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Sample records for gonadotropins pituitary

  1. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  2. Hormones in Synergy: Regulation of the Pituitary Gonadotropin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Varykina G.; Mellon, Pamela L.; Coss, Djurdjica

    2009-01-01

    The precise interplay of hormonal influences that governs gonadotropin hormone production by the pituitary includes endocrine, paracrine and autocrine actions of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), activin and steroids. However, most studies of hormonal regulation of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary gonadotrope have been limited to analyses of the isolated actions of individual hormones. LHβ and FSHβ subunits have distinct patterns of expression during the menstrual/estrous cycle as a result of the integration of activin, GnRH, and steroid hormone action. In this review, we focus on studies that delineate the interplay among these hormones in the regulation of LHβ and FSHβ gene expression in gonadotrope cells and discuss how signaling cross-talk contributes to differential expression. We also discuss how recent technological advances will help identify additional factors involved in the differential hormonal regulation of LH and FSH. PMID:19747958

  3. A normal cumulative conception rate after human pituitary gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Healy, D L; Kovacs, G T; Pepperell, R J; Burger, H G

    1980-10-01

    Forty consecutive women were treated with human pituitary gonadotropin to induce ovulation. Thirty-seven patients (93%) ovulated and thirty (75%) conceived on at least one occasion. The cumulative conception rate for the series equaled that of the general population. Women with a past history of anorexia nervosa had the shortest average time to pregnancy. Of patients who did not conceive, four represented failures of patient selection in that they withdrew from treatment for a variety of psychiatric and social reasons, and six represented failures of treatment, not becoming pregnant despite the induction of ovulation. It is concluded that realistic goals for a contemporary human gonadotropin program include induction of ovulation in all patients and a cumulative conception rate equal to that of the general community. PMID:6252067

  4. INHIBIN INCREASES AND PROGESTERONE DECREASES RECEPTORS FOR GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE IN OVINE PITUITARY CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of progesterone (P4) and inhibin on gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor number (GnRH-R) and binding affinity were investigated using ovine pituitary cells in culture. ollowing treatment with P4 or porcine inhibin, GnRH binding was analyzed using a radioligand-rece...

  5. Stimulation of Spermiation by Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Carp Pituitary Extract in Grass Puffer, Takifugu niphobles

    PubMed Central

    Goo, In Bon; Park, In-Seok; Gil, Hyun Woo; Im, Jae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Spermiation was stimulated in the mature grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles, with an injection of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) or carp pituitary extract (CPE). Spermatocrit and sperm density were reduced, but milt production was increased in both the HCG and CPE treatment groups relative to those in the control group (P <0.05). These results should be useful for increasing the fertilization efficiency in grass puffer breeding programs. PMID:26973977

  6. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor mRNA expression by human pituitary tumors in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J M; Klibanski, A

    1994-01-01

    An important question in the pathogenesis and regulation of human gonadotroph adenomas is whether heterogeneous gonadotropin responses to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) are due to dysregulation of GnRH receptor biosynthesis and/or cell-signaling pathways. We investigated gonadotropin responsiveness to pulsatile GnRH in 13 gonadotroph adenomas. All tumors had evidence of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) beta and alpha subunit biosynthesis using reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) techniques. Four tumors significantly increased gonadotropin and/or free subunit secretion during pulsatile 10(-8) M GnRH administration. The GnRH antagonist Antide (10(-6) to 10(-8) M) blocked secretory increases in all GnRH-responsive tumors. Gonadotropin and/or free subunit secretion increased after 60 mM KCl, confirming that GnRH nonresponsiveness was not due to intracellular gonadotropin depletion. We hypothesized that GnRH nonresponsiveness in these tumors may be due to GnRH receptor (GnRH-Rc) biosynthetic defects. RTPCR analyses detected GnRH-Rc transcripts only in responsive tumors and normal human pituitary. This is the first demonstration of a cell-surface receptor biosynthetic defect in human pituitary tumors. We conclude (a) one third of gonadotroph tumors respond to pulsatile GnRH in vitro, (b) GnRH-Rc mRNA is detected in human gonadotroph adenomas and predicts GnRH responsiveness, and (c) GnRH-Rc biosynthetic defects may underlie GnRH nonresponsiveness in gonadotroph tumors. Images PMID:8200967

  7. Nitric oxide mediates gonadotropin-releasing hormone effects on frog pituitary.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, A; Zerani, M

    1998-06-01

    We studied the possible role of nitric oxide (NO) in GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion in the female water frog, Rana esculenta. During pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation, ovulation, post-ovulation, refractory, recovery and hibernation, pituitaries were incubated with medium-alone, GnRH, NO donor (NOd), NO synthase inhibitor (NOSi), cyclic GMP analogue (cGMPa), soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (sGCi), GnRH plus NOSi, GnRH plus sGCi, and NOd plus sGCi. Because antisera raised against gonadotropins are not available for this species, we measured these hormones indirectly through their effects on ovarian progesterone secretion. The ovaries were superfused with the pituitaries pre-incubated as reported above. In addition, NOS activity and cGMP levels were determined in the pre-incubated pituitaries. Those pre-incubated with medium-alone and with GnRH increased progesterone secretion during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation, ovulation and recovery; the increase induced by GnRH was higher than that induced by medium-alone during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery. NOd and cGMPa increased progesterone in all considered reproductive phases except ovulation; the increase induced by NOd and cGMP was higher than that induced by medium-alone during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery. NOS activity was highest during ovulation and lowest during post-ovulation, refractory and hibernation. GnRH increased NOS activity during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery. Cyclic GMP levels were highest during ovulation and lowest during post-ovulation, refractory and hibernation. GnRH increased cGMP levels during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery, NOd during all considered reproductive phases. These results suggest that NO mediates basal and GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion in female Rana esculenta. PMID:9688343

  8. Conservative management of a pituitary tumor during pregnancy following induction of ovulation with gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Jewelewicz, R; Zimmerman, E A; Carmel, P W

    1977-01-01

    Ovulation induced with human menopausal gonadotropin-human chorionic gonadotropin in a 27-year-old woman who had been amenorrheic for 7 years resulted in pregnancy. Although pretreatment neurologic evaluation was normal, significant loss of vision was found at 30 weeks' gestation, and a skull x-ray revealed enlargement and erosion of the sella turcica. As an attempt to delay surgery, 12 mg of dexamethasone daily arrested further visual deterioration, and the pregnancy continued uneventful for 36 weeks, when triplets were born. Five days after delivery the visual fields were normal. Trans-sphenoidal resection of a prolactin-secreting chromophobe adenoma of the pituitary was carried out 6 months later. It is suggested that when disturbance in visual perception due to a pituitary tumor occurs during pregnancy, a course of high-dose corticosteroids with frequent monitoring of visual fields and acuity might be tried before surgical intervention. Although further rapid deterioration in vision may dictate immediate surgical decompression, conservative management may result in stabilization, allowing the patient to carry the pregnancy to term and obviating the need for emergency surgery. PMID:832714

  9. Progestin increases the expression of gonadotropins in pituitaries of male zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuili; Liu, Dongteng; Chen, Weiting; Ge, Wei; Hong, Wanshu; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Shi X

    2016-07-01

    Our previous study showed that the in vivo positive effects of 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP), the major progestin in zebrafish, on early spermatogenesis was much stronger than the ex vivo ones, which may suggest an effect of DHP on the expression of gonadotropins. In our present study, we first observed that fshb and lhb mRNA levels in the pituitary of male adult zebrafish were greatly inhibited by 3 weeks exposure to 10nM estradiol (E2). However, an additional 24h 100nM DHP exposure not only reversed the E2-induced inhibition, but also significantly increased the expression of fshb and lhb mRNA. These stimulatory effects were also observed in male adult fish without E2 pretreatment, and a time course experiment showed that it took 24h for fshb and 12h for lhb to respond significantly. Because these stimulatory activities were partially antagonized by a nuclear progesterone receptor (Pgr) antagonist mifepristone, we generated a Pgr-knockout (pgr(-/-)) model using the TALEN technique. With and without DHP in vivo treatment, fshb and lhb mRNA levels of pgr(-/-) were significantly lower than those of pgr(+/+) Furthermore, ex vivo treatment of pituitary fragments of pgr(-/-) with DHP stimulated lhb, but not fshb mRNA expression. Results from double-colored fluorescent in situ hybridization showed that pgr mRNA was expressed only in fshb-expressing cells. Taken together, our results indicated that DHP participated in the regulation of neuroendocrine control of reproduction in male zebrafish, and exerted a Pgr-mediated direct stimulatory effect on fshb mRNA at pituitary level. PMID:27113852

  10. Actions of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin in the immature female rat: correlative changes in blood steroids, gonadotropins, and cytoplasmic estradiol receptors of the anterior pituitary and hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Parker, C R; Costoff, A; Muldoon, T G; Mahesh, V B

    1976-01-01

    Several blood steroids, serum gonadotropins and cytosol estradiol receptors of the anterior pituitary and hypothalamus were quantified in immature female rats which were induced to ovulate with pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG). Studies revealed that serum levels of progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, testosterone, androstenedione and estradiol were initially elevated at 6 PM (day 30) after administration of 8 IU of PMSG at 10 AM day 30. Serum levels of estradiol and testosterone rose progressively from day 30 through the AM of day 32. A further increase in serum concentrations of progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone occurred on the PM of day 32 whereas serum estradiol levels declined. Serum levels of all steroids declined on the day of estrus (33) and only progesterone levels were further elevated on day 34 (diestrus). Dihydrotestosterone concentrations were minimally altered by PMSG treatment. Saline administration resulted in no significant alterations in levels of any steroid quantified from day 29 to 34 in control animals. A progressive decline in cytosol estradiol receptor content of the anterior pituitary and hypothalamus was documented following PMSG treatment of intact female rats; there was no depletion of receptors following PMSG administration to ovariectomized immature rats. Maximal depletion of cytosol estradiol receptors occurred on day 32 with replenishment of cytosol estradiol receptor levels on estrus (day 33). The preovulatory gonadotropin surge was found to occur on the PM of day 32 after maximal receptor depletion. The cycle of depletion and replenishment of receptors was repeated during a second spontaneous estrous cycle four days later which coincided with a rise and fall in serum estradiol levels. It is suggested that the depletion of cytosol estradiol receptors of the anterior pituitary/hypothalamic unit may be causally related to the preovulatory gonadotropin surge

  11. Plasticity of the Reproductive Axis Caused by Social Status Change in an African Cichlid Fish: I. Pituitary Gonadotropins

    PubMed Central

    Maruska, Karen P.; Levavi-Sivan, Berta; Biran, Jakob; Fernald, Russell D.

    2011-01-01

    Social position in a dominance hierarchy is often tightly coupled with fertility. Consequently, an animal that can recognize and rapidly take advantage of an opportunity to rise in rank will have a reproductive advantage. Reproduction in all vertebrates is controlled by the brain-pituitary-gonad axis, and in males of the African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni, GnRH1 neurons at the apex of this axis are under social control. However, little is known about how quickly social information is transformed into functional reproductive change, or about how socially controlled changes in GnRH1 neurons influence downstream actions of the brain-pituitary-gonad axis. We created an opportunity for reproductively suppressed males to ascend in status and then measured how quickly the perception of this opportunity caused changes in mRNA and protein levels of the pituitary gonadotropins. mRNA levels of the β-subunits of LH and FSH rose rapidly in the pituitary 30 min after suppressed males perceived an opportunity to ascend. In contrast, mRNA levels of GnRH receptor-1 remained unchanged during social transition but were higher in stable dominant compared with subordinate males. In the circulation, levels of both LH and FSH were also quickly elevated. There was a positive correlation between mRNA in the pituitary and circulating protein levels for LH and FSH, and both gonadotropins were positively correlated with plasma 11-ketotestosterone. Our results show that the pituitary is stimulated extremely rapidly after perception of social opportunity, probably to allow suppressed males to quickly achieve reproductive success in a dynamic social environment. PMID:21068157

  12. Pituitary gonadotropin and testicular gonadotropin receptor expression in Atlantic cod (Gadusmorhua L.) during the first reproductive season: Effects of photoperiod modulation.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Fernanda Ferreira Loureiro; Andersson, Eva; Mittelholzer, Christian; Karlsen, Orjan; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Schulz, Rüdiger W

    2011-08-01

    Pituitary mRNA levels of gonadotropin β-subunits and of their cognate receptors in the testis were studied during puberty in Atlantic cod under normal and experimental photoperiod conditions that suppressed, delayed or accelerated testis maturation. Results are discussed in context with changes in testicular histology and plasma androgen levels, considered as end points of gonadotropic regulation. Up-regulation of fshb was closely associated with the onset of puberty, decreased when spermatogenesis was completed and reached minimum levels after spawning. These results demonstrate, for the first time using an experimental approach, that activation of Fsh-dependent signaling is associated with spermatogonial proliferation and formation of spermatogenic cysts. Changes in fshr expression were less prominent and could be explained by changes in the cellular composition and RNA content of cod testis tissue. At more advanced stages of development (spermiogenesis, spermiation and spawning), lhb and, one month later, lhcgr transcript levels increased and reached peak values in spawning fish, in a positive feedback loop involving plasma androgens and Lh/Lhcgr-dependent signaling. This loop was broken by a loss of lhb expression at the end of the spawning season. Continuous light (LL) from summer solstice, ~8 months prior to spawning, suppressed the start of testis maturation and the changes in gonadotropin and receptor mRNA levels, while LL from winter solstice initially up-regulated lhb and lhcgr expression, before resulting in a precocious termination of the spawning season and low expression of all four genes. Our studies provide experimental evidence for a clear functional discrimination of cod gonadotropins. PMID:21605561

  13. Expression of the putative gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor, NPFFR1, in the anterior pituitary gland of the gilt is affected by age and sexual maturation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) purportedly suppresses secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) by acting through a G-protein coupled receptor (NPFFR1) in the anterior pituitary gland and hypothalamus. The objective of these studies was to determine if expression of mRNA for NPFFR1 in the reprod...

  14. Gonadotropin Inhibitory Hormone Down-Regulates the Brain-Pituitary Reproductive Axis of Male European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Paullada-Salmerón, José A; Cowan, Mairi; Aliaga-Guerrero, María; Morano, Francesca; Zanuy, Silvia; Muñoz-Cueto, José A

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release from the pituitary of birds and mammals. However, the physiological role of orthologous GnIH peptides on the reproductive axis of fish is still uncertain, and their actions on the main neuroendocrine systems controlling reproduction (i.e., GnRHs, kisspeptins) have received little attention. In a recent study performed in the European sea bass, we cloned a cDNA encoding a precursor polypeptide that contained C-terminal MPMRFamide (sbGnIH-1) and MPQRFamide (sbGnIH-2) peptide sequences, developed a specific antiserum against sbGnIH-2, and characterized its central and pituitary GnIH projections in this species. In this study, we analyzed the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of sbGnIH-1 and sbGnIH-2 on brain and pituitary expression of reproductive hormone genes (gnrh1, gnrh2, gnrh3, kiss1, kiss2, gnih, lhbeta, fshbeta), and their receptors (gnrhr II-1a, gnrhr II-2b, kiss1r, kiss2r, and gnihr) as well as on plasma Fsh and Lh levels. In addition, we determined the effects of GnIH on pituitary somatotropin (Gh) expression. The results obtained revealed the inhibitory role of sbGnIH-2 on brain gnrh2, kiss1, kiss2, kiss1r, gnih, and gnihr transcripts and on pituitary fshbeta, lhbeta, gh, and gnrhr-II-1a expression, whereas sbGnIH-1 only down-regulated brain gnrh1 expression. However, at different doses, central administration of both sbGnIH-1 and sbGnIH-2 decreased Lh plasma levels. Our work represents the first study reporting the effects of centrally administered GnIH in fish and provides evidence of the differential actions of sbGnIH-1 and sbGnIH-2 on the reproductive axis of sea bass, the main inhibitory role being exerted by the sbGnIH-2 peptide. PMID:26984999

  15. Endocrine disrupting effects of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane analogues on gonadotropin hormones in pituitary gonadotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinghua; Yang, Ye; Xiong, Kang; Liu, Jing

    2014-05-01

    It has been shown that exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) analogues leads to disharmony of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). However, the effects and mechanisms of DDT analogues on the expression of gonadotropin genes (FSHβ, LHβ and Cgα), which is the rate-limiting step of FSH and LH biosynthesis, remain unknown. In this study, we assessed the effects of p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and methoxychlor (MXC) on gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis in gonadotrope cells. p,p'-DDT and MXC at test concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-7)mol/L, stimulated gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was required for the induction of gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis by p,p'-DDT or MXC exposure. This study showed for the first time that p,p'-DDT and MXC regulated gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis through ERK pathway in gonadotrope cells. PMID:24814263

  16. Wastewater treatment plant effluent alters pituitary gland gonadotropin mRNA levels in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Harding, Louisa B; Schultz, Irvin R; da Silva, Denis A M; Ylitalo, Gina M; Ragsdale, Dave; Harris, Stephanie I; Bailey, Stephanie; Pepich, Barry V; Swanson, Penny

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) present in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents interfere with reproduction in fish, including altered gonad development and induction of vitellogenin (Vtg), a female-specific egg yolk protein precursor produced in the liver. As a result, studies have focused on the effects of EDC exposure on the gonad and liver. However, impacts of environmental EDC exposure at higher levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis are less well understood. The pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are involved in all aspects of gonad development and are subject to feedback from gonadal steroids making them a likely target of endocrine disruption. In this study, the effects of WWTP effluent exposure on pituitary gonadotropin mRNA expression were investigated to assess the utility of Lh beta-subunit (lhb) as a biomarker of estrogen exposure in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). First, a controlled 72-h exposure to 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17β-trenbolone (TREN) was performed to evaluate the response of juvenile coho salmon to EDC exposure. Second, juvenile coho salmon were exposed to 0, 20 or 100% effluent from eight WWTPs from the Puget Sound, WA region for 72h. Juvenile coho salmon exposed to 2 and 10ng EE2L(-1) had 17-fold and 215-fold higher lhb mRNA levels relative to control fish. Hepatic vtg mRNA levels were dramatically increased 6670-fold, but only in response to 10ng EE2L(-1) and Fsh beta-subunit (fshb) mRNA levels were not altered by any of the treatments. In the WWTP effluent exposures, lhb mRNA levels were significantly elevated in fish exposed to five of the WWTP effluents. In contrast, transcript levels of vtg were not affected by any of the WWTP effluent exposures. Mean levels of natural and synthetic estrogens in fish bile were consistent with pituitary lhb expression, suggesting that the observed lhb induction may be due to

  17. [Heterogenity of the cryptorchid syndrome. Study of the pituitary gonadotropin reserve in 50 prepuberal bodys].

    PubMed

    Battin, J; Colle, M

    1977-01-01

    As compared to a control group, the study of the pituitary reserve of gonadotrophins in 50, not yet puberous, cryptorchid boys, evoked that there is a heterogeneity in cryptorchism. The LH pituitary reserve may be insufficient, normal or increased; the FSH pituitary reserve may be normal or above normal. A longitudinal study of these patients, as well as the correlations with ultra-structural and histologic studies should lead to a better understanding of the significance of the hormonal abnormalities encountered in cryptorchism, and to a better appreciation of the associated testicular changes. PMID:22316

  18. Inherent capacity of the pituitary gland to produce gonadotropins is not influenced by the number of ovarian follicles > or = 3 mm in diameter in cattle.

