor inconsistencies may reflect our imperfect knowledge of the distribution and properties of compressible sediments. When used in conjunction with coincident measurements of groundwater levels and other geologic information, InSAR data may be useful for constraining parameter estimates in simulations of aquifer system compaction.

  11. Dynamic Experiment Design Regularization Approach to Adaptive Imaging with Array Radar/SAR Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shkvarko, Yuriy; Tuxpan, José; Santos, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    We consider a problem of high-resolution array radar/SAR imaging formalized in terms of a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem of nonparametric estimation of the power spatial spectrum pattern (SSP) of the random wavefield scattered from a remotely sensed scene observed through a kernel signal formation operator and contaminated with random Gaussian noise. First, the Sobolev-type solution space is constructed to specify the class of consistent kernel SSP estimators with the reproducing kernel structures adapted to the metrics in such the solution space. Next, the “model-free” variational analysis (VA)-based image enhancement approach and the “model-based” descriptive experiment design (DEED) regularization paradigm are unified into a new dynamic experiment design (DYED) regularization framework. Application of the proposed DYED framework to the adaptive array radar/SAR imaging problem leads to a class of two-level (DEED-VA) regularized SSP reconstruction techniques that aggregate the kernel adaptive anisotropic windowing with the projections onto convex sets to enforce the consistency and robustness of the overall iterative SSP estimators. We also show how the proposed DYED regularization method may be considered as a generalization of the MVDR, APES and other high-resolution nonparametric adaptive radar sensing techniques. A family of the DYED-related algorithms is constructed and their effectiveness is finally illustrated via numerical simulations. PMID:22163859

  12. The DEFENSE (debris Flows triggEred by storms - nowcasting system): An early warning system for torrential processes by radar storm tracking using a Geographic Information System (GIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiranti, Davide; Cremonini, Roberto; Marco, Federica; Gaeta, Armando Riccardo; Barbero, Secondo

    2014-09-01

    Debris flows, responsible for economic losses and occasionally casualties in the alpine region, are mainly triggered by heavy rains characterized by hourly peaks of varying intensity, depending on the features of the basin under consideration. By integrating a recent classification of alpine basins with the radar storm tracking method, an innovative early warning system called DEFENSE (DEbris Flows triggEred by storms - Nowcasting SystEm) was developed using a Geographical Information System (GIS). Alpine catchments were classified into three main classes based on the weathering capacity of the bedrock into clay or clay-like minerals, the amount of which, in unconsolidated material, directly influences the debris flow rheology, and thus the sedimentary processes, the alluvial fan architecture, as well as the triggering frequency and seasonal occurrence probability of debris flows. Storms were identified and tracked by processing weather radar observations; subsequently, rainfall intensities and storm severity were estimated over each classified basin. Due to rainfall threshold values determined for each basin class, based on statistical analysis of historical records, an automatic corresponding warning could be issued to municipalities.

  13. Instantaneous Radar Polarimetry with Multiple Dually-polarized Antennas

    E-print Network

    Pezeshki, Ali

    1 Instantaneous Radar Polarimetry with Multiple Dually-polarized Antennas A. R. Calderbank,1 S. D radar systems are capable of simultaneously transmitting and receiving in two orthogonal polarizations. Instantaneous radar polarimetry exploits both polarization modes of a dually-polarized radar transmitter

  14. A radar image time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leberl, F.; Fuchs, H.; Ford, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A set of ten side-looking radar images of a mining area in Arizona that were aquired over a period of 14 yr are studied to demonstrate the photogrammetric differential-rectification technique applied to radar images and to examine changes that occurred in the area over time. Five of the images are rectified by using ground control points and a digital height model taken from a map. Residual coordinate errors in ground control are reduced from several hundred meters in all cases to + or - 19 to 70 m. The contents of the radar images are compared with a Landsat image and with aerial photographs. Effects of radar system parameters on radar images are briefly reviewed.

  15. Use of ground-penetrating radar technology in construction of the Los Angeles MetroRail subway system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, Christopher D.; Olson, Mark G.

    1995-05-01

    State-of-the-art ground penetrating radar (GPR) technology was used successfully in tunneling through the former L.A. City Oil Field to search for uncharted, abandoned oil wells. A magnetometer probe was previously used for this purpose, because it was felt abandoned oil wells with steel casings may exist ahead of tunneling. These wells were suspected to contain methane gases which could be released into the tunnels. Studies revealed the abandoned wells could be wooden-cased or uncased open holes, indicating they would not be detected using a magnetometer probe. GPR was therefore selected as a geophysical technique more capable of detecting both steel-cased and uncased oil wells. After some initial testing from inside the tunnel, a commercially available GPR system was selected. Procedures were developed for conducting the surveys and evaluating the data profiles for possible oil wells. The profiles were obtained by moving the radar antenna across the smoothed tunnel face. During tunnelling of the oil field area abandoned oil wells were not encountered. However, the GPR surveys did detect anomalous radar reflections that the machine operator was alerted to as possible oil wells. Review of the data indicates that other changes in ground conditions were detected, such as transitions from soft- to hard-ground conditions and zones of oil bearing sands. These results suggest GPR could be useful for other exploratory applications during mining. GPR was also used as an investigative tool to check for possible shallow subsurface voids from the ground surface. Air-filled cavities or voids beneath city streets can sometimes be formed as a result of deeper tunneling-induced ground movements, resulting in dangerous sink-hole forming conditions. The GPR surveys were conducted from the street surface above the tunnels in areas where geotechnical data measured greater ground movements. These surveys helped rule out the possibility of voids beneath the street pavement in an area where over nine inches of ground settlement was measured.

  16. The Weather Radar Toolkit, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climatic Data Center's support of interoperability and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S.; Del Greco, S.

    2006-12-01

    In February 2005, 61 countries around the World agreed on a 10 year plan to work towards building open systems for sharing geospatial data and services across different platforms worldwide. This system is known as the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The objective of GEOSS focuses on easy access to environmental data and interoperability across different systems allowing participating countries to measure the "pulse" of the planet in an effort to advance society. In support of GEOSS goals, NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) has developed radar visualization and data exporter tools in an open systems environment. The NCDC Weather Radar Toolkit (WRT) loads Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) volume scan (S-band) data, known as Level-II, and derived products, known as Level-III, into an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant environment. The application is written entirely in Java and will run on any Java- supported platform including Windows, Macintosh and Linux/Unix. The application is launched via Java Web Start and runs on the client machine while accessing these data locally or remotely from the NCDC archive, NOAA FTP server or any URL or THREDDS Data Server. The WRT allows the data to be manipulated to create custom mosaics, composites and precipitation estimates. The WRT Viewer provides tools for custom data overlays, Web Map Service backgrounds, animations and basic filtering. The export of images and movies is provided in multiple formats. The WRT Data Exporter allows for data export in both vector polygon (Shapefile, Well-Known Text) and raster (GeoTIFF, ESRI Grid, VTK, NetCDF, GrADS) formats. By decoding the various Radar formats into the NetCDF Common Data Model, the exported NetCDF data becomes interoperable with existing software packages including THREDDS Data Server and the Integrated Data Viewer (IDV). The NCDC recently partnered with NOAA's National Severe Storms Lab (NSSL) to decode Sigmet C-band Doppler radar data providing the NCDC Viewer/Data Exporter the functionality to read C-Band. This also supports a bilateral agreement between the United States and Canada for data sharing and to support interoperability with the US WSR-88D and Environment Canada radar networks. In addition, the NCDC partnered with the University of Oklahoma to develop decoders to read a test bed of distributed X- band radars that are funded through the Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) project. The NCDC is also archiving the National Mosaic and Next Generation QPE (Q2) products from NSSL, which provide products such as three-dimensional reflectivity, composite reflectivity and precipitation estimates at a 1 km resolution. These three sources of Radar data are also supported in the WRT.

