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Sample records for god improves response

  1. God will forgive: reflecting on God's love decreases neurophysiological responses to errors.

    PubMed

    Good, Marie; Inzlicht, Michael; Larson, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    In religions where God is portrayed as both loving and wrathful, religious beliefs may be a source of fear as well as comfort. Here, we consider if God's love may be more effective, relative to God's wrath, for soothing distress, but less effective for helping control behavior. Specifically, we assess whether contemplating God's love reduces our ability to detect and emotionally react to conflict between one's behavior and overarching religious standards. We do so within a neurophysiological framework, by observing the effects of exposure to concepts of God's love vs punishment on the error-related negativity (ERN)--a neural signal originating in the anterior cingulate cortex that is associated with performance monitoring and affective responses to errors. Participants included 123 students at Brigham Young University, who completed a Go/No-Go task where they made 'religious' errors (i.e. ostensibly exhibited pro-alcohol tendencies). Reflecting on God's love caused dampened ERNs and worse performance on the Go/No-Go task. Thinking about God's punishment did not affect performance or ERNs. Results suggest that one possible reason religiosity is generally linked to positive well-being may be because of a decreased affective response to errors that occurs when God's love is prominent in the minds of believers. PMID:25062839

  2. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  3. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  4. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  5. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  6. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  7. God will forgive: reflecting on God’s love decreases neurophysiological responses to errors

    PubMed Central

    Inzlicht, Michael; Larson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    In religions where God is portrayed as both loving and wrathful, religious beliefs may be a source of fear as well as comfort. Here, we consider if God’s love may be more effective, relative to God’s wrath, for soothing distress, but less effective for helping control behavior. Specifically, we assess whether contemplating God’s love reduces our ability to detect and emotionally react to conflict between one’s behavior and overarching religious standards. We do so within a neurophysiological framework, by observing the effects of exposure to concepts of God’s love vs punishment on the error-related negativity (ERN)—a neural signal originating in the anterior cingulate cortex that is associated with performance monitoring and affective responses to errors. Participants included 123 students at Brigham Young University, who completed a Go/No-Go task where they made ‘religious’ errors (i.e. ostensibly exhibited pro-alcohol tendencies). Reflecting on God’s love caused dampened ERNs and worse performance on the Go/No-Go task. Thinking about God’s punishment did not affect performance or ERNs. Results suggest that one possible reason religiosity is generally linked to positive well-being may be because of a decreased affective response to errors that occurs when God’s love is prominent in the minds of believers. PMID:25062839

  8. Under God?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes California case ("Newdow v. U.S. Congress") involving Constit utional challenge to the phrase "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance wherein the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals held that the phrase violated the Establishment Clause requiring state-church separation. (Contains 11 references.) (PKP)

  9. An old god awakens, briefly.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mariam

    2009-01-01

    During a psychodynamic psychotherapy with a middle-aged Catholic woman, her realization that she had foregone her calling to a religious vocation led to the patient's entering a convent. Throughout these developments the therapist struggled with countertransference responses related to her own religious history, recognizing the re-awakening of a previous god representation from her own adolescence. The interaction suggests that, although one's god representation may undergo maturation, old relationships with divinity may not be completely suppressed. PMID:19364257

  10. Good for God? Religious motivation reduces perceived responsibility for and morality of good deeds.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Will M

    2014-08-01

    Many people view religion as a crucial source of morality. However, 6 experiments (total N = 1,078) revealed that good deeds are perceived as less moral if they are performed for religious reasons. Religiously motivated acts were seen as less moral than the exact same acts performed for other reasons (Experiments 1-2 and 6). Religious motivations also reduced attributions of intention and responsibility (Experiments 3-6), an effect that fully mediated the effect of religious motivations on perceived morality (Experiment 6). The effects were not explained by different perceptions of motivation orientation (i.e., intrinsic vs. extrinsic) across conditions (Experiment 4) and also were evident when religious upbringing led to an intuitive moral response (Experiment 5). Effects generalized across religious and nonreligious participants. When viewing a religiously motivated good deed, people infer that actually helping others is, in part, a side effect of other motivations rather than an end in itself. Thus, religiously motivated actors are seen as less responsible than secular actors for their good deeds, and their helping behavior is viewed as less moral than identical good deeds performed for either unclear or secular motivations. PMID:24773192

  11. Of God and Psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Karasu, T Byram

    2015-01-01

    Psychotherapy is an instrument for remediation of psychological deficits and conflict resolution, as well as an instrument for growth and self-cultivation. In fact, psychotherapy is the finest form of life education. All of this is done without psychotherapists' playing a teacher, a minister, a priest, a rabbi, an imam, or a Buddhist monk, but by being familiar with what they know and more. That "more" is about understanding "the attributes" of gods and religions as they serve the all-too-human needs of believing and belonging. It is about the distillation of common psychological, sociological, moral, and philosophical attributes of religions, and the recognition that the attributes themselves are faith and God. Attributes that serve the affiliative needs define faith, for example, belonging is faith; attributes that serve the divine needs define God, for example, compassion is God. Those who have recovered from their primitive innocence need to formulate their ideas of God and religion, regardless of their affiliation with a religious community. One may need to resonate emotionally with the God of his or her religion, but intellectually need to transcend all its dogma and cultivate a personal concept of divinity free from any theological structure. Such an enlightened person achieves enduring equanimity by striving to own the attributes of Gods--to be godly. This is equally true for psychotherapists as it is for their patients. PMID:26802419

  12. How Children and Adults Represent God's Mind.

    PubMed

    Heiphetz, Larisa; Lane, Jonathan D; Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, humans have contemplated the minds of gods. Research on religious cognition is spread across sub-disciplines, making it difficult to gain a complete understanding of how people reason about gods' minds. We integrate approaches from cognitive, developmental, and social psychology and neuroscience to illuminate the origins of religious cognition. First, we show that although adults explicitly discriminate supernatural minds from human minds, their implicit responses reveal far less discrimination. Next, we demonstrate that children's religious cognition often matches adults' implicit responses, revealing anthropomorphic notions of God's mind. Together, data from children and adults suggest the intuitive nature of perceiving God's mind as human-like. We then propose three complementary explanations for why anthropomorphism persists in adulthood, suggesting that anthropomorphism may be (a) an instance of the anchoring and adjustment heuristic; (b) a reflection of early testimony; and/or (c) an evolutionary byproduct. PMID:25807973

  13. The god within and the god without.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Teddi

    2013-09-01

    Spirituality enables the direct experience of connection between the individual and God, and can exist with or without an intermediary such as a religious institution. Via meditation or spiritual practice one can find God within oneself. Seeing oneself as a little Christ or Buddha affirms that one is sacred, and worthy of self-love and self-respect. This self-image is incongruent with violence to the self, such as substance misuse. Through spirituality we learn to see ourselves as parts of a whole, and worthy of the love and respect of others. This love is sustainable, and can fulfill what was unconsciously or consciously sought through the misuse of substances. From the point of view of the therapist, this is the beginning of healing. PMID:24041176

  14. Gods behaving badly.

    PubMed

    Retsas, Spyros

    2015-02-01

    This paper addresses the myths surrounding the birth and death of Asclepios, the popular healing God of the Greeks and his place among other deities of the Greek Pantheon. The enigmatic invocation of Asclepios by Socrates, the Athenian philosopher condemned to take the hemlock, in his final moments is also discussed. PMID:24585610

  15. Thunder God Vine

    MedlinePlus

    ... god vine is a perennial vine native to China, Japan, and Korea. It has been used in China for health purposes for more than 400 years. ... made outside the United States (for example, in China) can sometimes be obtained, but it is not ...

  16. The House of God : another look.

    PubMed

    Wear, Delese

    2002-06-01

    Since its publication in 1978, Samuel Shem's The House of God has sold over two million copies in over 50 countries. While it has remained popular among medical students, its value as a literary text to promote critical reflection on self and profession continues to be unrecognized in professional spheres. In spite of the ongoing conditions in medical training that prompted Shem's satirical novel, The House of God continues to evoke negative responses from academic medicine and has even been dismissed as "dated." This article examines the novel, its reception by academic medicine, and the relevance of its satire through an analyses of articles, reviews, and letters, along with Shem's observations on the novel and its controversies. Finally, the future of The House of God is proposed. PMID:12063193

  17. Improving Student Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Sara; Hughs, Leah; Wilder, Ronda

    This action research project implemented and evaluated an intervention for increasing student academic and social responsibility. The targeted population consisted of kindergarten, 1st, and 5th grade students in a growing middle-class community in central Illinois. The problems of irresponsible academic and social behavior were documented through…

  18. Divine intuition: cognitive style influences belief in God.

    PubMed

    Shenhav, Amitai; Rand, David G; Greene, Joshua D

    2012-08-01

    Some have argued that belief in God is intuitive, a natural (by-)product of the human mind given its cognitive structure and social context. If this is true, the extent to which one believes in God may be influenced by one's more general tendency to rely on intuition versus reflection. Three studies support this hypothesis, linking intuitive cognitive style to belief in God. Study 1 showed that individual differences in cognitive style predict belief in God. Participants completed the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT; Frederick, 2005), which employs math problems that, although easily solvable, have intuitively compelling incorrect answers. Participants who gave more intuitive answers on the CRT reported stronger belief in God. This effect was not mediated by education level, income, political orientation, or other demographic variables. Study 2 showed that the correlation between CRT scores and belief in God also holds when cognitive ability (IQ) and aspects of personality were controlled. Moreover, both studies demonstrated that intuitive CRT responses predicted the degree to which individuals reported having strengthened their belief in God since childhood, but not their familial religiosity during childhood, suggesting a causal relationship between cognitive style and change in belief over time. Study 3 revealed such a causal relationship over the short term: Experimentally inducing a mindset that favors intuition over reflection increases self-reported belief in God. PMID:21928924

  19. [The God of women].

    PubMed

    Perez Aguirre, L

    1991-01-01

    The discourse of Christian theologians is by men and for men. The story of Salvation is about men; women have been excluded or colonized in ways carefully delimited by the Patriarchy. But a new struggle for liberation of women is underway worldwide in the dawn of the 21st century. The totality of relations between men and women is in change. The recent conquest of fertility control by women, which transferred ancestral male powers to them, and the decline of the Patriarchy are substantially modifying control of territory previously under male authority. The 2 revolutions are slowly but inexorably changing the social landscape. The feminization of poverty is of interest in this context. Women, 52% of the population, sow over half of food corps, account for 35% of the paid labor force and 60% of the hours worked, but receive only 10% of the income and possess only 1% of the world's property. Changes are occurring in the compulsively masculine culture, as well. A new consciousness and new intuitive knowledge of reality and its multiple cycles of change is emerging in which the individual is more satisfactorily related to the totality of the cosmos. Women in increasing numbers are freeing themselves of the known ways of the past which exalted the rational and mental to a new way which acknowledges the physical. In theology, the gods are beginning to appear as they were: true projections of the societies and structures of their times. Male theologians who reflect on these gods are always patriarchal because the church separates them from the world of women. They have been incapable as yet of comprehending the struggle of women who are opposing the world's oldest colonialism. For the same reasons they have been incapable of recognizing or accepting a fuller reality of existence and the divine. The prophetic female voice is still scarcely audible in an ecclesiastical world that remains enclosed in patriarch. PMID:12317342

  20. Method for improving instrument response

    DOEpatents

    Hahn, David W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Johnsen, Howard A.; Flower, William L.

    2000-01-01

    This invention pertains generally to a method for improving the accuracy of particle analysis under conditions of discrete particle loading and particularly to a method for improving signal-to-noise ratio and instrument response in laser spark spectroscopic analysis of particulate emissions. Under conditions of low particle density loading (particles/m.sup.3) resulting from low overall metal concentrations and/or large particle size uniform sampling can not be guaranteed. The present invention discloses a technique for separating laser sparks that arise from sample particles from those that do not; that is, a process for systematically "gating" the instrument response arising from "sampled" particles from those responses which do not, is dislosed as a solution to his problem. The disclosed approach is based on random sampling combined with a conditional analysis of each pulse. A threshold value is determined for the ratio of the intensity of a spectral line for a given element to a baseline region. If the threshold value is exceeded, the pulse is classified as a "hit" and that data is collected and an average spectrum is generated from an arithmetic average of "hits". The true metal concentration is determined from the averaged spectrum.

  1. Thinking of God Moves Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasteen, Alison L.; Burdzy, Donna C.; Pratt, Jay

    2010-01-01

    The concepts of God and Devil are well known across many cultures and religions, and often involve spatial metaphors, but it is not well known if our mental representations of these concepts affect visual cognition. To examine if exposure to divine concepts produces shifts of attention, participants completed a target detection task in which they…

  2. God-mother-baby: what children think they know.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Florian; Perner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    This study tested one hundred and nine 3- to 6-year-old children on a knowledge-ignorance task about knowledge in humans (mother, baby) and God. In their responses, participants not reliably grasping that seeing leads to knowing in humans (pre-representational) were significantly influenced by own knowledge and marginally by question format. Moreover, knowledge was attributed significantly more often to mother than baby and explained by agent-based characteristics. Of participants mastering the task for humans (representational), God was largely conceived as ignorant "man in the sky" by younger and increasingly as "supernatural agent in the sky" by older children. Evidence for egocentrism and for anthropomorphizing God lends support to an anthropomorphism hypothesis. First-time evidence for an agent-based conception of others' knowledge in pre-representational children is presented. PMID:24350816

  3. Meteor Beliefs Project: Spears of GodSpears of God

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Howard V.; McBeath, Alastair; Gheorghe, Andrei Dorian

    2012-04-01

    A selection of genuine or supposedly sky-fallen objects from real-world sources, a mixture of weapons, tools and "magical" objects of heavenly provenance, are drawn from their re-use in the near-future science-fiction novel Spears of God by author Howard V Hendrix, with additional discussion. The book includes other meteoric and meteoritic items too, some of which have been the subject of previous Meteor Beliefs Project examinations.

  4. Kairos: God's Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Julie A.

    1998-01-01

    Relates the development of the Kairos retreat at Georgetown Preparatory School and the positive responses and experiences of male youths who attended. States that the retreat experience invites youth to grapple with adolescent fears of loneliness, embrace an adult faith, and facilitate a new openness between teens and their families. (VWC)

  5. Immune responses to improving welfare.

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that "increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better" because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as "sickness behavior," includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  6. Immune responses to improving welfare

    PubMed Central

    Berghman, L. R.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that “increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better” because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as “sickness behavior,” includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  7. God and the Welfare State - Substitutes or Complements? An Experimental Test of the Effect of Belief in God's Control.

    PubMed

    Be'ery, Gilad; Ben-Nun Bloom, Pazit

    2015-01-01

    Belief in God's control of the world is common to many of the world's religions, but there are conflicting predictions regarding its role in shaping attitudes toward the welfare state. While the devout are expected to support pro-social values like helping others, and thus might be supportive of the welfare state, the possibility of taking action is undermined by the belief in God's absolute control over world affairs and in a morally perfect providence, who is responsible for the fates of individuals. As the literature provides mixed results on this question, this study examines the role of belief in God's control on welfare attitudes using three priming experiments and two priming tasks, carried out with a design that is both cross-cultural (US vs. Israel) and cross-religious tradition (Judaism vs. Catholicism). We find evidence that, largely, belief in God's control increases support for income redistribution among Israeli Jews (study 1), American Jews (study 2), and American Catholics (study 3). The findings suggest that the traditional and common political gap between the economic left and the religious, based on the evaluation that religious beliefs lead to conservative economic preferences, may be overstated. PMID:26061050

  8. How Children and Adults Represent God's Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiphetz, Larisa; Lane, Jonathan D.; Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L.

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, humans have contemplated the minds of gods. Research on religious cognition is spread across sub-disciplines, making it difficult to gain a complete understanding of how people reason about gods' minds. We integrate approaches from cognitive, developmental, and social psychology and neuroscience to illuminate the origins of…

  9. Perceiving Minds and Gods: How Mind Perception Enables, Constrains, and Is Triggered by Belief in Gods.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Will M

    2013-07-01

    Most people believe in the existence of empirically unverifiable gods. Despite apparent heterogeneity, people's conceptions of their gods center on predictable themes. Gods are overwhelmingly represented as intentional agents with (more or less) humanlike mental lives. This article reviews converging evidence suggesting that this regularity in god concepts exists in part because the ability to represent gods emerges as a cognitive by-product of the human capability to perceive minds. Basic human mind-perception abilities both facilitate and constrain belief in gods, with profound implications for individual differences in religious beliefs, implicit representations of supernatural agents, and the varieties of nonreligious experience. Furthermore, people react similarly to both reminders of gods and cues of social surveillance (e.g., audiences or video cameras), leading to interesting consequences in the domains of prosocial behavior, socially desirable responding, and self-awareness. Converging evidence indicates that mind perception is both cause and consequence of many religious beliefs. PMID:26173118

  10. LIGHT May Improve Immune Checkpoint Blockade Response.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    A new study suggests that insufficient T-cell infiltration may explain why a majority of patients do not respond to immunotherapy. Combining PD-L1 inhibitors with antibody-guided LIGHT, a protein that recruits tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, increased antitumor response in mice, and may have the potential to improve patient response rates to immunotherapy. PMID:27080334

  11. Humanitarian response: improving logistics to save lives.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Each year, millions of people worldwide are affected by disasters, underscoring the importance of effective relief efforts. Many highly visible disaster responses have been inefficient and ineffective. Humanitarian agencies typically play a key role in disaster response (eg, procuring and distributing relief items to an affected population, assisting with evacuation, providing healthcare, assisting in the development of long-term shelter), and thus their efficiency is critical for a successful disaster response. The field of disaster and emergency response modeling is well established, but the application of such techniques to humanitarian logistics is relatively recent. This article surveys models of humanitarian response logistics and identifies promising opportunities for future work. Existing models analyze a variety of preparation and response decisions (eg, warehouse location and the distribution of relief supplies), consider both natural and manmade disasters, and typically seek to minimize cost or unmet demand. Opportunities to enhance the logistics of humanitarian response include the adaptation of models developed for general disaster response; the use of existing models, techniques, and insights from the literature on commercial supply chain management; the development of working partnerships between humanitarian aid organizations and private companies with expertise in logistics; and the consideration of behavioral factors relevant to a response. Implementable, realistic models that support the logistics of humanitarian relief can improve the preparation for and the response to disasters, which in turn can save lives. PMID:19069032

  12. Response properties of self-improving systems.

    PubMed

    Krakovsky, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    We observe that a sustained positivity (or negativity) of a system's second-order response will result in a directional change of the system's characteristics under the corresponding random exposure. We identify these changes with improvement (or decline) in the state of a system and introduce the concept of self-improving systems as systems which characteristics can sustainably improve under a random exposure. The resulting framework is of a general phenomenological nature and can be applied to complex systems across different areas of knowledge. PMID:27059562

  13. Response properties of self-improving systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakovsky, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    We observe that a sustained positivity (or negativity) of a system's second-order response will result in a directional change of the system's characteristics under the corresponding random exposure. We identify these changes with improvement (or decline) in the state of a system and introduce the concept of self-improving systems as systems which characteristics can sustainably improve under a random exposure. The resulting framework is of a general phenomenological nature and can be applied to complex systems across different areas of knowledge.

  14. Mind God's mind: History, development, and teaching.

    PubMed

    Demetriou, Andreas; Makris, Nikos; Pnevmatikos, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    We dispute the target article that belief in Big Gods facilitated development of large societies and suggest that the direction of causality might be inverted. We also suggest that plain theory of mind (ToM), although necessary, is not sufficient to conceive Big Gods. Grasp of other aspects of the mind is required. However, this theory is useful for the teaching of religion. PMID:26948727

  15. Improved tumour response by laser light treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graschew, Georgi; Smith, Janice; Rakowsky, Stefan; Roelofs, Theo A.; Schlag, Peter M.; Stein, Ulrike

    2008-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) poses a serious barrier to the efficacy of clinical treatment of human cancers with chemotherapeutic drugs. This barrier might be reduced and eventually overcome by the simultaneous application of two or more treatment modalities. This study reports on the synergetic effect of combined application of laser light and cytostatic drugs to induce an improved tumour response in MDR cancer cells. The MDR breast cancer cell line MaTu/ADR, resistant to the drug adriamycin (ADR), was treated with a combination of ADR (125-1000 ng/ml) and laser light (488 nm with a total light dose between 6-18 J/cm2). This combined treatment leads to an additional reduction of the cell vitality by a factor of 2-3 as compared to treatment with ADR alone, suggesting that combined application of laser light and other treatment modalities might constitute a promising strategy for improvements in the tumour response.

