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Sample records for golf club head

  1. Lower extremity work is associated with club head velocity during the golf swing in experienced golfers.

    PubMed

    McNally, M P; Yontz, N; Chaudhari, A M

    2014-08-01

    While the golf swing is a complex whole body movement requiring coordination of all joints to achieve maximum ball velocity, the kinetic contribution of the lower extremities to club head velocity has not been quantified, despite the perception that the legs are a primary source of power during the swing. Mechanical power at the hips, knees, and ankles was estimated during the downswing phase of a full swing with a driver using a passive optical motion capture system and 2 force plates for adult males across a range of age and self-reported skill levels. Total work by the lower extremities was calculated by integrating the powers of all 6 joints over the downswing. Regression analyses showed that total lower extremity work was a strong predictor of club head velocity (R=0.63). Secondary analyses showed different relationships to club head velocity in lead and trail leg lower extremity joints, but none of these were as predictive of club head velocity as the total work performed by the lower extremities. These results provide quantitative evidence that the lower body's kinetic contribution may be an important factor in achieving greater club head velocity, contributing to greater driving distance and overall golf performance. PMID:24577856

  2. Memory Golf Clubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Memory Corporation's investigation of shape memory effect, stemming from Marshall Space Flight Center contracts to study materials for the space station, has aided in the development of Zeemet, a proprietary, high-damping shape memory alloy for the golf industry. The Nicklaus Golf Company has created a new line of golf clubs using Zeemet inserts. Its superelastic and high damping attributes translate into more spin on the ball, greater control, and a solid feel.

  3. Composite Golf Clubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Babcock & Wilcox Co. under a partnership with Marshall Space Flight Center, produced composite materials, originally from the shuttle program, for improving golf clubs. Company used Marshall Space Flight Center's data summary file summarizing typical processing techniques and mechanical and physical properties of graphite and boron- reinforced composite materials. Reinforced composites provide combination of shaft rigidity and flexibility that provide maximum distance.

  4. Golf players exhibit changes to grip speed parameters during club release in response to changes in club stiffness.

    PubMed

    Osis, Sean T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2012-02-01

    The influence of golf club stiffness on driving performance is currently unclear, and it is possible that this ambiguity is due in part to golfer adaptation to equipment. The purpose of the current study was to elucidate mechanisms of adaptation to club stiffness, during the golf swing, by employing tendon vibration to distort proprioceptive feedback. Vibration (∼50 Hz, ∼1 mm amplitude) was applied to the upper extremities of 24 golfers using DC motors with eccentric weights. Golfers hit golf balls in a laboratory setting using three clubs of varying shaft stiffness, and club kinematics were recorded using high speed (180 Hz) digital cameras. The results demonstrated significant slowing of the club grip during club release for a high-stiffness shaft with vibration. This suggests that, when proprioceptive feedback is available, players adapt to changes in club stiffness by modifying the release dynamics of the club late in the downswing. PMID:21820748

  5. Waste minimization assessment for a manufacturer of baseball bats and golf clubs. Environmental research brief

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, M.; Kirsch, F.W.; Maginn, J.C.

    1993-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Center (WMAC) at the University of Louisville performed an assessment at a plant manufacturing baseball bats and golf clubs -- approximately 1,500,000 bats/yr and 550,000 golf clubs/yr. To make the bats, wood billets are oven-dried and machined to a standard dimension. After sanding they are branded and finished. The golf clubs are made by finishing and assembling purchased heads and shafts. The team's report detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that the most waste, other than rinse water discharged to the publicly owned treatment works (POTW) and wood turnings which are sold, consists of scrap cardboard and paper from the shop and offices, and that the greatest savings, including new income, could be obtained by segregating the cardboard and paper wastes for sale to a local recycler.

  6. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf.

    PubMed

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and severity of injury, and functional outcomes. Seventy percent of the children sustained a TBI from a fall. We also found that playing golf was associated with 40% of the TBIs, with three (30%) children being unrestrained passengers in a moving golf cart and another one (10%) was struck by a golf club. Injury awareness could have benefited or prevented most injuries, and school nurses are in the best position to provide preventative practice education. In golf-centric communities, prevention of golf-related injuries should include education within the schools. PMID:25899097

  7. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    PubMed Central

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0–15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and severity of injury, and functional outcomes. Seventy percent of the children sustained a TBI from a fall. We also found that playing golf was associated with 40% of the TBIs, with three (30%) children being unrestrained passengers in a moving golf cart and another one (10%) was struck by a golf club. Injury awareness could have benefited or prevented most injuries, and school nurses are in the best position to provide preventative practice education. In golf-centric communities, prevention of golf-related injuries should include education within the schools. PMID:25899097

  8. R&W Club Frederick Hosts Second Annual Golf Tourney for The Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On Sept. 8, more than 40 NCI at Frederick and Leidos Biomedical Research employees, along with family and friends, swapped work clothes for golf gear at Maryland National Golf Club in Middletown. The golfers didn’t just play for fun; they participated in the second annual R&W Club Frederick Golf Tournament to support The Children’s Inn at NIH.

  9. R&W Club Frederick Raises $1,500 for The Children’s Inn at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Forty-four government and contractor employees, along with their friends and family members, took to the Maryland National Golf Club course this fall for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick held its third annual golf tournament at the Middletown, Md., golf course on Sept. 14 to raise funds for The Children’s Inn at NIH, which celebrated its 25th anniversary this year. The Inn provides support and a home away from home for seriously ill children and their families receiving treatment at the NIH Clinical Center. Through the tournament, the club raised approximately $1,500 for The Children’s Inn, according to Tanya Ransom, biologist, NCI Center for Cancer Research, and secretary of the R&W Club Frederick. She also coordinated the golf tournament. After the tournament, a silent auction of sports memorabilia and collectibles, sponsored by Great Moments, Frederick, was held, and a portion of the proceeds also went to the Inn.

  10. Three-dimensional trunk kinematics in golf: between-club differences and relationships to clubhead speed.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Christopher; Burnett, Angus; Cochrane, Jodie; Ball, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to determine whether significant three-dimensional (3D) trunk kinematic differences existed between a driver and a five-iron during a golf swing; and (ii) to determine the anthropometric, physiological, and trunk kinematic variables associated with clubhead speed. Trunk range of motion and golf swing kinematic data were collected from 15 low-handicap male golfers (handicap = 2.5 +/- 1.9). Data were collected using a 10-camera motion capture system operating at 250 Hz. Data on clubhead speed and ball velocity were collected using a real-time launch monitor. Paired t-tests revealed nine significant (p < or = 0.0019) between-club differences for golf swing kinematics, namely trunk and lower trunk flexion/extension and lower trunk axial rotation. Multiple regression analyses explained 33.7-66.7% of the variance in clubhead speed for the driver and five-iron, respectively, with both trunk and lower trunk variables showing associations with clubhead speed. Future studies should consider the role of the upper limbs and modifiable features of the golf club in developing clubhead speed for the driver in particular. PMID:23898684

  11. Use of piezoelectric dampers for improving the feel of golf clubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Emanuele; Spangler, Ronald L., Jr.; Pandell, Tracy

    1999-06-01

    Several sports are based upon a tool (club, bat, stick) striking an object (ball, puck) across a field of play. Anytime two structures collide, vibration is created by the impact of the two. The impact of the objects excites the structural modes of the tool, creating a vibration that can be felt by the player, especially if the hit is not at a `sweet spot'. Vibration adversely affects both feel and performance. This paper explains how piezoelectric dampers were developed to reduce vibration and improve the feel of ball-impact sporting goods such as golf clubs. The paper describes how the dynamic characteristics of a golf club were calculated, at first in the free-free condition, and then during its operation conditions (the swing of the club, and the impact with the ball). The dynamic characteristics were used to develop a damper that addressed a specific, or multiple, modes of interest. The damper development and testing are detailed in this paper. Both objective laboratory tests and subjective player tests were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the piezoelectric dampers. The results of the tests, along with published medical data on the sensitivity of the human body, were used to draw a correlation between human feel and vibration reduction.

  12. Grip pressure distributions and associated variability in golf: a two-club comparison.

    PubMed

    Langlais, Sean M; Broker, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Teaching and playing professionals offer multiple theories concerning the manner in which forces should be applied to the handle of the club during the golf swing. This study extends recent research concerning grip pressures and forces in golf, with the purpose of exploring the similarities and differences between force profiles for a 7-iron and driver swung by proficient golfers. A secondary purpose was to further analyze the way that golfers use grip forces to manipulate the club. Grip forces were measured on eight low handicap golfers (USGA indexes 0 to 7) swinging their own 7-irons and drivers. In total, lead-hand and trail-hand grip forces were isolated as well as anatomically specific forces within the hands. Force profile variability across multiple swings for each golfer and between golfers characterized consistencies and important differences. Correlations between 7-iron and driver force profiles characterized force 'signatures.' The data highlight large fluctuations in grip forces during the swing. Marked differences between participants were observed, involving force magnitudes and phasing. Dominant forces arose primarily from the lead hand, specifically the last three fingers. Force profiles were highly repeatable across swings for a golfer (standard deviations < 7% of total force) and force profile correlations between 7-iron and driver for a golfer were remarkably high (r2 = 0.86). Notably, within swing force variability was greatest during club acceleration, but dramatically decreased at impact. PMID:25122996

  13. Electromyographic analysis of lower limb muscles during the golf swing performed with three different clubs.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sérgio; Silva, Luís; Vaz, João Rocha; Castro, Maria António; Reinaldo, Gustavo; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the EMG patterns of select lower limb muscles throughout the golf swing, performed with three different clubs, in non-elite middle-aged players. Fourteen golfers performed eight swings each using, in random order, a pitching wedge, 7-iron and 4-iron. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from lower limb muscles: tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, gastrocnemius medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, rectus femoris and vastus lateralis. Three-dimensional high-speed video analysis was used to determine the golf swing phases. Results showed that, in average handicap golfers, the highest muscle activation levels occurred during the Forward Swing Phase, with the right semitendinosus and the right biceps femoris muscles producing the highest mean activation levels relative to maximal electromyography (70-76% and 68-73% EMG(MAX), respectively). Significant differences between the pitching wedge and the 4-iron club were found in the activation level of the left semitendinosus, right tibialis anterior, right peroneus longus, right vastus medialis, right rectus femuris and right gastrocnemius muscles. The lower limb muscles showed, in most cases and phases, higher mean values of activation on electromyography when golfers performed shots with a 4-iron club. PMID:26197882

  14. Determinants of Club Head Speed in PGA Professional Golfers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Adam L; Ward, Nick; Bishop, Chris; Maloney, Sean; Turner, Anthony N

    2016-08-01

    Turner, AN. Determinants of club head speed in PGA professional golfers. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2266-2270, 2016-Club head speed (CHS) has been significantly correlated with golf performance, but only in amateurs. The purpose of this study therefore, was to investigate the relationship between field-based measures of strength and power with CHS in Professional Golfers Association (PGA) professional golfers, and further determine differences between age groups. A correlation design was used to test relationships between squat jump (SJ), seated medicine ball throw (SMBT), rotational medicine ball throw (RMBT), and CHS. Twenty participants volunteered to take part in the study (age, 31.95 ± 8.7 years; height, 182.75 ± 6.88 cm; mass, 90.47 ± 15.6 kg). Intraclass correlation coefficients reported high reliability for performance variables (r = 0.85-0.95). Significant correlations (p < 0.01) were found between CHS and SJ (r = 0.817) and SMBT (r = 0.706), but not RMBT (r = 0.572). A stepwise linear regression analysis identified that SJ and SMBT explained 74% of the variance in CHS. When dividing the sample based on age, professionals <30 years (n = 10; 25.6 ± 2.9 years) displayed significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher CHS and SJ height compared with professionals >30 (n = 10; 39.7 ± 5.5 years). Correlations to CHS for <30 were significant for SJ (r = 0.801) and SMBT (r = 0.643), but nonsignificant for RMBT. Those >30 had significant correlations to CHS not only in SMBT (r = 0.881) and SJ (r = 0.729), but also in RMBT (r = 0.642). The results of this study suggest that SJ and SMBT have the largest contribution to CHS in PGA professional golfers. When comparing age groups, it appears that younger golfers (<30 years) utilize more leg strength whereas older golfers (>30 years) utilize more upper body strength. Results suggest that strength-based leg exercises and power-based chest exercises may improve CHS in professional golfers. PMID:26849785

  15. The influence of golf club shaft stiffness on clubhead kinematics at ball impact.

    PubMed

    Worobets, Jay; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2012-06-01

    The role of shaft stiffness on the golf swing is not well understood. Studies in which golfers hit balls with clubs of varying shaft flex have reported changes in ball distance. The results of mathematical models suggest that shaft stiffness affects only the orientation of the clubhead at impact, not the speed of the clubhead, but there are no experimental results validating these findings. The purpose of this study was therefore to experimentally examine the influence of shaft stiffness on clubhead kinematics at ball impact. Forty golfers hit 10 balls with each of five drivers varying in shaft stiffness from 'Ladies' to 'Extra-Stiff', in a double-blind study design. The motions of three reflective markers attached to the clubhead were captured with a high-speed motion analysis system. At ball impact, shaft stiffness had a statistically significant influence on clubhead speed for 27 subjects, on loft angle for 11 subjects, and on lie angle for all 40 subjects. No effect was observed on face angle, in to out path angle, or attack angle. These results show that shaft stiffness can affect ball launch conditions by altering clubhead speed and/or loft angle. PMID:22900404

  16. On the efficiency of the golf swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rod

    2006-12-01

    A non-driven double pendulum model is used to explain the principle underlying the surprising efficiency of the golf swing. The principle can be described as a parametric energy transfer between the arms and the club head due to the changing moment of inertia of the club. The transfer is a consequence of conservation of energy and angular momentum. Because the pendulum is not driven by an external force, it shows that the golfer need do little more than accelerate the arms with the wrists cocked and let the double pendulum transfer kinetic energy to the club head. A driven double pendulum model is used to study factors affecting the efficiency of a real golf swing. It is concluded that the wrist-cock angle is the most significant efficiency-determining parameter under the golfer's control and that improvements in golf technology have had a significant impact on driving distance.

  17. Vibration Control Using a State Observer that Considers Disturbances of a Golf Swing Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Yohei; Kobayashi, Yukinori; Yamada, Gen

    In this paper, optimal control of a golf swing robot that is used to evaluate the performance of golf clubs is described. The robot has two joints, a rigid link and a flexible link that is a golf club. A mathematical model of the golf club is derived by Hamilton’s principle in consideration of bending and torsional stiffness and in consideration of eccentricity of the center of gravity of the club head on the shaft axis. A linear quadratic regulator (LQR) that considers the vibration of the club shaft is used to stop the robot during the follow-through. Since the robot moves fast and has strong non-linearity, an ordinary state observer for a linear system cannot accurately estimate the states of the system. A state observer that considers disturbances accurately estimates the state variables that cannot be measured. The results of numerical simulation are compared with experimental results obtained by using a swing robot.

  18. Effects of fatigue on golf performance.

    PubMed

    Higdon, Nicholas R; Finch, W Holmes; Leib, Daniel; Dugan, Eric L

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if body position, weight transfer, and/or pelvis/trunk rotations changed as a result of a golf specific fatiguing protocol and whether these changes affected resultant club head velocity at impact and shot consistency. Six male golfers and one female golfer participated in the study, who had a mean age, height, and body mass of 23.9 +/- 3.9 years, 177.4 +/- 4.9 cm, and 75.3 +/- 9.9 kg, respectively. Path analysis was used to determine the relationships between fatigue, biomechanical variables, and resultant club head velocity at impact and shot consistency. In the statistical models representing the effects of biomechanical variables calculated at the top of the swing and ball contact, golf specific fatigue was associated with a 2.0% and 2.5% reduction in the club head velocity and a 7.1% and 9.4% improvement in the shot consistency, respectively. These data suggest that golf specific fatigue was not related to the initial lower body sagittal plane angles at address nor was simulated golf specific fatigue related to peak transverse plane pelvis and trunk rotational velocities (or their timings) in a manner that indicates a relationship to resultant club head velocity and shot consistency. PMID:22900400

  19. A Three Dimensional Kinematic and Kinetic Study of the Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Nesbit, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics of a golf swing as performed by 84 male and one female amateur subjects of various skill levels. The analysis was performed using a variable full-body computer model of a human coupled with a flexible model of a golf club. Data to drive the model was obtained from subject swings recorded using a multi-camera motion analysis system. Model output included club trajectories, golfer/club interaction forces and torques, work and power, and club deflections. These data formed the basis for a statistical analysis of all subjects, and a detailed analysis and comparison of the swing characteristics of four of the subjects. The analysis generated much new data concerning the mechanics of the golf swing. It revealed that a golf swing is a highly coordinated and individual motion and subject-to-subject variations were significant. The study highlighted the importance of the wrists in generating club head velocity and orienting the club face. The trajectory of the hands and the ability to do work were the factors most closely related to skill level. Key Points Full-body model of the golf swing. Mechanical description of the golf swing. Statistical analysis of golf swing mechanics. Comparisons of subject swing mechanics PMID:24627665

  20. 76 FR 41691 - Safety Zone; BGSU Football Gridiron Classic Golf and Dinner Fireworks, Catawba Island Club, Port...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; BGSU Football Gridiron Classic Golf and... Lake Erie during the BGSU Football Gridiron Classic Golf and Dinner Fireworks. This temporary safety..., Bowling Green State University will hold its BGSU Football Gridiron Classic Golf and Dinner Fireworks,...

  1. Frequency-effect of playing screen golf on body composition and golf performance in middle-aged men

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jung-Hoon; Jee, Yong-Seok; Oh, Hye-Won

    2014-01-01

    There are many studies showing that physical training improves body composition including bone mineral density (BMD) in almost all subjects. However, the frequency-dependent effect of playing golf on body composition is still not clearly comprehended. Moreover, the effect of screen golf in relations with exercise-frequency on body composition and golf performance has not been documented. Forty year old men participated and were classified into 4 groups: Control group (n= 10), BMD1 group (n= 10) played screen golf less than 1 day per a week, BMD2–3 group (n= 10) played screen golf 2–3 days per a week, and BMD5 group (n= 10) played screen golf 5 days per week. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed on 30 male recreational golfers and 10 sedentary individuals. The data gained through DXA were fat mass, lean mass, regional (head, rib, arm, leg, pelvis, spine and trunk) BMD level, and total BMD level summed by regional scores. The club speeds were measured using the Golfzon Vision machine and the handicap points were measured using a simple questionnaire. The present results suggest that the long-frequency of playing screen golf does not improve bone mineral density, lean mass, and handicap point yet improves fat mass and club speed in the middle-aged men. PMID:25426463

  2. Kinetic constrained optimization of the golf swing hub path.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, Steven M; McGinnis, Ryan S

    2014-12-01

    This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power) of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study. Key PointsThe hand path trajectory is an important characteristic of the golf swing and greatly affects club head velocity and golfer/club energy transfer.It is possible to increase the energy transfer from the golfer to the club by modifying the hand path and swing trajectories without increasing the kinetic output demands on the golfer.It is possible to identify relative kinetic output strengths and weakness of a golfer through assessment of the hand path and swing trajectories.Increasing any one of the kinetic outputs of the golfer can potentially increase the club head velocity at impact.The hand path trajectory has important influences over the club swing trajectory. PMID:25435779

  3. Kinetic Constrained Optimization of the Golf Swing Hub Path

    PubMed Central

    Nesbit, Steven M.; McGinnis, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This study details an optimization of the golf swing, where the hand path and club angular trajectories are manipulated. The optimization goal was to maximize club head velocity at impact within the interaction kinetic limitations (force, torque, work, and power) of the golfer as determined through the analysis of a typical swing using a two-dimensional dynamic model. The study was applied to four subjects with diverse swing capabilities and styles. It was determined that it is possible for all subjects to increase their club head velocity at impact within their respective kinetic limitations through combined modifications to their respective hand path and club angular trajectories. The manner of the modifications, the degree of velocity improvement, the amount of kinetic reduction, and the associated kinetic limitation quantities were subject dependent. By artificially minimizing selected kinetic inputs within the optimization algorithm, it was possible to identify swing trajectory characteristics that indicated relative kinetic weaknesses of a subject. Practical implications are offered based upon the findings of the study. Key Points The hand path trajectory is an important characteristic of the golf swing and greatly affects club head velocity and golfer/club energy transfer. It is possible to increase the energy transfer from the golfer to the club by modifying the hand path and swing trajectories without increasing the kinetic output demands on the golfer. It is possible to identify relative kinetic output strengths and weakness of a golfer through assessment of the hand path and swing trajectories. Increasing any one of the kinetic outputs of the golfer can potentially increase the club head velocity at impact. The hand path trajectory has important influences over the club swing trajectory. PMID:25435779

  4. A Scoping Review of the Associations of Golf with Eye Injuries in Adults and Children.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Evan; Hawkes, Roger; Murray, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Sport presents a risk of ocular trauma and accounts for a significant number of eye injuries that require hospital admission. The sport of golf presents a risk to eyesight from fast moving objects such as golf clubs and balls. This study aims to investigate the associations of golf with eye injuries and the reasons that these injuries occur. Material/Methods. A literature search was conducted using the databases MEDLINE, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, and PsycINFO. Grey literature was searched using the WHO international clinical trials registry platform, Google Scholar, and ProQuest. Data was extracted using a standardised form and summarised into a report. Results and Discussion. Twenty-three studies were found relating to eye injuries in golf. Injuries appear to be rare, but more frequent in men and children. Injuries resulted in high rates of enucleation and visual impairment. Children sustained more injury from golf clubs whereas adults sustained more injuries from golf balls. Conclusion. Efforts are needed to encourage golf participants to understand the risks of ocular and indeed other head injuries. Initiatives to provide appropriate supervision and education on this topic are merited. Further research is needed to investigate the circumstances of eye injury in golf and assess the effects of interventions aimed at reducing risk of injury. PMID:27504485

  5. A Scoping Review of the Associations of Golf with Eye Injuries in Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Sport presents a risk of ocular trauma and accounts for a significant number of eye injuries that require hospital admission. The sport of golf presents a risk to eyesight from fast moving objects such as golf clubs and balls. This study aims to investigate the associations of golf with eye injuries and the reasons that these injuries occur. Material/Methods. A literature search was conducted using the databases MEDLINE, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, and PsycINFO. Grey literature was searched using the WHO international clinical trials registry platform, Google Scholar, and ProQuest. Data was extracted using a standardised form and summarised into a report. Results and Discussion. Twenty-three studies were found relating to eye injuries in golf. Injuries appear to be rare, but more frequent in men and children. Injuries resulted in high rates of enucleation and visual impairment. Children sustained more injury from golf clubs whereas adults sustained more injuries from golf balls. Conclusion. Efforts are needed to encourage golf participants to understand the risks of ocular and indeed other head injuries. Initiatives to provide appropriate supervision and education on this topic are merited. Further research is needed to investigate the circumstances of eye injury in golf and assess the effects of interventions aimed at reducing risk of injury. PMID:27504485

  6. a New Golf-Swing Robot Model Utilizing Shaft Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Inooka, H.

    1998-10-01

    The performance of golf clubs and balls is generally evaluated by using golf-swing robots that conventionally have two or three joints with completely interrelated motion. This interrelation allows the user of this robot to specify only the initial posture and swing velocity of the robot and therefore the swing motion of this type of robot cannot be subtly adjusted to the specific characteristics of individual golf clubs. Consequently, golf-swing robots cannot accurately emulate advanced golfers, and this causes serious problems for the evaluation of golf club performance. In this study, a new golf-swing robot that can adjust its motion to both a specified value of swing velocity and the specific characteristics of individual golf clubs was analytically investigated. This robot utilizes the dynamic interference force produced by its swing motion and by shaft vibration and can therefore emulate advanced golfers and perform highly reliable evaluations of golf clubs.

  7. Effect of an 8-week combined weights and plyometrics training program on golf drive performance.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Iain M; Hartwell, Matthew

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a combined weights and plyometrics program on golf drive performance. Eleven male golfers' full golf swing was analyzed for club head speed (CS) and driving distance (DD) before and after an 8-week training program. The control group (n = 5) continued their normal training, while the experimental group (n = 6) performed 2 sessions per week of weight training and plyometrics. Controls showed no significant (p > or = 0.05) changes, while experimental subjects showed a significant increase (p < or = 0.05) in CS and DD. The changes in golf drive performance were attributed to an increase in muscular force and an improvement in the sequential acceleration of body parts contributing to a greater final velocity being applied to the ball. It was concluded that specific combined weights and plyometrics training can help increase CS and DD in club golfers. PMID:14971982

  8. Perceived distance during golf putting.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yumiko; Koyama, Satoshi; Inomata, Kimihiro

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the effect of anxiety states on the relationship between golf-putting distance and performance in an environment requiring high movement accuracy. Twenty-three amateur golfers attempted 15 putts at each of three putting distances, 1.25, 1.50, and 1.75m, under conditions characterized by both control demands and pressure. All attempts were recorded, and kinematic features were analyzed. Under conditions involving an audience and a monetary reward, the mean score on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Y-1 and the mean heart rate increased by 14 points and 11bpm, respectively. We grouped participants on an a posteriori basis using the median split. The backswing of high-anxiety performers shortened, the downswing speed declined, and the relative time to peak club-head velocity changed when putting under pressure from 1.25m. In contrast, no change in backswing or relative time to peak velocity was observed in low-anxiety performers, although impact velocity increased under this condition. These results indicate that the degree to which both low- and high-anxiety golfers were anxious about failure affected motor control at the 1.25-m distance, suggesting that a distortion in perceived distance may result from the interaction between putting distance and anxiety related to failure during golf putting. PMID:24050839

  9. Measuring Grip Pressure during the Golf Swing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budney, David R.

    1979-01-01

    With the use of a special instrumented golf club, grip pressure measurements can be used by the instructor to quantify and discuss the effects of grip pressure in relation to instructional points. (MM)

  10. Improve Your Golf: Learn How to Concentrate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodato, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    The fundamentals of the program described require that the athlete analyze the task of swinging a golf club by scrutinizing it and by understanding each step and its importance to the goal. Mental readiness is stressed as well. (DS)

  11. An eight-week golf-specific exercise program improves physical characteristics, swing mechanics, and golf performance in recreational golfers.

    PubMed

    Lephart, Scott M; Smoliga, James M; Myers, Joseph B; Sell, Timothy C; Tsai, Yung-Shen

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an 8-week golf-specific exercise program on physical characteristics, swing mechanics, and golf performance. Fifteen trained male golfers (47.2 +/- 11.4 years, 178.8 +/- 5.8 cm, 86.7 +/- 9.0 kg, and 12.1 +/- 6.4 U.S. Golf Association handicap) were recruited. Trained golfers was defined operationally as golfers who play a round of golf at least 2-3 times per week and practice at the driving range at least 2-3 times per week during the regular golf season. Subjects performed a golf-specific conditioning program 3-4 times per week for 8 weeks during the off-season in order to enhance physical characteristics. Pre- and posttraining testing of participants included assessments of strength (torso, shoulder, and hip), flexibility, balance, swing mechanics, and golf performance. Following training, torso rotational strength and hip abduction strength were improved significantly (p < 0.05). Torso, shoulder, and hip flexibility improved significantly in all flexibility measurements taken (p < 0.05). Balance was improved significantly in 3 of 12 measurements, with the remainder of the variables demonstrating a nonsignificant trend for improvement. The magnitude of upper-torso axial rotation was decreased at the acceleration (p = 0.015) and impact points (p =0.043), and the magnitude of pelvis axial rotation was decreased at the top (p = 0.031) and acceleration points (p = 0.036). Upper-torso axial rotational velocity was increased significantly at the acceleration point of the golf swing (p = 0.009). Subjects increased average club velocity (p = 0.001), ball velocity (p = 0.001), carry distance (p = 0.001), and total distance (p = 0.001). These results indicate that a golf-specific exercise program improves strength, flexibility, and balance in golfers. These improvements result in increased upper-torso axial rotational velocity, which results in increased club head velocity, ball velocity, and driving distance. PMID

  12. A new method to identify the location of the kick point during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Christopher; Burnett, Angus; Matthews, Miccal

    2013-12-01

    No method currently exists to determine the location of the kick point during the golf swing. This study consisted of two phases. In the first phase, the static kick point of 10 drivers (having identical grip and head but fitted with shafts of differing mass and stiffness) was determined by two methods: (1) a visual method used by professional club fitters and (2) an algorithm using 3D locations of markers positioned on the golf club. Using level of agreement statistics, we showed the latter technique was a valid method to determine the location of the static kick point. In phase two, the validated method was used to determine the dynamic kick point during the golf swing. Twelve elite male golfers had three shots analyzed for two drivers fitted with stiff shafts of differing mass (56 g and 78 g). Excellent between-trial reliability was found for dynamic kick point location. Differences were found for dynamic kick point location when compared with static kick point location, as well as between-shaft and within-shaft. These findings have implications for future investigations examining the bending behavior of golf clubs, as well as being useful to examine relationships between properties of the shaft and launch parameters. PMID:23271218

  13. Golf Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... who did not warm up before playing. The golf swing is broken down into four phases: backswing, downswing, ... is the repetitive nature of this sport. The golf swing involves repetitive, high-velocity movement of the neck, ...

  14. An electromyographic study of the effect of hand grip sizes on forearm muscle activity and golf performance.

    PubMed

    Sorbie, Graeme G; Hunter, Henry H; Grace, Fergal M; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien S; Ugbolue, Ukadike Chris

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the differences in surface electromyography (EMG) activity of two forearm muscles in the lead and trail arm at specific phases of the golf swing using a 7-iron with three different grip sizes among amateur and professional golfers. Fifteen right-handed male golfers performed five golf swings using golf clubs with three different grip sizes. Surface EMG was used to measure muscle activity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) on both forearms. There were no significant differences in forearm muscle activity when using the three golf grips within the group of 15 golfers (p > 0.05). When using the undersize grip, club head speed significantly increased (p = 0.044). During the backswing and downswing phases, amateurs produced significantly greater forearm muscle activity with all three grip sizes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, forearm muscle activity is not affected by grip sizes. However, club head speed increases when using undersize grips. PMID:27267082

  15. Multiple cervical spinous process fractures in a novice golf player.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sei-Yoon; Chung, Sang Ki; Kim, Dong-Yun

    2012-12-01

    Avulsion of spinous process, also called Clay-shoveler's fracture, is most prevalent among those engaged in hard physical labor. To the best of the author's knowledge, only one case of multiple spinous process fractures of the upper thoracic spine in a novice golfer has been reported. A 45-year-old female presented with intractable posterior neck pain. The patient experienced a sharp, sudden pain on the neck while swinging a golf club, immediately after the club head struck the ground. Dynamic cervical radiographic findings were C6 and C7 spinous process fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed C6 and C7 spinous process fractures without spinal cord pathology. The patient was treated with pain medications and cervical bracing. The patient's pain gradually improved. The injury mechanism was speculated to be similar to Clay-shoveler's fracture. Lower cervical spinous process fractures can be associated with a golf swing. If the patient complains of long lasting neck pain and has a history of golf activity, further study should be conducted to rule out lower cervical spinous fracture. PMID:23346334

  16. The role of biomechanics in maximising distance and accuracy of golf shots.

    PubMed

    Hume, Patria A; Keogh, Justin; Reid, Duncan

    2005-01-01

    Golf biomechanics applies the principles and technique of mechanics to the structure and function of the golfer in an effort to improve golf technique and performance. A common recommendation for technical correction is maintaining a single fixed centre hub of rotation with a two-lever one-hinge moment arm to impart force on the ball. The primary and secondary spinal angles are important for conservation of angular momentum using the kinetic link principle to generate high club-head velocity. When the golfer wants to maximise the distance of their drives, relatively large ground reaction forces (GRF) need to be produced. However, during the backswing, a greater proportion of the GRF will be observed on the back foot, with transfer of the GRF on to the front foot during the downswing/acceleration phase. Rapidly stretching hip, trunk and upper limb muscles during the backswing, maximising the X-factor early in the downswing, and uncocking the wrists when the lead arm is about 30 degrees below the horizontal will take advantage of the summation of force principle. This will help generate large angular velocity of the club head, and ultimately ball displacement. Physical conditioning will help to recruit the muscles in the correct sequence and to optimum effect. To maximise the accuracy of chipping and putting shots, the golfer should produce a lower grip on the club and a slower/shorter backswing. Consistent patterns of shoulder and wrist movements and temporal patterning result in successful chip shots. Qualitative and quantitative methods are used to biomechanically assess golf techniques. Two- and three-dimensional videography, force plate analysis and electromyography techniques have been employed. The common golf biomechanics principles necessary to understand golf technique are stability, Newton's laws of motion (inertia, acceleration, action reaction), lever arms, conservation of angular momentum, projectiles, the kinetic link principle and the stretch

  17. Muscle Strength And Golf Performance: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Ronda, Lorena; Sánchez-Medina, Luis; González-Badillo, Juan J.

    2011-01-01

    Golf has become an increasingly popular sport and a growing body of research trying to identify its main physical requirements is being published. The aim of this review was twofold: first, to examine the existing scientific literature regarding strength training and golf in healthy, non-injured, subjects; and second, to reach conclusions that could provide information on how to design more effective strength training programs to improve golf performance as well as directions for future research. Studies which analyzed the relationship between muscle strength, swing performance variables (club head speed, driving distance, ball speed) and skill (handicap, score) were reviewed. Changes in swing performance following different strength training programs were also investigated. Finally, a critical analysis about the methodologies used was carried out. The results of the reviewed studies seem to indicate that: 1) a positive relationship exists between handicap and swing performance (even though few studies have investigated this issue); 2) there is a positive correlation between skill (handicap and/or score) and muscle strength; and 3) there is a relationship between driving distance, swing speed, ball speed and muscle strength. Results suggest that training leg-hip and trunk power as well as grip strength is especially relevant for golf performance improvement. Studies that analyzed variations in swing performance following resistance-only training programs are scarce, thus it is difficult to prove whether the observed improvements are attributable to changes in strength levels. Many of the studies reviewed presented some methodological errors in their design and not all strength assessment protocols seemed appropriate. Further studies should determine muscle strength needs in relation to final swing performance, using well designed experiments and strict isoinertial assessment protocols which adequately relate to specific golf motion, age and skill level. More

  18. Muscle strength and golf performance: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Torres-Ronda, Lorena; Sánchez-Medina, Luis; González-Badillo, Juan J

    2011-01-01

    Golf has become an increasingly popular sport and a growing body of research trying to identify its main physical requirements is being published. The aim of this review was twofold: first, to examine the existing scientific literature regarding strength training and golf in healthy, non-injured, subjects; and second, to reach conclusions that could provide information on how to design more effective strength training programs to improve golf performance as well as directions for future research. Studies which analyzed the relationship between muscle strength, swing performance variables (club head speed, driving distance, ball speed) and skill (handicap, score) were reviewed. Changes in swing performance following different strength training programs were also investigated. Finally, a critical analysis about the methodologies used was carried out. The results of the reviewed studies seem to indicate that: 1) a positive relationship exists between handicap and swing performance (even though few studies have investigated this issue); 2) there is a positive correlation between skill (handicap and/or score) and muscle strength; and 3) there is a relationship between driving distance, swing speed, ball speed and muscle strength. Results suggest that training leg-hip and trunk power as well as grip strength is especially relevant for golf performance improvement. Studies that analyzed variations in swing performance following resistance-only training programs are scarce, thus it is difficult to prove whether the observed improvements are attributable to changes in strength levels. Many of the studies reviewed presented some methodological errors in their design and not all strength assessment protocols seemed appropriate. Further studies should determine muscle strength needs in relation to final swing performance, using well designed experiments and strict isoinertial assessment protocols which adequately relate to specific golf motion, age and skill level. More

  19. Golf Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A former Martin Marietta Manned Space Systems engineer, Robert T. Thurman went from analyzing airloads on the Space Shuttle External Tank to analyzing airloads on golf balls for Wilson Sporting Goods Company. Using his NASA know-how, Thurman designed the Ultra 500 golf ball, which has three different-sized dimples in 60 triangular faces (instead of the usual 20) formed by a series of intersecting "parting" lines. This balances the asymmetry caused by the molding line in all golf balls. According to Wilson, the ball sustains initial velocity longer and produces the most stable ball flight for "unmatched" accuracy and distance.

  20. 7. Chandler Falls, looking upstream (from north). Golf tee of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Chandler Falls, looking upstream (from north). Golf tee of the Mesa Country Club on right. Photographer: Mark Durben, February 1989. Source: SRPA - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. Training in timing improves accuracy in golf.

    PubMed

    Libkuman, Terry M; Otani, Hajime; Steger, Neil

    2002-01-01

    In this experiment, the authors investigated the influence of training in timing on performance accuracy in golf. During pre- and posttesting, 40 participants hit golf balls with 4 different clubs in a golf course simulator. The dependent measure was the distance in feet that the ball ended from the target. Between the pre- and posttest, participants in the experimental condition received 10 hr of timing training with an instrument that was designed to train participants to tap their hands and feet in synchrony with target sounds. The participants in the control condition read literature about how to improve their golf swing. The results indicated that the participants in the experimental condition significantly improved their accuracy relative to the participants in the control condition, who did not show any improvement. We concluded that training in timing leads to improvement in accuracy, and that our results have implications for training in golf as well as other complex motor activities. PMID:12038497

  2. Electromyographic Patterns during Golf Swing: Activation Sequence Profiling and Prediction of Shot Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Verikas, Antanas; Vaiciukynas, Evaldas; Gelzinis, Adas; Parker, James; Olsson, M Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes muscle activity, recorded in an eight-channel electromyographic (EMG) signal stream, during the golf swing using a 7-iron club and exploits information extracted from EMG dynamics to predict the success of the resulting shot. Muscles of the arm and shoulder on both the left and right sides, namely flexor carpi radialis, extensor digitorum communis, rhomboideus and trapezius, are considered for 15 golf players (∼5 shots each). The method using Gaussian filtering is outlined for EMG onset time estimation in each channel and activation sequence profiling. Shots of each player revealed a persistent pattern of muscle activation. Profiles were plotted and insights with respect to player effectiveness were provided. Inspection of EMG dynamics revealed a pair of highest peaks in each channel as the hallmark of golf swing, and a custom application of peak detection for automatic extraction of swing segment was introduced. Various EMG features, encompassing 22 feature sets, were constructed. Feature sets were used individually and also in decision-level fusion for the prediction of shot effectiveness. The prediction of the target attribute, such as club head speed or ball carry distance, was investigated using random forest as the learner in detection and regression tasks. Detection evaluates the personal effectiveness of a shot with respect to the player-specific average, whereas regression estimates the value of target attribute, using EMG features as predictors. Fusion after decision optimization provided the best results: the equal error rate in detection was 24.3% for the speed and 31.7% for the distance; the mean absolute percentage error in regression was 3.2% for the speed and 6.4% for the distance. Proposed EMG feature sets were found to be useful, especially when used in combination. Rankings of feature sets indicated statistics for muscle activity in both the left and right body sides, correlation-based analysis of EMG dynamics and features

  3. Electromyographic Patterns during Golf Swing: Activation Sequence Profiling and Prediction of Shot Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Verikas, Antanas; Vaiciukynas, Evaldas; Gelzinis, Adas; Parker, James; Olsson, M. Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes muscle activity, recorded in an eight-channel electromyographic (EMG) signal stream, during the golf swing using a 7-iron club and exploits information extracted from EMG dynamics to predict the success of the resulting shot. Muscles of the arm and shoulder on both the left and right sides, namely flexor carpi radialis, extensor digitorum communis, rhomboideus and trapezius, are considered for 15 golf players (∼5 shots each). The method using Gaussian filtering is outlined for EMG onset time estimation in each channel and activation sequence profiling. Shots of each player revealed a persistent pattern of muscle activation. Profiles were plotted and insights with respect to player effectiveness were provided. Inspection of EMG dynamics revealed a pair of highest peaks in each channel as the hallmark of golf swing, and a custom application of peak detection for automatic extraction of swing segment was introduced. Various EMG features, encompassing 22 feature sets, were constructed. Feature sets were used individually and also in decision-level fusion for the prediction of shot effectiveness. The prediction of the target attribute, such as club head speed or ball carry distance, was investigated using random forest as the learner in detection and regression tasks. Detection evaluates the personal effectiveness of a shot with respect to the player-specific average, whereas regression estimates the value of target attribute, using EMG features as predictors. Fusion after decision optimization provided the best results: the equal error rate in detection was 24.3% for the speed and 31.7% for the distance; the mean absolute percentage error in regression was 3.2% for the speed and 6.4% for the distance. Proposed EMG feature sets were found to be useful, especially when used in combination. Rankings of feature sets indicated statistics for muscle activity in both the left and right body sides, correlation-based analysis of EMG dynamics and features

  4. Golf and upper limb injuries: a summary and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    McHardy, Andrew J; Pollard, Henry P

    2005-01-01

    Background Golf is a popular past time that provides exercise with social interaction. However, as with all sports and activities, injury may occur. Many golf-related injuries occur in the upper limb, yet little research on the potential mechanisms of these injuries has been conducted. Objective To review the current literature on golf-related upper limb injuries and report on potential causes of injury as it relates to the golf swing. Discussion An overview of the golf swing is described in terms of its potential to cause the frequently noted injuries. Most injuries occur at impact when the golf club hits the ball. This paper concludes that more research into golf-related upper limb injuries is required to develop a thorough understanding of how injuries occur. Types of research include epidemiology studies, kinematic swing analysis and electromyographic studies of the upper limb during golf. By conducting such research, preventative measures maybe developed to reduce golf related injury. PMID:15967021

  5. Video Golf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    George Nauck of ENCORE!!! invented and markets the Advanced Range Performance (ARPM) Video Golf System for measuring the result of a golf swing. After Nauck requested their assistance, Marshall Space Flight Center scientists suggested video and image processing/computing technology, and provided leads on commercial companies that dealt with the pertinent technologies. Nauck contracted with Applied Research Inc. to develop a prototype. The system employs an elevated camera, which sits behind the tee and follows the flight of the ball down range, catching the point of impact and subsequent roll. Instant replay of the video on a PC monitor at the tee allows measurement of the carry and roll. The unit measures distance and deviation from the target line, as well as distance from the target when one is selected. The information serves as an immediate basis for making adjustments or as a record of skill level progress for golfers.