  17. The impact of reflectivity correction and accounting for raindrop size distribution variability to improve precipitation estimation by weather radar for an extreme low-land mesoscale convective system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, Pieter; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-11-01

    Between 25 and 27 August 2010 a long-duration mesoscale convective system was observed above the Netherlands, locally giving rise to rainfall accumulations exceeding 150 mm. Correctly measuring the amount of precipitation during such an extreme event is important, both from a hydrological and meteorological perspective. Unfortunately, the operational weather radar measurements were affected by multiple sources of error and only 30% of the precipitation observed by rain gauges was estimated. Such an underestimation of heavy rainfall, albeit generally less strong than in this extreme case, is typical for operational weather radar in The Netherlands. In general weather radar measurement errors can be subdivided into two groups: (1) errors affecting the volumetric reflectivity measurements (e.g. ground clutter, radar calibration, vertical profile of reflectivity) and (2) errors resulting from variations in the raindrop size distribution that in turn result in incorrect rainfall intensity and attenuation estimates from observed reflectivity measurements. A stepwise procedure to correct for the first group of errors leads to large improvements in the quality of the estimated precipitation, increasing the radar rainfall accumulations to about 65% of those observed by gauges. To correct for the second group of errors, a coherent method is presented linking the parameters of the radar reflectivity-rain rate (Z - R) and radar reflectivity-specific attenuation (Z - k) relationships to the normalized drop size distribution (DSD). Two different procedures were applied. First, normalized DSD parameters for the whole event and for each precipitation type separately (convective, stratiform and undefined) were obtained using local disdrometer observations. Second, 10,000 randomly generated plausible normalized drop size distributions were used for rainfall estimation, to evaluate whether this Monte Carlo method would improve the quality of weather radar rainfall products. Using the disdrometer information, the best results were obtained in case no differentiation between precipitation type (convective, stratiform and undefined) was made, increasing the event accumulations to more than 80% of those observed by gauges. For the randomly optimized procedure, radar precipitation estimates further improve and closely resemble observations in case one differentiates between precipitation type. However, the optimal parameter sets are very different from those derived from disdrometer observations. It is therefore questionable if single disdrometer observations are suitable for large-scale quantitative precipitation estimation, especially if the disdrometer is located relatively far away from the main rain event, which was the case in this study. In conclusion, this study shows the benefit of applying detailed error correction methods to improve the quality of the weather radar product, but also confirms the need to be cautious using locally obtained disdrometer measurements.

  18. An investigation of 3.2-cm attenuation by subtropical precipitation through use of a dual-frequency, equi-volume radar system

    E-print Network

    Hodges, Donald Bartholomew

    1966-01-01

    AN INVESTIGATION OF 3. 2-CM ATTENUATION BY SUBTROPICAL PRECIPITATION THROUGH USE OF A DUAL-FREQUENCY& EQUI-VOLUME RADAR SYSTEM A Thesis By DONALD B. HODGES Captain USAF Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1966 Major Subject: METEOROLOGY AN INVESTIGATION OF 3. 2-CM ATTENUATION BY SUBTROPICAL PRECIPITATION THROUGH USE OF A DUAL-FREQUENCY& EQUI-VOLUME RADAR SYSTEM A Thesis...

  19. Detection Strategies and Intercept Metrics for Intra-Pulse Radar-Embedded Communications

    E-print Network

    Metcalf, Justin

    2011-12-31

    region (multistatic systems). More commonly, the radar transmitter and receiver are considered to be physically co-located (monostatic). This thesis considers a monostatic radar transmitting pulsed waveforms. Radar systems are used for many different...

  20. Paleodrainages of the Eastern Sahara - The radar rivers revisited (SIR-A/B implications for a mid-tertiary Trans-African drainage system)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, J. F.; Breed, C. S.; Schaber, G. G.; Mchugh, W. P.; Haynes, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The images obtained by the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR)-A and -B systems over the southwestern Egypt and northwestern Sudan were coregistered with the Landsat images and the existing maps to aid in extrapolations of the buried paleodrainages ('radar rivers'), first discovered by SIR-A. Field observations explain the radar responses of three types of radar rivers, RR-1 (broad, aggraded valleys filled with alluvium), RR-2 (braided channels inset in the RR-1 valleys), and RR-3 (narrow, long, bedrock-incised channels). A generalized model of the radar rivers, based on field studies and regional geologic relations, shows inferred changes in river regimen since the large valleys were established during the later Paleogene-early Neogene. It is suggested that a former Trans-African master stream system may have flowed from headwaters in the Red Sea Hills southwestward across North Africa, discharging into the Atlantic at the Paleo-Niger delta, prior to the Neogene domal uplifts and building of volcanic edifices across the paths of these ancient watercourses.

  1. Mars Radar Opens a Planet's Third Dimension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Radar sounder instruments orbiting Mars have looked beneath the Martian surface and opened up the third dimension for planetary exploration. The technique's success is prompting scientists to think of all the other places in the Solar System where they would like to use radar sounders.

    The first radar sounder at Mars was the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on the European Space Agency's Mars Express Orbiter. It has been joined by the complementary Shallow Subsurface Radar (SHARAD), operating at a different wavelength aboard NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The data in this animation are from SHARAD.

  2. Dual Super-Systolic Core for Real-Time Reconstructive Algorithms of High-Resolution Radar/SAR Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Atoche, Alejandro Castillo; Castillo, Javier Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    A high-speed dual super-systolic core for reconstructive signal processing (SP) operations consists of a double parallel systolic array (SA) machine in which each processing element of the array is also conceptualized as another SA in a bit-level fashion. In this study, we addressed the design of a high-speed dual super-systolic array (SSA) core for the enhancement/reconstruction of remote sensing (RS) imaging of radar/synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor systems. The selected reconstructive SP algorithms are efficiently transformed in their parallel representation and then, they are mapped into an efficient high performance embedded computing (HPEC) architecture in reconfigurable Xilinx field programmable gate array (FPGA) platforms. As an implementation test case, the proposed approach was aggregated in a HW/SW co-design scheme in order to solve the nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem of nonparametric estimation of the power spatial spectrum pattern (SSP) from a remotely sensed scene. We show how such dual SSA core, drastically reduces the computational load of complex RS regularization techniques achieving the required real-time operational mode. PMID:22736964

  3. Shuttle orbiter Ku-band radar/communications system design evaluation: High gain antenna/widebeam horn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, R.; Dodds, J. G.; Broad, P.

    1979-01-01

    The physical characteristics of the high gain antenna reflector and feed elements are described. Deficiencies in the sum feed are discussed, and lack of atmospheric venting is posed as a potential problem area. The measured RF performance of the high gain antenna is examined and the high sidelobe levels measured are related to the physical characteristics of the antenna. An examination of the attributes of the feed which might be influenced by temperature extremes shows that the antenna should be insensitive to temperature variations. Because the feed support bipod structure is considered a significant contributor to the high sidelobe levels measured in the azimuth plane, pod relocation, material changes, and shaping are suggested as improvements. Alternate feed designs are presented to further improve system performance. The widebeam horn and potential temperature effects due to the polarizer are discussed as well as in the effects of linear polarization on TDRS acquisition, and the effects of circular polarization on radar sidelobe avoidance. The radar detection probability is analyzed as a function of scan overlap and target range.

  4. Contaminants in a soil-plant-lemming food chain system at a military radar site in the Canadian Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Dushenko, W.T.; Bright, D.A.; Grundy, S.L.; Reimer, K.J. [Royal Roads Military College, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada). Environmental Sciences Group

    1995-12-31

    Environmental assessment and impact studies have been conducted at Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line and other radar sites across the Canadian Arctic and Labrador, as well as Arctic background locations since 1989. Some of the major contaminants found in soils and plants in the vicinity of the stations include PCBs and inorganic elements such as lead, copper and zinc. The impact of these contaminants at higher levels of the food chain were examined using a soil-plant-lemming system in a sewage outfall (containing high soil concentrations of contaminants) and background areas at a radar site located at Cambridge Bay, NWT. Concentrations of PCBs in tissue samples from the sewage outfall were all significantly larger than background values with averages, in some cases, differing by an order of magnitude or more. Although the average PCB concentration declines from soils (average 1,600 ppb) to plants (average 9.3 ppb) in the outfall, plant-herbivore food chain biomagnification is indicated by a 6.5 fold increase in PCB concentration between whole lemming tissues (average 61 ppb) and plants. Levels in liver tissue were double this value (123 ppb) being comparable to values reported for predators of this species. The implications of these levels are discussed in terms of ecosystem toxicity using congener specific analysis.