  16. Response improved for neutron long counter.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanan; Li, Taosheng; Song, Gang; Mazunga, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    A low-sensitivity neutron long counter was designed as a standard directional flow detector to monitor neutron fluence reference values of an accelerator-based 14-MeV D-T neutron source with yield of 10(13) n s(-1). The energy response over 6 MeV was improved using a tungsten radiator, which acts as an energy converter via the (n, xn) reaction. Different parameters were optimised to flatten the neutron energy response over a wide energy range. A simulation of the designed neutron long counter was performed using the Monte Carlo codes SuperMC. The response function is relatively flat in the energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. The results show that the maximal relative variation is ∼7.8 %. PMID:25520377

  17. A journey toward wholeness, a journey to God: physical fitness as embodied spirituality.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Tracey C; Delgado, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    Physical fitness expressed through exercise can be, if done with the right intention, a form of spiritual discipline that reflects the relational love of humanity to God as well as an expression of a healthy love of the embodied self. Through an analysis of the physiological benefits of exercise science applied to the human body, this paper will demonstrate how such attention to the optimal physical fitness of the body, including weight and cardiovascular training and nutrition, is an affirmation of three foundational theological principles of human embodiment: as created in the "imago Dei", as unified body/spirit, and as part of God's creation calling for proper stewardship. In a contemporary climate where women's bodies in particular are viewed through the lens of commodification-as visual objects for sale based on prescribed notions of superficial esthetics and beauty-as well as the consistently high rates of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and obesity, authors Greenwood and Delgado offer a vision of how women and men can imagine a subjective relationship with their own bodies that reflects the abundant love of God for God's creation. Spoken from the lived experience of professional fitness competitor and trainer, as well as trained biokineticist, Dr. Greenwood presents the most current scientific data in the field of biokinetics that grounds the theological analysis offered by Dr. Delgado, whose personal journey through anorexia and scholarly emphasis on Christian theological anthropology inform this work. Taken together, Greenwood and Delgado suggest a response to God's love for humanity, including our physical bodily humanity, which entails a responsibility to attend to the physical fitness of our bodies in order to live into the fullness, flourishing and love of God's creation as God intended. PMID:22005967

  18. [Gods, women and pharmacy in Greek Mythology].

    PubMed

    Vons, J

    2001-01-01

    The study of Greek Mythology fully justifies Herophilus's phrase: "Medicines are the hands of Gods" (third cent. B.C.). A number of Gods are said to be the inventors of the drugs which are useful to men. Their names are still alive in the scholarly or popular appellations of a great many medicinal herbs. However, insofar as the action of a drug (of a Pharmakon) remains mysterious, one finds it in essentially female practices as well as in medicine. The study of these ancient beliefs, which have survived in spite of the progress of twentieth century science, can develop the history of epistemology of pharmacy by stimulating interdisciplinary research. PMID:11944656

  19. John of God: an enigma for the medical sciences.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ernesto

    2014-12-01

    Some cures carried out by Medium João Teixeira de Faría (John of God) are presented. He claims to channel spiritual entities (Drs. Augusto de Almeida, Oswaldo Cruz, and José Valdivino) that have instantaneous access to the physical, emotional and spiritual history of each patient who is then treated by physical or "spiritual" surgeries, herbs, meditation, prayers and the ingestion of "energized" water. People operated on have no pain during the interventions and infections have not been observed. The mechanisms responsible for the healings are unknown. PMID:25558757

  20. Improving Ecological Response Monitoring of Environmental Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Alison J.; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D.; Nielsen, Daryl L.; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  1. Psychoanalytic Bases for One's Image of God: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buri, John R.

    As a result of Freud's seminal postulations of the psychoanalytic bases for one's God-concept, it is a frequently accepted hypothesis that an individual's image of God is largely a reflection of experiences with and feelings toward one's own father. While such speculations as to an individual's phenomenological conceptions of God have an…

  2. Engaging the Young to Experience God

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brochu, Barbara; Baragar-Brcic, Penny

    2007-01-01

    In the way of Catholic Education, young people are engaged to experience God. Although the authors' reflections are written from the Catholic faith perspective, they feel the suggestions offered for educators to engage the human spirit could be extended to various faith communities or audiences. These suggestions were coalesced from their personal…

  3. Provide History of Religion and God

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginex, Nicholas P.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for high school, college, and university educators to introduce their students to a history of mankind's development of religions and beliefs in God. Regarded as too sensitive a subject, students are deprived of learning how mankind has evolved ways to establish moral and righteous behavior to maintain harmony among competing…

  4. The wind god promotes lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Steven M; Schaller, Michael D

    2014-05-12

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Li and colleagues demonstrate that the hematopoietic transcription factor Aiolos (named after the Wind God of Greek mythology) confers anoikis resistance in lung tumor cells through repression of cell adhesion-related genes including the mechanosensor p66Shc. PMID:24823631

  5. Myths and Gods of Ancient Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rascon, Vincent P.

    Intended to help Americans of Mexican descent understand their rich cultural heritage, this portfolio contains 12 full-color drawings of the myths and gods of the Olmecs and Toltecs of Ancient Mexico. These original drawings are by Vincent P. Rascon. Information captions in English and Spanish are given for each drawing which is printed on heavy…

  6. Doing God in a Liberal Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulin, Daniel; Robson, James

    2012-01-01

    While we agree with Cooling's argument from fairness, we argue that Cooling fails to give an adequate account of how fairness can be conceived, particularly because he does not decisively tackle the issues surrounding doing God in a plural context, or the contentious issues of compulsory collective worship and faith schools. In order to explore an…

  7. "She Made Me Think about God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Penny

    2011-01-01

    Teaching is interventionist. Agreement is necessary to decide what is to be taught. May one begin from the premise that God is worthy of attention? And how can teachers help pupils discern true from false in religion? This article compares the Non-Statutory National Framework for Religious Education with the Birmingham Agreed Syllabus to consider…

  8. Playing God in Frankenstein's Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life.

    PubMed

    van den Belt, Henk

    2009-12-01

    The emergent new science of synthetic biology is challenging entrenched distinctions between, amongst others, life and non-life, the natural and the artificial, the evolved and the designed, and even the material and the informational. Whenever such culturally sanctioned boundaries are breached, researchers are inevitably accused of playing God or treading in Frankenstein's footsteps. Bioethicists, theologians and editors of scientific journals feel obliged to provide an authoritative answer to the ambiguous question of the 'meaning' of life, both as a scientific definition and as an explication with wider existential connotations. This article analyses the arguments mooted in the emerging societal debates on synthetic biology and the way its practitioners respond to criticism, mostly by assuming a defiant posture or professing humility. It explores the relationship between the 'playing God' theme and the Frankenstein motif and examines the doctrinal status of the 'playing God' argument. One particularly interesting finding is that liberal theologians generally deny the religious character of the 'playing God' argument-a response which fits in with the curious fact that this argument is used mainly by secular organizations. Synthetic biology, it is therefore maintained, does not offend so much the God of the Bible as a deified Nature. While syntheses of artificial life forms cause some vague uneasiness that life may lose its special meaning, most concerns turn out to be narrowly anthropocentric. As long as synthetic biology creates only new microbial life and does not directly affect human life, it will in all likelihood be considered acceptable. PMID:20234875

  9. Improving Science Communication with Responsive Web Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilverda, M.

    2013-12-01

    the world use low-bandwidth connections. Communicating science effectively includes efficient delivery of the information to the reader. To meet this criteria, responsive designs should also incorporate "mobile first" elements such as serving ideal image sizes (a low resolution cell phone does not need to receive a large desktop image) and a focus on fast, readable content delivery. The technical implementation of responsive web design is constantly changing as new web standards and approaches become available. However, fundamental design principles such as grid layouts, clear typography, and proper use of white space should be an important part of content delivery within any responsive design. This presentation will discuss current responsive design approaches for improving scientific communication across multiple devices, operating systems, and bandwidth capacities. The presentation will also include example responsive designs for scientific papers and websites. Implementing a responsive design approach with a focus on content and fundamental design principles is an important step to ensuring scientific information remains clear and accessible as screens and devices continue to evolve.

  10. [Traffic accidents during the Roman empire: to go to the doctor o to the god?].

    PubMed

    Gourevitch, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    A few pages by Galen and an inscription from Roman Egypt testify to two psychological attitudes towards diseases and accidents: either you feel responsible and go to the doctor, or you think you are in the hands of some god. PMID:23038866

  11. Auditory Brainstem Response Improvements in Hyperbillirubinemic Infants

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Farzaneh Zamiri; Manchaiah, Vinaya; Lotfi, Yones

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Hyperbillirubinemia in infants have been associated with neuronal damage including in the auditory system. Some researchers have suggested that the bilirubin-induced auditory neuronal damages may be temporary and reversible. This study was aimed at investigating the auditory neuropathy and reversibility of auditory abnormalities in hyperbillirubinemic infants. Subjects and Methods The study participants included 41 full term hyperbilirubinemic infants (mean age 39.24 days) with normal birth weight (3,200-3,700 grams) that admitted in hospital for hyperbillirubinemia and 39 normal infants (mean age 35.54 days) without any hyperbillirubinemia or other hearing loss risk factors for ruling out maturational changes. All infants in hyperbilirubinemic group had serum bilirubin level more than 20 milligram per deciliter and undergone one blood exchange transfusion. Hearing evaluation for each infant was conducted twice: the first one after hyperbilirubinemia treatment and before leaving hospital and the second one three months after the first hearing evaluation. Hearing evaluations included transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) screening and auditory brainstem response (ABR) threshold tracing. Results The TEOAE and ABR results of control group and TEOAE results of the hyperbilirubinemic group did not change significantly from the first to the second evaluation. However, the ABR results of the hyperbilirubinemic group improved significantly from the first to the second assessment (p=0.025). Conclusions The results suggest that the bilirubin induced auditory neuronal damage can be reversible over time so we suggest that infants with hyperbilirubinemia who fail the first hearing tests should be reevaluated after 3 months of treatment. PMID:27144228

  12. The 3Rs of Productivity Improvement: Responsibility, Recognition, Reward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Describes the American Production Center and a productivity improvement system in which people become part of the productivity solution when given responsibility, recognition, and reward for productivity improvement. (LRA)

  13. God Loves Us All: Helping Christians Know and Name God in a Post-Holocaust Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nienhaus, Cyndi

    2011-01-01

    Reflection on the Holocaust is still critical today to help all educators teach their students about good and evil in the world today. In particular, reflection on the Holocaust is crucial for religious educators to help people know and name God, as well as help them deal with questions of theodicy, within their everyday life experiences. This…

  14. God put a thought into my mind: the charismatic Christian experience of receiving communications from God

    PubMed Central

    Dein, Simon; Cook, Christopher C.H.

    2015-01-01

    The agentive aspects of communicative religious experiences remain somewhat neglected in the social sciences literature. There is a need for phenomenological descriptions of these experiences and the ways in which they differ from culturally defined psychopathological states. In this semi-structured interview study, eight congregants attending an evangelical church in London were asked to describe their experiences of God communicating with them. Communications from God were related to current events rather than to the prediction of future events. These communications were received as thoughts and do not generally reveal metaphysical insights, but rather they relate to the mundane world. They provided direction, consolation and empowerment in the lives of those receiving them. Individuals recounted that on occasion God sometimes speaks audibly, or accompanied by supernatural phenomena, but in the vast majority of cases, the way God speaks is through thoughts or impressions. In all instances, agency is maintained, individuals can choose to obey the thoughts/voices or not. The findings are discussed in relation to externalisation of agency and the phenomenon of thought insertion in schizophrenia. PMID:25999778

  15. Exploring God: Using the Arts as a Way to Engage Secondary Students in Discussions about God

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reingold, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The article presents research from a practitioner research study conducted in a non-denominational Jewish secondary school. As part of the study, students created artistic works based on chapter 12 of the biblical book of Numbers. Four of the twelve student groups created works that directly engaged with their conceptions of God as represented in…

  16. Designing a Response Scale to Improve Average Group Response Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Randall

    2008-01-01

    Creating surveys is a common task in evaluation research; however, designing a survey instrument to gather average group response data that can be interpreted in a meaningful way over time can be challenging. When surveying groups of people for the purpose of longitudinal analysis, the reliability of the result is often determined by the response…

  17. Mask of Black God: The Pleiades in Navajo Cosmology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Teresa M.

    2005-01-01

    One Navajo legend attributes the creation of the primary stars and constellations to Black God. Today, a famous star cluster--the Pleiades--often appears on the traditional mask worn by chanters impersonating Black God during special ceremonies. In this case study, students learn about the Pleiades in Navajo cosmology while honing their…

  18. Man and His Gods, English, World Literature: 5114.58.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This curriculum guide examines man's relation to his gods--his fear, love, obedience, worship, and imitation of God--as demonstrated in print and nonprint sources. Classical, Judaeo-Christian, and other outlooks are considered. Reading includes such works as "Oedipus Rex,""The Odyssey," selections from the New Testament, "King Lear,""Don…

  19. Conceptions of Parents, Conceptions of Self, and Conceptions of God.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buri, John R.; Mueller, Rebecca A.

    Different theorists have suggested that an individual's view of God may be related to one's view of one's father, one's mother, or one's self. A study was conducted to examine the relationship of college students' conceptions of the wrathfulness-kindliness of God to their conceptions of their father's and mother's permissiveness, authoritarianism,…

  20. Are gods and good governments culturally and psychologically interchangeable?

    PubMed

    McCauley, Robert N

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive by-product theorists maintain that standard cognitive development facilitates the acquisition of religion. Citing secularization, Norenzayan et al. qualify that theory, proposing that gods and good governments are psychologically and culturally interchangeable. That contention, though, occasions questions about the psychological dynamics involved, about what qualifies as religiosity, and about asymmetries between gods and good governments in the face of catastrophes. PMID:26948736

  1. Why would anyone want to believe in Big Gods?

    PubMed

    Brazil, Inti A; Farias, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We suggest an alternative explanation for the emergence of Big Gods that places less emphasis on the role of cognitive tendencies and selection of prosocial cultural variants. Instead, we argue that the fundamental motivation to reduce uncertainty and increase long-term predictability provides a better account for the rise of Big moralizing Gods in a complex and heavily regulated social environment. PMID:26948752

  2. Nearness to God: A Perspective on Islamic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alavi, Hamid Reza

    2008-01-01

    Islam, as one of the most important religions of the world, has particular and significant educational views. The purpose of this article is to extract and interpret Islam's view of education. Using classic texts and the author's scholarship, Islamic education is defined as a form of religious education drawing humans near to God and God's…

  3. Divine Intuition: Cognitive Style Influences Belief in God

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenhav, Amitai; Rand, David G.; Greene, Joshua D.

    2012-01-01

    Some have argued that belief in God is intuitive, a natural (by-)product of the human mind given its cognitive structure and social context. If this is true, the extent to which one believes in God may be influenced by one's more general tendency to rely on intuition versus reflection. Three studies support this hypothesis, linking intuitive…

  4. Clarity and causality needed in claims about Big Gods.

    PubMed

    Watts, Joseph; Bulbulia, Joseph; Gray, Russell D; Atkinson, Quentin D

    2016-01-01

    We welcome Norenzayan et al.'s claim that the prosocial effects of beliefs in supernatural agents extend beyond Big Gods. To date, however, supporting evidence has focused on the Abrahamic Big God, making generalisations difficult. We discuss a recent study that highlights the need for clarity about the causal path by which supernatural beliefs affect the evolution of big societies. PMID:26948745

  5. [Playing God? Critical consideration of biotechnology].

    PubMed

    ter Schegget, G H

    2002-05-01

    The ethics must do justice to the man who can freely decide and should pose to him the proper questions that can lead to a good choice. 'Playing God' is out of the question, because the biblical God has taken the enchantment out of the creation and produced man for him to shape and keep her. The zygote is already a human being in gestation. But not all stages of gestation of man have the right to the same reverence. The end justifies the means. Reason why this growing respect should be weighed against the use and meaning of the modifying action. The goal should be human in order to have a justifiable effect. Man is not determined by his genes but conditioned by them: they are pliable. Prenatal diagnostic tests and cloning should not be allowed to lead to the moulding of an 'Ubermensch'. It is indeed not yet technologically possible. Germination technology is justifiable provided that it is safely performed. DNA-profiling for identification of criminals is allowed. If only the profile and not the DNA were kept one could consider making a profile-bank. The patenting of discoveries should not stop developing countries from getting cheap medicines (e.g. for AIDS). Not everything that is possible is also allowed. Every time the reason and the benefit should be weighed against the damage and there must be a humane authority. PMID:12046448

  6. An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

  7. Targeting chromatin to improve radiation response

    PubMed Central

    Olcina, M M; O'Dell, S

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin, the structure formed by the wrapping of approximately 146 base pairs of DNA around an octamer of histones, has a profound impact on numerous DNA-based processes. Chromatin modifications and chromatin remodellers have recently been implicated in important aspects of the DNA damage response including facilitating the initial sensing of the damage as well as subsequent recruitment of repair factors. Radiation is an effective cancer therapy for a large number of tumours, and there is considerable interest in finding approaches that might further increase the efficacy of radiotherapy. The use of radiation leads to the generation of DNA damage and, therefore, agents that can affect the sensing and repair of DNA damage may have an impact on overall radiation efficacy. The chromatin modifications as well as chromatin modifiers that have been associated with the DNA damage response will be summarized in this review. An emphasis will be placed on those processes that can be pharmacologically manipulated with currently available inhibitors. The rationale for the use of these inhibitors in combination with radiation will also be described. PMID:25513745

  8. OMG Earthquake! Can Twitter improve earthquake response?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, P. S.; Guy, M.; Ostrum, C.; Horvath, S.; Buckmaster, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investigating how the social networking site Twitter, a popular service for sending and receiving short, public, text messages, can augment its earthquake response products and the delivery of hazard information. The goal is to gather near real-time, earthquake-related messages (tweets) and provide geo-located earthquake detections and rough maps of the corresponding felt areas. Twitter and other social Internet technologies are providing the general public with anecdotal earthquake hazard information before scientific information has been published from authoritative sources. People local to an event often publish information within seconds via these technologies. In contrast, depending on the location of the earthquake, scientific alerts take between 2 to 20 minutes. Examining the tweets following the March 30, 2009, M4.3 Morgan Hill earthquake shows it is possible (in some cases) to rapidly detect and map the felt area of an earthquake using Twitter responses. Within a minute of the earthquake, the frequency of “earthquake” tweets rose above the background level of less than 1 per hour to about 150 per minute. Using the tweets submitted in the first minute, a rough map of the felt area can be obtained by plotting the tweet locations. Mapping the tweets from the first six minutes shows observations extending from Monterey to Sacramento, similar to the perceived shaking region mapped by the USGS “Did You Feel It” system. The tweets submitted after the earthquake also provided (very) short first-impression narratives from people who experienced the shaking. Accurately assessing the potential and robustness of a Twitter-based system is difficult because only tweets spanning the previous seven days can be searched, making a historical study impossible. We have, however, been archiving tweets for several months, and it is clear that significant limitations do exist. The main drawback is the lack of quantitative information

  9. Engineering Titanium for Improved Biological Response

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, C; Bearinger, J; Dimasi, E; Gilbert, J

    2002-01-23

    The human body and its aggressive environment challenge the survival of implanted foreign materials. Formidable biocompatibility issues arise from biological, chemical, electrical, and tribological origins. The body's electrolytic solution provides the first point of contact with any kind of implant, and is responsible for transport, healing, integration, or attack. Therefore, determining how to successfully control the integration of a biomaterial should begin with an analysis of the early interfacial dynamics involved. setting, a complicated feedback system of solution chemistry, pH, ions, and solubility exists. The introduction of a fixation device instantly confounds this system. The body is exposed to a range of voltages, and wear can bring about significant shifts in potentials across an implant. In the environment of a new implant the solution pH becomes acidic, ionic concentrations shift, cathodic currents can lead to corrosion, and oxygen levels can be depleted; all of these impact the ability of the implant to retain its protective oxide layer and to present a stable interface for the formation of a biolayer. Titanium has been used in orthopedic and maxilofacial surgery for many years due to its reputation as being biocompatible and its ability to osseointegrate. Osseointegration is defined as direct structural and functional connection between ordered, living bone, and the surface of a load carrying implant. Branemark discovered this phenomenon in the 60's while examining titanium juxtaposed to bone. The mechanism by which titanium and its passivating oxide encourage osseosynthetic activity remains unknown. However in general terms the oxide film serves two purposes: first to provide a kinetic barrier that prevents titanium from corroding and second to provide a substrate that allows the constituents of bone (calcium phosphate crystals, cells, proteins, and collagen) to bond to it. We believe that the electrochemical environment dictates the titanium

  10. The minds of gods: a comparative study of supernatural agency.

    PubMed

    Purzycki, Benjamin Grant

    2013-10-01

    The present work is the first study to systematically compare the minds of gods by examining some of the intuitive processes that guide how people reason about them. By examining the Christian god and the spirit-masters of the Tyva Republic, it first confirms that the consensus view of the Christian god's mind is one of omniscience with acute concern for interpersonal social behavior (i.e., moral behaviors) and that Tyvan spirit-masters are not as readily attributed with knowledge or concern of moral information. Then, it reports evidence of a moralization bias of gods' minds; American Christians who believe that God is omniscient rate God as more knowledgeable of moral behaviors than nonmoral information. Additionally, Tyvans who do not readily report pro- or antisocial behavior among the things that spirit-masters care about will nevertheless rate spirit-masters' knowledge and concern of moral information higher than nonmoral information. However, this knowledge is distributed spatially; the farther away from spirits' place of governance a moral behavior takes place, the less they know and care about it. Finally, the wider the breadth of knowledge Tyvans attribute to spirit-masters, the more they attribute moral concern for behaviors that transpire beyond their jurisdiction. These results further demonstrate that there is a significant gulf between expressed beliefs and intuitive religious cognition and provides evidence for a moralization bias of gods' minds. PMID:23891826

  11. Improving code blue response through the use of simulation.

    PubMed

    Huseman, Kelley F

    2012-01-01

    In this research project, the response times to chest compressions, first defibrillation, and first dose of epinephrine in cardiac arrest were measured over a 3-month period through retrospective chart reviews. All nursing staff then participated in random, unannounced mock code blue drills using a high-fidelity patient simulator. After 3 months of code blue drills, the variables were again measured in patient code blue situations and compared with the response times before training. At the conclusion of this study, the response times for start of chest compressions and epinephrine administration improved significantly; the response time to defibrillation did not improve significantly. The response times were measured for an additional 3-month period to assess if the improvement was sustained. PMID:22617782

  12. A Quasi Meta-Analysis of the God Concept Literature from 1970 to 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Norman

    This literature review examines the "God concept," defined as the "cognitive or affective internal psychological representation of God." Most religions have a conception of God. In this review relevant literature focused on: (1) conceptual representations of God; (2) factors related to or predictive of these representations; and/or (3) development…

  13. Harlem Connections: Teaching Walter Dean Myers'"Scorpions" with Paul Laurence Dunbar's "The Sport of the Gods."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Mark I.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the author, in a course titled "Literature for Adolescents" paired Walter Dean Myers' 1988 young adult novel, "Scorpions," with Paul Laurence Dunbar's 1902 novel for adults, "The Sport of the Gods." Describes student readers' responses to the pair of books, which focus on the difficulties of growing up in Harlem. (SR)

  14. Addressing Race, Class, and Gender in Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Are Watching God": Strategies and Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Brenda M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an educator's attempt to raise multicultural issues in the classroom through a course centered on Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Are Watching God." Maintains that educators have a responsibility to raise issues of cultural diversity in learning communities that provide ways for student to engage in thinking that expands their world…

  15. Does God Make it Real? Children's Belief in Religious Stories from the Judeo-Christian Tradition

    PubMed Central

    Vaden, Victoria Cox; Woolley, Jacqueline D.