  6. Disc Golf, a Growing Sport

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Joseph T.; Jones, Richard E.; Runstrom, Michael; Hardy, Jolene

    2015-01-01

    Background Disc golf is a sport played much like traditional golf, but rather than using a ball and club, players throw flying discs with various throwing motions. It has been played by an estimated 8 to 12 million people in the United States. Like all sports, injuries sustained while playing disc golf are not uncommon. Although formalized in the 1970s, it has grown at a rapid pace; however, disc golf–related injuries have yet to be described in the medical literature. Purpose To describe the most common injuries incurred by disc golf players while comparing the different types of throwing styles. Study Design Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods The data in this study were collected from 883 disc golf players who responded to an online survey collected over a 1-month period. Respondents answered 49 questions related to demographics, experience, style of play, and injury details. Using a chi-square analysis, common injuries sustained in players using backhand and forehand throwing styles were compared. Results More than 81% of respondents stated that they had sustained an injury playing disc golf, including injuries to the elbow (n = 325), shoulder (n = 305), back (n = 218), and knee (n = 199). The injuries were most commonly described as a muscle strain (n = 241), sprain (n = 162), and tendinitis (n = 145). The type of throw primarily used by players varied, with 86.2% using backhand, 12.7% using forehand, and 1.1% using an overhead throw. Players using a forehand throw were more likely to sustain an elbow injury (P = .014). Many players (n = 115) stated they had undergone surgery due to a disc golf–related injury, with the most common surgeries including meniscal, shoulder, spine, and foot/ankle surgeries. Conclusion The majority of surveyed disc golfers sustained at least 1 injury while playing disc golf, with many requiring surgery. The types of injuries sustained by players varied by the types of throw primarily used. As the sport of disc golf continues

  7. Golf Ball

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Ultra 500 Series golf balls, introduced in 1995 by Wilson Sporting Goods Company, has 500 dimples arranged in a pattern of 60 spherical triangles. The design employs NASA's aerodynamics technology analysis of air loads of the tank and Shuttle orbiter that was performed under the Space Shuttle External Tank program. According to Wilson, this technology provides 'the most symmetrical ball surface available, sustaining initial velocity longer and producing the most stable ball flight for unmatched accuracy and distance.' The dimples are in three sizes, shapes and depths mathematically positioned for the best effect. The selection of dimples and their placement optimizes the interaction of opposing forces of lift and drag. Large dimples reduce air drag, enhance lift, and maintain spin for distance. Small dimples prevent excessive lift that destabilizes the ball flight and the medium size dimples blend the other two.

  8. The Effects of an Ergogenic Aid on Golf Swing Consistency and Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John O.; Beitel, Patricia A.

    Golf experts suggest that a performer should attempt to swing the same way during each shot, changing clubs to alter the flight trajectory and distance of the ball. This study sought to determine if there was a difference in the development of golf skill and swing consistency between a control group and an experimental group using an ergogenic…

  9. Golf Tournament Drives in a Win for the Children’s Inn | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On September 23, golfers took to the Clustered Spires golf course in Frederick, Md., for a cause. The R&W Club Frederick hosted its inaugural golf tournament, with proceeds benefiting the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Children’s Inn.

  10. A Comparative Study of Sequence of Instruction When Introducing Golf Skills to Beginners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Robert E.

    Three instructional methods of club sequence for introducing golf skills to beginning golfers were compared: (1) full swing; (2) putter and short approach; and (3) freedom of choice. Sixty-eight male and female college students participated in golf lessons twice weekly for 12 weeks, receiving small group and individual instruction. Two forms of…

  11. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT WARM-UP PROGRAMS ON GOLF PERFORMANCE IN ELITE MALE GOLFERS

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Background: The physical demands required of the body to execute a shot in golf are enormous. Current evidence suggests that warm-up involving static stretching is detrimental to immediate performance in golf as opposed to active dynamic stretching. However the effect of resistance exercises during warm-up before golf on immediate performance is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the effects of three different warm-up programs on immediate golf performance. Methods: Fifteen elite male golfers completed three different warm-up programs over three sessions on non-consecutive days. After each warm-up program each participant hit ten maximal drives with the ball flight and swing analyzed with Flightscope® to record maximum club head speed (MCHS), maximal driving distance (MDD), driving accuracy (DA), smash factor (SF) and consistent ball strike (CBS). Results: Repeated measures ANOVA tests showed statistically significant difference within 3 of the 5 factors of performance (MDD, CBS and SF). Subsequently, a paired t-test then showed statistically significant (p<0.05) improvements occurred in each of these three factors in the group performing a combined active dynamic and functional resistance (FR) warm-up as opposed to either the active dynamic (AD) warm-up or the combined AD with weights warm-up (WT). There were no statistically significant differences observed between the AD warm-up and the WT warm-up for any of the five performance factors and no statistical significant difference between any of the warm-ups for maximum clubhead speed (MCHS) and driving accuracy (DA). Conclusion: Performing a combined AD and FR warm up with Theraband® leads to significant increase in immediate performance of certain factors of the golf drive compared to performing an AD warm-up by itself or a combined AD with WT warm-up. No significant difference was observed between the three warm-up groups when looking at immediate effect on driving accuracy or maximum

  12. Back pain in golf.

    PubMed

    Hosea, T M; Gatt, C J

    1996-01-01

    Although golfing is generally considered a begin activity, lower back pain is endemic among golfers. The golf swing subjects the lumbar spine to rapid, intense loads, more frequently in amateurs than in professionals. These loads predispose the golfing population to muscle strains, lumbar disc disease, spondylolysis, and facet joint arthropathy. It is imperative for all golfers to warm up properly, develop good swing mechanics, and participate in a lower back conditioning program off the golf course. PMID:8903708

  13. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong-Chul; Lee, Sung-Wan; Yeo, Yun-Ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed. PMID:25995553

  14. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joong-chul; Lee, Sung-wan; Yeo, Yun-ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed. PMID:25995553

  15. Le Golf, El Golf, and Le Baseball.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Philip

    Three bilingual booklets are presented listing technical terms for golf and baseball. The golf terms are in French-English and Spanish-English lists; the baseball terms are in French-English. The French terms are taken from French-Canadian newspapers, books, and periodicals, while the Spanish terms are taken from Mexican newspapers, books, and…

  16. The Effect of Biological Movement Variability on the Performance of the Golf Swing in High- and Low-Handicapped Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Elizabeth J.; Keogh, Justin W. L.; Hume, Patria A.; Maulder, Peter S.; Nortje, Jacques; Marnewick, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role of neuromotor noise on golf swing performance in high- and low-handicap players. Selected two-dimensional kinematic measures of 20 male golfers (n = 10 per high- or low-handicap group) performing 10 golf swings with a 5-iron club was obtained through video analysis. Neuromotor noise was calculated…

  17. Golf in the Wind: Exploring the Effect of Wind on the Accuracy of Golf Shots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaghoobian, Neda; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Golf play is highly dependent on the weather conditions with wind being the most significant factor in the unpredictability of the ball landing position. The direction and strength of the wind alters the aerodynamic forces on a ball in flight, and consequently its speed, distance and direction of travel. The fact that local wind conditions on any particular hole change over times-scales ranging all the way from a few seconds to minutes, hours and days introduces an element of variability in the ball trajectory that is not understood. Any such analysis is complicated by the effect of the local terrestrial and vegetation topology, as well as the inherent complexity of golf-ball aerodynamics. In the current study, we use computational modeling to examine the unpredictability of the shots under different wind conditions over Hole-12 at the Augusta National Golf Club, where the Masters Golf Tournament takes place every year. Despite this being the shortest hole on the course, the presence of complex vegetation canopy around this hole introduces a spatial and temporal variability in wind conditions that evokes uncertainty and even fear among professional golfers. We use our model to examine the effect of wind direction and wind-speed on the accuracy of the golf shots at this hole and use the simulations to determine the key aerodynamic factors that affect the accuracy of the shot.

  18. The physics of golf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, A. Raymond

    2003-02-01

    An overview of the application of physics to the game of golf is given. The golf swing is modelled as a double pendulum. This model and its variations have been used extensively by researchers in determining the effect that various swing parameters have on clubhead speed. These results as well as examples of three-link models are discussed. Kinematic and kinetic measurements taken on the recorded downswings of golfers as well as force measurements are reviewed. These measurements highlight differences between the swings of skilled and unskilled golfers. Several aspects of the behaviour of a golf ball are examined. Measurements and models of the impact of golf balls with barriers are reviewed. Such measurements have allowed researchers to determine the effect that different golf ball constructions have on their launch parameters. The launch parameters determine not only the length of the golf shot but also the behaviour of the golf ball on impact with the turf. The effect of dimples on the aerodynamics of a golf ball and the length of the golf shot is discussed. Models of the bounce and roll of a golf ball after impact with the turf as well as models of the motion of a putted ball are presented. Researchers have measured and modelled the behaviour of both the shaft and the clubhead during the downswing and at impact. The effect that clubhead mass and loft as well as the shaft length and mass have on the length of a golf shot are considered. Models and measurements of the flexing of the shaft as well as research into the flexing of the clubface and the effects of its surface roughness are presented. An important consideration in clubhead design is its behaviour during off-centre impacts. In line with this, the effects that the curvature of a clubface and the moments of inertia of the clubhead have on the launch parameters and trajectory of an off-centred impacted golf ball are examined.

  19. Skill Analysis of the Wrist Release in the Golf Swings Utilizing Shaft Elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Soichiro; Hoshino, Yohei; Kobayashi, Yukinori

    This study analyzes the skill component of the wrist release in the golf swing by employing a three-dimensional dynamic model considering vibration of the club shaft. It is observed that professional and expert golfers relax their wrists in the swing motion as a "natural" or "late" release. Thus, the relationship between the timing of the wrist release and the shaft vibration is examined in this study. First, it is demonstrated that "natural release" at the zero-crossing point of the bending vibration of the shaft efficiently increases the head speed at impact. In the next step, the "late hitting" condition is imposed upon the model. It is demonstrated that "late hitting" could further improve the efficiency of the swing motion. Finally, the skill component in the wrist release for the long drive is experimentally verified by measuring the movement of the wrist and the dynamic deformation of the shaft during the downswing.

  20. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rohypnol, ketamine, as well as MDMA (ecstasy) and methamphetamine ( Drug Facts: Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug ... Club Drugs , National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2010). Methamphetamine is a powerfully addictive stimulant associated with serious ...

  1. Playing Golf Is Elementary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jill S.; Pfluge, Kevin F.

    2010-01-01

    Golf is a lifelong activity that people of all ages can enjoy if they experience success and have fun. Early involvement in the sport facilitates the development of the ability to strike an object with an implement. Striking with implements can be challenging for young children and teachers, but golf can be taught in all elementary school settings…

  2. Centre of pressure patterns in the golf swing: individual-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Ball, Kevin; Best, Russell

    2012-06-01

    Weight transfer has been identified as important in group-based analyses. The aim of this study was to extend this work by examining the importance of weight transfer in the golf swing on an individual basis. Five professional and amateur golfers performed 50 swings with the driver, hitting a ball into a net. The golfer's centre of pressure position and velocity, parallel with the line of shot, were measured by two force plates at eight swing events that were identified from high-speed video. The relationships between these parameters and club head velocity at ball contact were examined using regression statistics. The results did support the use of group-based analysis, with all golfers returning significant relationships. However, results were also individual-specific, with golfers returning different combinations of significant factors. Furthermore, factors not identified in group-based analysis were significant on an individual basis. The most consistent relationship was a larger weight transfer range associated with a larger club head velocity (p < 0.05). All golfers also returned at least one significant relationship with rate of weight transfer at swing events (p < 0.01). Individual-based analysis should form part of performance-based biomechanical analysis of sporting skills. PMID:22900399

  3. Burrowing owl nesting productivity: A comparison between artificial and natural burrows on and off golf courses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, M.D.; Conway, C.J.; Ellis, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia) populations are declining in many portions of their range, and lack of suitable nesting burrows is thought to be one reason for observed declines. Burrowing owls are attracted to golf courses because the birds generally nest and forage in short-grass, open areas, yet golf courses seldom have suitable nesting burrows. We examined the efficacy of installing artificial nesting burrows on golf courses as a way to help restore local burrowing owl populations. From 2001-2004 we monitored over 175 natural burrows off golf courses, 14 natural burrows on golf courses, 86 artificial burrows off golf courses, and 130 artificial burrows on golf courses. Owls located and used 8 of the 130 artificial burrows installed on golf courses (4 were used as nests). Owls selected burrows that were closer to existing natural burrows, farther from maintained areas (areas receiving turf maintenance by golf course staff), and farther from sprinkler heads. All 4 of the artificial burrows used as nests successfully fledged young, and annual site fidelity for owls nesting on golf courses was higher than for owls nesting off golf courses. However, annual fecundity of owls nesting on golf courses was lower than that of owls nesting off golf courses. If golf courses have sufficiently large nonmaintained areas and there are nesting owls nearby, course managers potentially can help in restoring local burrowing owl populations by installing artificial nesting burrows on the periphery of the course. However, the low fecundity on golf courses reported here should be more thoroughly examined before artificial burrows are used to attract owls to golf courses.

  4. Synchronized metronome training induces changes in the kinematic properties of the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Marius; Häger, Charlotte; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible effects of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on movement dynamics during golf-swing performance, as captured by kinematic analysis. A one-group, between-test design was applied on 13 male golfers (27.5 +/- 4.6 years old, 12.7 +/- 4.9 handicap) who completed 12 sessions of SMT over a four-week period. Pre- and post-assessments of golf swings with three different clubs (4-iron, 7-iron, and pitching wedge) were performed using a three-dimensional motion capture system. Club velocity at three different swing phases (backswing, downswing, and follow-through) was measured and cross-correlation analysis of time-series signals were made on joint couplings (wrist-elbow-shoulder) of both arms, and between joints and the club, during the full golf swing. There were significantly higher cross-correlations between joint-couplings and concomitant changes of the associated phase-shift differences, as well as reduced phase-shift variability at post-test. No significant effect of SMT was found for the club velocities. We suggest that domain-general influences of SMT on the underlying brain-based motor control strategies lead to a more coordinated movement pattern of the golf-swing performance, which may explain previous observations of significantly improved golf-shot accuracy and decreased variability after SMT. PMID:24968507

  5. Reflections on Miniature Golf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Nancy Norem; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes a transformational geometry project in which groups of students explore symmetry, reflections, translations, rotations, and dilations to design and create one hole of miniature golf large enough to play on. Includes unit plan for transformational geometry. (MKR)

  6. Digital clubbing

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Mahesh, D. M.; Madabhavi, Irappa

    2012-01-01

    Digital clubbing is an ancient and important clinical signs in medicine. Although clubbed fingers are mostly asymptomatic, it often predicts the presence of some dreaded underlying diseases. Its exact pathogenesis is not known, but platelet-derived growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor are recently incriminated in its causation. The association of digital clubbing with various disease processes and its clinical implications are discussed in this review. PMID:23243350

  7. Lumbar corsets can decrease lumbar motion in golf swing.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Kei; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hattori, Ryo; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Toshio; Ohno, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K.), full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC), with a soft corset (SC), and with a hard corset (HC), with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity) in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt) were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38°) or HC (28°) than under WOC (44°) conditions (p < 0.05). The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec) than under SC (177°/sec) and WOC (191° /sec) conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC. Key pointsRotational and extension forces on the lumbar spine may cause golf-related low back painWearing lumbar corsets during a golf swing can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles and angular velocity.Wearing lumbar corsets increased the rotational motion of the hip joint while reducing the rotation of the lumbar spine. PMID:24149729

  8. Lumbar Corsets Can Decrease Lumbar Motion in Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Koji; Miyamoto, Kei; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hattori, Ryo; Aoki, Takaaki; Matsuoka, Toshio; Ohno, Takatoshi; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K.), full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC), with a soft corset (SC), and with a hard corset (HC), with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity) in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt) were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38°) or HC (28°) than under WOC (44°) conditions (p < 0.05). The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec) than under SC (177°/sec) and WOC (191° /sec) conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC. Key points Rotational and extension forces on the lumbar spine may cause golf-related low back pain Wearing lumbar corsets during a golf swing can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles and angular velocity. Wearing lumbar corsets increased the rotational motion of the hip joint while reducing the rotation of the lumbar spine. PMID:24149729

  9. Improved determination of dynamic balance using the centre of mass and centre of pressure inclination variables in a complete golf swing cycle.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Golf requires proper dynamic balance to accurately control the club head through a harmonious coordination of each human segment and joint. In this study, we evaluated the ability for dynamic balance during a golf swing by using the centre of mass (COM)-centre of pressure (COP) inclination variables. Twelve professional, 13 amateur and 10 novice golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras, two force platforms and SB-Clinic software were used to measure the net COM and COP trajectories. In order to evaluate dynamic balance ability, the COM-COP inclination angle, COM-COP inclination angular velocity and normalised COM-COP inclination angular jerk were used. Professional golfer group revealed a smaller COM-COP inclination angle and angular velocity than novice golfer group in the lead/trail direction (P < 0.01). In the normalised COM-COP inclination angular jerk, the professional golfer group showed a lower value than the other two groups in all directions. Professional golfers tend to exhibit improved dynamic balance, and this can be attributed to the neuromusculoskeletal system that maintains balance with proper postural control. This study has the potential to allow for an evaluation of the dynamic balance mechanism and will provide useful basic information for swing training and prevention of golf injuries. PMID:26264189

  10. Spine biomechanics associated with the shortened, modern one-plane golf swing.

    PubMed

    Dale, R Barry; Brumitt, Jason

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare kinetic, kinematic, and performance variables associated with full and shortened modern backswings in a skilled group of modern swing (one-plane) golfers. Shortening the modern golf backswing is proposed to reduce vertebral spine stress, but supporting evidence is lacking and performance implications are unknown. Thirteen male golfers performed ten swings of each swing type using their own 7-iron club. Biomechanical-dependent variables included the X-Factor kinematic data and spine kinetics. Performance-related dependent variables included club head velocity (CHV), shot distance, and accuracy (distance from the target line). Data were analysed with repeated measures ANOVA with an a priori alpha of 0.05 (SPSS 22.0, IBM, Armonk, NY, USA). We found significant reductions for the X-Factor (p < 0.05) between the full and shortened swings. The shortened swing condition ameliorated vertebral compression force from 7.6 ± 1.4 to 7.0 ± 1.7 N (normalised to body weight, p = 0.01) and significantly reduced CHV (p < 0.05) by ~2 m/s with concomitant shot distance diminution by ~10 m (p < 0.05). Further research is necessary to examine the applicability of a shortened swing for golfers with low back pain. PMID:27064175

  11. Culture Clubs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gersten, Bridget Fitzgerald

    1998-01-01

    One way to break down barriers and promote understanding among English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) and mainstream students is to establish culture clubs. Culture clubs involve frequent exchange of information about social, academic, and cultural topics in extracurricular settings. They are a critical component of ESL programs. The article explains…

  12. Real-ear acoustical characteristics of impulse sound generated by golf drivers and the estimated risk to hearing: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Bardsley, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated real-ear acoustical characteristics in terms of the sound pressure levels (SPLs) and frequency responses in situ generated from golf club drivers at impact with a golf ball. The risk of hearing loss caused by hitting a basket of golf balls using various drivers was then estimated. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting The three driver clubs were chosen on the basis of reflection of the commonality and modern technology of the clubs. The participants were asked to choose the clubs in a random order and hit six two-piece range golf balls with each club. The experiment was carried out at a golf driving range in South Wales, UK. Participants 19 male amateur golfers volunteered to take part in the study, with an age range of 19–54 years. Outcome measures The frequency responses and peak SPLs in situ of the transient sound generated from the club at impact were recorded bilaterally and simultaneously using the GN Otometric Freefit wireless real-ear measurement system. A swing speed radar system was also used to investigate the relationship between noise level and swing speed. Results Different clubs generated significantly different real-ear acoustical characteristics in terms of SPL and frequency responses. However, they did not differ significantly between the ears. No significant correlation was found between the swing speed and noise intensity. On the basis of the SPLs measured in the present study, the percentage of daily noise exposure for hitting a basket of golf balls using the drivers described above was less than 2%. Conclusions The immediate danger of noise-induced hearing loss for amateur golfers is quite unlikely. However, it may be dangerous to hearing if the noise level generated by the golf clubs exceeded 116 dBA. PMID:24448845

  13. Improved Motor-Timing: Effects of Synchronized Metro-Nome Training on Golf Shot Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Marius; Rönnqvist, Louise

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on motor timing and how this training might affect golf shot accuracy. Twenty-six experienced male golfers participated (mean age 27 years; mean golf handicap 12.6) in this study. Pre- and post-test investigations of golf shots made by three different clubs were conducted by use of a golf simulator. The golfers were randomized into two groups: a SMT group and a Control group. After the pre-test, the golfers in the SMT group completed a 4-week SMT program designed to improve their motor timing, the golfers in the Control group were merely training their golf-swings during the same time period. No differences between the two groups were found from the pre-test outcomes, either for motor timing scores or for golf shot accuracy. However, the post-test results after the 4-weeks SMT showed evident motor timing improvements. Additionally, significant improvements for golf shot accuracy were found for the SMT group and with less variability in their performance. No such improvements were found for the golfers in the Control group. As with previous studies that used a SMT program, this study’s results provide further evidence that motor timing can be improved by SMT and that such timing improvement also improves golf accuracy. Key points This study investigates the effect of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on motor timing and how this training might affect golf shot accuracy. A randomized control group design was used. The 4 week SMT intervention showed significant improvements in motor timing, golf shot accuracy, and lead to less variability. We conclude that this study’s results provide further evidence that motor timing can be improved by SMT training and that such timing improvement also improves golf accuracy. PMID:24149608

  14. Club Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... uses. Other uses of these drugs are abuse. Club drugs are also sometimes used as "date rape" drugs, to make someone unable to say no to or fight back against sexual assault. Abusing these drugs can ...

  15. Comparison of Two Methods of Teaching Golf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Danny; Burkhardt, Ed

    This study investigated the effects of two methods of teaching golf. The subjects were 63 male college students enrolled in beginning golf who had played no more than three rounds of golf during their life and had received no previous golf instruction. Before instruction began, each group was given written copies of the general rules of golf and…

  16. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  17. [Club drugs].

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Diogo Frasquilho; Carmo, Ana Lisa; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Navarro, Rita; Góis, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Club drugs are the following substances: Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA); Methamphetamine; Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD); Ketamine; Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and Flunitrazepam. These substances are mainly used by adolescents and young adults, mostly in recreational settings like dance clubs and rave parties. These drugs have diverse psychotropic effects, are associated with several degrees of toxicity, dependence and long term adverse effects. Some have been used for several decades, while others are relatively recent substances of abuse. They have distinct pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, are not easy to detect and, many times, the use of club drugs is under diagnosed. Although the use of these drugs is increasingly common, few health professionals feel comfortable with the diagnosis and treatment. The authors performed a systematic literature review, with the goal of synthesising the existing knowledge about club drugs, namely epidemiology, mechanism of action, detection, adverse reactions and treatment. The purpose of this article is creating in Portuguese language a knowledge data base on club drugs, that health professionals of various specialties can use as a reference when dealing with individual with this kind of drug abuse. PMID:22525626

  18. Electromyography variables during the golf swing: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sérgio; Silva, Luís; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Cabri, Jan

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to review systematically the literature available on electromyographic (EMG) variables of the golf swing. From the 19 studies found, a high variety of EMG methodologies were reported. With respect to EMG intensity, the right erector spinae seems to be highly activated, especially during the acceleration phase, whereas the oblique abdominal muscles showed moderate to low levels of activation. The pectoralis major, subscapularis and latissimus dorsi muscles of both sides showed their peak activity during the acceleration phase. High muscle activity was found in the forearm muscles, especially in the wrist flexor muscles demonstrating activity levels above the maximal voluntary contraction. In the lower limb higher muscle activity of the trail side was found. There is no consensus on the influence of the golf club used on the neuromuscular patterns described. Furthermore, there is a lack of studies on average golf players, since most studies were executed on professional or low handicap golfers. Further EMG studies are needed, especially on lower limb muscles, to describe golf swing muscle activation patterns and to evaluate timing parameters to characterize neuromuscular patterns responsible for an efficient movement with lowest risk for injury. PMID:22542769

  19. Trunk muscle activation during golf swing: Baseline and threshold.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís; Marta, Sérgio; Vaz, João; Fernandes, Orlando; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    There is a lack of studies regarding EMG temporal analysis during dynamic and complex motor tasks, such as golf swing. The aim of this study is to analyze the EMG onset during the golf swing, by comparing two different threshold methods. Method A threshold was determined using the baseline activity recorded between two maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Method B threshold was calculated using the mean EMG activity for 1000ms before the 500ms prior to the start of the Backswing. Two different clubs were also studied. Three-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare methods, muscles and clubs. Two-way mixed Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) with absolute agreement was used to determine the methods reliability. Club type usage showed no influence in onset detection. Rectus abdominis (RA) showed the higher agreement between methods. Erector spinae (ES), on the other hand, showed a very low agreement, that might be related to postural activity before the swing. External oblique (EO) is the first being activated, at 1295ms prior impact. There is a similar activation time between right and left muscles sides, although the right EO showed better agreement between methods than left side. Therefore, the algorithms usage is task- and muscle-dependent. PMID:23816264

  20. Angular Impulse and Balance Regulation During the Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Travis J; Wilcox, Rand R; McNitt-Gray, Jill L

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to determine how skilled players regulate linear and angular impulse while maintaining balance during the golf swing. Eleven highly-skilled golf players performed swings with a 6-iron and driver. Components contributing to linear and angular impulse generated by the rear and target legs (resultant horizontal reaction force [RFh], RFh-angle, and moment arm) were quantified and compared across the group and within a player (α = .05). Net angular impulse generated by both the rear and target legs was greater for the driver than the 6-iron. Mechanisms used to regulate angular impulse generation between clubs varied across players and required coordination between the legs. Increases in net angular impulse with a driver involved increases in target leg RFh. Rear leg RFh-angle was maintained between clubs whereas target leg RFh became more aligned with the target line. Net linear impulse perpendicular to the target line remained near zero, preserving balance, while net linear impulse along the target line decreased in magnitude. These results indicate that the net angular impulse was regulated between clubs by coordinating force generation of the rear and target legs while sustaining balance throughout the task. PMID:26958870

  1. Star Clubbing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Maria; Davis, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Despite the rewards, there are numerous barriers to teachers running clubs: (1) getting weekly fresh activity ideas and resourcing them; (2) the lack of a budget; and (3) shortage of time. With the best will in the world, it is easy to feel that time is already swallowed up with planning and assessment of normal lessons, let alone putting in the…

  2. Golf: A Game of Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Golf has become a popular sport for kids throughout the world; however, many do not realize that it is also a sport that offers benefits to children with physical challenges. Golf can be used for recreational purposes and as a motivational tool for rehabilitation. These two principles serve as the foundation upon which Texas Scottish Rite Hospital…

  3. Caloric Cost of Playing Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampley, James H.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Women who play golf at the same rate of speed as men will use energy at a higher rate, but the rapidity with which the course is completed, which is dependent on the number of members of the golfing party, is a factor in the caloric expenditure of both sexes. (JD)

  4. Golf-Related Low Back Pain: A Review of Causative Factors and Prevention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, David M.; Vandervoort, Anthony A.

    2014-01-01

    Golf is a popular sport with both perceived and real health benefits. However, certain injury risks are also prevalent, particularly to the lower back. Epidemiological studies have shown that lower back pain (LBP) from golf account for between 18% and 54% of all documented ailments, leading many researchers to regard the condition as the most common golf injury. The purpose of this review was to examine the scientific literature to ascertain the risk factors associated with the development of LBP from playing golf and suggest methods to modify or limit these factors. Results of the review indicate that the high frequency of LBP appears multi-factorial although the asymmetrical and forceful nature of the swing along with excessive play and practice, particularly amongst elite players, appear to be common factors. Other factors include swing flaws leading to excessive side-bend and over-rotation of the spine, abnormal muscle recruitment, poor trunk endurance, restricted lead hip internal rotation and the use of unnecessarily stressful club transportation methods. Methods to help control or eliminate excessive stress on the lower back would include reducing the amount spent playing or practicing, seeking professional assistance to assess and adjust swing mechanics, improve trunk and hip flexibility, increase the strength and endurance of the trunk musculature, consider different footwear options and avoid carrying the golf bag. Adopting some or all of these recommendations should allow players to continue to enjoy the sport of golf well into their senior years. PMID:25741420

  5. Regulation of reaction forces during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    McNitt-Gray, J L; Munaretto, J; Zaferiou, A; Requejo, P S; Flashner, H

    2013-06-01

    During the golf swing, the reaction forces applied at the feet control translation and rotation of the body-club system. In this study, we hypothesized that skilled players using a 6-iron would regulate shot distance by scaling the magnitude of the resultant horizontal reaction force applied to the each foot with minimal modifications in force direction. Skilled players (n = 12) hit golf balls using a 6-iron. Shot distance was varied by hitting the ball as they would normally and when reducing shot distance using the same club. During each swing, reaction forces were measured using dual force plates (1200 Hz) and three-dimensional kinematics were simultaneously captured (110 Hz). The results indicate that, on average, the peak resultant horizontal reaction forces of the target leg were significantly less than normal (5%, p < 0.05) when reducing shot distance. No significant differences in the orientation of the peak resultant horizontal reaction forces were observed. Resultant horizontal reaction force-angle relationships within leg and temporal relationships between target and rear legs during the swing were consistent within player across shot conditions. Regulation of force magnitude with minimal modification in force direction is expected to provide advantages from muscle activation, coordination, and performance points of view. PMID:23898685

  6. What Research Tells the Golf Instructor about the Golf Swing and Putting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Robert E.

    The purpose of this survey was to clarify some misconceptions and challenge some common practices in teaching golf skills. Over 100 research studies in golf have been reviewed and summarized. The following categories relating to the golf swing were examined: (1) grip; (2) videotape; (3) electronic golf swing analyzer; (4) teaching methods; (5)…

  7. Bringing Golf Links Up to Par

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fream, Ronald

    1976-01-01

    When the process of remodeling a golf course is undertaken with professional and thorough planning, creative design, and proper construction techniques, the finished product can provide many years of challenging and esthetically pleasing golf play. (JD)

  8. Golf Injuries: They Really Do Happen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duda, Marty

    1987-01-01

    Although golf is not a rigorous sport, it has its share of injuries. Greater attention to preplay stretching and conditioning programs and to the proper mechanics of the golf swing can help prevent injuries. (Author/CB)

  9. The effect of retinal defocus on golf putting.

    PubMed

    Bulson, Ryan C; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Hung, George K

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of type and magnitude of retinal defocus on golf putting accuracy, and on the related eye, head, and putter movements. Eye, head, and putter movements were assessed objectively along with putting accuracy in 16 young adult, visually normal inexperienced golfers during a fixed 9-foot golf putt. Convex spherical (+0.50 D, +1.00 D, +1.50 D, +2.00 D, +10.00 D) and cylindrical (+1.00 D x 90, +2.00 D x 90) lenses were added binocularly to create various types and magnitudes of retinal defocus. Putting accuracy was significantly reduced only under the highest spherical blur lens condition (+10.00 D). No significant differences were found between any other lens conditions for eye, head or putter movements. Small amounts of spherical and astigmatic retinal defocus had a minimal impact on overall golf putting performance, except for putting accuracy under the highest blur condition. This is consistent with the findings of related studies. For a fixed putting distance, factors other than quality of the retinal image, such as blur adaptation and motor learning, appeared to be sufficient to maintain a high level of motor performance. PMID:18565089

  10. Pesticide Fate in a Golf Course Environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information on the fate of pesticides in a golf course environment was presented to science professionals and golf course personnel at the Minnesota Golf Course Superintendents' Association March Mini-Seminar in Bloomington, MN, on 6 March 2007. Topics presented included: the definition of pesticide...

  11. Join This Cool Club!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novelli, Joan

    1995-01-01

    Students can study the Arctic by creating Arctic clubs, using modems to communicate with students nationwide who are following International Arctic Project (IAP) explorers. The article describes the IAP, explains how to form a club, and discusses issues that clubs can tackle, for example, pollution, Arctic animals, natural resources, and the…

  12. Upper extremity injuries in golf.

    PubMed

    Bayes, Matthew C; Wadsworth, L Tyler

    2009-04-01

    Golf is an asymmetric sport with unique patterns of injury depending upon the skill level. Higher handicap players typically experience injuries that result from swing mechanics, whereas lower handicap and professional players have overuse as the major cause of their injuries. The majority of shoulder injuries affecting golfers occur in the nondominant shoulder. Common shoulder injuries include subacromial impingement, rotator cuff pathology, glenohumeral instability, and arthritis involving the acromioclavicular and/or glenohumeral joints. Lead arm elbow pain resulting from lateral epicondylosis (tennis elbow) is the leading upper extremity injury in amateur golfers. Tendon injury is the most common problem seen in the wrist and forearm of the golfer. Rehabilitation emphasizing improvement in core muscle streng is important in the treatment of golf injury. Emerging treatments for tendinopathy include topical nitrates, ultrasound-guided injection of therapeutic substances, and eccentric rehabilitation. There is evidence supporting physiotherapy, and swing modification directed by a teaching professional, for treatment of upper extremity golf injuries. This article focuses on upper extremity injuries in golf, including a discussion of the epidemiology, causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of injuries occurring in the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand. PMID:20048492

  13. Effect of different external attention of focus instruction on learning of golf putting skill.

    PubMed

    Shafizadeh, Mohsen; McMorris, Terry; Sproule, John

    2011-10-01

    The effect of different sources of external attentional focus on learning a motor skill was assessed in the present study. 30 students (12 men, 18 women) participated voluntarily and were divided, according to type of external focus, into target, club swing, and target-club swing groups. The task was a golf putting skill. The target focus group attended to the target (hole), the club swing focus group attended to the execution of the club's swing, and the target-club swing focus group attended to both. All participants performed 50 trials of the putting skill in the acquisition phase and 10 trials in the 24-hr. delayed retention phase. The dependent variable was the error in the putting skill measured as the distance from the hole to the ball after each strike. Results showed the target-club swing focus group had better scores in the acquisition and retention phases than the other groups. It was concluded that external focus instruction helped the learners to integrate target cue with action cue and is more effective in skill learning than other external-focus instructions. These results support the claims of ecological psychology theorists concerning the effects of external focus of attention. PMID:22185080

  14. Proper swing technique and biomechanics of golf.

    PubMed

    Adlington, G S

    1996-01-01

    Golf is an alluring sport because there are many different ways for an individual to create good, effective golf swings. The key for teachers and players is to design good swings that are not physically debilitating. The human body certainly was not designed with golf in mind. That does not mean, however, that golf must be physically damaging. The current fixation on injury has more to do today with the type of player than the game itself. Many of the new players in golf today are older, generally between 30 and 55 years. They come to golf from other sports, such as tennis, jogging, basketball, baseball, and so on. The injuries we see today in golf have probably been brewing in other sports for many years. Golf is simply the current sport of choice, but it often is seen as the culprit for injury. This is all the more reason for continuing to educate players and teachers in the hope that they can create pain-free and injury-free golf swings. If injury prevention moves to the forefront of modern-day teaching, there will be an opportunity to change the way golf is taught and played. That is a mission well worth undertaking. PMID:8903706

  15. Care for Cardiac Arrest on Golf Courses: Still Not up to Par?

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Leisa; Paternoster, Ryan; Putman, Kevin; Fales, William; Swor, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Early CPR and use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) have been shown to improve cardiac arrest (CA) outcomes. Placement of AEDs on golf courses has been advocated for more than a decade, with many trade golf publications calling for their use. Objective. To describe the incidence and treatment of CAs at Michigan golf courses and assess the response readiness of their staff. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of CA on Michigan golf courses from 2010 to 2012. Cases were identified from the Michigan EMS Information (MI-EMSIS) database. Cases with "golf" or "country club" were manually reviewed and location type was confirmed using Google Maps. We conducted a structured telephone survey capturing demographics, course preparedness, including CPR training and AED placement, and a description of events, including whether CPR was performed and if an AED was used. Our primary area of interest was the process of care. We also recorded return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) as an outcome measure. EMS Utstein data were collected from MI-EMSIS. Descriptive data are presented. Results. During the study period, there were 14,666 CAs, of which 40 (0.18%) occurred on 39 golf courses (1 arrest/64 courses/year). Of these, 38 occurred between May and October, yielding a rate of 1 arrest/33.5 courses/golf season. Almost all (96.2%) patients were male, mean age 66.3 (range 45-85), 68% had VT/VF, and 7 arrested after EMS arrival. Mean interval from 9-1-1 call to EMS arrival at the patient was 9:45 minutes (range 3-20). Of all cases, 24 (72.3%) patients received CPR with 2 patients having CPR performed by course staff. Although AEDs were available at 9 (22.5%) courses, they were only placed on 2 patients prior to EMS arrival. Sustained ROSC was obtained in 12 (30.0%) patients. Only 7, (17.9%) courses required CPR/AED training of staff. Conclusion. When seasonally adjusted, the rate of cardiac arrest on Michigan golf courses is similar to that of

  16. Lightning strike in golf practice.

    PubMed

    Elena-Sorando, E; Galeano-Ricaño, N; Agulló-Domingo, A; Cimorra-Moreno, G; Gil-Castillo, C

    2006-03-31

    The case is presented of a golfer who was struck by lightning while playing golf during a thunderstorm. The patient was found lying unconscious on wet grass with his clothes scorched and his spiked golf shoes torn. He had suffered dermal burns affecting the neck, thorax, abdomen, and upper and lower limbs (10% total body surface area), without any cardiovascular or respiratory disturbances. It may be hypothesized that the lightning current went over the outside of the patient, causing ignition of his clothes. Treatment included monitoring, adequate fluid management, debridement, and topical treatment (silver sulphadiazine). Complete healing of the wounds was achieved in two weeks. After three years' follow-up, the patient had no sequelae. PMID:21991022

  17. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (156). Golf-induced hamate hook fracture.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hsien Khai; Chew, Nicholas; Chew, Kelvin TL; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2014-01-01

    The wrist is a common site of injury and the most frequently injured body part among professional golfers. A 37-year-old, right-handed male golfer presented with pain at the ulnar aspect of his left palm, which grew worse after an initial traumatic impact from the golf club handle. There was tenderness over the hypothenar eminence of the left palm. Computed tomography of the left wrist showed an undisplaced fracture through the base of the hamate hook. The golf-induced hamate hook fracture was managed conservatively, with cessation of physical activity involving the left hand and wrist for eight weeks. The patient made a full recovery. Repetitive trauma, exacerbated by improper wrist motion, leads to typical wrist injuries affecting golfers, such as ulnar impaction syndrome, de Quervain’s disease, and tendinopathy affecting the flexor carpi ulnaris and extensor carpi ulnaris, all of which can be diagnosed on imaging. PMID:25631891

  18. Analysis of the 5 iron golf swing when hitting for maximum distance.

    PubMed

    Healy, Aoife; Moran, Kieran A; Dickson, Jane; Hurley, Cillian; Smeaton, Alan F; O'Connor, Noel E; Kelly, Philip; Haahr, Mads; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2011-07-01

    Most previous research on golf swing mechanics has focused on the driver club. The aim of this study was to identify the kinematic factors that contribute to greater hitting distance when using the 5 iron club. Three-dimensional marker coordinate data were collected (250 Hz) to calculate joint kinematics at eight key swing events, while a swing analyser measured club swing and ball launch characteristics. Thirty male participants were assigned to one of two groups, based on their ball launch speed (high: 52.9 ± 2.1 m · s(-1); low: 39.9 ± 5.2 m · s(-1)). Statistical analyses were used to identify variables that differed significantly between the two groups. Results showed significant differences were evident between the two groups for club face impact point and a number of joint angles and angular velocities, with greater shoulder flexion and less left shoulder internal rotation in the backswing, greater extension angular velocity in both shoulders at early downswing, greater left shoulder adduction angular velocity at ball contact, greater hip joint movement and X Factor angle during the downswing, and greater left elbow extension early in the downswing appearing to contribute to greater hitting distance with the 5 iron club. PMID:21678149

  19. High resolution electrical resistivity tomography of golf course greens irrigated with reclaimed wastewater: Hydrological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapias, Josefina C.; Lovera, Raúl; Himi, Mahjoub; Gallardo, Helena; Sendrós, Alexandre; Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Casas, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Actually, there are over 300 golf courses and more than three thousand licensed players in Spain. For this reason golf cannot be considered simply a hobby or a sport, but a very significant economic activity. Considered as one of the most rapidly expanding land-use and water demanding business in the Mediterranean, golf course development generates controversy. In the recent years there has been a considerable demand for golf courses to adopt environmentally sustainable strategies and particularly water authorities are forcing by law golf managers to irrigate with alternative water resources, mainly reclaimed wastewater. Watering practices must be based on soil properties that are characterized by samples removed from the different zones of the golf course and submitted to an accredited physical soil testing laboratory. Watering schedules are critical on greens with poor drainage or on greens with excessively high infiltration rates. The geophysical survey was conducted over the greens of the Girona Golf Club. Eighteen electrical resistivity tomographies were acquired using a mixed Wenner-Schlumberger configuration with electrodes placed 0.5 meter apart. Small stainless-steel nails were used as electrodes to avoid any damage in the fine turfgrass of greens The resistivity meter was set for systematically and automatically selects current electrodes and measurement electrodes to sample apparent resistivity values. Particle size analysis (PSA) has been performed on soil materials of any putting green. The PSA analysis has been composed of two distinct phases. The first has been the textural analysis of the soils for determining the content of sand, silt, and clay fraction via the use of a stack of sieves with decreasing sized openings from the top sieve to the bottom. Subsequently, the hydraulic conductivity of the substrates has been evaluated by means of Bredding and Hazen empirical relationships. The results of this research show that the electrical resistivity

  20. Curve Numbers for Golf Course Watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storm event runoff is a critical component to the environmental and structural design related to hydrology. The curve number (CN) method is a robust and accepted method for determining excess rainfall. Measured CNs for golf course watersheds and for that matter hydrologic data from golf course wate...