  5. Using X-band Weather Radar Measurements to Monitor the Integrity of Digital Elevation Models for Synthetic Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steve; UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Sayre, Jonathon

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) provide pilots with displays of stored geo-spatial data representing terrain, obstacles, and cultural features. As comprehensive validation is impractical, these databases typically have no quantifiable level of integrity. Further, updates to the databases may not be provided as changes occur. These issues limit the certification level and constrain the operational context of SVS for civil aviation. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of using a realtime monitor to bound the integrity of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) by using radar altimeter measurements during flight. This paper describes an extension of this concept to include X-band Weather Radar (WxR) measurements. This enables the monitor to detect additional classes of DEM errors and to reduce the exposure time associated with integrity threats. Feature extraction techniques are used along with a statistical assessment of similarity measures between the sensed and stored features that are detected. Recent flight-testing in the area around the Juneau, Alaska Airport (JNU) has resulted in a comprehensive set of sensor data that is being used to assess the feasibility of the proposed monitor technology. Initial results of this assessment are presented.

  6. High resolution radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Donald L.

    1988-11-01

    The goal of this project is to formulate and investigate new approaches for forming images of radar targets from spotlight-mode, delay-doppler measurements. These measurements could be acquired with a high-resolution radar-imaging system operating with an optical-or radio-frequency carrier. Two approaches are under study. The first is motivated by an image-reconstruction algorithm used in radionuclide imaging called the confidence-weighted algorithm; here, we will refer to this approach as the chirp-rate modulation approach. The second approach is based on more fundamental principles which starts with a mathematical model that accurately describes the physics of an imaging radar-system and then uses statistical-estimation theory with this model to derive processing algorithms; we will refer to this as the estimation-theory approach. Progress during this reporting period has been made on: (1) extending the estimation-theory approach to include a constraint on input signal-to-noise ratio; (2) extending the estimation-theory approach to include a sieve constraint for stabilizing image estimates, (3) extending the estimation-theory approach to include a specular or glint component in the radar-echo data; (4) analyzing the performance of the estimation-theory approach through computer simulations; and (5) modifying the chirp-rate modulation approach through the introduction of the Wigner-Ville distribution. A patent was awarded associated with the chirp-rate modulation approach.

  7. The International Radar Directory: who makes what and where

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen L. Johnston

    1998-01-01

    The newly compiled International Radar Directory CD-ROM resulted from a twenty year collection effort by this author of open information on radars of the world. During World War II radars were made in only a few countries, but are now manufactured in many countries. Radar applications now included number some 50. Radar is frequently teamed with military IR\\/EO\\/laser\\/weapon systems; however,

  8. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Jordan, Jay D. (Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Theodore J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-03

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  9. A Cloud and Precipitation Radar System Concept for the ACE Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, S. L.; Tanelli, S.; Epp, L.; Jamnejad, V.; Perez, R.; Prata, A.; Samoska, L.; Long, E; Fang, H.; Esteban-Fernandez, D.; Lee, C.

    2011-01-01

    One of the instruments recommended for deployment on the Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems (ACE) mission is a new advanced cloud profiling radar. In this paper, we describe such a radar design, called ACERAD, which has 35- and 94-GHz channels, each having Doppler and dual-polarization capabilities. ACERAD will scan at Ka-band and will be nadir-looking at W-band. To get a swath of 25-30 km, considered the minimum useful for Ka-band, ACERAD needs to scan at least 2 degrees off nadir; this is at least 20 beamwidths, which is quite large for a typical parabolic reflector. This problem is being solved with a Dragonian design; a scaled prototype of the antenna is being fabricated and will be tested on an antenna range. ACERAD also uses a quasi-optical transmission line at W-band to connect the transmitter to the antenna and antenna to the receiver. A design for this has been completed and is being laboratory tested. This paper describes the current ACERAD design and status.

  10. Radars in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, Victor E.

    1990-01-01

    The capabilities of active microwave devices operating from space (typically, radar, scatterometers, interferometers, and altimeters) are discussed. General radar parameters and basic radar principles are explained. Applications of these parameters and principles are also explained. Trends in space radar technology, and where space radars and active microwave sensors in orbit are going are discussed.

  11. Multi-channel photon counting three-dimensional imaging laser radar system using fiber array coupled Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Rong; Huang, Genghua; Hou, Libing; He, Zhiping; Hu, Yihua

    2012-09-01

    Photon counting laser radar is the most sensitive and efficiency detection method of direct-detection laser radar. With the use of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (APD) or other single photon detectors, every laser photon could be sufficiently used for ranging and three-dimensional imaging. The average energy of received laser signal could be as low as a single photon, or even less than one. This feature of photon counting laser radar enables ranging under conditions of long range, low laser pulse energy, and multi-pixel detection, while receiver size, mass, power, and complexity of laser radar are reduced. In this paper, a latest multi-channel photon counting 3D imaging laser radar system using fiber array coupled Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (APD) is introduced. Detection model based on Poisson statistics of a photon counting laser radar is discussed. A laser radar system, working under daylight condition with ultra-low signal level (less than single photon per pulse), has been designed and analyzed with the detection model and photon counting three-dimensional imaging theory. A passively Q-switched microchip laser is used to transmit short sub-nanosecond laser pulses at 532nm. The output laser is divided into 1×8 laser spots, which correspond to 8 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes coupled by a 1×8-pixel fiber array. A FPGA based time-to-digital converter (TDC), which is designed by delay line interpolation technology, is used for multi-hit signal acquisition. The algorithm of photon counting three-dimensional imaging is developed for signal photon events extraction and noise filter. Three-dimensional images under daylight conditions were acquired and analyzed. The results show that system could operate at strong solar background. The ranging accuracy of the system is 6.3cm (?) while received laser pulse signal level is only 0.04 photoelectrons on average. The advantages and feasibility of photon counting laser radar working at daylight have been demonstrated experimentally.

  12. Advanced ground penetrating radar

    SciTech Connect

    Warhus, J.P.; Mast, J.E.; Johansson, E.M.; Nelson, S.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Electronics Engineering Dept.

    1994-07-26

    An advanced Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) system has the potential for efficiently and reliably providing high resolution images for inspecting concrete civil structures for defects and damage assessment. To achieve the required performance, improvements in radar hardware, and development and adaptation of advanced 2- and 3-dimensional synthetic aperture imaging techniques are needed. Recent and continuing advancement in computer and computer-related technology areas have made it possible to consider more complex and capable systems for a variety of imaging applications not previously conceived. The authors developed conceptual designs, analyzed system requirements, and performed experiments, modeling, and image reconstructions to study the feasibility of improving GPR technology for non-destructive evaluation of bridge decks and other high-value concrete structures. An overview and summary of practical system concepts and requirements, are presented.

  13. Electromagnetic approaches to wall characterization, wall mitigation, and antenna design for through-the-wall radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thajudeen, Christopher

    Through-the-wall imaging (TWI) is a topic of current interest due to its wide range of public safety, law enforcement, and defense applications. Among the various available technologies such as, acoustic, thermal, and optical imaging, which can be employed to sense and image targets of interest, electromagnetic (EM) imaging, in the microwave frequency bands, is the most widely utilized technology and has been at the forefront of research in recent years. The primary objectives for any Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging (TWRI) system are to obtain a layout of the building and/or inner rooms, detect if there are targets of interest including humans or weapons, determine if there are countermeasures being employed to further obscure the contents of a building or room of interest, and finally to classify the detected targets. Unlike conventional radar scenarios, the presence of walls, made of common construction materials such as brick, drywall, plywood, cinder block, and solid concrete, adversely affects the ability of any conventional imaging technique to properly image targets enclosed within building structures as the propagation through the wall can induce shadowing effects on targets of interest which may result in image degradation, errors in target localization, and even complete target masking. For many applications of TWR systems, the wall ringing signals are strong enough to mask the returns from targets not located a sufficient distance behind the wall, beyond the distance of the wall ringing, and thus without proper wall mitigation, target detection becomes extremely difficult. The results presented in this thesis focus on the development of wall parameter estimation, and intra-wall and wall-type characterization techniques for use in both the time and frequency domains as well as analysis of these techniques under various real world scenarios such as reduced system bandwidth scenarios, various wall backing scenarios, the case of inhomogeneous walls, presence of ground reflections, and situations where they may be applied to the estimation of the parameters associated with an interior wall. It is demonstrated through extensive computer simulations and laboratory experiments that, by proper exploitation of the electromagnetic characteristics of walls, one can efficiently extract the constitutive parameters associated with unknown wall(s) as well as to characterize and image the intra-wall region. Additionally, it is possible, to a large extent, to remove the negative wall effects, such as shadowing and incorrect target localization, as well as to enhance the imaging and classification of targets behind walls. In addition to the discussion of post processing the radar data to account for wall effects, the design of antenna elements used for transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) operations in TWR radars is also discussed but limited to antennas for mobile, handheld, or UAV TWR systems which impose design requirements such as low profiles, wide operational bands, and in most cases lend themselves to fabrication using surface printing techniques. A new class of wideband antennas, formed though the use of printed metallic paths in the form of Peano and Hilbert space-filling curves (SFC) to provide top-loading properties that miniaturize monopole antenna elements, has been developed for applications in conformal and/or low profile antennas systems, such as mobile platforms for TWRI and communication systems. Additionally, boresight gain enhancements of a stair-like antenna geometry, through the addition of parasitic self-similar patches and gate like ground plane structures, are presented.