    2010-01-01

    Four- to 6-year-old children heard religious or non-religious stories and were questioned about their belief in the reality status of the story characters and events. Children had low to moderate levels of belief in the story characters and events. Children in the religious story condition had higher levels of belief in the reality of the story characters and events than did children in the non-religious condition; this relationship strengthened with age. Children who used God as an explanation for the events showed higher levels of belief in the factuality of those events. Story familiarity and family religiosity also affected children's responses. We conclude that God's involvement in a story influences children's belief in the reality of the characters and events in that story. PMID:21466542

  16. God and the search for meaning among hospice caregivers.

    PubMed

    Mickley, J R; Pargament, K I; Brant, C R; Hipp, K M

    1998-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to describe both religious and nonreligious appraisals of caregiving for a terminally ill patient and (2) to explore the relationship between these appraisals with situational outcomes, mental health outcomes, and spiritual health outcomes in the caregivers. Ninety-two caregivers completed a questionnaire consisting of religious and nonreligious appraisals, general and religious outcomes, depression, anxiety, and purpose in life. Caregivers who appraised their situation as part of God's plan or as a means of gaining strength or understanding from God reported positive outcomes while caregivers who viewed their situation as unjust, as unfair punishment from God, or as desertion from God had low scores on mental and spiritual health outcomes. Religious appraisals made a significant and unique contribution to the prediction of situational outcomes and mental and spiritual health outcomes above and beyond the effects of nonreligious appraisals. PMID:9883124

  17. 1. STREETSCAPE VIEW OF COMMUNITY PARK KNOWN AS GOD'S LITTLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. STREETSCAPE VIEW OF COMMUNITY PARK KNOWN AS GOD'S LITTLE ACRE, STONE WALL, AND APPROACH TO BRIDGE, FACING NORTH. - West Branch Bridge, South Carolina Road S-569 spanning West Branch of Pacolet River, Pacolet, Spartanburg County, SC

  18. 212. MOUNT SINAI CHURCH OF GOD AT 530 SOUTH TWENTIETH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    212. MOUNT SINAI CHURCH OF GOD AT 530 SOUTH TWENTIETH STREET, SOUTH SIDE - Russell Neighborhood, Bounded by Congress & Esquire Alley, Fifteenth & Twenty-first Streets, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  19. From Checklist to Awareness: Hearing God's Call to Missions.

    PubMed

    Snead, Victoria; Moss, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    This student experience of international community health nursing in Cape Town, South Africa, illustrates the value of missions that provide health training and education to lay persons, and the calling of God to serve him through nursing. PMID:27295232

  20. Attributes of God: Conceptual Foundations of a Foundational Belief.

    PubMed

    Shtulman, Andrew; Lindeman, Marjaana

    2016-04-01

    Anthropomorphism, or the attribution of human properties to nonhuman entities, is often posited as an explanation for the origin and nature of God concepts, but it remains unclear which human properties we tend to attribute to God and under what conditions. In three studies, participants decided whether two types of human properties-psychological (mind-dependent) properties and physiological (body-dependent) properties-could or could not be attributed to God. In Study 1 (n = 1,525), participants made significantly more psychological attributions than physiological attributions, and the frequency of those attributions was correlated both with participants' religiosity and with their attribution of abstract, theological properties. In Study 2 (n = 99) and Study 3 (n = 138), participants not only showed the same preference for psychological properties but were also significantly faster, more consistent, and more confident when attributing psychological properties to God than when attributing physiological properties. And when denying properties to God, they showed the reverse pattern-that is, they were slower, less consistent, and less confident when denying psychological properties than when denying physiological properties. These patterns were observed both in a predominantly Christian population (Study 2) and a predominantly Hindu population (Study 3). Overall, we argue that God is conceptualized not as a person in general but as an agent in particular, attributed a mind by default but attributed a body only upon further consideration. PMID:26041124

  1. Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance

    SciTech Connect

    David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

    2007-08-01

    Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

  2. An Electron is the God Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Milo

    2001-04-01

    Philosophers, Clifford, Mach, Einstein, Wyle, Dirac & Schroedinger, believed that only a wave structure of particles could satisfy experiment and fulfill reality. A quantum Wave Structure of Matter is described here. It predicts the natural laws more accurately and completely than classic laws. Einstein reasoned that the universe depends on particles which are "spherically, spatially extended in space." and "Hence a discrete material particle has no place as a fundamental concept in a field theory." Thus the discrete point particle was wrong. He deduced the true electron is primal because its force range is infinite. Now, it is found the electron's wave structure contains the laws of Nature that rule the universe. The electron plays the role of creator - the God particle. Electron structure is a pair of spherical outward/inward quantum waves, convergent to a center in 3D space. This wave pair creates a h/4pi quantum spin when the in-wave spherically rotates to become the out-wave. Both waves form a spinor satisfying the Dirac Equation. Thus, the universe is binary like a computer. Reference: http://members.tripod.com/mwolff

  3. Outsourcing punishment to God: beliefs in divine control reduce earthly punishment

    PubMed Central

    Laurin, Kristin; Shariff, Azim F.; Henrich, Joseph; Kay, Aaron C.

    2012-01-01

    The sanctioning of norm-transgressors is a necessary—though often costly—task for maintaining a well-functioning society. Prior to effective and reliable secular institutions for punishment, large-scale societies depended on individuals engaging in ‘altruistic punishment’—bearing the costs of punishment individually, for the benefit of society. Evolutionary approaches to religion suggest that beliefs in powerful, moralizing Gods, who can distribute rewards and punishments, emerged as a way to augment earthly punishment in large societies that could not effectively monitor norm violations. In five studies, we investigate whether such beliefs in God can replace people's motivation to engage in altruistic punishment, and their support for state-sponsored punishment. Results show that, although religiosity generally predicts higher levels of punishment, the specific belief in powerful, intervening Gods reduces altruistic punishment and support for state-sponsored punishment. Moreover, these effects are specifically owing to differences in people's perceptions that humans are responsible for punishing wrongdoers. PMID:22628465

  4. A Christian faith-based recovery theory: understanding God as sponsor.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Shirley M

    2012-12-01

    This article reports the development of a substantive theory to explain an evangelical Christian-based process of recovery from addiction. Faith-based, 12-step, mutual aid programs can improve drug abstinence by offering: (a) an intervention option alone and/or in conjunction with secular programs and (b) an opportunity for religious involvement. Although literature on religion, spirituality, and addiction is voluminous, traditional 12-step programs fail to explain the mechanism that underpins the process of Christian-based recovery (CR). This pilot study used grounded theory to explore and describe the essence of recovery of 10 former crack cocaine-addicted persons voluntarily enrolled in a CR program. Data were collected from in-depth interviews during 4 months of 2008. Audiotapes were transcribed verbatim, and the constant comparative method was used to analyze data resulting in the basic social process theory, understanding God as sponsor. The theory was determined through writing theoretical memos that generated key elements that allow persons to recover: acknowledging God-centered crises, communicating with God, and planning for the future. Findings from this preliminary study identifies important factors that can help persons in recovery to sustain sobriety and program administrators to benefit from theory that guides the development of evidence-based addiction interventions. PMID:21046250

  5. Some strategies for improving caloric responses with ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Scott, James F.; Dkhil, Brahim

    2016-06-01

    Many important breakthroughs and significant engineering developments have been achieved during the past two decades in the field of caloric materials. In this review, we address ferroelectrics emerging as ideal materials which permit both giant elastocaloric and/or electrocaloric responses near room temperature. We summarize recent strategies for improving caloric responses using geometrical optimization, maximizing the number of coexisting phases, combining positive and negative caloric responses, introducing extra degree of freedom like mechanical stress/pressure, and multicaloric effect driven by either single stimulus or multiple stimuli. This review highlights the promising perspective of ferroelectrics for developing next-generation solid-state refrigeration.

  6. The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

  7. Making God real and making God good: some mechanisms through which prayer may contribute to healing.

    PubMed

    Luhrmann, Tanya Marie

    2013-10-01

    Many social scientists attribute the health-giving properties of religious practice to social support. This paper argues that another mechanism may be a positive relationship with the supernatural, a proposal that builds upon anthropological accounts of symbolic healing. Such a mechanism depends upon the learned cultivation of the imagination and the capacity to make what is imagined more real and more good. This paper offers a theory of the way that prayer enables this process and provides some evidence, drawn from experimental and ethnographic work, for the claim that a relationship with a loving God, cultivated through the imagination in prayer, may contribute to good health and may contribute to healing in trauma and psychosis. PMID:23793786

  8. Unanswered prayers: religiosity and the god-serving bias.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Heidi R; Uhalt, Joshua; Matthies, Brigitte K

    2014-01-01

    Two self-report experiments examined how religiosity affects attributions made for a target person's death. Online adults (Study 1, N = 427) and undergraduate students (Study 2, N = 326) read about Chris who had a heart attack, used religious or health behaviors, and lived or died. Participants made attributions to Chris and God (both studies), and reported their emotions (Study 2). Participants made more attributions to Chris when he lived than when he died, but only when he used health behaviors. The highly religious made more attributions to God, but not when Chris used religious behaviors and died (the God-serving bias); they reported the most positive emotions when Chris lived after using religious behaviors (the Hallelujah effect). Directions for future research in terms of implicit religious beliefs and normative evaluations of religion are discussed. PMID:25280166

  9. Mentalizing Deficits Constrain Belief in a Personal God

    PubMed Central

    Norenzayan, Ara; Gervais, Will M.; Trzesniewski, Kali H.

    2012-01-01

    Religious believers intuitively conceptualize deities as intentional agents with mental states who anticipate and respond to human beliefs, desires and concerns. It follows that mentalizing deficits, associated with the autistic spectrum and also commonly found in men more than in women, may undermine this intuitive support and reduce belief in a personal God. Autistic adolescents expressed less belief in God than did matched neuro-typical controls (Study 1). In a Canadian student sample (Study 2), and two American national samples that controlled for demographic characteristics and other correlates of autism and religiosity (Study 3 and 4), the autism spectrum predicted reduced belief in God, and mentalizing mediated this relationship. Systemizing (Studies 2 and 3) and two personality dimensions related to religious belief, Conscientiousness and Agreeableness (Study 3), failed as mediators. Mentalizing also explained the robust and well-known, but theoretically debated, gender gap in religious belief wherein men show reduced religious belief (Studies 2–4). PMID:22666332

  10. Improving thermoluminescence response through the fabrication of novel microstructured fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermosesian, E.; Amouzad Mahdiraji, G.; Mahamd Adikan, F. R.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel technique aimed at improving upon the thermoluminescence (TL) response of optical fibers. The technique, based on the stack-and-draw method, is more conventionally used for microstructured optical fiber (MOF) fabrication. Utilizing the approach, the TL response of a single microstructured fiber can be shown to substantially improve upon that of a single capillary fiber, approaching a 30 fold increase in sensitivity. Present results provide strong support for the idea that by collapsing and fusing the surface walls of stacked fibers, strain-related defects are created, increasing the TL yield many times over. The substantial increase in sensitivity of these glass-based systems point to more extensive applications, the production of such detectors allowing versatile use, down to much lower doses than currently available using single capillary fibers.

  11. 75 FR 51518 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Ballplayers, Gods, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Ballplayers, Gods, and Rainmaker... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Ballplayers, Gods, and Rainmaker Kings: Masterpieces...

  12. Armenian Vahagn God as birth of four Cosmic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunian, H. A.

    2014-10-01

    The survived two snatches of the mythological history about Vahagn - the Armenian god of the Sun and Fire is analyzed to find fingerprints of ancient cosmology. In the first fragment known as "Birth of Vahagn" all the four primary elements are mentioned as travailing ones which brought the god into life. The second fragment devoted to the ancient conception on the formation of the Milky Way named in Armenian mythology "Straw Thief's Way". The fact that both survived fragments concern the structure of the Universe might be explained easily if the ode glorifying Vahagn was based on the ancient Armenian cosmological views.

  13. Response of a seagrass fish assemblage to improved wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ourgaud, M; Ruitton, S; Bell, J D; Letourneur, Y; Harmelin, J G; Harmelin-Vivien, M L

    2015-01-15

    We compared the structure of a seagrass fish assemblage near a sewage outlet before and after improvements to wastewater treatment. To determine whether responses by the fish assemblage were due to changes in water quality or to other factors, comparisons were made with the structure of a fish assemblage from a nearby site unaffected by sewage effluent. Total species richness, density and biomass of fish, decreased at both sites over the 30-year period. An increase in mean trophic level near the sewage outlet following improvements in water quality indicated that wastewater treatment had another important effect. This result is consistent with the reductions in food webs supporting pelagic and benthic fishes that typically accompany decreases in nutrient inputs. Although improvements to wastewater treatment explained much of the variation in the structure of the fish assemblage at PC, our results also suggest that fishing and climate change, at both sites. PMID:25499183

  14. Improving Response Inhibition in Parkinson’s Disease with Atomoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zheng; Altena, Ellemarije; Nombela, Cristina; Housden, Charlotte R.; Maxwell, Helen; Rittman, Timothy; Huddleston, Chelan; Rae, Charlotte L.; Regenthal, Ralf; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Barker, Roger A.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Rowe, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dopaminergic drugs remain the mainstay of Parkinson’s disease therapy but often fail to improve cognitive problems such as impulsivity. This may be due to the loss of other neurotransmitters, including noradrenaline, which is linked to impulsivity and response inhibition. We therefore examined the effect of the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine on response inhibition in a stop-signal paradigm. Methods This pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging study used a double-blinded randomized crossover design with low-frequency inhibition trials distributed among frequent Go trials. Twenty-one patients received 40 mg atomoxetine or placebo. Control subjects were tested on no-drug. The effects of disease and drug on behavioral performance, regional brain activity, and functional connectivity were analyzed using general linear models. Anatomical connectivity was examined using diffusion-weighted imaging. Results Patients with Parkinson’s disease had longer stop-signal reaction times, less stop-related activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus (RIFG), and weaker functional connectivity between the RIFG and striatum compared with control subjects. Atomoxetine enhanced stop-related RIFG activation in proportion to disease severity. Although there was no overall behavioral benefit from atomoxetine, analyses of individual differences revealed that enhanced response inhibition by atomoxetine was associated with increased RIFG activation and functional frontostriatal connectivity. Improved performance was more likely in patients with higher structural frontostriatal connectivity. Conclusions This study suggests that enhanced prefrontal cortical activation and frontostriatal connectivity by atomoxetine may improve response inhibition in Parkinson’s disease. These results point the way to new stratified clinical trials of atomoxetine to treat impulsivity in selected patients with Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24655598

  15. Prosthesis, Surrogation, and Relation in Arturo Islas's "The Rain God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, John Alba

    2008-01-01

    This essay seeks to intervene in critical discussions about Arturo Islas's 1984 novel "The Rain God", as well as to suggest the potential for synthesizing discourses heretofore deployed in disparate conversations about disability, sexuality, and ethnicity. I first demonstrate how the novel's queer characters, Miguel Chico and Felix, pose critical…

  16. God-Concept Socialization: Some Explanations from Piaget.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Discusses some tendencies in young children's thinking that have been identified by Piaget as helping a child's initial socialization to the God-concept. Attempts to explain such tendencies of thought as childhood nominal realism, internal necessity, and affirmation in childhood thought. (DB)

  17. The Development of the Concept of God in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, W. Chad; And Others

    The development of the concept of God was assessed among 120 children between the ages of 5 to 16 years who attended private Protestant and Catholic day schools in the San Diego area. All children participated in a semi-clinical interview. Twelve interview questions were asked as the first step of a probing technique used to initiate a dialogue…

  18. Using "Children of a Lesser God" To Teach Intercultural Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Russell F., II; Rock, Roseanna

    One film widely recommended as an instructional resource for communication courses is "Children of a Lesser God," the 1986 movie starring Marlee Matlin and William Hurt. In this film, which can serve as a case study, James Leeds, a talented young teacher in a school for the deaf, falls in love with Sarah Norman, a graduate of the school who, in…

  19. Should God Get Tenure? Essays on Religion and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, David W., Ed.

    Essays on the role of religion in higher education include: "Should God Get Tenure?" (David W. Gill); "On Being a Professor: The Case of Socrates" (Bruce R. Reichenbach); "Academic Excellence: Cliche or Humanizing Vision?" (Merold Westphal); "Religion, Science, and the Humanities in the Liberal Arts Curriculum" (H. Newton Maloney); "Tolstoy and…

  20. Who's Crazy? Students Critique "The Gods Must Be Crazy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawking, Chris

    2012-01-01

    On the surface, "The Gods Must Be Crazy" is a campy confluence of three independent plotlines involving Xi, a Kalahari tribesman, who journeys to the end of the earth to dispose of a Coke bottle that has begun to disrupt the harmony of his community; Mr. Steyn, a white scientist, and the beautiful blonde schoolteacher he escorts through the bush;…

  1. God, Sport Philosophy, Kinesiology: A MacIntyrean Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twietmeyer, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Sport philosophy is in crisis. This subdiscipline of kinesiology garners little to no respect and few tenure track lines in kinesiology departments. Why is this the case? Why isn't philosophy held in greater esteem? Is it possible that philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre's (2009) diagnosis found in "God, Philosophy, Universities" could…

  2. The God That Limps: Science and Technology in the Eighties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Colin

    The title of this book derives its name from Hephaestus, the Greek god of fire and metalworking, who had a pronounced limp. Focusing on science and technology in the eighties, the first chapter of this book uses Hephaestus as a focal point since he was entrusted with the development and maintenance of key technologies and with keeping society…

  3. What If I Don't Want to Play God?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrin, Kelly Hykes; Yarnall, Gary Dean

    The authors review technological advances in medicine, such as gene manipulation, amniocentesis, ultra sound, organ transplants, and cloning, and point out ethical and moral dilemmas resulting from such capabilities. Implications of overpopulation are briefly considered. The authors contend that the decision "to play God" has already been made,…

  4. Dewey's Democracy as the Kingdom of God on Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2009-01-01

    John Dewey has been portrayed as a sort of villain in Rosenow's (1997) article which appeared in this journal, apparently because he was unfairly opposed to God and to religion, and also because he deliberately usurped religious language to "camouflage" his secular ideas. By drawing mainly upon similar sources but with some important additions, I…

  5. Faith Fictions: "The Word between This World and God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Tran, Mai-Anh

    2009-01-01

    The search for religious truth and depth in "fiction" invites a conceptualization of life and fictional narratives as "faith fictions"--narrative accounts of human experiences and the human condition that bridge this world and God. This article juxtaposes "Mother Crocodile", "Hunger", and "Lost in Translation" to highlight the ways in which they,…

  6. Scriptural Engagement, Communication with God, and Moral Behavior among Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovwigho, Pamela Caudill; Cole, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    How often an individual reads or listens to scripture is one dimension of private spirituality rarely discussed in the literature. In this study, we use data from a random sample survey of 1009 American children (ages eight to 12) to explore children's engagement with the Christian Bible, their views of communicating with God, and their moral…

  7. View of main entrance of the Church of God. This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of main entrance of the Church of God. This structure was originally a lodge hall for the Woodmen of the World from the adjacent mill neighborhoods such as Lincoln and Dallas Mill - 601 Humes Avenue (House), 601 Humes Avenue, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. The encounter with God in myth and madness

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Otto; Velásquez, Óscar

    2007-01-01

    Background It is well known how often psychiatric patients report religious experiences. These are especially frequent in schizophrenic and epileptic patients as the subject of their delusions. The question we pose is: are there differences between this kind of religious experiences and those we find in religious texts or in the mythological tradition? Results An overview on famous mythological narratives, such as The Aeneid, allows us to establish that the divinities become recognizable to the human being at the moment of their departure. Thus, Aeneas does not recognise his mother, Venus, when she appears to him in the middle of the forest at the coast of Africa. A dialogue between the two takes place, and only at the end of the encounter, when she is going away and already with her back to Aeneas, she shows her son the signs of her divinity: the rose-flush emanating from her neck, her hair perfume and the majesty of her gait. Something analogous can be observed in the encounter of Moses with Yahweh on Mount Sinai. Moses asks God: "Show me your glory, I beg you". And God replies, among other things: "you shall see the back of me, but my face is not to be seen". In the same sense, the Emmaus disciples do not recognise Jesus till the moment of his disappearance ("but he had vanished from their sight"), and Saul of Tars falls off his horse just in the moment when he feels the divine presence. In short, the direct encounter with the divinity seems not to occur in the realm of myth or in religious tradition. The realm of madness is exactly the opposite. Our research on religious experiences in schizophrenic and epileptic patients leads us to conclude that God appears to them face to face, and the patient describes God the father, Jesus or the Virgin Mary in intimate detail, always in an everyday setting. So, the divinity is seen in the garden, or in the bedroom, or maybe above the wardrobe, without any of its majesty. The nearness to God also tends to be so extreme

  9. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jin; Osterlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent the accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins. In this work, we over-expressed a mutant HSF1 gene HSF1-R206S which can constitutively activate HSR, so the heat shock response was induced at different levels, and we studied the impact of HSR on heterologous protein secretion. We found that moderate and high level over-expression of HSF1-R206S increased heterologous α-amylase yield 25 and 70 % when glucose was fully consumed, and 37 and 62 % at the end of the ethanol phase, respectively. Moderate and high level over-expression also improved endogenous invertase yield 118 and 94 %, respectively. However, human insulin precursor was only improved slightly and this only by high level over-expression of HSF1-R206S, supporting our previous findings that the production of this protein in S. cerevisiae is not limited by secretion. Our results provide an effective strategy to improve protein secretion and demonstrated an approach that can induce ER and cytosolic chaperones simultaneously. PMID:23208612

  10. Energy response improvement for photon dosimetry using pulse analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Dizaji H.