  1. A synoptic view of golf course management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katula, Robert L.

    1996-03-01

    The maintenance, construction, and redesign of private, public, and municipal golf courses in the United States is a multi-billion dollar industry. The entire golf course maintenance market, according to the National Golf Foundation, was 6.2 billion per year in 1991. The average maintenance cost in the United States was approximately 40,000 per hole per year for the over 15,000 golf courses in the United States in 1991. Golf course maintenance costs have risen 500 percent from 1971 to 1991. These costs are projected to continue to increase at a rate of 8 percent per year due to the demand for quality playing surfaces, increased use of non-potable water, and taxes on water and chemicals required to maintain turfgrass. The golf course construction and redesign market continues to maintain a rate of over 300 new golf courses and redesigned courses completed each year. The average construction costs run from 4 to 6 million and the average redesign costs 2 to 3 million per course. In order to create a perfectly maintained golf course, golf course managers may use as many as 25 different pesticides, fertilizers, and herbicides to control insects and turf disease. Further, turfgrass is often stressed to its limits when kept at the unnatural heights required to obtain firm and fast greens and fairways. The daily practice of living on the edge is often done with limited knowledge of changes taking place on the golf course, of the location of soil types and fertility, of surface and subsurface drainage, and of previous maintenance practices. There is a growing concern in the golf course industry that the concentration of chemicals and water required to maintain today's golf course may endanger ground water supplies for the surrounding ecosystem. This paper will describe the general methodology PTS used to develop a new management system for the maintenance, construction, and redesign of golf courses. The management system integrates remote sensing technology, geographic

  2. Golf injuries of the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, Ethan R; Lumsden, Boyd

    2005-01-01

    Golf has demonstrated increasing popularity and with this heightened enthusiasm has come an increased awareness of the significant number of injuries associated with playing golf. While back injuries represent the most commonly injured specific body part, upper extremity injuries are most frequent overall and the most likely to result in loss of play. Patterns of injury differ based on level of play and time spent playing or practicing golf. Among golf professionals, the hand/wrist is the most commonly injured upper extremity structure. Among amateurs, the elbow is most commonly injured. The vast majority of upper extremity injuries are due to overuse. Age, ability, equipment, and swing mechanics also play contributing roles. Most upper extremity golf injuries can be successfully treated with appropriate cessation or modification of play, anti-inflammatory modalities, and rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is rarely required, but if needed can prove successful in a high percentage of patients. PMID:15766435

  3. Multimodal Learning Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Multimodal learning clubs link principles of motivation and engagement with 21st century technological tools and texts to support content area learning. The author describes how a sixth grade health teacher and his class incorporated multimodal learning clubs into a unit of study on human body systems. The students worked collaboratively online…

  4. The Book Club Exploded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffert, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    One leader, 12 readers, and a few well-thumbed copies of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice." That is all a book club once required, but this is no longer the case. This article describes how the runaway popularity of book clubs has brought with it a whole new set of possibilities. Thematic discussion? A fiction/nonfiction mix? Videoconferencing?…

  5. Designing Hollow Nano Gold Golf Balls

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hollow/porous nanoparticles, including nanocarriers, nanoshells, and mesoporous materials have applications in catalysis, photonics, biosensing, and delivery of theranostic agents. Using a hierarchical template synthesis scheme, we have synthesized a nanocarrier mimicking a golf ball, consisting of (i) solid silica core with a pitted gold surface and (ii) a hollow/porous gold shell without silica. The template consisted of 100 nm polystyrene beads attached to a larger silica core. Selective gold plating of the core followed by removal of the polystyrene beads produced a golf ball-like nanostructure with 100 nm pits. Dissolution of the silica core produced a hollow/porous golf ball-like nanostructure. PMID:24937196

  6. Perception and action in golf putting: skill differences reflect calibration.

    PubMed

    van Lier, Wim H; van der Kamp, John; Savelsbergh G, J P

    2011-06-01

    We assessed how golfers cope with the commonly observed systematic overshoot errors in the perception of the direction between the ball and the hole. Experiments 1 and 2, in which participants were required to rotate a pointer such that it pointed to the center of the hole, showed that errors in perceived direction (in degrees of deviation from the perfect aiming line) are destroyed when the head is constrained to move within a plane perpendicular to the green. Experiment 3 compared the errors in perceived direction and putting errors of novice and skilled players. Unlike the perceived direction, putting accuracy (in degrees of deviation from the perfect aiming line) was not affected by head position. Novices did show a rightward putting error, while skilled players did not. We argue that the skill-related differences in putting accuracy reflect a process of recalibration. Implications for aiming in golf are discussed. PMID:21659668

  7. Myths of Teaching the Golf Swing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    This article dispells 11 myths about common teaching practices and misconceptions about the modern golf swing. Each myth is counterbalanced by facts presented by researchers about appropriate movements, skills, and practices. (CB)

  8. Fuel-cell-powered golf cart

    SciTech Connect

    Bobbett, R.E.; McCormick, J.B.; Lynn, D.K.; Kerwin, W.J.; Derouin, C.R.; Salazar, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    The implementation of a battery/fuel-cell-powered golf cart test bed designed to verify computer simulations and to gain operational experience with a fuel cell in a vehicular environment is described. A technically untrained driver can easily operate the golf cart because the motor and fuel cell controllers automatically sense and execute the appropriate on/off sequencing. A voltage imbalance circuit and a throttle compress circuit were developed that are directly applicable to electric vehicles in general.

  9. Boys & Girls Clubs of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Now Corporation for National and Community Service and Boys & Girls Clubs of America partner with Google to help ... Military Youth Arianna Skinner Receives Top Honor from Boys & Girls Clubs of America JB MDL- Fort Dix Youth ...

  10. Hybrid markerless tracking of complex articulated motion in golf swings.

    PubMed

    Fung, Sim Kwoh; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Kiang, Lam Chee; Nadarajah, Sivadev; Sahayadhas, Arun; Ali, Md Asraf; Islam, Md Anamul; Palaniappan, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    Sports video tracking is a research topic that has attained increasing attention due to its high commercial potential. A number of sports, including tennis, soccer, gymnastics, running, golf, badminton and cricket have been utilised to display the novel ideas in sports motion tracking. The main challenge associated with this research concerns the extraction of a highly complex articulated motion from a video scene. Our research focuses on the development of a markerless human motion tracking system that tracks the major body parts of an athlete straight from a sports broadcast video. We proposed a hybrid tracking method, which consists of a combination of three algorithms (pyramidal Lucas-Kanade optical flow (LK), normalised correlation-based template matching and background subtraction), to track the golfer's head, body, hands, shoulders, knees and feet during a full swing. We then match, track and map the results onto a 2D articulated human stick model to represent the pose of the golfer over time. Our work was tested using two video broadcasts of a golfer, and we obtained satisfactory results. The current outcomes of this research can play an important role in enhancing the performance of a golfer, provide vital information to sports medicine practitioners by providing technically sound guidance on movements and should assist to diminish the risk of golfing injuries. PMID:24725790

  11. The Four Keys to Teaching Golf in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasil, Jay

    2006-01-01

    Golf is a lifetime sport that can have a positive influence on children in many ways. Golf provides physical educators a means of teaching character education, etiquette, and interdisciplinary concepts such as math, in addition to physical education objectives such as motor skills, coordination, and flexibility. When teaching golf in schools,…

  12. Archery - Golf Guide with Official Rules. June 1972 - June 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Margaret L., Ed.; Michalson, Doddy, Ed.

    This guide for women's archery and golf dated June 1972 - June 1974 details rules and standards as well as the Division for Girls and Women's Sports (DGWS) statement of beliefs. Articles on archery nomenclature, archery interest builders, and archery golf are included in the section on archery. Articles dealing with golf take up such topics as…

  13. Expert Golf Instructors' Student-Teacher Interaction Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schempp, Paul; McCullick, Bryan; St. Pierre, Peter; Woorons, Sophie; You, JeongAe; Clark, Betsy

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the dominant instructional interaction patterns of expert golf instructors. Instructors (N = 22) were selected by the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) Teaching based on the following criteria: (a) 10 or more years of golf teaching experience, (b) LPGA certification, (c) awards received for the…

  14. The Kindergarten Club.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmore, Elaine Mitchell

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development of an after-school club for kindergarten-age children enrolled in a Montessori preschool program in Nashville, Tennessee. Activity units included performing a play of Sendak's "Where the Wild Things Are," studying country music and writing songs, and holding a dinner for the children's parents. (KB)

  15. The smallest study club.

    PubMed

    Sauget, Earl

    2002-01-01

    A specialist on Guam describes a study club of specialists on the island. Although the number of participants is small in absolute terms, the group's monthly meetings centered around cases serves the functions of stimulating currency and self learning and enhances coordination of complex treatment cases. PMID:12602217

  16. The Other Club Scene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Noah

    2007-01-01

    At colleges nationwide, students from diverse racial, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds meet and befriend each other under the auspices of club sports. Adam Pruett, the recreational sports coordinator at the University of California, Los Angeles, says any cultural uneasiness is overcome by the students' shared passion for the particular…

  17. 75 FR 52360 - Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration Project, El Dorado County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration Project, El Dorado.../EIS for the Upper Truckee River Restoration and Golf Course Reconfiguration Project (Project... golf course use, removal of the entire Lake Tahoe Golf Course, or reconfiguration of the golf course...

  18. Level up Book Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaGarde, Jennifer; Winner, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Like all great ideas, Level Up Book Club grew out of a genuine need, the spontaneous firing of a few brain sparks, and the kind of luck that comes from being "in the right place at the right time." By mid-June 2011 the authors were already "bona fide" wonder twins--two educators who, although they'd never met, had stumbled upon each other through…

  19. Adventures with a High School Book Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Beverly

    2005-01-01

    A library media specialist writes about high school book clubs describing about setting the administration, dealing with logistics, recruiting members, choosing the right books, reaping the benefits, publicizing the club and reaching out to other clubs.

  20. Methamphetamine Use in Club Subcultures

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Brian C.; LeClair, Amy; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, methamphetamine developed a peculiar geographic distribution in the United States, with limited diffusion in the Northeast. While use within gay clubs received attention, methamphetamine in club subcultures more broadly remains less clear. Using quantitative and qualitative data, we provide a descriptive assessment of methamphetamine use in club subcultures. Methamphetamine use in club subcultures often has instrumental purposes. The context of initiation into methamphetamine use and its close connection to cocaine shape later patterns of use. Viewing meth solely as a gay party drug misses a significant part of the population and may misguide public health strategies to reduce methamphetamine use in the Northeast. PMID:23848380

  1. Shock and Vibration Control of a Golf-Swing Robot at Impacting the Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Yohei; Kobayashi, Yukinori

    A golf swing robot is a kind of fast motion manipulator with a flexible link. A robot manipulator is greatly affected by Corioli's and centrifugal forces during fast motion. Nonlinearity due to these forces can have an adverse effect on the performance of feedback control. In the same way, ordinary state observers of a linear system cannot accurately estimate the states of nonlinear systems. This paper uses a state observer that considers disturbances to improve the performance of state estimation and feedback control. A mathematical model of the golf robot is derived by Hamilton's principle. A linear quadratic regulator (LQR) that considers the vibration of the club shaft is used to stop the robot during the follow-through action. The state observer that considers disturbances estimates accurate state variables when the disturbances due to Corioli's and centrifugal forces, and impact forces work on the robot. As a result, the performance of the state feedback control is improved. The study compares the results of the numerical simulations with experimental results.

  2. Book Clubbing! Successful Book Clubs for Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlejohn, Carol

    2011-01-01

    This practical guide demonstrates how to sponsor a successful, student-led book club for grades K through 12 that is fun, easy-to-implement, and encourages reading. Establishing a book club for children and young people that's self-sustaining and successful long-term is a challenge that this book addresses and conquers. According to recent…

  3. The effects of golf expertise and presentation modality on memory for golf and everyday items.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Katinka; MacMahon, Clare; Misirlisoy, Mine

    2008-06-01

    The present study assessed whether golf expertise, presentation modality, and domain relevance affected memory for golf-related and everyday items. Forty-eight experienced golfers and 48 non-golfers were compared in their memory for golf-related ("putt to the hole") and everyday ("turn on the lamp") items. To-be-remembered items were presented verbally, visually, or were enacted. Enacted information was recalled best, followed by visually presented information. Combined effects of modality and golf expertise on recall of golf items were demonstrated on immediate but not on delayed recall. The findings suggest that recall of domain-relevant information is optimal when one has relevant background knowledge, and under conditions of visual encoding. The data support research on facilitation of domain-relevant knowledge on recall [Weber, N., & Brewer, N. (2003). Expert memory: The interaction of stimulus structure, attention, and expertise. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 17, 295-308]. Interpersonal body representation may have played a role in recall processes among experts [Thomas, R., Press, C., & Haggard, P. (2006). Shared representations in body perception. Acta Psychologica, 121, 317-330]. PMID:18439984

  4. 4-H Club Goat Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, R. Kipp

    This guide provides information for 4-H Club members who have decided on a club goat project. Topics include general information in the following areas: show rules; facilities and equipment (barns/sheds, fences, feeders, water containers, and equipment); selection (structural correctness, muscle, volume and capacity, style and balance, and growth…

  5. School Book Club Expurgation Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keresey, Gayle

    1984-01-01

    Discusses expurgation practices (deletion, excision, alteration, obliteration of parts of books) of major school book clubs--Scholastic, Xerox's Read Book Club, Troll Associates--as identified by Intellectual Freedom Committee of Young Adult Services Division of the American Library Association. Implications for school libraries are noted.…

  6. Sensorimotor Rhythm Neurofeedback Enhances Golf Putting Performance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming Yang; Huang, Chung Ju; Chang, Yu Kai; Koester, Dirk; Schack, Thomas; Hung, Tsung Min

    2015-12-01

    Sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) activity has been related to automaticity during skilled action execution. However, few studies have bridged the causal link between SMR activity and sports performance. This study investigated the effect of SMR neurofeedback training (SMR NFT) on golf putting performance. We hypothesized that preelite golfers would exhibit enhanced putting performance after SMR NFT. Sixteen preelite golfers were recruited and randomly assigned into either an SMR or a control group. Participants were asked to perform putting while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded, both before and after intervention. Our results showed that the SMR group performed more accurately when putting and exhibited greater SMR power than the control group after 8 intervention sessions. This study concludes that SMR NFT is effective for increasing SMR during action preparation and for enhancing golf putting performance. Moreover, greater SMR activity might be an EEG signature of improved attention processing, which induces superior putting performance. PMID:26866770

  7. Head Injuries in School-Age Children Who Play Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter-Rice, Karin; Krebs, Madelyn; Eads, Julia K.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. We conducted a prospective study, which examined injury characteristics and outcomes of school-age children of 5.0-15.0 years (N = 10) who were admitted to hospital for a TBI. This study evaluated the role of age, gender, the Glasgow Coma Scale, mechanisms and…

  8. OVERHILLS GOLF COURSE LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SPECTATOR SHELTER BACK UP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERHILLS GOLF COURSE LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SPECTATOR SHELTER BACK UP FAIRWAY #1 - Overhills, Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Approximately 15 miles NW of Fayetteville, Overhills, Harnett County, NC

  9. 2012 Problem 15: Frustrating Golf Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan; Zhu, Zheyuan; Gao, Wenli; Wang, Sihui

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the condition for a golf ball to escape from a hole. The two determining factors are the ball's initial velocity v0 and its deviation from the center of the hole d. There is a critical escaping velocity vc for every deviation d. The ball's motion is analyzed by calculating the change of velocity whenever the ball collides with the hole. The critical conditions predicted by our theory are verified through experiment.

  10. The DUDES Club

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Paul A.; Efimoff, Iloradanon; Patrick, Lyana; Josewski, Viviane; Hau, Keith; Lambert, Sandy; Smye, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed In Canada, there are few health promotion programs for men, particularly programs focused on indigenous and other men marginalized by social and structural inequities. Objective of program To build solidarity and brotherhood among vulnerable men; to promote health through education, dialogue, and health screening clinics; and to help men regain a sense of pride and fulfilment in their lives. Program description The DUDES Club was established in 2010 as a community-based health promotion program for indigenous men in the Downtown Eastside neighbourhood of Vancouver, BC. Between August 2014 and May 2015, 150 men completed an evaluation survey developed using a logic model approach. Responses were analyzed based on the 4 dimensions of the indigenous medicine wheel (mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual). Evaluation results demonstrated high participant satisfaction and positive outcomes across all 4 dimensions of health and well-being: 90.6% of respondents indicated that the DUDES Club program improved their quality of life. Participants who attended meetings more often experienced greater physical, mental, and social benefits (P < .05). Conclusion Findings indicate that this innovative model is effective in promoting the well-being of mainly indigenous men through culturally safe services in an urban community.

  11. Hip and shoulder rotations during the golf swing of sub-10 handicap players.

    PubMed

    Burden, A M; Grimshaw, P N; Wallace, E S

    1998-02-01

    The motion of the shoulders, arms and club during the golf swing has often been explained using the 'double pendulum' model. Despite subsequent explanations for the actions of the distal segments of the body, the coordination of more proximal segments during the swing is less well understood. To ascertain the pattern of centre of mass motion and hip and shoulder rotations that result in a high clubhead speed at impact, the swing used in driving from the tee of eight low-handicap golfers was videotaped and analysed using three-dimensional techniques. The shoulders rotated in excess of 90 degrees during the backswing and, in 75% of the golfers, continued rotating away from the flag as the hips began turning back towards it. This sequential pattern of hip and shoulder rotation indicated that they conformed to the 'summation of speed' principle, which is hypothesized to result in a greater torque being applied to the club before impact. The speed of the drive was also benefited by the centre of mass shifting exclusively in the intended direction of ball flight during impact. PMID:9531005

  12. Evaluation of vibrotactile sensations in the ‘feel’ of a golf shot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J. R.; Jones, R.; Mansfield, N. J.; Rothberg, S. J.

    2005-07-01

    Players' subjective perceptions of the characteristics, suitability and quality of sports equipment will have a significant bearing on their equipment selection. The 'feel' of a golf club is such a perception and the vibration at impact perceived by the player is generally considered to contribute significantly to 'feel'. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between golfers' subjective perceptions of the feel of a shot and the post-impact vibration of a club. Suitable test procedures were developed to quantify the golfers' perceptions and to obtain measurements of vibration at the hands. The five feel characteristics investigated, 'pleasantness', 'hardness', 'solidity', 'liveliness' and perceived vibration level, were found to be strongly correlated; shots that were regarded as having a pleasant feel were also rated as having felt solid, lively, soft and with little vibration perceived. When these ratings were correlated with raw measurements of impact vibration, the relationships were initially weak. Techniques, such as normalizing the data, weighting the data and using mean data, were developed, resulting in much stronger correlations. Ultimately, a reduction in the total rms vibration level was found to correlate well with the players' subjective descriptions of 'pleasant', 'solid', 'lively' and 'soft' feel.

  13. Book Clubs. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Book clubs provide a reading framework designed to supplement or organize regular classroom reading instruction for students in grades K-8. This review focuses on "Book Club" (Raphael & McMahon, 1994) and "Literature Circles" (Daniels, 2002), but it uses the general lowercase) term "book clubs" to embrace both "Literature Circles" and "Book Club"…

  14. Computer Club Information Kit for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Educational Data Systems, Washington, DC.

    A computer club can provide a group of high school students with an opportunity to satisfy their curiosity about computers and computer programing. This guide offers suggestions for organizing and running such a club. The objectives of a computer club and the duties of the club's sponsor are outlined. Some activities for the first few meetings are…

  15. The control of upper body segment speed and velocity during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Horan, Sean A; Kavanagh, Justin J

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the dynamics of upper body motion during the downswing is an important step in determining the control strategies required for a successful and repeatable golf swing. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between head, thorax, and pelvis motion, during the downswing of professional golfers. Three-dimensional data were collected for 14 male professional golfers (age 27 +/- 8 years, golf-playing experience 13.3 +/- 8 years) using an optical motion analysis system. The amplitude and timing of peak speed and peak velocities were calculated for the head, thorax, and pelvis during the downswing. Cross-correlation analysis was used to examine the strength of coupling and phasing between and within segments. The results indicated the thorax segment had the highest peak speeds and peak velocities for the upper body during the downswing. A strong coupling relationship was evident between the thorax and pelvis (average R2 = 0.92 across all directions), while the head and thorax showed a much more variable relationship (average R2 = 0.76 across all directions). The strong coupling between the thorax and pelvis is possibly a method for simplifying the motor control strategy used during the downswing, and a way of ensuring consistent motor patterns. PMID:22900398

  16. Leidos Reclaims Defelice Cup at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Leidos Biomedical Research reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from NCI at the eighth annual Ronald H. Defelice golf tournament, held October 14. The final score was 15–7, with Leidos Biomed tying the series 4 to 4. Fourteen players on each team battled it out at Rattlewood golf course in Mount Airy, Md.

  17. Using Sport Education to Teach the Lifetime Sport of Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarboro, Shot; Pritchard, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Golf is a lifetime sport activity that can be taught in physical education classes. How one teaches golf in physical education could influence whether students will want to continue to participate outside of physical education. The sport education model (SEM) is an instructional model that promotes student learning in all three domains by ensuring…

  18. Mapping soil water content on golf course greens with GPR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be an effective and efficient method for high-resolution mapping of volumetric water content in the sand layer directly beneath the ground surface at a golf course green. This information could potentially be very useful to golf course superintendents for determi...

  19. Neuromotor Issues in the Learning and Control of Golf Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Christopher A.

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical and practical issues related to the neuromotor control of a golf swing are presented in this paper. The typical strategy for golf training consists of high volume repetition with an emphasis on a large variety of isolated swing characteristics. The student is frequently instructed to maintain consistent performance in each swing with…

  20. Club of Rome

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le Club de Rome s'est fait connaître du grand public par la publication du premier ouvrage "Halte à la croissance" qui a fait l'object d'un débat, il y a 2 ans. Le Prof. Tinbergen a commencé par s'adonner à la physique, il est docteur en physique et très tôt il s'est tourné vers les problèmes sociaux économiques. Il est expert auprès des nombreux gouvernements et organisations internationales et il a vu ses travaux couronnés par le prix Nobel en 1969.

  1. Everyday Engineering: Ain't She Sweet--Bats, Rackets, Golf Clubs, and All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Richard; Everett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The pitcher throws the ball and the batter takes a mighty swing. Crack! The ball is hit on the sweet spot and soars to the outfield. Or, you hear a thud! This time, the ball dribbles along the infield ground and the batter's hands sting. Everyone who has played baseball or softball has probably experienced both of these outcomes. This may not seem…

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF BASEBALL BATS AND GOLF CLUBS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. aste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACS) were established at selected un...

  3. Aerodynamics of a golf ball with grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooha; Son, Kwangmin; Choi, Haecheon

    2009-11-01

    It is well known that the drag on a dimpled ball is much lower than that on smooth ball. Choi et al. (Phys. Fluids, 2006) showed that turbulence is generated through the instability of shear layer separating from the edge of dimples and delays flow separation. Based on this mechanism, we devise a new golf ball with grooves on the surface but without any dimples. To investigate the aerodynamic performance of this new golf ball, an experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel at the Reynolds numbers of 0.5 x10^5 - 2.7 x10^5 and the spin ratios (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of α=0 - 0.5, which are within the ranges of real golf-ball velocity and spin rate. We measure the drag and lift forces on the grooved ball and compare them with those of smooth ball. At zero spin, the drag coefficient on the grooved ball shows a rapid fall-off at a critical Reynolds number and maintains a minimum value which is lower by 50% than that on smooth ball. At non-zero α, the drag coefficient on the grooved ball increases with increasing α, but is still lower by 40% than that on smooth ball. The lift coefficient on the grooved ball increases with increasing α, and is 100% larger than that on smooth ball. The aerodynamic characteristics of grooved ball is in general quite similar to that of dimpled ball. Some more details will be discussed in the presentation.

  4. 76 FR 58108 - Safety Zone; Ryder Cup Captain's Duel Golf Shot, Chicago River, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Ryder Cup Captain's Duel Golf Shot, Chicago... restrict vessels from a portion of the Chicago River during a golfing event that will involve hitting golf... the public and their vessels from the hazards associated with golf balls being hit from land onto...

  5. Movement Variability in the Golf Swing: Theoretical, Methodological, and Practical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazier, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Movement variability in the golf swing has recently been identified as a priority for future research in golf science. Although this ubiquitous aspect of golf performance has featured in previous empirical investigations of the golf swing, it has tended to be subordinate and studied as an adjunct to other more conventional research questions.…

  6. Starting a Planet Protectors Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    If your mission is to teach children how to reduce, reuse, and recycle waste and create the next generation of Planet Protectors, perhaps leading a Planet Protectors Club is part of your future challenges. You don't have to be an expert in waste reduction and recycling to lead a a Planet Protectors Club. You don't even have to be a teacher. You do…

  7. Rich-club and page-club coefficients for directed graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilkov, Daniel; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2010-06-01

    Rich-club and page-club coefficients and their null models are introduced for directed graphs. Null models allow for a quantitative discussion of the rich-club and page-club phenomena. These coefficients are computed for four directed real-world networks: Arxiv High Energy Physics paper citation network, Web network (released from Google), Citation network among US Patents, and email network from a EU research institution. The results show a high correlation between rich-club and page-club ordering. For journal paper citation network, we identify both rich-club and page-club ordering, showing that “elite” papers are cited by other “elite” papers. Google web network shows partial rich-club and page-club ordering up to some point and then a narrow declining of the corresponding normalized coefficients, indicating the lack of rich-club ordering and the lack of page-club ordering, i.e. high in-degree (PageRank) pages purposely avoid sharing links with other high in-degree (PageRank) pages. For UC patents citation network, we identify page-club and rich-club ordering providing a conclusion that “elite” patents are cited by other “elite” patents. Finally, for email communication network we show lack of both rich-club and page-club ordering. We construct an example of synthetic network showing page-club ordering and the lack of rich-club ordering.

  8. Resistance training for performance and injury prevention in golf

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Gregory J

    2006-01-01

    This introductory resistance training program is designed to minimize injury risk, improve golf swing speed and the overall fitness of recreational golfers. This article aims to introduce to the Chiropractor the basic concepts sport specific resistance training, periodization models of resistance training and proposes a year round conditioning resistance training program specific to golf. The exercises have been chosen based on the best biomechanical evidence to minimize injury risk and on the research supporting the use of movement specific training adaptations. Upper body strength exercises are performed standing to develop both trunk and hip stabilizing musculature and the primary movement of the golf swing. PMID:17549167

  9. Assessment of planarity of the golf swing based on the functional swing plane of the clubhead and motion planes of the body points.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Hoo; Como, Christopher S; Singhal, Kunal; Lee, Sangwoo; Han, Ki Hoon

    2012-06-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to determine the functional swing plane (FSP) of the clubhead and the motion planes (MPs) of the shoulder/arm points and (2) to assess planarity of the golf swing based on the FSP and the MPs. The swing motions of 14 male skilled golfers (mean handicap = -0.5 +/- 2.0) using three different clubs (driver, 5-iron, and pitching wedge) were captured by an optical motion capture system (250Hz). The FSP and MPs along with their slope/relative inclination and direction/direction of inclination were obtained using a new trajectory-plane fitting method. The slope and direction of the FSP revealed a significant club effect (p < 0.001). The relative inclination and direction of inclination of the MP showed significant point (p < 0.001) and club (p < 0.001) effects and interaction (p < 0.001). Maximum deviations of the points from the FSP revealed a significant point effect (p < 0.001) and point-club interaction (p < 0.001). It was concluded that skilled golfers exhibited well-defined and consistent FSP and MPs, and the shoulder/arm points moved on vastly different MPs and exhibited large deviations from the FSP. Skilled golfers in general exhibited semi-planar downswings with two distinct phases: a transition phase and a planar execution phase. PMID:22900396

  10. The Continuous Quality Improvement Book Club: Developing a Book Club to Promote Praxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Becky; Ray, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article poses a model for developing a book club to promote praxis. This model is built upon a basic four step framework for developing book clubs and includes specific recommendations to focus the book club on reflection of theory and how to incorporate it into practice. This model will be used to start a book club examining Continuous…

  11. Clubbing of the fingers or toes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic lung infections that occur in people with bronchiectasis , cystic fibrosis , or lung abscess Infection of the ... Echocardiogram EKG Pulmonary function tests There is no treatment for the clubbing itself. The cause of clubbing ...

  12. Testing of different soil combinations as substrates in slalom slopes and golf courses in the cold climate environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlaja, Jouni

    2010-05-01

    Testing of different soil combinations as substrates in slalom slopes and golf courses in the cold climate environment Jouni Pihlaja, Geological Survey of Finland, Northern Finland Office, P.O. Box 77, FIN-96101 Rovaniemi, Finland. jouni.pihlaja@gtk.fi, www.gtk.fi The Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) is, with some partners, carrying out a cooperative project, POMARA, in the Levi tourist center in northern Finland. The purpose of this applied geology project is to determine which soil combinations work best over the long term as substrates on slalom slopes and golf course areas. Since the tourist center is located in a cold climate area, it gives extra challenges to those landscaping activities. The average temperature in January is about -15°C and in July +14°C. In the Levi area, the slalom slopes have normally been covered by local carex peat during the shaping phase of slopes. The problem has been that on the top part of the fell, the peat has "disappeared" after some years and stones have come up under the peat layer, since these areas are naturally covered by block fields. The main assumption at the beginning of the project was that frost weathering is causing the problems. In this project, test areas have been prepared on the slopes. The most important task is to compare test areas covered by carex peat to areas covered by a combination of sandy till and carex peat. The reason why sandy till was chosen to be the additional material was that it is supposed to stand up better against frost weathering than peat itself. Also, when considering future landscaping, the sandy till is the most economically viable mineral material to be used because of its nearby location . In the golf course areas, a combination of fine sand and sphagnum peat has been used in landscaping. The peat was brought from the Simo area, 300 km south of Levi. In this project, the goal is to determine if the local carex peat is working properly in the green areas of the golf club. The

  13. Director von Braun Presents General Medaris With Golf Bag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center Director Wernher von Braun presents General J.B. Medaris with a new golf bag. General Medaris, (left) was a Commander of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama during 1955 to 1958.

  14. Role Calls for Boys & Girls Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Allesandro, Lou

    2013-01-01

    The New Hampshire Alliance of Boys & Girls Clubs has come a long way since the inception of the state's first Club in Manchester more than 100 years ago. The goal of the Boys & Girls Clubs of America is to provide youth with programs and services that allow them to realize their full potential as productive members of society. State and federal…

  15. Club Sports in Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Jay; And Others

    This report outlines policies to aid administrators of athletic, physical education, and intramural programs as they seek to provide leadership to the club sports movement on their campuses. The report first discusses the recent emergence and popularity of club sports, and explains some advantages of club sports over varsity sports. The next…

  16. How To Be a Great Club Adviser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granese, Judith

    This guide to being an effective adviser for school clubs begins with an essay explaining the philosophy of school club advisership. It describes the adviser's role as a leader and as a teacher of leadership. Subsequent chapters discuss the following guidelines: (1) club advisers should be aware of the time needed to support and encourage student…

  17. The influence of monetary reward and punishment on psychological, physiological, behavioral and performance aspects of a golf putting task.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshifumi; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to examine kinematic characteristics and force control during a golf-putting task under a pressure condition. The secondary purpose was to provide an exploratory investigation of the relationship between changes in behavior (kinematics and force control) and performance on the one hand, and psychological (attention and affect) and physiological (arousal level) changes on the other hand. Twenty male novices performed 150 acquisition trials, followed by 10 test trials during a pressure condition induced by performance-contingent distracters: a cash reward or punishment. A three-dimensional motion analysis revealed that, during the pressure test, angular displacements of rotational movements at the horizontal plane and movement time of the arms and club during the backswing and downswing phases all decreased, while acceleration of the elbows during the downswing phase increased. Mean performance indices in all participants' were unchanged in spite of the kinematic changes under the pressure condition. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the decrement in performance, as well as increased variability of movement time and speed, were more likely to increase when participants shifted their attention to movements. Furthermore, changes in heart rate and negative affect were related to both the increase in movement acceleration and a decrease in grip force. These findings suggest that performance and behavioral changes during golf-putting under pressure can be associated with attentional changes, along with the influences of physiological-emotional responses. PMID:21684618

  18. Facilitating a midwifery book club.

    PubMed

    Chenery-Morris, Samantha

    2012-03-01

    A midwifery student book club was set up at University Campus Suffolk (UCS) with the aim of engaging students in alternative forms of literature relevant to their studies and to enhance their university experience. The book club was well attended by first and second year midwifery students, but less so by third years. There was evidence of informal student engagement with the lecturer through follow up emails about the meetings. Most of the books reviewed were enjoyed, but the responsibility of suggesting a book for their peers to review was deemed too much by some students. PMID:22479853

  19. Braking hazards of golf cars and low speed vehicles.

    PubMed

    Seluga, K J; Ojalvo, I U

    2006-11-01

    Research and analysis of braking issues for golf cars and other low speed vehicles (LSVs) are reported in this study. It is shown that many such vehicles only provide braking for their rear wheels, which can lead to a driver losing control during travel on typical steep downgrades. The braking performance of a golf car equipped with brakes on two or four wheels was analyzed to determine the effects of two and four wheel brake designs on braking efficiency and vehicle yaw stability. Besides reducing braking efficiency, it is demonstrated that installing brakes on only the rear wheels can lead to directional instability (fishtailing) and rollover when the rear wheels are braked until skidding occurs. The nonexistence of golf course standards and the inadequacy of golf car and LSV standards are noted and a connection between this and the comparatively high level of accidents with such vehicles is inferred. Based on these results, it is advisable to install brakes on all four wheels of golf cars and LSVs. In addition, new safety standards should be considered to reduce the occurrence of golf car accidents on steep downhill slopes. PMID:16806027

  20. 40. Detail of fireplace ornament, nearly life size heads of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Detail of fireplace ornament, nearly life size heads of General Stilwell and associated personnel, evenly spaced across the entire face of the mantlepiece. - Fort Ord, Soldiers' Club, California State Highway 1 near Eighth Street, Seaside, Monterey County, CA

  1. A Science Club Takes Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeDee, Olivia; Mosser, Anna; Gamble, Tony; Childs, Greg; Oberhauser, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The after-school science club at Galtier Math, Science, and Technology Elementary Magnet School in St. Paul, Minnesota, learned some valuable lessons when they took newfound knowledge about pollution into their homes. After learning about the effects of various contaminants on health and what informed citizens can do about it, students tested…

  2. Club Drugs. The DAWN Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Applied Studies.

    This report was prepared in response to requests from the media, law enforcement, and community leaders for information about club drugs. By being able to utilize statistics from hospital emergency departments and by compiling statistics on drug-related deaths, the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) is able to alert parents, educators, and others…

  3. Science Club--A Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegner, Claas; Issak, Nicole; Tesch, Katharina; Zehne, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    The following article presents a concept of a science club which was developed by two master's students as a part of their thesis and which has been developed and improved ever since. The extra-curricular concept emphasises pupils' individuality through focusing on problem based leaning, station learning, and mixed age groups. Having joined the…

  4. Estimated Colorado Golf Course Irrigation Water Use, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivahnenko, Tamara

    2009-01-01

    Golf course irrigation water-use data were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Use Program's 2005 compilation to provide baseline information, as no golf course irrigation water-use data (separate from crop irrigation) have been reported in previous compilations. A Web-based survey, designed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Rocky Mountain Golf Course Superintendents Association (RMGCSA), was electronically distributed by the association to the 237 members in Colorado. Forty-three percent of the members returned the survey, and additional source water information was collected by telephone for all but 20 of the 245 association member and non-member Colorado golf courses. For golf courses where no data were collected at all, an average 'per hole' coefficient, based on returned surveys from that same county, were applied. In counties where no data were collected at all, a State average 'per hole' value of 13.2 acre-feet was used as the coefficient. In 2005, Colorado had 243 turf golf courses (there are 2 sand courses in the State) that had an estimated 2.27 acre-feet per irrigated course acre, and 65 percent of the source water for these courses was surface water. Ground water, potable water (public supply), and reclaimed wastewater, either partially or wholly, were source waters for the remaining courses. Fifty-three of the 64 counties in Colorado have at least one golf course, with the greatest number of courses in Jefferson (23 courses), Arapahoe (22 courses), and El Paso Counties (20 courses). In 2005, an estimated 5,647.8 acre-feet in Jefferson County, 5,402 acre-feet in Arapahoe County, and 4,473.3 acre-feet in El Paso County were used to irrigate the turf grass.

  5. Reliability of an experimental method to analyse the impact point on a golf ball during putting.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Ashley K; Mitchell, Andrew C S; Hughes, Gerwyn

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the reliability of an experimental method identifying the location of the impact point on a golf ball during putting. Forty trials were completed using a mechanical putting robot set to reproduce a putt of 3.2 m, with four different putter-ball combinations. After locating the centre of the dimple pattern (centroid) the following variables were tested; distance of the impact point from the centroid, angle of the impact point from the centroid and distance of the impact point from the centroid derived from the X, Y coordinates. Good to excellent reliability was demonstrated in all impact variables reflected in very strong relative (ICC = 0.98-1.00) and absolute reliability (SEM% = 0.9-4.3%). The highest SEM% observed was 7% for the angle of the impact point from the centroid. In conclusion, the experimental method was shown to be reliable at locating the centroid location of a golf ball, therefore allowing for the identification of the point of impact with the putter head and is suitable for use in subsequent studies. PMID:26102559

  6. The creation of a superstitious belief regarding putters in a laboratory-based golfing task

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Andrew; Taylor, Jamie A.; Parkes, Royston

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to determine the extent to which it was possible to induce superstitious behaviour and beliefs in a golf putting task in a laboratory. Participants (N = 28) took part in a putting task using three identical clubs in which visual feedback regarding performance was restricted. Participants were provided with verbal feedback of their performance, which was honest when they used one putter, negative with a second putter (they did better than they were told) and positive with a third (they did worse than they were told). After this initial acquisition phase, a competition was announced and participants were asked to select a putter they would like to use. The participants were then asked to rate various qualities of the putters. Significantly more participants selected the “positive” putter for the competition (N = 22) compared to the “negative” putter (N = 1), p < .001. In addition, participants claimed that the positive putter had a better weight, was more comfortable and easier to use than the negative putter (all p < .001). Overall, this evidence can be taken to show that a superstitious belief can be formed in a short amount of time within a laboratory setting and that it can affect both the perceptions and choices of an individual. PMID:26877722

  7. Movement variability in the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Langdown, Ben L; Bridge, Matt; Li, Francois-Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, golf biomechanics has focused upon achieving consistency in swing kinematics and kinetics, whilst variability was considered to be noise and dysfunctional. There has been a growing argument that variability is an intrinsic aspect of skilled motor performance and plays a functional role. Two types of variability are described: 'strategic shot selection' and 'movement variability'. In 'strategic shot selection', the outcome remains consistent, but the swing kinematics/kinetics (resulting in the desired ball flight) are free to vary; 'movement variability' is the changes in swing kinematics and kinetics from trial to trial when the golfer attempts to hit the same shot. These changes will emerge due to constraints of the golfer's body, the environment, and the task. Biomechanical research has focused upon aspects of technique such as elite versus non-elite kinematics, kinetics, kinematic sequencing, peak angular velocities of body segments, wrist function, ground reaction forces, and electromyography, mainly in the search for greater distance and clubhead velocity. To date very little is known about the impact of variability on this complex motor skill, and it has yet to be fully researched to determine where the trade-off between functional and detrimental variability lies when in pursuit of enhanced performance outcomes. PMID:22900407

  8. Role of Dimples on Golf Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin

    2005-11-01

    It is an open question why the drag coefficient on golf ball remains nearly constant with increasing Reynolds number after its sharp decrease. In order to investigate this interesting phenomenon, we measure the drag, separation angle, wall pressure and streamwise velocity inside/outside dimples before main separation. When drag reduction occurs with dimples, the separation angle measured is nearly constant even with increasing Reynolds number. Also, the wall pressure distributions outside dimples are nearly the same at different Reynolds numbers, although those inside dimples vary depending on the Reynolds number. From the streamwise velocity measurement, it is found that dimples located at the angles of 65^o ˜90^o (three rows of dimples exist in our experimental setup) make an important role in changing flow characteristics. Inside one or two rows of dimples located at those angles, a small separation bubble exists and flow becomes quickly transitional and turbulent with reattachment. After the reattachment, the flow does not separate at the downstream dimples owing to fuller velocity profile. With dimples, the main separation occurs further downstream at 110 degree. This main separation angle does not change even with increasing Reynolds number, because downstream dimples do not make an important role in changing flow characteristics any more.

  9. Modeling golf ball fluid mechanics - challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Kyle

    2009-11-01

    Numerical simulation presents a powerful tool for understanding the fundamental fluid mechanics that influence golf ball aerodynamics, as well as providing an approach for ultimately analyzing and designing golf balls for manufacture. Robust and accurate simulation strategies are central to providing a means to screen designs prior to costly prototyping and field measurement. Results from a hierarchy of simulation strategies applied to the flow around golf balls will be presented, ranging from Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computations to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). RANS methods, while leading to computationally efficient approaches, are challenged to represent using ad hoc turbulence models the subtle effects induced by surface dimpling. DNS on the other hand, offers a first-principles approach that enables detailed examination of mechanisms though carries a significant computational cost. Predictions from both techniques are contrasted; opportunities for advancing each technique are identified.

  10. Boys and Girls: Join the Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Allesandro, Lou; Wool, Michael; McKenzie, Mary Alice

    2012-01-01

    Boys & Girls Clubs of America count 4,000 community-based clubs serving more than 4 million young people through membership and community outreach. They provide a safe place to spend time during non-school hours and the summer as an alternative to the streets or being home alone--a place to play, have fun and learn. Boys & Girls Clubs began in New…

  11. View of yacht club and avila pier, facing west. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of yacht club and avila pier, facing west. The San Luis Bay Club is visible on the hill in the background. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  12. Club Drug Use in Hispanic College Students

    PubMed Central

    Resor, Michelle R.; Cooper, Theodore V.

    2010-01-01

    Club drug use and correlates were examined among 251 Hispanic college students on the Texas - México border. Participants completed questionnaires on substance use, club drug attitudes and beliefs, sexual risk-taking behaviors, depressive symptoms, and acculturation. One-quarter of participants reported club drug use. Regression analyses demonstrated that frequency and history of lifetime use were consistently associated with more permissive drug attitudes and other substance use but not sexual risk-taking, depression symptoms, or acculturation. Acculturation was negatively associated with frequency of club drug use, yet positively associated with use of other illicit substances. Avenues for future studies are suggested. PMID:20653638

  13. Neuromotor issues in the learning and control of golf skill.

    PubMed

    Knight, Christopher A

    2004-03-01

    Theoretical and practical issues related to the neuromotor control of a golf swing are presented in this paper. The typical strategy for golf training consists of high volume repetition with an emphasis on a large variety of isolated swing characteristics. The student is frequently instructed to maintain consistent performance in each swing with absolute invariance. Based on dynamical systems and motor control schema perspectives, it is argued that golfers can learn a more reliable swing by exploring swing parameters and focusing on higher order control principles that reduce the vast number of degrees of freedom. Some candidate training practices are proposed for applying these theoretical issues into practice. PMID:15532356

  14. A Rare Cause of Foot Pain With Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Petrera, Massimo; Dwyer, Tim; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell J.

    2013-01-01

    The os vesalianum is an uncommon accessory bone of the foot, located proximally to the base of the fifth metatarsal. It is usually asymptomatic and detected incidentally on radiographs. This is a case of bilateral os vesalianum, symptomatic only in the right foot, in a golf player. After a failed nonoperative treatment, the os vesalianum in the symptomatic foot was excised and the peroneus brevis tendon reattached using a suture anchor. The functional outcome was excellent, and the patient returned to golf 8 weeks after surgery. PMID:24459554

  15. Healthy Living Initiative: Running/Walking Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stylianou, Michalis; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Kloeppel, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    This study was grounded in the public health literature and the call for schools to serve as physical activity intervention sites. Its purpose was twofold: (a) to examine the daily distance covered by students in a before-school running/walking club throughout 1 school year and (b) to gain insights on the teachers perspectives of the club.…

  16. Book Clubs Turn the Page to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sennett, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The nation's schools and libraries have come up with shelves full of innovative twists on the basic book club. This article offers a few of these fun and educational ideas that can be adapted for everyone from young beginning readers to teens. Teachers and librarians describe book club activities that they have found successful in: bringing…

  17. Running Clubs--A Combinatorial Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nissen, Phillip; Taylor, John

    1991-01-01

    Presented is a combinatorial problem based on the Hash House Harriers rule which states that the route of the run should not have previously been traversed by the club. Discovered is how many weeks the club can meet before the rule has to be broken. (KR)

  18. What A Booster Club Can Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidinger, George

    This speech was presented at the 1976 American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation national convention by the principal of an Iowa high school. It discusses the development and effectiveness of the Jefferson High School Booster Club which was developed by an interested parent and has been quite successful. The club has assisted…

  19. STEM Club Participation and STEM Schooling Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Michael A.; Williams, Darryl N.