  14. Space Radar Images of Earth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, is studying how our global environment is changing. From the unique vantage point of space, the radar system observes, monitors and assesses large-scale environmental processes with a focus on climate change. The spaceborne data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, gives scientists highly detailed information that will help them distinguish natural environmental changes from those that are the result of human activity. The images are divided into nine categories for easier viewing.

  15. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP. Volume 30: International School on Atmospheric Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukao, Shoichiro (editor)

    1989-01-01

    Broad, tutorial coverage is given to the technical and scientific aspects of mesosphere stratosphere troposphere (MST) meteorological radar systems. Control issues, signal processing, atmospheric waves, the historical aspects of radar atmospheric dynamics, incoherent scatter radars, radar echoes, radar targets, and gravity waves are among the topics covered.

  16. The FlySafe project: How weather radars can improve the en-route bird strike warning system. Hans van Gasteren1,2

    E-print Network

    Graaf, Martin de

    1 The FlySafe project: How weather radars can improve the en-route bird strike warning system. Hans Graaf3 and Willem Bouten1 In civil aviation the majority of bird strikes occur below 1000 ft, thus civil bird strikes predominantly occur on and around aerodromes. In military aviation, however, the problem

  17. A 77 GHz Transceiver for Automotive Radar System Using a120nm In AlAs/In GaAs Metamorphic HEMTs

    E-print Network

    Kwon, Youngwoo

    A 77 GHz Transceiver for Automotive Radar System Using a120nm 0.4 0.35 In AlAs/In GaAs Metamorphic. Compared with this, Metamorphic HEMT (MHEMT) has higher gain and lower noise characteristics at high

  18. Interception of LPI radar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jim P.

    1991-11-01

    Most current radars are designed to transmit short duration pulses with relatively high peak power. These radars can be detected easily by the use of relatively modest EW intercept receivers. Three radar functions (search, anti-ship missile (ASM) seeker, and navigation) are examined to evaluate the effectiveness of potential low probability of intercept (LPI) techniques, such as waveform coding, antenna profile control, and power management that a radar may employ against current Electronic Warfare (EW) receivers. The general conclusion is that it is possible to design a LPI radar which is effective against current intercept EW receivers. LPI operation is most easily achieved at close ranges and against a target with a large radar cross section. The general system sensitivity requirement for the detection of current and projected LPI radars is found to be on the order of -100 dBmi which cannot be met by current EW receivers. Finally, three potential LPI receiver architectures, using channelized, superhet, and acousto-optic receivers with narrow RF and video bandwidths are discussed. They have shown some potential in terms of providing the sensitivity and capability in an environment where both conventional and LPI signals are present.

  19. Cockpit weather radar display demonstrator and ground-to-air sferics telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickum, J. D.; Mccall, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The results of two methods of obtaining timely and accurate severe weather presentations in the cockpit are detailed. The first method described is a course up display of uplinked weather radar data. This involves the construction of a demonstrator that will show the feasibility of producing a course up display in the cockpit of the NASA simulator at Langley. A set of software algorithms was designed that could easily be implemented, along with data tapes generated to provide the cockpit simulation. The second method described involves the uplinking of sferic data from a ground based 3M-Ryan Stormscope. The technique involves transfer of the data on the CRT of the Stormscope to a remote CRT. This sferic uplink and display could also be included in an implementation on the NASA cockpit simulator, allowing evaluation of pilot responses based on real Stormscope data.

  20. An Integrated Navigation System using GPS Carrier Phase for Real-Time Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Fellerhoff, J. Rick; Kim, Theodore J.; Kohler, Stewart M.

    1999-06-24

    A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires accu- rate measurement of the motion of the imaging plat- form to produce well-focused images with minimal absolute position error. The motion measurement (MoMeas) system consists of a inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a P-code GPS receiver that outputs corrected ephemeris, L1 & L2 pseudoranges, and L1 & L2 carrier phase measurements. The unknown initial carrier phase biases to the GPS satellites are modeled as states in an extended Kalman filter and the resulting integrated navigation solution has po- sition errors that change slowly with time. Position error drifts less than 1- cm/sec have been measured from the SAR imagery for various length apertures.

  1. Inverse problems arising in different synthetic aperture radar imaging systems and a general Bayesian approach for them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sha; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Li, Xiang; Mao, Junjie

    2011-03-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging systems are nowadays very common technics of imaging in remote sensing and environment survey. There are different acquisition modes: spotlight, stripmap, scan; different geometries: mono-, bi- and multi-static; and varieties of specific applications: interferometric SAR (InSAR), polarimetric SAR etc. In this paper, first a common inverse problem framework for all of them is given, and then basics of SAR imaging and the classical deterministic inversion methods are presented. Aiming at overcoming the inadequacies of deterministic methods, a general probabilistic Bayesian estimation method is pioneered for solving image reconstruction problems. In particular, two priors which simply allow the automated determination of the hyperparameters in a Type-II likelihood framework are considered. Finally, the performances of the proposed methods on synthetic data.

  2. The development of a power spectral density processor for C and L band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. A., III; Chladek, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A real-time signal processor was developed for the NASA/JSC L-and C-band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems. The purpose of the effort was to reduce ground data processing costs. Conversion of two quadrature channels of data (like and cross polarized) was made to obtain Power Spectral Density (PSD) values. A chirp-z transform (CZT) approach was used to filter the Doppler return signal and improved high frequency and angular resolution was realized. The processors have been tested with record signals and excellent results were obtained. CZT filtering can be readily applied to scatterometers operating at other wavelengths by altering the sample frequency. The design of the hardware and software and the results of the performance tests are described in detail.

  3. Debris Flux Comparisons From The Goldstone Radar, Haystack Radar, and Hax Radar Prior, During, and After the Last Solar Maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokely, C. L.; Stansbery, E. G.; Goldstein, R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The continual monitoring of low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment using highly sensitive radars is essential for an accurate characterization of these dynamic populations. Debris populations are continually evolving since there are new debris sources, previously unrecognized debris sources, and debris loss mechanisms that are dependent on the dynamic space environment. Such radar data are used to supplement, update, and validate existing orbital debris models. NASA has been utilizing radar observations of the debris environment for over a decade from three complementary radars: the NASA JPL Goldstone radar, the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) Long Range Imaging Radar (known as the Haystack radar), and the MIT/LL Haystack Auxiliary radar (HAX). All of these systems are highly sensitive radars that operate in a fixed staring mode to statistically sample orbital debris in the LEO environment. Each of these radars is ideally suited to measure debris within a specific size region. The Goldstone radar generally observes objects with sizes from 2 mm to 1 cm. The Haystack radar generally measures from 5 mm to several meters. The HAX radar generally measures from 2 cm to several meters. These overlapping size regions allow a continuous measurement of cumulative debris flux versus diameter from 2 mm to several meters for a given altitude window. This is demonstrated for all three radars by comparing the debris flux versus diameter over 200 km altitude windows for 3 nonconsecutive years from 1998 through 2003. These years correspond to periods before, during, and after the peak of the last solar cycle. Comparing the year to year flux from Haystack for each of these altitude regions indicate statistically significant changes in subsets of the debris populations. Potential causes of these changes are discussed. These analysis results include error bars that represent statistical sampling errors, and are detailed in this paper.