    PubMed

    Mossa, F; Jimenez-Krassel, F; Walsh, S; Berry, D P; Butler, S T; Folger, J; Smith, G W; Ireland, J L H; Lonergan, P; Ireland, J J; Evans, A C O

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesised that higher serum FSH concentrations in cattle with low v. high follicle numbers during follicular waves are caused by a different capacity of the pituitary gland to produce gonadotropins. Dairy cows with high (> or = 30; n = 5) and low (< or = 15; n = 5) follicle numbers were selected and serum concentrations of oestradiol and FSH during an oestrous cycle were measured. Cows were ovariectomised at oestrus and bled frequently up to 8 days after ovariectomy. After 33 days, cows were injected with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and bled intensively up to 8 h after GnRH injection. One day later, animals were injected with follicular fluid (FF) from bovine follicles and were bled intensively up to 2 days after the first injection. Serum concentrations of FSH and LH were measured. After 2 days, cows were killed and their pituitary glands collected. Prior to ovariectomy, serum oestradiol concentrations were similar between groups, whereas FSH concentrations were higher in cattle with low v. high numbers of follicles. No differences were detected in serum gonadotropin concentrations after ovariectomy, GnRH injection or FF challenge between groups. The results indicate that the inherent capacity of the pituitary gland to secrete gonadotropins does not differ between cattle with high v. low numbers of follicles during follicular waves. PMID:20188028

  19. Regulation and distribution of squirrel monkey chorionic gonadotropin and secretogranin II in the pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Vasauskas, Audrey A.; Hubler, Tina R.; Mahanic, Christina; Gibson, Susan; Kahn, Andrea G.; Scammell, Jonathan G.

    2011-01-01

    Secretogranin II (SgII) is a member of the granin family of proteins found in neuroendocrine and endocrine cells. The expression and storage of SgII in the pituitary gland of Old World primates and rodents have been linked with those of luteinizing hormone (LH). However, New World primates including squirrel monkeys do not express LH in the pituitary gland, but rather CG is expressed. If CG takes on the luteotropic role of LH in New World primates, SgII may be associated with the expression and storage of CG in the pituitary gland. The goal of this study was to evaluate the regulation and distribution of CG and SgII in the squirrel monkey. A DNA fragment containing approximately 750 bp of squirrel monkey SgII promoter was isolated from genomic DNA and found to contain a cyclic AMP response element that is also present in the human SgII promoter and important for GnRH responsiveness. The squirrel monkey and human SgII promoters were similarly activated by GnRH in luciferase reporter gene assays in LβT2 cells. Double immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated close association of SgII and CG in gonadotrophs of squirrel monkey pituitary gland. These results suggest that CG and SgII have a similar intercellular distribution and are coregulated in squirrel monkey pituitary gland. PMID:21095191

  20. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone and gonadal steroids regulate transcription factor mRNA expression in primary pituitary and immortalized gonadotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiming; Grafer, Constance M; Kim, Jonathan; Halvorson, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    Hormonal regulation of pituitary gonadotropin gene expression has been attributed to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-mediated stimulation of immediate early gene expression and gonadal steroid interactions with their respective nuclear receptors. A number of orphan nuclear receptors including steroidogenic factor 1, liver receptor homologue 1, dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1, and chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors I/II as well as the GATA family members, GATA2 and GATA4, have also been implicated in transcriptional regulation of the gonadotropin genes. We hypothesized that hormonally mediated changes in these latter transcription factors may provide an additional mechanism for mediating hormonal effects beyond the more classically appreciated pathways. In these studies, we demonstrate significant regulation of orphan nuclear receptor and GATA messenger RNA levels by GnRH, dihydrotestosterone, estradiol, and progesterone in both cultured primary pituitary cells and gonadotrope-derived cell line, LβT2. These results advance our understanding of the complex mechanisms by which GnRH and steroid hormones achieve precise regulation of anterior pituitary function. PMID:25563755

  1. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from perifused equine pituitaries.

    PubMed

    Pinaud, M A; Roser, J F; Dybdal, N

    1991-07-01

    In vitro responsiveness of the horse anterior pituitary (AP) gonadotropes to single and multiple GnRH challenges was examined. The pituitaries were collected from reproductively sound mares in estrus (n = 5) and diestrus (n = 5). Uniform 0.5 mm AP slices were subdivided using a 3 mm biopsy punch and then bisected for use in the perifusion chamber. Four bisected sections per chamber were perifused at 0.5 ml/min at 37 C for 560 min in Medium 199 saturated with 95% 0(2)/5% CO2. Ten minute fractions were collected after an initial 2 hr equilibration period. Four different treatment regimes of GnRH (10(-10) M) were evaluated: (A) three consecutive 10 min GnRH pulses separated by 80 and 100 min, respectively; (B) a single 120 min GnRH infusion; (C) a 10 min GnRH pulse followed 80 min later by a 120 min GnRH infusion and (D) two 10 min GnRH pulses separated by 60 min followed 80 min later by a 120 min GnRH infusion. Estimated total pituitary LH content was higher in estrous than diestrus mares (p less than 0.05). The total amount of LH released in response to GnRH tended to be greater in estrus than diestrus (p less than 0.1), whereas the percentage of LH released in estrus and diestrus was similar. An increase in the area under the LH response curve was noted with each successive 10 min pulse of GnRH during both estrus and diestrus (p less than 0.05), demonstrating a self-priming effect of GnRH. In addition, a significant increase in the peak LH amplitude (p less than 0.05) and the slope to peak amplitude (p less than 0.05) were observed for the 120 min GnRH pulse in regime C and D indicating that prior exposure to short-term pulses of GnRH increased the acute LH secretory response. These results suggest that in the cycling mare (1) the responsiveness of the pituitary (amount of LH released as percent of total LH) is similar in both estrus and diestrus, however, the magnitude of the LH response (total microgram amount of LH released) differs with the stage of the estrous

  2. Gonadotropin-Releasing hormones in the brain and pituitary of the white sucker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, T. Craig; Tobet, Stuart A.; Chase, Cindy; Waldron, Travis; Sower, Stacia A.

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigated GnRH forms within the brain of a representative of the order Cypriniformes, the white sucker, Catostomus commersoni, using HPLC, RIA, andimmunocytochemistry. Several immunoreactive (ir) GnRH forms were identified in the brain of the white sucker by chromatography and radioimmunoassay, including ir-salmon GnRH, ir-lamprey GnRH-I and -III, and ir-chicken GnRH-II. Results from immunocytochemical studies were consistent with multiple GnRH forms distributed in different patterns, particularly for fibers. Neuronal perikarya containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH were found laterally within the preoptic area and rostralhypothalamus. Cells containing exclusively ir-salmon GnRH appeared slightly more rostrally, but in the same region. Fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH were seen throughout the caudal telencephalon and extended into thediencephalon, toward the pituitary. Fibers containing ir-chicken-II-like GnRH were also seen in the caudal telencephalon, but were concentrated more dorsally in the diencephalon. Within the pituitary, fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH entered the neurohypophysis, but differed in their destinations. Fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH remained within the neurohypophysis, while fibers containing ir-lamprey-like GnRH targeted adenohypophyseal tissue. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple GnRH forms with multiple functions exist within the brain and pituitary of teleosts and provide further evidence of a lamprey-like GnRH within an early evolved teleost species.

  3. Gonadotropin-releasing hormones in the brain and pituitary of the teleost, the white sucker.

    PubMed

    Robinson, T C; Tobet, S A; Chase, C; Waldron, T; Sower, S A

    2000-03-01

    The present study investigated GnRH forms within the brain of a representative of the order Cypriniformes, the white sucker, Catostomus commersoni, using HPLC, RIA, and immunocytochemistry. Several immunoreactive (ir) GnRH forms were identified in the brain of the white sucker by chromatography and radioimmunoassay, including ir-salmon GnRH, ir-lamprey GnRH-I and -III, and ir-chicken GnRH-II. Results from immunocytochemical studies were consistent with multiple GnRH forms distributed in different patterns, particularly for fibers. Neuronal perikarya containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH were found laterally within the preoptic area and rostral hypothalamus. Cells containing exclusively ir-salmon GnRH appeared slightly more rostrally, but in the same region. Fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH were seen throughout the caudal telencephalon and extended into the diencephalon, toward the pituitary. Fibers containing ir-chicken-II-like GnRH were also seen in the caudal telencephalon, but were concentrated more dorsally in the diencephalon. Within the pituitary, fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH entered the neurohypophysis, but differed in their destinations. Fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH remained within the neurohypophysis, while fibers containing ir-lamprey-like GnRH targeted adenohypophyseal tissue. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple GnRH forms with multiple functions exist within the brain and pituitary of teleosts and provide further evidence of a lamprey-like GnRH within an early evolved teleost species. PMID:10764549

  4. [Postpartum ovarian physiology. Pituitary gonadotropins, estradiol and prolactin during 12 months of postpartum physiology].

    PubMed

    Hernández Horta, J L; Alonso Uriarte, Q; Cortés Gallegos, V

    1994-06-01

    In order to establish a relationship between hyperprolactinemia and FSH-LH associated to the ovarian physiology postpartum, a clinical/endocrinological follow-up was performed during a period of twelve months in a cohorte of seventeen women beginning pregnancy resolution. The study had two phases: Lactancy (LAC) and Post-lactancy (LAC) and Post-lactancy (POST-LAC). In both phases blood samples were obtained every week from the first one through the 52nd, to quantitate FSH, LH, prolactin (PRL) and estradiol (E-2). PRL levels were significantly higher during LAC as compared to POST-LAC: an inverse relationship in E-2/PRL was seen through the study. No significant changes for LH and FSH were attained in both phases. Concentrations of these gonadotropins were at the physiological levels and no differences in either one of the two phases were shown when compared to a nonlactating subject. There was a negative association in prolactin levels and the weeks postpartum, and on the contrary, a positive one for E-2. Thus, ovarian follicular development apparently is independent to the gonadotropic-hypophysis stimulus. PMID:8056364

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of the gonadotropin subunits GPα, FSHβ, and LHβ genes in the stinging catfish Heteropneustes fossilis: phylogeny, seasonal expression and pituitary localization.

    PubMed

    Acharjee, Arup; Chaube, Radha; Joy, Keerikkattil Paily

    2015-10-01

    Gonadotropins are heterodimeric glycoproteins secreted by the pituitary, and consist of a common glycoprotein hormone alpha (GPα) and the function-specific follicle-stimulating hormone beta subunit (FSHβ) or luteinizing hormone beta subunit (LHβ). In the present study, the subunit protein genes were cloned and characterized from the pituitary of the catfish Heteropneustes fossilis. Full-length cDNAs of GPα, FSHβ, and LHβ are 511 base pairs (bp), 659 bp and 660 bp long, and encode 92, 108, and 112 aminoacids long mature proteins, respectively. GPα has 10 cysteines with 2 N-linked glycosylation sites while LHβ contains 12 cysteines with a single N-linked glycosylation site. In contrast, FSHβ has 13 cysteines, 1 additional over the conserved 12 cysteines of other vertebrates, and a single glycosylation site between Cys 3 and Cys 4. Phylogenetic analyses of the deduced proteins confirm their homology and relationships with the respective gonadotropin subunit proteins of gnathostome vertebrates. Tissue expression analysis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR shows that GPα mRNA is expressed only in the pituitary while both FSHβ and LHβ mRNA are expressed in extra-pituitary sites. The subunit mRNAs show both seasonal and sex dimorphic variations especially in the expression of FSHβ and LHβ transcripts. In the sexually quiescent phase, the transcript expression is low while in the recrudescent phase, the expressions are differential, high, and varied with regard to sex and reproductive phase. In situ hybridization of the mRNAs gave positive signals in gonadotropes in the pars distalis of the pituitary, which exhibited seasonal variation in staining intensity and numbers. PMID:26205349

  6. Pituitary self-priming actions of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Kinetics of estradiol's potentiating effects on gonadotropin-releasing hormone-facilitated luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone release in healthy postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Evans, W S; Rogol, A D; Kolp, L; Thorner, M O; Stumpf, P

    1986-06-01

    We examined the kinetically distinct characteristics of estradiol's effects upon pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release in response to pulses of exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in healthy postmenopausal individuals. The putative self-priming actions of GnRH on LH and FSH release were tested by intravenous injections of equal paired doses of GnRH (10 micrograms) before and after 1, 5, 10, and 30 d of pure estradiol-17 beta delivery via an intravaginal silastic ring. Self-priming actions of GnRH, as defined by heightened gonadotropin release in response to the second pulse of GnRH compared with the first, were completely absent in the hypoestrogenemic state. However, estradiol administration unmasked GnRH self-priming in a time-dependent fashion, with maximal expression after 5 and 10 d of steroid replacement, followed by attenuation by 30 d. Since estradiol's modulation of GnRH action was expressed differentially on LH and FSH release, we suggest that such facilitation of GnRH-stimulated pituitary LH and FSH release may provide an additional mechanism for dissociated secretion of gonadotropic hormones in health or disease. PMID:3086382

  7. Distribution of LPXRFa, a gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone ortholog peptide, and LPXRFa receptor in the brain and pituitary of the tilapia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Satoshi; Sivalingam, Mageswary; Biran, Jakob; Golan, Matan; Anthonysamy, Rachel Shalini; Levavi-Sivan, Berta; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2016-10-01

    In vertebrates, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), respectively, regulate reproduction in positive and negative manners. GnIH belongs to the LPXRFa family of peptides previously identified in mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. Studying the detailed distribution of LPXRFa as well as its receptor (LPXRFa-R) in the brain and pituitary is important for understanding their multiple action sites and potential functions. However, the distribution of LPXRFa and LPXRFa-R has not been studied in teleost species, partially because of the lack of fish-specific antibodies. Therefore, in the present study, we generated specific antibodies against LPXRFa and its receptor from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), and examined their distributions in the brain and pituitary by immunohistochemistry. Tilapia LPXRFa-immunoreactive neurons lie in the posterior ventricular nucleus of the caudal preoptic area, whereas LPXRFa-R-immunoreactive cells are distributed widely. Double immunofluorescence showed that neither LPXRFa-immunoreactive fibers nor LPXRFa-R is closely associated or coexpressed with GnRH1, GnRH3, or kisspeptin (Kiss2) neurons. In the pituitary, LPXRFa fibers are closely associated with gonadotropic endocrine cells [expressing luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)], with adrenocorticomelanotropic cells [corticotropin (ACTH) and α-melanotropin (α-MSH)], and with somatolactin endocrine cells. In contrast, LPXRFa-R are expressed only in LH, ACTH, and α-MSH cells. These results suggest that LPXRFa and LPXRFa-R signaling acts directly on the pituitary cells independent from GnRH or kisspeptin and could play multiple roles in reproductive and nonreproductive functions in teleosts. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2753-2775, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917324

  8. Inhibition of P450 aromatase enhances gonadotropin secretion in early and midpubertal boys: evidence for a pituitary site of action of endogenous E.

    PubMed

    Wickman, S; Dunkel, L

    2001-10-01

    In early pubertal boys, E concentrations are very low. We studied the role and site of action of endogenous E in the regulation of gonadotropin secretion in early and midpubertal boys by inhibiting the action of E with a potent and specific P450 aromatase inhibitor, letrozole. A total of 35 boys who were referred to us because of suspicion of delayed puberty were included in the study. The boys were in either early or midpuberty, and they composed 3 groups: 10 boys did not receive any treatment, 12 boys received T alone, and 13 boys received T and letrozole. In the untreated group during the 5-month follow-up, no changes were observed in 17beta-E2, T, basal gonadotropin, or inhibin B concentrations or in the GnRH-induced gonadotropin responses. In the T-treated group during the 5-month treatment, the T concentration increased by 55% (P < 0.05), and the 17beta-E2 concentration increased by 130% (P < 0.02). Concurrently, basal gonadotropin concentrations were suppressed, but the GnRH-induced gonadotropin responses and the inhibin B concentration remained unchanged. In the T- plus letrozole-treated group during the 5-month treatment, an increase in T concentration of 606% was observed (P < 0.001), but the 17beta-E2 concentration remained unchanged. The changes in the 17beta-E2 concentration within 5 months in the untreated and the T- plus letrozole-treated groups were different (P < 0.02), indicating significant inhibition of endogenous E synthesis during letrozole treatment. During the T plus letrozole treatment, basal gonadotropin concentration, the GnRH-induced LH response, and inhibin B concentration increased, and the GnRH-induced FSH response did not change significantly. Serum nocturnal gonadotropin pulses were determined in 5 boys treated with T and in 5 boys treated with T plus letrozole. In the T- plus letrozole-treated group, the nocturnal LH pulse amplitude increased, and the LH pulse frequency and interpulse interval remained unchanged. In conclusion, in

  9. Stimulating effect of glycoprotein hormone free alpha-subunit and daily gonadotropin releasing hormone treatment on prolactin release from 50-day ovine foetal pituitary explants.

    PubMed

    Chabot, V; Gauthier, C; Combarnous, Y; Taragnat, C

    2001-02-01

    The aim of our study was to determine whether free alpha of glycoprotein hormones (free alpha) plays a role in lactotroph function during early pituitary development in the sheep foetus. Detection and quantification of free alpha, luteinzing hormone beta-subunit (LHbeta) and prolactin immunolabelling were determined by immunocytochemistry at days 32, 37, 42, 50 and 63 of gestation. Free alpha- and LHbeta-containing cells were first detected in the ovine foetal pituitary gland on day 37 of gestation, while prolactin-containing cells were first identified on day 42. Analysis of serial sections suggested that free alpha immunoreactive cells were also LHbeta-positive, indicating that free alpha was mainly synthesized by gonadotrophs. In early foetal stages, free alpha occurred in the antero-medio ventral region of the pituitary gland, whereas prolactin-containing cells were more dorsally and more caudally localized. The free alpha-, LHbeta- and prolactin-immunostained area increased markedly between days 50 and 63 of gestation. To evaluate a possible functional relationship between gonadotrophs and lactotrophs, the effects of free alpha or gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) on prolactin release were assayed. Chronic treatment of pituitary explants from male and female 42-day-old ovine foetuses for 8 days with 10-9 or 10-7 M ovine free alpha did not affect prolactin release. By contrast, free alpha administration on pituitary explants from male and female 50-day-old foetuses resulted in enhanced prolactin release. At this age, a daily (2 h per day) treatment with 10-8 M GnRH had similar stimulatory effect to free alpha whereas a 'first day' treatment (24 h on the first day) reduced prolactin release throughout the culture in males and had no effect in females. These results indicate that, despite early detection of free alpha at day 37 in the ovine foetal pituitary, its stimulatory effect on prolactin release occurs from day 50 of gestation, corresponding to the

  10. Serotonin interferes with Ca2+ and PKC signaling to reduce gonadotropin-releasing hormone-stimulated GH secretion in goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Wong, Anderson O L; Chang, John P

    2008-10-01

    In goldfish, two endogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH), salmon GnRH (sGnRH) and chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II), are thought to stimulate growth hormone (GH) release via protein kinase C (PKC) and subsequent increases in intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)](i)). In contrast, the signaling mechanism for serotonin (5-HT) inhibition of GH secretion is still unknown. In this study, whether 5-HT inhibits GH release by actions at sites along the PKC and Ca(2+) signal transduction pathways leading to hormone release were examined in primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells. Under static incubation and column perifusion conditions, 5-HT reduced basal, as well as sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-stimulated, GH secretion. 5-HT also suppressed GH responses to two PKC activators but had no effect on the GH-releasing action of the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin. Ca(2+)-imaging studies with identified somatotropes revealed that 5-HT did not alter basal [Ca(2+)](i) but attenuated the magnitude of the [Ca(2+)](i) responses to the two GnRHs. Prior treatment with 5-HT and cGnRH-II reduced the magnitude of the [Ca(2+)](i) responses induced by depolarizing levels of K(+). Similar inhibition, however, was not observed with prior treatment of 5-HT and sGnRH. These results suggest that 5-HT, by direct actions at the somatotrope level, interferes with PKC and Ca(2+) signaling pathways to reduce the GH-releasing effect of GnRH. 5-HT action may occur at the level of PKC activation or its downstream signaling events prior to the subsequent rise in [Ca(2+)](i.). The differential Ca(2+) responses by depolarizing doses of K(+) is consistent with our previous findings that sGnRH and cGnRH-II are coupled to overlapping and yet distinct Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms. PMID:18723020

  11. Cytoplasmic kinases downstream of GPR30 suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from bovine anterior pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    RUDOLF, Faidiban O.; KADOKAWA, Hiroya