    2013-01-01

    To develop a more robust understanding of the relationship between non-formal, school-based STEM activities and students' success and persistence in STEM fields, this study evaluates how math club participation influences math GPA and how science club participation influences science GPA. Additionally, this study evaluates how math or science…

  20. Multicultural Mosaic: A Family Book Club.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dias-Mitchell, Laurie; Harris, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Authors, a library media specialist and a literature/language arts teacher, both recipients of Theodore R. Sizer Fellowships, describe their joint project, "Multicultural Mosaic: A Family Book Club." Their proposal was to strengthen the home-school connection by establishing a book club accessible to all middle and high school students and their…

  1. A Different Kind of Book Club.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesperance, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Describes one teacher's experiences developing a book group for students in his suburban New York high school. Rather than attending required meetings, students read any book they chose and submitted book reviews on a book club bulletin board. For each book completed, students received a free book and eligibility to attend book club sponsored…

  2. Partners against tuberculosis: Ethiopia's "TB clubs".

    PubMed

    Getahun, H

    1998-11-01

    TB (tuberculosis) clubs were first introduced in the Estie district of South Gonder administrative zone, Amhara region of northwestern Ethiopia in January 1997, in an attempt to improve TB control in rural areas. Before the clubs were introduced, patients who were family members or close neighbors were given different treatment follow-up dates. Walking long distances alone to secure treatment, patients often grew discouraged from continuing treatment once their health began to improve. However, upon the introduction of the TB clubs, neighboring patients, or those in the same family, had their follow-up appointment dates rearranged in the same clinics. Local neighborhoods were also used to group nearby patients in the same follow-up clinic. The patients then formed their own groups (TB clubs) and elected leaders. 3-10 members usually comprise each club, with the club leaders monitoring drug intake and new developments, such as drug side effects and toxic skin reactions. The social ostracism and stigma otherwise experienced by patients have been largely overcome as a result of the TB information disseminated within the communities by the clubs, while patient attendance for treatment has increased from 68% to 98%, according to one study's findings. This intervention has taken place using the long-course treatment protocol (2STH/EH and 10TH/EH). TB clubs are improving patient adherence to treatment, passive case detection, defaulter tracing, TB reporting and recording, and community involvement in health care. PMID:12294916

  3. STEM Club Participation and STEM Schooling Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Michael A.; Williams, Darryl N.

    2013-01-01

    To develop a more robust understanding of the relationship between non-formal, school-based STEM activities and students' success and persistence in STEM fields, this study evaluates how math club participation influences math GPA and how science club participation influences science GPA. Additionally, this study evaluates how math or science club…

  4. Practices of Productive Adult Book Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Richard; Yussen, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: This article examines two adult book club members' responses to literary texts over a 23-month period to identify practices that contribute to productive book club participation. Members were interviewed regarding their book selection procedures, preparation for and perceptions of the discussions, and what they valued about the…

  5. Golf Instruction. An Application of Schmidt's Generalized Motor Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asbell, Ann C.

    1989-01-01

    This article describes how application of the generalized motor program, conceptualized by Schmidt, can yield consistent and effective results when teaching students the golf swing. Specific teaching suggestions are given and a brief discussion of the applicability of this program to tennis and swimming is included. (JAH)

  6. Review of the GOLF/SOHO helioseismic results and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, S.; GOLF Team; GOLF-Ng Team; Dynamics Teams

    2007-07-01

    Helioseismic measurements aboard SoHO deliver new facts useful to improve our understanding of Sun and stars. After more than a decade of measurements aboard SoHO, we present the helioseismic results obtained with the GOLF instrument. If the first published papers of this community have mainly contrained the internal microphysics, these last 5 years have revealed an unprecedent insight on the impact of the solar cycle on the outer layers thanks to acoustic modes and on the radiative zone dynamics thanks to gravity mode studies. We will show why GOLF appears as an excellent instrument for this purpose and what we have learned from 10 years of observation aboard SoHO with this french-spanish resonant spectrometer. The progress done today by Doppler velocity measurements aboard SoHO (GOLF+ MDI) and by ground networks (BiSON and GONG) opens a totally new perspective for solar and stellar physics. So we then mention the questions that might be solved with the next generation of instruments already in construction in different european laboratories including GOLF-NG. They lead to two formation flying missions DynaMICCS and HIRISE proposed in the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision perspective. An european strategy of measurements is suggested to maintain this discipline in the best conditions for the two next decades in order to get quantitative estimate of the effective role of the solar variabilities along time.

  7. Erosion Potential of Various Golf Course Bunker Sands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sand bunkers are principal golf course features adding aesthetic beauty and challenge for golfers. Bunkers often require substantial resources for proper maintenance particularly where sand is installed on severe slopes in humid climates subject to occasional heavy rainfall. Numerous sands are comme...

  8. Age, psychological skills, and golf performance: a prospective investigation.

    PubMed

    Hayslip, Bert; Petrie, Trent A

    2014-03-01

    This study explored the influence of age in understanding mental skills utilization in the context of performance at a major national golf competition. Participants, who ranged in age and in skill level, included 1150 male and 170 female amateur golfers competing in the Dupont World Amateur Golf Championship in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Measures targeted general mental skills used in competitions, golf-specific skills, and competitive trait anxiety. Hierarchical linear regression was utilized to explore the potential moderating role that chronological age may play in influencing the impact of psychological skills and anxiety on competitive tournament performance across the adult life span. Findings suggested no significant age-moderating effects and instead pointed to the importance of developing golf-specific psychological skills to enhance or maintain performance, irrespective of age. Although automaticity (performance feels "automatic") predicted performance for all golfers, commitment to the game and confidence in one's putting did so only for the men. These findings reinforce the age-irrelevant role of such skills in fostering the experience of peak performance in a competitive sport context and underscore the importance of interventions targeting older players to help maintain or facilitate the use of psychological skills in helping them manage their games. PMID:23525546

  9. Measuring the Area of Golf Greens and Other Irregular Regions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, W. Gary; Ponte, Joao

    1985-01-01

    A real-life problem involving a greenskeeper needing to know the area of golf greens is presented, with solutions using a scale drawing, Maple's methods, and Heron's formula. Methods are checked with a computer and discussed mathematically. Three computer program listings are included. (MNS)

  10. Effects of Terrestrial Buffer Zones on Amphibians on Golf Courses

    PubMed Central

    Puglis, Holly J.; Boone, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    A major cause of amphibian declines worldwide is habitat destruction or alteration. Public green spaces, such as golf courses and parks, could serve as safe havens to curb the effects of habitat loss if managed in ways to bolster local amphibian communities. We reared larval Blanchard's cricket frogs (Acris blanchardi) and green frogs (Rana clamitans) in golf course ponds with and without 1 m terrestrial buffer zones, and released marked cricket frog metamorphs at the golf course ponds they were reared in. Larval survival of both species was affected by the presence of a buffer zone, with increased survival for cricket frogs and decreased survival for green frogs when reared in ponds with buffer zones. No marked cricket frog juveniles were recovered at any golf course pond in the following year, suggesting that most animals died or migrated. In a separate study, we released cricket frogs in a terrestrial pen and allowed them to choose between mown and unmown grass. Cricket frogs had a greater probability of using unmown versus mown grass. Our results suggest that incorporating buffer zones around ponds can offer suitable habitat for some amphibian species and can improve the quality of the aquatic environment for some sensitive local amphibians. PMID:22761833

  11. Assistant Superintendent Hiring Criteria Used by Golf Course Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlossberg, Maxim J.; Greene, Wilmot; Karnok, Keith J.

    2004-01-01

    Of the many opportunities available upon graduating, most turfgrass management/turfgrass science students seek assistant golf course superintendent positions. By tradition, faculty are responsible for preparing graduates to serve as capable assistant superintendents. Moreover, faculty are queried for guidance on how to best compete for these…

  12. Coaching College Women's Golf: Profiling an Emerging Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Nancy; Miller, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Intercollegiate athletics have struggled with the concept of same-sex coaches, asking the question of whether or not those who coach women or men should be of the same gender. With the advent of Title IX, the conversation has grown particularly acute in non-revenue sports, such as women's golf. The current national study profiles NCAA Division I…

  13. Acrchery-Golf Guide. June 1974-June 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shick, Jacqueline, Ed.; Hague, Andrea, Ed.

    This guide is a collection of essays by various authors on archery and golf. There is a separate section for each sport. In the archery section, the topics covered include archery coaching, aiming, the spine of the arrow, do-it-yourself ideas for archery instruction, archery visual aids, and official rules for various archery activities. The…

  14. On a Simple Formulation of the Golf Ball Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pujol, O.; Perez, J. Ph.

    2007-01-01

    The motion of a ball rolling without slipping on the lateral section inside a fixed vertical cylinder is analysed in the Earth referential frame which is assumed to be Galilean. Equations of motion are rapidly obtained and the golf ball paradox is understood: these equations describe a motion consisting of a vertical harmonic oscillation related…

  15. Disc Golf Play: Using Recreation to Improve Disruptive Classroom Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Michael Lee; Newgent, Rebecca A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the use of disc golf as a creative, recreational play intervention for improving classroom behaviors in disruptive children. Twenty-two elementary students were randomly selected for either a treatment or control group and rated at pre- and post- by their teachers on the use of nine positive classroom behaviors (e.g., sharing,…

  16. Hazardous materials on golf courses: Experience and knowledge of golf course superintendents and grounds maintenance workers from seven states

    PubMed Central

    Arcury-Quandt, Alice E.; Gentry, Amanda L.; Marín, Antonio J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The golf course industry has a growing Latino work force. Little occupational health research has addressed this work force. This paper examines golf course superintendents’ and Latino grounds maintenance workers’ pesticide knowledge, beliefs, and safety training. In particular, it focuses on knowledge of and adherence to OSHA Right-to-Know regulations. Methods In person, in-depth interviews were conducted with ten golf course superintendents in five states and with sixteen Latino grounds maintenance workers in four states. Results Few superintendents were in compliance with Right-to-Know regulations or did pesticide safety training with all of their workers. Few workers had any pesticide safety knowledge. Most safety training on golf courses was rudimentary and focused on machine safety, and was usually conducted in the off-season or on rainy days, not before workers were assigned tasks. Conclusions More Right-to-Know training is necessary for superintendents and grounds maintenance workers. Culturally and linguistically appropriate Spanish language materials need to be developed or made more widely available to train workers. Better enforcement of safety and training regulations is necessary. PMID:21360723

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A HOMEMAKER'S CLUB, LARIMER COUNTY, FORT COLLINS, COLORADO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDGINGTON, ROYAL H.

    THE ORGANIZATION OF A HOMEMAKER'S CLUB FOR MOTHERS UNDER AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN WAS PRESENTED. THE CLUB WAS SPONSORED BY THE LARIMER COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. PERSONNEL FROM THE DEPARTMENT ASSISTED IN EVALUATING A PAST FAILURE OF A HOMEMAKER'S CLUB AND IN FORMULATING PLANS FOR A SECOND CLUB. A DISCUSSION OF THE FAILURE OF THE FIRST…

  18. The Sierra Club--A History. Part 2: Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Douglas H.

    1977-01-01

    This second article on Sierra Club history brings the Club into the 1960s. It relates early conservation activities of the club, such as the efforts to save the Hetch Hetchy Valley. The campaign against construction of a dam in Dinosaur National Monument helped establish the club as a national organization. (MA)

  19. Redesigning journal club in residency.

    PubMed

    Al Achkar, Morhaf

    2016-01-01

    The gap between production and implementation of knowledge is the main reason for the suboptimal quality of health care. To eliminate this gap and improve the quality of patient care, journal club (JC) in graduate medical education provides an opportunity for learning the skills of evidence-based medicine. JC, however, continues to face many challenges mainly due to poorly defined goals, inadequate preparation, and lack of interest. This article presents an innovative model to prepare and present JC based on three pillars: dialogical learning through group discussion, mentored residents as peer teachers, and including JC as part of a structured curriculum to learn evidence-based medicine. This engaging model has the potential to transform JC from a moribund session that is daunting for residents into a lively discussion to redefine clinical practice using the most current evidence. PMID:27313486

  20. Redesigning journal club in residency

    PubMed Central

    Al Achkar, Morhaf

    2016-01-01

    The gap between production and implementation of knowledge is the main reason for the suboptimal quality of health care. To eliminate this gap and improve the quality of patient care, journal club (JC) in graduate medical education provides an opportunity for learning the skills of evidence-based medicine. JC, however, continues to face many challenges mainly due to poorly defined goals, inadequate preparation, and lack of interest. This article presents an innovative model to prepare and present JC based on three pillars: dialogical learning through group discussion, mentored residents as peer teachers, and including JC as part of a structured curriculum to learn evidence-based medicine. This engaging model has the potential to transform JC from a moribund session that is daunting for residents into a lively discussion to redefine clinical practice using the most current evidence. PMID:27313486

  1. How to Make a Club from Scratch: The Beginning of the University of Arizona Astronomy Club

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Amy; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Towner, A. P.; Walker-LaFollette, A.; Carleton, T.; McCarthy, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    Beginning and maintaining an independent, student run club can be a challenge. The University of Arizona Astronomy Club has been working hard to build a strong basis since its revitalization in 2007. Since that time, the club has evolved and learned strategies for increasing and maintaining membership through research, community outreach, fund raising, telescope building projects and educational scale models. We will discuss how club involvement benefits astronomy and non-astronomy majors, the University, the astronomical community and the local community through social support and networking.

  2. Highlight summarization in golf videos using audio signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoung-Gook; Kim, Jin Young

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic summarization of highlights in golf videos based on audio information alone without video information. The proposed highlight summarization system is carried out based on semantic audio segmentation and detection on action units from audio signals. Studio speech, field speech, music, and applause are segmented by means of sound classification. Swing is detected by the methods of impulse onset detection. Sounds like swing and applause form a complete action unit, while studio speech and music parts are used to anchor the program structure. With the advantage of highly precise detection of applause, highlights are extracted effectively. Our experimental results obtain high classification precision on 18 golf games. It proves that the proposed system is very effective and computationally efficient to apply the technology to embedded consumer electronic devices.

  3. The Outing Club: Science without Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Paul Dow; Burks, Timothy

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to give students an opportunity to strengthen skills that will make them effective group members, authors developed a program, "The Doherty School Outing Club", that stresses group dynamics in an outdoor setting. (Author/RK)

  4. Florida, National Space Club Embrace Commercial Endeavors

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) Manager Ed Mango and Florida's Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll were guest speakers at the National Space Club Florida Committee's luncheon at the Radisson Resort at t...

  5. 76 FR 65380 - Safety Zone; 2011 Head of the South Regatta, Savannah River, Augusta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... Head of the South Regatta, which will consist of a series of rowing races. The 2011 Head of the South... hazards associated with the event. ] Discussion of Rule On November 11 and 12, 2011, Augusta Rowing Club is hosting the 2011 Head of the South Regatta, a series of rowing races on the Savannah River...

  6. Motor abundance and control structure in the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Morrison, A; McGrath, D; Wallace, E S

    2016-04-01

    Variability and control structure are under-represented areas of golf swing research. This study investigated the use of the abundant degrees of freedom in the golf swing of high and intermediate skilled golfers using uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis. The variance parallel to (VUCM) and orthogonal to (VOrth) the UCM with respect to the orientation and location of the clubhead were calculated. The higher skilled golfers had proportionally higher values of VUCM than lower skilled players for all measured outcome variables. Motor synergy was found in the control of the orientation of the clubhead and the combined outcome variables but not for clubhead location. Clubhead location variance zeroed-in on impact as has been previously shown, whereas clubhead orientation variance increased near impact. Both skill levels increased their control over the clubhead location leading up to impact, with more control exerted over the clubhead orientation in the early downswing. The results suggest that to achieve higher skill levels in golf may not lie simply in optimal technique, but may lie more in developing control over the abundant degrees of freedom in the body. PMID:26784706

  7. Lumbar spinal loads and muscle activity during a golf swing.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young-Tae; Chow, John W; Chae, Woen-Sik

    2012-06-01

    This study estimated the lumbar spinal loads at the L4-L5 level and evaluated electromyographic (EMG) activity of right and left rectus abdominis, external and internal obliques, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi muscles during a golf swing. Four super VHS camcorders and two force plates were used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) kinematics and kinetics of golf swings performed by five male collegiate golfers. Average EMG levels for different phases of golf swing were determined. An EMG-assisted optimization model was applied to compute the contact forces acting on the L4-L5. The results revealed a mean peak compressive load of over six times the body weight (BW) during the downswing and mean peak anterior and medial shear loads approaching 1.6 and 0.6 BW during the follow-through phases. The peak compressive load estimated in this study was high, but less than the corresponding value (over 8 BW) reported by a previous study. Average EMG levels of different muscles were the highest in the acceleration and follow-through phases, suggesting a likely link between co-contractions of paraspinal muscles and lumbar spinal loads. PMID:22900401

  8. Brain networks governing the golf swing in professional golfers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Han, Joung Kyue; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Han, Doug Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Golf, as with most complex motor skills, requires multiple different brain functions, including attention, motor planning, coordination, calculation of timing, and emotional control. In this study we assessed the correlation between swing components and brain connectivity from the cerebellum to the cerebrum. Ten female golf players and 10 age-matched female controls were recruited. In order to determine swing consistency among participants, the standard deviation (SD) of the mean swing speed time and the SD of the mean swing angle were assessed over 30 swings. Functional brain connectivity was assessed by resting state functional MRI. Pro-golfers showed greater positive left cerebellum connectivity to the occipital lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe and both frontal lobes compared to controls. The SD of play scores was positively correlated with the SD of the impact angle. Constant swing speed and back swing angle in professional golfers were associated with functional connectivity (FC) between the cerebellum and parietal and frontal lobes. In addition, the constant impact angle in professional golfers was associated with improved golf scores and additional FC of the thalamus. PMID:25761601

  9. Evidence for biomechanics and motor learning research improving golf performance.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Justin W L; Hume, Patria A

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this review was to determine how the findings of biomechanics and motor control/learning research may be used to improve golf performance. To be eligible, the biomechanics and motor learning studies had to use direct (ball displacement and shot accuracy) or indirect (clubhead velocity and clubface angle) golf performance outcome measures. Biomechanical studies suggested that reducing the radius path of the hands during the downswing, increasing wrist torque and/or range of motion, delaying wrist motion to late in the downswing, increasing downswing amplitude, improving sequential acceleration of body parts, improving weight transfer, and utilising X-factor stretch and physical conditioning programmes can improve clubhead velocity. Motor learning studies suggested that golf performance improved more when golfers focused on swing outcome or clubhead movement rather than specific body movements. A distributed practice approach involving multiple sessions per week of blocked, errorless practice may be best for improving putting accuracy of novice golfers, although variable practice may be better for skilled golfers. Video, verbal, or a combination of video and verbal feedback can increase mid-short iron distance in novice to mid-handicap (hcp) golfers. Coaches should not only continue to critique swing technique but also consider how the focus, structure, and types of feedback for practice may alter learning for different groups of golfers. PMID:22900408

  10. Minimizing Injuries and Enhancing Performance in Golf Through Training Programs

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Erik P.; Brumitt, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Context: Golf is a popular sport, particularly in older populations. Regardless of age and skill level, golfers risk injury to the back, shoulder, wrist and hand, elbow, and knee. Because of the unique compressive, shear, rotational, and lateral bending forces created in the lumbar region during the golf swing, the primary sport-related malady experienced by amateurs and professionals is low back pain. Extrinsic and intrinsic injury risk factors have been reported in the literature. A growing body of evidence supports the prescription of strength training routines to enhance performance and reduce the risk of injury. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant studies were reviewed on golf injuries, swing mechanics, training routines, and general training program design. The following electronic databases were used to identify research relevant to this report: MEDLINE (from 1950–November 2009), CINAHL (1982–November 2009), and SPORTDiscus (1830–November 2009). Results: Injuries may be associated with lack of warm-up, poor trunk flexibility and strength, faulty swing technique, and overuse. Conclusions: Implementing a training program that includes flexibility, strength, and power training with correction of faulty swing mechanics will help the golfer reduce the likelihood of injury and improve overall performance. PMID:23015957

  11. Flight trajectory of a rotating golf ball with grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Moonheum; Kim, Jooha; Choi, Haecheon

    2014-11-01

    Dimples are known to reduce drag on a sphere by the amount of 50% as compared to a smooth surface. Despite the advantage of reducing drag, dimples deteriorate the putting accuracy owing to their sharp edges. To minimize this putting error but maintain the same flight distance, we have devised a grooved golf ball (called G ball hereafter) for several years. In this study, we modify the shape and pattern of grooves, and investigate the flow characteristics of the G ball by performing wind-tunnel experiments at the Reynolds numbers of 0 . 5 ×105 - 2 . 5 ×105 and the spin ratios (ratio of surface velocity to the free-stream velocity) of 0 - 0.6 that include the real golf-ball velocity and rotational speed. We measure the drag and lift forces on the rotating G ball and compare them with those of a smooth ball and two well-known dimpled balls. The lift-to-drag ratio of the G ball is much higher than that of a smooth ball and is in between those of the two dimpled balls. The trajectories of flying golf balls are computed. The flight distance of G ball is almost the same as that of one dimpled ball but slightly shorter than that of the other dimpled ball. The fluid-dynamic aspects of these differences will be discussed at the talk. Supported by 2011-0028032, 2014M3C1B1033980.

  12. Hong Kong: women's club movement expanding.

    PubMed

    1980-01-01

    2 more women's clubs have been opened by the Family Planning Association of Hong Kong following the success of the 1st such club at Yue Taipo organized in September 1970. The 2nd club is located at the Hing Shing Temporary Housing Area in Kwai Chung and caters to new residents. The 3rd, established January 4, 1980, is located at the Fortune Street Temporary Housing Area in Cheung Sha Wan. The overall aim of these clubs is to give a boost to the quality of family life through organized educational and recreational facilities. Activities at both clubs were initiated by formal opening ceremonies presided over by representatives of the Housing Estates and Family Planning Association. Welcoming wellwishers at each ceremony, Mrs. Peggy Lam, Acting Director of the Family Planning Association of Hong Kong; drew attention to the important contribution made by family planning to the well being of families. It was through the wise planning of their families that parents were provided with ample time and energy for the upbringing of chilren, said Mrs. Lam. The activities of the women's clubs include instruction on traditional women's activities, and talks on sanitation, childrearing, interpersonal relations, nutrition, and permanent contraception. Mrs. Lam felt that the fact that 79% of married women of childbearing age in Hing Shing were practicing family planning was most encouraging. PMID:12262028

  13. Recurrence after composite repair of a giant hiatus hernia: 'the golf club' deformity is a distinctive clinical and radiological picture.

    PubMed

    Furtado, R V; Falk, G L; Vivian, S J

    2016-07-01

    Background Recurrence of a hiatus hernia after cardiopexy repair can obstruct the lower oesophagus but also provide characteristic radiographic images after a barium meal. Case History Two patients with recurrence of a hiatus hernia underwent repeat surgery. Here, we provide and discuss diagnostic imaging, surgical findings and outcome for these male and female patients. Conclusions Repeat surgery is indicated in patients with recurrence of a hiatus hernia after repair. PMID:27241603

  14. Heads Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenil HEADS UP to School Sports Online Concussion Training Coaches Parents Athletes Sports Officials HEADS UP to Schools School Nurses Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals Parents HEADS UP ...

  15. 76 FR 27253 - Safety Zone; Catawba Island Club Fireworks, Catawba Island Club, Port Clinton, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Catawba Island Club Fireworks, Catawba Island Club, Port Clinton, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Clinton, Ohio. This zone is intended to restrict vessels from portions of Lake Erie for the Catawba...

  16. Promoting Golf as a Lifetime Physical Activity for Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandt, Dawn D.; Flynn, Erin; Turner, Tiffany A.

    2014-01-01

    Golf is one of the most accessible and versatile physical activities and is a viable choice for young adults with disabilities to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Teaching golf to youth with disabilities requires more than making accommodations regarding equipment, technique, and rules in the physical education setting. For…

  17. Golf Ball Roll Distance: A Field Exercise to Explore Management Factors Affecting Putting Green Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Cale A.; Walker, Kristina S.

    2007-01-01

    Putting greens are the most important golf course use area and regularly draw comments regarding their appearance and playing condition. This field laboratory exercise taught students how to properly measure putting green speed, an important functional characteristic, using a Stimpmeter device that measures golf ball roll distance (BRD).…

  18. Nitrous oxide emissions from a golf course fairway and rough following application of different nitrogen fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that destroys stratospheric ozone. There is limited research of golf course N2O emission and the effects of frequent fertilization and irrigation. Three enhanced efficiency nitrogen fertilizers (EENFs) were applied to a Colorado golf course fairway and ...

  19. Bridging the Generation Gap: "Growing Golf" through an Action Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbert, Norb; Cumiskey, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an action learning simulation designed for a Professional Golf Management (PGM) program housed in a College of Business of a public university. The PGA Golf Management University Program, a 4.5- to 5-year college curriculum for aspiring PGA Professionals is offered at 19 PGA accredited universities nationwide. The program…

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF A GOLF COMPLEX ON COASTAL WETLANDS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of contamination to nearby coastal wetlands and other near-shore areas. The chemical and biological magnitude of the problem is almost unknown. To provide perspective on this issue, the effects of golf complex r...

  1. Guidelines for a proposed lightning protection policy of a golf association or tournament sponsor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillyer, Charles C.

    1991-01-01

    Because lightning causes many deaths and injuries each year on golf courses, guidelines are given for measures to be taken during golf events. Recommendations are given relative to warning systems, shelters, suspension of play, and the distribution of written policy statements.

  2. Shufflegolf: Teaching Golf Strategies and Etiquette to Young Children and Learners with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Francis M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share a unique curricular idea with physical educators interested about adding golf concepts to their curriculum. The focus is on a modified golf game that helps teach tactics, strategies, rules, and etiquette to young learners and those with intellectual disabilities. The specific content for this unit focuses on…

  3. The Club of Rome and its computer.

    PubMed

    Chase, S

    1973-03-01

    When the Club of Rome, an assemblage of 75 scientists and businessmen gathered to study the ''predicament of mankind in the face of technology growing at an exponential rate,'' issued its computer study it launched a battle between proponents of gross national product and those favoring quality of life. The computer simulation studied the interaction of population growth, food supply, inductrial production, resource use, and pollution under varying conditions. It concluded that our industrial system is headed for too many people in relation to food and living space, too much production in relation to natural resources, and for too much pollution. This will affect all countries. The traditional economists say the continued growth of the gross national product is the only way to ensure better living conditions while the ecologists point out that quality of life is being destroyed. The author cites arguments both for and against the quality-of-life view. The problem is that continued industrial growth creates wants as well as satisfying them and leads to waste as well as needful consumption. John Stuart Mill stated 100 years ago that the world could not support continued technological expansion and society must reach an equilibrium. 8 steps must be taken if the planet is to reach such an equilibrium, which is essential to the survival of all: 1) a zero rate of population growth, although there may be variations between countries with some over and some under; 2) a zero rate of industrial output with overall new investment equal to overall rate of industrial depreciation; 3) a policy of recycling and conserving material resources; 4) an adequate budget of food, shelter, clothing, health services, and education for every human being (a budget which does not allow for autos and air conditioning); 5) a sharp decline in consumption of material goods in affluent societies with a corresponding shift to more services and an increase in material goods for low energy societies

  4. High School Political Clubs--A First Amendment Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Martin R.

    1977-01-01

    The First and Fourteenth Amendments guarantee that high school students may form political clubs. Such clubs should be recognized by the school unless they prevent others from learning, interrupt class, or violate valid school rules. (Author/IRT)

  5. KIND Clubs: A Humane Education Innovation That's Working.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Patty

    1990-01-01

    The Kids in Nature's Defense (KIND) Club and the "adopt" a teacher program are described. The importance of animals and the environment is emphasized. Information on how to start a KIND Club is provided. (KR)

  6. Contextual view to southwest of Burton Park Club House and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view to southwest of Burton Park Club House and Amphitheater (90mm lens). Pedestals within Amphitheater are supports for bench seating - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  7. View of the yacht club facing south from Front Street. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the yacht club facing south from Front Street. Harbor storage building and restrooms are on the left. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  8. Detail, exterior side of doubleplanked north end, Burton Park Club ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, exterior side of double-planked north end, Burton Park Club House, view to south-southwest (135mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  9. Interior detail, fireplace, main room, Burton Park Club House, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior detail, fireplace, main room, Burton Park Club House, view to northwest (135mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  10. Contextual view to northnorthwest of Burton Park Club House and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view to north-northwest of Burton Park Club House and Amphitheater (90 mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  11. Detail, front doors, Burton Park Club House, view to west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, front doors, Burton Park Club House, view to west northwest (135mm lens). Note simplified pilasters flanking doors. - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  12. Contextual view to north of Burton Park Club House and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view to north of Burton Park Club House and Amphitheater, taken from adjacent circular drive (135mm lens) - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  13. Oblique view, north end and west side, Burton Park Club ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view, north end and west side, Burton Park Club House, view to south (90mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  14. General view, Belair Bath and Tennis Club, Belair at Bowie, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view, Belair Bath and Tennis Club, Belair at Bowie, Maryland, looking west. - Belair Bath and Tennis Club, Southwest corner of Belair Drive and Tulip Grove Drive, Bowie, Prince George's County, MD

  15. Integrating Current Meteorological Research Through Club Fundraising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, S. S.; Kauffman, C. M.

    2003-12-01

    Earth science programs whose focus is primarily an undergraduate education do not often have the funding to take students to very many conferences which could expose the student to new research as well as possible graduate programs and employment opportunities. Conferences also give the more enthusiastic and hardworking students a venue in which to present their research to the meteorological community. In addition, the California University services largely lower income counties, which make student attendance at conferences even more difficult even though the student in SW PA may be individually motivated. This issue is compounded by the fact that the Meteorology Concentration within the Earth Science department at Cal U is composed of only two full-time Professors, which limits the amount of research students can be exposed to within a classroom setting. New research ideas presented at conferences are thus an important mechanism for broadening what could be an isolated program. One way in which the meteorology program has circumvented the funding problem to a certain extent is through an active student club. With nearly 60 majors (3/4 of which are active in club activities, the meteorology club is able to execute a variety of fundraising activities. Money that is raised can then request from student services matching funds. Further money is given to clubs, which are very active not only in fundraising, but using that money for academic related activities. For the last 3 years the club budget has been in the neighborhood of \\$4500. The money has then been used to partially finance student registration and accommodation costs making conference attendance much more affordable. Normally 8-16 students attend conferences that they would otherwise not be able to attend without great expense. There are times when more than 16 students wish to attend, but travel arrangements prohibit more than 16. Moreover club money is also use to supplement student costs on a summer

  16. A Librarian's Planning Handbook for the Texas Reading Club.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelan, Jody

    Developed for the Texas Reading Club, a program sponsored cooperatively by local libraries and the Texas State Library and designed to encourage children and their parents to read and use the library, this planning handbook is intended to help librarians and volunteers organize and manage a local reading club. The Texas Reading Club program is…

  17. Health Promotion Guidance Activity of Youth Sports Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokko, Sami; Kannas, Lasse; Villberg, Jari; Ormshaw, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to clarify the extent to which youth sports clubs guide their coaches to recognise health promotion as a part of the coaching practice. The guidance activity of clubs is seen parallel to internal organisational communication. Design/methodology/approach: A survey of 93 (from 120, 78 per cent) youth sports clubs in Finland…

  18. An Exploration of Recent Club Drug Use among Rave Attendees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacoubian, George S.; Peters, Ronald J.

    2007-01-01

    Raves are characterized by large numbers of youth dancing for long periods of time and by the use of "club drugs," such as 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy"). While a small body of research has explored the use of ecstasy and other club drugs (EOCD) among club rave attendees in the United States, we are aware of no studies that…

  19. Contextual view to northwest of Burton Park Club House and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view to northwest of Burton Park Club House and Amphitheater. Steps lead up from wings of stage area to club house grade level (135mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  20. The Prevalence and Practices of Academic Library Journal Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Philip; Vilelle, Luke

    2011-01-01

    Increased mention of journal clubs in the library literature and the recent creation of clubs at the authors' institutions sparked curiosity about how widespread they are in academic libraries. An online survey announced on library listservs assessed their prevalence and practices. Library journal clubs promote current awareness, analysis skills,…

  1. The 4-H Club Meeting: An Essential Youth Development Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassels, Alicia; Post, Liz; Nestor, Patrick I.

    2015-01-01

    The club meeting has served as a key delivery method for 4-H programming across the United States throughout its history. A survey of WV 4-H community club members reinforces the body of evidence that the 4-H club meeting is an effective vehicle for delivering positive youth learning opportunities within the umbrella of the Essential Elements of…

  2. 5. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CLUB MODERNE LOUNGE SHOWING EXAMPLES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CLUB MODERNE LOUNGE SHOWING EXAMPLES OF THE LEATHER COVERED BOOTHS INSTALLED IN 19486. FACADE OF THE CLUB MODERNE, SHOWING THE ORIGINAL CURVED CORNER PROFILE AND TRI-COLOR CARRERE GLASS FACADE. - Anaconda Historic District, Club Moderne, 801 East Park Avenue, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, MT

  3. Brown & Gold Club Member Survey: What Senior Adults Want.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Karen A.

    In order to better serve the senior population in its community, Johnson County Community College (JCCC) (Kansas) created the Brown and Gold Club (named after the school colors), which offers JCCC education and special events to adults age 55 and over. Membership in the club now exceeds 4,800 people. Not only does the club serve the senior…

  4. Power and control in gay strip clubs.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Joseph R G

    2007-01-01

    The gay strip club is a place in which more than displays of male beauty take place. The mix of customers, performers, liquor, and nudity results in fascinating dynamics. Of interest in this article are the power relationships and issues of control played out both among and between strippers and customers. Based on extensive participant observation conducted in eight cities and numerous bars/clubs and including more than 150 in-depth interviews, this article concerns just one aspect of the world of male strippers who perform for men. PMID:18019071

  5. Peer pressure and thai amateur golfers' gambling on their games: the mediating effect of golf self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ariyabuddhiphongs, Vanchai; Promsakha Na Sakolnakorn, Chomnad

    2014-09-01

    Our study hypothesizes that Thai amateur golfers gamble on their game because of peer pressure and their golf self-efficacy. To support our hypothesis, we conducted a study to examine the mediating effect of golf self-efficacy on the peer pressure-golf gambling relationship among 387 amateur golfers in Thailand. Peer pressure was operationally defined as fellow players' influence on the individual golfer to gamble; golf self-efficacy as the judgment of the golfer's skills to play golf; and golf gambling as the frequency and amounts of gambling. Regression analysis with bootstrapping was used to test the mediation effect of golf self-efficacy on the peer pressure-golf gambling relationship. The results support our hypothesis; peer pressure predicted golf gambling, and the indirect effect of peer pressure to golf gambling through the mediation of golf self-efficacy was significant. The results support the influence of peer pressure on gambling, and the social cognitive theory reciprocal relationship model. PMID:23504240

  6. GUIDE FOR SELF-EXAMINATION AND PLANNING, THE CLUB ANALYSIS PROGRAM OF INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT CLUBS OF THE YMCA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MEYER, WILLIAM F.

    THIS GUIDE PROVIDES A QUESTION AND ANSWER METHOD IN WHICH LEADERS OF INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT CLUBS (IMC) MAY EVALUATE CLUB PROGRESS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS. A REPORT OF A NATIONAL STUDY MADE BY GEORGE WILLIAMS COLLEGE ON I.M.C. MEMBERS AND THEIR ATTITUDES TOWARD CLUB PROGRESS IS PROVIDED AS A GUIDE FOR GATHERING INFORMATION. A SMALL CORE STEERING…

  7. Constitutional Law--State Action--Golden v. Biscayne Bay Yacht Club: Preventing Discrimination by Private Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Michael W.

    1976-01-01

    Although the Supreme Court has refrained from answering whether the membership policies of private clubs can be attacked on state action grounds, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals held in the affirmative in Golden v. Biscayne Bay Yacht Club. It ruled that leasing publicly owned bay bottom land to a yacht club constituted sufficient state…

  8. Victor Coxon, member, B.J.'s Black Tie Club at Palmer, 1936-1941.

    PubMed

    Hart, J

    1998-12-01

    The 1930's era was a turbulent time for B.J. Palmer who was proposing radical changes in chiropractic methodologies, i.e., the Hole-in-one upper cervical approach, neurocalometer examinations and heavy reliance on x-ray for vertebral listings. Palmer needed and found an inner circle of loyal supporters at the Fountain Head who were named the "Black Tie Club," identified at important Palmer functions wearing the flowing black tie--the Windsor. One such Black Tie Club member was Victor Coxon--a 1930 Palmer School graduate who passed away recently. The present article explores Coxon's assistant directorship of the B.J. Palmer Chiropractic Clinic, some of his many writings, as well as correspondence Dr. Coxon had with the author. PMID:11623680

  9. Rotational biomechanics of the elite golf swing: benchmarks for amateurs.

    PubMed

    Meister, David W; Ladd, Amy L; Butler, Erin E; Zhao, Betty; Rogers, Andrew P; Ray, Conrad J; Rose, Jessica

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine biomechanical factors that may influence golf swing power generation. Three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics were examined in 10 professional and 5 amateur male golfers. Upper-torso rotation, pelvic rotation, X-factor (relative hip-shoulder rotation), O-factor (pelvic obliquity), S-factor (shoulder obliquity), and normalized free moment were assessed in relation to clubhead speed at impact (CSI). Among professional golfers, results revealed that peak free moment per kilogram, peak X-factor, and peak S-factor were highly consistent, with coefficients of variation of 6.8%, 7.4%, and 8.4%, respectively. Downswing was initiated by reversal of pelvic rotation, followed by reversal of upper-torso rotation. Peak X-factor preceded peak free moment in all swings for all golfers, and occurred during initial downswing. Peak free moment per kilogram, X-factor at impact, peak X-factor, and peak upper-torso rotation were highly correlated to CSI (median correlation coefficients of 0.943, 0.943, 0.900, and 0.900, respectively). Benchmark curves revealed kinematic and kinetic temporal and spatial differences of amateurs compared with professional golfers. For amateurs, the number of factors that fell outside 1-2 standard deviations of professional means increased with handicap. This study identified biomechanical factors highly correlated to golf swing power generation and may provide a basis for strategic training and injury prevention. PMID:21844613

  10. Training-induced neural plasticity in golf novices.

    PubMed

    Bezzola, Ladina; Mérillat, Susan; Gaser, Christian; Jäncke, Lutz

    2011-08-31

    Previous neuroimaging studies in the field of motor learning have shown that learning a new skill induces specific changes of neural gray and white matter in human brain areas necessary to control the practiced task. Former longitudinal studies investigating motor skill learning have used strict training protocols with little ecological validity rather than physical leisure activities, although there are several retrospective and cross-sectional studies suggesting neuroprotective effects of physical leisure activities. In the present longitudinal MRI study, we used voxel-based morphometry to investigate training-induced gray matter changes in golf novices between the age of 40 and 60 years, an age period when an active life style is assumed to counteract cognitive decline. As a main result, we demonstrate that 40 h of golf practice, performed as a leisure activity with highly individual training protocols, are associated with gray matter increases in a task-relevant cortical network encompassing sensorimotor regions and areas belonging to the dorsal stream. A new and striking result is the relationship between training intensity (time needed to complete the 40 training hours) and structural changes observed in the parieto-occipital junction. Thus, we demonstrate that a physical leisure activity induces training-dependent changes in gray matter and assume that a strict and controlled training protocol is not mandatory for training-induced adaptations of gray matter. PMID:21880905

  11. Hip Rotational Velocities During the Full Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Gulgin, Heather; Armstrong, Charles; Gribble, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Since labral pathology in professional golfers has been reported, and such pathology has been associated with internal/external hip rotation, quantifying the rotational velocity of the hips during the golf swing may be helpful in understanding the mechanism involved in labral injury. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the peak internal/external rotational velocities of the thigh relative to the pelvis during the golf swing. Fifteen female, collegiate golfers participated in the study. Data were acquired through high-speed three dimensional (3-D) videography using a multi-segment bilateral marker set to define the segments, while the subjects completed multiple repetitions of a drive. The results indicated that the lead hip peak internal rotational velocity was significantly greater than that of the trail hip external rotational velocity (p = 0.003). It appears that the lead hip of a golfer experiences much higher rotational velocities during the downswing than that of the trail hip. In other structures, such as the shoulder, an increased risk of soft tissue injury has been associated with high levels of rotational velocity. This may indicate that, in golfers, the lead hip may be more susceptible to injury such as labral tears than that of the trailing hip. Key points Lead hip of golfer experiences significantly higher rotational velocities than the trail hip. Golfers may be more susceptible to injuries on the lead hip. Clubhead velocities were consistent with elite female golfers. PMID:24149541

  12. Electromyographic analysis of the hip and knee during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Bechler, J R; Jobe, F W; Pink, M; Perry, J; Ruwe, P A

    1995-07-01

    As golf increases in popularity, more golfers seek the proper mechanics necessary for the perfect golf swing. Surprisingly little scientific work has been published on the contribution of the hip and knee muscles during the golf swing even though most professionals have recognized their vital contribution. Recent studies have described the electromyographic (EMG) muscle activity of the shoulder, back, and trunk during the golf swing. The purpose of this study was to describe the electrical muscle activity in seven hip and knee muscles of both the left (lead) and right (trail) leg in competitive golfers while performing the golf swing. Sixteen golfers were studied with indwelling electrodes and high-speed cinematography. The EMG was synchronized with the film to discern five phases of the golf swing. Means, SDs, and t-tests were done. The results revealed that the trail hip extensors and abductors in conjunction with the lead adductor magus initiated pelvic rotation during forward swing. The lead hamstrings maintained a flexed knee and provided a stable base on which pelvic rotation took place. The peak EMG muscle activity recorded in the hips and knees occurred in an earlier phase than that measured previously in the trunk and shoulder. This confirmed the sequential firing pattern of the hip and knee muscles that takes place during the competitive golf swing. Information gained from this study can be used by players and coaches to optimize performance and to minimize injury. PMID:7670971

  13. Implementing a successful journal club in an anesthesiology residency program.

    PubMed

    Pitner, Nathaniel D; Fox, Chris A; Riess, Matthias L

    2013-01-01

    Journal clubs are an integral element of residency training. We report the successful implementation of a monthly structured journal club in our anesthesia residency program. Based on resident surveys before and one year after its start, the journal club led to a significantly higher confidence in how to critically appraise literature and present a manuscript. The journal club also improved the residents' ability to search the literature and their statistical knowledge, skills that are essential in the practice of evidence-based medicine. We describe key features that may aid other training programs in organizing a stimulating an educational and sustainable journal club. PMID:24358844

  14. Correlation of Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screens and golf swing faults.

    PubMed

    Gulgin, Heather R; Schulte, Brian C; Crawley, Amy A

    2014-02-01

    Although some research in the past has examined how physical limitations in strength or flexibility affect a golfer's performance, the performance outcome most measured was driving distance. Currently, there are no data that have examined the relationship between selected strength and flexibility variables and golf swing faults. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) level 1 movement screen variables and 14 common golf swing faults. Thirty-six male and female golfers (mean age, 25.4 ± 9.9 years; height, 175.9 ± 16.2 cm; mass, 76.2 ± 14.6 kg; handicap, 14.2 ± 10.4) participated. Twelve physical tests of strength, flexibility, and balance were assessed using the TPI level 1 golf fitness screening tool. Golfers then hit 4 golf shots (with a 5-iron) while being videoed, and those were then analyzed for 14 different golf swing faults (using V1Pro software). Three significant associations between a physical limitation and a particular golf swing fault were found: toe touch and early hip extension (p = 0.015), bridge on right side with both early hip extension (p = 0.050), and loss of posture (p = 0.028). In addition, an odds ratio showed that when a golfer could not overhead deep squat or single leg balance on left side, they were 2-3 times more likely to exhibit a early hip extension, loss of posture, or slide during the golf swing, as compared with those who could perform a correct overhead deep squat. Based on our findings, it is important for the golf fitness professional to particularly address a golfer's core strength, balance, and hamstring flexibility to help avoid common golf swing faults, which affect a golfer's ball striking ability and ultimately their performance. PMID:24476744

  15. Topics for Mathematics Clubs. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, LeRoy C., Ed.; Snyder, Henry D., Ed.