  4. Study of and proposals for the correction of errors in a radar ranging device designed to facilitate docking of a teleoperator maneuvering system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    A frequency modulated continuous wave radar system was developed. The system operates in the 35 gigahertz frequency range and provides millimeter accuracy range and range rate measurements. This level of range resolution allows soft docking for the proposed teleoperator maneuvering system (TMS) or other autonomous or robotic space vehicles. Sources of error in the operation of the system which tend to limit its range resolution capabilities are identified. Alternative signal processing techniques are explored with emphasis on determination of the effects of inserting various signal filtering circuits in the system. The identification and elimination of an extraneous low frequency signal component created as a result of zero range immediate reflection of radar energy from the surface of the antenna dish back into the mixer of the system is described.

  5. Characterization of Adolescent Prescription Drug Abuse and Misuse Using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS®) System

    PubMed Central

    Zosel, Amy; Bartelson, Becki Bucher; Bailey, Elise; Lowenstein, Steven; Dart, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the characteristics and health effects of adolescent (age 13–19 years) prescription drug abuse and misuse using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS®) System. Method Secondary analysis of data collected from RADARS System participating poison centers was performed. Data for all intentional exposures from 2007 through 2009 were used to describe adolescent prescription opioid (oxycodone, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, morphine, methadone, buprenorphine, and tramadol) and stimulant (methylphenidate and amphetamines) exposures. Results A total of 16,209 intentional adolescent exposures to prescription drugs were identified, 68% to opioids and 32% to stimulants. The mean age was 16.6 years (SD ± 1.7 years). Slightly more than half (52.4%) of drug mentions involved females. The five most frequently misused or abused drugs were hydrocodone (32%), amphetamines (18%), oxycodone (15%), methylphenidate (14%), and tramadol (11%). Of all exposures, 38%were classified as suspected suicidal. Of adolescents who intentionally exposed themselves to prescription drugs, 30% were treated in a health care facility, 2,792 of whom were admitted to the hospital, including 1,293 to the intensive care unit. A total of 17.2% of intentional exposures were associated with no effect, 38.9% minor effects, 23.3% moderate effects, 3.6% major effects, and 0.1% were associated with death. Oxycodone and methadone were associated with the most deaths. No deaths were associated with exposures to stimulants. Conclusions Prescription drug misuse and abuse poses an important health problem and results in thousands of hospitalizations of adolescents per year. Further work is needed to develop focused interventions and educational programs to prevent prescription drug abuse and misuse by adolescents. PMID:23357446

  6. Weather Radar Fundamentals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    This 2-hour module presents the fundamental principles of Doppler weather radar operation and how to interpret common weather phenomena using radar imagery. This is accomplished via conceptual animations and many interactive radar examples in which the user can practice interpreting both radar reflectivity and radar velocity imagery. Although intended as an accelerated introduction to understanding and using basic Doppler weather radar products, the module can also serve as an excellent refresher for more experienced users.

  7. From Bursts to Back-Projection: Signal Processing Techniques for Earth and Planetary Observing Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Discusses: (1) JPL Radar Overview and Historical Perspective (2) Signal Processing Needs in Earth and Planetary Radars (3) Examples of Current Systems and techniques (4) Future Perspectives in signal processing for radar missions

  8. The Arecibo Observatory as an MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    The radars and other systems at the Arecibo Observatory were designed and built, originally, for incoherent-scatter and radio-astronomy research. More recently, important additions have been made for planetary radar and artificial RF heating of the ionosphere. Although designed and built for a different application, these systems have shown to be very powerful tools for tropospheric, stratospheric and mesospheric research. The Observatory at present has two main radars: one at 430 and the other at 2380 MHz. In addition, 50-MHz MST radar work has been done using portable transmitters brought to the Observatory for this purpose. This capability will become permanent with the recent acquisition of a transmitter at this frequency. Furthermore, control and data processing systems have been developed to use the powerful HF transmitter and antennas of the HF-heating facility as an HF bistatic radar. A brief description of the four radars available at the Observatory is presented.

  9. New directions in bistatic radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugh Griffiths

    2008-01-01

    It has been remarked that interest in the subject of bistatic radar has varied cyclically, with a period of about fifteen years. The very first radars were bistatic, until T\\/R switches were invented. Interest was revived in the 1950s\\/1960s, with semi-active homing missiles and the SPASUR system, then died away. The second resurgence was in the mid-1970s to mid-1980s, with

  10. The NASA Polarimetric Radar (NPOL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Wolff, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of the NASA NPOL S-band dual-polarimetric radar are presented including its operating characteristics, field configuration, scanning capabilities and calibration approaches. Examples of precipitation science data collections conducted using various scan types, and associated products, are presented for different convective system types and previous field campaign deployments. Finally, the NASA NPOL radar location is depicted in its home base configuration within the greater Wallops Flight Facility precipitation research array supporting NASA Global Precipitation Measurement Mission ground validation.

  11. Development of dual-polarization radar in an active and passive dual-wavelength (X\\/Ka) microwave remote sensing system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shu Duan; Ling Zhang; Jinli Liu

    2003-01-01

    In order to enhance the sensing power of precipitating clouds, a dual-polarization radar is developed to be added in an active and passive microwave dual-wavelength (X\\/Ka band) remote sensing system. After this upgrading of dual-polarization function addition, the advanced properties of the principle of the former remote sensing system are augmented. This upgraded system becomes a new capability of synthetically

  12. Nonlinear trajectory generation for unmanned air vehicles with multiple radars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tamer Inanc; Kathy Misovec; Richard M. Murray

    2004-01-01

    The problem of finding a real time optimal trajectory to minimize the probability of detection of unmanned air vehicles by opponent radar detection systems is investigated. This paper extends our preliminary results on low observable trajectory generation in three ways. First, trajectory planning in the presence of detection by multiple radar systems, rather than a single radar system, is considered.

  13. 500 IEEE GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING LETTERS, VOL. 3, NO. 4, OCTOBER 2006 ELF Radar System Proposed for Localized

    E-print Network

    Simpson, Jamesina J.

    Taflove, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--This letter proposes a novel extremely low frequency (ELF) radar extremely low frequency (ELF: 3­300 Hz) radar for locating and characterizing localized ionospheric is the detection of hypothesized ionospheric earthquake precursors. Index Terms--Earthquakes, extremely low

  14. High-resolution vertical imaging of the troposphere and lower stratosphere using the new MU radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, H.; Hassenpflug, G.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.

    2006-05-01

    In the present paper, a new application of the range imaging technique called Frequency Interferometry Imaging (FII) or Range Imaging (RIM), performed in April 2005, is shown using the new 46.5-MHz Middle and Upper (MU) atmosphere radar system (Shigaraki, Japan). Height-time images of brightness distribution have been computed at the highest resolution ever obtained for imaging with VHF radars in the troposphere and, for the very first time, in the lower stratosphere, up to about 22 km. The images were produced by processing signals obtained with an initial range-resolution of ?r=150 m and five equally-spaced frequencies within ?f=1.0 MHz, with the adaptive Capon method. These values represent an improvement of a factor 2 over all the previous published experiments at VHF, which were performed with ?r=300 m and ?f=0.5 MHz. The Capon images present realistic and self-consistent features, and reveal many more organized structures than the height-time SNR plots at the initial range-resolution. For example, the Capon images show persistent enhanced brightness layers significantly thinner than 150 m in the stratosphere, which are impossible to track with the standard single-frequency mode owing to a lack of range resolution. These observations thus support the idea of strong stratification even at vertical scales much smaller than 100 m, as suggested by recent high-resolution temperature observations by balloons (Dalaudier et al., 1994). We also present comparisons of Capon images with patterns obtained from the dual-FDI technique and two parametric methods (the MUSIC algorithm and the newly-introduced Maximum Entropy Method based on an auto-regressive (AR) model). The comparisons confirm the insufficiencies of the dual-FDI technique and indicate that parametric methods such as MEM and the MUSIC algorithm can help to validate the Capon images when the parametric methods provide similar patterns.