    2016-02-01

    During the last few years, active personal dosimeters have been developed and have replaced passive personal dosimeters in some external monitoring systems, frequently using silicon diode detectors. Incident photons interact with the constituents of the diode detector and produce electrons. These photon-induced electrons deposit energy in the detector's sensitive region and contribute to the response of diode detectors. To achieve an appropriate photon dosimetry response, the detectors are usually covered by a metallic layer with an optimum thickness. The metallic cover acts as an energy compensating shield. In this paper, a software process is performed for energy compensation. Selective data sampling based on pulse height is used to determine the photon dose equivalent. This method is applied to improve the energy response in photon dosimetry. The detector design is optimized for the response function and determination of the photon dose equivalent. Photon personal dose equivalent is determined in the energy range of 0.3-6 MeV. The error values of the calculated data for this wide energy range and measured data for 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co and 241Am-Be sources respectively are up to 20% and 15%. Fairly good agreement is seen between simulation and dose values obtained from our process and specifications from several photon sources.

  11. Hourly Rounding to Improve Nursing Responsiveness: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Matthew D.; Lavenberg, Julia G.; Trotta, Rebecca; Umscheid, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Synthesize the evidence concerning the effect of hourly rounding programs on patient satisfaction with nursing care, and discuss implications for nurse administrators. Background Patient satisfaction is a key metric that influences both hospital ratings and reimbursement. Studies have suggested that purposeful nursing rounds can improve patient satisfaction but the evidence to date has not been systematically examined. Methods Systematic review of published literature and GRADE analysis of evidence regarding nursing rounds. Results There is little consistency in how results of hourly rounds were measured, precluding quantitative analysis. There is moderate-strength evidence that hourly rounding programs improve patients’ perception of nursing responsiveness. There is also moderate-strength evidence that these programs reduce patient falls and call light use. Conclusions Nurse administrators should consider implementing an hourly rounding program while controlled trials discern the most cost-effective approach. PMID:25148400

  12. Improving Dynamic Load and Generator Response PerformanceTools

    SciTech Connect

    Lesieutre, Bernard C.

    2005-11-01

    This report is a scoping study to examine research opportunities to improve the accuracy of the system dynamic load and generator models, data and performance assessment tools used by CAISO operations engineers and planning engineers, as well as those used by their counterparts at the California utilities, to establish safe operating margins. Model-based simulations are commonly used to assess the impact of credible contingencies in order to determine system operating limits (path ratings, etc.) to ensure compliance with NERC and WECC reliability requirements. Improved models and a better understanding of the impact of uncertainties in these models will increase the reliability of grid operations by allowing operators to more accurately study system voltage problems and the dynamic stability response of the system to disturbances.

  13. Improvement of digital photoelasticity based on camera response function.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih-Hsin; Wu, Hsien-Huang P

    2011-09-20

    Studies on photoelasticity have been conducted by many researchers in recent years, and many equations for photoelastic analysis based on digital images were proposed. While these equations were all presented by the light intensity emitted from the analyzer, pixel values of the digital image were actually used in the real calculations. In this paper, a proposal of using relative light intensity obtained by the camera response function to replace the pixel value for photoelastic analysis was investigated. Generation of isochromatic images based on relative light intensity and pixel value were compared to evaluate the effectiveness of the new approach. The results showed that when relative light intensity was used, the quality of an isochromatic image can be greatly improved both visually and quantitatively. We believe that the technique proposed in this paper can also be used to improve the performance for the other types of photoelastic analysis using digital images. PMID:21947044

  14. Improving the Material Response for Slow Heat of Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L

    2010-03-08

    The goal of modern high explosive slow heat cookoff modeling is to understand the level of mechanical violence. This requires understanding the coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical system that such an environment creates. Recent advances have improved our ability to predict the time to event, and we have been making progress on predicting the mechanical response. By adding surface tension to the product gas pores in the high explosive, we have been able to reduce the current model's tendency to overpressurize confinement vessels. We describe the model and demonstrate how it affects a LX-10 STEX experiment. Issues associated with current product gas equations of state are described and examined.

  15. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  16. 34 CFR 200.49 - SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... out its responsibilities with respect to school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring, the... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective... Agencies Lea and School Improvement § 200.49 SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective...

  17. Active microwave responses - An aid in improved crop classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, W. D.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    A study determined the feasibility of using visible, infrared, and active microwave data to classify agricultural crops such as corn, sorghum, alfalfa, wheat stubble, millet, shortgrass pasture and bare soil. Visible through microwave data were collected by instruments on board the NASA C-130 aircraft over 40 agricultural fields near Guymon, OK in 1978 and Dalhart, TX in 1980. Results from stepwise and discriminant analysis techniques indicated 4.75 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 0.4 GHz cross-polarized microwave frequencies were the microwave frequencies most sensitive to crop type differences. Inclusion of microwave data in visible and infrared classification models improved classification accuracy from 73 percent to 92 percent. Despite the results, further studies are needed during different growth stages to validate the visible, infrared, and active microwave responses to vegetation.

  18. The use of quorum sensing to improve vaccine immune response.

    PubMed

    Sturbelle, R T; Conceição, R C S; Da Rosa, M C; Roos, T B; Dummer, L; Leite, F P L

    2013-12-17

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is an important cause of diarrhea in both newborn and post-weaning pigs, it is also responsible for economic losses on farms worldwide. Vaccines that use ETEC virulence factors have been well documented, and several vaccines containing inactivated bacteria with protective antigens, or purified (isolated) antigens are available on the market. Vaccination of pregnant sows is widely seen as an effective strategy for the control of the disease. Yet these vaccines very often do not lead to efficient protection. In this study, we produced an ETEC bacterin with the use of quorum sensing (QS), and observed a significant expression of F4 adhesin, and heat-labile toxin (LT) in the cultures when compared to the controls. Mice, and pigs vaccinated with the QS bacterin demonstrated higher antibody titers against these antigens when compared with commercial and control bacterin. Our results suggest that the system might bring promising improvements in ETEC bacterin efficacy. PMID:24188753

  19. Quality improvement in nursing: Administrative mandate or professional responsibility?

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Shigeko

    2012-01-01

    For professionals, providing quality service and striving for excellence are ethical responsibilities. In many hospitals in the U.S., however, there is evidence indicating current quality improvement (QI) involving nurses is not always driven by their professional accountability and professional values. QI has become more an administrative mandate than an ethical standard for nurses. In this paper, the tension between QI as nurses’ professional ethics and an administrative mandate will be described, and the implicit ideal-reality gap of QI will be examined. The threat to professional nursing posed by the current approach to QI will be examined, and ways to incorporate nursing professional values in a practical QI effort will be explored. PMID:23127240

  20. Teotlaqualli: the psychoactive food of the Aztec gods.

    PubMed

    Elferink, J G

    1999-01-01

    The Aztecs in pre-Columbian Mexico used not only a large number of single hallucinogens, they also used some combinations. The present article describes reports of the use of teotlaqualli, an unction prepared from ololiuhqui and picietl, with a large number of additions. The work of the chroniclers of pre-Columbian Mexico served as a source of information. The teotlaqualli was offered to the gods, for whom it served as food. The Aztec priests smeared themselves with this unction, to lose fear and to get the appropriate state of mind to serve the Aztec gods. A few cases are reported in which the Aztec emperor or soldiers were smeared with teotlaqualli. It is suggested that the black color of some Aztec deities, as depicted in the codices, was due to anointment with teotlaqualli. In addition to its use for psychoactive purposes, teotlaqualli was used in medicine under the name teopatli. PMID:10681110

  1. Improving models to predict phenological responses to global change

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    2015-11-25

    The term phenology describes both the seasonal rhythms of plants and animals, and the study of these rhythms. Plant phenological processes, including, for example, when leaves emerge in the spring and change color in the autumn, are highly responsive to variation in weather (e.g. a warm vs. cold spring) as well as longer-term changes in climate (e.g. warming trends and changes in the timing and amount of rainfall). We conducted a study to investigate the phenological response of northern peatland communities to global change. Field work was conducted at the SPRUCE experiment in northern Minnesota, where we installed 10 digital cameras. Imagery from the cameras is being used to track shifts in plant phenology driven by elevated carbon dioxide and elevated temperature in the different SPRUCE experimental treatments. Camera imagery and derived products (“greenness”) is being posted in near-real time on a publicly available web page (http://phenocam.sr.unh.edu/webcam/gallery/). The images will provide a permanent visual record of the progression of the experiment over the next 10 years. Integrated with other measurements collected as part of the SPRUCE program, this study is providing insight into the degree to which phenology may mediate future shifts in carbon uptake and storage by peatland ecosystems. In the future, these data will be used to develop improved models of vegetation phenology, which will be tested against ground observations collected by a local collaborator.

  2. Ribavirin improves early responses to peginterferon through enhanced interferon signaling

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Jordan J.; Lutchman, Glen A.; Heller, Theo; Hara, Koji; Pfeiffer, Julie K.; Leff, Richard D; Meek, Claudia; Rivera, Maria; Ko, Myung; Koh, Christopher; Rotman, Yaron; Ghany, Marc G.; Haynes-Williams, Vanessa; Neumann, Avidan U.; Liang, T. Jake; Hoofnagle, Jay H.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims: The therapeutic mechanisms of ribavirin for hepatitis C are unclear. Microarray analyses have shown that ribavirin increases induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). We evaluated viral kinetics, serum cytokine expression, and viral mutagenesis during early stages of peginterferon therapy with and without ribavirin. Methods: Fifty patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection genotype 1 were randomly assigned to groups that were given peginterferon alfa-2a, with or without ribavirin, for 4 weeks; all patients then received an additional 44 weeks of combination therapy. First- and second-phase viral kinetics were evaluated. Serum levels of IP10, MIG, and MCP1 were quantified as measures of the ISG response. NS5A and NS5B were partially sequenced and mutation rates were calculated. Results: The first-phase decrease in HCV RNA was similar between groups. Patients that received ribavirin had a more rapid second-phase decrease, compared with patients that did not receive ribavirin—particularly those with an adequate first-phase decrease (0.61 vs. 0.35 log10 IU/mL/week, p=0.018). At 12 hrs, fold induction of serum IP10 was higher in patients given the combination therapy than those given only peginterferon (7.6- vs. 3.8-fold, p=0.01); however, the difference was greatest in patients with an adequate first-phase decrease in HCV RNA. IP10-induction correlated with first- and second-phase kinetics and with ribavirin serum concentrations on day 3. HCV mutation rates were similar between groups. Conclusion: Ribavirin improves the kinetics of the early response to therapy in patients with an adequate initial response to peginterferon. Induction of interferon-stimulated cytokines correlates with viral kinetics following ribavirin therapy, suggesting that ribavirin promotes interferon signaling. PMID:20303352

  3. Newton's Metaphysics of Space as God's Emanative Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquette, Dale

    2014-09-01

    In several of his writings, Isaac Newton proposed that physical space is God's "emanative effect" or "sensorium," revealing something interesting about the metaphysics underlying his mathematical physics. Newton's conjectures depart from Plato and Aristotle's metaphysics of space and from classical and Cambridge Neoplatonism. Present-day philosophical concepts of supervenience clarify Newton's ideas about space and offer a portrait of Newton not only as a mathematical physicist but an independent-minded rationalist philosopher.

  4. Experimenting with Spirituality: Analyzing The God Gene in a Nonmajors Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    References linking genes to complex human traits, such as personality type or disease susceptibility, abound in the news media and popular culture. In his book The God Gene: How Faith is Hardwired into Our Genes, Dean Hamer argues that a variation in the VMAT2 gene plays a role in one's openness to spiritual experiences. In a nonmajors class, we read and discussed The God Gene and conducted on a small scale an extension of the study it describes. Students used polymerase chain reaction to replicate a portion of their VMAT2 genes, and they analyzed three polymorphic sites in the sequence of these products. Associations between particular VMAT2 alleles and scores on a personality test were assessed by t test. The course, of which this project was a major part, stimulated student learning; scores on a test covering basic genetic concepts, causation/correlation, and laboratory methodology improved after completion of the course. In a survey, students reported the laboratory project aided their learning, especially in the areas of statistics and the linking of genes to behaviors. They reported high levels of engagement with the project, citing in particular its personal nature as motivating their interest. PMID:18316816

  5. Improving alkenone paleothermometry by incorporating cell response to environmental stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, F. G.; Wolfe, G. V.; Mix, A. C.; Sparrow, M. A.

    2003-04-01

    A linear, global coretop calibration now exists for the alkenone unsaturation index Uk’37 and mean annual SST (maSST). The calibration equation is statistically the same as that for a subarctic Pacific strain of Emiliania huxleyi (Ehux) grown exponentially under isothermal conditions in batch culture. Although the calibration has been applied widely for paleoSST reconstruction, uncertainty still exists, stemming from two key factors: genetic variability among strains, and physiologic response to stress and growth state. We will discuss in this talk the extent that Uk’37 and other aspects of cellular alkenone composition vary in response to nutrient depletion and light deprivation in isothermal (15^oC) batch cultures of Ehux isolated from three different ocean locations - a Norwegian fjord (CCMP370); the subarctic Pacific (CCMP1742) and the Sargasso Sea (CCMP 372). We will also present results from detailed alkenone compositional analysis in thirty surface sediments collected between ˜50^oS and 10^oS along the Chile-Peru margin in the SE Pacific Ocean. The Uk’37 - maSST relationship derived from this dataset is statistically indistinguishable from the global coretop calibration. But, comparison of other compositional properties shows that the alkenone signature preserved in the Chile-Peru margin sediments is also not consistent with that expressed by exponentially growing cells of any of the three cultured Ehux strains. Alkenone signatures preserved in sediments appear more like that in algal cells that have experienced some level of non-thermal, physiological stress such as nutrient and light limitation. Given our observations as a precedent, improved confidence in paleotemperature estimates derived from Uk’37 measurements may require interpretation of unsaturation patterns in full context with the overall alkenone composition preserved in the sediment.

  6. Examining attachment to God and health risk-taking behaviors in college students.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karissa D; Ellison, Christopher G; Loukas, Alexandra; Downey, Darcy L; Barrett, Jennifer B

    2012-06-01

    Drawing on insights from attachment theory, this study examined whether three types of attachment to God--secure, avoidant, and anxious--were associated with health-risk behaviors, over and above the effects of religious attendance, peer support, and demographic covariates, in a sample of 328 undergraduate college students. Contrary to prior theory, secure attachment to God is not inversely associated with recent alcohol or marijuana use, or substance use prior to last sexual intercourse. Instead, avoidant and anxious attachment to God are associated with higher levels of drinking; anxious attachment to God is associated with marijuana use; and avoidant attachment to God is associated with substance use prior to last sexual intercourse. These patterns are gender-specific; problematic attachment to God is linked with negative outcomes solely among men. PMID:20632208

  7. Spiritual Struggle Among Patients Seeking Treatment for Chronic Headaches: Anger and Protest Behaviors Toward God.

    PubMed

    Exline, Julie J; Krause, Steven J; Broer, Karen A

    2016-10-01

    This study examined anger and protest behaviors toward God among 80 US adults seeking treatment for chronic headaches (66 women, 14 men; 71 completed treatment). Measures were administered before and after an intensive 3-week outpatient treatment program. At both times, anger and protest toward God correlated with lower pain acceptance, more emotional distress, and greater perceived disability. However, when considered simultaneously, anger predicted sustained distress, whereas protest behaviors (e.g., complaining, questioning, arguing) predicted both reduced distress and an increased sense of meaning. These findings suggest the utility of distinguishing between anger toward God and behaviors suggesting assertiveness toward God. PMID:27216030

  8. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  9. Moralistic gods, supernatural punishment and the expansion of human sociality.

    PubMed

    Purzycki, Benjamin Grant; Apicella, Coren; Atkinson, Quentin D; Cohen, Emma; McNamara, Rita Anne; Willard, Aiyana K; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Norenzayan, Ara; Henrich, Joseph

    2016-02-18

    Since the origins of agriculture, the scale of human cooperation and societal complexity has dramatically expanded. This fact challenges standard evolutionary explanations of prosociality because well-studied mechanisms of cooperation based on genetic relatedness, reciprocity and partner choice falter as people increasingly engage in fleeting transactions with genetically unrelated strangers in large anonymous groups. To explain this rapid expansion of prosociality, researchers have proposed several mechanisms. Here we focus on one key hypothesis: cognitive representations of gods as increasingly knowledgeable and punitive, and who sanction violators of interpersonal social norms, foster and sustain the expansion of cooperation, trust and fairness towards co-religionist strangers. We tested this hypothesis using extensive ethnographic interviews and two behavioural games designed to measure impartial rule-following among people (n = 591, observations = 35,400) from eight diverse communities from around the world: (1) inland Tanna, Vanuatu; (2) coastal Tanna, Vanuatu; (3) Yasawa, Fiji; (4) Lovu, Fiji; (5) Pesqueiro, Brazil; (6) Pointe aux Piments, Mauritius; (7) the Tyva Republic (Siberia), Russia; and (8) Hadzaland, Tanzania. Participants reported adherence to a wide array of world religious traditions including Christianity, Hinduism and Buddhism, as well as notably diverse local traditions, including animism and ancestor worship. Holding a range of relevant variables constant, the higher participants rated their moralistic gods as punitive and knowledgeable about human thoughts and actions, the more coins they allocated to geographically distant co-religionist strangers relative to both themselves and local co-religionists. Our results support the hypothesis that beliefs in moralistic, punitive and knowing gods increase impartial behaviour towards distant co-religionists, and therefore can contribute to the expansion of prosociality. PMID:26863190

  10. [To God through science. Natural theology in Francoism].

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Francisco Blázquez

    2011-01-01

    In Spain, during Franco's dictatorship (1939-1975) the teaching and divulgation of science were subordinated to the Catholic religion and many books defended a theistic and creationistic point of view of biology that accepted a literal interpretation of the Book of Genesis and denied the theory of evolution, especially as it relates to human origin. This article is devoted to the main books and characteristics of this way of thinking which reproduced arguments and metaphors of the pre-Darwinian natural theology, arguing that nature was ruled by God and living organisms were the results of his design. PMID:22372008

  11. Improved Response of ZnO Films for Pyroelectric Devices

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Yu, Shih-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the temperature variation rate is a useful method for enhancing the response of pyroelectric devices. A three-dimensional ZnO film was fabricated by the aerosol deposition (AD) rapid process using the shadow mask method, which induces lateral temperature gradients on the sidewalls of the responsive element, thereby increasing the temperature variation rate. To enhance the quality of the film and reduce the concentration of defects, the film was further treated by laser annealing, and the integration of a comb-like top electrode enhanced the voltage response and reduced the response time of the resulting ZnO pyroelectric devices. PMID:23235444

  12. 34 CFR 200.49 - SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... charter school law. (g) Factors affecting student achievement. The SEA must notify the Secretary of... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective... Agencies Lea and School Improvement § 200.49 SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective...