    One of the main purposes of a mathematics club is to provide the opportunity for students to study exciting topics in mathematics not ordinarily discussed in the classroom. Each of the 10 chapters in this booklet is a collection of related subtopics. Each idea is presented and discussed; bibliographies then suggest in-depth reading. The chapters…

  16. Operations Course Icebreaker: Campus Club Cupcakes Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Brent; Southin, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Campus Club Cupcakes is an in-class "introduction to operations management" experiential learning exercise which can be used within minutes of starting the course. After reading the one-page mini case, students are encouraged to meet each other and collaborate to determine if making and selling cupcakes to fellow business students would…

  17. Dr. von Braun Visits Huntsville Boys Club

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun, Director of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and chairman of this year's United Givers Fund (UGF) drive at MSFC, takes time out from the problems of sending a man to the Moon to talk baseball with 11-year-old Randy Smith at the Huntsville Boys Club.

  18. The Academic Clubs: Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bicknell, Noel

    2010-01-01

    The Lab School of Washington (LSW) uses a unique approach to teaching social studies and humanities content. As part of its arts-driven lower school program, each child spends 40 minutes a day in dedicated rooms that simulate a specific historical time and place. Called "academic clubs," teachers use these spaces to teach thematic, arts-based,…

  19. Clubs Reach Urban Middle Level Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Rosalind P.

    1993-01-01

    When busing limits number of afternoon activities and students do not seem interested anyway, principals must look for opportunities during day to involve students. One inner-city middle-school principal helped teachers initiate program of morning clubs and assemblies to increase student self-esteem and encourage student and parent involvement…

  20. New Methods for an Undergraduate Journal Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jordan M.; Rollins, Adam W.; Smith, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Journal clubs have been used to advance students' scientific skills beyond basic knowledge and comprehension, but students often view the traditional format of analyzing reported data and experimental design as laborious and intimidating. As such, the traditional approach can diminish student engagement and enthusiasm for the value of…

  1. Radio Clubs of Niger: September, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAnany, Emile G.

    The Radio Club Association of Niger (ARCN) is a private agency and has been in operation for ten years under the guidance of the radio section of the Ministry of Information. The primary objective of this project is not the assimilation of information but the growth in awareness of their situation by local people. Most of the program therefore…

  2. Advice on Setting up a STEM Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Faisal

    2013-01-01

    Setting up a STEM club can be the most daunting item that one faces on a department's development plan. Coupled with all the other demands that exist within teaching and learning, teachers can be easily forgiven for pushing this task further and further into the school year until it eventually becomes one of next year's "to-do" items.…

  3. Head circumference

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child's head circumference Normal ranges for a child's sex and age (weeks, months), based on values that experts have obtained for normal growth rates of infants' and children's heads Measurement of the head circumference is an ...

  4. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  5. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... of head injuries include bicycle or motorcycle wrecks, sports injuries, falls from windows (especially among children who live ... to watch for? When can I start playing sports again after a head injury? How can brain damage from a head injury ...

  6. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to do ...

  7. Effect of spinal manipulative therapy with stretching compared with stretching alone on full-swing performance of golf players: a randomized pilot trial☆

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Soraya M.V.; Chibana, Yumi E.T.; Giavarotti, Leandro; Compagnoni, Débora S.; Shiono, Adriana H.; Satie, Janice; Bracher, Eduardo S.B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective There has been a steady growth of chiropractic treatment using spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) that aims to increase the performance of athletes in various sports. This study evaluates the effect of SMT by chiropractors on the performance of golf players. Methods Golfers of 2 golf clubs in São Paulo, Brazil, participated in this study. They were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: Group I received a stretch program, and group II received a stretch program in addition to SMT. Participants in both groups performed the same standardized stretching program. Spinal manipulative therapy to dysfunctional spinal segments was performed on group II only. All golfers performed 3 full-swing maneuvers. Ball range was considered as the average distance for the 3 shots. Treatment was performed after the initial measurement, and the same maneuvers were performed afterward. Each participant repeated these procedures for a 4-week period. Student t test, Mann-Whitney nonparametric test, and 1-way analysis of variance for repeated measures with significance level of 5% were used to analyze the study. Results Forty-three golfers completed the protocol. Twenty participants were allocated to group I and 23 to group II. Average age, handicap, and initial swing were comparable. No improvement of full-swing performance was observed during the 4 sessions on group I (stretch only). An improvement was observed at the fourth session of group II (P = .005); when comparing the posttreatment, group II had statistical significance at all phases (P = .003). Conclusions Chiropractic SMT in association with muscle stretching may be associated with an improvement of full-swing performance when compared with muscle stretching alone. PMID:19948307

  8. Prevalence and Predictors of Club Drug Use among Club-Going Young Adults in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Brian C.; Wells, Brooke E.

    2006-01-01

    Club drugs” encompass a diverse range of substances. Although efforts have been made to determine the extent of club drug use among the general population, it is equally important to assess patterns of use among key target populations from which drug trends typically diffuse. This paper describes the results of a survey focused upon club drug use among club-going young adults in NYC. Time-space sampling generated a sample of 1,914 club-going young adults (ages 18–29) who provided data on their use of six key club drugs: ecstasy, ketamine, cocaine, methamphetamine, GHB, and LSD, as well as data on their gender, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, and other demographic variables. Club-going young adults report drug use at high rates—70% report lifetime illicit drug use and 22% report recent club drug use. Rates of club drug use differ by gender, sexual orientation and race/ethnicity. Male gender is predictive of ketamine, GHB, and methamphetamine use, while female gender is predictive of cocaine use. Gay/bisexual orientation and White race are predictive of the use of several club drugs. Greater health promotion efforts are warranted among this population. Intervention programs and campaigns should tailor specific drug messages to differentially target various segments of dance club patrons. PMID:16937088

  9. Golfing skill level postural control differences: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, James S; Marclay, Samuel; Najafi, Bijan

    2012-01-01

    Golfers have better balance than their age-matched counterparts; however, it is uncertain if this persists during the swing as a function of skill level. The purpose of the study was to investigate dynamic postural control (center of mass (COM) motion) measured during different phases of the swing in golfers of varying proficiency. Eighteen healthy golfers were grouped by handicap: novice (no handicap, n = 7), intermediate (handicap 15-19, n = 7), and advanced (handicap 9-14, n = 4). Indoor testing was performed hitting 3 tee shots using a common driver. A five-camera (60 Hz) motion analysis system (9 markers) was used to extract kinematics data. There were no significant group differences in gender, age, or BMI. Advanced players had lower COM displacement with respect to address at the time of maximum arm speed (p = 0. 001) compared to intermediate (57%, p = 0.014) and novice (73%, p = 0.023). These changes persisted after COM distance and time normalization. Advanced golfers had improved COM linearity during the downswing (p < 0.001) compared to intermediate (30%, p = 0.029) and novice (51%, p < 0.001). Advanced players had decreased COM displacement at the time of maximum arm speed and a more linear COM path during the early downswing. Further study should focus on these changes during ball launch conditions. Key pointsStudies suggest that static and dynamic balance is important in golf. However, none have investigated dynamic postural control during the golf swing in golfers of varying proficiency.Our findings suggest advanced players demonstrated improved postural control at the point of maximum arm speed when compared to less skilled players. Furthermore, center of mass acceleration in advanced players is closer to impact than less-skilled players.We observed an increased center of mass linearity of trajectory during the early downswing for advanced players over novice players. We theorized this strategy may help advanced golfers to improve the economy of COM

  10. 77 FR 62444 - Safety Zone; 2012 Head of the South Regatta, Savannah River, Augusta, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... South Regatta, which will consist of a series of rowing races. The 2012 Head of the South Regatta is... November 9, 2012, Augusta Rowing Club is hosting the 2012 Head of the South Regatta, a series of...

  11. Improving performance in golf: current research and implications from a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kerrie; Tuttle, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Golf, a global sport enjoyed by people of all ages and abilities, involves relatively long periods of low intensity exercise interspersed with short bursts of high intensity activity. To meet the physical demands of full swing shots and the mental and physical demands of putting and walking the course, it is frequently recommended that golfers undertake golf-specific exercise programs. Biomechanics, motor learning, and motor control research has increased the understanding of the physical requirements of the game, and using this knowledge, exercise programs aimed at improving golf performance have been developed. However, while it is generally accepted that an exercise program can improve a golfer's physical measurements and some golf performance variables, translating the findings from research into clinical practice to optimise an individual golfer's performance remains challenging. This paper discusses how biomechanical and motor control research has informed current practice and discusses how emerging sophisticated tools and research designs may better assist golfers improve their performance. PMID:26537808

  12. Improving performance in golf: current research and implications from a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Evans, Kerrie; Tuttle, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Golf, a global sport enjoyed by people of all ages and abilities, involves relatively long periods of low intensity exercise interspersed with short bursts of high intensity activity. To meet the physical demands of full swing shots and the mental and physical demands of putting and walking the course, it is frequently recommended that golfers undertake golf-specific exercise programs. Biomechanics, motor learning, and motor control research has increased the understanding of the physical requirements of the game, and using this knowledge, exercise programs aimed at improving golf performance have been developed. However, while it is generally accepted that an exercise program can improve a golfer's physical measurements and some golf performance variables, translating the findings from research into clinical practice to optimise an individual golfer's performance remains challenging. This paper discusses how biomechanical and motor control research has informed current practice and discusses how emerging sophisticated tools and research designs may better assist golfers improve their performance. PMID:26537808

  13. Golf course development in a major tourist destination: implications for planning and management.

    PubMed

    Warnken, J; Thompson, D; Zakus, D H

    2001-05-01

    The planning and design of golf course developments is influenced by many factors. This paper focuses on the environmental ramifications of insufficient or lack of compliance with standard environmental and economic planning practices. Specifically, it looks at a tourist destination location that was under the influence of extensive land development and investment speculation. The Gold Coast in Australia was the focal point for large overseas investment due to changes in government legislation regarding foreign investment. Due to the economic climate in the second half of the 1980s many golf course resort developments were built, approved, or planned. Many of these circumvented normal business and environment planning processes. The result has been a dangerous concentration of golf facilities in environmentally sensitive areas and an oversupply of golf facilities. Both of these matters are discussed in terms of the general planning process and the potential economic and environmental impacts to the Gold Coast and similar destinations in other parts of the world. PMID:11334156

  14. Water quality, pesticide occurrence, and effects of irrigation with reclaimed water at golf courses in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swancar, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Reuse of treated wastewater for golf course irrigation is an increasingly popular water management option in Florida, where growth has put stress on potable water supplies. Surface water, ground water, and irrigation water were sampled at three pairs of golf courses quarterly for one year to determine if pesticides were present, and the effect of irrigation with treated effluent on ground-water quality, with an emphasis on interactions of effluent with pesticides. In addition to the six paired golf courses, which were in central Florida, ground water was sampled for pesticides and other constituents at three more golf courses in other parts of the State. This study was the first to analyze water samples from Florida golf courses for a broad range of pesticides. Statistical methods based on the percentage of data above detection limits were used to determine the effects of irrigation with reclaimed water on ground-water quality. Shallow ground water at golf courses irrigated with treated effluent has higher concentrations of chloride, lower concentrations of bicarbonate, and lower pH than ground water at golf courses irrigated with water from carbonate aquifers. There were no statistically significant differences in nutrient concentrations in ground water between paired golf courses grouped by irrigation water type at a 95 percent confidence level. The number of wells where pesticides occurred was significantly higher at the paired golf courses using ground water for irrigation than at ones using reclaimed water. However, the limited occurrences of individual pesticides in ground water make it difficult to correlate differences in irrigation- water quality with pesticide migration to the water table. At some of the golf courses, increased pesticide occurrences may be associated with higher irrigation rates, the presence of well-drained soils, and shallow depths to the surficial aquifer. Pesticides used by golf courses for turf grass maintenance were detected in

  15. Off site transport of fungicides with snowmelt and rainfall runoff from golf course fairway turf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pesticides associated with the turfgrass industry have been detected in storm runoff and surface waters of urban watersheds; inferring contaminant contributions from residential, urban, and recreational sources. Golf course turf often requires multiple applications of pesticides at rates that exceed...

  16. Fabricator tees up with golf-car redesign

    SciTech Connect

    Hallum, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    EZ-Go Textron, Augusta, USA, manufactures 40 models of gasoline- and electric-powered utility vehicles, personnel carriers, and golf cars. Despite its popular product line, EZ-Go management recognized it had a problem; fabricating processes and product design hadn`t changed for 25 years and, at peak production, workers cloistered in dark, dingy shops were fabricating over-designed chassis and car frames using manual gas-metal arc welding. A global production plan, involving redesign of the product and plant modernization, was presented 3 years ago. The plan established volume outputs and shutdown steps for migrating from the old to the new design. The author describes the plan which incorporates linking product redesign, complex stampings, conveyor lines, and robotic welding.

  17. Root-knot nematodes in golf course greens of the western United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A survey of 238 golf courses in ten of the Western U.S. found root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) in 60 % of the putting greens sampled. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA, D2-D3 of 28S rRNA, ITS-rRNA and mtDNA gene sequences were used to identify specimens from 110 golf courses. The...

  18. The Biomechanics of the Modern Golf Swing: Implications for Lower Back Injuries.

    PubMed

    Cole, Michael H; Grimshaw, Paul N

    2016-03-01

    The modern golf swing is a complex and asymmetrical movement that places an emphasis on restricting pelvic turn while increasing thorax rotation during the backswing to generate higher clubhead speeds at impact. Increasing thorax rotation relative to pelvic rotation preloads the trunk muscles by accentuating their length and allowing them to use the energy stored in their elastic elements to produce more power. As the thorax and pelvis turn back towards the ball during the downswing, more skilled golfers are known to laterally slide their pelvis toward the target, which further contributes to final clubhead speed. However, despite the apparent performance benefits associated with these sequences, it has been argued that the lumbar spine is incapable of safely accommodating the forces they produce. This notion supports a link between the repeated performance of the golf swing and the development of golf-related low back injuries. Of the complaints reported by golfers, low back injuries continue to be the most prevalent, but the mechanism of these injuries is still poorly understood. This review highlights that there is a paucity of research directly evaluating the apparent link between the modern golf swing and golf-related low back pain. Furthermore, there has been a general lack of consensus within the literature with respect to the methods used to objectively assess the golf swing and the methods used to derived common outcome measures. Future research would benefit from a clear set of guidelines to help reduce the variability between studies. PMID:26604102

  19. The rich club phenomenon in the classroom

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, Luis M.; Cebrian, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of the online interactions held by college students and report on novel relationships between social structure and performance. Our results indicate that more frequent and intense social interactions generally imply better score for students engaging in them. We find that these interactions are hosted within a “rich-club”, mediated by persistent interactions among high performing students, which is created during the first weeks of the course. Low performing students try to engage in the club after it has been initially formed, and fail to produce reciprocity in their interactions, displaying more transient interactions and higher social diversity. Furthermore, high performance students exchange information by means of complex information cascades, from which low performing students are selectively excluded. Failure to engage in the rich club eventually decreases these students' communication activity towards the end of the course. PMID:23378908

  20. A Unifying Framework for Measuring Weighted Rich Clubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alstott, Jeff; Panzarasa, Pietro; Rubinov, Mikail; Bullmore, Edward T.; Vértes, Petra E.

    2014-12-01

    Network analysis can help uncover meaningful regularities in the organization of complex systems. Among these, rich clubs are a functionally important property of a variety of social, technological and biological networks. Rich clubs emerge when nodes that are somehow prominent or `rich' (e.g., highly connected) interact preferentially with one another. The identification of rich clubs is non-trivial, especially in weighted networks, and to this end multiple distinct metrics have been proposed. Here we describe a unifying framework for detecting rich clubs which intuitively generalizes various metrics into a single integrated method. This generalization rests upon the explicit incorporation of randomized control networks into the measurement process. We apply this framework to real-life examples, and show that, depending on the selection of randomized controls, different kinds of rich-club structures can be detected, such as topological and weighted rich clubs.

  1. The Fuel Cell Powered Club Car Carryall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center initiated development of the Fuel Cell Powered Club Car Carryall as a way to reduce pollution in industrial settings, reduce fossil fuel consumption and reduce operating costs for transportation systems. The Club Car Carryall provides an inexpensive approach to advance the state of the art in electric vehicle technology in a practical application. The project transfers space technology to terrestrial use via non-traditional partners, and provides power system data valuable for future aeronautics and space applications. The work was done under the Hybrid Power Management (HPM) Program. The Carryall is a state of the art, dedicated, electric utility vehicle. Hydrogen powered proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are the primary power source. Ultracapacitors were used for energy storage as long life, maintenance free operation, and excellent low temperature performance is essential. Metal hydride hydrogen storage was used to store hydrogen in a safe and efficient low-pressure solid form. The report concludes that the Fuel Cell Powered Club Car Carryall can provide excellent performance, and that the implementation of fuel cells in conjunction with ultracapacitors in the power system can provide significant reliability and performance improvements.

  2. A Book Club Sheds Light on Boys and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weih, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    This article is about a book club for middle school boys. The idea of a book club for boys came from the author's concern about what he had been hearing and reading about boys falling behind in their reading abilities. The purpose of establishing the club was to discover from the boys themselves what could be done to support them in their reading.…

  3. Frontal Plane Knee Moments in Golf: Effect of Target Side Foot Position at Address

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Scott K.; Noffal, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    Golf has the potential to keep people active well into their later years. Injuries to the target side knee have been reported in golfers, yet no mechanisms for these injuries have been proposed. The loads on the knee during the golf swing may be insufficient to cause acute injury, yet they may be a factor in the progression of overuse/degenerative conditions; therefore, research developing swing modifications that may alter loading of the knee is warranted. It has been suggested that the proper golf set-up position has the target-side foot externally rotated but no reasoning for this modification has been provided. Frontal plane knee moments have been implicated in many knee pathologies. Therefore, this study used a 3-dimensional link segment model to quantify the frontal plane knee moments during the golf swing in a straight (STR) and externally rotated (EXT) target-side foot position. Subjects were 7 collegiate golfers and knee moments were compared between conditions using repeated measures T-tests. The golf swing knee moment magnitudes were also descriptively compared to those reported for two athletic maneuvers (drop jump landing, side-step cutting) and activities of daily living (gait, stair ascent). The EXT condition decreased the peak knee adduction moment as compared to the STR condition; however, foot position had no effect on the peak knee abduction moment. Also, the magnitude of the knee adduction moments during the two activities of daily living were 9-33% smaller than those experienced during the two different golfing conditions. The drop jump landing and golf swing knee moments were of similar magnitude (STR= - 5%, EXT= + 8%); however, the moments associated with side- step cutting were 50-71% larger than those on the target side knee during the golf swing. The loading of the target side knee during the golf swing may be a factor in the development and progression of knee pathologies and further research should examine ways of attenuating these loads

  4. Experiences of participating in an antiretroviral treatment adherence club

    PubMed Central

    Dudhia, Raashika; Kagee, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to streamline the management of large numbers of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in South Africa, adherence clubs were introduced in some districts in the Western Cape since 2008. Adherence clubs are group clinic visits of approximately thirty ART users who receive group adherence counselling and obtain a supply of medication. We sought to document the experiences of patients attending adherence clubs and health care workers at clinics where clubs were operating. Participants were six ART adherence club members and seven health care workers, which included HIV nurses, medical doctors, pharmacists and counsellors. Data in the form of one-on-one interviews were collected at the Infectious Diseases Clinic of a large district hospital in a peri-urban area in the Western Cape region of South Africa. The interviews covered ART users’ experiences of the clubs, advantages and challenges that arose in the context of the club-based method of providing treatment, and the concerns facing ART users and health care workers (HCW’s) with regard to the clubs. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. There were clear benefits to the introduction of adherence clubs, most importantly the reduced amount of time ART users needed to spend at the clinic. Yet, various problems also emerged, the most important one being the logistical problems associated with the timely and correct delivery of drugs. These benefits and disadvantages are discussed in the context of providing ART services to large numbers of patients in post-apartheid South Africa. PMID:25168720

  5. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  6. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prescription products. Over-the-counter shampoos and lotions containing pyrethrin (one brand name: Rid) or permethrin ( ... commonly used to treat head lice. Shampoos and lotions that kill head lice contain pesticides and other ...

  7. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  8. Head lice.

    PubMed

    Devore, Cynthia D; Schutze, Gordon E

    2015-05-01

    Head lice infestation is associated with limited morbidity but causes a high level of anxiety among parents of school-aged children. Since the 2010 clinical report on head lice was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, newer medications have been approved for the treatment of head lice. This revised clinical report clarifies current diagnosis and treatment protocols and provides guidance for the management of children with head lice in the school setting. PMID:25917986

  9. A model of greenhouse gas emissions from the management of turf on two golf courses.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Mark D; James, Iain T

    2011-11-01

    An estimated 32,000 golf courses worldwide (approximately 25,600 km2), provide ecosystem goods and services and support an industry contributing over $124 billion globally. Golf courses can impact positively on local biodiversity however their role in the global carbon cycle is not clearly understood. To explore this relationship, the balance between plant–soil system sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions from turf management on golf courses was modelled. Input data were derived from published studies of emissions from agriculture and turfgrass management. Two UK case studies of golf course type were used, a Links course (coastal, medium intensity management, within coastal dune grasses) and a Parkland course (inland, high intensity management, within woodland).Playing surfaces of both golf courses were marginal net sources of greenhouse gas emissions due to maintenance (Links −2.2 ± 0.4 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1); Parkland − 2.0 ± 0.4 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1)). A significant proportion of emissions were from the use of nitrogen fertiliser, especially on tees and greens such that 3% of the golf course area contributed 16% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The area of trees on a golf course was important in determining whole-course emission balance. On the Parkland course, emissions from maintenance were offset by sequestration from turfgrass, and trees which comprised 48% of total area, resulting in a net balance of −5.4 ± 0.9 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1). On the Links course, the proportion of trees was much lower (2%) and sequestration from links grassland resulted in a net balance of −1.6 ± 0.3 Mg CO2e ha(−1) y(−1). Recommendations for golf course management and design include the reduction of nitrogen fertiliser, improved operational efficiency when mowing, the inclusion of appropriate tree-planting and the scaling of component areas to maximise golf course sequestration capacity. The findings are transferrable to the management and design of

  10. A model of greenhouse gas emissions from the management of turf on two golf courses.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Mark D; James, Iain T

    2011-03-15

    An estimated 32,000 golf courses worldwide (approximately 25,600 km(2)), provide ecosystem goods and services and support an industry contributing over $ 124 billion globally. Golf courses can impact positively on local biodiversity however their role in the global carbon cycle is not clearly understood. To explore this relationship, the balance between plant-soil system sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions from turf management on golf courses was modelled. Input data were derived from published studies of emissions from agriculture and turfgrass management. Two UK case studies of golf course type were used, a Links course (coastal, medium intensity management, within coastal dune grasses) and a Parkland course (inland, high intensity management, within woodland). Playing surfaces of both golf courses were marginal net sources of greenhouse gas emissions due to maintenance (Links 0.4 ± 0.1Mg CO(2)e ha(-1)y(-1); Parkland 0.7 ± 0.2Mg CO(2)e ha(-1)y(-1)). A significant proportion of emissions were from the use of nitrogen fertiliser, especially on tees and greens such that 3% of the golf course area contributed 16% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The area of trees on a golf course was important in determining whole-course emission balance. On the Parkland course, emissions from maintenance were offset by sequestration from trees which comprised 48% of total area, resulting in a net balance of -4.3 ± 0.9 Mg CO(2e) ha(-1)y(-1). On the Links course, the proportion of trees was much lower (2%) and sequestration from links grassland resulted in a net balance of 0.0 ± 0.2Mg CO(2e) ha(-1)y(-1). Recommendations for golf course management and design include the reduction of nitrogen fertiliser, improved operational efficiency when mowing, the inclusion of appropriate tree-planting and the scaling of component areas to maximise golf course sequestration capacity. The findings are transferrable to the management and design of urban parks and gardens, which range

  11. Is outcome related to movement variability in golf?

    PubMed

    Tucker, Catherine B; Anderson, Ross; Kenny, Ian C

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method to quantify movement variability in the backswing and downswing phase of the golf swing and statistically assess whether there was any relationship between movement variability and outcome variability. Sixteen highly skilled golfers each performed 10 swings wearing retro-reflective markers which were tracked by a three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis system operating at 400 Hz. Ball launch conditions were captured using a launch monitor. Performance variability was calculated for each body marker based on a scalene ellipsoid volume concept which produced a score representative of the 3D variability over the 10 trials. Outcome variability was quantified as the coefficient of variation of ball velocity for the 10 trials. The statistical analysis revealed no significant correlations between performance variability for each marker trajectory and outcome variability. Performance variability in the backswing or downswing was not related to ball velocity variability. It was postulated that individual players used their own strategies in order to control their performance variability, such that it had no effect on outcome variability. PMID:24466647

  12. The efficacy of video feedback for learning the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Guadagnoli, M; Holcomb, W; Davis, M

    2002-08-01

    This study was designed to examine the efficacy of video instruction relative to that of verbal and self-guided instruction. Before training, 30 golfers were assigned at random to one of three groups: video, verbal or self-guided instruction. Video instruction was defined as a practice session in which the teacher was aided by the use of video. Verbal instruction was defined as practising with the teacher providing verbal feedback. Self-guided practice was defined as practising without the aid of a teacher. The participants had a pre-test, four 90 min practice sessions, an immediate post-test and a 2 week delayed post-test. During the pre-test and post-tests, all participants were required to strike 15 golf balls, with a 7-iron, from an artificial turf mat for distance and accuracy. The results showed that all groups were equal on the pre-test. On the first post-test, the two instruction groups performed worse than the self-guided group. However, on the second post-test, the two instruction groups performed better than the self-guided group, with the video group performing best. We interpret these results to mean that video analysis is an effective means of practice, but that the positive effects may take some time to develop. PMID:12190281

  13. Think aloud: acute stress and coping strategies during golf performances.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Adam R; Polman, Remco C J

    2008-07-01

    A limitation of the sport psychology coping literature is the amount of time between a stressful episode and the recall of the coping strategies used in the stressful event (Nicholls & Polman, 2007). The purpose of this study was to develop and implement a technique to measure acute stress and coping during performance. Five high-performance adolescent golfers took part in Level 2 verbalization think aloud trials (Ericsson & Simon, 1993), which involved participants verbalizing their thoughts, over six holes of golf. Verbal reports were audio-recorded during each performance, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using protocol analysis (Ericsson & Simon, 1993). Stressors and coping strategies varied throughout the six holes, which support the proposition that stress and coping is a dynamic process that changes across phases of the same performance (Lazarus, 1999). The results also revealed information regarding the sequential patterning of stress and coping, suggesting that the golfers experienced up to five stressors before reporting a coping strategy. Think aloud appears a suitable method to collect concurrent stress and coping data. PMID:18612855

  14. Tips for Organizing an Educational Agricultural Commodity Trading Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, John

    2011-01-01

    Educational commodity marketing clubs have been an effective tool for producers to develop their grain and livestock marketing skills. These groups are further enhanced when the participants engage in "actual trading" versus "paper trading" techniques. When a club chooses to try actual trading, it becomes more complicated than pooling monies…

  15. 11. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, Detroit, Michigan). GROUNDBREAKING FOR ADDITION, JUNE 23, 1965. Left Sid Abel, Genral Manager of the Detroit Hockey Club Center - Jerome Cavanaugh, Mayor, City of Detroit Right - Nick Landis, General Manager of the Olympia Stadium - Olympia Arena, 5920 Grand River Avenue, Detroit, MI

  16. School Nurse Book Clubs: An Innovative Strategy for Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenawald, Deborah A.; Adams, Theresa M.

    2008-01-01

    Recognizing the ongoing need for continuing education for school nurses, the authors discuss the use of school nurse book clubs as an innovative lifelong-learning strategy. Current research supports the use of literature in nursing education. This article discusses the benefits of book club participation for school nurses and includes suggested…

  17. Learning Masculinities in a Japanese High School Rugby Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This paper draws on research conducted on a Tokyo high school rugby club to explore diversity in the masculinities formed through membership in the club. Based on the premise that particular forms of masculinity are expressed and learnt through ways of playing (game style) and the attendant regimes of training, it examines the expression and…

  18. The Oprah Revolution: Book Clubs in Library Media Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlejohn, Carol

    2006-01-01

    When Oprah Winfrey began her successful book club in 1996, she continued a tradition that public libraries have provided for decades. Oprah placed a spotlight on reading that encouraged many women who had never read a book "to read." Book clubs sprang up in neighborhoods, bookstores, and on Web sites. Library media centers began offering book…

  19. The "Oprahfication" of Literacy: Reading "Oprah's Book Club."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, R. Mark

    2003-01-01

    Considers how although the influence of "Oprah's Book Club" has been well documented in the popular media, it has received little attention from the academic community. Examines the club as a literacy delivery system, asking how literacy takes its shape from the interests of both Winfrey and her readers. (SG)

  20. Club drugs: coming to a patient near you.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Jeananne Johnson

    2014-03-13

    Club drugs have become increasingly popular with young adults and adolescents. Although users report similar effects of these drugs, they are pharmacologically and physiologically different. Understanding these differences and recognizing trends and effects of club drugs is essential for nurse practitioners. PMID:24481485

  1. Read Across Texas! 2002 Texas Reading Club Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgmon, Missy; Ferate-Soto, Paolo; Foley, Lelana; Hager, Tina; Heard, Adriana; Ingham, Donna; Lopez, Nohemi; McMahon, Dorothy; Meyer, Sally; Parrish, Leila; Rodriguez-Gibbs, Josefina; Moreyra-Torres, Maricela; Travis, Gayle; Welch, Willy

    The goal of the Texas Reading Club is to encourage the children of Texas to become library users and lifelong readers. This manual was created for the 2002 Texas Reading Club, a program of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. The theme, "Read Across Texas!" invites children to explore the history, geography, and culture of Texas…

  2. View of the yacht club facing north. The beach is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the yacht club facing north. The beach is in the foreground, the pier to the right. The painted octagonal window is above the deck. Avila's Front Street is at the rear of the building. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  3. View of the yacht club from avila pier, facing west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the yacht club from avila pier, facing west northwest. The main entry is to the right and the more recent deck addition is to the left. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  4. View of the yacht club facing east. The new deck ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the yacht club facing east. The new deck and the avila pier are on the right and the harbor storage and restrooms are on the left. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  5. Online Book Clubs: Bridges between Old and New Literacies Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharber, Cassandra

    2009-01-01

    In this Digital Literacies column, online book clubs are offered as one example of how to effectively bridge old and new literacy practices. These Internet-based book clubs capitalize on children's interest in new literacy practices while complementing, and hopefully encouraging, traditional reading practices. Examples from online book clubs…

  6. Contextual view to northnorthwest of Burton Park Club House and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view to north-northwest of Burton Park Club House and Amphitheater (90 mm lens). View taken from top of steps visible in previous photo. - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  7. Interior, main room , Burton Park Club House, view to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, main room , Burton Park Club House, view to south from north end door (90mm lens). Front doors visible at left, fireplace at right, while kingpost trusses supports the roof. - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  8. Contextual view to northwest of Burton Park Club House and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view to northwest of Burton Park Club House and Amphitheater. Gable-roofed building at right is barn housing maintenance equipment for the park. Adobe wall with pilasters forms backdrop for amphitheater stage (135mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  9. Interior, main room, Burton Park Club House, view to north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, main room, Burton Park Club House, view to north (90mm lens). Fireplace at left, kitchen and restroom are through open doorway visible at right side of opposite end wall. - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  10. Stalemate: Girls and a Mixed-Gender Chess Club.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galitis, Ingrid

    2002-01-01

    Observed and conducted discussions with female members of an elementary-level, mixed-gender, Australian chess club to investigate why girls left and boys came to dominate the club. Results indicated that both home values and schooling transmitted and reinforced inequalities between the sexes, though in more subtle and less overt forms than in the…

  11. The Sierra Club--A History. Part 1: Origins & Outings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Douglas H.

    1977-01-01

    This article discusses the early beginnings of the Sierra Club, nearly 100 years ago, and the leadership of John Muir and his contemporaries. Turn of the century photographs show campers and hikers on organized club outing designed to introduce people to mountain wilderness and its preservation. (MA)

  12. Registration of “Cara” soft white winter club wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Club wheat (Triticium aestivum ssp. compactum) is an important component of the export grain market for the Pacific Northwest. Our objective was to develop a club wheat cultivar with resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis, f. sp. tritici Westend) and strawbreaker foot rot Oculimacula yallu...

  13. Handwriting Club: Using Sensory Integration Strategies To Improve Handwriting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Melissa

    2001-01-01

    This article describes all the steps and materials necessary to organize and conduct a handwriting club that provides direct instruction in handwriting combined with sensory integration activities. Typical club session format, sample activities, the promotion of social skills, handwriting strategies, and external stimulants are discussed.…

  14. A Framework for Facilitating Productive Discussions in Video Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Es, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Video has become a popular tool for professional development. Yet, little is known about how to design video-based learning environments that are productive for teacher learning. The author has used video for teacher learning in the context of a video club. In video clubs, teachers meet together on a regular basis to view and discuss video…

  15. Simplicity, Harmony Essential to Club of Rome Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepkowski, Wil

    1979-01-01

    This interview with Aurelio Peccei details the next phase in the Club of Rome's goal of reeducating mankind to global threats. Peccei discusses a variety of topics relating to science and the human condition, including his plans for the implementation of the Club of Rome activities. (BT)

  16. Teaching for Geographic Literacy: Our Afterschool Geography Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas-Brown, Karen A.

    2011-01-01

    This research describes how enrolling students in an afterschool Geography Club affects their perception of the discipline and their geographic literacy. The creation of the afterschool club at this particular school came out of the recognition of the need to increase students' exposure to geographical content. The results of this study show the…

  17. Arthropathy, ankylosing spondylitis, and clubbing of fingers in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, K. N.; Prescott, R. J.; Walker, R. J.; Sircus, W.; McManus, J. P. A.; Card, W. I.

    1970-01-01

    In a retrospective study of 399 patients with ulcerative colitis, 27 patients had colitic arthritis, 17 had ankylosing spondylitis, and 20 had clubbing of the fingers. Colitic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis were not related to severity, extent of involvement, or duration of colitis. A significant association between colitic arthropathy and other complications of ulcerative colitis, such as pseudopolyposis, perianal disease, eye lesions, skin eruptions, aphthous ulceration, and liver disease has been demonstrated. The outcome of the first referred attack of colitis in the presence of colitic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis remained uninfluenced. Clubbing of fingers was related to severity, extent of involvement, and length of the history of colitis. A significant association between clubbing of the fingers and carcinoma of the colon, pseudopolyposis, toxic dilatation, and arthropathy has been shown. The frequency of surgical intervention in patients with clubbing was higher but the overall mortality was not significantly different from the patients without clubbing. PMID:5473606

  18. Medical marijuana: Federal, State attacks against California cannabis clubs.

    PubMed

    Gardner, F; James, J S

    1998-01-23

    The Clinton administration filed suit to close six marijuana buyers' clubs in California more than a year after Proposition 215, permitting medical use of the drug, was passed. This action was taken against six clubs: Cannabis Cultivators Club, Flower Therapy, Marin Alliance for Medical Marijuana, Oakland Cannabis Buyers' Cooperative, Santa Cruz Buyers' Club, and Ukiah Buyers' Club. Although Proposition 215 gives persons with a documented need for the drug a legal right to use it in California, the Federal prohibitions for its use still violates Federal law. In practice, social users can usually obtain marijuana while many patients who need it have no source from which to buy it. The history of the Federal attack on medical marijuana usage in California and the State's response are included. PMID:11365003

  19. 76 FR 2409 - Proclaiming Certain Lands, Golf Course Acquisition, as an Addition to the Bay Mills Indian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Proclaiming Certain Lands, Golf Course Acquisition, as an Addition to the Bay... Reservation by enrollment or tribal membership. Bay Mills Indian Community Reservation, Golf...

  20. 76 FR 66328 - Callaway Golf Ball Operations, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Reliable Temp Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Federal Register on July 8, 2011 (76 FR 40401). At the request of the State agency, the Department... Employment and Training Administration Callaway Golf Ball Operations, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers..., 2011, applicable to workers of Callaway Golf Ball Operations, Inc., including on-site leased...

  1. Par for the Course: Students Design Their Miniature Golf Course Sculptures while Considering Functional, Technical, and Communication Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassil, Darlene

    2005-01-01

    Designing an eighteen-hole miniature-golf course is not the typical end-of-the-year art project, but at Winfield School it's "par for the course." Students anxiously count the days to the first day of miniature golf, courtesy of the sixth-grade art classes. The design and production of the miniature gold course serves as a great motivator and…

  2. Journal clubs. Prevalence, format, and efficacy in PM&R.

    PubMed

    Moberg-Wolff, E A; Kosasih, J B

    1995-01-01

    Journal clubs can play an integral part in graduate medical education. They promote critical thinking, dissemination of information, and research and impact clinical practice. Little has been written, however, about how to organize a journal club or improve its efficacy. Although numerous articles discuss how journal clubs can be used to evaluate medical literature, only a few have examined what physicians are actually doing. We surveyed all accredited PM&R program chief/residents to ascertain the prevalence, format, and efficacy of PM&R residency journal clubs. All programs that responded (89%) reported having a journal club, with most stating its purpose was to disseminate information from the current literature. Review of classic articles and specialty topics (e.g., electromyography, sports medicine) was fairly uncommon. Eighty-four percent of journal clubs were department-sponsored, and most met monthly for 1 hr during the workday. Typically, four or more articles were presented under the guidance of the chief or other resident. Impacting clinical practice and teaching critical analysis were other important goals of the journal clubs, yet most (76%) lacked an organized method for critical review. This, in addition to poor faculty attendance, was a chief concern of those surveyed. Surprisingly, journal club participation was not felt to significantly alter the amount of reading residents did. Although most felt their journal clubs were successful, improving faculty participation, strengthening critical analysis skills, identifying and incorporating classic articles, improving clinical relevance, and providing a mechanism for feedback may further improve journal club efficacy and participant satisfaction. PMID:7779334

  3. Club Drug Use among Young Adults Frequenting Dance Clubs and Other Social Venues in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Halkitis, Perry N.; Bimbi, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A convenience sample of young adults (ages 18-25) in New York City was recruited to complete anonymous surveys in social venues (either dance clubs or other social settings, such as coffee shops and university "hangouts") regarding their use of "club drugs" (e.g., MDMA/Ecstasy, GHB, ketamine, crystal methamphetamine, cocaine, and LSD).…

  4. Why Children Join and Stay in Sports Clubs: Case Studies in Australian, French and German Swimming Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Richard L.; Harvey, Stephen; Memmert, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article builds upon research on youth sport clubs conducted from a socio-cultural perspective by reporting on a study that inquired into the reasons why children aged 9-12 joined swimming clubs in France, Germany and Australia. Comprising three case studies it employed a mixed method approach with results considered within the framework of…

  5. Box Cello Middle School Science Clubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandegrift, Guy

    1998-10-01

    The Box Cello is a middle school science club which is attempting to (1) understand the cello and (2) design a low-cost starter instrument. We can support and justify this research by adding a third goal: (3) to help supply local science classes with equipment. My policy of spending one entire day each week away from the university, out in a local school is essential to this project. This schedule also permits me to conduct lessons on optics and music in the schools. And, it permits circulation of tools and equipment. A simple calculation demonstrates the great economy achieved by combining science clubs with academic year school visits. Consider the cost of letting 10,000 students in 10 middle schools each learn about and play with a pair of "upside-down" glasses for one hour. A visit to each school for three consecutive weeks would easily permit such a circulation if only 30 pairs were constructed. Assume rhetorically, that the construction of 30 pairs of glasses were to consume the entire estimated annual budget of $100,000. The cost per student would be only ten dollars! The visits, guest lectures, and equipment loans permit informal networking (including lunch) with math, science and music teachers in 10 schools. For more information, visit the http://www.utep.edu/boxcello/

  6. Direct Numerical Simulations of the Flow around a Golf Ball: Effect of Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clinton; Beratlis, Nikolaos; Squires, Kyle; Balaras, Elias; Tsunoda, Masaya

    2008-11-01

    Golf ball flight is affected by rotation of the ball (lift generation) and dimpling on the surface (drag reduction). Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is being developed for the flow around a rotating golf ball using an immersed boundary method. Adding to the computational cost is that the moving body must be re-located as the ball rotates. In the present effort, interface-tracking of the moving body is optimized using the Approximate Nearest Neighbor (ANN) approach. The code is parallelized using domain decomposition and message passing interface (MPI), and parallel performance results are presented for a range of grid sizes. Results are presented from a series of validation cases for flow over a smooth sphere and a golf ball.

  7. Dimples and drag: Experimental demonstration of the aerodynamics of golf balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libii, Josué Njock

    2007-08-01

    While it is well known that the presence of dimples reduces the drag force exerted on a golf ball, demonstrations of this phenomenon are not common. A simple pendulum is designed and used in a wind tunnel to measure the drag force exerted by a moving stream of air on a spherical object. This pendulum is then used in experiments to measure drag forces exerted on smooth balls and on golf balls in order to compare the results. Data collected from 12 balls tested at speeds ranging from 54to180km/h demonstrate that the presence of dimples on the surface of golf balls causes them to experience drag forces that are smaller than those on smooth balls of the same diameters and weights.