  15. Dual scan rate radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. M. Waters

    1986-01-01

    A dual scan rate radar system (DSR) includes a phased array antenna, a transmitter, a receiver and a control unit. Each rf pulse from the transmitter includes contiguous long-range and short-range pulses. The control unit adjusts the antenna so that the long-range pulse is transmitted into a slow beam at theta s and the short-range pulse is transmitted into a

  16. Multibeam synthetic aperture radar for global oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.

    1979-01-01

    A single-frequency multibeam synthetic aperture radar concept for large swath imaging desired for global oceanography is evaluated. Each beam iilluminates a separate range and azimuth interval, and images for different beams may be separated on the basis of the Doppler spectrum of the beams or their spatial azimuth separation in the image plane of the radar processor. The azimuth resolution of the radar system is selected so that the Doppler spectrum of each beam does not interfere with the Doppler foldover due to the finite pulse repetition frequency of the radar system.

  17. Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar in Bridge Health Monitoring Using Different Frequency Antennae Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alani, A.; Kilic, G.; Aboutalebi, M.

    2012-04-01

    Inspection and assessment of bridge structures within the context of health monitoring of structures as well as the life cycle of structures is of paramount importance for structural engineers and bridge owners. No doubt the early detection of structural defects in particular internal structural elements such as bridge deck delamination, formation of cracks and corrosion of rebar will enable engineers to remedy the imperfection and prolong the serviceability of the structure. Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) have proved to be effective in detecting such imperfections if utilised correctly. This paper presents and discusses the applications of GPR in assessing the structural integrity of a heavily used bridge in a town centre position (Pentagon Road Bridge, Chatham, Kent, UK) using different antennae in terms of frequency and method of application (2 GHz and 200-600 MHz GPR antennae). The paper focuses on the effectiveness of using the 'correct' tool and data processing in terms of better understanding possible structural defects. Processing, interpretation and analysis of collected data were supported by GRED software, with three-dimensional scanning capabilities. Reported results illustrate the effectiveness of GPR mapping providing valuable information regarding the positions of rebar (upper and lower reinforcement), unknown structural features as well as possible moisture ingress within the structure. The results also demonstrate a possible phenomenon in identifying the presence of moisture within the bridge deck confirming a similar finding in an earlier case (Forth Road Bridge in Scotland). Keywords: Bridge; Structure; Health Monitoring; Moisture Ingress.

  18. Ground penetrating radar antenna system analysis for prediction of earth material properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oden, C.P.; Wright, D.L.; Powers, M.H.; Olhoeft, G.

    2005-01-01

    The electrical properties of the ground directly beneath a ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna very close to the earth's surface (ground-coupled) must be known in order to predict the antenna response. In order to investigate changing antenna response with varying ground properties, a series of finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations were made for a bi-static (fixed horizontal offset between transmitting and receiving antennas) antenna array over a homogeneous ground. We examine the viability of using an inversion algorithm based on the simulated received waveforms to estimate the material properties of the earth near the antennas. Our analysis shows that, for a constant antenna height above the earth, the amplitude of certain frequencies in the received signal can be used to invert for the permittivity and conductivity of the ground. Once the antenna response is known, then the wave field near the antenna can be determined and sharper images of the subsurface near the antenna can be made. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  19. Feasibility study of a low-cost system-on-a-chip UWB pulse radar on silicon for the heart monitoring

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Domenico Zito; Domenico Pepe; Bruno Neri; Danilo De Rossi

    2007-01-01

    In February 2002 the FCC authorized the marketing of a new class of radiofrequency devices: the ultra-wide-band (UWB) systems. One of the most interesting applications for which the UWB systems are addressed is related to the medical imaging. This paper addresses the feasibility study of a novel fully integrated 3.1-10.6 GHz UWB radar on a standard silicon technology for the

  20. Miniature multimode deep ground penetrating radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun-lin Huang; Shi-ping Zhu; Ming Lu

    2010-01-01

    Deep ground penetrating radar, as its name says, is able to image the deep buried objects with high resolution. It becomes an important tool for human to know the underground world. In this paper a stepped frequency deep penetrating radar system has been developed. This miniature system is designed for three operation modes: Mode 1 is fast measurement, real-time data

  1. All-digital radar architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanov, Pavlo A.

    2014-10-01

    All digital radar architecture requires exclude mechanical scan system. The phase antenna array is necessarily large because the array elements must be co-located with very precise dimensions and will need high accuracy phase processing system for aggregate and distribute T/R modules data to/from antenna elements. Even phase array cannot provide wide field of view. New nature inspired all digital radar architecture proposed. The fly's eye consists of multiple angularly spaced sensors giving the fly simultaneously thee wide-area visual coverage it needs to detect and avoid the threats around him. Fly eye radar antenna array consist multiple directional antennas loose distributed along perimeter of ground vehicle or aircraft and coupled with receiving/transmitting front end modules connected by digital interface to central processor. Non-steering antenna array allows creating all-digital radar with extreme flexible architecture. Fly eye radar architecture provides wide possibility of digital modulation and different waveform generation. Simultaneous correlation and integration of thousands signals per second from each point of surveillance area allows not only detecting of low level signals ((low profile targets), but help to recognize and classify signals (targets) by using diversity signals, polarization modulation and intelligent processing. Proposed all digital radar architecture with distributed directional antenna array can provide a 3D space vector to the jammer by verification direction of arrival for signals sources and as result jam/spoof protection not only for radar systems, but for communication systems and any navigation constellation system, for both encrypted or unencrypted signals, for not limited number or close positioned jammers.

  2. An analysis of radar estimated precipitation to rain gauge measurements

    E-print Network

    Gleason, Byron Edward

    1997-01-01

    different case events. These events were classified into one of three weather system classifications. The classifications were based on two criteria, synoptic conditions and the storms radar signature. Radar data were collected from five levels above...

  3. Application of Electromagnetic (EM): Radar Salah M. Al-Ofi

    E-print Network

    Masoudi, Husain M.

    .g. plane, cars, iceberg or missile. Since the evolution of radar in the second World War, it has been the first radar system called "Cain Home" which con- sists of an array of towers of 300 feet high to guide

  4. Modern radar: Theory, operation and maintenance \\/2nd edition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. L. Safford Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A compendium on radar systems and theory is presented. The development of the magnetron and the klystron is reviewed along with the methods used to solve the original radar problems. The early display devices are surveyed with a view to their ongoing evolution. The pulse, Doppler, CW, and pulse-Doppler radar systems are detailed. Target reflectivity, pulse calculations, Doppler clutter, signal

  5. Classification of radar clutter in an air traffic control environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SIMON HAYKIN; WOLFGANG STEHWIEN; CONG DENG; PETER WEBER; RICHARD MANN

    1991-01-01

    The results of an experimental study aimed at the classification of radar clutter encountered on ground-based coherent scanning radar systems used for air traffic control are presented. The clutter signals of interest are primarily those due to birds and to clouds and weather systems. A historical perspective on the radar clutter classification problem is given, and related issues are discussed.

  6. Optimal cooperative placement of UAVs for ground target tracking with Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Abhijit; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    2004-08-01

    With the recent advent of moderate-cost unmanned (or uninhabited) aerial vehicles (UAV) and their success in surveillance, it is natural to consider the cooperative management of groups of UAVs. The problem considered in this paper is the optimization of the information obtained by a group of UAVs carrying out surveillance of several ground targets distributed over a large area. The UAVs are assumed to be equipped with Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radars, which measure the locations of moving ground targets as well as their radial velocities (Doppler). In this research the Fisher information, obtained from the information form of Riccati equation, is used in the objective function. Sensor survival probability and target detection probability for each target-sensor pair are also included in the objective function, where the detection probability is a function of both range and range rate. The optimal sensor placement problem is solved by a genetic algorithm based optimizer. Simulation results on two different scenarios are presented for four different types of prior information.

  7. Analysis of synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Some problems faced in applications of radar measurements in hydrology are: (1) adequate calibration of the radar systems and direct digital data will be required in order that repeatable data can be acquired for hydrologic applications; (2) quantitative hydrologic research on a large scale will be prohibitive with aircraft mounted synthetic aperture radar systems due to the system geometry; (3) spacecraft platforms appear to be the best platforms for radar systems when conducting research over watersheds larger than a few square kilometers; (4) experimental radar systems should be designed to avoid use of radomes; and (5) cross polarized X and L band data seem to discriminate between good and poor hydrologic cover better than like polarized data.