    2015-01-01

    GPR30 is known as a membrane receptor for picomolar concentrations of estradiol. The GPR30-specific agonist G1 causes a rapid, non-genomic suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells. A few studies have recently clarified that protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) might be involved in cytoplasmic signaling pathways of GPR30 in other cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that PKA and ERK kinase (MEK) are important cytoplasmic mediators for GPR30-associated non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells. Bovine AP cells (n = 8) were cultured for 3 days under steroid-free conditions. The AP cells were previously treated for 30 min with one of the following: 5000 nM of PKA inhibitor (H89), 1000 nM of MEK inhibitor (U0126), or a combination of H89 and U0126. Next, the AP cells were treated with 0.01 nM estradiol for 5 min before GnRH stimulation. Estradiol treatment without inhibitor pretreatment significantly suppressed GnRH-induced LH secretion (P < 0.01). In contrast, estradiol treatment after pretreatment with H89, U0126 or their combination had no suppressive effect on GnRH-induced LH secretion. The inhibitors also inhibited the G1 suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion. Therefore, these data supported the hypothesis that PKA and MEK (thus, also pERK) are the intracellular mediators downstream of GPR30 that induce the non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells by estradiol or G1. PMID:26522383

  12. Effect of very high dose D-leucine6-gonadotropin-releasing hormone proethylamide on the hypothalamic-pituitary testicular axis in patients with prostatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, B; Worgul, T J; Drago, J; Demers, L; Dufau, M; Max, D; Santen, R J

    1983-01-01

    Potent synthetic analogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone produce parodoxical antireproductive effects when administered chronically. These compounds are minimally toxic and may exhibit no plateau of the dose-response curve even at very high doses. These considerations served as the basis for our systematic evaluation of [D-leucine6-desarginine-glycine-NH2(10)]gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-A) proethylamide in the very high dose range (i.e., 10-fold larger amounts than previously used). In rats given the analog for 12 wk, prostate, testis, and seminal vesicle weights were suppressed to a greater extent with 200 micrograms q.d. than with 40 micrograms q.d. (P less than 0.01 prostate, less than 0.01 testis, less than 0.01 seminal vesicles), indicating dose-response effects in the very high dose range. 200 micrograms of [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10]-GnRH-A consistently suppressed leutinizing hormone (LH) values at 6 and 12 wk (basal 71 +/- 9.5; 6 wk 34 +/- 3.8; 12 wk 28 +/- 5 ng/ml) whereas 40 micrograms suppressed LH variably (basal 33 +/- 3.8; 6 wk 17 +/- 3.9; 12 wk 32 +/- 5.2). Testosterone fell to 15 +/- 2.4 and 19 +/- 2.0 ng/100 ml in response to 200 micrograms q.d. and to 27 +/- 6.4 and 22 +/- 7.4 ng/100 ml with the 40-micrograms dose. These findings in the rodent prompted treatment of stage D prostate cancer patients with similarly high doses of [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10)]-GnRH-A. After treatment for 11 wk with 1,000 or 10,000 micrograms/d of the analog, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels transiently rose and then fell into the surgically castrate range (testosterone 19 +/- 4.4 ng/100 ml [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10)]-GnRH-A vs. surgically castrate 11 +/- 0.9 ng/100 ml, P = NS; dihydrotestosterone 15 +/- 1.7 ng/100 ml GnRH-A vs. surgically castrate 15 +/- 4.1 ng/100 ml. P = NS). However, unlike the chronic stimulatory effect on the pituitary at lower doses, very high dose therapy resulted in profound suppression of plasma and urine LH. Plasma levels fell to

  13. Primary structure of solitary form of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in cichlid pituitary; three forms of GnRH in brain of cichlid and pumpkinseed fish.

    PubMed

    Powell, J F; Fischer, W H; Park, M; Craig, A G; Rivier, J E; White, S A; Francis, R C; Fernald, R D; Licht, P; Warby, C

    1995-05-01

    GnRH is a decapeptide family with at least nine distinct structures. Vertebrates, except for most placental mammals, have more than one of these GnRH forms within the brain. We report chromatographical and immunological evidence that three forms of GnRH are in the brains of both cichlid (Haplochromis burtoni) and pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus) fishes. We argue that the three forms correspond to those previously described as sea bream GnRH (sbGnRH), chicken GnRH-II and salmon GnRH. In contrast, only one GnRH form was present in the pituitary of the cichlid and is identified as sbGnRH by amino acid sequence. This is the first report in which the primary structure of GnRH is determined from pituitary tissue. The N-terminus was identified by monitoring the digestion of the peptide by pyroglutamate aminopeptidase with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). The amidation of the C-terminus was established using an esterification procedure for monitoring with MALDI-MS. This report supports the idea that three forms of GnRH within one species is widespread in the order Perciformes. The present study establishes sbGnRH as the third GnRH form in H. burtoni and predicts that sbGnRH is synthesized in preoptic neurons, then transported to the pituitary in the preoptic-hypophyseal axons for the release of one or both gonadotropins. PMID:7644702

  14. EFFECT OF SULFAMETHAZINE AND PHOTOSTIMULATION ON GENE EXPRESSION OF VASOACTIVE INTESTINAL POLYPEPTIDE (VIP) AND PHOSPHODIESTERASE IN THE LATERAL SEPTAL ORGAN (LSO) AND PITUITARY GONADOTROPIN CONTENT IN THE CHICK.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most birds living in the temperate zone use seasonal changes in day length as predictive environmental cues to initiate and terminate breeding. Long day illumination induces rapid gonadal developmen tand stimulates gonadotropin-releasng hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizin...

  15. Novel evidence that pituitary gonadotropins directly stimulate human leukemic cells-studies of myeloid cell lines and primary patient AML and CML cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Borkowska, Sylwia; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Tonn, Torsten; Rodriguez, Cesar; Moniuszko, Marcin; Bolkun, Lukasz; Koloczko, Janusz; Eljaszewicz, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.; Kucia, Magda

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that normal hematopoietic stem cells express functional pituitary sex hormone (SexH) receptors. Here we report for the first time that pituitary-secreted gonadotrophins stimulate migration, adhesion, and proliferation of several human myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cell lines. Similar effects were observed after stimulation of human leukemic cell lines by gonadal SexHs. This effect seems to be direct, as the SexH receptors expressed by leukemic cells responded to stimulation by phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKTser473. Furthermore, in parallel studies we confirmed that human primary patient-derived AML and CML blasts also express several functional SexH receptors. These results shed more light on the potential role of SexHs in leukemogenesis and, in addition, provide further evidence suggesting a developmental link between hematopoiesis and the germline. PMID:26701888

  16. Novel evidence that pituitary gonadotropins directly stimulate human leukemic cells-studies of myeloid cell lines and primary patient AML and CML cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Borkowska, Sylwia; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Tonn, Torsten; Rodriguez, Cesar; Moniuszko, Marcin; Bolkun, Lukasz; Koloczko, Janusz; Eljaszewicz, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Kucia, Magda

    2016-01-19

    We recently reported that normal hematopoietic stem cells express functional pituitary sex hormone (SexH) receptors. Here we report for the first time that pituitary-secreted gonadotrophins stimulate migration, adhesion, and proliferation of several human myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cell lines. Similar effects were observed after stimulation of human leukemic cell lines by gonadal SexHs. This effect seems to be direct, as the SexH receptors expressed by leukemic cells responded to stimulation by phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKTser473. Furthermore, in parallel studies we confirmed that human primary patient-derived AML and CML blasts also express several functional SexH receptors. These results shed more light on the potential role of SexHs in leukemogenesis and, in addition, provide further evidence suggesting a developmental link between hematopoiesis and the germline. PMID:26701888

  17. Changes in brain mRNA levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide, and somatostatin during ovulatory luteinizing hormone and growth hormone surges in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Canosa, Luis Fabián; Stacey, Norm; Peter, Richard Ector

    2008-12-01

    In goldfish, circulating LH and growth hormone (GH) levels surge at the time of ovulation. In the present study, changes in gene expression of salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II), somatostatin (SS) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) were analyzed during temperature- and spawning substrate-induced ovulation in goldfish. The results demonstrated that increases in PACAP gene expression during ovulation are best correlated with the GH secretion profile. These results suggest that PACAP, instead of GnRH, is involved in the control of GH secretion during ovulation. Increases of two of the SS transcripts during ovulation are interpreted as the activation of a negative feedback mechanism triggered by high GH levels. The results showed a differential regulation of sGnRH and cGnRH-II gene expression during ovulation, suggesting that sGnRH controls LH secretion, whereas cGnRH-II correlates best with spawning behavior. This conclusion is further supported by the finding that nonovulated fish induced to perform spawning behavior by prostaglandin F2alpha treatment increased cGnRH-II expression in both forebrain and midbrain, but decreased sGnRH expression in the forebrain. PMID:18815210

  18. Seasonal expression of KiSS-1 and the pituitary gonadotropins LHβ and FSHβ in adult male Libyan jird (Meriones libycus).

    PubMed

    Boufermes, R; Richard, N; Le Moguen, K; Amirat, Z; Khammar, F; Kottler, M L

    2014-06-10

    The molecular mechanisms operating on a seasonal time-scale and regulating functions such as reproduction are poorly understood in animals living in desert environments. Kisspeptin, the product of the KiSS-1 gene, plays a critical role in control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis that orchestrates the reproductive system in vertebrates. We report a sequence analysis of KiSS-1 and the pituitary luteinising hormone-beta (LHβ) and follicle-stimulating hormone-beta (FSHβ) in the Libyan jird (Meriones libycus), a seasonal breeding rodent that is sexually active during spring and quiescent in fall. We also assessed gene expression by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction during the non-breeding and breeding seasons. The KiSS-1 cDNA sequence analysis showed high homology between M. libycus and all other rodents (94%) and humans (92%). KiSS-1 expression was higher during the breeding season than that during the non-breeding season. In contrast, LHβ and FSHβ expression levels were higher during the non-breeding season in autumn and varied in an opposite manner with testicular, seminal vesicle weights and plasma testosterone levels. Our results extend the role for KiSS-1 in activating the HPG axis in this desert rodent in its natural biotope by relaying environmental cues as in other seasonal non-desert rodent models. PMID:24786546

  19. Involvement of pituitary gonadotropins, gonadal steroids and breeding season in sex change of protogynous dusky grouper, Epinephelus marginatus (Teleostei: Serranidae), induced by a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Carlos Eduardo de O; Araújo, Bruno C; Mello, Paulo H; Narcizo, Amanda de M; Rodrigues-Filho, Jandyr A; Medrado, Andreone T; Zampieri, Ricardo A; Floeter-Winter, Lucile M; Moreira, Renata Guimarães

    2013-10-01

    Two experiments were performed using the aromatase inhibitor (AI) letrozole (100mg/kg) to promote sex change, from female-to-male, in protogynous dusky grouper. One experiment was performed during the breeding season (spring) and the other at the end of the breeding season (summer). During the spring, AI promoted sex change after 9 weeks and the sperm produced was able to fertilize grouper oocytes. During the summer, the sex change was incomplete; intersex individuals were present and sperm was not released by any of the animals. Sex changed gonads had a lamellar architecture; cysts of spermatocytes and spermatozoa in the lumen of the germinal compartment. In the spring, after 4 weeks, 11ketotestosterone (11KT) levels were higher in the AI than in control fish, and after 9 weeks, coincident with semen release, testosterone levels increased in the AI group, while 11KT returned to the initial levels. Estradiol (E2) levels remained unchanged during the experimental period. Instead of decreasing throughout the period, as in control group, 17 α-OH progesterone levels did not change in the AI-treated fish, resulting in higher values after 9 weeks when compared with control fish. fshβ and lhβ gene expression in the AI animals were lower compared with control fish after 9 weeks. The use of AI was effective to obtain functional males during the breeding season. The increase in androgens, modulated by gonadotropins, triggered the sex change, enabling the development of male germ cells, whereas a decrease in E2 levels was not required to change sex in dusky grouper. PMID:23792264

  20. Neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotropin secretion in seasonally breeding birds

    PubMed Central

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Bentley, George E.; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Seasonally breeding birds detect environmental signals, such as light, temperature, food availability, and presence of mates to time reproduction. Hypothalamic neurons integrate external and internal signals, and regulate reproduction by releasing neurohormones to the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland synthesizes and releases gonadotropins which in turn act on the gonads to stimulate gametogenesis and sex steroid secretion. Accordingly, how gonadotropin secretion is controlled by the hypothalamus is key to our understanding of the mechanisms of seasonal reproduction. A hypothalamic neuropeptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), activates reproduction by stimulating gonadotropin synthesis and release. Another hypothalamic neuropeptide, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release directly by acting on the pituitary gland or indirectly by decreasing the activity of GnRH neurons. Therefore, the next step to understand seasonal reproduction is to investigate how the activities of GnRH and GnIH neurons in the hypothalamus and their receptors in the pituitary gland are regulated by external and internal signals. It is possible that locally-produced triiodothyronine resulting from the action of type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase on thyroxine stimulates the release of gonadotropins, perhaps by action on GnRH neurons. The function of GnRH neurons is also regulated by transcription of the GnRH gene. Melatonin, a nocturnal hormone, stimulates the synthesis and release of GnIH and GnIH may therefore regulate a daily rhythm of gonadotropin secretion. GnIH may also temporally suppress gonadotropin secretion when environmental conditions are unfavorable. Environmental and social milieus fluctuate seasonally in the wild. Accordingly, complex interactions of various neuronal and hormonal systems need to be considered if we are to understand the mechanisms underlying seasonal reproduction. PMID:23531789

  1. Gonadotropin-Dependent Precocious Puberty: Neoplastic Causes and Endocrine Considerations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Premature activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis manifests as gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty. The mechanisms behind HPG activation are complex and a clear etiology for early activation is often not elucidated. Though collectively uncommon, the neoplastic and developmental causes of gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty are very important to consider, as a delay in diagnosis may lead to adverse patient outcomes. The intent of the current paper is to review the neoplastic and developmental causes of gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty. We discuss the common CNS lesions and human chorionic gonadotropin-secreting tumors that cause sexual precocity, review the relationship between therapeutic radiation and gonadotropin-dependent precocious puberty, and finally, provide an overview of the therapies available for height preservation in this unique patient population. PMID:21603196

  2. Pituitary abscess.

    PubMed

    Rudwan, M A

    1977-05-28

    Three cases of pituitary abscess are presented. The history of recurrent attacks of aseptic meningitis, together with radiological and clinical features suggestive of pituitary tumor, appear to form a fairly typical picture of the condition. Long follow-up was possible in two of the cases. There are no radiological features which distinguish the lesion from pituitary tumor, hence the importance of recognizing the significance of such a clinical presentation with radiological evidence of sellar enlargement. Pituitary abscesses seem to occur in preexisting pituitary tumors. The possible relationship with pituitary infarction is discussed. PMID:865667

  3. Pituitary gland

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... gland is the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus decides which hormones the pituitary should release by sending it either ... the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland releases the following hormones: GH (growth hormone) – increases size of muscle and ...

  4. Activation of the chicken gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor reduces gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Mamiko; Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y

    2010-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a hypothalamic peptide from the RFamide peptide family that has been identified in multiple avian species. Although GnIH has clearly been shown to reduce LH release from the anterior pituitary gland, its mechanism of action remains to be determined. The overall objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the GnIH receptor (GnIH-R) signaling pathway, (2) to evaluate potential interactions with gonadotropin releasing hormone type III receptor (GnRH-R-III) signaling, and (3) to determine the molecular mechanisms by which GnIH and GnRH regulate pituitary gonadotrope function during a reproductive cycle in the chicken. Using real-time PCR, we showed that in the chicken pituitary gland, GnIH-R mRNA levels fluctuate in an opposite manner to GnRH-R-III, with higher and lower levels observed during inactive and active reproductive stages, respectively. We demonstrated that the chicken GnIH-R signals by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase cAMP production, most likely by coupling to G(alphai). We also showed that this inhibition is sufficient to significantly reduce GnRH-induced cAMP responsive element (CRE) activation in a dose-dependent manner, and that the ratio of GnRH/GnIH receptors is a significant factor. We propose that in avian species, sexual maturation is characterized by a change in GnIH/GnRH receptor ratio, resulting in a switch in pituitary sensitivity from inhibitory (involving GnIH) to stimulatory (involving GnRH). In turn, decreasing GnIH-R signaling, combined with increasing GnRH-R-III signaling, results in significant increases in CRE activation, possibly initiating gonadotropin synthesis. PMID:20350548

  5. Gonadotrope-specific Deletion of Dicer Results in Severely Suppressed Gonadotropins and Fertility Defects*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huizhen; Graham, Ian; Hastings, Richard; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Brinkmeier, Michelle L.; Conn, P. Michael; Camper, Sally A.; Kumar, T. Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary gonadotropins follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone are heterodimeric glycoproteins expressed in gonadotropes. They act on gonads and promote their development and functions including steroidogenesis and gametogenesis. Although transcriptional regulation of gonadotropin subunits has been well studied, the post-transcriptional regulation of gonadotropin subunits is not well understood. To test if microRNAs regulate the hormone-specific gonadotropin β subunits in vivo, we deleted Dicer in gonadotropes by a Cre-lox genetic approach. We found that many of the DICER-dependent microRNAs, predicted in silico to bind gonadotropin β subunit mRNAs, were suppressed in purified gonadotropes of mutant mice. Loss of DICER-dependent microRNAs in gonadotropes resulted in profound suppression of gonadotropin-β subunit proteins and, consequently, the heterodimeric hormone secretion. In addition to suppression of basal levels, interestingly, the post-gonadectomy-induced rise in pituitary gonadotropin synthesis and secretion were both abolished in mutants, indicating a defective gonadal negative feedback control. Furthermore, mutants lacking Dicer in gonadotropes displayed severely reduced fertility and were rescued with exogenous hormones confirming that the fertility defects were secondary to suppressed gonadotropins. Our studies reveal that DICER-dependent microRNAs are essential for gonadotropin homeostasis and fertility in mice. Our studies also implicate microRNAs in gonadal feedback control of gonadotropin synthesis and secretion. Thus, DICER-dependent microRNAs confer a new layer of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in gonadotropes to orchestrate the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis physiology. PMID:25525274

  6. Seasonal changes in plasma concentrations of gonadotropins and in the responsiveness of the pituitary and testis to GnRH in a desert rodent, the sand rat (Psammomys obesus).

    PubMed

    Khammar, F; Brudieux, R

    1991-01-01

    The male sand rat (Psammomys obesus), captured alive in the Sahara desert in the area of Béni-Abbès (Algeria), exhibited seasonal changes in plasma concentrations of LH, characterized by an increase in early summer. Administration of a standard dose of GnRH (200 ng/100 g body weight) failed to elicit significant season-dependent changes in LH release, whereas the increase in plasma testosterone was maximum in June-July and quite small between November and March-April. The present results suggest that the summer seasonal onset of the testicular endocrine activity of the sand rat is due to increases both in LH release and in testis sensitivity to gonadotropin. PMID:1777059

  7. Effect of gonadotropin secretion rate on the radiosensitivity of the rat luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone neuron and gonadotroph

    SciTech Connect

    Winterer, J.; Barnes, K.M.; Lichter, A.S.; Deluca, A.M.; Loriaux, D.L.; Cutler, G.B. Jr.

    1988-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that the functional state of hypothalamic LHRH neurons and pituitary gonadotrophs might alter their radiosensitivity, we determined the experimental conditions under which the gonadotropin response to castration could be impaired by a single dose of cranial irradiation. Single doses of cranial irradiation greater than 2000 rads were lethal to unshielded rats. Shielding of the oropharynx and esophagus allowed the animals to survive doses up to 5000 rads. Doses between 2000 and 5000 rads had no effect on basal gonadotropin levels for as long as 3 months after irradiation. Irradiation caused a dose- and time-dependent impairment, however, in the gonadotropin response to castration. Impairment of the gonadotropin levels of castrate animals occurred in animals that were irradiated either before or after castration. However, rats irradiated in the castrate state showed a decreased susceptibility to irradiation damage. Additionally, stimulation of the pituitary by LHRH agonist (LHRHa) 3 h before irradiation significantly reduced the impairment of gonadotropin secretion 12-20 weeks after irradiation (P less than 0.05). Thus, increased functional activity of the rat hypothalamus or pituitary at the time of irradiation, induced by either castration or acute LHRHa administration, was associated with some protection against the gonadotropin-lowering effect of irradiation. Based upon these data, we hypothesize that stimulation of gonadotropin secretion at the time of therapeutic cranial irradiation in humans might protect against subsequent impairment of gonadotropin secretion.