  13. 34 CFR 200.49 - SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... charter school law. (g) Factors affecting student achievement. The SEA must notify the Secretary of... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective... Agencies Lea and School Improvement § 200.49 SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective...

  14. 34 CFR 200.49 - SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... charter school law. (g) Factors affecting student achievement. The SEA must notify the Secretary of... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective... Agencies Lea and School Improvement § 200.49 SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective...

  15. Disappointment with God and Well-Being: The Mediating Influence of Relationship Quality and Dispositional Forgiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strelan, Peter; Acton, Collin; Patrick, Kent

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which disappointment with God influenced the psychological and spiritual well-being of 160 churchgoers, and the potential mediating influences of relationship quality (spiritual maturity and relationship commitment) and dispositional forgiveness. Disappointment with God was positively related to depression and…

  16. Young Children's God Concepts: Influences of Attachment and Religious Socialization in a Family and School Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Roos, Simone A.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution offers an overview of two studies testing two attachment theoretical correspondence hypotheses in the prediction of individual differences in young children's God concepts. The correspondence hypothesis supposes that people's view on God parallels their images of their early caregiver-child relationship. The revised…

  17. Adolescents' Justifications for Faith or Doubt in God: A Study of Fulfilled and Unfulfilled Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nipkow, Karl Ernst; Schweitzer, Friedrich

    1991-01-01

    Presents results of an analysis of a collection of statements about God written by German students between 16 and 22 years of age. Examines results from a psychoanalytic and cognitive-developmental perspective. Also considers the ways in which adolescents talk about the relationship between God and the church. (BB)

  18. A Revised Semantic Differential Scale Distinguishing between Negative and Positive God Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Leslie J.; Robbins, Mandy; Gibson, Harry M.

    2006-01-01

    A sample of 755 school pupils between the ages of 11 and 18 years completed the Benson and Spilka semantic differential measure of God images. Factor analysis indicated the advantages of re-scoring the measure as an eight item unidimensional index, defining semantic space relating to God images ranging from negative affect to positive affect.…

  19. Images of a Loving God and Sense of Meaning in Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroope, Samuel; Draper, Scott; Whitehead, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Although prior studies have documented a positive association between religiosity and sense of meaning in life, the role of specific religious beliefs is currently unclear. Past research on images of God suggests that loving images of God will positively correlate with a sense of meaning and purpose. Mechanisms for this hypothesized relationship…

  20. God's Categories: The Effect of Religiosity on Children's Teleological and Essentialist Beliefs about Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diesendruck, Gil; Haber, Lital

    2009-01-01

    Creationism implies that God imbued each category with a unique nature and purpose. These implications closely correspond to what some cognitive psychologists define as an essentialistic and teleological stance towards categories. This study assessed to what extent the belief in God as creator of categories is related to the mappings of these…

  1. My Hero, My Friend: Exploring Honduran Youths' Lived Experience of the God-Individual Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Monique B.; Silver, Christopher F.; Ross, Christopher F. J.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive social science research has focused on God image and God concept through the lens of attachment theory and the parental relationship. While vast theoretical frameworks exist, the authors suggest that more focused phenomenological research would shed light on adolescent lived experience within experiential descriptive language and…

  2. Children's Image of God and Their Parents: Explorations in Children's Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baring, Rito

    2012-01-01

    Exploring children's image of God and parents has invited interest among program preparers for children's spirituality in the Philippines. This research seeks to find out the fundamental orientation of children's image of God as well as their perceptions of father and mother from 241 fifth graders in three selected government primary schools in…

  3. Chinese Christians in America: Attachment to God, Stress, and Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Meifen; Ku, Tsun-Yao; Chen, Hwei-Jane; Wade, Nathaniel; Liao, Kelly Yu-Hsin; Guo, Gwo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether attachment to God moderated the relation between perceived stress and well-being (i.e., life satisfaction and positive affect) among 183 Chinese Christian international students and immigrants. Results showed significant main effects of (a) perceived stress on life satisfaction and (b) secure attachment to God and…

  4. 75 FR 15764 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Gods of Angkor: Bronzes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Gods of Angkor: Bronzes From the... 15, 2003 , I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Gods of...

  5. Improving response rates and evaluating nonresponse bias in surveys: AMEE Guide No. 102.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew W; Reddy, Shalini; Durning, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    Robust response rates are essential for effective survey-based strategies. Researchers can improve survey validity by addressing both response rates and nonresponse bias. In this AMEE Guide, we explain response rate calculations and discuss methods for improving response rates to surveys as a whole (unit nonresponse) and to questions within a survey (item nonresponse). Finally, we introduce the concept of nonresponse bias and provide simple methods to measure it. PMID:26648511

  6. Improvements to a Response Surface Thermal Model for Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Stephen W.; Walker, William Q.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to determine if a Design of Experiments (DOE)/Response Surface Methodology could be applied to on-orbit thermal analysis and produce a set of Response Surface Equations (RSE) that predict Orion vehicle temperatures within 10 F. The study used the Orion Outer Mold Line model. Five separate factors were identified for study: yaw, pitch, roll, beta angle, and the environmental parameters. Twenty-three external Orion components were selected and their minimum and maximum temperatures captured over a period of two orbits. Thus, there are 46 responses. A DOE case matrix of 145 runs was developed. The data from these cases were analyzed to produce a fifth order RSE for each of the temperature responses. For the 145 cases in the DOE matrix, the agreement between the engineering data and the RSE predictions was encouraging with 40 of the 46 RSEs predicting temperatures within the goal band. However, the verification cases showed most responses did not meet the 10 F goal. After reframing the focus of the study to better align the RSE development with the purposes of the model, a set of RSEs for both the minimum and maximum radiator temperatures was produced which predicted the engineering model output within +/-4 F. Therefore, with the correct application of the DOE/RSE methodology, RSEs can be developed that provide analysts a fast and easy way to screen large numbers of environments and assess proposed changes to the RSE factors.

  7. Science Partnerships Enabling Rapid Response: Designing a Strategy for Improving Scientific Collaboration during Crisis Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mease, L.; Gibbs, T.; Adiseshan, T.

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster required unprecedented engagement and collaboration with scientists from multiple disciplines across government, academia, and industry. Although this spurred the rapid advancement of valuable new scientific knowledge and tools, it also exposed weaknesses in the system of information dissemination and exchange among the scientists from those three sectors. Limited government communication with the broader scientific community complicated the rapid mobilization of the scientific community to assist with spill response, evaluation of impact, and public perceptions of the crisis. The lessons and new laws produced from prior spills such as Exxon Valdez were helpful, but ultimately did not lead to the actions necessary to prepare a suitable infrastructure that would support collaboration with non-governmental scientists. As oil demand pushes drilling into increasingly extreme environments, addressing the challenge of effective, science-based disaster response is an imperative. Our study employs a user-centered design process to 1) understand the obstacles to and opportunity spaces for effective scientific collaboration during environmental crises such as large oil spills, 2) identify possible tools and strategies to enable rapid information exchange between government responders and non-governmental scientists from multiple relevant disciplines, and 3) build a network of key influencers to secure sufficient buy-in for scaled implementation of appropriate tools and strategies. Our methods include user ethnography, complex system mapping, individual and system behavioral analysis, and large-scale system design to identify and prototype a solution to this crisis collaboration challenge. In this talk, we will present out insights gleaned from existing analogs of successful scientific collaboration during crises and our initial findings from the 60 targeted interviews we conducted that highlight key collaboration challenges that government

  8. Improving Beta Test Evaluation Response Rates: A Meta-Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ-Eft, Darlene; Preskill, Hallie

    2005-01-01

    This study presents a meta-evaluation of a beta-test of a customer service training program. The initial evaluation showed a low response rate. Therefore, the meta-evaluation focused on issues related to the conduct of the initial evaluation and reasons for nonresponse. The meta-evaluation identified solutions to the nonresponse problem as related…

  9. Item Response Theory in the context of Improving Student Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Chase; Davis, Jeremy; Pyper, Brian

    2011-10-01

    We are interested to see if Item Response Theory can help to better inform the development of reasoning ability in introductory physics. A first pass through our latest batch of data from the Heat and Temperature Conceptual Evaluation, the Lawson Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning, and the Epistemological Beliefs About Physics Survey may help in this effort.

  10. Improving Student Responsibility through the Use of Individual Behavior Contracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Darlene; Nizzi, Denise; Pitt, Wendy; Rudolph, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of prior research, articles and studies revealed that concerns exist regarding student behavior in the classroom, at both the national and local levels. The learning environment is severely impacted by off-task behavior, as well as, lack of responsibility for daily routines and homework. Multiple reasons have been suggested as to why this…

  11. Improved design provides faster response time in photomultiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Dynamic Crossed-Field Electron Multiplying /DCFEM/ light demodulator avoids the normal response time limitations inherent in static field devices by using time varying crossed electric and static magnetic fields. This eliminates the transit time spread that affects electrons as they proceed along the secondary emission stages of the tube.

  12. Chemical and Biological Terrorism: Improvements to Emergency Medical Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGraffenreid, Jeff Gordon

    The challenge facing many emergency medical services (EMS) is the implementation of a comprehensive educational strategy to address emergency responses to terrorism. One such service, Johnson County (Kansas) Medical Action, needed a strategy that would keep paramedics safe and offer the community an effective approach to mitigation. A…

  13. Instructional Improvement: Roles and Responsibilities in Statewide Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jane M. E.; Kenney, Jane L.

    This paper summarizes the first 18 months of Maryland's School Improvement through Instructional Process (SITIP) program, begun in fall 1980. Four general methods of data collection were used for the project: observation, interviews, questionnaires, and document analysis. Of Maryland's 24 local education agencies (LEAs)--Baltimore City plus 23…

  14. Moderate variability in stimulus presentation improves motor response control.

    PubMed

    Wodka, Ericka L; Simmonds, Daniel J; Mahone, E Mark; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2009-05-01

    To examine the impact of interstimulus "jitter" (i.e., randomization of the interval between successive stimulus events) on response control during continuous task performance, 41 healthy adults completed four go/no-go tasks that were identical except for interstimulus interval (ISI) jitter: a 0% jitter task with a fixed (1,000-ms) ISI, a 10% jitter task with an ISI range of 900-1,100 ms, a 30% jitter task with an ISI range of 700-1,300 ms, and a 50% jitter task with an ISI range of 500-1,500 ms. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a quadratic effect of jitter on commissions across the group and on intrasubject reaction time variability in men; in both cases, performance was best for the 10% jitter condition. A linear effect of jitter was observed for reaction time (RT) with high levels of jitter (50%) resulting in longer RT. Findings suggest that response selection, including inhibition, is optimized by moderate increases in ISI jitter. More deliberate and controlled responding observed with increasing jitter may have important treatment implications for disorders (e.g., attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ADHD), associated with impaired response control. PMID:18686112

  15. Work of the Gods: Tatai Arorangi (Maori Astronomy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leather, Kay; Hall, Richard

    Knowledgeable elders of ancient times, and their descendants today, studied the heavens and the stars - such was matai whetu, study of the stars - to identify the heavenly bodies and their relationships to each other. The knowledge gained was arranged in whakapapa, genealogies. Recitation of the star names was known as tatai whetu; navigation across the seas was tatai aro rangi: finding the appropriate path by the stars. The maramataka, or literally moon calendar, and the seasons were determined by the heliacal rising (rising just before the Sun) of certain stars. Knowledge of their world was the tool the ancients used to order their lives. From the first twitch in Te Kore, which gave life, to the continuous flow of creation, carried in the waters of life, even unto the breath of life, which allows creatures to move under their own mana, all the universe shares the tapu and the mana of the gods.

  16. Accidents and acts of God: a history of the terms.

    PubMed Central

    Loimer, H; Guarnieri, M

    1996-01-01

    Despite criticism from safety professionals, scientists continue to use the word accident, meaning an unexpected, unintended injury, or event. Some argue for its use based on tradition, but "traditional" arguments appear to be invalid given our examination of the history of the word and its companion phrase act of God in statistics, law, and religion. People who were interested in public health recognized in the 1600s that unintended injuries were neither random nor unexpected. Legal scholars in the 1800s saw the word was useless for technical purposes. The word does not appear in the Bible until the mid 1900s and then only in a para-phrased edition. Others have maintained that the meaning of accident is well understood, even though it has not been perfectly defined. We maintain that without a clear definition, people substitute an image, which may be distorted or damaging. Images p102-a p104-a p105-a PMID:8561226

  17. Improving Flow Response of a Variable-rate Aerial Application System by Interactive Refinement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate response of a variable-rate aerial application controller to changing flow rates and to improve its response at correspondingly varying system pressures. System improvements have been made by refinement of the control algorithms over time in collaboration with ...

  18. Improved immune response to recombinant influenza nucleoprotein formulated with ISCOMATRIX.

    PubMed

    Cargnelutti, Diego E; Sanchez, Maria V; Alvarez, Paula; Boado, Lorena; Glikmann, Graciela; Mattion, Nora; Scodeller, Eduardo A

    2012-03-01

    Current influenza vaccines elicit antibodies effective against homologous strains, but new strategies are urgently needed for protection against emerging epidemic or pandemic strains. Although influenza vaccine candidates based on the viral nucleoprotein (NP) or matrix protein do not elicit sterilizing immunity, they have the advantage of inducing immunity that may cover a larger number of viral strains. In this study, recombinant NP produced in Escherichia coli was purified and formulated in combination with the adjuvant ISCOMATRIX. This formulation increased a NP-specific immunity in mice, with a Th1 profile, and may constitute a promising low-cost influenza vaccine candidate, with ability to stimulate humoral and cellular immune responses.. PMID:22450799

  19. Improving Item Response Theory Model Calibration by Considering Response Times in Psychological Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Research findings indicate that response times in personality scales are related to the trait level according to the so-called speed-distance hypothesis. Against this background, Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva proposed a latent trait model for the responses and response times in a test. The model consists of two components, a standard item response…

  20. The Importance of Terminal Values and Religious Experience of God's Presence and God's Absence in the Lives of University Students with Various Levels of Empathy.

    PubMed

    Głaz, Stanisław

    2015-06-01

    The aims of the research I embarked on were: (a) to show the preference of terminal values in personal and in social character, as well to determine the level of religious experience--God's presence and God's absence, in groups of young people characterized by a high and low level of empathy and (b) to show the relation between terminal values in personal and in social character and religious experience: God's presence and God's absence, in groups of young people with a high and low level of empathy. In the research, the following methods were applied: The Scale of Religious Experience by Głaz-in order to define the level of religious experience: God's presence and God's absence, and Mehrabian and Epstein's Questionnaire Measure of Emotional Empathy-in order to define the level of empathy. In order to show the terminal values preference amongst young people, the Rokeach Value Survey was applied. The research was carried out in Kraków amongst 200 university students. The research has shown that students with a high level of empathy reveal a higher level of experience of God's presence than the people with a low level of it. University students with a high level of empathy amongst terminal values prefer most two values in personal character, that is wisdom and pleasure, and one in social character-family security. Similarly, students with a low level of empathy prefer most also two values in personal character, that is pleasure and freedom, and one in social character-family security. In the group of people with a high level of empathy, it is value in personal character-a sense of accomplishment-that contribute more to explaining the variance of religious experience of God's presence, and in group of people with a low level of empathy, it is social value-social recognition. Whereas in the group of people with a high level of empathy it is value in social character-equality-that contribute more to explaining the variance of religious experience of God's absence, and

  1. Improving Kepler Pipeline Sensitivity with Pixel Response Function Photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Robert L.; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of our investigation into the feasibility and expected benefits of implementing PRF-fitting photometry in the Kepler Science Processing Pipeline. The Kepler Pixel Response Function (PRF) describes the expected system response to a point source at infinity and includes the effects of the optical point spread function, the CCD detector responsivity function, and spacecraft pointing jitter. Planet detection in the Kepler pipeline is currently based on simple aperture photometry (SAP), which is most effective when applied to uncrowded bright stars. Its effectiveness diminishes rapidly as target brightness decreases relative to the effects of noise sources such as detector electronics, background stars, and image motion. In contrast, PRF photometry is based on fitting an explicit model of image formation to the data and naturally accounts for image motion and contributions of background stars. The key to obtaining high-quality photometry from PRF fitting is a high-quality model of the system's PRF, while the key to efficiently processing the large number of Kepler targets is an accurate catalog and accurate mapping of celestial coordinates onto the focal plane. If the CCD coordinates of stellar centroids are known a priori then the problem of PRF fitting becomes linear. A model of the Kepler PRF was constructed at the time of spacecraft commissioning by fitting piecewise polynomial surfaces to data from dithered full frame images. While this model accurately captured the initial state of the system, the PRF has evolved dynamically since then and has been seen to deviate significantly from the initial (static) model. We construct a dynamic PRF model which is then used to recover photometry for all targets of interest. Both simulation tests and results from Kepler flight data demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science

  2. Disasters, the environment, and public health: improving our response.

    PubMed Central

    Logue, J N

    1996-01-01

    Natural and human-made disasters continue to adversely affect all areas of the world in both predictable and unpredictable ways. To highlight the importance of natural disasters, the United Nations declared the 1990s the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. This paper considers the public health response to disasters. It highlights environmental health issues and approaches since disasters are extreme environmental events, and it reviews developments relating to capacity building, training, and collaboration. Although progress is noted, a comprehensive federal or academic approach is not evident in the United States and the proper linkage to environmental health is lacking. With the International Decade now half over, public health professionals and others involved with disaster management should reflect on progress made to date and goals for the future. PMID:8806369

  3. Sensitivity and response time improvements in millimeter-wave spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbe, W.F.; Leskovar, B.

    1980-09-01

    A new version of a microwave spectrometer for the detection of gaseous pollutants and other atmospheric constituents is described. The spectrometer, which operates in the vicinity of 70 GHz, employs a Fabry-Perot resonator as a sample cell and uses superhetrodyne detection for high sensitivity. The spectrometer has been modified to incorporate a frequency doubler modulated at 30 MHz to permit operation with a single Gunn oscillator source. As a result, faster response time and somewhat greater sensitivity are obtained. The spectrometer is capable of detecting a minimum concentration of 1 ppM of SO/sub 2/ diluted in air with a 1 second time constant. For OCS diluted in air, the minimum detectable concentration is 800 ppB and with a 10 second time constant 300 ppB.

  4. Nerve conduction velocity measurements: improved accuracy using superimposed response waves.

    PubMed

    Halar, E M; Venkatesh, B

    1976-10-01

    A new procedure of serial motor nerve conduction velocity (NCV) measurements with the use of "superimposed response waves" technique (or double stimulus technique) was performed on 29 normal subjects. Six peripheral nerves were tested once a week for four to six weeks. A total of 760 NCV measurements were thus obtained to try to assess the magnitude of error in serial NCV testings. With the double stimulus technique employed, a significant reduction in variations of serial NCV measurements was found. The overall standard deviation of four to six consecutive NCV measurements in the 34 subjects was 1.3 meters per second with a coefficient of variation of 2.4%. These findings obtained with the double stimulus technique have proven to be approximately three times more accurate than results obtained by investigators who studied nerve conduction velocity measurement variation with single stimulus standard NCV testing techniques. PMID:184754

  5. European consumer response to packaging technologies for improved beef safety.

    PubMed

    Van Wezemael, Lynn; Ueland, Øydis; Verbeke, Wim

    2011-09-01

    Beef packaging can influence consumer perceptions of beef. Although consumer perceptions and acceptance are considered to be among the most limiting factors in the application of new technologies, there is a lack of knowledge about the acceptability to consumers of beef packaging systems aimed at improved safety. This paper explores European consumers' acceptance levels of different beef packaging technologies. An online consumer survey was conducted in five European countries (n=2520). Acceptance levels among the sample ranged between 23% for packaging releasing preservative additives up to 73% for vacuum packaging. Factor analysis revealed that familiar packaging technologies were clearly preferred over non-familiar technologies. Four consumer segments were identified: the negative (31% of the sample), cautious (30%), conservative (17%) and enthusiast (22%) consumers, which were profiled based on their attitudes and beef consumption behaviour. Differences between consumer acceptance levels should be taken into account while optimising beef packaging and communicating its benefits. PMID:21543160

  6. Improving OCD time to solution using Signal Response Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Pandev, Stilian; Sanko, Dimitry; Ramanathan, Vidya; Venkataraman, Kartik; Haupt, Ronny

    2016-03-01

    In recent technology nodes, advanced process and novel integration scheme have challenged the precision limits of conventional metrology; with critical dimensions (CD) of device reduce to sub-nanometer region. Optical metrology has proved its capability to precisely detect intricate details on the complex structures, however, conventional RCWA-based (rigorous coupled wave analysis) scatterometry has the limitations of long time-to-results and lack of flexibility to adapt to wide process variations. Signal Response Metrology (SRM) is a new metrology technique targeted to alleviate the consumption of engineering and computation resources by eliminating geometric/dispersion modeling and spectral simulation from the workflow. This is achieved by directly correlating the spectra acquired from a set of wafers with known process variations encoded. In SPIE 2015, we presented the results of SRM application in lithography metrology and control [1], accomplished the mission of setting up a new measurement recipe of focus/dose monitoring in hours. This work will demonstrate our recent field exploration of SRM implementation in 20nm technology and beyond, including focus metrology for scanner control; post etch geometric profile measurement, and actual device profile metrology.