  8. 26 CFR 1.274-2 - Disallowance of deductions for certain expenses for entertainment, amusement, recreation, or travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... include, but are not limited to, country clubs, golf and athletic clubs, airline clubs, hotel clubs, and... entertaining at night clubs, cocktail lounges, theaters, country clubs, golf and athletic clubs, sporting... includes persons other than business associates, at places such as cocktail lounges, country clubs,...

  9. 26 CFR 1.274-2 - Disallowance of deductions for certain expenses for entertainment, amusement, recreation, or travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... include, but are not limited to, country clubs, golf and athletic clubs, airline clubs, hotel clubs, and... entertaining at night clubs, cocktail lounges, theaters, country clubs, golf and athletic clubs, sporting... includes persons other than business associates, at places such as cocktail lounges, country clubs,...

  10. 26 CFR 1.274-2 - Disallowance of deductions for certain expenses for entertainment, amusement, recreation, or travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... include, but are not limited to, country clubs, golf and athletic clubs, airline clubs, hotel clubs, and... entertaining at night clubs, cocktail lounges, theaters, country clubs, golf and athletic clubs, sporting... includes persons other than business associates, at places such as cocktail lounges, country clubs,...

  11. 26 CFR 1.274-2 - Disallowance of deductions for certain expenses for entertainment, amusement, recreation, or travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... include, but are not limited to, country clubs, golf and athletic clubs, airline clubs, hotel clubs, and... entertaining at night clubs, cocktail lounges, theaters, country clubs, golf and athletic clubs, sporting... includes persons other than business associates, at places such as cocktail lounges, country clubs,...

  12. Evaluation of golf courses water demand in southern of Portugal for the last three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago Pedras, Celestina M.; Lança, Rui M.; Martins, Fernando; Fernandez, Helena; Vieira, Cristina; Monteiro, José Paulo; Guerrero, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Golf is an economic activity with a prominent position in the tourist-sport offer in the region of Algarve. Located in southern of Portugal, this region is the most suitable region for the growth of the golf industry. The climate is characterized by mild winters with slight rainfall and hot and dry summers. The region has an annual average temperature of 14oC and annual precipitation that rarely exceeds 500 mm year-1. Since most of the rainfall occurs concentrated in the winter, irrigation is needed during the remaining months of the year to meet the water demand from plants. A proper irrigation management will allow to optimize the use water, thus it constitutes a key issue for the sustainability of this activity in areas subjected to water scarcity. Currently, remote sensing provides the tools to assess the evolution of the greenish quality of the area in the golf courses. In this study, based on Landsat images, vegetation indices were calculated the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), for the spring and summer seasons during the last 30 years. For the same period, according the data collected from weather stations distributed in the region, maps of precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity and wind were produced. According the current maintenance practices and irrigation cycles, maps of potential and real evapotranspiration and with basis on the water balance were calculated, and water deficit maps estimated. Upon crossing this information with the NDVI maps, trends were identified in the consumption of water for irrigation due to the growth of the occupied area by golf courses in the region of Algarve. Since drought problems tend to increase due to climate changes, it becomes relevant the need to conduct this study aiming the research of strategies to ensure the beneficial use of water on golf courses and other turfgrass areas. Keywords: evapotranspiration, golf, irrigation, NDVI, water deficit

  13. Head lice.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Barbara L; Bocchini, Joseph A

    2010-08-01

    Head lice infestation is associated with limited morbidity but causes a high level of anxiety among parents of school-aged children. Since the 2002 clinical report on head lice was published by the American Academy of Pediatrics, patterns of resistance to products available over-the-counter and by prescription have changed, and additional mechanical means of removing head lice have been explored. This revised clinical report clarifies current diagnosis and treatment protocols and provides guidance for the management of children with head lice in the school setting. PMID:20660553

  14. Enhanced cell adhesion to the dimpled surfaces of golf-ball-shaped microparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyuk; Lee, Chang-Soo; Cho, Kuk Young

    2014-10-01

    Engineering surface morphology as in honeycomb-structured planar films is of great importance for providing new potential application and improved performance in biomedical fields. We demonstrate potential new applications for the uniform biocompatible golf-ball-shaped microparticles that resembles 3D feature of honeycomb-structured film. Dimple size controllable golf-ball-shaped microparticles were fabricated by microfluidic device. Surface dimples not only can act as picoliter beaker but also enhance cell adhesion without any chemical modification of the surface. PMID:25265359

  15. Effects of turbulence on the drag force on a golf ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2016-09-01

    Measurements are presented of the drag force on a golf ball dropped vertically into a tank of water. As observed previously in air, the drag coefficient drops sharply when the flow becomes turbulent. The experiment would be suitable for undergraduate students since it can be undertaken at low ball speeds and since the effects of turbulence are easily observed on video film. A modified golf ball was used to show how a ball with a smooth and a rough side, such as a cricket ball, is subject to a side force when the ball surface itself is asymmetrical in the transverse direction.

  16. View of javelin and golf ball on lunar surface during Apollo 14 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    View shows the javelin and golf ball used by Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Apollo 14 commander, during the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA-2) on Feb. 6, 1971. Just to the left of center lies the javelin, with the golf ball just below it, almost perpendicular to it. Dark colored trails are the results of tracks made by the lunar overshoes of the astronauts and the wheels of the Modularized Equipment Transporter (MET). This photograph was made through the right window of the Lunar Module, looking northwest.

  17. 76 FR 37007 - Safety Zone; Stockton Ports Baseball Club Fourth of July Fireworks Display, Stockton, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Stockton Ports Baseball Club Fourth of July... Stockton Ports Baseball Club will sponsor the Stockton Ports Baseball Club Fourth of July Fireworks Display... read as follows: Sec. 165.T11-422 Safety Zone; Stockton Ports Baseball Club Fourth of July...

  18. Professional Development Through The University of Arizona Astronomy Club

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Allison M.; Nieberding, Megan N.; Austin, Carmen; Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The University of Arizona Astronomy Club creates a unique environment for undergraduates to accomplish goals early in their academic career. The club provides research opportunities with advisors, graduate students, and projects organized by fellow undergraduates. Undergraduates that work side-by-side develop strong working relationships which keeps students interested in astronomy and enables them to thrive in their studies and research. Club members are encouraged to attend and present their research at professional conferences where they are exposed early to the scientific research community, learn about internship and REU opportunities, and get information about graduate programs. In addition to preparing undergraduates to thrive in their academic career, the club also offers outreach opportunities for members to actively educate the southern Arizona community. Members of the club design and create many of their outreach materials including 3D models of our local stellar neighborhood and astronomical objects. Astronomy Club has had a positive impact on its members, the Department of Astronomy, and the southern Arizona community for the past seven years. The club continues to strive to improve undergraduate retention and prepare students for their future careers.

  19. Promoting undergraduate involvement through the University of Arizona Astronomy Club

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Allison M.; Austin, Carmen; Noyes, Matthew; Calahan, Jenny; Lautenbach, Jennifer; Henrici, Andrew; Ryleigh Fitzpatrick, M.; Shirley, Yancy L.

    2016-01-01

    The University of Arizona Astronomy Club is devoted to undergraduate success in astronomy, physics, planetary sciences and many other related fields. The club promotes many undergraduate opportunities; research projects, participating in telescope observational runs, sponsoring conference attendance as well as several public outreach opportunities. Research projects involving exoplanet transit observations and radio observations of cold molecular clouds allow undergraduates to experience data collection, telescope operations, data reduction and research presentation. The club hosts many star parties and various other public outreach events for the Tucson, Arizona location. The club often constructs their own outreach materials and structures. The club is currently working on creating a portable planetarium to teach about the night sky on the go even on the cloudiest of nights. The club is also working on creating a binocular telescope with two 10" mirrors as a recreation of the local Large Binocular Telescope for outreach purposes as well. This is a club that strives for undergraduate activity and involvement in a range of academic and extracurricular activates, and is welcoming to all majors of all levels in hopes to spark astronomical interest.

  20. Rich Club Organization and Cognitive Performance in Healthy Older Participants.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Hugo C; Segura, Barbara; Junque, Carme; de Reus, Marcel A; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Van den Heuvel, Martijn P

    2015-09-01

    The human brain is a complex network that has been noted to contain a group of densely interconnected hub regions. With a putative "rich club" of hubs hypothesized to play a central role in global integrative brain functioning, we assessed whether hub and rich club organizations are associated with cognitive performance in healthy participants and whether the rich club might be differentially involved in cognitive functions with a heavier dependence on global integration. A group of 30 relatively older participants (range = 39-79 years of age) underwent extensive neuropsychological testing, combined with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to reconstruct individual structural brain networks. Rich club connectivity was found to be associated with general cognitive performance. More specifically, assessing the relationship between the rich club and performance in two specific cognitive domains, we found rich club connectivity to be differentially associated with attention/executive functions-known to rely on the integration of distributed brain areas-rather than with visuospatial/visuoperceptual functions, which have a more constrained neuroanatomical substrate. Our findings thus provide first empirical evidence of a relevant role played by the rich club in cognitive processes. PMID:25941870

  1. Women's Clubs as Educative Agencies: Wilmington, Delaware New Century Club, 1889-1920

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taggart, Robert

    2006-01-01

    There is no doubt that women had a role in progressive reform a century ago, despite their lack of vote. However, it may not be so clear what the nature of this reform effort was. This article suggests that women were highly organized in women's clubs that served as a major organ of change in society, and that they had a great impact on education…

  2. Essayists, essays, and hosts: Daniel Hale Williams Medical Reading Club.

    PubMed Central

    Greene Reed, T.; Evans, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    The 66-year-old Daniel Hale Williams Medical Reading Club is an independent reading club comprised of 65 physicians in the metropolitan Washington, DC, area. Members representing all specialty fields meet six times a year for dinner and fellowship, to consider topics of common interest to the profession, and to hear a prepared lecture given by a featured essayist. Club members take turns as hosts for each meeting. This article gives a historical list of these meetings, naming the essayist and the topic, the hosts, and the site of the meetings. PMID:8918074

  3. Kinetic and Kinematic Differences in a Golf Swing in One and Both Lower Limb Amputees.

    PubMed

    Stastny, Petr; Maszczyk, Adam; Tománková, Kristina; Kubový, Petr; Richtrová, Michaela; Otáhal, Jakub; Čichoň, Rostislav; Mostowik, Aleksandra; Żmijewski, Piotr; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-11-22

    Amputee golfers need to cope with the absence of sole proprioception, a decreased range of swing motion and other factors which should be recognized for training purposes. The aim of this study was to determine the kinetic and kinematic differences in the golf swing in one leg and two legs amputees. The participants consisted of two males and one female at a professional or amateur level with a different degree of disability. Each participant was taped by 3D markers and performed five golf swings with the iron 6. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) did not vary between individuals in kinematics, however, it was low in kinetic variables of two leg amputees. The Kendal rank correlation showed a significant relationship between the level of amputation and a large number of kinetic and kinematic variables such as X factor, O factor, S factor and individual body angles. The fluency and similarity of the golf swing did not depend on the level of amputation. One lower limb amputation did not seem to increase movement variability contrary to two lower limb amputation. The most variable parameter was a weight-shift in all golfers. The takeaway and horizontal force angle depended on the level of amputation rather than individual technique, thus, their modification by training may be difficult. Estimation of golf swing "mistakes" in amputees in respect to the leading arm in an early follow or late follow position appeared to be useless. PMID:26834871

  4. Kinetic and Kinematic Differences in a Golf Swing in One and Both Lower Limb Amputees

    PubMed Central

    Stastny, Petr; Maszczyk, Adam; Tománková, Kristina; Kubový, Petr; Richtrová, Michaela; Otáhal, Jakub; Čichoň, Rostislav; Mostowik, Aleksandra; Żmijewski, Piotr; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Amputee golfers need to cope with the absence of sole proprioception, a decreased range of swing motion and other factors which should be recognized for training purposes. The aim of this study was to determine the kinetic and kinematic differences in the golf swing in one leg and two legs amputees. The participants consisted of two males and one female at a professional or amateur level with a different degree of disability. Each participant was taped by 3D markers and performed five golf swings with the iron 6. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) did not vary between individuals in kinematics, however, it was low in kinetic variables of two leg amputees. The Kendal rank correlation showed a significant relationship between the level of amputation and a large number of kinetic and kinematic variables such as X factor, O factor, S factor and individual body angles. The fluency and similarity of the golf swing did not depend on the level of amputation. One lower limb amputation did not seem to increase movement variability contrary to two lower limb amputation. The most variable parameter was a weight-shift in all golfers. The takeaway and horizontal force angle depended on the level of amputation rather than individual technique, thus, their modification by training may be difficult. Estimation of golf swing „mistakes” in amputees in respect to the leading arm in an early follow or late follow position appeared to be useless. PMID:26834871

  5. ADDING GLYCERINE TO ECO-FRIENDLY GOLF TEES TO ACCELERATE BIODEGRADABILITY AND IMPROVE FABRICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is expected that a suitable combination of DDGS and glycerine with PLA as well as a corresponding blend with corn-starch will be found. These blends will be applicable to a commercial, biodegradable golf tee with superior environmental properties, compared to what is on the...

  6. Use of industrial byproducts to filter PO43- and pesticides in golf green drainage water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Golf courses are vulnerable to phosphate (PO43-) and pesticide loss by infiltration because of the sandy, porous grass rooting media used and presence of subsurface tile drainage. In this study, a blend of industrial byproducts, including granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), cement kiln dust (CKD),...

  7. A pilot study of indoor air quality in screen golf courses.

    PubMed

    Goung, Sun-Ju Nam; Yang, Jinho; Kim, Yoon Shin; Lee, Cheol Min

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this study were to provide basic data for determining policies on air quality for multi-user facilities, including the legal enrollment of the indoor air quality regulation as designated by the Ministry of Environment, and to establish control plans. To this end, concentrations of ten pollutants (PM10, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde (HCHO), total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs), radon (Rn), oxone (O3), total bacteria counts (TBC), and asbestos) in addition to nicotine, a smoking index material used to determine the impact of smoking on the air quality, were investigated in indoor game rooms and lobbies of 64 screen golf courses. The average concentration of none of the ten pollutants in the game rooms and lobbies of screen golf courses was found to exceed the limit set by the law. There were, however, pollutant concentrations exceeding limits in some screen golf courses, in order to establish a control plan for the indoor air quality of screen golf courses, a study on the emission sources of each pollutant was conducted. The major emission sources were found to be facility users' activities such as smoking and the use of combustion appliances, building materials, and finishing materials. PMID:25510613

  8. A Survey of Golf Courses as a Source of Invasive C3 Grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.; CBG), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.; KBG), and fine fescue species (Festuca spp.; FF) are commonly used as turf on golf courses. All have been identified as invasive species by governmental or non-governmental groups. We hypothesized that abundan...

  9. Performance processes within affect-related performance zones: a multi-modal investigation of golf performance.

    PubMed

    van der Lei, Harry; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2012-12-01

    Individual affect-related performance zones (IAPZs) method utilizing Kamata et al. (J Sport Exerc Psychol 24:189-208, 2002) probabilistic model of determining the individual zone of optimal functioning was utilized as idiosyncratic affective patterns during golf performance. To do so, three male golfers of a varsity golf team were observed during three rounds of golf competition. The investigation implemented a multi-modal assessment approach in which the probabilistic relationship between affective states and both, performance process and performance outcome, measures were determined. More specifically, introspective (i.e., verbal reports) and objective (heart rate and respiration rate) measures of arousal were incorporated to examine the relationships between arousal states and both, process components (i.e., routine consistency, timing), and outcome scores related to golf performance. Results revealed distinguishable and idiosyncratic IAPZs associated with physiological and introspective measures for each golfer. The associations between the IAPZs and decision-making or swing/stroke execution were strong and unique for each golfer. Results are elaborated using cognitive and affect-related concepts, and applications for practitioners are provided. PMID:22562463

  10. The Sequence of Hip and Selected Upper-Extremity Joint Movements During the Golf Drive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Charles L.

    This study analyzed wrist, elbow, and hip actions of golfers who were accurately driving a golf ball a maximum distance. Electrogoniometry and cinematography were used to measure wrist, forearm, elbow, and hip actions during the downswing of 10 low-handicap golfers who were attempting to drive a minimum of 225 yards within a 50-yard corridor.…

  11. Assessment of Commercially Marketed Filter Materials for Tile Drainage Outlets on Golf Courses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface tile drainage is essential in the construction and functionality of golf course greens. However, due to turf management, the waters conveyed by the drainage network contain potentially high levels of nutrients and pesticides. The objective of this research is to assess the subsurface hydr...

  12. Nutrient Load Generated by Storm Event Runoff from a Golf Course Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turf systems are prevalent in urban areas, and include the grassed areas of home lawns, roadsides, commercial property, golf courses, parks, recreational resorts, schools, churches, cemeteries, and airports. Turf is the most intensively managed land use system in the urban landscape. Substantial inp...

  13. Buffer zones promoting oligotrophication in golf course runoffs: fiddler crabs as estuarine health indicators.

    PubMed

    George, R Y; Bodnar, G; Gerlach, S L; Nelson, R M

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen pollution above a threshold level induces a eutrophication process in coastal creek ecosystems and consequently impacts on the water quality. The remedy for this scenario is the introduction of methods to enhance oligotrophication by means of constructed wetlands and buffer zones. This paper discusses new data on nitrogen flux and population changes in the primary consumers in the Bradley Creek ecosystem, adjacent to the Duck Haven Golf Course in southeastern North Carolina. In 1998-99, over different seasons, density distribution of the field populations of the fiddler crab Uca minax, was monitored as an indicator of environmental health. A control site at Whiskey Creek, adjacent to the University Center for Marine Sciences, was monitored in the same period since this site is not influenced by any golf course nutrient flux. The results pointed out that threshold level for optimum population density in Spartina grandiflora salt marsh is 0.1 mg/L of nitrates. A dense crab population, adjacent to the golf course with a buffer zone, was indicative of restoration of the estuarine ecosystem. A model, involving the use of constructed wetlands for oligotrophication, is being prepared on the basis of studies conducted by the University of South Alabama for a stormwater wetland constructed adjacent to the university's golf course. PMID:11804155

  14. Biochar-compost mixtures added to simulated golf greens increase creeping bentgrass growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixtures of 85% sand and 15% mixtures of peat (control), a commercial biochar, a commercial biochar-compost product (CarbonizPN), and seven biochar-commercial compost mixtures were tested on the growth of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L. "007") in simulated golf greens. Physical properti...

  15. Managing phosphorus export from golf courses using industrial byproducts as filter materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Golf courses, and in particular the tees, fairways, and putting greens, are vulnerable to loss of phosphorus (P) as dissolved reactive P (DRP) through sandy, porous grass rooting media and subsurface tile drainage. Excess levels of phosphorus (P) in surface waters promotes eutrophication, which in t...

  16. GOLF COURSES AS A SOURCE OF COASTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY: A FLORIDA EXPERIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical and biological impacts of two coastal golf courses that receive wastewater spray irrigation were determined during a two-year period. A variety of techniques were used to assess the spatial and temporal variability of contaminant levels and their bioavailability in t...

  17. EFFECTS OF A COASTAL GOLF COMPLEX ON WATER QUALITY, PERIPHYTON, AND SEAGRASS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a golf course complex on water quality, colonized periphyton and seagrass meadows in adjacent freshwater, near-coastal and wetland areas. The environmental impact of the recreational facility, which uses spray wastewater...

  18. CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH A COASTAL GOLF COURSE COMPLEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of contamination to nearby coastal areas, the chemical and biological magnitude of which is almost unknown. The objective of this study was to compare the concentrations of contaminants and toxicities of sedime...

  19. Beating the Bunker: The Effect of PETTLEP Imagery on Golf Bunker Shot Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dave; Wright, Caroline J.; Cantwell, Cara

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of physical practice with PETTLEP-based (Physical, Environment, Task, Timing, Learning, Emotion and Perspective; Holmes & Collins, 2001) imagery and PETTLEP + physical practice interventions on golf bunker shot performance. Thirty-two male county- or international-level golfers were assigned to one…

  20. You Don't Have to Be a Professional Golfer to Teach Golf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kory; Thornburg, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Although physical educators cannot be experts on every sport or activity, there is still a need to include specialized activities in the curriculum that a physical educator may not initially feel comfortable teaching because of inexperience and a lack of expertise. Golf, like other activities such as tennis, requires a specificity of training that…

  1. SEDIMENT CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH A COASTAL GOLF COURSE COMPLEX.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing density of golf courses represents a potential source of sediment contamination to nearby coastal areas, the chemical and biological magnitude of which is almost unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of contaminants and toxicities...

  2. Evaluation of a Florida coastal golf complex as a local and watershed source of bioavailable contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Robert L. Quarles, Darrin D. Dantin and James C. Moore. 2004. Evaluation of a Coastal Golf Complex as a Local and Watershed Source of Bioavailable Contaminants. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 48(3-4):254-262. (ERL,GB 1183).

    Contaminant fate in coastal areas impacte...

  3. Addition of biochar to simulated golf greens promotes creeping bentgrass growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic amendments such as peat moss and various composts are typically added to sand-based root zones such as golf greens to increase water and nutrient retention. However, these attributes are generally lost as these amendments decompose in a few years. Biochar is a high carbon, extremely porous ...

  4. Public Park Acquisition: The Saticoy Golf Course. Research Reports in Public Policy, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, William

    Reported is a demonstration of the use of basic economic principles to aid local governments in decision making. The problem analyzed in this study is the possible acquisition and development of a golf course by the City of San Buenaventura, California. Three purchasing alternatives and several financing options are examined. Researchers conclude…

  5. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Topographic Survey of Cosmos Club, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Topographic Survey of Cosmos Club, 1950, by Bernard Locroft, Civil Engineer (Showing Grounds as They Were at End of Sumner Welles Era) SITE PLAN - Townsend House, 2121 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. 4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CLUB HOUSE REFRIGERATION UNIT, SHOWING COOLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CLUB HOUSE REFRIGERATION UNIT, SHOWING COOLING COILS AND CORK-LINED ROOM. CAMERA IS BETWEEN SEVEN AND EIGHT FEET ABOVE FLOOR LEVEL, FACING SOUTHEAST. - Swan Falls Village, Clubhouse 011, Snake River, Kuna, Ada County, ID

  7. Beyond content: leadership development through a journal club.

    PubMed

    Kattan, Jessica A; Apostolou, Andria; Al-Samarrai, Teeb; El Bcheraoui, Charbel; Kay, Meagan K; Khaokham, Christina B; Pillai, Parvathy; Sapkota, Sanjeeb; Jani, Asim A; Koo, Denise; Taylor, William C

    2014-11-01

    CDC designed its Health Systems Integration Program to prepare leaders to function at the interface of public health and health care. Specific Health Systems Integration Program competencies in the areas of communication, analysis and assessment, and health systems were developed to nurture evidence-based decision-making and leadership skills crucial for future public health leaders. The program therefore designed an innovative journal club as part of its competency-based curriculum not only to meet the standard goals for a journal club-critical reading, interpretation, and acquiring content knowledge-but also to foster leadership development. This report describes the Health Systems Integration Program journal club format, its implementation, challenges, and key elements of success. Other programs using a journal club model as a learning format might consider using the Health Systems Integration Program's innovative approach that focuses on leadership development. PMID:25439249

  8. Leading the Fit Life: Jobs in Health Clubs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kathleen

    1995-01-01

    Depicts the health club work force: fitness personnel, such as instructors, trainers, and directors, and nonfitness personnel, such as receptionists, marketers, and managers, as well as physicians and therapists. Gives information on how to acquire credentials in the field. (SK)

  9. Encouraging a Culture of Outreach in Astronomy Clubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, J.; Berendsen, M.; Schultz, G.; Gurton, S.; Santascoy, J.; White, V.; Frank, K.; Jones, E.; Yocco, V.; John, M. S.; Castori, P.

    2014-07-01

    Astronomy clubs constitute a “marching army” of knowledgeable, experienced astronomy enthusiasts deployed in a national network: an important resource for engaging the public through educational outreach events and activities. The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) in partnership with the Institute for Learning Innovation (ILI) and Inverness Research, Inc., has been engaged in a multi-year NSF-supported project focusing on this network and its potential to advance astronomy education and outreach. The project has explored the culture of astronomy clubs, identified impediments to building cultures of outreach within clubs, and developed and introduced new mechanisms to overcome these impediments and enhance clubs' abilities to encourage and sustain cultures that value and promote outreach efforts. This paper shares initial research, development and evaluation findings of the project, and describes ongoing supplemental efforts that continue to advance project objectives.

  10. Seeing the Forest for the Trees. Penn State Faculty Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The new faculty club at Pennsylvania State University designed by Venturi and Rauch, is praised for its siting, but criticized for the institutional colors of the interior and lack of accommodation to human needs. (MLF)

  11. 7. CLUBHOUSE. FIREPLACE IN CLUB ROOM. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. CLUBHOUSE. FIREPLACE IN CLUB ROOM. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Clubhouse, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  12. Difference in peak weight transfer and timing based on golf handicap.

    PubMed

    Queen, Robin M; Butler, Robert J; Dai, Boyi; Barnes, C Lowry

    2013-09-01

    Weight shift during the golf swing has been a topic of discussion among golf professionals; however, it is still unclear how weight shift varies in golfers of different performance levels. The main purpose of this study was to examine the following: (a) the changes in the peak ground reaction forces (GRF) and the timing of these events between high (HHCP) and low handicap (LHCP) golfers and (b) the differences between the leading and trailing legs. Twenty-eight male golfers were recruited and divided based on having an LHCP < 9 or HHCP > 9. Three-dimensional GRF peaks and the timing of the peaks were recorded bilaterally during a golf swing. The golf swing was divided into different phases: (a) address to the top of the backswing, (b) top of the backswing to ball contact, and (c) ball contact to the end of follow through. Repeated measures analyses of variance (α = 0.05) were completed for each study variable: the magnitude and the timing of peak vertical GRF, peak lateral GRF, and peak medial GRF (α = 0.05). The LHCP group had a greater transfer of vertical force from the trailing foot to the leading foot in phase 2 than the HHCP group. The LHCP group also demonstrated earlier timing of peak vertical force throughout the golf swing than the HHCP group. The LHCP and HHCP groups demonstrated different magnitudes of peak lateral force. The LHCP group had an earlier timing of peak lateral GRF in phase 2 and earlier timing of peak medial GRF in phases 1 and 2 than the HHCP group. In general, LHCP golfers demonstrated greater and earlier force generation than HHCP golfers. It may be relevant to consider both the magnitude of the forces and the timing of these events during golf-specific training to improve performance. These data reveal weight shifting differences that can be addressed by teaching professionals to help their students better understand weight transfer during the golf swing to optimize performance. PMID:23222089

  13. The development and validation of a golf swing and putt skill assessment for children.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Lisa M; Hardy, Louise L; Brian, Ali S; Robertson, Sam

    2015-03-01

    The aim was to describe development of a process-oriented instrument designed to assess the golf swing and putt stroke, and to assess the instrument's discriminative validity in terms of age and reliability (intra-rater and re-test). A Delphi consultation (with golf industry professionals and researchers in movement skill assessment) was used to develop an assessment for each skill based on existing skill assessment protocols. Each skill had six components to be marked as present/absent. Individual scores were based on the number of performance components successfully demonstrated over two trials for each skill (potential score range 0 to 24). Children (n = 43) aged 6-10 years (M = 7.8 years, SD = 1.3) were assessed in both skills live in the field by one rater at Time 1(T1). A subset of children (n = 28) had consent for assessments to be videoed. Six weeks later 19 children were reassessed, five days apart (T2, T3). An ANOVA assessed discriminative validity i.e. whether skill competence at T1 differed by age (6 years, 7/8 years and 9/10 years). Intraclass correlations (ICC) assessed intra-rater reliability between the live and video assessment at T1 and test-retest reliability (between T2 and T3). Paired t-tests assessed any systematic differences between live and video assessments (T1) and between T2 and T3. Older children were more skilled (F (2, 40) = 11.18, p < 0.001). The live assessment reflected the video assessment (ICC = 0.79, 95% CI 0.59, 0.90) and scores did not differ between live and video assessments. Test retest reliability was acceptable (ICC = 0.60, 95% CI 0.23, 0.82), although the mean score was slightly higher at retest. This instrument could be used reliably by golf coaches and physical education teachers as part of systematic early player assessment and feedback. Key pointsGolf is becoming an increasingly popular sport among young children, however there is no standard protocol available to assess and identify skill deficits, mastery level

  14. The Development and Validation of a Golf Swing and Putt Skill Assessment for Children

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Lisa M.; Hardy, Louise L.; Brian, Ali S.; Robertson, Sam

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to describe development of a process-oriented instrument designed to assess the golf swing and putt stroke, and to assess the instrument’s discriminative validity in terms of age and reliability (intra-rater and re-test). A Delphi consultation (with golf industry professionals and researchers in movement skill assessment) was used to develop an assessment for each skill based on existing skill assessment protocols. Each skill had six components to be marked as present/absent. Individual scores were based on the number of performance components successfully demonstrated over two trials for each skill (potential score range 0 to 24). Children (n = 43) aged 6-10 years (M = 7.8 years, SD = 1.3) were assessed in both skills live in the field by one rater at Time 1(T1). A subset of children (n = 28) had consent for assessments to be videoed. Six weeks later 19 children were reassessed, five days apart (T2, T3). An ANOVA assessed discriminative validity i.e. whether skill competence at T1 differed by age (6 years, 7/8 years and 9/10 years). Intraclass correlations (ICC) assessed intra-rater reliability between the live and video assessment at T1 and test-retest reliability (between T2 and T3). Paired t-tests assessed any systematic differences between live and video assessments (T1) and between T2 and T3. Older children were more skilled (F (2, 40) = 11.18, p < 0.001). The live assessment reflected the video assessment (ICC = 0.79, 95% CI 0.59, 0.90) and scores did not differ between live and video assessments. Test retest reliability was acceptable (ICC = 0.60, 95% CI 0.23, 0.82), although the mean score was slightly higher at retest. This instrument could be used reliably by golf coaches and physical education teachers as part of systematic early player assessment and feedback. Key points Golf is becoming an increasingly popular sport among young children, however there is no standard protocol available to assess and identify skill deficits, mastery level

  15. Estimating watershed level nonagricultural pesticide use from golf courses using geospatial methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, G.A.; Thelin, G.P.; Sabbagh, G.J.; Fuchs, J.W.; Kelly, I.D.

    2008-01-01

    Limited information exists on pesticide use for nonagricultural purposes, making it difficult to estimate pesticide loadings from nonagricultural sources to surface water and to conduct environmental risk assessments. A method was developed to estimate the amount of pesticide use on recreational turf grasses, specifically golf course turf grasses, for watersheds located throughout the conterminous United States (U.S.). The approach estimates pesticide use: (1) based on the area of recreational turf grasses (used as a surrogate for turf associated with golf courses) within the watershed, which was derived from maps of land cover, and (2) from data on the location and average treatable area of golf courses. The area of golf course turf grasses determined from these two methods was used to calculate the percentage of each watershed planted in golf course turf grass (percent crop area, or PCA). Turf-grass PCAs derived from the two methods were used with recommended application rates provided on pesticide labels to estimate total pesticide use on recreational turf within 1,606 watersheds associated with surface-water sources of drinking water. These pesticide use estimates made from label rates and PCAs were compared to use estimates from industry sales data on the amount of each pesticide sold for use within the watershed. The PCAs derived from the land-cover data had an average value of 0.4% of a watershed with minimum of 0.01% and a maximum of 9.8%, whereas the PCA values that are based on the number of golf courses in a watershed had an average of 0.3% of a watershed with a minimum of <0.01% and a maximum of 14.2%. Both the land-cover method and the number of golf courses method produced similar PCA distributions, suggesting that either technique may be used to provide a PCA estimate for recreational turf. The average and maximum PCAs generally correlated to watershed size, with the highest PCAs estimated for small watersheds. Using watershed specific PCAs, combined

  16. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  17. Investigation report on golf cart fire at the U.S. DOE Pinellas Plant on May 11, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report documents the results of an accident investigation of a golf cart fire that occurred May 11, 1993, at the Pinellas Plant. The direct cause of the fire was determined to be excessive heat generation in the cart`s resistor coil box. The current flow creating the excessive heat was caused by the defeat of cart safety systems and a partially depressed accelerator pedal. The root cause of the fire is inadequate training of golf cart operators. Recommendations to prevent further recurrence of this type of accident include operator training and golf cart inspections.

  18. R&W Club Frederick Sews for Kids | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Sewing enthusiasts of all skill levels are invited to attend a sewing party hosted by the R&W Club Frederick on Feb. 18. Stop by the Building 549 Café Room between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to sew for a cause: help the club make pillowcases for ConKerr Cancer, a nonprofit organization that supports children in hospitals across the country.

  19. Evaluation of water demand in golf courses from southern Portugal during the last three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago Pedras, Celestina M.; Lança, Rui M.; Granja-Martins, Fernando M.; Neto-Paixão, Helena M.; Vieira, Cristina; Monteiro, José P.; Guerrero, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Golf is an economic activity with a prominent position in the tourist-sport offer in the region of Algarve. Located in southern of Portugal, this region is the most suitable region for the growth of the golf industry. The climate is characterized by mild winters with slight rainfall and hot and dry summers. The region has an annual average temperature of 14oC and annual precipitation that rarely exceeds 500 mm year-1. Since most of the rainfall occurs concentrated in the winter, irrigation is needed during the remaining months of the year to meet the water demand from plants. A proper irrigation management will allow to optimize the use water, thus it constitutes a key issue for the sustainability of this activity in areas subjected to water scarcity. Currently, remote sensing provides the tools to assess the evolution of the greenish quality of the area in the golf courses. In this study, based on Landsat images, vegetation indices were calculated the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), for the spring and summer seasons during the last 30 years. For the same period, according the data collected from weather stations distributed in the region, maps of precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity and wind were produced. According the current maintenance practices and irrigation cycles, maps of potential and real evapotranspiration and with basis on the water balance were calculated, and water deficit maps estimated. Upon crossing this information with the NDVI maps, trends were identified in the consumption of water for irrigation due to the growth of the occupied area by golf courses in the region of Algarve. Since drought problems tend to increase due to climate changes, it becomes relevant the need to conduct this study aiming the research of strategies to ensure the beneficial use of water on golf courses and other turfgrass areas.

  20. Adrenomedullin regulates club cell recovery following lung epithelial injury.

    PubMed

    García-Sanmartín, Josune; Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-06-01

    The equilibrium between lung epithelium damage and recovery in the context of chronic injury is at the basis of numerous lung diseases, including lung cancer and COPD. Understanding the contribution of growth factors and other molecular intermediates to this crosstalk may help in devising new therapeutic approaches. To better understand the contribution of adrenomedullin (AM) to lung homeostasis, we built club cell-specific conditional knockout (KO) mice for AM and subjected them to naphthalene injury. Untreated KO mice had lower levels of club cell 10 KDa protein (CC10) immunoreactivity than their wild type (WT) littermates in both terminal and regular bronchioles. Naphthalene injury resulted in a rapid necrosis of club cells followed by a progressive recovery of the epithelium. Club cells proliferated at higher rates in the KO mice and at 21 days post-injury the club cell coverage of the main bronchioles was higher and more homogeneous than in the WT animals. In conclusion, the paracrine/autocrine influence of AM in club cells subtly modulates their proliferation and spreading kinetics during lung epithelium recovery. PMID:26661726

  1. Substance Use in the Club Scene of Rome: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Vento, Alessandro Emiliano; Martinotti, Giovanni; Cinosi, Eduardo; Acciavatti, Tiziano; Carrus, Dario; Chillemi, Eleonora; di Giannantonio, Massimo; Corazza, Ornella; Schifano, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Over the last few years, a wide number of unregulated substances have been marketed on the Web and in smart and head shops; they are usually advertised as legal alternatives to commonly known drugs and are defined as “smart drugs,” “legal highs,” and “novel psychoactive substances” (NPS). Aim of our work is to describe use habits and distribution of NPS in a population of young adults in Rome club scene. Methods. A self-administered questionnaire was proposed to subjects over 18 years of age at the entrance of 5 nightclubs in Rome. Socioeconomic characteristics and substance use were investigated. Results. Preliminary results give evidence that 78% of respondents have a lifetime history of NPS use. In addition, 56% of the sample has consumed illicit drugs in the past and 39% has used psychoactive substances in the 12 hours preceding the questionnaire administration. Conclusions. A significant proportion of subjects report use of novel psychoactive substances; traditional illicit drugs consumption, particularly cocaine, appears to be very high as well in the club scene. These data highlight a serious public health challenge, since pharmacological, toxicological, and psychopathological effects linked to interactions among all these substances may be unpredictable and sometimes fatal in vulnerable individuals. PMID:25243163

  2. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  3. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Usually, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  4. Head Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a toy called "Sound Bites" can be modified to demonstrate the transmission of sound waves. Students can hear music from the toy when they press it against any bone in their heads or shoulders. (WRM)

  5. [Almaty club "KAIRAT" young football players' health].

    PubMed

    Kausova, G K; Karabaeva, A I

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the investigation was to study young football players' health. The study was conducted on 161 football players (mean age 12.3) of six children football teams of Almaty club "KAIRAT" during the competition period. It was found that 55,5% of the football players are practically healthy; 18,6% of football players have iron deficiency anemia. 32,6% of football players have caries; 5% of football players have problems of cardiopulmonary system. Investigation reveal, that in a junior sportsman was body weigh surging with downtrend during contest, testify to portability of aerobic load and in childhood unconformable of metabolism' level. This tendency was retain also in the oldest sportsman, this testify to most emulative aerobic load in comparison with junior sportsman. According as the age increases it is emulative load's extension and free occurrence of body weigh subsequent reduction but in the oldest sportsman with prevalence macrosomia. Concurrently with improvement of the anthropometric profile as far as increase of age in soccer players it is forming of a high training level. In spite of lowering of energy resources and the physical load organism's adaptation there are these phenomena. According as the age increases in a soccer player's performance of cardiac and respiratory system are improved. PMID:24214593

  6. Journal club: screen, select, probe & evaluate.

    PubMed

    Kanthraj, G R; Srinivas, C R

    2005-01-01

    Postgraduate dermatology training programs like seminars, panel discussions, and case presentations help residents to acquire knowledge. Journal club (JC) exercises help residents to update themselves with the current literature. What article a resident should choose and how a resident should evaluate and analyze an article or critically appraise a topic are issues that are most relevant for the success of a JC. Little guidance is available in the biomedical literature on how to deal with such issues. The objective of this article is to provide guidance to neophytes on dealing with JC exercises in a way that helps them in learning the critical appraisal skills. A review of the literature and of the author's experience in JC exercises will be presented. Knowing the methodology of rapid screening of articles along with the art of evaluating them, coupled with a sound knowledge of epidemiology and bio-statistics, helps a resident to select appropriate articles and discard poorly conceived or designed topics that may not generate interest in JC attendees. Hence, such an approach helps the resident in acquiring new knowledge in the shortest time. Choosing the right topic and then applying the newly obtained information to clinical practice, participants succeed in making the JC a valuable learning experience. Further, such well-formatted JCs help residents to improve the quality of health care delivered to patients. PMID:16394494

  7. Epidemiological comparison of injuries in school and senior club rugby.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A J; Garraway, W M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency, nature, circumstances, and outcome of schoolboy rugby injuries and to compare these injuries with those occurring in senior rugby clubs. METHODS: The study was a prospective cohort study, conducted on 1705 (98%) of 1736 eligible players from nine Edinburgh schools and 1169 (96%) of 1216 eligible players from all 26 senior Scottish Rugby Union clubs (South District) who provided personal details before the 1993-1994 rugby season. Adult linkpersons were appointed to notify the circumstances of all injury episodes occurring in matches or in rugby related training. RESULTS: 154 school players (9%) experienced 210 separate injuries in 186 injury episodes, 80% of which arose in matches. The prevalence rate of schoolboy match injuries was 86.8 (95% confidence interval 73.4 to 100.2) per 1000 player-seasons. Senior club match injury prevalence was much higher at 367.0 (339.4 to 394.6) per 1000 player-seasons. Club players had a higher rate of match injury than school-boys for all injury types. One third of schoolboy match injury episodes occurred in September and the majority of match injury episodes were associated with tackling (40%) or with being tackled (24%). Nine per cent of schoolboy match injury episodes were classified as severe, compared to 13% for clubs. Sixteen per cent (n = 23) of all schoolboy match injury episodes resulted in missed school attendance compared with 27% (n = 117) of all senior club match injury episodes which involved loss of employment or education. CONCLUSIONS: Schoolboy rugby is much safer than senior club rugby and the outcome of injuries that do occur is less disruptive. The relatively high rate of match injury in September migh be reduced by a more intensive period of preseason training. PMID:8889113

  8. The effect of leisure activity golf practice on motor imagery: an fMRI study in middle adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bezzola, Ladina; Mérillat, Susan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    Much is known about practice-induced plasticity of the motor system. But it is not clear how a physical training influences the mental rehearsal of the practiced task and its associated hemodynamic responses. In the present longitudinal study with two measurement time-points, we used the method of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a motor imagery task, in order to explore the dynamic neuro-functional changes induced by a highly complex physical training. The 11 golf novices between the age of 40 and 60 years practiced the motor training as leisure activity. Additionally, data from an age and sex-matched control group without golf training was collected. As a main result, we demonstrate that changes between the two measurement time-points were only found in the golf novice group. The golf novices showed a decrease in hemodynamic responses during the mental rehearsal of the golf swing in non-primary motor areas after the 40 h of golf practice. Thus, the results indicate that a complex physical leisure activity induces functional neuroplasticity in the seldom studied population of middle-aged adults, and that this effect is evident during mental rehearsal of the practiced task. This finding supports the idea that (a) a skill improvement is associated with a modified activation pattern in the associated neuronal network that can be identified during mental rehearsal of the practiced task, and that (b) a strict training protocol is not necessary to induce functional neuroplasticity. PMID:22479243

  9. The effect of leisure activity golf practice on motor imagery: an fMRI study in middle adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Bezzola, Ladina; Mérillat, Susan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    Much is known about practice-induced plasticity of the motor system. But it is not clear how a physical training influences the mental rehearsal of the practiced task and its associated hemodynamic responses. In the present longitudinal study with two measurement time-points, we used the method of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a motor imagery task, in order to explore the dynamic neuro-functional changes induced by a highly complex physical training. The 11 golf novices between the age of 40 and 60 years practiced the motor training as leisure activity. Additionally, data from an age and sex-matched control group without golf training was collected. As a main result, we demonstrate that changes between the two measurement time-points were only found in the golf novice group. The golf novices showed a decrease in hemodynamic responses during the mental rehearsal of the golf swing in non-primary motor areas after the 40 h of golf practice. Thus, the results indicate that a complex physical leisure activity induces functional neuroplasticity in the seldom studied population of middle-aged adults, and that this effect is evident during mental rehearsal of the practiced task. This finding supports the idea that (a) a skill improvement is associated with a modified activation pattern in the associated neuronal network that can be identified during mental rehearsal of the practiced task, and that (b) a strict training protocol is not necessary to induce functional neuroplasticity. PMID:22479243

  10. Estimating Impact Forces of Tail Club Strikes by Ankylosaurid Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Arbour, Victoria Megan

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been assumed that the unusual tail club of ankylosaurid dinosaurs was used actively as a weapon, but the biological feasibility of this behaviour has not been examined in detail. Ankylosaurid tail clubs are composed of interlocking vertebrae, which form the handle, and large terminal osteoderms, which form the knob. Methodology/Principal Findings Computed tomographic (CT) scans of several ankylosaurid tail clubs referred to Dyoplosaurus and Euoplocephalus, combined with measurements of free caudal vertebrae, provide information used to estimate the impact force of tail clubs of various sizes. Ankylosaurid tails are modeled as a series of segments for which mass, muscle cross-sectional area, torque, and angular acceleration are calculated. Free caudal vertebrae segments had limited vertical flexibility, but the tail could have swung through approximately 100° laterally. Muscle scars on the pelvis record the presence of a large M. longissimus caudae, and ossified tendons alongside the handle represent M. spinalis. CT scans showed that knob osteoderms were predominantly cancellous, which would have lowered the rotational inertia of the tail club and made it easier to wield as a weapon. Conclusions/Significance Large knobs could generate sufficient force to break bone during impacts, but average and small knobs could not. Tail swinging behaviour is feasible in ankylosaurids, but it remains unknown whether the tail was used for interspecific defense, intraspecific combat, or both. PMID:19707581

  11. School Astronomy Club: from Project to Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folhas, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    Prepare a generation of young people for the challenges of the future is a task which forces us to rethink the school, not just for being difficult, but also because students feel that the school has very little to offer, especially something that interests them. Thus, the school is dysfunctional, is ill, and needs prompt treatment. School have to adjust to the new times, and this does not mean changing the old blackboards by advanced interactive whiteboards. The school has to find the way to the students with something that seduce them: the Challenge. The Astronomy Club that I lead in my school is essentially a Project space. Students who voluntarily joined the club, organize themselves according to their interests around projects whose outcome is not defined from the beginning, which requires them to do, undo and redo. Which obliges them to feel the need to ask for help to mathematics or physics to achieve answers, to feel the passion to study with a genuine purpose of learning. Some examples of the work: The younger students are challenged to reproduce the historical astronomical experiments that have opened the doors of knowledge such as the Eratosthenes experiment to determine the perimeter of the Earth (on equinox), or by using congruent triangles, determine the diameter the sun. These students are driven to establish distance scales in the solar system, which, to their astonishment, allows them to clear misconceptions that arise from some pictures of books and allows them to have a scientifically correct idea of the planetary orbit and distance separating the planets of the Solar System. For students from 15 to 18 years, I have to raise the level of the challenges and use the natural tendency of this age bracket to assert making new and exciting things. To this purpose, I am fortunate to have the support of large organizations like NUCLIO, ESA, CERN, and Go-Lab Project, Inspiring Science Education, Open Discovery Space and Global Hands on Universe. Through

  12. Cone Heads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The author, a middle school art teacher, describes a sculpture project lesson involving Cone Heads (sculptures made from cardboard cones). Discussion of caricatures with exaggerated facial features and interesting profiles helped students understand that the more expressive the face, the better. This project took approximately four to five…

  13. East façade, Burton Park Club House, with Amphitheater in foreground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East façade, Burton Park Club House, with Amphitheater in foreground, view to north from Amphitheater stage (90 mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  14. Helioseismic inferences of the solar cycles 23 and 24: GOLF and VIRGO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Jiménez, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Sun-as-a star helioseismic spectrophotometer GOLF and photometer VIRGO instruments onboard the SoHO spacecraft are collecting high-quality, continuous data since April 1996. We analyze here these unique datasets in order to investigate the peculiar and weak on-going solar cycle 24. As this cycle 24 is reaching its maximum, we compare its rising phase with the rising phase of the previous solar cycle 23.