  8. Inhibitory effect of pure 31-kilodalton bovine inhibin on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced up-regulation of GnRH binding sites in cultured rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q F; Farnworth, P G; Findlay, J K; Burger, H G

    1989-01-01

    Primary cultures of enzymatically dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells were used to examine the effect of pure 31 kilodalton bovine inhibin on GnRH-induced up-regulation of GnRH binding sites. After 2 days in culture, the cells were exposed to stimuli with or without test substances for 10 h, followed by evaluation of GnRH binding sites using iodinated GnRH-A (Buserelin) as tracer. Inhibin suppressed GnRH-induced up-regulation of GnRH binding sites in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of 0.13 U/ml (5.5 pM). The inhibin-related peptides transforming growth factor-beta, and Müllerian inhibitory substance had no detectable effect (stimulatory or inhibitory), suggesting that the action is specific to inhibin. In addition, inhibin inhibited the calcium ionophore A23187-induced up-regulation of GnRH binding sites, indicating that this effect of inhibin can occur, at least in part, at a stage subsequent to Ca2+ mobilization. Inhibin did not compete with iodinated GnRH-A for GnRH binding sites. In conclusion, pure 31 kilodalton bovine inhibin suppressed GnRH-induced up-regulation of GnRH binding sites in cultured rat anterior pituitary cells, providing direct evidence that inhibin modulates delayed actions of GnRH. PMID:2535810

  9. Regulation of tonic gonadotropin release in prepubertal female hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.G.; Matt, K.S.; Prestowitz, W.F.; Stetson, M.H.

    1982-04-01

    Basal serum gonadotropin levels were monitored weekly in female hamsters from birth to 10 weeks of age. Hamsters raised on three different photoperiods presented uniform pre- and postpubertal patterns of serum LH and FSH, suggesting that gonadotropin release in the young hamster occurs independently of ambient photoperiod. In all groups, serum LH levels increased gradually in animals up to 4 weeks of age, after which levels plateaued at 50--100 ng/ml. Serum FSH was markedly elevated in 2- and 3-week-old hamsters (800--1200 ng/ml), but remained at 200--400 ng/ml in all other groups. We next examined the change in the responsiveness of the pituitary to exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) challenge. Female hamsters 2 days of age failed to respond to any dose (0.025--1000 ng) of GnRH, while 10-day old females responded in typical dose-dependent fashion. GnRH-stimulated LH release first occurred in 6-day-old hamsters and was maximal by day 9, whereas FSH release first occurred on day 8 and was maximal by day 9. The prepubertal pattern of gonadotropin release can, in part, be explained on the basis of the development of pituitary GnRH sensitivity, which occurs independently of photoperiod.

  10. Pituitary tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... The pituitary is a small gland at the base of the brain. It regulates the body's balance of many hormones. ... cause symptoms and are never diagnosed during the person's lifetime. ... at the base of the brain. The pituitary helps control the ...

  11. Contemporary issues in the evaluation and management of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Pekic, S; Stojanovic, M; Popovic, V

    2015-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas are common benign monoclonal neoplasms accounting for about 15% of intracranial neoplasms. Data from postmortem studies and imaging studies suggest that 1 of 5 individuals in the general population may have pituitary adenoma. Some pituitary adenomas (mainly microadenomas which have a diameter of less than 1 cm) are exceedingly common and are incidentally diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed for an unrelated reason (headache, vertigo, head trauma). Most microadenomas remain clinically occult and stable in size, without an increase in tumor cells and without local mass effects. However, some pituitary adenomas grow slowly, enlarge by expansion and become demarcated from normal pituitary (macroadenomas have a diameter greater than 1 cm). They may be clinically silent or secrete anterior pituitary hormones in excess such as prolactin, growth hormone (GH), or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) causing diseases like prolactinoma, acromegaly, Cushing's disease or rarely thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) or gonadotropins (LH, FSH). The incidence of the various subtypes of pituitary adenoma varies but the most common is prolactinoma. Clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), which do not secrete hormones often cause local mass symptoms and represent one-third of pituitary adenomas. Given the high prevalence of pituitary adenomas and their heterogeneity (different tumor subtypes), it is critical that clinicians have a thorough understanding of the potential abnormalities in pituitary function and prognostic factors for behavior of pituitary adenomas in order to timely implement specific treatment modalities. Regarding pathogenesis of these tumors genetics, epigenetics and signaling pathways are the focus of current research yet our understanding of pituitary tumorigenesis remains incomplete. Although several genes and signaling pathways have been identified as important factors in the development of pituitary tumors, current

  12. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone induces miR-132 and miR-212 to regulate cellular morphology and migration in immortalized LbetaT2 pituitary gonadotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Joseph; Nishimura, Marin; Webster, Nicholas J G

    2011-05-01

    GnRH is central to the regulation of reproductive function. It acts on pituitary gonadotropes to stimulate LH and FSH synthesis and secretion. We had previously presented evidence for translational control of LHβ synthesis; therefore we investigated whether micro-RNAs might play a role in GnRH regulation in LβT2 cells. We show here that GnRH strongly induces the AK006051 gene transcript that encodes two micro-RNAs, miR-132 and miR-212, within the first intron. We show furthermore that the AK006051 promoter region is highly GnRH responsive. We verify that the p250Rho GTPase activating protein (GAP) is a target of miR-132/212 and show that GnRH treatment leads to a decrease in mRNA and protein expression. This reduction is blocked by an anti-miR to miR-132/212 and mimicked by a pre-miR-132. GnRH inhibits p250RhoGAP expression through a miR-132/212 response element within the 3'-untranslated region. The loss of p250RhoGAP expression leads to activation of Rac and marked increases in both the number and length of neurite-like processes extending from the cell. Knockdown of p250RhoGAP by small interfering RNA induces the same morphological changes observed with GnRH treatment. In addition, loss of p250RhoGAP causes an increase in cellular motility. Our findings suggest a novel pathway regulating long-term changes in cellular motility and process formation via the GnRH induction of miR-132/212 with the subsequent down-regulation of p250RhoGAP. PMID:21372146

  13. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... or milk production), sex hormones (control the menstrual cycle and other sexual functions), thyroid gland hormones (control the thyroid gland), adrenal gland hormones, and vasopressin (a hormone involved in water and electrolyte balance). Symptoms of pituitary adenoma and ...

  14. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediates gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release responses to endogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormones in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Christian; Booth, Morgan; Habibi, Hamid R; Chang, John P

    2008-08-01

    The possible involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in mediating the stimulatory actions of two endogenous goldfish gonadotropin-releasing hormones (salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II) on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion was examined. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of ERK and phosphorylated (p)ERK in goldfish brain, pituitary, liver, ovary, testis and muscle tissue extracts, as well as extracts of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells and HeLa cells. Interestingly, a third ERK-like immunoreactive band of higher molecular mass was detected in goldfish tissue and pituitary cell extracts in addition to the ERK1-p44- and ERK2-p42-like immunoreactive bands. Incubation of primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells with either a PKC-activating 4beta-phorbol ester (TPA) or a synthetic diacylglycerol, but not a 4alpha-phorbol ester, elevated the ratio of pERK/total (t)ERK for all three ERK isoforms. The stimulatory effects of TPA were attenuated by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and the MEK inhibitor PD98059. sGnRH and cGnRH-II also elevated the ratio of pERK/tERK for all three ERK isoforms, in a time-, dose- and PD98059-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with PD98059 reduced the sGnRH-, cGnRH-II- and TPA-induced increases in gonadotropin subunit mRNA levels in Northern blot studies and sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-elicited LH release in cell column perifusion studies with goldfish pituitary cells. These results indicate that GnRH and PKC can activate ERK through MEK in goldfish pituitary cells. More importantly, the present study suggests that GnRH-induced gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release involve MEK/ERK signaling in goldfish. PMID:18558406

  15. Emerging concepts regarding the integration of neuroendocrine signals that regulate gonadotropin secretion in domestic livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pulsatile discharge of GnRH from hypothalamic neurons is obligatory for the synthesis and release of the pituitary gonadotropins. Many conditions have been characterized that reduce gondadotropin secretion and result in anovulatory states which contribute to inefficiencies in livestock producti...

  16. Pituitary Apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Briet, Claire; Salenave, Sylvie; Bonneville, Jean-François; Laws, Edward R; Chanson, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Pituitary apoplexy, a rare clinical syndrome secondary to abrupt hemorrhage or infarction, complicates 2%-12% of pituitary adenomas, especially nonfunctioning tumors. Headache of sudden and severe onset is the main symptom, sometimes associated with visual disturbances or ocular palsy. Signs of meningeal irritation or altered consciousness may complicate the diagnosis. Precipitating factors (increase in intracranial pressure, arterial hypertension, major surgery, anticoagulant therapy or dynamic testing, etc) may be identified. Corticotropic deficiency with adrenal insufficiency may be life threatening if left untreated. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging confirms the diagnosis by revealing a pituitary tumor with hemorrhagic and/or necrotic components. Formerly considered a neurosurgical emergency, pituitary apoplexy always used to be treated surgically. Nowadays, conservative management is increasingly used in selected patients (those without important visual acuity or field defects and with normal consciousness), because successive publications give converging evidence that a wait-and-see approach may also provide excellent outcomes in terms of oculomotor palsy, pituitary function and subsequent tumor growth. However, it must be kept in mind that studies comparing surgical approach and conservative management were retrospective and not controlled. PMID:26414232

  17. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... org Tel: 773-577-8750; 800-886-2282 Fax: 847-827-9918 National Brain Tumor Society 55Chapel ... http://www.braintumor.org Tel: 866-455-3214 Fax: 617-924-9998 Pituitary Network Association P.O. ...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... (i) Gilts. For induction of fertile estrus (heat) in healthy prepuberal (noncycling) gilts. (ii)...

  19. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... (i) Gilts. For induction of fertile estrus (heat) in healthy prepuberal (noncycling) gilts. (ii)...

  20. 21 CFR 522.1079 - Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Serum gonadotropin and chorionic gonadotropin. 522.1079 Section 522.1079 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN.... (i) Gilts. For induction of fertile estrus (heat) in healthy prepuberal (noncycling) gilts. (ii)...

  1. Binding sites for gonadotropins in human postmenopausal ovaries

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, R.; Shima, K.; Yamoto, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Nishimori, K.; Hiraoka, J.

    1989-02-01

    The binding of human LH and human FSH to postmenopausal ovarian tissue from 21 patients with cervical carcinoma was analyzed. The binding sites for FSH and LH were demonstrated in postmenopausal ovarian tissue. The surface-binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the cells of cortical stroma of the postmenopausal ovary. In addition, diffuse cytoplasmic staining of endogenous estrogen and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity were detected immunohistochemically and histochemically in the cells of the cortical stroma. Electron microscopic study also suggested steroidogenic function in the cells of the cortical stroma. The results of the present study suggest that postmenopausal ovaries contain specific binding sites for pituitary gonadotropins and play a role in ovarian steroidogenesis.

  2. Pituitary Changes in Prop1 Transgenic Mice: Hormone Producing Tumors and Signet-ring Type Gonadotropes

    PubMed Central

    Egashira, Noboru; Minematsu, Takeo; Miyai, Syunsuke; Takekoshi, Susumu; Camper, Sally A.; Osamura, Robert Y.

    2008-01-01

    Prophet of Pit-1 (Prop1) is an early transcription factor that delays the appearance of gonadotropin in the developing pituitaries. Prop1 transgenic (Tg) mice have been shown to generate pituitary tumors that either produce TSH or are non-hormone producing. In our series of Prop1 Tg mice, only 5 out of 9 female mice produced pituitary adenomas, and the adenomas were only GH, PRL, GH and PRL, PRL and gonadotropin or TSH producing. The pituitary cells that surrounded these adenomas showed hyperplasia of the corresponding hormone producing cells; i.e. the GH cells were increased in the pituitary that contained GH producing adenoma. In addition, although the adenomas lacked the expression of Prop1, the non-neoplastic pituitary cells showed expression of Prop1. The Prop1 Tg mice also showed vacuolated cells with eccentric nuclei, which are characteristic of “signet-ring hypertrophic cells”. Using immunohistochemistry, these signet ring hypertrophic cells were found to be positive for gonadotropin. Taken together, our results suggest a (1) tumorigenic effect of Prop1 in the pituitaries, and (2) causative effects of signet ring-type gonadotropes. PMID:18636109

  3. Stages of Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  4. The general and comparative biology of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH).

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Bentley, George E; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Saigoh, Etsuko; Yin, Hong; Osugi, Tomohiro; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S; Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Ciccone, Nick; Sharp, Peter J; Wingfield, John C

    2007-01-01

    The decapeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the primary factor responsible for the hypothalamic control of gonadotropin secretion. Gonadal sex steroids and inhibin inhibit gonadotropin secretion via feedback from the gonads, but a neuropeptide inhibitor of gonadotropin secretion was, until recently, unknown in vertebrates. In 2000, we identified a novel hypothalamic dodecapeptide that inhibits gonadotropin release in cultured quail pituitaries and termed it gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH). To elucidate the mode of action of GnIH, we then identified a novel G protein-coupled receptor for GnIH in quail. The GnIH receptor possesses seven transmembrane domains and specifically binds to GnIH. The GnIH receptor is expressed in the pituitary and several brain regions including the hypothalamus. These results indicate that GnIH acts directly on the pituitary via GnIH receptor to inhibit gonadotropin release. GnIH may also act on the hypothalamus to inhibit GnRH release. To demonstrate the functional significance of GnIH and its potential role as a key regulatory neuropeptide in avian reproduction, we investigated GnIH actions on gonadal development and maintenance in quail. Chronic treatment with GnIH inhibited gonadal development and maintenance by decreasing gonadotropin synthesis and release. GnIH was also found in the hypothalamus of other avian species including sparrows and chickens and also inhibited gonadotropin synthesis and release. The pineal hormone melatonin may be a key factor controlling GnIH neural function, since quail GnIH neurons express melatonin receptor and melatonin treatment stimulates the expression of GnIH mRNA and mature GnIH peptide. Thus, GnIH is capable of transducing photoperiodic information via changes in the melatonin signal, thereby influencing the reproductive axis. It is concluded that GnIH, a newly discovered hypothalamic neuropeptide, is a key factor controlling avian reproduction. The discovery of avian GnIH opens

  5. Electrical synapses connect a network of gonadotropin releasing hormone neurons in a cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yunyong; Hu, Caroline K.; Huguenard, John R.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2015-01-01

    Initiating and regulating vertebrate reproduction requires pulsatile release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH1) from the hypothalamus. Coordinated GnRH1 release, not simply elevated absolute levels, effects the release of pituitary gonadotropins that drive steroid production in the gonads. However, the mechanisms underlying synchronization of GnRH1 neurons are unknown. Control of synchronicity by gap junctions between GnRH1 neurons has been proposed but not previously found. We recorded simultaneously from pairs of transgenically labeled GnRH1 neurons in adult male Astatotilapia burtoni cichlid fish. We report that GnRH1 neurons are strongly and uniformly interconnected by electrical synapses that can drive spiking in connected cells and can be reversibly blocked by meclofenamic acid. Our results suggest that electrical synapses could promote coordinated spike firing in a cellular assemblage of GnRH1 neurons to produce the pulsatile output necessary for activation of the pituitary and reproduction. PMID:25775522

  6. Pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Run; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common and mostly benign neoplasia which cause excess or deficiency of pituitary hormones and compressive damage to adjacent organs. Oncogene activation [e.g. PTTG (pituitary tumor-transforming gene) and HMGA2], tumor suppressor gene inactivation (e.g. MEN1 and PRKAR1A), epigenetic changes (e.g. methylation) and humoral factors (e.g. ectopic production of stimulating hormones) are all possible pituitary tumor initiators; the micro-environment of pituitary tumors including steroid milieu, angiogenesis and abnormal cell adhesion further promote tumor growth. Senescence, a cellular defence mechanism against malignant transformation, may explain the benign nature of at least some pituitary tumors. We suggest that future research on pituitary tumor pathogenesis should incorporate systems approaches, and address regulatory mechanisms for pituitary cell proliferation, development of new animal models of pituitary tumor and isolation of functional human pituitary tumor cell lines. PMID:20541667

  7. Rapid enlargement of an intracranial germ cell tumor after gonadotropin hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Yasuo; Tachibana, Osamu; Nakagawa, Athushi; Nakada, Satoko; Nojima, Takayuki; Koya, Daisuke; Iizuka, Hideaki

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of an intracranial germ cell tumor (iGCT) that showed rapid enlargement after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) hormone therapy for pituitary hypogonadism. A 16-year-old boy presented with headache and was diagnosed with a suprasellar tumor. He was initially observed without surgery. Intranasal desmopressin therapy was started for central diabetes insipidus, but there was no change in the tumor size on MRI. The diagnosis of the tumor remained unknown for 4years. Levels of serum gonadotropin hormones (follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormone) and testosterone progressively decreased, and the patient developed pituitary hypogonadism and complained about his undeveloped beard, lack of underarm hair, and erectile dysfunction. Intramuscular gonadotropin injection (hCG 5000U×2/week) was started at age 20. Eight months after the first gonadotropin injection, the MRI showed tumor growth with vivid enhancement. Craniotomy was performed and the tumor was partially resected. The histological diagnosis was immature teratoma. After surgery, the patient was treated with 5 cycles of chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide. He also received radiation therapy of 50Gy (20Gy tumor bed and 30Gy whole ventricles) to the residual tumor, after which the tumor decreased in size. We postulate that iGCT may be at risk of progression during hCG hormone therapy. Thus, careful monitoring is required for a patient with iGCT who receives this therapy. PMID:27050912

  8. Insulin Augments Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Induction of Translation in LβT2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Navratil, Amy M.; Song, Hyunjin; Hernandez, Jeniffer B.; Cherrington, Brian D.; Santos, Sharon J.; Low, Janine M.; Do, Minh-Ha T.; Lawson, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The integrated signaling of insulin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the pituitary gonadotropes may have a profound bearing on reproductive function, although the cross-receptor signaling mechanisms are unclear. We demonstrate that the insulin receptor is constitutively localized to non-caveolar lipid raft microdomains in the pituitary gonadotrope cell line LβT2. The localization to rafts is consistent with similar localization of the GnRH receptor. Insulin receptor phosphorylation occurs in raft domains and activates the downstream signaling targets Insulin Receptor Substrate1 and Akt/Protein Kinase B. Although insulin alone does not strongly activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase second messenger cascade, co-stimulation potentiates the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase by gonadotropin-releasing hormone. The co-stimulatory effect of insulin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone is also evident in increased activation of cap-dependent translation. In contrast, co-stimulation attenuates Akt/Protein Kinase B activation. Our results show that both gonadotropin-releasing hormone and insulin are capable of mutually altering their respective regulatory signaling cascades. We suggest that this provides a mechanism to integrate neuropeptide and energy homeostatic signals to modulate reproductive function. PMID:19632296

  9. Anatomical and functional gonadotrope networks in the teleost pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Matan; Martin, Agnés O.; Mollard, Patrice; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian pituitaries exhibit a high degree of intercellular coordination; this enables them to mount large-scale coordinated responses to various physiological stimuli. This type of communication has not been adequately demonstrated in teleost pituitaries, which exhibit direct hypothalamic innervation and expression of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in distinct cell types. We found that in two fish species, namely tilapia and zebrafish, LH cells exhibit close cell–cell contacts and form a continuous network throughout the gland. FSH cells were more loosely distributed but maintained some degree of cell–cell contact by virtue of cytoplasmic processes. These anatomical differences also manifest themselves at the functional level as evidenced by the effect of gap-junction uncouplers on gonadotropin release. These substances abolished the LH response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulation but did not affect the FSH response to the same stimuli. Dye transfer between neighboring LH cells provides further evidence for functional coupling. The two gonadotropins were also found to be differently packaged within their corresponding cell types. Our findings highlight the evolutionary origin of pituitary cell networks and demonstrate how the different levels of cell–cell coordination within the LH and FSH cell populations are reflected in their distinct secretion patterns. PMID:27029812

  10. Effects of estrogens, clomiphene and castration in a male transsexual with as compared to those without hypersecretion of gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Goh, H H; Ratnam, S S

    1990-06-01

    A 24-year-old male-to-female transsexual with hypersecretion of gonadotropins was studied with regard to his recovery from sex steroid hormone treatment before his sex change operation and the effects of castration, clomiphene tests and estrogens on the hypersecretion of gonadotropins. Computer-assisted tomography and X-ray results indicated that the possibility that the hypersecretion of gonadotropins was not associated with a pituitary adenoma could not be ruled out. After a period of recovery from previous sex steroid hormone therapy, inappropriately high FSH and LH levels in the presence of normal male levels of testosterone and estradiol were found. The latter normal levels failed to suppress both the FSH and LH levels. From the clomiphene challenge tests carried out before and after the sex reassignment operation, the estradiol infusion studies and treatment with ethinyl estradiol after the sex reassignment operation, it appears that the hypersecretion of gonadotropins was responsive to the negative feedback effect of estrogens. However, the sensitivity, especially that of FSH, was very attenuated. Even after 23 weeks of ethinyl estradiol treatment FSH remained well above the upper limit for normal men. The results showed that before his sex change operation the hypersecretion of gonadotropins in the patient was probably under autonomous control. Testicular factors at normal male concentrations appear to have a minimal negative feedback effect on the hypersecretion of gonadotropins. However, hypersecretion of gonadotropins can be suppressed by prolonged exposure to estrogens. PMID:2118708

  11. Effect of nutrition during calfhood and peripubertal period on serum metabolic hormones, gonadotropins and testosterone concentrations, and on sexual development in bulls.