  7. Improving policy responses to the risk of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Rabl, Ari; Nathwani, Jatin; Pandey, Mahesh; Hurley, Fintan

    2007-02-01

    This paper offers a brief review of the need for cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and the available policy instruments for air pollution. To prioritize different possible actions, one needs to know which source of pollution causes how much damage. This requires an impact pathway analysis, that is, an analysis of the chain emission --> dispersion --> dose-response function --> monetary valuation. The methodology for this is described and illustrated with the results of the ExternE (External Costs of Energy) project series of the European Commission. Two examples of an application to CBA are shown: one where a proposed reduction of emission limits is justified, and one where it is not. It is advisable to subject any proposed regulation to a CBA, including an analysis of the uncertainties. Even if the uncertainties are large and a policy decision may have to take other considerations into account, a well-documented CBA clarifies the issues and provides a basis for rational discussion. One of the main sources of uncertainty lies in the monetary valuation of premature mortality, the dominant contribution to the damage cost of air pollution. As an alternative, an innovative policy tool is described, the Life Quality Index (LQI), a compound indicator comprising societal wealth and life expectancy. It is applied to the Canada-wide standards for particulate matter and ozone. Regardless of monetary valuation, a 50% reduction of PM10 concentrations in Europe and North America has been shown to yield a population-average life expectancy increase on the order of 4 to 5 mo. PMID:17365594

  8. Playing God and the ethics of divine names: an Islamic paradigm for biomedical ethics.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Qaiser

    2007-10-01

    The notion of 'playing God' frequently comes to fore in discussions of bioethics, especially in religious contexts. The phrase has always been analyzed and discussed from Christian and secular standpoints. Two interpretations exist in the literature. The first one takes 'God' seriously and playing 'playfully'. It argues that this concept does state a principle but invokes a perspective on the world. The second takes both terms playfully. In the Islamic Intellectual tradition, the Sufi concept of 'adopting divine character traits' provides a legitimate paradigm for 'playing God'. This paradigm is interesting because here we take both terms 'God' and 'playing' seriously. It is significant for the development of biomedical ethics in contemporary Islamic societies as it can open new vistas for viewing biotechnological developments. PMID:17845447

  9. Ojirami-Ugbo: the village where the god of cleanliness is worshipped.

    PubMed

    Aletor, G A

    1999-06-01

    The beliefs and practices of the people of Ojirami-Ugbo, who worship Atta, the god of cleanliness, have been reported. A laboratory survey showed significant medical benefits in those health measures adopted by the people. PMID:11043005

  10. Periodontitis treatment improves systemic lupus erythematosus response to immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Cristiana; Fuller, Ricardo; Bonfá, Eloisa; Guedes, Lissiane K N; D'Alleva, Paulo Sergio R; Borba, Eduardo F

    2014-04-01

    Periodontal disease (POD) may affect rheumatic diseases severity, but there are no data regarding the effect of its treatment on disease activity in SLE patients under immunosuppressive therapy. Forty-nine consecutive SLE patients (SLEDAI ≥ 2) with POD and under corticosteroid and cyclophosphamide pulse therapy (IVCYC) were selected. Periodontal assessment included bleeding gingival index (BGI), probing depth (PD), and probing attachment level (PAL). At entry, POD was defined as BGI > 1 and patients were assigned to groups according to the availability of odontological intervention in TREATED (n = 32) and NOT TREATED (n = 17). SLEDAI and POD parameters were determined at entry and after 3 months. Age, female gender, and race were alike among TREATED and NOT TREATED (p > 0.05). Both groups had also comparable disease duration (10.7 ± 6.8 vs. 11.0 ± 6.6, p = 0.83), IVCYC number (5.8 ± 4.8 vs. 4.5 ± 4.8, p = 0.17), and SLEDAI (5.9 ± 4.2 vs. 6.3 ± 4.3, p = 0.73) as well as POD parameters [BGI (40.8 ± 31.0 vs. 40.7 ± 36.2 %, p = 0.89), PD (1.7 ± 1.8 vs. 1.5 ± 0.60 mm, p = 0.80), and PAL (2.5 ± 1.9 vs. 1.9 ± 1.1 mm, p = 0.18)]. At the end of the study, TREATED group had a significant improvement in SLEDAI (5.9 ± 4.2 vs. 3.4 ± 3.3, p = 0.04) with a paralleled reduction in BGI (40.8 ± 31.0 vs. 15.2 ± 17.2 %, p < 0.01), PD (1.7 ± 1.8 vs. 1.1 ± 0.3 mm, p < 0.01), and PAL (2.5 ± 1.9 vs. 1.7 ± 0.9 mm, p < 0.01). In contrast, SLEDAI (6.3 ± 4.3 vs. 6.0 ± 5.5, p = 0.40) and POD parameters [BGI (p = 0.33), PD (p = 0.91), and PAL (p = 0.39)] remained largely unchanged in NOT TREATED group. Periodontal disease treatment seems to have a beneficial effect in controlling disease activity in SLE patients under immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, management of this modifiable risk factor is

  11. Investigations of the mechanisms by which lower body negative pressure (LBNP) improves orthostatic responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, S. M.; Steinmann, L.; Dussack, L.; Wood, M.; Cintron, N.; Whitson, P.

    1992-01-01

    Saline ingestion during LBNP is a counter measure proposed to improve orthostatic function during space flight. To understand the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect, body fluid, endocrine, and orthostatic responses (graded LBNP tests) were measured during bed rest (BR) and after 2 hr and 4 hr LBNP/saline treatments (-30 mm Hg and 1 liter of isotonic saline). PV (from I-125 and hematocrit measurements) decreased during BR but was restored to the pre-bed rest level (3157 +/- 161 ml) 20 hrs after both 2 hr (3109 +/- 146 ml) and 4 hr (3144 +/- 173 ml) LBNP. The heart rate response to graded LBNP tests was significantly improved after the 4 hr, but not after the 2 hr treatment. These results suggest PV expansion may be responsible for some improvement in orthostatic responses, but other mechanisms also must contribute.

  12. Fingers-of-God effect of infalling satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikage, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Non-linear redshift-space distortion known as the Fingers-of-God (FoG) effect is a major systematic uncertainty in redshift-space distortion studies conducted to test gravity models. The FoG effect has been usually attributed to the random motion of galaxies inside their clusters. When the internal galaxy motion is not well virialized, however, the coherent infalling motion towards the cluster centre generates the FoG effect. Here, we derive an analytical model of the satellite velocity distribution due to the infall motion combined with the random motion. We show that the velocity distribution becomes far from Maxwellian when the infalling motion is dominant. We use simulated subhalo catalogues to find that the contribution of infall motion is important to massive subhaloes and that the velocity distribution has a top-hat like shape as expected from our analytic model. We also study the FoG effect due to infall motion on the redshift-space power spectrum. Using simulated mock samples of luminous red galaxies constructed from haloes and massive subhaloes in N-body simulations, we show that the redshift-space power spectra can differ from expectations when the infall motion is ignored.

  13. Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers: Using a Public Health Systems Approach to Improve All-Hazards Preparedness and Response

    PubMed Central

    Leinhos, Mary; Williams-Johnson, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, at the request of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) prepared a report identifying knowledge gaps in public health systems preparedness and emergency response and recommending near-term priority research areas. In accordance with the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act mandating new public health systems research for preparedness and emergency response, CDC provided competitive awards establishing nine Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers (PERRCs) in accredited U.S. schools of public health. The PERRCs conducted research in four IOM-recommended priority areas: (1) enhancing the usefulness of public health preparedness and response (PHPR) training, (2) creating and maintaining sustainable preparedness and response systems, (3) improving PHPR communications, and (4) identifying evaluation criteria and metrics to improve PHPR for all hazards. The PERRCs worked closely with state and local public health, community partners, and advisory committees to produce practice-relevant research findings. PERRC research has generated more than 130 peer-reviewed publications and nearly 80 practice and policy tools and recommendations with the potential to significantly enhance our nation's PHPR to all hazards and that highlight the need for further improvements in public health systems. PMID:25355970

  14. Improving Survey Response Rates of School Counselors: Comparing the Use of Incentives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Sheri

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of incentives in improving survey response rates of school counselors and compares the findings with those of previously researched populations. A $1 cash incentive increased response rates for a one-wave mailing of a questionnaire, while a raffle opportunity did not. The number and length of optional…

  15. Improved Algorithms for Identifying Spelling and Word Order Errors in Student Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Robert S.

    The report describes improved algorithms within a computer program for identifying spelling and word order errors in student responses. A "markup analysis" compares a student's response string to an author-specified model string and generates a graphical error markup that indicates spelling, capitalization, and accent errors, extra or missing…

  16. Mind over Matter: Reappraising Arousal Improves Cardiovascular and Cognitive Responses to Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamieson, Jeremy P.; Nock, Matthew K.; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have theorized that changing the way we think about our bodily responses can improve our physiological and cognitive reactions to stressful events. However, the underlying processes through which mental states improve downstream outcomes are not well understood. To this end, we examined whether reappraising stress-induced arousal could…

  17. 34 CFR 200.39 - Responsibilities resulting from identification for school improvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities resulting from identification for school improvement. 200.39 Section 200.39 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING...

  18. 34 CFR 200.49 - SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring. 200.49 Section 200.49 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF...

  19. Suffering and the sovereignty of God: one Evangelical's perspective on doctor-assisted suicide.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Darrel W

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents my personal convictions, as an Evangelical, regarding the absolute impropriety of doctor-assisted suicide for Christians. They have been "bought with a price" and are owned by Another. Hence, they must always strive to glorify God in their bodies, both in life and in death. Although they crave the well-being of temporal health, when they are ill seek healing or relief, and may well recoil even from the thought of suffering and dying, they should realize that their values and priorities must be rooted in biblical truths and that their well-being is eternal and not temporal, spiritual and not material. As Christians, their attitudes and responses to suffering and dying must be molded by the reality that their Creator and Sovereign will cause all things to work together for their good and that their Lord has called them into a fellowship of His suffering in which they are sustained by dependence upon Him. Hence, for Christians to take their lives in order to escape from the trials and testings ordained by Him would be a failure of love and a breach of trust. PMID:11654497

  20. Jung and White and the God of terrible double aspect.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Ann C

    2007-06-01

    This paper discusses theoretical, historical and personal issues in the ill-fated friendship and intellectual collaboration between C.G. Jung and the Dominican scholar Victor White, O.P., based on primary documents in their correspondence, 1945 to 1960. The collaboration of Jung and White began with high expectations but fell into painful disagreements about the nature of God, the problem of evil, and shadow aspects of the Self. They made a rapid commitment to their working alliance based on personal and professional hopes, but paying scant attention to their divergent underlying assumptions. White hoped to build theoretical and practical connections between Jungian psychology and Catholic theology for the sake of modern Catholics. Jung needed learned theological support as he explored the psychological meanings of Christian symbols, including the central symbol of Christ. At the grandest level, they both hoped to transform the Christian West, after the moral disaster of World War II. Their collaboration was risky for both men, especially for White in his career as a Dominican, and it led to considerable suffering. The Self is prominent in the relationship, symbolically present in the text of the correspondence and consciously forming their major topic of debate. From the start, the Self is an archetypal field, drawing the friends into their visionary task at the risk of unconscious inflation. Later the Self is revealed with its shadow as a burden, a puzzle, and a basis for estrangement. Finally, with the intervention of feminine wisdom, mortal suffering is transformed by an attitude of conscious sacrifice. PMID:17537141

  1. New Approaches to Measuring Sticky Molecules: Improvement of Instrumental Response Times Using Active Passivation.

    PubMed

    Roscioli, J R; Zahniser, M S; Nelson, D D; Herndon, S C; Kolb, C E

    2016-03-10

    A novel method has been developed to improve sampling system response times for nominally "sticky" molecules such as HNO3 and NH3. The method reported here makes use of active, continuous passivation, where the instrument interfaces are continuously exposed to 0.01-1 ppm of fluorinated acidic or basic surfactants. To reduce HNO3 response times, perfluoroheptanoic acid and perfluorobutanesulfonic acid vapors are evaluated as passivation species. 1H,1H-perfluorooctylamine is used to improve NH3 response times. The resulting time responses using the perfluoroalkanoic acids are on the order of 0.4-0.7 s for a 75% quantitative recovery of HNO3, and 1-5 s for 90% recovery. Similar response time improvements are seen in detection of NH3 using perfluorooctylamine (<1 s for a 75% recovery, ∼2 s for 90% recovery). This generally applicable methodology significantly improves the capability of eddy covariance flux and real-time plume-based measurements of highly polar molecules that have historically been hampered by slow response times due to adsorption on sampling system surfaces. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by field measurements of HNO3 eddy covariance fluxes in a central U.S. prairie. PMID:26106902

  2. The relationship between core self-evaluations, views of god, and intrinsic/extrinsic religious motivation.

    PubMed

    Smither, James W; Walker, Alan G

    2015-04-01

    Core self-evaluations refer to a higher-order construct that subsumes four well-established traits in the personality literature: self-esteem, generalized self-efficacy, (low) neuroticism, and (internal) locus of control. Studies that have examined the relationship between various measures of religiosity and individual components of core self-evaluations show no clear pattern of relationships. The absence of a clear pattern may be due to the failure of most previous studies in this area to use theory to guide research. Therefore, theories related to core self-evaluations, religious motivation, and views of God were used to develop and test four hypotheses. 220 adults completed measures of four religious attitudes (intrinsic religious motivation, extrinsic religious motivation, viewing God as loving, and viewing God as punitive), general religiosity, and core self-evaluations, separated by 6 weeks (with the order of measures counterbalanced). Multivariate multiple regression, controlling for general religiosity, showed that core self-evaluations were positively related to viewing God as loving, negatively related to viewing God as punitive, and negatively related to extrinsic religious motivation. The hypothesis that core self-evaluations would be positively related to intrinsic religious motivation was not supported. PMID:25826433

  3. The Association Between Belief in God and Fertility Desires in Slovenia and the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Cranney, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Context Research on the association between religiosity and fertility—and, particularly, on the effects of secularization on fertility desires and outcomes—has been concerned primarily with mechanisms that are fundamentally institutional and are embedded in formal religious structures. Supplementary explanations focused on noninstitutional dimensions of religiosity have never been tested. Methods Conventional ordinary least-squares regression was used to test the association between belief in God (i.e., a personal God or some sort of life force) and fertility desires among 2,251 women aged 18–45 in Slovenia and 951 women aged 15–44 in the Czech Republic who participated in the European Family and Fertility Survey in the mid-1990s. Results In both samples, substantial proportions of women either were nonbelievers or believed in God but were not institutionally religious. Belief in God was independently associated with fertility desires even in analyses controlling for self-reported religiosity. Women who believed in a personal God wanted approximately 0.2 more children, and those who believed in a life force wanted approximately 0.1 more children, than nonbelievers. Results were similar across several alternative measures of religiosity. Conclusions At least some of the connection between religiosity and fertility apparently is attributable to metaphysical beliefs. Future research on the effect of secularization on fertility decline should investigate the potentially distinct effects of different dimensions of religiosity. PMID:25682844

  4. God-Mediated Control and Change in Self-Rated Health

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Neal

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if feelings of God-mediated control are associated with change in self-rated health over time. In the process, an effort was made to see if a sense of meaning in life and optimism mediated the relationship between God-mediated control and change in health. The following hypothesized relationships were contained in the conceptual model that was developed to evaluate these issues: (1) people who go to church more often tend to have stronger God-mediated control beliefs than individuals who do not attend worship services as often; (2) people with a strong sense of God-mediated control are more likely to find a sense of meaning in life and be more optimistic than individuals who do not have a strong sense of God-mediated control; (3) people who are optimistic and who have a strong sense of meaning in life will rate their health more favorably over time than individuals who are not optimistic, as well as individuals who have not found a sense of meaning in life. Data from a longitudinal nationwide survey of older adults provided support for each of these hypotheses. PMID:21057586

  5. Rabies DNA vaccine in the horse: strategies to improve serological responses.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Laurent; Minke, Jules; Dufay, Nathalie; Baudu, Philippe; Audonnet, Jean Christophe

    2003-11-01

    In order for DNA vaccines to become a practical alternative to conventional vaccines their ability to induce antibody responses in large mammals needs to be improved. We used DNA vaccination against rabies in the horse as a model to test the potential of two different strategies to enhance antibody responses in a large mammalian species. The administration of the DNA vaccine in the presence of aluminum phosphate improved both the onset and the intensity of serological responses but was not potent enough to achieve seroconversion in all vaccinated ponies. However, when the DNA vaccine was formulated with the cationic lipid DMRIE-DOPE instead of aluminum phosphate, a very strong impact on both onset and intensity of serological responses was observed. This latter strategy ensured excellent seroconversion in all vaccinated ponies after a primary course of two injections, demonstrating a clear improvement of the homogeneity of the induced responses. These data indicate that rabies DNA vaccination is feasible in horses and further suggests that properly formulated DNA vaccines can generate immune responses in large veterinary species at a level comparable to the responses achieved with conventional vaccines. PMID:14575772

  6. HIV/AIDS support and African pentecostalism: the case of the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG).

    PubMed

    Adogame, Afe

    2007-05-01

    International and African discourses on the HIV/AIDS pandemic and intervention neglect the role of religion and religious organizations. Social science perspectives in tackling health and disease neglect religious doctrines and faith central to worldviews and praxis of religious groups. Both aspects are important for religious groups and individuals affected by HIV/AIDS. Informed by a religious studies paradigm and through the religious ethnography of the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG) in Nigeria and the Diaspora, this article demonstrates mechanisms employed by African Pentecostals to combat the epidemic and provide support for infected members. The RCCG conceptualization of disease and healing is central to understanding responses and measures in combating HIV/AIDS. PMID:17439997

  7. Development of Vestibular Stochastic Resonance as a Sensorimotor Countermeasure: Improving Otolith Ocular and Motor Task Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; DeDios,Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob; Wood, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. The goal of our present study is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular SR that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and improve motor task responses to mitigate associated risks.

  8. On timing response improvement of an NE213 scintillator attached to two PMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, S.; Ghal-Eh, N.; Bayat, E.

    2013-09-01

    A 5 cm diameter by 6 cm height NE213 scintillator attached to two XP2282 PHOTONIS photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) exposed to 241Americium-Berylium (Am-Be) neutron-gamma source has been used for timing response studies. The neutron-gamma discrimination (NGD) measurements based on a modified zero-crossing (ZC) method show that the discrimination quality, usually expressed in figure-of-merit (FoM) and peak-to-valley (P/V) values, has been improved. The timing response evaluated with Monte Carlo light transport code, PHOTRACK, also verifies this improvement.

  9. Assessing and improving cross-border chemical incident preparedness and response across Europe.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Evans, James; Hall, Lisbeth; Czerczak, Slawomir; Manley, Kevin; Dobney, Alec; Hoffer, Sally; Pałaszewska-Tkacz, Anna; Jankowska, Agnieszka

    2014-11-01

    Good practices in emergency preparedness and response for chemical incidents include practices specific to the different functions of exposure assessment (e.g., within the monitoring function, the use of mobile monitoring equipment; within the modelling function, the use of rapid dispersion models with integrated mapping software) and generic practices to engage incident response stakeholders to maximise exposure assessment capabilities (e.g., sharing protocols and pre-prepared information and multi-agency training and exercising). Such practices can optimise cross-border collaboration. A wide range of practices have been implemented across MSs during chemical incident response, particularly during incidents that have cross-border and trans-boundary impacts. This paper proposes a self-assessment methodology to enable MSs, or organisations within MSs, to examine exposure assessment capabilities and communication pathways between exposure assessors and public health risk assessors. Where gaps exist, this methodology provides links to good practices that could improve response, communication and collaboration across local, regional and national borders. A fragmented approach to emergency preparedness for chemical incidents is a major obstacle to improving cross-border exposure assessment. There is no one existing body or structure responsible for all aspects of chemical incident preparedness and response in the European Union. Due to the range of different organisations and networks involved in chemical incident response, emergency preparedness needs to be drawn together. A number of recommendations are proposed, including the use of networks of experts which link public health risk assessors with experts in exposure assessment, in order to coordinate and improve chemical incident emergency preparedness. The EU's recent Decision on serious cross-border threats to health aims to facilitate MSs' compliance with the International Health Regulations, which require

  10. Adolescents' relationship with God and internalizing adjustment over time: the moderating role of maternal religious coping.