  8. An MSK Radar Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2012-01-01

    The minimum-shift-keying (MSK) radar waveform is formed by periodically extending a waveform that separately modulates the in-phase and quadrature- phase components of the carrier with offset pulse-shaped pseudo noise (PN) sequences. To generate this waveform, a pair of periodic PN sequences is each passed through a pulse-shaping filter with a half sinusoid impulse response. These shaped PN waveforms are then offset by half a chip time and are separately modulated on the in-phase and quadrature phase components of an RF carrier. This new radar waveform allows an increase in radar resolution without the need for additional spectrum. In addition, it provides self-interference suppression and configurable peak sidelobes. Compared strictly on the basis of the expressions for delay resolution, main-lobe bandwidth, effective Doppler bandwidth, and peak ambiguity sidelobe, it appears that bi-phase coded (BPC) outperforms the new MSK waveform. However, a radar waveform must meet certain constraints imposed by the transmission and reception of the modulation, as well as criteria dictated by the observation. In particular, the phase discontinuity of the BPC waveform presents a significant impediment to the achievement of finer resolutions in radar measurements a limitation that is overcome by using the continuous phase MSK waveform. The phase continuity, and the lower fractional out-of-band power of MSK, increases the allowable bandwidth compared with BPC, resulting in a factor of two increase in the range resolution of the radar. The MSK waveform also has been demonstrated to have an ambiguity sidelobe structure very similar to BPC, where the sidelobe levels can be decreased by increasing the length of the m-sequence used in its generation. This ability to set the peak sidelobe level is advantageous as it allows the system to be configured to a variety of targets, including those with a larger dynamic range. Other conventionally used waveforms that possess an even greater spectral efficiency than the MSK waveform, such as linear frequency modulation (LFM) and Costas frequency hopping, have a fixed peak sidelobe level that is therefore not configurable, and can be exceeded by high contrast targets. Furthermore, in the case of a multistatic experiment observing a target in motion, self-interference from the transmitter to the receiver is mitigated by the MSK waveform. Waveforms that have delay Doppler coupling, such as LFM, provide no such protection.

  9. The impact of reflectivity correction and conversion methods to improve precipitation estimation by weather radar for an extreme low-land Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, Pieter; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    Between 25 and 27 August 2010 a long-duration mesoscale convective system was observed above the Netherlands. For most of the country this led to over 15 hours of near-continuous precipitation, which resulted in total event accumulations exceeding 150 mm in the eastern part of the Netherlands. Such accumulations belong to the largest sums ever recorded in this country and gave rise to local flooding. Measuring precipitation by weather radar within such mesoscale convective systems is known to be a challenge, since measurements are affected by multiple sources of error. For the current event the operational weather radar rainfall product only estimated about 30% of the actual amount of precipitation as measured by rain gauges. In the current presentation we will try to identify what gave rise to such large underestimations. In general weather radar measurement errors can be subdivided into two different groups: 1) errors affecting the volumetric reflectivity measurements taken, and 2) errors related to the conversion of reflectivity values in rainfall intensity and attenuation estimates. To correct for the first group of errors, the quality of the weather radar reflectivity data was improved by successively correcting for 1) clutter and anomalous propagation, 2) radar calibration, 3) wet radome attenuation, 4) signal attenuation and 5) the vertical profile of reflectivity. Such consistent corrections are generally not performed by operational meteorological services. Results show a large improvement in the quality of the precipitation data, however still only ~65% of the actual observed accumulations was estimated. To further improve the quality of the precipitation estimates, the second group of errors are corrected for by making use of disdrometer measurements taken in close vicinity of the radar. Based on these data the parameters of a normalized drop size distribution are estimated for the total event as well as for each precipitation type separately (convective, stratiform and undefined). These are then used to obtain coherent parameter sets for the radar reflectivity-rainfall rate (Z-R) and radar reflectivity-attenuation (Z-k) relationship, specifically applicable for this event. By applying a single parameter set to correct for both sources of errors, the quality of the rainfall product improves further, leading to >80% of the observed accumulations. However, by differentiating between precipitation type no better results are obtained as when using the operational relationships. This leads to the question: how representative are local disdrometer observations to correct large scale weather radar measurements? In order to tackle this question a Monte Carlo approach was used to generate >10000 sets of the normalized dropsize distribution parameters and to assess their impact on the estimated precipitation amounts. Results show that a large number of parameter sets result in improved precipitation estimated by the weather radar closely resembling observations. However, these optimal sets vary considerably as compared to those obtained from the local disdrometer measurements.

  10. Pointing mechanisms for the Shuttle Radar Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienthal, Gerald W.; Olivera, Argelio M.; Shiraishi, Lori R.

    1993-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Laboratory (SRL) is scheduled for launch in December of 1993 on the first of its two missions. The SRL has three major radar instruments: two distributed phased-array antennas, which make up the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C System (SIR-C) and are capable of being electronically steered, and one X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (X-SAR), which is pointed mechanically by a suite of mechanisms. This paper will describe these mechanisms and summarize the development difficulties that were encountered in bringing them from the design stage through prototype development and protoflight testing.

  11. Assessing the Predictability of Convection using Ensemble Data Assimilation of Simulated Radar Observations in an LETKF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Heiner; Craig, George

    2014-05-01

    This study uses the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) to perform storm-scale Data Assimilation of simulated Doppler radar observations into the non-hydrostatic, convection-permitting COSMO model. In perfect model experiments (OSSEs), it is investigated how the limited predictability of convective storms affects precipitation forecasts. The study compares a fine analysis scheme with small RMS errors to a coarse scheme that allows for errors in position, shape and occurrence of storms in the ensemble. The coarse scheme uses superobservations, a coarser grid for analysis weights, a larger localization radius and larger observation error that allow a broadening of the Gaussian error statistics. Three hour forecasts of convective systems (with typical lifetimes exceeding 6 hours) from the detailed analyses of the fine scheme are found to be advantageous to those of the coarse scheme during the first 1-2 hours, with respect to the predicted storm positions. After 3 hours in the convective regime used here, the forecast quality of the two schemes appears indiscernible, judging by RMSE and verification methods for rain-fields and objects. It is concluded that, for operational assimilation systems, the analysis scheme might not necessarily need to be detailed to the grid scale of the model. Depending on the forecast lead time, and on the presence of orographic or synoptic forcing that enhance the predictability of storm occurrences, analyses from a coarser scheme might suffice.

  12. A probabilistic approach of the Flash Flood Early Warning System (FF-EWS) in Catalonia based on radar ensemble generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, David; Sempere-Torres, Daniel; Corral, Carles; Llort, Xavier; Velasco, Enrique

    2010-05-01

    Early Warning Systems (EWS) are commonly identified as the most efficient tools in order to improve the preparedness and risk management against heavy rains and Flash Floods (FF) with the objective of reducing economical losses and human casualties. In particular, flash floods affecting torrential Mediterranean catchments are a key element to be incorporated within operational EWSs. The characteristic high spatial and temporal variability of the storms requires high-resolution data and methods to monitor/forecast the evolution of rainfall and its hydrological impact in small and medium torrential basins. A first version of an operational FF-EWS has been implemented in Catalonia (NE Spain) under the name of EHIMI system (Integrated Tool for Hydrometeorological Forecasting) with the support of the Catalan Water Agency (ACA) and the Meteorological Service of Catalonia (SMC). Flash flood warnings are issued based on radar-rainfall estimates. Rainfall estimation is performed on radar observations with high spatial and temporal resolution (1km2 and 10 minutes) in order to adapt the warning scale to the 1-km grid of the EWS. The method is based on comparing observed accumulated rainfall against rainfall thresholds provided by the regional Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves. The so-called "aggregated rainfall warning" at every river cell is obtained as the spatially averaged rainfall over its associated upstream draining area. Regarding the time aggregation of rainfall, the critical duration is thought to be an accumulation period similar to the concentration time of each cachtment. The warning is issued once the forecasted rainfall accumulation exceeds the rainfall thresholds mentioned above, which are associated to certain probability of occurrence. Finally, the hazard warning is provided and shown to the decision-maker in terms of exceeded return periods at every river cell covering the whole area of Catalonia. The objective of the present work includes the probabilistic component to the FF-EWS. As a first step, we have incorporated the uncertainty in rainfall estimates and forecasts based on an ensemble of equiprobable rainfall scenarios. The presented study has focused on a number of rainfall events and the performance of the FF-EWS evaluated in terms of its ability to produce probabilistic hazard warnings for decision-making support.