    PubMed

    Brito, Leonardo F C; Barth, Albert D; Rawlings, Norm C; Wilde, Randal E; Crews, Denny H; Mir, Priya S; Kastelic, John P

    2007-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the effects of nutrition on circulating concentrations of metabolic hormones, gonadotropins, and testosterone during sexual development in bulls. Nutrition regulated the hypothalamus-pituitary-testes axis through effects on the GnRH pulse generator in the hypothalamus and through direct effects on the testes. Pituitary function (gonadotropin secretion after GnRH challenge) was not affected by nutrition. However, nutrition affected LH pulse frequency and basal LH concentration during the early gonadotropin rise (10-26 weeks of age). There were close temporal associations between changes in insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations and changes in LH pulse frequency, suggesting a role for IGF-I in regulating the early gonadotropin rise in bulls. The peripubertal increase in testosterone concentration was delayed in bulls with lesser serum IGF-I concentrations (low nutrition), suggesting a role for IGF-I in regulating Leydig cell function. Serum IGF-I concentrations accounted for 72 and 67% of the variation in scrotal circumference and paired-testes volume, respectively (at any given age), indicating that IGF-I may regulate testicular growth. Bulls with a more sustained elevated LH pulse frequency during the early gonadotropin rise (high nutrition) had greater testicular mass at 70 weeks of age relative to the control group (medium nutrition), despite no differences in metabolic hormone concentrations after 26 weeks of age. Therefore, gonadotropin-independent mechanism regulating testicular growth might be dependent on previous gonadotropin milieu. PMID:16677793

  12. Side Effects of Injectable Fertility Drugs (Gonadotropins)

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually are used during fertility treatments such as intrauterine insemination (IUI) or in vitro fertilization (IVF). Injections of gonadotropins ... Gestation. When using injectable gonadotropins alone or with IUI, up to 30% of pregnancies are associated with ...

  13. Evidence that obesity and androgens have independent and opposing effects on gonadotropin production from puberty to maturity.

    PubMed

    Rosenfield, Robert L; Bordini, Brian

    2010-12-10

    Optimal fat mass is necessary for normal gonadotropin levels in adults, and both undernutrition and overnutrition suppress gonadotropins: thus, the gonadotropin response to relative adipose mass is biphasic. Adult obesity is associated with blunted luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse amplitude that is partially attributable to increased LH clearance rate. Testosterone appears to have a biphasic effect on gonadotropin production in females. Moderate elevations of testosterone appear to stimulate LH production at both the hypothalamic and pituitary level, while very high levels of testosterone suppress LH. Thus, obesity per se appears to suppress gonadotropin production, and moderate hyperandrogenemia in women appears to stimulate LH. The ordinary hypergonadotropic hyperandrogenism of obese women appears to be an exception to this model because it is usually due to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a condition in which intrinsic functional ovarian hyperandrogenism and excess adiposity share a common origin that involves insulin-resistant hyperinsulinemia. LH elevation seems to be secondary to hyperandrogenemia and is absent in the most obese cases. Overweight early pubertal girls have significant blunting of sleep-related LH production, which is the first hormonal change of puberty. The data are compatible with the possibility that excess adiposity may paradoxically subtly suppress hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in early puberty although it is known to contribute to the early onset of puberty. PMID:20816944

  14. Role of PROP1 in pituitary gland growth.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert D; Raetzman, Lori T; Suh, Hoonkyo; Stone, Brandon M; Nasonkin, Igor O; Camper, Sally A

    2005-03-01

    Mutations in the PROP1 transcription factor gene lead to reduced production of thyrotropin, GH, prolactin, and gonadotropins as well as to pituitary hypoplasia in adult humans and mice. Some PROP1-deficient patients initially exhibit pituitary hyperplasia that resolves to hypoplasia. To understand this feature and to explore the mechanism whereby PROP1 regulates anterior pituitary gland growth, we carried out longitudinal studies in normal and Prop1-deficient dwarf mice from early embryogenesis through adulthood, examining the volume of Rathke's pouch and its derivatives, the position and number of dividing cells, the rate of apoptosis, and cell migration by pulse labeling. The results suggest that anterior pituitary progenitors normally leave the perilumenal region of Rathke's pouch and migrate to form the anterior lobe as they differentiate. Some of the cells that seed the anterior lobe during organogenesis have proliferative potential, supporting the expansion of the anterior lobe after birth. Prop1-deficient fetal pituitaries are dysmorphic because mutant cells are retained in the perilumenal area and fail to differentiate. After birth, mutant pituitaries exhibit enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation, apparently because the mutant anterior lobe is not seeded with progenitors. These studies suggest a mechanism for Prop1 action and an explanation for some of the clinical findings in human patients. PMID:15591534

  15. Pregnancy and pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Glezer, Andrea; Jallad, Raquel S; Machado, Marcio C; Fragoso, Maria C; Bronstein, Marcello D

    2016-09-01

    Infertility is frequent in patients harboring pituitary adenomas. The mechanisms involved include hypogonadism secondary to hormonal hypersecretion (prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol), stalk disconnection and pituitary damage. With the improvement of clinical and surgical treatment, pregnancy in women harboring pituitary adenomas turned into a reality. Pituitary hormonal hyper- and hyposecretion influences pregnancy outcomes, as well as pregnancy can interfere on pituitary tumors, especially in prolactinomas. We review literature about specific follow-up and management in pregnant women harboring prolactinomas, acromegaly, or Cushings disease and the impact of clinical and surgical treatment on each condition. PMID:26977888

  16. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor signaling and its impact on reproduction in chickens.

    PubMed

    Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y; McFarlane, Heather; Maddineni, Sreenivasa R; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2009-09-01

    In birds, as in other vertebrates, reproduction is controlled by the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis with each component secreting specific neuropeptides or hormones. Until recently, it was believed this axis is exclusively under the stimulatory control of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone I (GnRH-I) which in turn, stimulates luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion from the pituitary gland. However, the discovery of a novel inhibitory hypothalamic peptide able to reduce LH secretion (gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone: GnIH) challenged this dogma. Furthermore, with the characterization of its specific receptor (GnIHR), progress has been made to clarify the physiological relevance of GnIH in birds. This short review discusses the recent advances in GnIHR signaling at the level of the pituitary gland and the gonads. GnIHR is a member of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family which couples to G(alphai) and, upon activation inhibits adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity, thus reducing intracellular cAMP levels. This implies that GnIH interferes with signaling of any GPCR coupled to G(alphas), including GnRH, LH and FSH receptors. In the chicken pituitary gland, the GnRHR-II/GnIHR ratio changes during sexual maturation in favor of GnRHR-II that appears to result in hypothalamic control of gonadotropin secretion shifting from inhibitory to stimulatory, with corresponding changes in GnRH-induced cAMP levels. Within the gonads, GnIH and its receptor may act in an autocrine/paracrine manner and may interfere with LH and FSH signaling to influence ovarian follicular maturation and recruitment, as well as spermatogenesis. PMID:19332068

  17. The effects of kisspeptin on gonadotropin release in non-human mammals.

    PubMed

    Abbara, Ali; Ratnasabapathy, Risheka; Jayasena, Channa N; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2013-01-01

    The Kiss1 gene encodes a 145-amino acid pre-peptide, kisspeptin, which is cleaved into smaller peptides of 54, 14, 13, and 10 amino acids. This chapter reviews in detail the effects of kisspeptin on gonadotropin secretion in non-human mammals. Studies of kisspeptin's effects have included both acute and chronic administration regimens via a number of administration routes. Acute kisspeptin stimulates gonadotropin secretion in a wide range of species of non-human mammals, including rats, mice, hamsters, sheep, pigs, goats, cows, horses, and monkeys. In general, the stimulatory effect of kisspeptin treatment is more pronounced for LH than FSH secretion. Kisspeptin is thought to exert its stimulatory effects on LH and FSH release via stimulation of GnRH release from the hypothalamus, since pre--administration of a GnRH antagonist prevents kisspeptin's stimulation of gonadotropin secretion. Although the kisspeptin receptor is also expressed on anterior pituitary cells of some species, and incubation of anterior pituitary cells with high concentrations of kisspeptin can stimulate in vitro LH release, the contribution of direct effects of kisspeptin on the pituitary is thought to be negligible in vivo. Continuous kisspeptin administration results in reduced sensitivity to the effects of kisspeptin, in some species. This desensitization is thought to occur at the level of the kisspeptin receptor, since the response of the pituitary gland to exogenous GnRH is maintained. Overall, the findings discussed in this chapter are invaluable to the understanding of the reproductive role of kisspeptin and the potential therapeutic uses of kisspeptin for the treatment of fertility disorders. PMID:23550002

  18. Structural and Functional Divergence of Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone from Jawless Fish to Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) was discovered as a novel hypothalamic peptide that inhibits gonadotropin release in the quail. The presence of GnIH-homologous peptides and its receptors (GnIHRs) have been demonstrated in various vertebrate species including teleosts, suggesting that the GnIH-GnIHR family is evolutionarily conserved. In avian and mammalian brain, GnIH neurons are localized in the hypothalamic nuclei and their neural projections are widely distributed. GnIH acts on the pituitary and gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons to inhibit reproductive functions by decreasing gonadotropin release and synthesis. In addition, GnIH-GnIHR signaling is regulated by various factors, such as environmental cues and stress. However, the function of fish GnIH orthologs remains inconclusive because the physiological properties of fish GnIH peptides are debatable. This review summarizes the current research progress in GnIH-GnIHR signaling and their physiological functions in vertebrates with special emphasis on non-mammalian vertebrate species. PMID:25386165

  19. General Information about Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Pituitary Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  1. Fox Tales: Regulation of Gonadotropin Gene Expression by Forkhead Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Varykina G.

    2013-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) are produced by pituitary gonadotrope cells and are required for steroidogenesis, the maturation of ovarian follicles, ovulation, and spermatogenesis. Synthesis of LH and FSH is tightly regulated by a complex network of signaling pathways activated by hormones including gonadotropin-releasing hormone, activin and sex steroids. Members of the forkhead box (FOX) transcription factor family have been shown to act as important regulators of development, homeostasis and reproduction. In this review, we focus on the role of four specific FOX factors (FOXD1, FOXL2, FOXO1 and FOXP3) in gonadotropin hormone production and discuss our current understanding of the molecular function of these factors derived from studies in mouse genetic and cell culture models. PMID:24099863

  2. Rapid Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Antagonism in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients with High Gonadotropin Levels in the AGRA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kåss, Anita; Hollan, Ivana; Fagerland, Morten Wang; Gulseth, Hans Christian; Torjesen, Peter Abusdal; Førre, Øystein Torleiv

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and pituitary gonadotropins, which appear to be proinflammatory, undergo profound secretory changes during events associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) onset, flares, or improvement e.g. menopausal transition, postpartum, or pregnancy. Potential anti-inflammatory effects of GnRH-antagonists may be most pronounced in patients with high GnRH and gonadotropin levels. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy and safety of a GnRH-antagonist, cetrorelix, in RA patients with high gonadotropin levels. Methods We report intention-to-treat post hoc analyses among patients with high gonadotropin levels (N = 53), i.e. gonadotropin levels>median, from our proof-of-concept, double-blind AGRA-study (N = 99). Patients with active longstanding RA, randomized to subcutaneous cetrorelix (5mg days1–2; 3mg days 3–5) or placebo, were followed through day 15. Only predefined primary and secondary endpoints were analyzed. Results The primary endpoint, Disease Activity Score of 28-joint counts with C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP), improved with cetrorelix compared with placebo by day 5 (-1.0 vs. -0.4, P = 0∙010). By day 5, more patients on cetrorelix achieved at least a 20% improvement in the American College of Rheumatology scale (44% vs. 19%, P = 0.049), DAS28-CRP≤3.2 (24% vs. 0%, P = 0.012), and European League against Rheumatism ‘Good-responses’ (19% vs. 0%, P = 0.026). Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-10, and CRP decreased with cetrorelix (P = 0.045, P = 0.034, P = 0.020 and P = 0.042 respectively) compared with placebo by day 15. Adverse event rates were similar between groups. Conclusions GnRH-antagonism produced rapid anti-inflammatory effects in RA patients with high gonadotropin levels. GnRH should be investigated further in RA. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00667758 PMID:26460564

  3. Development, validation, and utilization of a novel antibody specific to the type III chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, H O; Joseph, N T; Maddineni, S R; Ramachandran, R; Bédécarrats, G Y

    2011-02-01

    Two gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors (GnRH-Rs) have been characterized in chickens to date: cGnRH-R-I and cGnRH-R-III, with cGnRH-R-III being the predominant pituitary form. The purpose of the present study was to first validate a novel antibody for the specific detection of cGnRH-R-III and second, using this antibody, detect changes in cGnRH-R-III protein levels in the pituitary gland of male and female chickens during a reproductive cycle. The localization of cGnRH-R-III within the anterior pituitary gland was also determined. Western blotting of pituitary extracts and transiently transfected COS-7 cell lysates revealed that our antibody is highly specific to cGnRH-R-III protein. Similarly, when used in immunocytochemistry, this antibody specifically detects cells expressing cGnRH-R-III and not cGnRH-R-I. Western blot analyses of chicken pituitary gland homogenates show that cGnRH-R-III protein levels are significantly greater in sexually mature birds than in immature birds or birds at the end of a reproductive cycle (P < 0.0001). A similar pattern was observed for both males and females. Additionally, the antibody was able to detect cGnRH-R-III in cells along the periphery of the cephalic and caudal lobes of the anterior pituitary where the cells containing the gonadotropins are located. In summary, we successfully validated a novel antibody to cGnRH-R-III and showed levels of cGnRH-R-III protein in the pituitary fluctuate with respect to the reproductive status in both male and female chickens. PMID:21093197

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to gonadotropin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, P.H.; Moyle, W.R.; Canfield, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies to peptide hormones, with their unifocal binding sites, can provide tools for understanding hormone structure and function. The paper focuses on techniques that are important for the study of monoclonal antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), including hybridoma production, methods of screening for desired clones, properties of the monoclonal antibodies, effect of antibodies on hormone-receptor interaction, inhibition of binding of radiolabeled hCG, inhibition of hCG induced steroidogenesis, determination of relative orientation of epitopes, and synergistic actions of monoclonal antibodies to hCG.

  5. Gonadotropin therapy: a 20th century relic.

    PubMed

    Reindollar, Richard H; Goldman, Marlene B

    2012-04-01

    Gonadotropin therapy has been a cornerstone of infertility therapy for half a century. From the very beginning, its use has been associated with a high rate of multiple births, particularly high order multiples, and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Initially, success rates seemed acceptable when used for superovulation (SO)/IUI therapy. However, as data from RCTs have emerged, reported outcomes suggest that we question the use of injectible gonadotropins. This manuscript examines the studies that have challenged gonadotropin use for SO/IUI and other research that supports reduced doses of gonadotropins for IVF. We examine the challenges for its continued use for SO/IUI and for moving to lower doses worldwide for IVF. We propose a future that views gonadotropins as a relic of the twentieth century. PMID:22463775

  6. A FSH-Secreting Pituitary Macroadenoma Causing A Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong; Ge, Li; Cui, Yuanqing; Lang, Cuihong; Hao, Cuifang

    2014-04-01

    FSH-secreting pituitary adenomas can affect sexual and reproductive function. In this article, we have reported the case of a 32-year-old male with secondary infertility. The patient had sexual and reproductive disturbances. The test results of the blood samples indicated obviously decreased testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) levels. Based on previous hormonal results, the patient received pituitary stimulation and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) tests. Both follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) showed low response during the pituitary stimulation test. The results of the hCG test indicated that T/E2 could recover to a normal level. In addition, this patient was diagnosed with pituitary macroadenoma, which was supported by the pituitary MRI. The man's sexual and reproductive functions recovered following surgery. The pathological results confirmed that the tumor tissue was an FSH-secreting pituitary adenoma by immunohistochemical staining. The purpose of this report was to review the relative literature and discuss the influence of FSH-secreting pituitary adenomas on hormones through the hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis. PMID:24696774

  7. Familial pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Alband, Neda; Korbonits, Márta

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign intracranial neoplasms that present a major clinical concern due to hormone overproduction and/or tumor mass effects. The majority of pituitary adenomas occur sporadically; however, familial cases are increasingly being recognized, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Carney complex (CNC), and familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA). Familial pituitary tumors appear to differ from their sporadic counterparts both in their genetic basis and in clinical characteristics. Evidence suggests that, especially in MEN1 and FIPA, tumors are more aggressive and affect patients at a younger age, therefore justifying the importance of early diagnosis, while in Carney complex pituitary hyperplasia is common. The genetic alterations responsible for the formation of familial pituitary syndromes include the MEN1 gene, responsible for about 80% of MEN1 cases, the regulatory subunit of the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A, responsible for about 70% of Carney complex cases, and AIP, the gene coding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein, responsible for about 20% of FIPA cases. Rarely other genes have also been found responsible for familial pituitary adenoma cases. McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) also has a genetic origin due to mosaic mutations in the G protein-coupled α subunit coded by the GNAS1 gene. In this chapter, we summarize the genetic and clinical characteristics of these familial pituitary syndromes and MAS. PMID:25248598

  8. Effects of gonadoliberin analogue triptorelin on the pituitary-testicular complex in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Dygalo, N N; Shemenkova, T V; Kalinina, T S; Shishkina, G T

    2014-02-01

    Triptorelin, a synthetic analogue of neurohormone gonadoliberin (gonadotropin-releasing hormone, GnRH) administered daily to rats on postnatal days 5-7 suppressed the expression of GnRH receptor in the pituitary gland, but did not change functioning of the pituitary-testicular complex. Administration of triptorelin on postnatal days 12-14 (i.e. during the formation of pulsatile pattern of GnRH secretion and increasing levels of its mRNA receptor in the pituitary gland) had no effect on receptor expression, but increased the levels of luteinizing hormone mRNA in the pituitary gland and the weight of testes. At that time, blood levels of testosterone were lowered, which indicated disturbed pulsatile pattern of GnRH secretion. PMID:24771429

  9. Double pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Iacovazzo, D; Bianchi, A; Lugli, F; Milardi, D; Giampietro, A; Lucci-Cordisco, E; Doglietto, F; Lauriola, L; De Marinis, L

    2013-04-01

    Double pituitary adenomas represent up to 2.6 % of pituitary adenomas in large surgical series and up to 3.3 % of patients with Cushing's disease have been found to have double or multiple pituitary adenomas. We report the case of a 60-year-old male patient whose medical history began in 2002 with erectile dysfunction; hyperprolactinemia was found and MRI showed a 6-mm area of delayed enhancement in the lateral portion of the right pituitary lobe. Treatment with cabergoline was started with normalization of prolactin levels; the following MRI, performed in 2005 and 2008, showed shrinkage of the pituitary lesion. In 2005, the patient began to manifest weight gain, hypertension, and facial plethora, but no further evaluations were done. In January 2010, the patient came to our attention and underwent multiple tests that suggested Cushing's disease. A new MRI was negative. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling showed significant pituitary-to-peripheral ratio and, in May 2010, the patient underwent exploratory pituitary surgery with evidence of a 1-2-mm white-coloured midline area compatible with pituitary adenoma that was surgically removed. Post-operatively, the patient's clinical conditions improved with onset of secondary hypoadrenalism. The histologic examination confirmed a pituitary adenoma (immunostaining was found to be positive for ACTH and negative for prolactin). We report the case of an ACTH-producing microadenoma metachronous to a prolactin secreting microadenoma although not confirmed histologically, shrunk by medical treatment. A review of data in the literature regarding double or multiple pituitary adenomas has also been done. PMID:23325364

  10. A virilizing Leydig cell tumor of the ovary associated with stromal hyperplasia under gonadotropin control.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, J A; Nery, M; Mendonça, B B; Hayashida, S A; Halbe, H W; Carvalho, F M; Wajchenberg, B L

    1997-12-01

    A 34-yr-old nulliparous black woman presented with hair loss, facial hirsutism, irregular menses and infertility associated with greatly increased serum total testosterone levels. The adrenal glands and the ovaries were normal on radiological and ultrasonographic investigation. Catheterization of the veins draining from the adrenal glands and the ovaries yielded testosterone levels of 20.3 nmol/L and 20.0 nmol/L in the right and the left adrenal veins, respectively, and 17.9 nmol/L and 27.4 nmol/L in the right and left ovaries venous plexus, respectively. Sequencial dexamethasone and ethynyl estradiol suppression test showed a decrease in cortisol level with no change in total testosterone level on dexamethasone while an increase in testosterone from 10.5 nmol/L to 20.1 nmol/L was observed ten days after ethynil estradiol had been associated to dexamethasone. When a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (gonadorelin 3.5 mg i.m.) was administered for 2 months, serum gonadotropins levels decreased to less than 2 IU/L, total testosterone to 3.8 nmol/L and estradiol to less than 36 pmol/L. The patient was submitted to a pelvic exploratory laparotomy and a left salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. A solid and circumscribed ovarian tumor of 1.0 cm in diameter was found. The pathological diagnosis was a Leydig cell tumor with surrounding stromal hyperplasia. These findings may suggest that this tumor was gonadotropin-dependent being indirectly stimulated by ethynil estradiol, through a sensitization of the pituitary gonadotropes and increase in gonadotropin levels and suppressed by a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist. PMID:9492110

  11. FOXO1 is Regulated by Insulin and IGF1 in Pituitary Gonadotropes

    PubMed Central

    Skarra, Danalea V.; Thackray, Varykina G.