  15. Prevalence of health promotion policies in sports clubs in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Dobbinson, Suzanne Jane; Hayman, Jane Amanda; Livingston, Patricia Mary

    2006-06-01

    In recent years, some health agencies offered sponsorship to sporting associations to promote healthy environments by encouraging clubs to develop health-related policies. However, the extent to which these sponsorship contracts reach their stated aims is of concern. This study aimed to quantify levels of policy development and practice in sports clubs for each of five key health areas, namely smoke-free facilities, sun protection, healthy catering, responsible serving of alcohol and sports injury prevention. Representatives from 932 Victorian sports clubs were contacted by telephone with 640 clubs (69%) participating in the survey. Results suggested that the establishment of written policies on the key health areas by sports clubs varied widely by affiliated sport and health area: 70% of all clubs with bar facilities had written policies on responsible serving of alcohol, ranging from 58% of tennis clubs to 100% of diving and surfing clubs. In contrast, approximately one-third of sports clubs had a smoke-free policy, with 36% of tennis, 28% of country football and 28% of men's cricket clubs having policy. Moreover, 34% of clubs overall had established sun protection policy, whereas clubs competing outside during summer months, [diving (86%) and life-saving (81%)] were most likely to have a written sun protection policy. Injury prevention policies were established in 30% of sports clubs, and were most common among football (56%), diving (43%) and life-saving (41%). This study suggests that policy development for health promotion can be achieved in sports clubs when it is well supported by health agencies and consideration is given to the appropriateness of the specific behaviours to be encouraged for a given sport. Communication between associations and clubs needs to be monitored by health agencies to ensure support and resources for policy development to reach the club level. PMID:16403799

  16. Mental imagery combined with physical practice of approach shots for golf beginners.

    PubMed

    Brouziyne, M; Molinaro, C

    2005-08-01

    Recent research on motor skills of golf have pointed to the usefulness of mental imagery. In golf, such training is rarely used as a teaching technique for beginners on the grounds that only top professionals stand to gain from mental imagery. This study tested whether mental imagery combined with physical practice can improve golf performance for the approach shot. 23 volunteer beginners, 8 women and 15 men, M age 23.4 yr. (SD = 3.7), enrolled in the University Physical and Sporting Activities Department, were divided into three groups, using a combination of physical practice of the approach shot plus mental imagery, physical practice only, and a third group engaging in various sporting activities instead of either mental or physical practice of the chip shot. Analysis showed that the beginners' approach shot performance improved most in the group combining physical practice and mental imagery when compared with the group just physically practising the approach shot. It seems mental training can be used effectively to improve performance even with beginners. PMID:16350625

  17. Examination of the suitability of collecting in event cognitive processes using Think Aloud protocol in golf

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Amy E.; Taylor, Jamie A.; Polman, Remco C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Two studies examined the use of Think Aloud (TA) protocol as a means for collecting data of cognitive processes during performance in golf. In Study 1, TA was employed to examine if different verbalisation (Level 2 or Level 3 TA) instructions influence performance of high and low skilled golfers. Participants performed 30 putts using TA at either Levels 2, 3, or no verbalization condition. Although Level 3 verbalization produced a higher volume of verbal data than Level 2, TA at either Level 2 or 3 did not impair putting performance compared to no verbalization. Study 2 examined the congruence between data collected via TA at Level 3 and cued retrospective recall of cognitive processes during golf performance. Experienced golfers performed six holes of golf whilst engaging in Level 3 TA. After performance, three semi-structured retrospective interviews were conducted (10 min after performance, 24 h after performance and 48 h after performance). A comparison of the themes identified large discrepancies between the information reported during TA and at interview, with only 38–41% similarity in variables reported to influence decision making on each hole. Both studies suggest TA is a valuable method for recording cognitive processes of individuals during task performance. TA provides richer verbal data regarding decisions than cued retrospective recall, and TA does not negatively impact performance. PMID:26284007

  18. Contracting and chaining to improve the performance of a college golf team: improvement and deterioration.

    PubMed

    Simek, T C; O'Brien, R M; Figlerski, L B

    1994-06-01

    Recent work with operant procedures in sports has shown that feedback, reinforcement, and chaining can be effective techniques in improving performance. In many cases, however, a problem remains in getting the participants to practice the appropriate responses. In the present study, 14 college golfers were put on successive contingency contracts over three weeks to go through the Total Golf chaining-mastery program of Simek and O'Brien. Rewards consisted of activities such as spots on the starting team and the opportunity to play better courses as well as tangible rewards such as new golf balls. After the first two weeks of training, through 19 steps backward from the green, the mean of three posttraining rounds for these 14 golfers was 3.4 strokes lower than the mean of their three rounds at baseline. At this point, the coach did not follow through with the rewards promised in the second contract. Having been placed on extinction, only three of the 14 players followed through on the third contract. In this return to baseline-like condition an average increase of over two strokes for the team as a whole was noted. The number of steps of the chain mastered in practice and the difference between mean scores at baseline and the last measurement period correlated .86, indicating that 74% of the improvement in golf scores was accounted for by performance on the mastery chain. PMID:7936932

  19. Use of industrial byproducts to filter phosphorus and pesticides in golf green drainage water.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sheela G; King, Kevin W; Moore, James F; Levison, Phil; McDonald, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Golf courses are vulnerable to phosphate (PO) and pesticide loss by infiltration of the sandy, porous grass rooting media used and through subsurface tile drainage. In this study, an effort was made to remove PO, chlorothalonil, mefenoxam, and propiconazole in a golf green's drainage water with a filter blend comprised of industrial byproducts, including granulated blast furnace slag, cement kiln dust, silica sand, coconut shell-activated carbon, and zeolite. To test this filter media, two 6-h storm events were simulated by repeat irrigation of the golf green after PO and pesticide application. Drainage flows ranged from 0.0034 to 0.6433 L s throughout the course of the simulations. A significant decrease in the chlorothalonil load for the experimental run (with filter media) was observed compared with the control (without filter media) ( < 0.05). In general, percent reductions in chlorothalonil were very high (>80%) near peak flows. In contrast, filter media was not effective in removing PO, mefenoxam, or propiconazole ( > 0.05). Instead, it appears that the filter blend added PO to the effluent above flow rates of 0.037 L s. Overall, flow rate, the amount of filter media used, and contaminant properties may have influenced the filter media's ability to remove contaminants. More research is needed to determine the optimal blend and configuration for the filter media to remove significant amounts of all contaminants investigated. PMID:21712597

  20. Evaluation of a Florida coastal golf complex as a local and watershed source of bioavailable contaminants.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael A; Quarles, Robert L; Dantin, Darrin D; Moore, James C

    2004-02-01

    Contaminant fate in coastal areas impacted by golf course runoff is not well understood. This report summarizes trace metal, pesticide and PCB residues for colonized periphyton, Ruppia maritima (widgeon grass), Callinectes sapidus Rathbun (blue crabs) and Crassostrea virginica Gemlin (Eastern oyster) collected from areas adjacent to a Florida golf course complex which receive runoff containing reclaimed municipal wastewater. Concentrations of 19 chlorinated pesticides and 18 PCB congeners were usually below detection in the biota. In contrast, 8 trace metals were commonly detected although concentrations were not usually significantly different for biota collected from reference and non-reference coastal areas. Residue concentrations in decreasing order were typically: zinc, arsenic, copper, chromium, lead, nickel, cadmium and mercury. Mean BCF values for the eight trace metals ranged between 160-57000 (periphyton), 79-11033 (R. maritima), 87-162625 (C. virginica) and 12-9800 (C. sapidus). Most trace metal residues in periphyton colonized adjacent to the golf complex, were either similar to or significantly less than those reported for periphyton colonized in nearby coastal areas impacted by urban stormwater runoff and treated municipal and industrial wastewater discharges. Consequently, the recreational complex does not appear to be a major source of bioavailable contaminants locally nor in the immediate watershed based on results for the selected biota. PMID:14972577

  1. Visual and anatomic outcomes of golf ball-related ocular injuries

    PubMed Central

    Park, S J; Park, K H; Heo, J W; Woo, S J

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate the characteristics and prognoses of golf ball-related ocular injuries (GROIs) using standardized terminology, classification, and scoring systems. Methods Twenty-two GROI patients were assessed using the Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology, Ocular Trauma Classification Group (OTCG) classification, and Ocular Trauma Score. Globe preservation and final visual acuity (FVA) were assessed according to the injury severity categorical designation. Results Fourteen patients were injured on golf courses and eight on driving ranges. Nine patients (40.9%) had open-globe injuries (five ruptures (22.7%), four penetrating injuries (18.2%)). All rupture cases required enucleation, whereas penetrating injury cases did not (the FVA ranged from 20/100 to no light perception). In open-globe injuries, wearing glasses protected against rupture (P=0.008). Thirteen patients sustained closed-globe injuries that were accompanied by lens subluxation (38.5%), choroidal rupture (30.8%), macular commotio retinae (38.5%), and traumatic optic neuropathy (7.7%). Twelve (54.5%) patients had orbital wall fractures. The mean number of related surgeries required was 1.5±1.7 across all patients. Conclusion Eyes with GROIs had devastating FVA and globe preservation status, especially those with open-globe injuries. Observing golf rules and improving driving-range facilities are essential for preventing GROIs. Protective eyewear may reduce ocular damage from GROIs, especially globe rupture. PMID:24384962

  2. Effects of a coastal golf complex on water quality, periphyton, and seagrass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, M.A.; Boustany, R.G.; Dantin, D.D.; Quarles, R.L.; Moore, J.C.; Stanley, R.S.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide baseline information on the effects of a golf course complex on water quality, colonized periphyton, and seagrass meadows in adjacent freshwater, near-coastal, and wetland areas. The chemical and biological impacts of the recreational facility, which uses reclaimed municipal wastewater for irrigation, were limited usually to near-field areas and decreased seaward during the 2-year study. Concentrations of chromium, copper, and organochlorine pesticides were below detection in surface water, whereas mercury, lead, arsenic, and atrazine commonly occurred at all locations. Only mercury and lead exceeded water quality criteria. Concentrations of nutrients and chlorophyll a were greater in fairway ponds and some adjacent coastal areas relative to reference locations and Florida estuaries. Periphyton ash free dry weight and pigment concentrations statistically differed but not between reference and non-reference coastal areas. Biomass of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) was approximately 43% less in a meadow located adjacent to the golf complex (P < 0.05). The results of the study suggest that the effects of coastal golf courses on water quality may be primarily localized and limited to peripheral near-coastal areas. However, this preliminary conclusion needs additional supporting data. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  3. Numerical study on the aerodynamics of a golf ball and its comparison with a smooth sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Tsubokura, Makoto; Tsunoda, Masaya

    2014-11-01

    The present study has numerically investigated the flow over a golf ball and a smooth sphere by conducting large-eddy simulation (LES) using hundreds of millions of unstructured elements. Simulations were conducted at various Reynolds numbers ranging from the subcritical to the supercritical regimes. Special attention was paid to the phenomenon of drag crisis as well as the effect of surface roughness on the drag crisis. The simulation result shows that the surface roughness introduced by the dimples of the golf ball causes a local instability of the flow around the ball and subsequently leads to a momentum transfer in the near-wall region inside the dimples. The flow with high momentum in the near-wall region travels further downstream, which consequently results in the drag crisis occurring at a relatively lower Reynolds number compared with that of the smooth sphere. Moreover, the Magnus effect resulting from the rotating motion of a sphere was also one of the main concerns in this study. The simulation result shows that lift forces are imposed on both the rotating smooth sphere and rotating golf ball. For most cases the lift force points to the positive direction, however, the negative lift force appears also under certain conditions.

  4. Journal clubs: a strategy to teach civility to nursing students.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Cindy; Jenkins, Sheryl; Woith, Wendy; Kim, Myoungjin

    2012-05-01

    Incivility affects nurses and nursing students and can negatively influence patient care and the quality of nursing education. The Institute of Medicine, The Joint Commission, and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing recommended implementation of strategies to manage incivility and build social capital. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the influence of a journal club as an educational intervention to build civility and academic integrity among nursing students. Seventy-nine nursing students completed the Nurses' Intervention for Civility Education Questionnaire and the Ways of Coping Questionnaire before and after the Civility Journal Club intervention. Students involved in the Civility Journal Club were more aware of civility and incivility, more likely to be helpful to their peers, and better equipped to cope with episodes of incivility. PMID:22432534

  5. Social media, medicine and the modern journal club.

    PubMed

    Topf, Joel M; Hiremath, Swapnil

    2015-04-01

    Medical media is changing along with the rest of the media landscape. One of the more interesting ways that medical media is evolving is the increased role of social media in medical media's creation, curation and distribution. Twitter, a microblogging site, has become a central hub for finding, vetting, and spreading this content among doctors. We have created a Twitter journal club for nephrology that primarily provides post-publication peer review of high impact nephrology articles, but additionally helps Twitter users build a network of engaged people with interests in academic nephrology. By following participants in the nephrology journal club, users are able to stock their personal learning network. In this essay we discuss the history of medical media, the role of Twitter in the current states of media and summarize our initial experience with a Twitter journal club. PMID:25906989

  6. The Supernova Club: Urban Youth Engagement that Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimoto, Philip J.; Luckey, V.; Balsara, D.

    2008-05-01

    One of IYA's goals is to promote greater involvement by underrepresented minorities in scientific and engineering careers. IYA can serve as a catalyst for such involvement, but ultimate success requires a longer-term approach. The Supernova Club is an experiment in such a long-term approach. The goal is to see if engagement in a year-round astronomy club can propel youths from some of the most severely disadvantaged areas of our region into careers in science. We recruited club members by bringing astronomy activities to over a hundred youths ages 10-16 who were on campus in Summer 2007 for Notre Dames’ National Youth Sports Program (NYSP). Approximately 20 percent of the participants, most of who were underrepresented minorities and from below poverty level, expressed interest in joining an after-school astronomy club, and thirteen of them ultimately did so. The club meets one evening a week at Notre Dame's Robinson Community Learning Center. Center staff provide extensive support with logistics, meals, training in social skills and conduct, and communications with parents. Notre Dame scientists, assisted by local teachers, provide weekly activities. After one year, the club members have shown large improvements in interest in science and astronomy, ability to focus on tasks or discussions, and general behavior at school and at home. Funding for this first pilot year was provided through education supplements to HST research grants. With NASA space science education funding currently on an indefinite stand down, we are seeking other funds with which to carry on this experiment.

  7. Making Every Day Count: Boys & Girls Clubs' Role in Promoting Positive Outcomes for Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbreton, Amy

    2009-01-01

    The third in a series of reports from P/PV's three-year study of the role Boys & Girls Clubs play in the lives of the youth they serve, "Making Every Day Count" examines how Club participation is related to youth's positive and healthy development in three outcome areas identified by Boys & Girls Clubs of America as central to its mission: good…

  8. 7 CFR 795.10 - Club, society, fraternal or religious organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Club, society, fraternal or religious organization... General § 795.10 Club, society, fraternal or religious organization. Each individual club, society..., society, fraternal or religious organization is engaged in the production of crops as a separate...

  9. Raising Money Through Gift Clubs: A Survey of Techniques at 42 Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Robert D., Comp.

    The way that 42 private schools, colleges, and universities use gift clubs to motivate donors is examined. Based on a nationwide survey, information is presented on the clubs' origins, requirements for membership, methods of enlisting new members, and ways of encouraging current members to increase gifts. Attention is also directed to the clubs'…

  10. Toward an Ecstasy and Other Club Drug (EOCD) Prevention Intervention for Rave Attendees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yacoubian, George S., Jr.; Miller, Sarah; Pianim, Selwyn; Kunz, Michael; Orrick, Erin; Link, Tanja; Palacios, Wilson R.; Peters, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    A growing body of recent research has identified that "rave" attendees are at high risk for the use of "club drugs," such as 3,4-methylenedioxymeth-amphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy"). Rave attendees, however, comprise only one of several club-going populations. In the current study, we explore the prevalence of ecstasy and other club drug (EOCD) use…

  11. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(7)-1 - Social clubs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Social clubs. 1.501(c)(7)-1 Section 1.501(c)(7)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(c)(7)-1 Social clubs. (a) The exemption provided by... general, this exemption extends to social and recreation clubs which are supported solely by...

  12. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(7)-1 - Social clubs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Social clubs. 1.501(c)(7)-1 Section 1.501(c)(7)-1...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(c)(7)-1 Social clubs. (a) The exemption provided by... general, this exemption extends to social and recreation clubs which are supported solely by...

  13. Teaching Note--Incorporating Journal Clubs into Social Work Education: An Exploratory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Megan; Fawley-King, Kya; Stone, Susan I.; Accomazzo, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines the implementation of a journal club for master's and doctoral social work students interested in mental health practice. It defines educational journal clubs and discusses the history of journal clubs in medical education and the applicability of the model to social work education. The feasibility of implementing…

  14. Almost All Start but Who Continue? A Longitudinal Study of Youth Participation in Swedish Club Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobsson, Britta Thedin; Lundvall, Suzanne; Redelius, Karin; Engstrom, Lars-Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Many young people in Sweden stop participating in club sports during their teens, but some continue. Drawing on a longitudinal study, the aim of this article is to highlight some of the characteristics of teenagers who continue with club sports and to discuss the relation between club-sport participation and social and cultural conditions, with…

  15. Charismatic Cops, Patriarchs and a Few Good Women: Leadership, Club Culture and Young Peoples' Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Peter; Hickey, Chris; Cormack, Sue; Harrison, Lyn; Lindsay, Jo

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports on key findings of a research project that examined the roles that community-based sporting clubs in the Australian state of Victoria play in shaping young people's understandings and uses of alcohol. Our research imagined clubs as community hubs that are located in complex networks that impact on the ways that clubs understand…

  16. Undergraduate Journal Club as an Intervention to Improve Student Development in Applying the Scientific Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandefur, Conner I.; Gordy, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We developed and implemented a series of workshops and seminars in an undergraduate journal club targeted at improving student development in applying the scientific process. Students were surveyed before and after participating in the club about their confidence in accessing, analyzing, and reporting scientific research. Post-club, the students…

  17. Coaches' Perceptions of French Sports Clubs: Health-Promotion Activities, Aims and Coach Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoye, Aurélie; Sarrazin, Philippe; Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Kokko, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Background: Given the benefits of participating in sport, sports clubs have been recognised as health promoting organizations. To examine health-promotion activities in Finnish sports clubs, Kokko et al. developed a set of standards for health-promoting sports clubs (HPSC). Objective: The present study extends this line of research, by (1)…

  18. Sources of Information Used by Teachers in Professional Development Book Club Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Nicole H.

    2010-01-01

    The research questions were: What sources of information do teachers use in their book-club discussions; and is there variability among teachers in which sources of information they use in book club discussions? Sources of information were described in four categories: (a) the Book-Club Text that is read and discussed by the book club…

  19. An Academic Club Service Learning Project as a Demonstration of Experiential Teaching Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonczek, James L.; Snyder, Lori Unruh; Ellis, Larry R.

    2007-01-01

    We describe our pedagogical approaches and experiences with an academic club service learning project (one semester, 20 club participants, including both graduate students and lower and upper-level undergraduates). Our service learning project responds to the recent demand for more community service-based club projects within the College of…

  20. Prescription Drug Misuse Among Club Drug-Using Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Brian C.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2009-01-01

    Nonmedical prescription (Rx) drug use has recently increased, particularly among young adults. Using time-space sampling to generate a probability-based sample of club-going young adults (18–29), 400 subjects provided data on Rx drug misuse. Club-going young adults misuse Rx drugs at high rates. An overwhelming majority of the sample indicated lifetime use of pain killers, sedatives, and stimulants. A majority indicated recent pain killer use. Variations by gender and sexuality exist in this population. Young lesbian/bisexual women emerged as the group most likely to abuse Rx drugs. Research into the contexts influencing these patterns is imperative. PMID:17994483

  1. Method of transportation and drinking among club patrons

    PubMed Central

    Bourdeau, Beth; Miller, Brenda A.; Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The current study examines the variation in alcohol use among nightclub patrons under three transportation conditions: those who departed from a club using modes of transportation other than cars or motorcycles (e.g., pedestrians, bicyclists, subway riders); those who were passengers of drivers (auto/taxi passenger patrons); and those who drove from the club (driving patrons). We seek to determine whether patrons' choice for how to leave the club contributes to their risk, as assessed by blood alcohol concentrations (BAC), after controlling for other factors that may contribute to their BAC including demographic characteristics and social drinking group influences. Methods Data were collected from social drinking groups as they entered and exited clubs for 71 different evenings at ten clubs from 2010 through 2012. Using portal methodology, a research site was established proximal to club entrances. Each individual participant provided data on themselves and others in their group. The present analyses are based upon 1833 individuals who completed both entrance and exit data. Our outcome variable is blood alcohol content (BAC) based upon breath tests attained from patrons at entrance and exit from the club. Independent variables include method of transportation, social group characteristics, drug use, and personal characteristics. We use step-wise multiple regressions to predict entrance BAC, change in BAC from entrance to exit, and exit BAC: first entering individual demographic characteristics, then entering group characteristics, then drug use, and finally entering method of transportation (two dummy coded variables such that drivers are the referent category). Results In sum, in all three of our analyses, only three variables are consistently predictive of BAC: presence of a group member who is frequently drunk and non-driving modes of transportation, either being the passenger or taking alternate methods of transportation. In particular, taking an

  2. Book clubs--outreach opportunities for hospital libraries.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Priscilla L; Clever, Shannon; Coady, Teresa R; Ender, Deniz; Heyd, Michael; Peth, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Book clubs and discussion groups provide opportunities for hospital librarians to reach out to staff from all areas of their facilities while introducing them to literature reflecting participants' personal and professional interests. Librarians presenting these case studies have coordinated local book clubs where topics ranged from titles about the nature of healing, to leadership development, and patient-centered care. Some also included contemporary novels of interest to participants. No matter the setting or scope of material discussed, each group has provided unique networking opportunities for staff to meet others working in various departments of their facilities. PMID:25316078

  3. The professionalization of Carl G. Jung's analytical psychology clubs.

    PubMed

    Samuels, A

    1994-04-01

    This paper addresses (1) the history of a cluster of unusual institutions-analytical psychology clubs--which started in 1916 and by 1934 had become established in many of the countries in the world in which there was interest in the analytical psychology of Carl G. Jung; (2) the conflicts involved in trying to unite the relatively informal earlier "Jung Clubs" with the more formal societies being established by the increasing numbers of professionally trained analysts; and (3) the wider cultural and social issues included in the professionalization of analytical psychology. PMID:8034963

  4. 78 FR 38198 - Safety Zones & Special Local Regulations; Recurring Marine Events in Captain of the Port Long...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ..., 2013 (78 FR 31402). Under the provisions of 33 CFR 165.151, the fireworks displays and swim events... position 40 59'41.40'' N, 072 06'08.70'' W (NAD 83). 7.36 Friar's Head Golf Club Fireworks.. Date: July 6....03'' N, 073 08'40.25'' W (NAD 83). 7.44 National Golf Links Fireworks..... Date: July 6, 2013....

  5. Women's involvement in community development: the story of Korea's Family Planning Mothers' Club.

    PubMed

    Bong Soo Kang

    1990-04-01

    Women's participation in Korea's economic and community development programs has increased since the early 1960s. The Family Planning (FP) Mothers' Club was organized by Planned Parenthood Federation of Korea (PPFK) in rural villages. Early in 1968, PPFK recruited 139 county field officers. They were put into county health centers, one in each county. They helped set up the Mothers' Clubs. Women wanted to have these clubs, but husbands and village elders did not want them to get together and talk about family planning. 12,650 Mothers' Clubs were established in the 1st year; about 2000 clubs were organized annually after that. In 1976, there were 27,292 village-level Mothers' Clubs with 750,000 members. Some 2000 clubs have been disbanded. The purposes of the clubs are to promote practice, to make FP part of everyday life, to foster a cooperative spirit among members, and to push active participation in community development so that productivity is increased and optimal surroundings created. The Mothers' Clubs were classified into: 1) the village and grass roots clubs; 2) their chairpersons, who constituted the Eup and Myon clubs; and 3) the county federation of Mothers' Clubs. Membership is open to all married village women, aged 20 to 45. Each village club has 1 elected chairperson, 1 vice chairperson, and 1 secretary. There was an average of 23 members per club in 1968, but this grew to 30 in 1972. Club programs include social activities, community development, cooperative work, income- generation projects, a Mothers' Bank, and FP. PPFK supports the clubs by financial aid, material aid, technical aid, training, and awards and acknowledgements. Mothers' clubs have promoted FP and served as distribution points for contraceptives. Environments were drastically changed in many villages through the community development work of the Mothers' Clubs. The traditional role of Korean women was early marriage and the production of at least 1 son. The Mothers' Clubs

  6. 75 FR 34374 - Safety Zone; Stockton Ports Baseball Club/City of Stockton, 4th of July Fireworks Display...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Stockton Ports Baseball Club/City of... Ports Baseball Club and the City of Stockton will sponsor the Stockton Ports Baseball Club/City of... Ports Baseball Club/City of Stockton 4th of July Fireworks Display, Stockton, CA. (a) Location....

  7. A Cross-Cultural Study on Meaning and the Nature of Children's Experiences in Australian and French Swimming Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study conducted in Australia and France that inquired into the meaning and the nature of children's experiences of being in swimming clubs with a focus on the positive aspects of membership that keep them in their clubs. Three-month long case studies were conducted in a club in Australia and in a club in France, employing…

  8. Sexy ladies sexing ladies: women as consumers in strip clubs.

    PubMed

    Wosick-Correa, Kassia R; Joseph, Lauren J

    2008-01-01

    Recent shifts in the consumer base of the sex industry have involved greater female attendance in strip clubs. This article examines how strip clubs and dancers incorporate female patrons into a sexualized space traditionally designed for men by identifying three interactional processes: passing over, sidestaging, and tailoring. We suggest dancers pass over women because they perceive female patron behavior to include resistance to "buying the game" and spending patterns that diverge from male customers. Drawing on Goffman's dramaturgical analysis, we suggest the dynamic relationship between dancer and female patron involves what we term sidestaging, which refers to both dancers' disclosure and how the club's spatial organization inhibits the construction of women as customers through sharing gendered spaces, such as the bathroom. We argue that when a dancer tailors her lap dance for a female patron, she succeeds in acknowledging the female customer's sexual subjectivity and potential same-sex desires by providing an individualized avenue for exploring an erotic experience. Finally, we discuss data implications for understanding how same-sex desire and sexual identity operate in an environment that eroticizes the female form, and how the strip club becomes a potential space for engaging in same-sex eroticism that includes elements of play. PMID:18686149

  9. The Morehouse College Glee Club: History and Recent Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, David

    1987-01-01

    The history of the Morehouse College Glee Club, founded around 1911 at the Black college, is highlighted by appearances before such notables as Franklin D. Roosevelt, Martin Luther King, Jr., Haile Selassie, Jimmy Carter, and Benjamin E. Mays and performances with people such as Robert Shaw, Leontyne Price, Diahann Carroll, Maynard Jackson, Billy…

  10. Bears, Trolls, and Pagemasters: Learning about Learners in Book Clubs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Carolyn R.; Dixon, Carol N.; Brandts, Lois R.

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates how in one particular second-grade classroom students had opportunities for learning the academic and social content of literature while simultaneously engaging in the processes and practices of reading. Focuses on the kinds of opportunities offered to students in their involvement in Book Clubs and how those opportunities occur when…

  11. Trailblazers, Stargazers. Program Guide for the Texas Reading Club, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noe, Marie

    This guide outlines the suggested program for 1988 for the Texas Reading Club, an activity sponsored cooperatively by local libraries and the Texas State Library to encourage children and their parents to read and use the library. The general theme, "Trailblazers, Stargazers," focuses on people who do new things, go new places, experiment,…

  12. Marshall Amateur Radio Club experiment (MARCE) post flight data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupp, Charles C.

    1987-01-01

    The Marshall Amateur Radio Club Experiment (MARCE) data system, the data recorded during the flight of STS-61C, the manner in which the data was reduced to engineering units, and the performance of the student experiments determined from the data are briefly described.

  13. Rich-club organization of the newborn human brain

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Gareth; Aljabar, Paul; Zebari, Sally; Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Merchant, Nazakat; Robinson, Emma C.; Ogundipe, Enitan; Rueckert, Daniel; Edwards, A. David; Counsell, Serena J.

    2014-01-01

    Combining diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and network analysis in the adult human brain has identified a set of highly connected cortical hubs that form a “rich club”—a high-cost, high-capacity backbone thought to enable efficient network communication. Rich-club architecture appears to be a persistent feature of the mature mammalian brain, but it is not known when this structure emerges during human development. In this longitudinal study we chart the emergence of structural organization in mid to late gestation. We demonstrate that a rich club of interconnected cortical hubs is already present by 30 wk gestation. Subsequently, until the time of normal birth, the principal development is a proliferation of connections between core hubs and the rest of the brain. We also consider the impact of environmental factors on early network development, and compare term-born neonates to preterm infants at term-equivalent age. Though rich-club organization remains intact following premature birth, we reveal significant disruptions in both in cortical–subcortical connectivity and short-distance corticocortical connections. Rich club organization is present well before the normal time of birth and may provide the fundamental structural architecture for the subsequent emergence of complex neurological functions. Premature exposure to the extrauterine environment is associated with altered network architecture and reduced network capacity, which may in part account for the high prevalence of cognitive problems in preterm infants. PMID:24799693

  14. Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club

    ScienceCinema

    Eric Isaccs

    2010-01-08

    Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club on 9/15/2009. To build a national economy based on sustainable energy, the nation must first "reignite its innovation ecology," he said. Issacs makes the case for investing in science to secure America's future.

  15. Invent the Future--READ! 2000 Texas Reading Club Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Martha; Davis, Robin Works; Harris, Marlive; Marcum, Paul

    The Texas Reading Club is designed to encourage youth to read for pleasure and to promote library usage.A statewide theme is selected each year that emphasizes ways in which reading expands young minds and encourages children to use their imaginations. The year 2000's theme, "Invent the future! READ!," emphasizes ways in which reading expands…

  16. Imaginary Indians: Representations of Native Americans in Scholastic Reading Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhri, Amina; Schau, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Scholastic Reading Clubs are a popular and inexpensive way for teachers to build classroom libraries and for parents to purchase books for their children. The books made accessible to children through the order forms are assumed to be suitable for young readers in terms of their content, popularity, currency, and curricular relevance.…

  17. The Environmental Message of Audubon and the Sierra Club Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoesterey, John; Bowman, James S.

    1976-01-01

    This study attempted to determine the impact of environmental values on two periodicals: Audubon and the Sierra Club Bulletin. The two periodicals were analyzed for the period 1969-1974. Many conclusions are presented including that the Audubon Society may be undergoing an organizational change by becoming more politically oriented. (BT)

  18. Using Digital Classrooms to Conduct 4-H Club Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Patricia; Fuhrman, Nicholas E.; Morgan, A. Christian; Duncan, Dennis W.

    2012-01-01

    Using computer technology and digital classrooms to conduct 4-H Club meetings is an efficient way to continue delivering quality 4-H programming during times of limited resources and staff. Nineteen Junior and Senior 4-H'ers participated in seven digital classroom workshops using the Wimba Classroom application. These digital classroom…

  19. "Tipping" Teachers toward Change: Developing Leadership Characteristics through Book Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinker, JoAnn Franklin; Watson, Patricia A.; Furgerson, Paige; Halsey, Pamela; Janisch, Carole

    2010-01-01

    Teacher leadership is difficult because teachers often lack encouragement and opportunities to implement ideas that deliberately and strategically interact with and tap power structures in schools. In this study, a book club of university faculty and middle school teachers provided teacher leaders with a template for change around concepts…

  20. Extracurricular School Clubs: A Time for Fun and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pence, Alicia R.; Dymond, Stacy K.

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion in school clubs affords students with severe disabilities learning opportunities as well as a natural context for addressing curricula. These learning opportunities expand the number of settings in which students can practice, master, and generalize skills associated with priority IEP objectives. Teaching skills within natural activities…

  1. Mission Possible: Spy a Book! 2003 Texas Reading Club Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heard, Adriana Flores; Ingham, Donna; McDermott, Joe; Meyer, Sally; Parrish, Leila; Schill, Victor; Trevino, Rose

    The purpose of this manual for the 2003 Texas Reading Club, "Mission Possible: Spy a Book!" is to assist library staff who serve youth by suggesting ideas for programs that will attract children to the library. The following chapters are included: (1) Marketing, Cooperation and PR; (2) Serving Children with Disabilities; (3) Theme Songs; (4)…

  2. The Secret Club Project: Exploring Miscarriage through the Visual Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seftel, Laura

    2001-01-01

    Examines art as a means to understand the physical and emotional loss of miscarriage. "The Secret Club Project," an innovative exhibit featuring 10 women artists' visual responses to miscarriage, is described. Rituals related to pregnancy loss are reviewed, as well as artists' and art therapists' use of the creative process to move through grief.…

  3. Biology Blogs: An Online Journal Club & Assessment Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Souza-Hart, Janet A.

    2010-01-01

    A "blog" can be used as an online journal club to supplement classroom learning. When crafted in a certain way, it can help students develop their scientific reading comprehension, critical thinking, and writing skills in a way that can easily be assessed by educators.

  4. 8. INTERIOR VIEW OF CLUB HOUSE BEDROOM ON SOUTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR VIEW OF CLUB HOUSE BEDROOM ON SOUTHEAST CORNER OF HOTEL. BOAT HOUSE AND DOCK VISIBLE FROM WINDOW ON LEFT; SWAN FALLS POWER HOUSE AND CONSTRUCTION SITE VISIBLE FROM WINDOW ON RIGHT. CAMERA FACING WEST/NORTHWEST. - Swan Falls Village, Clubhouse 011, Snake River, Kuna, Ada County, ID

  5. "Space Capers." Texas Reading Club 1982: A Librarian's Planning Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Peggy Jemelka

    Originally designed as a summer program to be offered through the network of bookmobiles and rural public libraries in the state, the Texas Reading Club is now also promoted year round by school and institutional libraries to encourage young readers and to acquaint them with libraries and their services. A theme, formats and ideas, and basic…

  6. Boys and Girls Clubs in Public Housing. Final Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Carl E.; And Others

    This report presents findings and recommendations resulting from the evaluation of programs implemented in 15 cities by the Boys and Girls Clubs of America. These programs were implemented to distribute variations on the "Weed and Seed" program and its provision of crime and drug prevention programs. The overall goal of Weed and Seed was to form…

  7. Interdisciplinary Journal Club: Advancing Knowledge Translation in a Rural State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Ruth E.; Potvin, Marie-Christine; MacLeod, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Professionals who provide health and related supports and services to children with disabilities in educational programs and community settings must practice in an evidence-based manner to ensure children and families receive the highest quality care. Vermont's Interdisciplinary Journal Club provides a successful approach to supporting…

  8. A Case Study of a Mother/Daughter Science Club.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Frances Tate; Parsons, Sharon

    This paper describes a case study of a Mother/Daughter Science Club which was established to explore the issue of adolescent girls' increasingly negative attitudes towards science and math. Data was collected on participants' (n=40, 20 pre-adolescent fifth-grade girls and their mothers) attitudes toward math and science through the use of…

  9. Developing Preservice Teachers' Knowledge of Science Teaching Through Video Clubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Heather J.; Cotterman, Michelle E.

    2015-06-01

    Though an adequate understanding of content is a natural prerequisite of teaching (Carlsen in Journal of Research in Science Teaching 30:471-481, 1993), teachers also need to be able to interpret content in ways that facilitate student learning. How to best support novice teachers in developing and refining their content knowledge for teaching is a crucial and ongoing question for preservice teacher educators. Recently, video clubs are being explored as potential contexts for teacher learning (Barnhart & van Es in Teaching and Teacher Education 45:83-93, 2015; Sherin & Han in Teaching and Teacher Education 20:163-183, 2004). We hypothesized that pairing video clubs with student teaching experiences would provide a forum for preservice teachers to discuss issues relevant to their professional trajectory through exposure to models of peer teaching and opportunities to reflect on practice. In this study, we explored how secondary science preservice teachers used video club to restructure their overall science knowledge into science knowledge for teaching. Our findings suggest that video clubs allowed preservice teachers to access and leverage student thinking and instructional resources to deepen their understanding of science content and trajectories for science learning.

  10. Journal Club Format Emphasizing Techniques of Critical Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, James R., Jr.; Winkel, Craig E.

    1982-01-01

    The journal club format offers the resident a unique opportunity to develop specific skills in reading, comprehending, and evaluating medical literature. A course designed for residents in obstetrics and gynecology at the Letterman Army Medical Center and at the University of Cincinnati is described. (MLW)

  11. Tracking Club Sport Participation from Childhood to Early Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Rosalina; Williams, Sheila; Poulton, Richie; Reeder, Anthony I.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the strength of tracking sport participation from childhood to early adulthood among the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort. Participation in sport, dance, or gymnastics as part of a club or group (outside of school) was assessed at ages 7, 9, 15, 18, and 21 years. In addition to the traditionally…

  12. Transnational Alliances: "La Clase Mágica--Nepohualtzitzin" Ethnomathematics Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Linda; Claeys, Lorena; González, Everardo Lara

    2015-01-01

    This article exposes the ancient "Nepohualtzitzin" as an important contemporary mathematical tool. The design and development of "Nepohualtzitzin" Ethnomathematics Clubs (NECs) in predominantly Latina/o and low-income schools is also presented. NECs provide informal learning opportunities to develop and strengthen cultural…

  13. Kids Food CyberClub. Teacher's Guide. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belyea, Monica

    This guide is designed to help teachers educate students to be healthier now and in the future. It presents fun, learner-centered activities about nutrition, food, hunger, and food sources. It offers an overview of each section of the Kids Food CyberClub web site, and classroom activities teachers can use to expand on information students will…

  14. Teens, Crime, and the Community in Boys & Girls Clubs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Andrea

    Teens, Crime, and the Community (TCC) curriculum creates an awareness among teens of the crime problems facing our communities and how they affect our nation. It encourages youth to take responsibility for reducing crime and victimization, making schools and neighborhoods safer. Boys and Girls Clubs offer a variety of programs for youth, and TCC…

  15. Bullying 101: The Club Crew's Guide to Bullying Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PACER Center, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Bullying 101" is the Club Crew's Guide to Bullying Prevention. A visually-friendly, age-appropriate, 16-page colorful guide for students to read or for parents to use when talking with children, this guide describes and explains what bullying is and is not, the roles of other students, and tips on what each student can do to prevent…

  16. An Undergraduate Journal Club Experience: A Lesson in Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to better prepare undergraduate students to read and critically evaluate scientific literature, a journal club experience was introduced into a university's bachelor of science curriculum. As a result of this experience, students have been found to be more thoughtful, poised, and articulate presenters, a fact that they, the students,…

  17. 17. Interior of upper level (Turf Club level) of south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Interior of upper level (Turf Club level) of south and west additions to the Clubhouse. Camera pointed W. Stairs in foreground lead to the 'Gallery' room. Stairs in background lead to the 'Callahan' room. 'Broderick' room (not shown) is entered from south side of 'Gallery' room. (July 1993) - Longacres, Clubhouse & Additions, 1621 Southwest Sixteenth Street, Renton, King County, WA

  18. 27 CFR 31.41 - Clubs or similar organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clubs or similar organizations. 31.41 Section 31.41 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS ALCOHOL BEVERAGE DEALERS Activities Subject to This Part Certain Organizations, Agencies, and Persons...