  13. A satellite-based radar wind sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xin, Weizhuang

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to investigate the application of Doppler radar systems for global wind measurement. A model of the satellite-based radar wind sounder (RAWS) is discussed, and many critical problems in the designing process, such as the antenna scan pattern, tracking the Doppler shift caused by satellite motion, and backscattering of radar signals from different types of clouds, are discussed along with their computer simulations. In addition, algorithms for measuring mean frequency of radar echoes, such as the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) estimator, the covariance estimator, and the estimators based on autoregressive models, are discussed. Monte Carlo computer simulations were used to compare the performance of these algorithms. Anti-alias methods are discussed for the FFT and the autoregressive methods. Several algorithms for reducing radar ambiguity were studied, such as random phase coding methods and staggered pulse repitition frequncy (PRF) methods. Computer simulations showed that these methods are not applicable to the RAWS because of the broad spectral widths of the radar echoes from clouds. A waveform modulation method using the concept of spread spectrum and correlation detection was developed to solve the radar ambiguity. Radar ambiguity functions were used to analyze the effective signal-to-noise ratios for the waveform modulation method. The results showed that, with suitable bandwidth product and modulation of the waveform, this method can achieve the desired maximum range and maximum frequency of the radar system.

  14. Aseismic Slip Events along the Southern San Andreas Fault System Captured by Radar Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P

    2001-10-01

    A seismic slip is observed along several faults in the Salton Sea and southernmost Landers rupture zone regions using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data spanning different time periods between 1992 and 1997. In the southernmost Landers rupture zone, projecting south from the Pinto Mountain Fault, sharp discontinuities in the interferometric phase are observed along the sub-parallel Burnt Mountain and Eureka Peak Faults beginning three months after the Landers earthquake and is interpreted to be post-Landers after-slip. Abrupt phase offsets are also seen along the two southernmost contiguous 11 km Durmid Hill and North Shore segments of the San Andreas Fault with an abrupt termination of slip near the northern end of the North Shore Segment. A sharp phase offset is seen across 20 km of the 30 km-long Superstition Hills Fault before phase decorrelation in the Imperial Valley along the southern 10 km of the fault prevents coherent imaging by InSAR. A time series of deformation interferograms suggest most of this slip occurred between 1993 and 1995 and none of it occurred between 1992 and 1993. A phase offset is also seen along a 5 km central segment of the Coyote Creek fault that forms a wedge with an adjoining northeast-southwest trending conjugate fault. Most of the slip observed on the southern San Andreas and Superstition Hills Faults occurred between 1993 and 1995--no slip is observed in the 92-93 interferograms. These slip events, especially the Burnt Mountain and Eureka Peak events, are inferred to be related to stress redistribution from the June, 1992 M{sub w} = 7.3 Landers earthquake. Best-fit elastic models of the San Andreas and Superstition Hills slip events suggest source mechanisms with seismic moments over three orders of magnitude larger than a maximum possible summation of seismic moments from all seismicity along each fault segment during the entire 4.8-year time interval spanned by the InSAR data. Aseismic moment releases of this magnitude (equivalent to M{sub w} = 5.3 and 5.6 events on the Superstition Hills and San Andreas Faults respectively) are hitherto unknown and have not been captured previously by any geodetic technique.

  15. Modern radar: Theory, operation and maintenance /2nd edition/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safford, E. L., Jr.

    1981-02-01

    A compendium on radar systems and theory is presented. The development of the magnetron and the klystron is reviewed along with the methods used to solve the original radar problems. The early display devices are surveyed with a view to their ongoing evolution. The pulse, Doppler, CW, and pulse-Doppler radar systems are detailed. Target reflectivity, pulse calculations, Doppler clutter, signal processing, and bandwidth are discussed. The uses and basic components are examined of the radar systems utilized in military, intruder detection, avionics, aerospace, police, satellite, and guided missile applications. A coverage of radar frequency components, tracking systems, aircraft signatures, and receivers is provided.

  16. Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Neil

    1986-01-01

    In June of 1985 the Project Initiation Agreement was signed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications for the Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project (SIR). The thrust of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar Project is to continue the evolution of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) science and technology developed during SEASAT, SIR-A and SIR-B missions to meet the needs of the Earth Observing System (EOS) in the mid 1990's. As originally formulated, the Project plans were for a reflight of the SIR-B in 1987, the development of a new SAR, SIR-C, for missions in mid 1989 and early 1990, and the upgrade of SIR-C to EOS configuration with a qualification flight aboard the shuttle in the 1993 time frame (SIR-D). However, the loss of the shuttle Challenger has delayed the first manifest for SIR to early 1990. This delay prompted the decision to drop SIR-B reflight plans and move ahead with SIR-C to more effectively utilize this first mission opportunity. The planning for this project is discussed.

  17. Dual-polarization radar rainfall estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifelli, Robert; Chandrasekar, V.

    Dual-polarization radar is a critical tool for weather research applications, including rainfall estimation, and is at the verge of being a key instrument for operational meteorologists. This new radar system is being integrated into radar networks around the world, including the planned upgrade of the U.S. National Weather Service Weather Surveillance Radar, 1988 Doppler radars. Dual polarization offers several advantages compared to single-polarization radar systems, including additional information about the size, shape, and orientation of hydrometeors. This information can be used to more accurately retrieve characteristics of the drop size distribution, identify types of hydrometeors, correct for signal loss (attenuation) in heavy precipitation, and more easily identify spurious echo scatterers. In addition to traditional backscatter measurements, differential propagation phase characteristics allow for rainfall estimation that is immune to absolute calibration of the radar system, attenuation effects, as well as partial beam blocking. By combining different radar measurements, rainfall retrieval algorithms have developed that minimize the error characteristics of the different rainfall estimators, while at the same time taking advantage of the data quality enhancements. Although dual-polarization techniques have been applied to S band and C band radar systems for several decades, polarization diversity at higher frequencies including X band are now widely available to the radar community. This chapter provides an overview of dual-polarization rainfall estimation applications that are typically utilized at X, C, and S bands. The concept of distinguishing basic and applied science issues and their impact on rainfall estimation is introduced. Various dual-polarization radar rainfall techniques are discussed, emphasizing the strengths and weaknesses of various estimators at different frequencies.

  18. Stereo radar for mapping and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, L.

    1980-01-01

    The use of terrain imaging radar to extract elevation information by stereo viewing and measurement is discussed. Either a three dimensional visual model or elevation measurements may be obtained by simultaneous viewing or differential measurement of images obtained by a side-looking radar from two different flightpaths. Expressions describing radar image geometry, model vertical exaggeration, and stereo measurement accuracy are derived. The dependence of the exaggeration and accuracy on system parameters and key system errors is derived, discussed, and illustrated by application to several airborne and spaceborne systems and system concepts, and the results of some preliminary measurements of imagery from two airborne and one spaceborne system are given.

  19. Understanding the relationships between radar response patterns and the bio- and geophysical parameters of urban areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zong-Guo Xia; Floyd M. Henderson

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the current understanding of the relationships between radar response patterns and the bio- and geophysical parameters of urban areas. Specifically, it examines the effects of radar system, ground target, and environmental factors on the intensity and pattern of radar returns from urban features. System parameters considered include radar signal wavelength, polarization, incident angle, and look direction. Ground

  20. Designing a Multichannel Sense-and-Avoid Radar for Small UASs

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    Designing a Multichannel Sense-and-Avoid Radar for Small UASs Mikhail Zakharov ITTC-FY2014-TR-70093............................................................................................................................................. 7 Chapter 1: Sense-and-Avoid Radar for Small UASs 1.1 Requirements (FMCW) collision-avoidance radar for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UASs). This radar system is being