    2015-01-01

    The FOXO1 transcription factor is important for multiple aspects of reproductive function. We previously reported that FOXO1 functions as a repressor of gonadotropin hormone synthesis, but how FOXO1 is regulated in pituitary gonadotropes is unknown. The growth factors, insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) function as key regulators of cell proliferation, metabolism and apoptosis in multiple cell types through the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In this study, we found that insulin and IGF1 signaling in gonadotropes induced FOXO1 phosphorylation through the PI3K/AKT pathway in immortalized and primary cells, resulting in FOXO1 relocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, insulin administration in vivo induced phosphorylation of FOXO1 and AKT in the pituitary. Thus, insulin and IGF1 act as negative regulators of FOXO1 activity and may serve to fine-tune gonadotropin expression. PMID:25676570

  12. Letrozole, Gonadotropin, or Clomiphene for Unexplained Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, M.P.; Legro, R.S.; Coutifaris, C.; Alvero, R.; Robinson, R.D.; Casson, P.; Christman, G.M.; Ager, J.; Huang, H.; Hansen, K.R.; Baker, V.; Usadi, R.; Seungdamrong, A.; Bates, G.W.; Rosen, R.M.; Haisenleder, D.; Krawetz, S.A.; Barnhart, K.; Trussell, J.C.; Ohl, D.; Jin, Y.; Santoro, N.; Eisenberg, E.; Zhang, H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The standard therapy for women with unexplained infertility is gonadotropin or clomiphene citrate. Ovarian stimulation with letrozole has been proposed to reduce multiple gestations while maintaining live birth rates. METHODS We enrolled couples with unexplained infertility in a multicenter, randomized trial. Ovulatory women 18 to 40 years of age with at least one patent fallopian tube were randomly assigned to ovarian stimulation (up to four cycles) with gonadotropin (301 women), clomiphene (300), or letrozole (299). The primary outcome was the rate of multiple gestations among women with clinical pregnancies. RESULTS After treatment with gonadotropin, clomiphene, or letrozole, clinical pregnancies occurred in 35.5%, 28.3%, and 22.4% of cycles, and live birth in 32.2%, 23.3%, and 18.7%, respectively; pregnancy rates with letrozole were significantly lower than the rates with standard therapy (gonadotropin or clomiphene) (P = 0.003) or gonadotropin alone (P<0.001) but not with clomiphene alone (P = 0.10). Among ongoing pregnancies with fetal heart activity, the multiple gestation rate with letrozole (9 of 67 pregnancies, 13%) did not differ significantly from the rate with gonadotropin or clomiphene (42 of 192, 22%; P = 0.15) or clomiphene alone (8 of 85, 9%; P = 0.44) but was lower than the rate with gonadotropin alone (34 of 107, 32%; P = 0.006). All multiple gestations in the clomiphene and letrozole groups were twins, whereas gonadotropin treatment resulted in 24 twin and 10 triplet gestations. There were no significant differences among groups in the frequencies of congenital anomalies or major fetal and neonatal complications. CONCLUSIONS In women with unexplained infertility, ovarian stimulation with letrozole resulted in a significantly lower frequency of multiple gestation but also a lower frequency of live birth, as compared with gonadotropin but not as compared with clomiphene. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; Clinical

  13. Normal gonadotropin production and fertility in gonadotrope-specific Bmpr1a knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Ying; Ongaro, Luisina; Boehm, Ulrich; Kaartinen, Vesa; Mishina, Yuji; Bernard, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) synthesis is regulated by transforming growth factorβsuperfamily ligands, most notably the activins and inhibins. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) also regulate FSHβ subunit (Fshb) expression in immortalized murine gonadotrope-like LβT2 cells and in primary murine or ovine primary pituitary cultures. BMP2 signals preferentially via the BMP type I receptor, BMPR1A, to stimulate murine Fshb transcription in vitro Here, we used a Cre-lox approach to assess BMPR1A's role in FSH synthesis in mice in vivo Gonadotrope-specific Bmpr1a knockout animals developed normally and had reproductive organ weights comparable with those of controls. Knockouts were fertile, with normal serum gonadotropins and pituitary gonadotropin subunit mRNA expression. Cre-mediated recombination of the floxed Bmpr1a allele was efficient and specific, as indicated by PCR analysis of diverse tissues and isolated gonadotrope cells. Furthermore, BMP2 stimulation of inhibitor of DNA binding 3 expression was impaired in gonadotropes isolated from Bmpr1a knockout mice, confirming the loss of functional receptor protein in these cells. Treatment of purified gonadotropes with small-molecule inhibitors of BMPR1A (and the related receptors BMPR1B and ACVR1) suppressed Fshb mRNA expression, suggesting that an autocrine BMP-like molecule might regulate FSH synthesis. However, deletion of Bmpr1a and Acvr1 in cultured pituitary cells did not alter Fshb expression, indicating that the inhibitors had off-target effects. In sum, BMPs or related ligands acting via BMPR1A or ACVR1 are unlikely to play direct physiological roles in FSH synthesis by murine gonadotrope cells. PMID:27029473

  14. Characterization of GnRH receptors in bovine pituitary membranes.

    PubMed

    Hazum, E; Keinan, D

    1984-05-01

    Bovine pituitary gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors were characterized and identified utilizing a superactive GnRH analog, Buserelin [( D-Ser(t-Bu)6, des-Gly10-ethylamide]-GnRH), and a photoreactive GnRH analog, [azidobenzoyl-D- Lys6 ]-GnRH. Both analogs bind with high affinity to a single class of receptors, with apparent IC50 values of 0.5 nM and 1 nM, respectively. The binding of 125I-labeled Buserelin to pituitary membranes was inhibited, in a dose-responsive manner, by both trypsin and chymotrypsin, with the former being less effective. Neuraminidase at a concentration up to 100 micrograms/ml did not affect the binding. Lectins, such as concanavalin A and wheat-germ agglutinin, at a concentration range of 20-200 micrograms/ml had no effect on the binding, whereas soybean agglutinin at high concentrations (150 and 200 micrograms/ml) slightly inhibited the specific binding. Photoaffinity labeling of the bovine pituitary GnRH receptors resulted in the identification of two specific bands with apparent molecular weights of 60 K and 30 K daltons. The latter probably represents very low affinity binding sites. Both specific bands were sensitive to trypsin and chymotrypsin treatment but were not affected by neuraminidase treatment. These results suggest a slight difference between rat and bovine pituitary GnRH receptors. PMID:6329848

  15. Pituitary Tumors: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress. Growth hormone helps control body growth and metabolism. Thyroid-stimulating hormone is involved in growth, body temperature, and heart rate. Nonfunctioning pituitary tumors (also called nonsecretory tumors) do ...

  16. What Are Pituitary Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... too little makes you sluggish. If a pituitary tumor makes too much TSH, it can cause hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid gland). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, also known as corticotropin ) causes ...

  17. Prenatal Exposure to Low Doses of Bisphenol A Increases Pituitary Proliferation and Gonadotroph Number in Female Mice Offspring at Birth1

    PubMed Central

    Brannick, Katherine E.; Craig, Zelieann R.; Himes, Ashley D.; Peretz, Jackye R.; Wang, Wei; Flaws, Jodi A.; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pituitary gland is composed of hormone-producing cells essential for homeostasis and reproduction. Pituitary cells are sensitive to endocrine feedback in the adult and can have altered hormonal secretion from exposure to the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A (BPA). BPA is a prevalent plasticizer used in food and beverage containers, leading to widespread human exposure. Although prenatal exposure to BPA can impact reproductive function in the adult, the effects of BPA on the developing pituitary are unknown. We hypothesized that prenatal exposure to low doses of BPA impacts gonadotroph cell number or parameters of hormone synthesis. To test this, pregnant mice were administered 0.5 μg/kg/day of BPA, 50 μg/kg/day of BPA, or vehicle beginning on Embryonic Day 10.5. At parturition, pituitaries from female offspring exposed in utero to either dose of BPA had increased proliferation, as assessed by mKi67 mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry. Coincidently, gonadotroph number also increased in treated females. However, we observed a dichotomy between mRNA levels of Lhb and Fshb. Female mice exposed to 0.5 μg/kg/day BPA had increased mRNA levels of gonadotropins and the gonadotropin-receptor hormone (GNRH) receptor (Gnrhr), which mediates GNRH regulation of gonadotropin production and release. In contrast, mice treated with 50 μg/kg/day of BPA had decreased gonadotropin mRNA levels, Gnrhr and Nr5a1, a transcription factor required for gonadotroph differentiation. No other pituitary hormones were altered on the day of birth in response to in utero BPA exposure, and male pituitaries showed no change in the parameters tested. Collectively, these results show that prenatal exposure to BPA affects pituitary gonadotroph development in females. PMID:22875908

  18. Control of puberty onset and fertility by gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Herbison, Allan E

    2016-08-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal network generates pulse and surge modes of gonadotropin secretion critical for puberty and fertility. The arcuate nucleus kisspeptin neurons that innervate the projections of GnRH neurons in and around their neurosecretory zone are key components of the pulse generator in all mammals. By contrast, kisspeptin neurons located in the preoptic area project to GnRH neuron cell bodies and proximal dendrites and are involved in surge generation in female rodents (and possibly other species). The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis develops embryonically but, apart from short periods of activation immediately after birth, remains suppressed through a combination of gonadal and non-gonadal mechanisms. At puberty onset, the pulse generator reactivates, probably owing to progressive stimulatory influences on GnRH neurons from glial and neurotransmitter signalling, and the re-emergence of stimulatory arcuate kisspeptin input. In females, the development of pulsatile gonadotropin secretion enables final maturation of the surge generator that ultimately triggers the first ovulation. Representation of the GnRH neuronal network as a series of interlocking functional modules could help conceptualization of its functioning in different species. Insights into pulse and surge generation are expected to aid development of therapeutic strategies ameliorating pubertal disorders and infertility in the clinic. PMID:27199290

  19. Separation of gonadotropic fractions with different species specificities from tuna pituitaries

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, H.; Ishii, S.

    1988-05-01

    Eight different gonadotropic glycoprotein fractions were separated from the acetone-dried powder of yellow fin tuna pituitary glands by successive chromatographies on Superose 12 for gel filtration and Mono Q for anion exchange using the Pharmacia fast protein liquid chromatography system. This was preceded by preliminary separations using an ammonium sulfate precipitation method and affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-Sepharose. For biological characterization, we employed two radioreceptor assay systems, one using goby testis plasma membranes and silver carp GTH as the receptor and radioligand, respectively, and the other using testis plasma membranes of the yellow fin tuna and gonadotropin of the same species, respectively. We also employed two testicular cyclic AMP accumulation bioassay methods in vitro, one with the goby testis and the other with the mackerel testis. The least acidic fraction after Mono Q was further separated into four subfractions by rechromatography with Mono Q. They were strongly active in the tuna and mackerel assays but almost inactive in the goby assays. They were referred to as tuna-type tuna gonadotropin. In contrast, the most acidic fraction obtained after the first Mono Q was active in the goby assays but almost inactive in the tuna and mackerel assays. It was referred to as goby-type tuna gonadotropin. The intermediate fractions were active on both assays and are considered to be mixtures of tuna-type and goby-type gonadotropins. The reason for the presence of gonadotropin inactive to homologous species is discussed from the evolutionary viewpoint.

  20. Treatment Options for Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain, including the sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). ... sphenoid bone (a butterfly-shaped bone at the base of the skull ) to reach the pituitary gland . ...

  1. [Treatment of pituitary adenomas].

    PubMed

    Mezosi, Emese; Nemes, Orsolya

    2009-09-27

    According to epidemiological studies, the prevalence of pituitary adenomas is 16.5% and the majority of them are "incidentalomas". The symptoms of pituitary disorders are often non-specific; disturbances of pituitary function, compression symptoms, hypophysis apoplexy or accidental findings may help the diagnosis. The hormonal evaluation of pituitary adenomas is different from the algorithm used in the disorders of peripheral endocrine organs. The first-line therapy of prolactinomas are the dopamine agonists, and the aims of the treatment are to normalize the prolactin level, restore fertility in child-bearing age, decrease tumor mass, save or improve the residual pituitary function and inhibit the relapse of the disease. The available dopamine agonists in Hungary are bromocriptine and quinagolide. In case of tumors with good therapeutic response, medical therapy can be withdrawn after 3-5 years; hyperprolactinemia will not recur in 2/3 of these patients. Neurosurgery is the primary therapy of GH-, ACTH-, TSH-producing and inactive adenomas. In the last decades, significant improvement has been reached in surgical procedures, resulting in low mortality rates. Acromegalic patients with unresectable tumors have a great benefit from somatostatin analog treatment. The growth hormone receptor antagonist pegvisomant is the newest modality for the treatment of acromegaly. The medical therapy of Cushing's disease is still based on the inhibition of steroid production. A new, promising somatostatin analog, pasireotide is evaluated in clinical trials. The rare TSH-producing tumor can respond to both dopamine agonist and somatostatin analog therapy. The application of conventional radiotherapy has decreased; radiotherapy is mainly used in the treatment of invasive, incurable or malignant tumors. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact role of radiosurgery and fractionated stereotaxic irradiation in the treatment of pituitary tumors. PMID:19758960

  2. Pituitary abscess: an unexpected diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Anatoly; Gunnarsson, Thorsteinn; Sommer, Doron; Miller, Elka

    2010-02-01

    The pituitary gland can demonstrate a variety of pathologies with different clinical presentations. Amongst them, pituitary abscess is a rare infectious disease for which contrast-enhanced MRI aids the diagnostic pathway. We present a 16-year-old girl with imaging and surgical findings consistent with primary pituitary abscess. PMID:19937240

  3. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity and PKC messenger RNAs in human pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Maeda, T; Chandler, W F; Lloyd, R V

    1993-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the differentiation and growth regulation of a variety of tissues including anterior pituitary gland cells. To determine the distribution of PKC in different types of adenomas, PKC activity was analyzed in human pituitary tumors and the effects of hypothalamic hormone stimulation on PKC activity were examined in cultured adenoma cells. Gonadotroph (LH/FSH) and null cell adenomas had significantly higher levels of particulate, soluble, and total PKC activity compared with growth hormone (GH) adenomas (P < 0.05). Chronic stimulation of null cell adenomas with gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone or of one GH adenoma with GH-releasing hormone for 7 days did not significantly alter total PKC activity in pituitary cells cultured in serum-free medium. Localization of the calcium-dependent PKC isozymes (alpha, beta and gamma) by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed predominantly PKC alpha in all adenomas and variable expression of PKC beta and gamma in some tumors. When the calcium-independent PKC isozymes (delta, epsilon, and zeta) were localized by in situ hybridization, normal and neoplastic pituitaries expressed abundant mRNA for PKC epsilon, whereas some tumors and one normal pituitary had a few cells positive for PKC zeta mRNA as evaluated by grain density and the number of cells labeled. These results indicate that there is a variable distribution of PKC mRNA isozymes in human pituitary adenomas and that normal pituitaries and pituitary adenoma cells express the mRNA for both the calcium-dependent and some of the calcium-independent PKC isozymes. Chronic treatment with the hypothalamic gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone and GH-releasing hormone, which increased LH/FSH and GH secretion, respectively, did not increase PKC activity in cultured adenoma cells. The presence of calcium-dependent and calcium-independent PKC isozymes in normal and neoplastic pituitary cells indicates that PKC probably plays a

  4. Restoration of Dioxin-Induced Damage to Fetal Steroidogenesis and Gonadotropin Formation by Maternal Co-Treatment with α-Lipoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Takayuki; Ishida, Takumi; Takeda, Tomoki; Ishii, Yuji; Uchi, Hiroshi; Tsukimori, Kiyomi; Yamamoto, Midori; Himeno, Masaru; Furue, Masutaka; Yamada, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an endocrine disruptor, causes reproductive and developmental toxic effects in pups following maternal exposure in a number of animal models. Our previous studies have demonstrated that TCDD imprints sexual immaturity by suppressing the expression of fetal pituitary gonadotropins, the regulators of gonadal steroidogenesis. In the present study, we discovered that all TCDD-produced damage to fetal production of pituitary gonadotropins as well as testicular steroidogenesis can be repaired by co-treating pregnant rats with α-lipoic acid (LA), an obligate co-factor for intermediary metabolism including energy production. While LA also acts as an anti-oxidant, other anti-oxidants; i.e., ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxyanisole and edaravone, failed to exhibit any beneficial effects. Neither wasting syndrome nor CYP1A1 induction in the fetal brain caused through the activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) could be attenuated by LA. These lines of evidence suggest that oxidative stress makes only a minor contribution to the TCDD-induced disorder of fetal steroidogenesis, and LA has a restorative effect by targeting on mechanism(s) other than AhR activation. Following a metabolomic analysis, it was found that TCDD caused a more marked change in the hypothalamus, a pituitary regulator, than in the pituitary itself. Although the components of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the ATP content of the fetal hypothalamus were significantly changed by TCDD, all these changes were again rectified by exogenous LA. We also provided evidence that the fetal hypothalamic content of endogenous LA is significantly reduced following maternal exposure to TCDD. Thus, the data obtained strongly suggest that TCDD reduces the expression of fetal pituitary gonadotropins to imprint sexual immaturity or disturb development by suppressing the level of LA, one of the key players serving energy production. PMID:22911699

  5. Molecular Imaging of Pituitary Pathology.

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2016-01-01

    The presence of large numbers and/or the high affinity of dopamine D2 and/or somatostatin receptors on pituitary adenomas may enable their visualization with radionuclide-coupled receptor agonists or antagonists. However, the role of these imaging modalities in the differential diagnosis of or therapeutic purposes for pituitary lesions is very limited. Only in very specific cases might these molecular imaging techniques become helpful. These include the differential diagnosis of pituitary lesions, ectopic production of pituitary hormones, such as adrenocorticotrophic hormone, growth hormone (GH) or their releasing hormones (corticotropin-releasing hormone and GH-releasing hormone), and the localization of metastases from pituitary carcinomas. PMID:27002335

  6. Pituitary cells in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Shellenberger, K.; Grindeland, R.

    1994-01-01

    Cells of the mammalian pituitary gland synthesize and secrete several protein hormones which regulate a number of organ systems throughout the body. These include the musculoskeletal, immune, vascular and endocrine systems. Since changes occur in these tissues as a result of spaceflight, and since pituitary growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in the control of these systems on earth, we have focused attention over the last 10 years on GH and PRL cell function during and after spaceflight. The cumulative results of 4 spaceflight missions and several mimicked microgravity experiments establish 1) that production and release of biologically active GH and PRL is repeatedly and significantly attenuated (usually >50%) and 2) that changes in cell morphology also occur. In this paper we describe our results within the framework of methodologies and approaches frequently used to study pituitary cell function on earth. In so doing we hope to develop future flight experiments aimed at uncovering possible microgravity 'sensing systems' within the pituitary cell.