    PubMed

    Goeke-Morey, Marcie C; Taylor, Laura K; Merrilees, Christine E; Shirlow, Peter; Cummings, E Mark

    2014-12-01

    A growing literature supports the importance of understanding the link between religiosity and youths' adjustment and development, but in the absence of rigorous, longitudinal designs, questions remain about the direction of effect and the role of family factors. This paper investigates the bidirectional association between adolescents' relationship with God and their internalizing adjustment. Results from 2-wave, SEM cross-lag analyses of data from 667 mother/adolescent dyads in Belfast, Northern Ireland (50% male, M age = 15.75 years old) supports a risk model suggesting that greater internalizing problems predict a weaker relationship with God 1 year later. Significant moderation analyses suggest that a stronger relationship with God predicted fewer depression and anxiety symptoms for youth whose mothers used more religious coping. PMID:24955590

  11. Feelings of Gratitude Toward God Among Older Whites, Older African Americans, and Older Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Neal

    2011-01-01

    The first goal of this study is to see if social relationships in the church influence feelings of gratitude toward God. The second goal is to assess the impact of race and ethnicity on this relationship. The data support the following hypotheses: (1) older people who go to church more often tend to receive more spiritual support from fellow church members; (2) older adults who receive more spiritual support at church will derive a deeper understanding of themselves and others; (3) older people who develop greater insight into themselves and others will derive a greater sense of religious meaning in life; and (4) older adults who develop a deeper sense of religious meaning in life will feel more grateful to God. The results also indicate that the study model explains how feelings of gratitude toward God arise among older blacks and whites, but not older Mexican Americans. PMID:23543840

  12. Adolescents’ relationship with God and internalizing adjustment over time: The moderating role of maternal religious coping

    PubMed Central

    Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Taylor, Laura K.; Merrilees, Christine E.; Shirlow, Peter; Cummings, E. Mark

    2015-01-01

    A growing literature supports the importance of understanding the link between religiosity and youths’ adjustment and development, but in the absence of rigorous, longitudinal designs, questions remain about the direction of effect and the role of family factors. This paper investigates the bi-directional association between adolescents’ relationship with God and their internalizing adjustment. Results from two-wave, SEM cross-lag analyses of data from 667 mother/adolescent dyads in Belfast, Northern Ireland (50% male, M age = 15.75 years old) supports a risk model suggesting that greater internalizing problems predicts a weaker relationship with God one year later. Significant moderation analyses suggest that a stronger relationship with God predicted fewer depression and anxiety symptoms for youth whose mothers used more religious coping. PMID:24955590

  13. Improving response rate and quality of survey data with a scratch lottery ticket incentive

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The quality of data collected in survey research is usually indicated by the response rate; the representativeness of the sample, and; the rate of completed questions (item-response). In attempting to improve a generally declining response rate in surveys considerable efforts are being made through follow-up mailings and various types of incentives. This study examines effects of including a scratch lottery ticket in the invitation letter to a survey. Method Questionnaires concerning oral health were mailed to a random sample of 2,400 adults. A systematically selected half of the sample (1,200 adults) received a questionnaire including a scratch lottery ticket. One reminder without the incentive was sent. Results The incentive increased the response rate and improved representativeness by reaching more respondents with lower education. Furthermore, it reduced item nonresponse. The initial incentive had no effect on the propensity to respond after the reminder. Conclusion When attempting to improve survey data, three issues become important: response rate, representativeness, and item-response. This study shows that including a scratch lottery ticket in the invitation letter performs well on all the three. PMID:22515335

  14. Use of the Vocera Communications Badge Improves Public Safety Response Times

    PubMed Central

    Joslin, Jeremy D.; Goldberger, David; Johnson, Loretta; Waltz, D. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Violence in the Emergency Department (ED) has been a long-standing issue complicated by deficiencies in staff training, ease of weapons access, and response availability of public safety officers. The Vocera Badge is being used by our staff to request public safety assistance in lieu of a formal phone call to the University Police Communications Center. We sought to learn if use of this technology improved officer response times to the ED. Methods. Mean response times were reviewed and descriptive statistics analyzed to determine if the use of the Vocera Badge improved public safety officer response times to the ED. Results. Average response times improved from an average of 3.2 minutes (SD = 0.456) in the 6 months before the use of the communication badges to an average of 1.02 minutes (SD = 0.319) in the 6 months after use began. Conclusions. The use of the Vocera Badge seemed to decrease response times of public safety officers to our ED compared with the traditional method of calling a dispatch center to request assistance. PMID:27127654

  15. The problem of the imperfection of a world, itself created by a perfect god

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, André

    1992-02-01

    The two main arguments concern (1) the presence of an “enlightened complementarity” between philosophic (including scientific) and religious ( not including mystic) thought, and (2) the necessity to postulate a “threefold relationship” whenever one is to gain knowledge of any kind. They are both inspired by physics (from Bohr's “strict complementarity”, resp. from Newton's fundamental postulate). God's perfection resides at least in Symmetry in a generalized (not restrictively spatial) sense. Yet, as the argument goes, Space does not “exist” as a thing. Consequently, the Great Geometer (God) cannot dwell within a World He creates, and it is wrong to speak about His (God's) ‘existence’; for, existence is bound to the temporal, and Time is, together with the World, part of God's creation. Thus the only possible creation consists in God separating World and Time from Himself: This is the paradigm of Symmetry-breaking. Polytheistic mythologies all assume such and such imperfection of their deities; hence perfection is meaningful for monotheism only. A relationship of a threefold (‘trinitary’) nature must then obtain between God, World, and Time; this is analogous to Newton's postulate relating force, momentum and time. Just as the latter and its specific generalizations must be “found true” by verification, the said threefold relationship must also be found true: within philosophic thought more geometrico (in a generalized sense), within religious thought more “hymnometrico”. Yet the complementarity (called “enlightened”) arising between the two kinds of thought is of a higher nature than Bohr's “strict” complementarity. While it can be understood from the role assumed by language itself, it can however only be disposed of within mystic contemplation.

  16. 76 FR 63702 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Aphrodite and the Gods of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Aphrodite and the Gods of Love... determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Aphrodite and the Gods of Love,''...

  17. Attachment and God Representations among Lay Catholics, Priests, and Religious: A Matched Comparison Study Based on the Adult Attachment Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassibba, Rosalinda; Granqvist, Pehr; Costantini, Alessandro; Gatto, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Based on the idea that believers' perceived relationships with God develop from their attachment-related experiences with primary caregivers, the authors explored the quality of such experiences and their representations among individuals who differed in likelihood of experiencing a principal attachment to God. Using the Adult Attachment Interview…

  18. Assessing the Role of Attachment to God, Meaning, and Religious Coping as Mediators in the Grief Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Melissa M.; Chan, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    Research has examined the relationship of styles of attachment to others and meaning with grief and the stress-related growth process. Less has been written on styles of attachment to God and patterns of religious coping and how these constructs may impact adjustment in persons dealing with loss. This study examines the roles of attachment to God,…

  19. Assessing God Locus of Control as a Factor in College Students' Alcohol Use and Sexual Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Erin W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study explored God locus of control beliefs (ie, God's control over behavior) regarding their influence on alcohol use and sexual behavior as an alternative religiosity measure to religious behaviors, which does not capture perceived influence of religiosity. Additionally, demographic differences in religious beliefs were…

  20. Conscientizacion of the Oppressed Language and the Politics of Humor in Ana Castillo's "So Far from God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thananopavarn, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This essay explores the relationship between Ana Castillo's novel "So Far from God" (1993) and her development of an activist poetics inspired by Paulo Freire's influential 1970 treatise "Pedagogy of the Oppressed." "So Far from God" may be understood as the practical application of Castillo's theory of "conscienticized poetics"; that is, the…

  1. What's God Got to Do with It? How Religiosity Predicts Atheists' Health.

    PubMed

    Speed, David; Fowler, Ken

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between atheism and health is poorly understood within the Religion/Spirituality-health literature. While the extant literature promotes the idea that Attendance, Prayer, and Religiosity are connected to positive health outcomes, these relationships have not been established when controlling for whether a person is an atheist. Data from the 2008-2012 American General Social Survey (n = 3210) were used to investigate this relationship. Results indicated that atheists experienced Religiosity more negatively than non-atheists. Additionally, results demonstrated that non-belief in God was not related to better or worse perceived global health, suggesting that belief in God is not inherently linked to better reported health. PMID:26133915

  2. Hysterectomy improves sexual response? Addressing a crucial omission in the literature

    PubMed Central

    Komisaruk, Barry R.; Frangos, Eleni; Whipple, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing view in the literature is that hysterectomy improves the quality of life. This is based on claims that hysterectomy alleviates pain (dyspareunia and abnormal bleeding), and improves sexual response. Since hysterectomy requires cutting the sensory nerves that supply the cervix and/or uterus, it is surprising that the reports of deleterious effects on sexual response are so limited. However, we note that almost all the papers we found reported that some of the women in their studies claim that hysterectomy is detrimental to their sexual response. It is likely that the degree to which a woman’s sexual response and pleasure are affected by hysterectomy would depend not only upon which nerves were severed by the surgery, but also the genital regions whose stimulation the woman enjoys for eliciting sexual response. Since clitoral sensation (via pudendal and genitofemoral nerves) should not be affected by hysterectomy, this surgery would not diminish sexual response in women who prefer clitoral stimulation. However, women whose preferred source of stimulation is vaginal or cervical would be more likely to experience a decrement in sensation and consequently sexual response after hysterectomy, because the nerves innervating those organs -- pelvic, hypogastric and vagus -- are more likely to be damaged or severed in the course of hysterectomy. However, all the published reports of the effects of hysterectomy on sexual response fail to specify the women’s preferred sources of genital stimulation. As discussed in the present review, we believe that the critical lack of information as to the women’s preferred sources of genital stimulation is key to accounting for the discrepancies in the literature as to whether hysterectomy improves or attenuates sexual pleasure. PMID:21545957

  3. Changes in Sensory Evoked Responses Coincide with Rapid Improvement in Speech Identification Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alain, Claude; Campeanu, Sandra; Tremblay, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Perceptual learning is sometimes characterized by rapid improvements in performance within the first hour of training (fast perceptual learning), which may be accompanied by changes in sensory and/or response pathways. Here, we report rapid physiological changes in the human auditory system that coincide with learning during a 1-hour test session…

  4. Interventions to Improve Responses of Helping Professionals to Intimate Partner Violence: A Quick Scoping Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Y. Joon; An, Soonok

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to systematically review the available evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to improve the response of various helping professionals who come into contact with female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV). Methods: Several databases were searched, and N = 38 studies met the inclusion criteria…

  5. Improving Instructor Response to Student E-Mails Using Template and Reminder Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbeck, Matthew; Song, Minjung

    2011-01-01

    Student e-mails without the student's name, message, file attachment, and other identifying information may impede a timely and thorough instructor response. To help resolve this issue, we apply template and reminder interventions to improve student e-mail format defined as the degree of agreement between a student's e-mail format and an…

  6. 42 CFR 441.745 - State plan HCBS administration: State responsibilities and quality improvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State plan HCBS administration: State responsibilities and quality improvement. 441.745 Section 441.745 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: REQUIREMENTS AND LIMITS APPLICABLE TO...

  7. TECHNIQUES TO IMPROVE GROWTH, MORPHOGENESIS, AND SECONDARY METABOLISM RESPONSES FROM LAMIACEAE SPECIES IN VITRO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultural procedures to improve growth (fresh weight) and morphogenesis (leaves, shoots, and roots) responses from mint family (Lamiaceae) species (e.g., basil, catnip, oregano, and spearmint) in vitro are presented. Novel plant tissue culture systems were employed to increase biomass and shooting. ...

  8. Early Symptom Improvement as a Predictor of Response to Extended Release Quetiapine in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Roger S.; Gorwood, Philip; Thase, Michael E.; Liss, Charlie; Desai, Dhaval; Chen, Ji; Bauer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this post-hoc analysis was to determine whether early symptom improvement with extended release quetiapine (quetiapine XR) may predict treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder. Data were from 6, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of quetiapine XR (2 fixed-dose and 2 flexible-dose monotherapy and 2 adjunct studies) in adult patients with major depressive disorder. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Clinical Global Impression-Severity Score (CGI-S) were assessed at baseline, weeks 2, 4, and 6. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) was assessed at baseline and week 6. The MADRS improvement at week 2 (15%, 20%, 25%, 30%) was used to predict response and remission, based on MADRS (50% improvement; total score ≤ 12) or HAM-D (50% improvement; total score ≤ 7). The CGI-S improvement (1 point) at week 2 was used to predict final outcome (CGI-S score ≤ 2). The predictive value for early improvement with quetiapine XR was found to be “very strong” (Yule’s Q coefficient, a combined measure of sensitivity and specificity) using 30% MADRS improvement as the threshold. This was relatively comparable for response and remission and for fixed-dose, flexible-dose, and adjunct studies. This was also observed for placebo. Exceptions were: adjunct studies (where predictivity was lower for ongoing antidepressant/placebo), and for remission (predictivity for remission appeared lower than for response with placebo). In conclusion, outcome at week 6 with quetiapine XR for a major depressive episode could be predicted by 30% improvement after 2 weeks, a finding that could give doctors confidence to continue treatment and may facilitate adherence in patients. PMID:26474010

  9. The 6 "ws" of rapid response systems: best practices for improving development, implementation, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Benishek, Lauren E; Sonesh, Shirley C; Patzer, Brady; Robinson, Patricia; Wallace, Ruth; Salas, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Delays in care have been cited as one of the primary contributors of preventable mortality; thus, quality patient safety is often contingent upon the delivery of timely clinical care. Rapid response systems (RRSs) have been touted as one mechanism to improve the ability of suitable staff to respond to deteriorating patients quickly and appropriately. Rapid response systems are defined as highly skilled individual(s) who mobilize quickly to provide medical care in response to clinical deterioration. While there is mounting evidence that RRSs are a valid strategy for managing obstetric emergencies, reducing adverse events, and improving patient safety, there remains limited insight into the practices underlying the development and execution of these systems. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to synthesize the literature and answer the primary questions necessary for successfully developing, implementing, and evaluating RRSs within inpatient settings-the Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How of RRSs. PMID:24595258

  10. Optimization of an Active Twist Rotor Blade Planform for Improved Active Response and Forward Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the optimum blade tip planform for a model-scale active twist rotor. The analysis identified blade tip design traits which simultaneously reduce rotor power of an unactuated rotor while leveraging aeromechanical couplings to tailor the active response of the blade. Optimizing the blade tip planform for minimum rotor power in forward flight provided a 5 percent improvement in performance compared to a rectangular blade tip, but reduced the vibration control authority of active twist actuation by 75 percent. Optimizing for maximum blade twist response increased the vibration control authority by 50 percent compared to the rectangular blade tip, with little effect on performance. Combined response and power optimization resulted in a blade tip design which provided similar vibration control authority to the rectangular blade tip, but with a 3.4 percent improvement in rotor performance in forward flight.

  11. Mind over Matter: Reappraising Arousal Improves Cardiovascular and Cognitive Responses to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Jeremy P.; Nock, Matthew K.; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have theorized that changing the way we think about our bodily responses can improve our physiological and cognitive reactions to stressful events. However, the underlying processes through which mental states improve downstream outcomes are not well-understood. To this end, we examined whether reappraising stress-induced arousal could improve cardiovascular outcomes and decrease attentional bias for emotionally-negative information. Participants were randomly assigned to either a reappraisal condition in which they were instructed to think about their physiological arousal during a stressful task as functional and adaptive, or to one of two control conditions: attention reorientation and no instructions. Relative to controls, participants instructed to reappraise their arousal exhibited more adaptive cardiovascular stress responses – increased cardiac efficiency and lower vascular resistance – and decreased attentional bias. Thus, reappraising arousal shows physiological and cognitive benefits. Implications for health and potential clinical applications are discussed. PMID:21942377

  12. Improving Access to Medicines in Low and Middle Income Countries: Corporate Responsibilities in Context

    PubMed Central

    Leisinger, Klaus Michael; Garabedian, Laura Faden; Wagner, Anita Katharina

    2012-01-01

    More than two billion people in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) lack adequate access to essential medicines. In this paper, we make strong public health, human rights and economic arguments for improving access to medicines in LMIC and discuss the different roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders, including national governments, the international community, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). We then establish a framework of pharmaceutical firms’ corporate responsibilities - the “must,” the “ought to,” and the “can” dimensions - and make recommendations for actionable business strategies for improving access to medicines. We discuss controversial topics, such as pharmaceutical profits and patents, with the goal of building consensus around facts and working towards a solution. We conclude that partnerships and collaboration among multiple stakeholders are urgently needed to improve equitable access to medicines in LMIC. PMID:23535994

  13. Moral Voices of Women and Men in the Christian Liberal Arts College: Links between Views of Self and Views of God.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Kaye V.; Larson, Daniel C,; Boivin, Monique D.

    2003-01-01

    Explores Christian college students views of self and of a Christian God. Discusses differences in views between men and women. Suggests that the Christian liberal arts context nurtures integrated and complex views of the self, but authoritative views of God. Notes authoritative views of God shaped the heavy justice self-ethic. (CAJ)

  14. Responses from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Thomas C.; Heft, James L.; Nuzzi, Ronald J.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents responses from Thomas C. Hunt, James L. Heft, S.M., and Ronald J. Nuzzi to the report of the Notre Dame Task Force on Catholic Education's (2006), "Making God Known, Loved and Served: The Future of Catholic Primary and Secondary Schools in the United States." Hunt analyzes the 12 recommendations offered by Notre Dame on…

  15. Development of urban planning guidelines for improving emergency response capacities in seismic areas of Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Kambod Amini; Jafari, Mohammad Kazem; Hosseini, Maziar; Mansouri, Babak; Hosseinioon, Solmaz

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the results of research carried out to improve emergency response activities in earthquake-prone areas of Iran. The research concentrated on emergency response operations, emergency medical care, emergency transportation, and evacuation-the most important issues after an earthquake with regard to saving the lives of victims. For each topic, some guidelines and criteria are presented for enhancing emergency response activities, based on evaluations of experience of strong earthquakes that have occurred over the past two decades in Iran, notably Manjil (1990), Bam (2003), Firouz Abad-Kojour (2004), Zarand (2005) and Broujerd (2006). These guidelines and criteria are applicable to other national contexts, especially countries with similar seismic and social conditions as Iran. The results of this study should be incorporated into comprehensive plans to ensure sustainable development or reconstruction of cities as well as to augment the efficiency of emergency response after an earthquake. PMID:19500324

  16. Nanotextured stainless steel for improved corrosion resistance and biological response in coronary stenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Chandini C.; Prabhath, Anupama; Cherian, Aleena Mary; Vadukumpully, Sajini; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Chennazhi, Krishnaprasad; Menon, Deepthy

    2014-12-01

    Nanosurface engineering of metallic substrates for improved cellular response is a persistent theme in biomaterials research. The need to improve the long term prognosis of commercially available stents has led us to adopt a `polymer-free' approach which is cost effective and industrially scalable. In this study, 316L stainless steel substrates were surface modified by hydrothermal treatment in alkaline pH, with and without the addition of a chromium precursor, to generate a well adherent uniform nanotopography. The modified surfaces showed improved hemocompatibility and augmented endothelialization, while hindering the proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Moreover, they also exhibited superior material properties like corrosion resistance, surface integrity and reduced metal ion leaching. The combination of improved corrosion resistance and selective vascular cell viability provided by nanomodification can be successfully utilized to offer a cell-friendly solution to the inherent limitations pertinent to bare metallic stents.

  17. God on the Gallows: Reading the Holocaust through Narratives of Redemption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Karen

    2007-01-01

    "Where is God now?" is a question from the Holocaust memoir "Night" by Elie Wiesel and an underlying narrative dilemma for the teachers and most student participants in this qualitative study of three Holocaust units in secondary English classrooms in the Midwestern United States. Using a narrative theory framework, this study explores how…

  18. A Puzzle Unsolved: Failure to Observe Different Effects of God and Religion Primes on Intergroup Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Jonathan E; Tong, Eddie M W; Pang, Joyce S; Chowdhury, Avijit

    2016-01-01

    Religious priming has been found to have both positive and negative consequences, and recent research suggests that the activation of God-related and community-related religious cognitions may cause outgroup prosociality and outgroup derogation respectively. The present research sought to examine whether reminders of God and religion have different effects on attitudes towards ingroup and outgroup members. Over two studies, little evidence was found for different effects of these two types of religious primes. In study 1, individuals primed with the words "religion", "God" and a neutral control word evaluated both ingroup and outgroup members similarly, although a marginal tendency towards more negative evaluations of outgroup members by females exposed to religion primes was observed. In study 2, no significant differences in attitudes towards an outgroup member were observed between the God, religion, and neutral priming conditions. Furthermore, the gender effect observed in study 1 did not replicate in this second study. Possible explanations for these null effects are discussed. PMID:26812526

  19. Attachment to God/Higher Power and Bulimic Symptoms among College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buser, Juleen K.; Gibson, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between avoidant and anxious attachment to God/Higher Power and bulimia symptoms among 599 female college student participants. After controlling for body mass index, the authors found a positive association between both attachment variables and bulimia. When entered together in a regression, anxious…

  20. Folklore in Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God." [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Zora Neale Hurston's work is lively, lyrical, funny, and poignant, but this consummate literary craftsperson was also a first-rate ethnographer, conducting field work for Franz Boas and for the Works Progress Administration (WPA). "Their Eyes Were Watching God," often acclaimed as Hurston's masterpiece, is perhaps the richest beneficiary of her…

  1. Perceptions of the character of God as narrated by East African women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Kako, Peninnah M; Kibicho, Jennifer W

    2012-01-01

    Two qualitative research studies conducted with women living with HIV in Malawi (N = 72) and Kenya (N = 54) separately revealed personal faith as a primary coping mechanism that mitigates the effects of stigma and promotes spiritual, physical, and mental health. Fourth characteristics of God emerged that sustain the women in daily life. PMID:22866377

  2. Experimenting with Spirituality: Analyzing "The God Gene" in a Nonmajors Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveira, Linda A.