  19. Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Isaccs

    2009-09-17

    Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club on 9/15/2009. To build a national economy based on sustainable energy, the nation must first "reignite its innovation ecology," he said. Issacs makes the case for investing in science to secure America's future.

  20. Integration of Ground Penetrating Radar with Real Time Kinematic - Global Positioning System Receivers for Efficient Mapping of Drainage Pipe Systems Beneath Golf Course Greens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. alone has over 16,000 golf course facilities. The upkeep of these facilities requires continual maintenance and occasional remodeling. The superintendents and architects responsible for golf course maintenance and remodeling efforts need non-destructive tools for obtaining shallow subsurfac...

  1. Occurrence of Meloidogyne fallax in North America, and molecular characterization of M. fallax and M. minor from U.S. golf course greens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are known to have significant presence on turf grass in golf course greens, particularly in the western United States. Nematodes isolated from a golf course in King Co., Washington were identified as Meloidogyne minor based on analysis of the...

  2. Chinese Obstetrics & Gynecology journal club: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Ilene K; Dodson, William C; Kunselman, Allen R; Kuang, Hongying; Han, Feng-Juan; Legro, Richard S; Wu, Xiao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether a journal club model could improve comprehension and written and spoken medical English in a population of Chinese medical professionals. Setting and participants The study population consisted of 52 medical professionals who were residents or postgraduate master or PhD students in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine, China. Intervention After a three-part baseline examination to assess medical English comprehension, participants were randomised to either (1) an intensive journal club treatment arm or (2) a self-study group. At the conclusion of the 8-week intervention participants (n=52) were re-tested with new questions. Outcome measures The primary outcome was the change in score on a multiple choice examination. Secondary outcomes included change in scores on written and oral examinations which were modelled on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Results Both groups had improved scores on the multiple choice examination without a statistically significant difference between them (90% power). However, there was a statistically significant difference between the groups in mean improvement in scores for both written (95% CI 1.1 to 5.0; p=0.003) and spoken English (95% CI 0.06 to 3.7; p=0.04) favouring the journal club intervention. Conclusions Interacting with colleagues and an English-speaking facilitator in a journal club improved both written and spoken medical English in Chinese medical professionals. Journal clubs may be suitable for use as a self-sustainable teaching model to improve fluency in medical English in foreign medical professionals. Trial registration number NCT01844609. PMID:26823180

  3. Experiencing aggression in clubs: social group and individual level predictors.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brenda A; Bourdeau, Beth; Johnson, Mark; Voas, Robert

    2015-05-01

    To examine the social drinking group's influence on the individual's experiences of physical or sexual aggression at clubs, data were collected from 368 groups (N = 986 individuals). Both group and individual level indicators were examined for impact on self-reports of physical and sexual aggression experiences while at the club. Recent aggressive experiences and perpetration, concerns for group safety, one's own plans and assessment of other group members' plans to drink to the point of intoxication, and personal characteristics were examined, using both individual and group indicators. At exit, participants reported experiencing physical aggression (12.3 %) and sexual aggression (12.6 %) at the club. Using generalized linear mixed modeling to account for nested data (club, event, and group), group level indicators predicted both the individual's physical and sexual aggression experiences. Especially for experiences of physical aggression, group effects are notable. Being in a group whose members recently experienced physical aggression increased the risk for the individual. Interestingly, groups that had higher levels of planned intoxication decreased risks of experiencing aggression, while a discrepancy in these intentions among group members increased the risks. Group effects were also noted for experiencing sexual aggression. High levels of prior experiences for sexual aggression in the group increased the risks for the individual during the event. Also, being in a group that is identified as having at least one member who is frequently drunk increases the risk for experiencing sexual aggression. These findings inform prevention strategies for young adults engaged in high-risk behaviors by targeting social drinking groups who frequent clubs. PMID:24838821

  4. Predictors of experiencing aggression in clubs: Beyond alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brenda A.; Bourdeau, Beth; Johnson, Mark; Voas, Robert

    2014-01-01

    To examine the social drinking group's influence on the individual's experiences of physical or sexual aggression at clubs, data were collected from 368 groups (N=986 individuals). Both group and individual level indicators were examined for impact on self-reports of physical and sexual aggression experiences while at the club. Recent aggressive experiences and perpetration, concerns for group safety, one's own plans and assessment of other group members' plans to drink to the point of intoxication, and personal characteristics were examined, using both individual and group indicators. At exit, participants reported experiencing physical aggression (12.3%) and sexual aggression (12.6%) at the club. Using generalized linear mixed modeling to account for nested data (club, event, and group), group level indicators predicted both the individual's physical and sexual aggression experiences. Especially for experiences of physical aggression, group effects are notable. Being in a group whose members recently experienced physical aggression, increased the risk for the individual. Interestingly, groups that had higher levels of planned intoxication decreased risks of experiencing aggression, while a discrepancy in these intentions among group members increased the risks. Group effects were also noted for experiencing sexual aggression. High levels of prior experiences for sexual aggression in the group increased the risks for the individual during the event. Also, being in a group that is identified as having at least one member who is frequently drunk, increases the risk for experiencing sexual aggression. These findings inform prevention strategies for young adults engaged in high risk behaviors by targeting social drinking groups who frequent clubs. PMID:24838821

  5. The Use of Journal Clubs in Science Teacher Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallman, Karen A.; Feldman, Allan

    2016-03-01

    This qualitative study explored how in a 7-month-long journal club pre- and inservice science teachers engaged with education research literature relevant to their practice to reduce the theory-practice gap. In the journal club they had the opportunity to critique and analyze peer-reviewed science education articles in the context of their classroom practice. Data sources included audio recordings of the meetings; semi-structured pre- and post-interviews of the teachers; focus groups; and artifacts (e.g., journal articles, reflective paper, email exchanges, and researcher's field notes). Data were analyzed using the techniques of grounded theory (Corbin & Strauss in Basics of qualitative research, 3rd ed. Sage, Thousand Oaks, 2008). In addition we used some preconceived categories that we created from existing literature on journal clubs and communities of practice (Newswander & Borrego in European Journal of Engineering Education 34(6): 561-571, 2009; Wenger in Communities of practice: learning, meaning, and identity. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1998) and from our previous research (Tallman & Feldman, 2012). We found that the journal club incorporated the three characteristics of a community of practice (Wenger in Communities of practice: learning, meaning, and identity. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1998) into its functioning (mutual engagement, joint enterprise, and shared repertoire). The teachers mutually engaged around the joint enterprise of reading, critiquing, and understanding the research studies with the goal of improving practice. The teachers also asked each other analytical questions, which became a shared repertoire of the journal club. They reflected on their practice by presenting, reading, and discussing the articles, which helped them to determine whether and how the findings from the articles could be incorporated into their teaching practice. In doing so, they learned the skills needed to critique the research literature in

  6. The Use of Journal Clubs in Science Teacher Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallman, Karen A.; Feldman, Allan

    2016-04-01

    This qualitative study explored how in a 7-month-long journal club pre- and inservice science teachers engaged with education research literature relevant to their practice to reduce the theory-practice gap. In the journal club they had the opportunity to critique and analyze peer-reviewed science education articles in the context of their classroom practice. Data sources included audio recordings of the meetings; semi-structured pre- and post-interviews of the teachers; focus groups; and artifacts (e.g., journal articles, reflective paper, email exchanges, and researcher's field notes). Data were analyzed using the techniques of grounded theory (Corbin & Strauss in Basics of qualitative research, 3rd ed. Sage, Thousand Oaks, 2008). In addition we used some preconceived categories that we created from existing literature on journal clubs and communities of practice (Newswander & Borrego in European Journal of Engineering Education 34(6): 561-571, 2009; Wenger in Communities of practice: learning, meaning, and identity. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1998) and from our previous research (Tallman & Feldman, 2012). We found that the journal club incorporated the three characteristics of a community of practice (Wenger in Communities of practice: learning, meaning, and identity. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1998) into its functioning (mutual engagement, joint enterprise, and shared repertoire). The teachers mutually engaged around the joint enterprise of reading, critiquing, and understanding the research studies with the goal of improving practice. The teachers also asked each other analytical questions, which became a shared repertoire of the journal club. They reflected on their practice by presenting, reading, and discussing the articles, which helped them to determine whether and how the findings from the articles could be incorporated into their teaching practice. In doing so, they learned the skills needed to critique the research literature in

  7. MDI and GOLF simulation and intercomparison via the Mt. Wilson 150-foot tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Scott Edward

    A 24 channel analyzer (Evans and Ulrich, 1995) was designed and built for the Mt. Wilson 150-foot solar tower. This instrument has 4 channels dedicated to the continuance of the existing dataset for the CrII and FeI solar lines. Additionally, the instrument employs 10 channels each for NaD1 and NiI. The latter two lines are those studied by the SOHO instruments GOLF and MDI respectively. Ten-point line profiles are taken for both Ni and NaD1 and analyzed using computer simulations of both the MDI and GOLF instruments. Since the data are taken simultaneously and for a resolved sun, the signal derived from the MDI simulation can be compared on a pixel by pixel basis to the GOLF single wing signal. A correlation is found between MDI Id and GOLF single wing intensity. By removing the Id contribution to the GOLF signal, we hope to achieve a purer velocity signal in GOLF and hence raise the signal to noise ratio. The roll angle of MDI has not been accurately measured due to the failure of SOHO's gyros. At present, a single guide star is being used for spacecraft pointing and the error in roll angle is unkown. Previously (Ulrich and Henney, 1994) the MDI roll angle was estimated by comparing magnetograms from MDI and Mt. Wilson. Observations derived from the new multichannel system at Mt. Wilson can measure the roll angle directly by comparing MDI proxy images to a Mt. Wilson proxy derived from the MDI data. The 38 roll angle measurements spanning selected time frames covering nearly the entire SOHO mission average -.32 degrees. This suggests that a steady, equator-crossing flow of ~-10 m/s would exist due to the error in MDI coordinates. A Southward, equator-crossing flow has been observed (Giles, et al. 1997) whose magnitude is roughly -7 m/s. Thus some or even all of such a flow may be explainable by the MDI roll angle. Sources of error in the Mt. Wilson determination of the MDI roll angle are discussed and found to be relatively small (~3-4 are minutes) when estimated

  8. Report of ground water monitoring for expansion of the golf course, Salt Lake City, Utah, vitro processing site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    To determine the potential impacts of the proposed golf course expansion on the south side of the Vitro site, ground water data from the UMTRA Vitro processing site were evaluated in response to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office request. Golf in the Round, Inc., has proposed an expansion of the present driving range to include a 9-hole golf course on the UMTRA Vitro processing site, which is owned by the Central Valley Water Reclamation Facility (CVWRF). An expanded golf course would increase irrigation and increase the amount of water that could infiltrate the soil, recharging the unconfined aquifer. Increased water levels in the aquifer could alter the ground water flow regime; contaminants in the shallow ground water could then migrate off the site or discharge to surface water in the area. Dewatering of the unconfined aquifer on CVWRF property could also impact site contaminant migration; a significant amount of ground water extraction at CVWRF could reduce the amount of contaminant migration off the site. Since 1978, data have been collected at the site to determine the distribution of tailings materials (removed from the site from 1985 to 1987) and to characterize the presence and migration of contaminants in sediments, soils, surface water, and ground water at the former Vitro processing site. Available data suggest that irrigating an expanded golf course may cause contamination to spread more rapidly within the unconfined aquifer. The public is not at risk from current Vitro processing site activities, nor is risk expected due to golf course expansion. However, ecological risk could increase with increased surface water contamination and the development of ground water seeps.

  9. Evaluating management-induced soil salinization in golf courses in semi-arid landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J.; Udeigwe, T. K.; Weindorf, D. C.; Kandakji, T.; Gautam, P.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Site-specific information on land management practices are often desired to make better assessments of their environmental impacts. A study was conducted in Lubbock, Texas, in the Southern High Plains of the United States, an area characterized by semi-arid climatic conditions, to (1) examine the potential management-induced alterations in soil salinity indicators in golf course facilities and (2) develop predictive relationships for a more rapid soil salinity examination within these urban landscape soils using findings from a portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer. Soil samples were collected from managed (well irrigated) and non-managed (non-irrigated) areas of seven golf course facilities at 0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm depths and analyzed for a suite of chemical properties. Among the extractable cations, sodium (Na) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the managed zones of all the golf facilities. Soil electrical conductivity (EC), exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), parameters often used in characterizing soil salinity and sodicity, were for the most part significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the managed areas. Water quality reports collected over a 22-year period (1991-2013, all years not available) indicated a gradual increase in pH, EC, SAR, total alkalinity, and extractable ions, thus supporting the former findings. Findings from the PXRF suggested possible differences in chemical species and sources that contribute to salinity between the managed and non-managed zones. PXRF-quantified Cl and S, and to a lesser extent Ca, individually and collectively explained 23-85% of the variability associated with soil salinity at these facilities.

  10. Evaluating management-induced soil salinization in golf courses in semi-arid landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J.; Udeigwe, T. K.; Weindorf, D. C.; Kandakji, T.; Gautam, P.; Mahmoud, M. M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific information on land management practices are often desired to make better assertions of their environmental impacts. A study was conducted in Lubbock, TX, in the Southern High Plains of the United States, an area characterized by semi-arid climatic conditions, to (1) examine the potential management-induced alteration in soil salinity indicators in golf course facilities and (2) develop predictive relationships for a more rapid soil salinity examination within these urban landscape soils using findings from portable x-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer. Soil samples were collected from the managed (well irrigated) and non-managed (non irrigated) areas of seven golf course facilities at 0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm depths, and analyzed for a suite of chemical properties. Among the extractable cations, sodium (Na) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the managed zones of all the golf facilities. Soil electrical conductivity (EC), exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), parameters often used in characterizing soil salinity and sodicity, were in most part significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the managed areas. Water quality report collected over a 22-year period (1991-2013, all years not available) indicated a gradual increase in pH, EC, SAR, total alkalinity, and extractable ions, thus, supporting the former findings. Findings from the PXRF suggested possible differences in chemical species and sources that contribute to salinity between the managed and non-managed zones. PXRF quantified Cl and S, and to a lesser extent Ca, individually and collectively explained 23-85% of the variability associated with soil salinity at these facilities.

  11. Estimation of Center of Mass Trajectory using Wearable Sensors during Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Bijan; Lee-Eng, Jacqueline; Wrobel, James S; Goebel, Ruben

    2015-06-01

    This study suggests a wearable sensor technology to estimate center of mass (CoM) trajectory during a golf swing. Groups of 3, 4, and 18 participants were recruited, respectively, for the purpose of three validation studies. Study 1 examined the accuracy of the system to estimate a 3D body segment angle compared to a camera-based motion analyzer (Vicon®). Study 2 assessed the accuracy of three simplified CoM trajectory models. Finally, Study 3 assessed the accuracy of the proposed CoM model during multiple golf swings. A relatively high agreement was observed between wearable sensors and the reference (Vicon®) for angle measurement (r > 0.99, random error <1.2° (1.5%) for anterior-posterior; <0.9° (2%) for medial-lateral; and <3.6° (2.5%) for internal-external direction). The two-link model yielded a better agreement with the reference system compared to one-link model (r > 0.93 v. r = 0.52, respectively). On the same note, the proposed two-link model estimated CoM trajectory during golf swing with relatively good accuracy (r > 0.9, A-P random error <1cm (7.7%) and <2cm (10.4%) for M-L). The proposed system appears to accurately quantify the kinematics of CoM trajectory as a surrogate of dynamic postural control during an athlete's movement and its portability, makes it feasible to fit the competitive environment without restricting surface type. Key pointsThis study demonstrates that wearable technology based on inertial sensors are accurate to estimate center of mass trajectory in complex athletic task (e.g., golf swing)This study suggests that two-link model of human body provides optimum tradeoff between accuracy and minimum number of sensor module for estimation of center of mass trajectory in particular during fast movements.Wearable technologies based on inertial sensors are viable option for assessing dynamic postural control in complex task outside of gait laboratory and constraints of cameras, surface, and base of support. PMID:25983585

  12. Estimation of Center of Mass Trajectory using Wearable Sensors during Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Bijan; Lee-Eng, Jacqueline; Wrobel, James S.; Goebel, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    This study suggests a wearable sensor technology to estimate center of mass (CoM) trajectory during a golf swing. Groups of 3, 4, and 18 participants were recruited, respectively, for the purpose of three validation studies. Study 1 examined the accuracy of the system to estimate a 3D body segment angle compared to a camera-based motion analyzer (Vicon®). Study 2 assessed the accuracy of three simplified CoM trajectory models. Finally, Study 3 assessed the accuracy of the proposed CoM model during multiple golf swings. A relatively high agreement was observed between wearable sensors and the reference (Vicon®) for angle measurement (r > 0.99, random error <1.2° (1.5%) for anterior-posterior; <0.9° (2%) for medial-lateral; and <3.6° (2.5%) for internal-external direction). The two-link model yielded a better agreement with the reference system compared to one-link model (r > 0.93 v. r = 0.52, respectively). On the same note, the proposed two-link model estimated CoM trajectory during golf swing with relatively good accuracy (r > 0.9, A-P random error <1cm (7.7%) and <2cm (10.4%) for M-L). The proposed system appears to accurately quantify the kinematics of CoM trajectory as a surrogate of dynamic postural control during an athlete’s movement and its portability, makes it feasible to fit the competitive environment without restricting surface type. Key points This study demonstrates that wearable technology based on inertial sensors are accurate to estimate center of mass trajectory in complex athletic task (e.g., golf swing) This study suggests that two-link model of human body provides optimum tradeoff between accuracy and minimum number of sensor module for estimation of center of mass trajectory in particular during fast movements. Wearable technologies based on inertial sensors are viable option for assessing dynamic postural control in complex task outside of gait laboratory and constraints of cameras, surface, and base of support. PMID:25983585

  13. Maximum projectile range with drag and lift, with particular application to golf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    1983-04-01

    This paper explores the interesting problem of projectile motion without the vacuum idealization. Particular attention is paid to golf ball trajectories with and without lift. No lift trajectories with linear and quadratic drag are considered first. Then, trajectories with lift and linear drag are investigated. Projection angles for maximum range are determined for all these cases. Computer solutions are used throughout, with a Runge-Kutta routine used for all cases except for the well-known closed solution for the no lift, linear drag projectile.

  14. Peer Effects in the Workplace: Evidence from Random Groupings in Professional Golf Tournaments

    PubMed Central

    Guryan, Jonathan; Kroft, Kory; Notowidigdo, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses random assignment in professional golf tournaments to test for peer effects in the workplace. We find no evidence that playing partners’ ability affects performance, contrary to recent evidence on peer effects in the workplace from laboratory experiments, grocery scanners, and soft-fruit pickers. In our preferred specification we can rule out peer effects larger than 0.043 strokes for a one stroke increase in playing partners’ ability. Our results complement existing studies on workplace peer effects and are useful in explaining how social effects vary across labor markets, across individuals, and with the form of incentives faced. PMID:20454555

  15. NCI Takes Back the Defelice Cup at Ninth Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer After being down by a point in the morning, NCI reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from Leidos Biomedical Research, with a final score of 12 ½ to 11 ½, at the ninth annual Ronald H. Defelice Golf Tournament, held Oct. 13. “The tightest matches in the nine-year history of this cup competition resulted in a narrow victory for NCI and allowed NCI to take a 5–4 victory total,” said Denny Dougherty, one of the team captains for Leidos Biomed and a retired senior subcontracts advisor at what was formerly SAIC-Frederick.

  16. Towards solar activity maximum 24 as seen by GOLF and VIRGO/SPM instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, R. A.; Salabert, D.; Mathur, S.; Régulo, C.; Ballot, J.; Davies, G. R.; Jiménez, A.; Simoniello, R.

    2013-06-01

    All p-mode parameters vary with time as a response to the changes induced by the cyclic behavior of solar magnetic activity. After the unusual long solar-activity minimum between cycles 23 and 24 -where the p-mode parameters have shown a different behavior than the surface magnetic proxies- we analyze the temporal variation of low-degree p-mode parameters measured by GOLF (in velocity) and VIRGO (in intensity) Sun-as-a-star instruments on board SoHO. We compare our results with other activity proxies.

  17. A rare cause of foot pain with golf swing: symptomatic os vesalianum pedis-a case report.

    PubMed

    Petrera, Massimo; Dwyer, Tim; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell J

    2013-07-01

    The os vesalianum is an uncommon accessory bone of the foot, located proximally to the base of the fifth metatarsal. It is usually asymptomatic and detected incidentally on radiographs. This is a case of bilateral os vesalianum, symptomatic only in the right foot, in a golf player. After a failed nonoperative treatment, the os vesalianum in the symptomatic foot was excised and the peroneus brevis tendon reattached using a suture anchor. The functional outcome was excellent, and the patient returned to golf 8 weeks after surgery. PMID:24459554

  18. Integrated dynamic policy management methodology and system for strategic environmental assessment of golf course installation policy in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ching-Ho; Liu, Wei-Lin; Liaw, Shu-Liang

    2011-01-15

    Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) focuses primarily on assessing how policies, plans, and programs (PPPs) influence the sustainability of the involved regions. However, the processes of assessing policies and developing management strategies for pollution load and resource use are usually separate in the current SEA system. This study developed a policy management methodology to overcome the defects generated during the above processes. This work first devised a dynamic management framework using the methods of systems thinking, system dynamics, and Managing for Results (MFRs). Furthermore, a driving force-pressure-state-impact-response (DPSIR) indicator system was developed. The golf course installation policy was applied as a case study. Taiwan, counties of Taiwan, and the golf courses within those individual counties were identified as a system, subsystems, and objects, respectively. This study identified an object-linked double-layer framework with multi-stage-option to simultaneously to quantify golf courses in each subsystem and determine ratios of abatement and allocation for pollution load and resource use of each golf course. The DPSIR indicator values for each item of each golf course in each subsystem are calculated based on the options taken in the two decision layers. The summation of indicator values for all items of all golf courses in all subsystems according to various options is defined as the sustainability value of the policy. An optimization model and a system (IDPMS) were developed to obtain the greatest sustainability value of the policy, while golf course quantity, human activity intensity, total quantities of pollution load and resource use are simultaneously obtained. The solution method based on enumeration of multiple bounds for objectives and constraints (EMBOC) was developed for the problem with 1.95 x 10{sup 128} combinations of possible options to solve the optimal solution in ten minutes using a personal computer with 3.0 GHz

  19. "In the Interest of the Colored Boys": Christopher J. Atkinson, William T. Coleman, and the Extension of Boys' Clubs Services to African-American Communities, 1906-1931

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Carter Julian

    2011-01-01

    This paper details how African-American boys' club workers, their Clubs as well as their service to African-American youth, gained legitimacy within the Boys' Club Federation, now Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA). Specifically, it illustrates what facilitated a predominantly urban, northeastern organization to begin opening Clubs for…

  20. The use of 3D scanning for sporting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friel, Kevin; Ajjimaporn, Pann; Straub, Jeremy; Kerlin, Scott

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the process and research that went into creating a set of 3D models to characterize a golf swing. The purpose of this work is to illustrate how a 3D scanner could be used for assessing athlete performance in sporting applications. In this case, introductory work has been performed to show how the scanner could be used to show the errors a golfer made in a swing. Multiple factors must be taken into account when assessing golfers' swings including the position and movement of the golfer's hands, arms, and foot placement as well as the position of the club head and shaft of the golf club.

  1. Demand-controlled ventilation of an entertainment club

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, G.V.

    1997-12-31

    Entertainment clubs, nightclubs, theaters, restaurants, and coliseums, with their highly variable occupancy rate, are excellent candidates for demand-controlled ventilation. The dynamic thermal requirements of both heating and cooling, coupled with the need to control indoor air quality because of the large number of patrons who also may be smoking during the highest occupancy, provide an opportunity to integrate the temperature controls with an indoor air quality control system. Significant energy savings may be realized by controlling the ventilation of outdoor air to match the heating, cooling, and humidity requirements as well as maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. This paper describes a demand-controlled ventilation system that was installed in an entertainment club in Boise, Idaho, using a multigas indoor air quality sensor to measure the level of indoor air pollutants, which, when combined with a mixed-air temperature sensor to provide economizer cooling, introduces outdoor air at a rate required to adequately ventilate the space.

  2. The Supernova Club: Bringing Space Science to Urban Youths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimoto, P. J.; Pettit, R.; Balsara, D.; Garnavich, P.

    2008-06-01

    The Supernova Club is an experiment aimed at bringing space science to youths, almost all African Americans, from the most severely disadvantaged areas of the South Bend, Indiana, region. It leverages the National Youth Sports Program (NYSP) that, in Summer 2007, brought 100 children, ages 10-16 and living at or below the poverty level, to the Notre Dame campus for a 4-week non-residential summer program. Six contact hours of space science instruction were added to the core curriculum of nutrition, physical fitness, and academic study. At summer's end, 13 high interest/high potential youths were selected to form ``The Supernova Club''-a year-round, after-school, weekly follow-up program.

  3. Literature circles book club for science and language arts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombard, Britain

    Students from an urban middle school participated in a Science Book Club for one semester using the literature circles format. These students voluntarily attended twice weekly lunch meetings, reading books that followed their Grade 7 science classes. Groups of three to six participants read the same text, each performing rotating jobs to improve group discussions during meetings. When a group completed a book, participants created a presentation to share what they learned with the other groups in the club and the researcher/teacher. This research measured gains in science content knowledge and language arts skills focusing on reading comprehension, and literary response and analysis. Gains were measured using pre-existing district benchmarks. An ANCOVA showed that while no gains were found in science content knowledge, there were gains in language arts in the areas of reading comprehension and literary response and analysis.

  4. [Cervical cord infarction associated with unilateral vertebral artery dissection due to golf swing].

    PubMed

    Tokumoto, Kazuki; Ueda, Nobuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A-68-year-old man experienced nuchal pain and bilateral shoulder weakness that occurred suddenly after he performed a golf swing. He was conscious. His cranial nerves were normal, but bilateral deltoid and biceps muscle strengths weakened. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) showed no brain stem infarctions or cervical epidural hematoma. We tentatively diagnosed him with concussion of the spinal cord because of mild recovery of his bilateral upper limb weakness after several hours; he was later discharged. The next day, he suddenly developed serious tetraplegia and was admitted to the emergency department. His breathing was controlled by a respirator as he had expectoration difficulty and respiratory muscle paralysis. A lesion in the cervical cord became apparent on MRI; the right vertebral artery was not detected on magnetic resonance angiography. Cervical MRI showed the intimal flap and a lack of flow void in the right vertebral artery. These findings revealed a right vertebral artery dissection. Cervical cord infarction due to unilateral vertebral artery dissection is rarer than posterior cerebral infarction due to the same pathogenesis; however, some such cases have been reported. We consider the present case to be caused by cervical cord infarction associated with unilateral vertebral artery dissection resulting from golf swing. PMID:24583591

  5. Looking to Learn: The Effects of Visual Guidance on Observational Learning of the Golf Swing.

    PubMed

    D'Innocenzo, Giorgia; Gonzalez, Claudia C; Williams, A Mark; Bishop, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    Skilled performers exhibit more efficient gaze patterns than less-skilled counterparts do and they look more frequently at task-relevant regions than at superfluous ones. We examine whether we may guide novices' gaze towards relevant regions during action observation in order to facilitate their learning of a complex motor skill. In a Pre-test-Post-test examination of changes in their execution of the full golf swing, 21 novices viewed one of three videos at intervention: i) a skilled golfer performing 10 swings (Free Viewing, FV); ii) the same video with transient colour cues superimposed to highlight key features of the setup (Visual Guidance; VG); iii) or a History of Golf video (Control). Participants in the visual guidance group spent significantly more time looking at cued areas than did the other two groups, a phenomenon that persisted after the cues had been removed. Moreover, the visual guidance group improved their swing execution at Post-test and on a Retention test one week later. Our results suggest that visual guidance to cued areas during observational learning of complex motor skills may accelerate acquisition of the skill. PMID:27224057

  6. Early Improper Motion Detection in Golf Swings Using Wearable Motion Sensors: The First Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a golf swing to detect improper motion in the early phase of the swing. Led by the desire to achieve a consistent shot outcome, a particular golfer would (in multiple trials) prefer to perform completely identical golf swings. In reality, some deviations from the desired motion are always present due to the comprehensive nature of the swing motion. Swing motion deviations that are not detrimental to performance are acceptable. This analysis is conducted using a golfer's leading arm kinematic data, which are obtained from a golfer wearing a motion sensor that is comprised of gyroscopes and accelerometers. Applying the principal component analysis (PCA) to the reference observations of properly performed swings, the PCA components of acceptable swing motion deviations are established. Using these components, the motion deviations in the observations of other swings are examined. Any unacceptable deviations that are detected indicate an improper swing motion. Arbitrarily long observations of an individual player's swing sequences can be included in the analysis. The results obtained for the considered example show an improper swing motion in early phase of the swing, i.e., the first part of the backswing. An early detection method for improper swing motions that is conducted on an individual basis provides assistance for performance improvement. PMID:23752563

  7. Quasi-stiffness of the knee joint in flexion and extension during the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ahnryul; Sim, Taeyong; Mun, Joung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical understanding of the knee joint during a golf swing is essential to improve performance and prevent injury. In this study, we quantified the flexion/extension angle and moment as the primary knee movement, and evaluated quasi-stiffness represented by moment-angle coupling in the knee joint. Eighteen skilled and 23 unskilled golfers participated in this study. Six infrared cameras and two force platforms were used to record a swing motion. The anatomical angle and moment were calculated from kinematic and kinetic models, and quasi-stiffness of the knee joint was determined as an instantaneous slope of moment-angle curves. The lead knee of the skilled group had decreased resistance duration compared with the unskilled group (P < 0.05), and the resistance duration of the lead knee was lower than that of the trail knee in the skilled group (P < 0.01). The lead knee of the skilled golfers had greater flexible excursion duration than the trail knee of the skilled golfers, and of both the lead and trail knees of the unskilled golfers. These results provide critical information for preventing knee injuries during a golf swing and developing rehabilitation strategies following surgery. PMID:25651162

  8. Recurrence quantification analysis and support vector machines for golf handicap and low back pain EMG classification.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís; Vaz, João Rocha; Castro, Maria António; Serranho, Pedro; Cabri, Jan; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    The quantification of non-linear characteristics of electromyography (EMG) must contain information allowing to discriminate neuromuscular strategies during dynamic skills. There are a lack of studies about muscle coordination under motor constrains during dynamic contractions. In golf, both handicap (Hc) and low back pain (LBP) are the main factors associated with the occurrence of injuries. The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of support vector machines SVM on EMG-based classification to discriminate Hc (low and high handicap) and LBP (with and without LPB) in the main phases of golf swing. For this purpose recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) features of the trunk and the lower limb muscles were used to feed a SVM classifier. Recurrence rate (RR) and the ratio between determinism (DET) and RR showed a high discriminant power. The Hc accuracy for the swing, backswing, and downswing were 94.4±2.7%, 97.1±2.3%, and 95.3±2.6%, respectively. For LBP, the accuracy was 96.9±3.8% for the swing, and 99.7±0.4% in the backswing. External oblique (EO), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST) and rectus femoris (RF) showed high accuracy depending on the laterality within the phase. RQA features and SVM showed a high muscle discriminant capacity within swing phases by Hc and by LBP. Low back pain golfers showed different neuromuscular coordination strategies when compared with asymptomatic. PMID:26027794

  9. Early improper motion detection in golf swings using wearable motion sensors: the first approach.

    PubMed

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a golf swing to detect improper motion in the early phase of the swing. Led by the desire to achieve a consistent shot outcome, a particular golfer would (in multiple trials) prefer to perform completely identical golf swings. In reality, some deviations from the desired motion are always present due to the comprehensive nature of the swing motion. Swing motion deviations that are not detrimental to performance are acceptable. This analysis is conducted using a golfer's leading arm kinematic data, which are obtained from a golfer wearing a motion sensor that is comprised of gyroscopes and accelerometers. Applying the principal component analysis (PCA) to the reference observations of properly performed swings, the PCA components of acceptable swing motion deviations are established. Using these components, the motion deviations in the observations of other swings are examined. Any unacceptable deviations that are detected indicate an improper swing motion. Arbitrarily long observations of an individual player's swing sequences can be included in the analysis. The results obtained for the considered example show an improper swing motion in early phase of the swing, i.e., the first part of the backswing. An early detection method for improper swing motions that is conducted on an individual basis provides assistance for performance improvement. PMID:23752563

  10. Beating the bunker: the effect of PETTLEP imagery on golf bunker shot performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dave; Wright, Caroline J; Cantwell, Cara

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of physical practice with PETTLEP-based (Physical, Environment, Task, Timing, Learning, Emotion and Perspective; Holmes & Collins, 2001) imagery and PETTLEP + physical practice interventions on golf bunker shot performance. Thirty-two male county- or international-level golfers were assigned to one of four groups; PETTLEP imagery, physical practice, PETTLEP + physical practice, or control. The PETTLEP imagery group imaged 15 bunker shots, their interventions incorporating PETTLEP components, such as physical, environment, and emotion, twice a week. The physical practice group physically performed their 15 bunker shots twice per week; the PETTLEP + physical practice group performed PETTLEP imagery once per week and physical practice once per week. Each group performed their respective tasks for 6 weeks. Pre- and posttests consisted of 15 bunker shots, with points awarded according to the ball proximity to the pin. All groups improved significantly (p < .01) from pre- to posttest, and the PETTLEP + physical practice group improved more (p < .05) than the PETTLEP and physical practice groups. However, there was no significant difference between the physical practice and PETTLEP groups (p > .05). Findings, therefore, support the effectiveness of PETTLEP in enhancing golf performance, especially when combined with physical practice. PMID:18816950

  11. Local Navon letter processing affects skilled behavior: a golf-putting experiment.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael B; Dawkins, Gemma

    2015-04-01

    Expert or skilled behaviors (for example, face recognition or sporting performance) are typically performed automatically and with little conscious awareness. Previous studies, in various domains of performance, have shown that activities immediately prior to a task demanding a learned skill can affect performance. In sport, describing the to-be-performed action is detrimental, whereas in face recognition, describing a face or reading local Navon letters is detrimental. Two golf-putting experiments are presented that compare the effects that these three tasks have on experienced and novice golfers. Experiment 1 found a Navon effect on golf performance for experienced players. Experiment 2 found, for experienced players only, that performance was impaired following the three tasks described above, when compared with reading or global Navon tasks. It is suggested that the three tasks affect skilled performance by provoking a shift from automatic behavior to a more analytic style. By demonstrating similarities between effects in face recognition and sporting behavior, it is hoped to better understand concepts in both fields. PMID:25102927

  12. Direct Numerical Simulations of the Flow around a Golf Ball: Flow Structure and Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Clinton; Beratlis, Nikolaos; Squires, Kyle; Balaras, Elias; Tsunoda, Masaya

    2007-11-01

    The drag on a golf ball can be reduced by as much as 50% compared to a smooth sphere. There have been very few studies, primarily experimental, that provide quantitative information on the details of the underlying mechanisms. To illuminate the underlying mechanisms, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is applied to the flow around a golf ball using an immersed boundary method. Computations are performed using up to 500 processors on a range of mesh resolutions from 61 million points to 1.2 billion points. Results are presented from simulations performed at Reynolds numbers of Re=UD/ν=0.25 x10^5 and 1.0 x10^5. Flow visualizations reveal the location of turbulent transition, as well as the delay of complete separation due to shear layer instability and the local separation within individual dimples. Prediction of the drag coefficient appears in reasonable agreement with measurements. Time-averaged statistics of the velocity and pressure are being acquired and will be presented at the meeting.

  13. GOLF-NG spectrometer, a space prototype for studying the dynamics of the deep solar interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turck-Chièze, Sylvaine; Carton, Pierre-Henri; Ballot, Jérome; Barrière, Jean-Christophe; Daniel-Thomas, Philippe; Delbart, Alain; Desforges, Daniel; Garcia, Rafaël A.; Granelli, Rémi; Mathur, Savita; Nunio, François; Piret, Yves; Pallé, Pere L.; Jiménez, Antonio J.; Jiménez-Reyes, Sebastian J.; Robillot, Jean Maurice; Fossat, Eric; Eff-Darwich, Antonio. M.; Gelly, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    The GOLF-NG (Global Oscillations at Low Frequency New Generation) instrument is devoted to the search for solar gravity and acoustic modes, and also chromospheric modes from space. This instrument which is a successor to GOLF/SOHO will contribute to improve our knowledge of the dynamics of the solar radiative zone. It is a 15 points resonant scattering spectrometer, working on the D1 sodium line. A ground-based prototype is under construction to validate the difficult issues. It will be installed at the Teide Observatory, on Tenerife in 2006 to analyse the separation of the effects of the magnetic turbulence of the line from the solar oscillations. We are prepared to put a space version of this instrument including a capability of identification of the modes, in orbit during the next decade. This instrument should be included in the ILWS program as it offers a key to the improvement of our knowledge of the solar core in combination with observations from SDO and PICARD. We hope to determine the core rotation and magnetic field, through precise measurements of oscillation mode frequency splittings. Understanding the magnetic field of the radiative zone is important for progress in the study of solar activity sources, an important player for the long-term Sun-Earth relationship.

  14. A parametric study of golf car and personal transport vehicle braking stability and their deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Seluga, Kristopher J; Baker, Lowell L; Ojalvo, Irving U

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes research and parametric analyses of braking effectiveness and directional stability for golf cars, personal transport vehicles (PTVs) and low speed vehicles (LSVs). It is shown that current designs, which employ brakes on only the rear wheels, can lead to rollovers if the brakes are applied while traveling downhill. After summarizing the current state of existing safety standards and brake system designs, both of which appear deficient from a safety perspective, a previously developed dynamic simulation model is used to identify which parameters have the greatest influence on the vehicles' yaw stability. The simulation results are then used to parametrically quantify which combination of these factors can lead to yaw induced rollover during hard braking. Vehicle velocity, steering input, path slope and tire friction are all identified as important parameters in determining braking stability, the effects of which on rollover propensity are presented graphically. The results further show that when vehicles are equipped with front brakes or four-wheel brakes, the probability of a yaw induced rollover is almost entirely eliminated. Furthermore, the parametric charts provided may be used as an aid in developing guidelines for golf car and PTV path design if rear brake vehicles are used. PMID:19540974

  15. Fertilizer source effects on phosphate and nitrate leaching through simulated golf greens.

    PubMed

    Shuman, L M

    2003-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen leached from high-porosity golf greens can adversely affect surface water and groundwater quality. Greenhouse and field lysimeter experiments were carried out to determine the effects of eight fertilizer sources on P and N leaching from simulated golf greens. Phosphorus appeared in the leachate later than nitrate-N, and the highest concentrations were for the soluble 20-20-20 and the 16-25-12 starter fertilizers. The other six sources resulted in lower P concentrations. The soluble 20-20-20 and the 16-25-12 sources each resulted in 43% of the added P eluting in the leachate, whereas the others varied from 15 to 25%. For nitrate-N the lowest cumulative mass was for the controlled-release 13-13-13 and sulfur-coated urea. A higher percentage of applied P than applied N leached from both field and greenhouse lysimeters. However, the amounts of P leached for the field lysimeters were lower than for the greenhouse columns. PMID:12826419

  16. Looking to Learn: The Effects of Visual Guidance on Observational Learning of the Golf Swing

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Claudia C.; Williams, A. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Skilled performers exhibit more efficient gaze patterns than less-skilled counterparts do and they look more frequently at task-relevant regions than at superfluous ones. We examine whether we may guide novices’ gaze towards relevant regions during action observation in order to facilitate their learning of a complex motor skill. In a Pre-test-Post-test examination of changes in their execution of the full golf swing, 21 novices viewed one of three videos at intervention: i) a skilled golfer performing 10 swings (Free Viewing, FV); ii) the same video with transient colour cues superimposed to highlight key features of the setup (Visual Guidance; VG); iii) or a History of Golf video (Control). Participants in the visual guidance group spent significantly more time looking at cued areas than did the other two groups, a phenomenon that persisted after the cues had been removed. Moreover, the visual guidance group improved their swing execution at Post-test and on a Retention test one week later. Our results suggest that visual guidance to cued areas during observational learning of complex motor skills may accelerate acquisition of the skill. PMID:27224057

  17. Benzodiazepine dependence among multidrug users in the club scene

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven P.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Levi-Minzi, Maria A.; Mooss, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Background Benzodiazepines (BZs) are among the most frequently prescribed drugs with the potential for abuse. Young adults ages 18–29 report the highest rates of BZ misuse in the United States. The majority of club drug users are also in this age group, and BZ misuse is prevalent in the nightclub scene. BZ dependence, however, is not well documented. This paper examines BZ dependence and its correlates among multidrug users in South Florida’s nightclub scene. Methods Data were drawn from structured interviews with men and women (N=521) who reported regular attendance at large dance clubs and recent use of both club drugs and BZs. Results Prevalences of BZ-related problems were 7.9% for BZ dependence, 22.6% BZ abuse, and 25% BZ abuse and/or dependence. In bivariate logistic regression models, heavy cocaine use (OR 2.27; 95% CI 1.18, 4.38), severe mental distress (OR 2.63; 95% CI 1.33, 5.21), and childhood victimization history (OR 2.43; 95% CI 1.10, 5.38) were associated with BZ dependence. Heavy cocaine use (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.10, 4.18) and severe mental distress (OR 2.16; 95% CI 1.07, 4.37) survived as predictors in the multivariate model. Discussion BZ misuse is widespread among multidrug users in the club scene, who also exhibit high levels of other health and social problems. BZ dependence appears to be more prevalent in this sample than in other populations described in the literature. Recommendations for intervention and additional research are described. PMID:21708434

  18. ASBMB Journal Club - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    On Wednesday, November 12, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM EST, Daniel Liebler, PhD (Vanderbilt University) and Karin Rodland, PhD (Pacific Northwestern National Laboratory) and Ruedi Aebersold, PhD (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) will share their research insight as part of the ASBMB Journal Club.  Both Doctors Liebler and Rodland are Principal Investigators in the NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium.

  19. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  20. Head and face reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Head and face reconstruction is surgery to repair or reshape deformities of the head and face (craniofacial). ... How surgery for head and face deformities (craniofacial reconstruction) ... and the person's condition. Surgical repairs involve the ...