  7. Pituitary aspergillus infection.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lauren A; Erstine, Emily M; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-07-01

    Fungal infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a pituitary or sellar mass, albeit fungal infections involving the pituitary gland and sella are a rare occurrence. We report a case of Aspergillus infection involving the pituitary gland and sellar region discovered in a 74-year-old man. The patient had a history of hypertension, chronic renal disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and presented with right eye pain, headaches and worsening hemiparesis. Imaging studies revealed a right internal carotid artery occlusion and an acute right pontine stroke along with smaller infarcts in the right middle cerebral artery distribution. Clinically, the patient was thought to have vasculitis. An infectious etiology was not identified. He developed respiratory distress and died. At autopsy, necrotizing meningitis was discovered. A predominantly chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate consisting of benign-appearing lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophages was accompanied by acute angle branching, angioinvasive hyphae which were highlighted on Gomori methenamine silver staining and were morphologically consistent with Aspergillus species. In previously reported cases of Aspergillus infection involving the pituitary or sella, most presented with headaches or impaired vision and were not immunocompromised. A transsphenoidal surgical approach is recommended in suspected cases in order to minimize the risk of dissemination of the infection. Some patients have responded well to antifungal medications once diagnosed. PMID:26896907

  8. Pituitary Disorders and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Jawiarczyk-Przybyłowska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Various hormonal disorders can influence bone metabolism and cause secondary osteoporosis. The consequence of this is a significant increase of fracture risk. Among pituitary disorders such effects are observed in patients with Cushing's disease, hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly, and hypopituitarism. Severe osteoporosis is the result of the coexistence of some of these disorders and hypogonadism at the same time, which is quite often. PMID:25873948

  9. Pituitary cells in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Shellenberger, K.; Grindeland, R.

    1994-08-01

    Cells of the mammalian pituitary gland synthesize and secrete several protein hormones which regulate a number of organ systems throughout the body. These include the musculoskeletal, immune, vascular and endocrine systems. Since changes occur in these tissues as a result of spaceflight, and since pituitary growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in the control of these systems on earth, we have focused attention over the last 10 years on GH and PRL cell function during and after spaceflight. The cumulative results of 4 spaceflight missions and several mimicked microgravity (μG) experiments establish 1) that production and release of biologically active GH and PRL is repeatedly and significantly attenuated (usually > 50%) and 2) that changes in cell morphology also occur. In this paper we describe our results within the framework of methodologies and approaches frequently used to study pituitary cell function on earth. In so doing we hope to develop future flight experiments aimed at uncovering possible μG ``sensing systems'' within the pituitary cell.

  10. Molecular characterization of three gonadotropin subunits and their expression patterns during ovarian maturation in Cynoglossus semilaevis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bao; Liu, Xuezhou; Xu, Yongjiang; Wang, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine regulation of reproduction in a multiple spawning flatfish with an ovary of asynchronous development remains largely unknown. The objectives of this study were to monitor changes in mRNA expression patterns of three gonadotropin hormone (GTH) subunits (FSHβ, LHβ and CGα) and plasma GTH levels during ovarian maturation of half-smooth tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis. Cloning and sequence analysis revealed that the cDNAs of FSHβ, LHβ and CGα were 541, 670 and 685 bp in length, and encode for peptides of 130, 158 and 127 amino acids, respectively. The number of cysteine residues and potential N-linked glycosylation sites of the flatfish GTHs were conserved among teleosts. However, the primary structure of GTHs in Pleuronectiformes appeared to be highly divergent. The FSHβ transcriptional level in the pituitary remained high during the vitellogenic stage while plasma levels of FSH peaked and oocyte development was stimulated. The LHβ expression in the pituitary and ovary reached the maximum level during oocyte maturation stages when the plasma levels of LH peaked. The brain GTHs were expressed at the different ovarian stages. These results suggested that FSH and LH may simultaneously regulate ovarian development and maturation through the brain-pituitary-ovary axis endocrine system in tongue sole. PMID:25633101

  11. Molecular Characterization of Three Gonadotropin Subunits and Their Expression Patterns during Ovarian Maturation in Cynoglossus semilaevis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bao; Liu, Xuezhou; Xu, Yongjiang; Wang, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine regulation of reproduction in a multiple spawning flatfish with an ovary of asynchronous development remains largely unknown. The objectives of this study were to monitor changes in mRNA expression patterns of three gonadotropin hormone (GTH) subunits (FSHβ, LHβ and CGα) and plasma GTH levels during ovarian maturation of half-smooth tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis. Cloning and sequence analysis revealed that the cDNAs of FSHβ, LHβ and CGα were 541, 670 and 685 bp in length, and encode for peptides of 130, 158 and 127 amino acids, respectively. The number of cysteine residues and potential N-linked glycosylation sites of the flatfish GTHs were conserved among teleosts. However, the primary structure of GTHs in Pleuronectiformes appeared to be highly divergent. The FSHβ transcriptional level in the pituitary remained high during the vitellogenic stage while plasma levels of FSH peaked and oocyte development was stimulated. The LHβ expression in the pituitary and ovary reached the maximum level during oocyte maturation stages when the plasma levels of LH peaked. The brain GTHs were expressed at the different ovarian stages. These results suggested that FSH and LH may simultaneously regulate ovarian development and maturation through the brain-pituitary-ovary axis endocrine system in tongue sole. PMID:25633101

  12. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Suppresses Gonadotropin-Stimulated Estradiol Release from Zebrafish Ovarian Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, Derek; Ings, Jennifer S.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2009-01-01

    While stress is known to impact reproductive performance, the pathways involved are not entirely understood. Corticosteroid effects on the functioning of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis are thought to be a key aspect of stress-mediated reproductive dysfunction. A vital component of the stress response is the pituitary secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which binds to the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) in the adrenal glands and activates cortisol biosynthesis. We recently reported MC2R mRNA abundance in fish gonads leading to the hypothesis that ACTH may be directly involved in gonadal steroid modulation. Using zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian follicles, we tested the hypothesis that acute ACTH stimulation modulates cortisol and estradiol (E2) secretion. ACTH neither affected cortisol nor unstimulated E2 release from ovarian follicles. However, ACTH suppressed human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated E2 secretion in a dose-related manner, with a maximum decrease of 62% observed at 1 I.U. ACTH mL−1. This effect of ACTH on E2 release was not observed in the presence of either 8-bromo-cAMP or forskolin, suggesting that the mechanism(s) involved in steroid attenuation was upstream of adenylyl cyclase activation. Overall, our results suggest that a stress-induced rise in plasma ACTH levels may initiate a rapid down-regulation of acute stimulated E2 biosynthesis in the zebrafish ovary, underscoring a novel physiological role for this pituitary peptide in modulating reproductive activity. PMID:19649243

  13. Experimental and computational study of inter- and intra- species specificity of gonadotropins for various gonadotropin receptors.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Joseph; Kowalsman, Noga; Kobayashi, Makito; Hollander, Lian; Sohn, Young Chang; Yoshizaki, Goro; Niv, Masha Y; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2012-11-25

    The gonadotropins follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) and their receptors play critical roles in vertebrate reproduction. In order to study intra- and interspecies ligand promiscuity of gonadotropins, COS-7 cells were transiently transfected with one of the gonadotropin receptor genes, FSHR or LHR, and tested for activation by gonadotropins from representative fish orders: Aquilliformes (eel; e), Salmoniformes (trout; tr), and Perciformes (tilapia; ta), and of mammalian origin: porcine (p), bovine (b) and human (h). The study reveals complex relations between the gonadotropin hormones and their receptors. Each gonadotropin activated its own cognate receptor. However, taLHR was also activated by hCG and eLHR was activated by hFSH, hCG, and trFSH. For FSHR, the only cross-reactivity detected was for hFSHR, which was activated by pFSH and bFSH. These findings are of great interest and applicability in the context of activation of various GTHRs by their ligands and by ligands from other vertebrates. Analysis of the three-dimensional models of the structures highlights the importance of residues outside of the currently established hormone-receptor interface region. In addition, the interface residues in taFSHR and the effect of exon duplication, which causes an insert in the LRR domain, are suggested to affect the interaction and binding of taFSH. PMID:22954681

  14. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....25 I.U. per kilogram of body weight per day. (b) Tolerances. A tolerance for residues of...

  15. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....25 I.U. per kilogram of body weight per day. (b) Tolerances. A tolerance for residues of...

  16. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....25 I.U. per kilogram of body weight per day. (b) Tolerances. A tolerance for residues of...

  17. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs §...

  18. 21 CFR 556.304 - Gonadotropin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gonadotropin. 556.304 Section 556.304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....25 I.U. per kilogram of body weight per day. (b) Tolerances. A tolerance for residues of...

  19. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Pituitary Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sapochnik, Melanie; Nieto, Leandro Eduardo; Fuertes, Mariana; Arzt, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, progress has been made on the identification of mechanisms involved in anterior pituitary cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Oncogene activation, tumor suppressor gene inactivation, epigenetic changes, and microRNAs deregulation contribute to the initiation of pituitary tumors. Despite the high prevalence of pituitary adenomas, they are mostly benign, indicating that intrinsic mechanisms may regulate pituitary cell expansion. Senescence is characterized by an irreversible cell cycle arrest and represents an important protective mechanism against malignancy. Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) is an oncogene involved in early stages of pituitary tumor development, and also triggers a senescence response by activating DNA-damage signaling pathway. Cytokines, as well as many other factors, play an important role in pituitary physiology, affecting not only cell proliferation but also hormone secretion. Special interest is focused on interleukin-6 (IL-6) because its dual function of stimulating pituitary tumor cell growth but inhibiting normal pituitary cells proliferation. It has been demonstrated that IL-6 has a key role in promoting and maintenance of the senescence program in tumors. Senescence, triggered by PTTG activation and mediated by IL-6, may be a mechanism for explaining the benign nature of pituitary tumors. PMID:26718581

  20. Identification of Human GnIH Homologs, RFRP-1 and RFRP-3, and the Cognate Receptor, GPR147 in the Human Hypothalamic Pituitary Axis

    PubMed Central

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Morgan, Kevin; Pawson, Adam J.; Osugi, Tomohiro; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S.; Minakata, Hiroyuki; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Millar, Robert P.; Bentley, George E.

    2009-01-01

    The existence of a hypothalamic gonadotropin-inhibiting system has been elusive. A neuropeptide named gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH, SIKPSAYLPLRF-NH2) which directly inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release from the pituitary was recently identified in quail hypothalamus. Here we identify GnIH homologs in the human hypothalamus and characterize their distribution and biological activity. GnIH homologs were isolated from the human hypothalamus by immunoaffinity purification, and then identified as MPHSFANLPLRF-NH2 (human RFRP-1) and VPNLPQRF-NH2 (human RFRP-3) by mass spectrometry. Immunocytochemistry revealed GnIH-immunoreactive neuronal cell bodies in the dorsomedial region of the hypothalamus with axonal projections to GnRH neurons in the preoptic area as well as to the median eminence. RT-PCR and subsequent DNA sequencing of the PCR products identified human GnIH receptor (GPR147) mRNA expression in the hypothalamus as well as in the pituitary. In situ hybridization further identified the expression of GPR147 mRNA in luteinizing hormone producing cells (gonadotropes). Human RFRP-3 has recently been shown to be a potent inhibitor of gonadotropin secretion in cultured sheep pituitary cells by inhibiting Ca2+ mobilization. It also directly modulates GnRH neuron firing. The identification of two forms of GnIH (RFRP-1 and RFRP-3) in the human hypothalamus which targets human GnRH neurons and gonadotropes and potently inhibit gonadotropin in sheep models provides a new paradigm for the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in man and a novel means for manipulating reproductive functions. PMID:20027225

  1. Pituitary stalk tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Stalldecker, Graciela; Diez, Sabrina; Carabelli, Alejandra; Reynoso, Roxana; Rey, Raul; Hofmann, Nestor; Beresñak, Alejandro

    2002-01-01

    Pituitary tuberculomas are exceptionally rare. Even with no evidence of systemic tuberculosis, it is important to recognize these lesions in the differential diagnosis of the intrasuprasellar tumors because they are curable. At present, in developed countries the frequency of intracranial tuberculomas of nervous system tumors is around 0.5-4%, whereas in under developed countries is 15-30%. It mainly affects children and young adults. In some cases, an accurate diagnosis may lead to an efficient medical therapy on the basis of biological, hormonal and imaging scans examinations. The case we studied shows the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis of a thickened stalk having normal pituitary image. It is to be highlighted the usage of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique. PMID:12812306

  2. Gonadotropins in the Russian Sturgeon: Their Role in Steroid Secretion and the Effect of Hormonal Treatment on Their Secretion.

    PubMed

    Yom-Din, Svetlana; Hollander-Cohen, Lian; Aizen, Joseph; Boehm, Benjamin; Shpilman, Michal; Golan, Matan; Hurvitz, Avshalom; Degani, Gad; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2016-01-01

    In the reproduction process of male and female fish, pituitary derived gonadotropins (GTHs) play a key role. To be able to specifically investigate certain functions of Luteinizing (LH) and Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in Russian sturgeon (Acipenser gueldenstaedtii; st), we produced recombinant variants of the hormones using the yeast Pichia pastoris as a protein production system. We accomplished to create in vitro biologically active heterodimeric glycoproteins consisting of two associated α- and β-subunits in sufficient quantities. Three dimensional modelling of both GTHs was conducted in order to study the differences between the two GTHs. Antibodies were produced against the unique β-subunit of each of the GTHs, in order to be used for immunohistochemical analysis and to develop an ELISA for blood and pituitary hormone quantification. This detection technique revealed the specific localization of the LH and FSH cells in the sturgeon pituitary and pointed out that both cell types are present in substantially higher numbers in mature males and females, compared to immature fish. With the newly attained option to prevent cross-contamination when investigating on the effects of GTH administration, we compared the steroidogeneic response (estradiol and 11-Keto testosterone (11-KT) in female and males, respectively) of recombinant stLH, stFSH, and carp pituitary extract in male and female sturgeon gonads at different developmental stages. Finally, we injected commercially available gonadotropin releasing hormones analog (GnRH) to mature females, and found a moderate effect on the development of ovarian follicles. Application of only testosterone (T) resulted in a significant increase in circulating levels of 11-KT whereas the combination of GnRH + T did not affect steroid levels at all. The response pattern for estradiol demonstrated a similar situation. FSH levels showed significant increases when GnRH + T was administered, while no changes were present in

  3. Familial pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Vandeva, S; Vasilev, V; Vroonen, L; Naves, L; Jaffrain-Rea, M-L; Daly, A F; Zacharieva, S; Beckers, A

    2010-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign intracranial neoplasms that present a major clinical concern because of hormonal overproduction or compression symptoms of adjacent structures. Most arise in a sporadic setting with a small percentage developing as a part of familial syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Carney complex (CNC), and the recently described familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and MEN-4. While the genetic alterations responsible for the formation of sporadic adenomas remain largely unknown, considerable advances have been made in defining culprit genes in these familial syndromes. Mutations in MEN1 and PRKAR1A genes are found in the majority of MEN1 and CNC patients, respectively. About 15% of FIPA kindreds present with mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene. Mutations in the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip)¹ were identified in MEN4 cases. Familial tumours appear to differ from their sporadic counterparts not only in genetic basis but also in clinical characteristics. Evidence suggests that, especially in MEN1 and FIPA, they are more aggressive and affect patients at younger age, therefore justifying the importance of early diagnosis. In this review, we summarize the genetic and clinical characteristics of these familial pituitary adenomas. PMID:20961530

  4. Expression of three gonadotropin subunits and gonadotropin receptor mRNA during male-to-female sex change in the cinnamon clownfish, Amphiprion melanopus.

    PubMed

    An, Kwang Wook; Lee, Jehee; Choi, Cheol Young

    2010-08-01

    To quantify the sex-change progression from male to female in the cinnamon clownfish, Amphiprion melanopus, we divided gonadal development into three stages (I, mature male; II, male at 90 days after removal of the female; and III, mature female), and the expression of GTH subunits and GTH receptors during each of these stages was investigated. The mRNA of the three GTH subunits and their receptors increased with progression from male to female. To understand the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) on this progression, we examined expression of genes encoding the GTH subunit mRNA in the pituitary and the GTH-receptor mRNA in the gonads in addition to investigating changes in plasma E(2) levels after GnRH analogue (GnRHa) injection. GnRHa treatment increased mRNA expression levels of these genes, as well as plasma E(2) levels, indicating that GnRH plays an important regulatory role in the brain-pituitary-gonad axis of immature cinnamon clownfish. PMID:20348005

  5. Synchronous pituitary adenoma and pituicytoma.

    PubMed

    Neidert, Marian C; Leske, Henning; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Kollias, Spyros S; Capper, David; Schrimpf, Daniel; Regli, Luca; Rushing, Elisabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Pituicytoma is a rare benign neoplasm arising in the sellar region, usually found in the posterior lobe and/or pituitary stalk. Here, we report the case of a 67-year-old woman who presented with bitemporal hemianopsia and visual impairment accompanied by mildly elevated prolactin. Pathologic and molecular examination of the tissue removed transsphenoidally revealed 2 distinct tumors: pituitary adenoma and pituicytoma. To the best of our knowledge, histologically proven pituicytoma and pituitary adenoma have never been reported together. PMID:26476569

  6. Influence of hormonal contraceptives on the pituitary response to LH/FSH-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Carol, W; Lauterbach, H; Klinger, G; Möller, R

    1978-03-01

    In the pre-ovulatory phase the absolute and relative LH increase was much greater than during the luteal phase and less pronounced in the early follicular phase of the normal cycle. FSH release was affected only during the pre-ovulatory period, where a retarded, 3- or 4-fold increase compared to basal levels was recorded. In the women taking oral contraceptives of the conventional type the first LH-RH test showed gonadotropin responses similar to those obtained during the luteal phase of the controls. The second test brought a significantly lower LH response, suggesting an increasing exogenous steroid inhibition at the pituitary level in the course of the therapeutic cycle. This inhibition seems to be reversed during the monthly tablet-free interval. A particularly small and retarded gonadotropin response was observed in patients taking Deposiston. These results are discussed as to their clinical significance. PMID:357145

  7. Exposure of tilapia pituitary cells to saponins: insight into their mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Levavi-Sivan, Berta; Hedvat, Rachel; Kanias, Tamir; Francis, George; Becker, Klaus; Kerem, Zohar