    2008-01-01

    References linking genes to complex human traits, such as personality type or disease susceptibility, abound in the news media and popular culture. In his book "The God Gene: How Faith is Hardwired into Our Genes", Dean Hamer argues that a variation in the "VMAT2" gene plays a role in one's openness to spiritual experiences. In a nonmajors class,…

  3. Felix beyond the Closet: Sexuality, Masculinity, and Relations of Power in Arturo Islas's "The Rain God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    This essay examines the uneasy relationship that Arturo Islas's "The Rain God" has had with narratives of identity, focusing on how the representation of Felix's sexuality makes him a problematic figure for certain strains of Chicana/o and queer studies. In other writings, Islas criticizes Quinto Sol, the chief publishing house of Chicano…

  4. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Beer lost by fire, theft... TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Refund or Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid...

  5. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Beer lost by fire, theft... TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Refund or Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid...

  6. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Beer lost by fire, theft... TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Refund or Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid...

  7. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Beer lost by fire, theft... TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Refund or Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid...

  8. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Beer lost by fire, theft... TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Refund or Adjustment of Tax or Relief From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid...

  9. Using the Movie, "The Gods Must Be Crazy," in Interpersonal Communications Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchey, David

    Opening in 1981 to moviegoers in Japan, France, and the United States, "The Gods Must Be Crazy" became an international hit. Set in Botswana, the film covers a relatively small geographic area yet nevertheless can open classroom discussions about how many cultures and how much cultural diversity can exist in a small area. It has three main groups…

  10. "Under God" and the Pledge of Allegiance: Examining a 1954 Sermon and Its Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groce, Eric C.; Heafner, Tina; Bellows, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    A lesson exploring the Pledge of Allegiance, its history, and the addition of the phrase "under God," can serve as a jumping off point into major themes of U.S. history and First Amendment freedoms. Although the Pledge is ubiquitous in contemporary America, educators and students are often uninformed about the history and meaning of the…

  11. Stress and Depression among Older Residents in Religious Monasteries: Do Friends and God Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Bishop J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore how friendship and attachment to God provide protective benefits against stress and depression. Participants included 235 men and women, age 64 and older, residing in religious monasteries affiliated with the Order of St. Benedict. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were completed to assess…

  12. Investigating the Importance of Relating with God for School Students' Spiritual Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Fisher's spiritual well-being (SWB) questionnaires assessed students' levels of relationship in four domains, namely with themselves, others, the environment and with a Transcendent Other (commonly called God). Students also reported the extent to which different entities helped them develop relationships in the four domains of SWB. However,…

  13. Teaching Religion in Public Schools: Review of Warren A. Nord, "Does God Make a Difference?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Walter

    2013-01-01

    In this review of Warren Nord's "Does God Make a Difference? Taking Religion Seriously in Our Schools and Universities," Walter Feinberg provides a detailed analysis of Nord's argument that the study of religion should be constitutionally mandated as a corrective to the overwhelmingly secular course of study offered in…

  14. Action video games and improved attentional control: Disentangling selection- and response-based processes.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Joseph D; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-10-01

    Research has demonstrated that experience with action video games is associated with improvements in a host of cognitive tasks. Evidence from paradigms that assess aspects of attention has suggested that action video game players (AVGPs) possess greater control over the allocation of attentional resources than do non-video-game players (NVGPs). Using a compound search task that teased apart selection- and response-based processes (Duncan, 1985), we required participants to perform an oculomotor capture task in which they made saccades to a uniquely colored target (selection-based process) and then produced a manual directional response based on information within the target (response-based process). We replicated the finding that AVGPs are less susceptible to attentional distraction and, critically, revealed that AVGPs outperform NVGPs on both selection-based and response-based processes. These results not only are consistent with the improved-attentional-control account of AVGP benefits, but they suggest that the benefit of action video game playing extends across the full breadth of attention-mediated stimulus-response processes that impact human performance. PMID:25772554

  15. Study on The Response Improvement of A Linear Actuator Using Temperature-Sensitive Magnetic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Katsuhiro; Kanzaki, Yasunori; Ota, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Kawase, Yoshihiro

    We have been studying a linear actuator for the thermostatic switch using temperature-sensitive magnetic material (TSMM). In this paper, the effect of the geometry of TSMM on response time is investigated by computing the dynamic characteristics of the actuator employing the 3-D finite element method coupled with the equations of magnetic field, heat transfer and motion. As a result, it is found that the response of the actuator is greatly improved. The validity of the computation is clarified though the comparison with the measurement of a prototype.

  16. Discovery of estrogen-responsive genes using an improved method which combines subtractive hybridization and PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, W; Su, W; Roberts, T M

    1998-01-01

    Here we describe a reliable method for isolating genes that are differentially expressed in two cell populations. The method is a combination of subtractive hybridization and PCR. Among many improvements to previously described methods is the incorporation of a new technology into the procedure which sterilizes(inactivates) PCR amplicons, and thereby overcomes the limitation of similar procedures. To test this improved method, we conducted a search for estrogen-responsive genes. Estrogen-regulated genes dominated the subtracted libraries after four rounds of subtractive hybridizations. Four estrogen-regulated genes were identified from the initial screening. PMID:9671829

  17. Improved Lunar Lander Handling Qualities Through Control Response Type and Display Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Eric Richard; Bilimoria, Karl D.; Frost, Chad Ritchie

    2010-01-01

    A piloted simulation that studied the handling qualities for a precision lunar landing task from final approach to touchdown is presented. A vehicle model based on NASA's Altair Lunar Lander was used to explore the design space around the nominal vehicle configuration to determine which combination of factors provides satisfactory pilot-vehicle performance and workload; details of the control and propulsion systems not available for that vehicle were derived from Apollo Lunar Module data. The experiment was conducted on a large motion base simulator. Eight Space Shuttle and Apollo pilot astronauts and three NASA test pilots served as evaluation pilots, providing Cooper-Harper ratings, Task Load Index ratings and qualitative comments. Each pilot flew seven combinations of control response types and three sets of displays, including two varieties of guidance and a nonguided approach. The response types included Rate Command with Attitude Hold, which was used in the original Apollo Moon landings, a Velocity Increment Command response type designed for up-and-away flight, three response types designed specifically for the vertical descent portion of the trajectory, and combinations of these. It was found that Velocity Increment Command significantly improved handling qualities when compared with the baseline Apollo design, receiving predominantly Level 1 ratings. This response type could be flown with or without explicit guidance cues, something that was very difficult with the baseline design, and resulted in approximately equivalent touchdown accuracies and propellant burn as the baseline response type. The response types designed to be used exclusively in the vertical descent portion of the trajectory did not improve handling qualities.

  18. The function and response of an improved stratospheric condensation nucleus counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Hyun, J. H.; Blackshear, E. D.

    1983-01-01

    An improved condensation nucleus counter (CNC) for use in the stratosphere is described. The University of Minnesota CNC (UMCNC) has a sequential saturator and condenser and uses n-butyl alcohol as the working fluid. The use of a coaxial saturator flow, with aerosol in the center and filtered, alcohol-laden air around it, speeds the response of this instrument and improves its stability as pressure changes. The counting efficiency has been studied as a function of particle size and pressure. The UMCNC provides an accurate measure of submicron aerosol concentration as long as the number distribution is not dominated by sub-0.02 micron diameter aerosol. The response of the UMCNC is compared with that of other stratospheric condensation nucleus counters, and the results of a (near) comparison with a balloon-borne condensation nucleus counter are presented. The UMCNC has operated 14 times on a NASA U-2 aircraft at altitudes from 8 to 21.5 km.

  19. Multi-scale surface texture to improve blue response of nanoporous black silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.; Jones, Kim M.; Yuan, Hao-Chih

    2011-09-01

    We characterize the optical and carrier-collection physics of multi-scale textured p-type black Si solar cells with conversion efficiency of 17.1%. The multi-scale texture is achieved by combining density-graded nanoporous layer made by metal-assisted etching with micron-scale pyramid texture. We found that (1) reducing the thickness of nanostructured Si layer improves the short-wavelength spectral response and (2) multi-scale texture permits thinning of the nanostructured layer while maintaining low surface reflection. We have reduced the nanostructured layer thickness by 60% while retaining a solar-spectrum-averaged black Si reflectance of less than 2%. Spectral response at 450 nm has improved from 57% to 71%.

  20. Improving the Recognition of, and Response to In-Hospital Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Peter; Peake, Sandra; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Jones, Daryl

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis is an important cause of patient morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although the associated mortality seems to be decreasing, approximately 20 % of patients with organ dysfunction die in hospital. Since 1991 diagnostic criteria for sepsis focused on the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). However, the utility of such criteria has been questioned, and alternative criteria have recently been proposed. It is likely that administration of early appropriate antibiotics and resolution of shock reduce sepsis-associated mortality. Accordingly, strategies need to be developed to improve the early recognition of, and response to patients with sepsis. Such system approaches may include improved acquisition and documentation of vital signs, enhanced recognition of shock, and integration of laboratory and microbiological results using clinical informatics. Hospitals should have guidelines for escalating care of septic patients, antibiotics stewardship programs, and systems to audit morbidity and mortality associated with sepsis. PMID:27193917

  1. The Mediational Role of Psychological Basic Needs in the Relation Between Conception of God and Psychological Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sebastiano; Gugliandolo, Maria C; Barberis, Nadia; Larcan, Rosalba

    2016-02-01

    Relatively few studies have examined the relationship between conception of God and psychological outcomes in a self-determination theory (SDT) framework. The aim of this study was to examine the role of basic psychological needs as a mediator of the association between conception of God and psychological outcomes. In a sample of 210 religious young adults, we found that the concept of a controlling God was positively associated with feelings of need frustration and depression, whilst the concept of an autonomy-supporting God was positively associated with feelings of need satisfaction and vitality. In turn, need satisfaction promoted feelings of vitality, whereas need frustration led to feelings of depression. The satisfaction of needs was a full mediator of the relationship between autonomy-supporting God and vitality, whilst the frustration of needs was a full mediator of the relationship between controlling God and depression. These findings are discussed in terms of SDT. We also discuss how future research may further increase our understanding of the dynamics involved in concepts of God and psychological outcomes. PMID:25316204

  2. Improvement of Electrochemical Response of Cocaine Sensors Based on DNA Aptamer by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, Satoshi; Shimono, Ken; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Fumio; Yoshioka, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    We report on a biosensor for cocaine based on the conformation change of DNA aptamer by capturing the cocaine molecules. The oxidation current of ferrocene conjugated on the terminal end of aptamer immobilized on an Au electrode increased with increasing cocaine concentration. The sensor response has been improved by a simple heat treatment after immobilization, since the aggregates of DNA aptamer generated during the immobilization step could be dissociated and rearranged on the electrode. PMID:27063722

  3. Alterations in Regulatory T Cells Induced by Specific Oligosaccharides Improve Vaccine Responsiveness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schijf, Marcel A.; Kerperien, JoAnn; Bastiaans, Jacqueline; Szklany, Kirsten; Meerding, Jenny; Hofman, Gerard; Boon, Louis; van Wijk, Femke; Garssen, Johan; van’t Land, Belinda

    2013-01-01

    Prophylactic vaccinations are generally performed to protect naïve individuals with or without suppressed immune responsiveness. In a mouse model for Influenza vaccinations the specific alterations of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs) in the immune modulation induced by orally supplied oligosaccharides containing scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS was assessed. This dietary intervention increased vaccine specific DTH responses. In addition, a significant increased percentage of T-bet+ (Th1) activated CD69+CD4+ T cells (p<0.001) and reduced percentage of Gata-3+ (Th2) activated CD69+CD4+T cells (p<0.001) was detected in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS compared to control mice. Although no difference in the number or percentage of Tregs (CD4+Foxp3+) could be determined after scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS intervention, the percentage of CXCR3 + /T-bet+ (Th1-Tregs) was significantly reduced (p<0.05) in mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS as compared to mice receiving placebo diets. Moreover, although no absolute difference in suppressive capacity could be detected, an alteration in cytokine profile suggests a regulatory T cell shift towards a reducing Th1 suppression profile, supporting an improved vaccination response. In conclusion These data are indicative for improved vaccine responsiveness due to reduced Th1 suppressive capacity in the Treg population of mice fed the oligosaccharide specific diet, showing compartmentalization within the Treg population. The modulation of Tregs to control immune responses provides an additional arm of intervention using alternative strategies possibly leading to the development of improved vaccines. PMID:24073243

  4. Blockade of pathological retinal ganglion cell hyperactivity improves optogenetically evoked light responses in rd1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, John M.; Degenaar, Patrick; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive retinal dystrophy that causes visual impairment and eventual blindness. Retinal prostheses are the best currently available vision-restoring treatment for RP, but only restore crude vision. One possible contributing factor to the poor quality of vision achieved with prosthetic devices is the pathological retinal ganglion cell (RGC) hyperactivity that occurs in photoreceptor dystrophic disorders. Gap junction blockade with meclofenamic acid (MFA) was recently shown to diminish RGC hyperactivity and improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of RGC responses to light flashes and electrical stimulation in the rd10 mouse model of RP. We sought to extend these results to spatiotemporally patterned optogenetic stimulation in the faster-degenerating rd1 model and compare the effectiveness of a number of drugs known to disrupt rd1 hyperactivity. We crossed rd1 mice with a transgenic mouse line expressing the light-sensitive cation channel channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) in RGCs, allowing them to be stimulated directly using high-intensity blue light. We used 60-channel ITO multielectrode arrays to record ChR2-mediated RGC responses from wholemount, ex-vivo retinas to full-field and patterned stimuli before and after application of MFA, 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18BGA, another gap junction blocker) or flupirtine (Flu, a Kv7 potassium channel opener). All three drugs decreased spontaneous RGC firing, but 18BGA and Flu also decreased the sensitivity of RGCs to optogenetic stimulation. Nevertheless, all three drugs improved the SNR of ChR2-mediated responses. MFA also made it easier to discern motion direction of a moving bar from RGC population responses. Our results support the hypothesis that reduction of pathological RGC spontaneous activity characteristic in retinal degenerative disorders may improve the quality of visual responses in retinal prostheses and they provide insights into how best to achieve this for optogenetic prostheses

  5. Blockade of pathological retinal ganglion cell hyperactivity improves optogenetically evoked light responses in rd1 mice.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John M; Degenaar, Patrick; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive retinal dystrophy that causes visual impairment and eventual blindness. Retinal prostheses are the best currently available vision-restoring treatment for RP, but only restore crude vision. One possible contributing factor to the poor quality of vision achieved with prosthetic devices is the pathological retinal ganglion cell (RGC) hyperactivity that occurs in photoreceptor dystrophic disorders. Gap junction blockade with meclofenamic acid (MFA) was recently shown to diminish RGC hyperactivity and improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of RGC responses to light flashes and electrical stimulation in the rd10 mouse model of RP. We sought to extend these results to spatiotemporally patterned optogenetic stimulation in the faster-degenerating rd1 model and compare the effectiveness of a number of drugs known to disrupt rd1 hyperactivity. We crossed rd1 mice with a transgenic mouse line expressing the light-sensitive cation channel channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) in RGCs, allowing them to be stimulated directly using high-intensity blue light. We used 60-channel ITO multielectrode arrays to record ChR2-mediated RGC responses from wholemount, ex-vivo retinas to full-field and patterned stimuli before and after application of MFA, 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18BGA, another gap junction blocker) or flupirtine (Flu, a Kv7 potassium channel opener). All three drugs decreased spontaneous RGC firing, but 18BGA and Flu also decreased the sensitivity of RGCs to optogenetic stimulation. Nevertheless, all three drugs improved the SNR of ChR2-mediated responses. MFA also made it easier to discern motion direction of a moving bar from RGC population responses. Our results support the hypothesis that reduction of pathological RGC spontaneous activity characteristic in retinal degenerative disorders may improve the quality of visual responses in retinal prostheses and they provide insights into how best to achieve this for optogenetic prostheses

  6. Network Analysis of Force Concept Inventory Responses to Improve Diagnostic Utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Eric; Bruun, Jesper

    2015-04-01

    The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) is a diagnostic instrument designed to investigate students' understanding of Newtonian Mechanics and is widely used in Physics Education Research. One of the strengths of the FCI is that the distractors are drawn from student conceptions based in their experiences. The distractors chosen are often more informative about student's understanding as they identify the particular nature of students' alternative conceptions. We propose a network based analysis of the FCI which will enhance the utility of the FCI as a diagnostic tool for identifying student conceptions. In this approach, student responses are treated as a bipartite network which is then projected into two networks - students and responses. The response network includes all responses that are shared among students. We use the LANS backbone extraction algorithm to identify patterns in student responses. We use community detection algorithms on the backbone networks to identify clusters of common responses which map to models held by students, for example, ``force is needed for movement'' and ``the active agent uses the most force.'' This method has utility across a variety of instruments and could be used to improve instruction by providing in-depth knowledge of student conceptions. Supported in part by NSF Grant #PHY 134424.

  7. Akt inhibition improves irinotecan treatment and prevents cell emergence by switching the senescence response to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vétillard, Alexandra; Jonchère, Barbara; Moreau, Marie; Toutain, Bertrand; Henry, Cécile; Fontanel, Simon; Bernard, Anne-Charlotte; Campone, Mario; Guette, Catherine; Coqueret, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Activated in response to chemotherapy, senescence is a tumor suppressive mechanism that induces a permanent loss of proliferation. However, in response to treatment, it is not really known how cells can escape senescence and how irreversible or incomplete this pathway is. We have recently described that cells that escape senescence are more transformed than non-treated parental cells, they resist anoikis and rely on Mcl-1. In this study, we further characterize this emergence in response to irinotecan, a first line treatment used in colorectal cancer. Our results indicate that Akt was activated as a feedback pathway during the early step of senescence. The inhibition of the kinase prevented cell emergence and improved treatment efficacy, both in vitro and in vivo. This improvement was correlated with senescence inhibition, p21waf1 downregulation and a concomitant activation of apoptosis due to Noxa upregulation and Mcl-1 inactivation. The inactivation of Noxa prevented apoptosis and increased the number of emergent cells. Using either RNA interference or p21waf1-deficient cells, we further confirmed that an intact p53-p21-senescence pathway favored cell emergence and that its downregulation improved treatment efficacy through apoptosis induction. Therefore, although senescence is an efficient suppressive mechanism, it also generates more aggressive cells as a consequence of apoptosis inhibition. We therefore propose that senescence-inducing therapies should be used sequentially with drugs favoring cell death such as Akt inhibitors. This should reduce cell emergence and tumor relapse through a combined induction of senescence and apoptosis. PMID:26485768

  8. Improving image contrast and material discrimination with nonlinear response in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forchheimer, Daniel; Forchheimer, Robert; Haviland, David B.

    2015-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy has recently been extented to bimodal operation, where increased image contrast is achieved through excitation and measurement of two cantilever eigenmodes. This enhanced material contrast is advantageous in analysis of complex heterogeneous materials with phase separation on the micro or nanometre scale. Here we show that much greater image contrast results from analysis of nonlinear response to the bimodal drive, at harmonics and mixing frequencies. The amplitude and phase of up to 17 frequencies are simultaneously measured in a single scan. Using a machine-learning algorithm we demonstrate almost threefold improvement in the ability to separate material components of a polymer blend when including this nonlinear response. Beyond the statistical analysis performed here, analysis of nonlinear response could be used to obtain quantitative material properties at high speeds and with enhanced resolution.

  9. Use of borated polyethylene to improve low energy response of a prompt gamma based neutron dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyada, P.; Ashwini, U.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    The feasibility of using a combined sample of borated polyethylene and normal polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent from measured prompt gamma emissions is investigated theoretically to demonstrate improvements in low energy neutron dose response compared to only polyethylene. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of boron, hydrogen and carbon prompt gamma emissions to mono energetic neutrons. The weighted least square method is employed to arrive at the best linear combination of these responses that approximates the ICRP fluence to dose conversion coefficients well in the energy range of 10-8 MeV to 14 MeV. The configuration of the combined system is optimized through FLUKA simulations. The proposed method is validated theoretically with five different workplace neutron spectra with satisfactory outcome.

  10. Use of Lean Response to Improve Pandemic Influenza Surge in Public Health Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yin; Prystajecky, Natalie; Petric, Martin; Mak, Annie; Abbott, Brendan; Paris, Benjamin; Decker, K.C.; Pittenger, Lauren; Guercio, Steven; Stott, Jeff; Miller, Joseph D.

    2012-01-01

    A novel influenza A (H1N1) virus detected in April 2009 rapidly spread around the world. North American provincial and state laboratories have well-defined roles and responsibilities, including providing accurate, timely test results for patients and information for regional public health and other decision makers. We used the multidisciplinary response and rapid implementation of process changes based on Lean methods at the provincial public health laboratory in British Columbia, Canada, to improve laboratory surge capacity in the 2009 influenza pandemic. Observed and computer simulating evaluation results from rapid processes changes showed that use of Lean tools successfully expanded surge capacity, which enabled response to the 10-fold increase in testing demands. PMID:22257385