    2005-01-01

    Cell permeation and durable effects of triterpenoidal saponin preparations from soybean (SbS), Quillaja saponaria Molina (QsS) and Gypsophila paniculata (GypS), were studied. A concentration-dependent change in hemolysis rates was observed when cells were incubated with QsS or GypS, but not with SbS. Dose dependence was also observed for the leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; MW 142,000) and of Luteinizing Hormone (LH; MW 35,000) from tilapia pituitary dispersed cells. Exposure of pituitary fragments to a combination of GnRH and GypS or QsS, resulted in a significantly high release of LH. GypS were shown to be more potent in inducing hemolysis of human RBC's and LH release from tilapia pituitary fragments. Interestingly, tilapia pituitary fragments treated with QsS were able to secrete LH in a characteristic manner, in response to a second Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) pulse, while fragments exposed to GypS did not respond to the second hormone pulse. The rapid recovery of pituitary fragments after the removal of QsS, may suggest a rearrangement of membranes rather than pore formation as the mechanism of action of QsS. Understanding the structural features underlying the reversible rearrangement of membranes and the lack of hemolysing activity by specific saponins may lead to the development of novel bioactive drugs. PMID:15792626

  8. Anti-Müllerian hormone: a new actor of sexual dimorphism in pituitary gonadotrope activity before puberty

    PubMed Central

    Garrel, Ghislaine; Racine, Chrystèle; L’Hôte, David; Denoyelle, Chantal; Guigon, Céline J.; di Clemente, Nathalie; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joëlle

    2016-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) contributes to male sexual differentiation and acts on gonads of both sexes. Identification of AMH receptivity in both pituitary and brain has led to the intriguing idea that AMH participates to the hypothalamic-pituitary control of reproduction, however in vivo experimental evidence is still lacking. We show that AMH stimulates secretion and pituitary gene expression of the gonadotropin FSH in vivo in rats. AMH action is sex-dependent, being restricted to females and occurring before puberty. Accordingly, we report higher levels of pituitary AMH receptor transcripts in immature females. We show that AMH is functionally coupled to the Smad pathway in LβT2 gonadotrope cells and dose-dependently increases Fshb transcript levels. Furthermore, AMH was shown to establish complex interrelations with canonical FSH regulators as it cooperates with activin to induce Fshb expression whereas it reduces BMP2 action. We report that GnRH interferes with AMH by decreasing AMH receptivity in vivo in females. Moreover, AMH specifically regulates FSH and not LH, indicating that AMH is a factor contributing to the differential regulation of gonadotropins. Overall, our study uncovers a new role for AMH in regulating gonadotrope function and suggests that AMH participates in the postnatal elevation of FSH secretion in females. PMID:27030385

  9. Potential Diagnostic Utility of Intermittent Short-Acting GnRH Agonist Administration in Gonadotropin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Carrie A.; Ehrmann, David A; Rosenfield, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The objective was to determine if intermittent, low-dose, short-acting GnRH agonist (GnRHag) administration up-regulates pituitary-gonadal function in gonadotropin deficiency (GnD) sufficiently to be of diagnostic or therapeutic value. Design/Intervention Low-dose leuprolide acetate was administered SC at 4–5 d intervals up to one year. Patients Adult volunteers and GnD patients were studied. Setting The studies were performed in a General Clinical Research Center. Main Outcome Measures LH, FSH, and sex steroid responses were determined. Results In normal men and women, low-dose GnRHag repetitively transiently stimulated gonadotropins in a gender-dimorphic manner. In congenitally GnD deficient men (n=6) and women (n=1), none of whom had a normal LH response to an initial GnRHag test dose, this regimen consistently stimulated LH to the normal baseline range within two weeks. Long-term GnRHag administration to a partially GnD man did not alleviate hypogonadism, however. Women with hypothalamic amenorrhea (n=2) responded normally to a single GnRHag injection; however, repeated dosing did not seem to induce the normal priming effect. Conclusions The subnormal LH response to GnRHag of congenital GnD normalized in response to repetitive intermittent GnRHag, but not sufficiently to improve hypogonadism. Hypothalamic amenorrhea patients lacked the priming response to repeated GnRHag, but otherwise had normal hormonal responses to GnRHag. We conclude that intermittent administration of a short-acting GnRHag is of potential diagnostic value in distinguishing hypothalamic from pituitary causes of GnD. PMID:20553679

  10. Three gonadotropin-releasing hormone genes in one organism suggest novel roles for an ancient peptide.

    PubMed Central

    White, S A; Kasten, T L; Bond, C T; Adelman, J P; Fernald, R D

    1995-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is known and named for its essential role in vertebrate reproduction. Release of this decapeptide from neurons in the hypothalamus controls pituitary gonadotropin levels which, in turn, regulate gonadal state. The importance of GnRH is underscored by its widespread expression and conservation across vertebrate taxa: five amino acids are invariant in all nine known forms, whereas two others show only conservative changes. In most eutherian mammals, only one form, expressed in the hypothalamus, is thought to exist, although in a recent report, antibody staining in developing primates suggests an additional form. In contrast, multiple GnRH forms and expression loci have been reported in many non-mammalian vertebrates. However, evidence based on immunological discrimination does not always agree with analysis of gene expression, since GnRH forms encoded by different genes may not be reliably distinguished by antibodies. Here we report the expression of three distinct GnRH genes in a teleost fish brain, including the sequence encoding a novel GnRH preprohormone. Using in situ hybridization, we show that this form is found only in neurons that project to the pituitary and exhibit changes in soma size depending on social and reproductive state. The other two GnRH genes are expressed in other, distinct cell populations. All three genes share the motif of encoding a polypeptide consisting of GnRH and a GnRH-associated peptide. Whereas the GnRH moiety is highly conserved, the GnRH-associated peptides are not, reflecting differential selective pressure on different parts of the gene. GnRH forms expressed in nonhypothalamic regions may serve to coordinate reproductive activities of the animal. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7667296

  11. Optimisation of an oviposition protocol employing human chorionic and pregnant mare serum gonadotropins in the Barred Frog Mixophyes fasciolatus (Myobatrachidae)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protocols for the hormonal induction of ovulation and oviposition are essential tools for managing threatened amphibians with assisted reproduction, but responses vary greatly between species and even broad taxon groups. Consequently, it is necessary to assess effectiveness of such protocols in representative species when new taxa become targets for induction. The threatened genus Mixophyes (family Myobatrachidae) has amongst the highest proportion of endangered species of all the Australian amphibians. This study developed and optimised the induction of oviposition in a non-threatened member of this taxon, the great barred frog (Mixophyes fasciolatus). Methods Gravid female M. fasciolatus were induced to oviposit on one or more occasions by administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) with or without priming with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG). Treatments involved variations in hormone doses and combinations (administered via injection into the dorsal lymph sacs), and timing of administration. Pituitary homogenates from an unrelated bufonid species (Rhinella marina) were also examined with hCG. Results When injected alone, hCG (900 to 1400 IU) induced oviposition. However, priming with two time dependent doses of PMSG (50 IU, 25 IU) increased responses, with lower doses of hCG (200 IU). Priming increased response rates in females from around 30% (hCG alone) to more than 50% (p = 0.035), and up to 67%. Increasing the interval between the first PMSG dose and first hCG dose from 3 to 6 days also produced significant improvement (p<0.001). Heterologous pituitary extracts administered with hCG were no more effective than hCG alone (p = 0.628). Conclusions This study found that M. fasciolatus is amongst the few amphibian species (including Xenopus (Silurana) and some bufonids) that respond well to the induction of ovulation utilising mammalian gonadotropins (hCG). The optimal protocol for M. fasciolatus involved two priming doses of

  12. Imaging of pediatric pituitary endocrinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2012-01-01

    Accurate investigation of the hypothalamic-pituitary area is required in pediatric patients for diagnosis of endocrine-related disorders. These disorders include hypopituitarism, growth failure, diencephalic syndrome, delayed puberty, precocious puberty, diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion, and hyperpituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice to visualize hypothalamic-pituitary axis and associated endocrinopathies. Neuroimaging can be normal or disclose abnormalities related to pituitary-hypothalamic axis like (i) congenital and developmental malformations; (ii) tumors; (iii) cystic lesions; and (iv) infectious and inflammatory conditions. Classical midline anomalies like septo-optic dysplasias or corpus callosum agenesis are commonly associated with pituitary endocrinopathies and also need careful evaluation. In this radiological review, we will discuss neuroendocrine disorders related to hypothalamic pituitary-axis. PMID:23087850

  13. Development of specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determining LH and FSH levels in tilapia, using recombinant gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Joseph; Kasuto, Harel; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2007-01-01

    We recently produced Oreochromis niloticus recombinant LH and FSH as single-chain polypeptides in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Glycoprotein subunit alpha was joined with tilapia (t) LHbeta or tFSHbeta mature protein-coding sequences to form a fusion gene that encodes a ;;tethered" polypeptide, in which the gonadotropin beta-subunit forms the N-terminal part and the alpha-subunit forms the C-terminal part. Recombinant (r) gonadotropins were used to develop specific and homologous competitive ELISAs for measurements of FSH and LH in the plasma and pituitary of tilapia, using primary antibodies against rtLHbeta or rtFSHbeta, respectively, and rtLHbetaalpha or rtFSHbetaalpha for the standard curves. The wells were coated with either rtLHbeta (2ng/ml) or rtFSHbeta (0.5ng/well), and the final concentrations of the antisera were 1:5000 (for tLH) or 1:50,000 (for tFSH). The sensitivity of the assay was 15.84pg/ml for tLH and 0.24pg/ml for tFSH measurements in the plasma, whereas for the measurements in the pituitary, the sensitivity was 2.43ng/ml and 1.52ng/ml for tLH and tFSH, respectively. The standard curves for tFSH and tLH paralleled those of serially diluted pituitary extracts of other cichlids, as well as of serially diluted pituitary extract of seabream, European seabass and hybrid bass. We examined plasma tFSH and tLH levels in the course of one reproductive cycle, between two successive spawnings, in three individual tilapia females. Plasma levels of both FSH and LH increased during the second day after the eggs had been removed, probably related to the vitellogenic phase. LH levels increased toward spawning, which occurred on the 11th day. FSH levels also increased on day of cycle, probably due to recruitment of a new generation of follicles for the successive spawning. The development of specific ELISAs using recombinant gonadotropins is expected to advance the study of the distinct functions of each of these important hormones. PMID:17507016

  14. Modeling the brain-pituitary-gonad axis in salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jonghan; Hayton, William L.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2006-08-24

    To better understand the complexity of the brain-pituitary-gonad axis (BPG) in fish, we developed a biologically based pharmacodynamic model capable of accurately predicting the normal functioning of the BPG axis in salmon. This first-generation model consisted of a set of 13 equations whose formulation was guided by published values for plasma concentrations of pituitary- (FSH, LH) and ovary- (estradiol, 17a,20b-dihydroxy-4-pregnene-3-one) derived hormones measured in Coho salmon over an annual spawning period. In addition, the model incorporated pertinent features of previously published mammalian models and indirect response pharmacodynamic models. Model-based equations include a description of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) synthesis and release from the hypothalamus, which is controlled by environmental variables such as photoperiod and water temperature. GnRH stimulated the biosynthesis of mRNA for FSH and LH, which were also influenced by estradiol concentration in plasma. The level of estradiol in the plasma was regulated by the oocytes, which moved along a maturation progression. Estradiol was synthesized at a basal rate and as oocytes matured, stimulation of its biosynthesis occurred. The BPG model can be integrated with toxico-genomic, -proteomic data, allowing linkage between molecular based biomarkers and reproduction in fish.

  15. Production and characterization of antibodies to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Hazum, E; Schvartz, I; Popliker, M

    1987-01-15

    Antibodies to the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor of bovine pituitary membranes have been raised in rabbits by immunization with affinity-purified receptor preparations. These antibodies did not compete with 125I-labeled GnRH analog (Buserelin) for binding to the receptors but did precipitate rat and bovine solubilized receptors labeled with 125I-Buserelin. Binding of the antibodies to the receptors was also demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of 125I-labeled purified receptors and photoaffinity-labeled receptors. The antibodies did not have a GnRH-like activity but rather inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, GnRH-stimulated luteinizing hormone release from cultured rat pituitary cells. In addition, the antibodies did not inhibit luteinizing hormone release stimulated by high K+ concentration. This suggests that the antibodies recognize domains of the receptor other than the binding site of the hormone and thereby inhibit the biological response. These GnRH receptor antibodies provide a useful tool for studying GnRH receptor structure, function, localization, and biosynthesis. PMID:3027055

  16. Nesfatin-1 regulates the hypothalamo-pituitary-ovarian axis of fish.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ronald; Shepperd, Erin; Thiruppugazh, Vetri; Lohan, Sneha; Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P; Unniappan, Suraj

    2012-10-01

    Nesfatin-1 is an anorexigen in goldfish. In the present study, we provide novel data indicating the presence and regulatory effects of nesfatin-1 on the hypothalamo-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis of goldfish. Nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2)/nesfatin-1-like immunoreactive (ir) cells are present in the hypothalamus and in the pituitary, suggesting a hypophysiotropic role for nesfatin-1. NUCB2/nesfatin-1-like ir cells colocalize gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the nucleus lateralis tuberis posterioris and the nucleus anterior tuberis of the goldfish hypothalamus. The presence of nesfatin-1 with GnRH in these two nuclei implicated in pituitary hormone release suggests a role for nesfatin-1 on gonadotropin secretion. A single i.p. injection of synthetic goldfish nesfatin-1 (50 ng/g body wt) resulted in an acute decrease (∼75%) in the expression of hypothalamic chicken GnRH-II and salmon GnRH mRNAs at 15 min postinjection in goldfish. Meanwhile, pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) beta and follicle-stimulating hormone beta mRNAs were also inhibited (∼80%), but only at 60 min postinjection. Nesfatin-1 administration also resulted in a significant reduction (∼60%) in serum LH levels at 60 min postadministration. Nesfatin-1-like immunoreactivity was also found in the follicle cells, but not the oocytes, in zebrafish and goldfish ovaries. Incubation of zebrafish follicles with nesfatin-1 resulted in a significant reduction in basal germinal vesicle breakdown (∼50%) during the oocyte maturation. In addition, nesfatin-1 also attenuated the stimulatory effects of maturation-inducing hormone on germinal vesicle breakdown. Together, the current results indicate that nesfatin-1 is a metabolic hormone with an inhibitory tone on fish reproduction. Nesfatin-1 appears to elicit this suppressive effect through actions on all three tissues in the fish HPO axis. PMID:22895855

  17. Electrotonic Coupling in the Pituitary Supports the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in a Sex Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Göngrich, Christina; García-González, Diego; Le Magueresse, Corentin; Roth, Lena C.; Watanabe, Yasuhito; Burks, Deborah J.; Grinevich, Valery; Monyer, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are present in many cell types throughout the animal kingdom and allow fast intercellular electrical and chemical communication between neighboring cells. Connexin-36 (Cx36), the major neuronal gap junction protein, synchronizes cellular activity in the brain, but also in other organs. Here we identify a sex-specific role for Cx36 within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at the level of the anterior pituitary gland (AP). We show that Cx36 is expressed in gonadotropes of the AP sustaining their synchronous activity. Cx36 ablation affects the entire downstream HPG axis in females, but not in males. We demonstrate that Cx36-mediated coupling between gonadotropes in the AP supports gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone. Furthermore, we provide evidence for negative feedback regulation of Cx36 expression in the AP by estradiol. We thus, conclude that hormonally-controlled plasticity of gap junction communication at the level of the AP constitutes an additional mechanism affecting female reproduction. PMID:27587994

  18. Electrotonic Coupling in the Pituitary Supports the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in a Sex Specific Manner.

    PubMed

    Göngrich, Christina; García-González, Diego; Le Magueresse, Corentin; Roth, Lena C; Watanabe, Yasuhito; Burks, Deborah J; Grinevich, Valery; Monyer, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are present in many cell types throughout the animal kingdom and allow fast intercellular electrical and chemical communication between neighboring cells. Connexin-36 (Cx36), the major neuronal gap junction protein, synchronizes cellular activity in the brain, but also in other organs. Here we identify a sex-specific role for Cx36 within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at the level of the anterior pituitary gland (AP). We show that Cx36 is expressed in gonadotropes of the AP sustaining their synchronous activity. Cx36 ablation affects the entire downstream HPG axis in females, but not in males. We demonstrate that Cx36-mediated coupling between gonadotropes in the AP supports gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone. Furthermore, we provide evidence for negative feedback regulation of Cx36 expression in the AP by estradiol. We thus, conclude that hormonally-controlled plasticity of gap junction communication at the level of the AP constitutes an additional mechanism affecting female reproduction. PMID:27587994

  19. Gonadotropin Surge-inhibiting/attenuating Factors: A Review of Current Evidence, Potential Applications, and Future Directions for Research

    PubMed Central

    VEGA, MARIO G.; ZAREK, SHVETHA M.; BHAGWAT, MEDHA; SEGARS, JAMES H.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Animal studies in the 1980s suggested the existence of an ovarian hormone, termed gonadotropin surge-inhibiting/attenuating factor (GnSIF/AF), that modulates pituitary secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH). Given the importance of identifying regulatory factors of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis and the accumulating data suggesting its existence, we conducted a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase to identify articles related to GnSIF/AF. The search generated 161 publications, of which 97 were included in this study. Several attempts have been made to identify and characterize this hormone and several candidates have been identified, but the protein sequences of these putative GnSIF/AF factors differ widely from one study to another. In addition, while the RF-amide RFRP-3 is known foremost as a neuropeptide, some research supports an ovarian origin for this non-steroidal hormone, thereby suggesting a role for RFRP-3 either as a co-modulator of GnSIF/AF or as a gonadotropin-inhibiting factor in the hypothalamus (GnIH). Discovery of the KNDy neurons that modulate GnRH secretion, on the other hand, further encourages the search for substance(s) that modulate their activity and that indirectly affect LH secretion and the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. While it has remained an elusive hormone, GnSIF/AF holds many potential applications for contraception, in vitro fertilization, and/or cancer as well as for understanding polycystic ovary syndrome, metabolic diseases, and/or pubertal development. In this review, we rigorously examine the available evidence regarding the existence of GnSIF/AF, previous attempts at its identification, limitations to its discovery, future directions of research, and potential clinical applications. PMID:25581424

  20. Endoscopic pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; de Divitiis, Oreste; Solari, Domenico; Esposito, Felice; Colao, Annamaria

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary surgery is a continuous evolving speciality of the neurosurgeons' armamentarium, which requires precise anatomical knowledge, technical skills and integrated appreciation of the pituitary pathophysiology. What we consider "pure" endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery is a procedure performed through the nose and the sphenoid bone, with the endoscope alone throughout the whole approach to visualize the surgical target area and without the use of any transsphenoidal retractor. It offers some advantages due to the endoscope itself: a superior close-up view of the relevant anatomy and an enlarged working angle are provided with an increased panoramic vision inside the surgical area. Concerning results in terms of mass removal, relief of clinical symptoms, cure of the underlying disease and complication rate, they are, at least, similar to those reported in the major microsurgical series, but patient compliance is by far better. Furthermore transsphenoidal endoscopy brings advantages to the patient (less nasal traumatism, no nasal packing, less post-op pain and usually quick recovery), to the surgeon (wider and closer view of the surgical target area, increase of the scientific activity as from the peer-reviewed literature on the topic in the last 10 years, smoothing of interdisciplinary cooperation), to the institution (shorter post-op hospital stay, increase of the case load). Besides, further progress and technological advance are expected from the close cooperation between different technologies and industries. Continuing works in such field of "minimalism" will offer further possibilities to provide the surgeon with even more effectiveness and safety, and, on the other hand, the patient with improvement of results. PMID:18286374

  1. The antigonadotropic activity of a 19-nor-progesterone derivative is exerted both at the hypothalamic and pituitary levels in women.

    PubMed

    Couzinet, B; Young, J; Kujas, M; Meduri, G; Brailly, S; Thomas, J L; Chanson, P; Schaison, G

    1999-11-01

    We have previously shown in postmenopausal women that a 19-nor-progesterone derivative, nomegestrol acetate (NOMA) had a strong antigonadotropic activity and that this effect was not mediated via the androgen receptor. The aim of the present study was to further assess the action of this progestin on gonadotropin secretion in women. To demonstrate at which level of the hypothalamo-pituitary-ovarian axis the gonadotropin inhibition was exerted, 10 normally cycling (NC) women, 3 women with a gonadotropin-independent ovarian function [McCune-Albright (MCA) syndrome], and 5 women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) participated in the study. NC women were treated orally with 5 mg NOMA for 21 days, after one control cycle. Plasma estradiol (E2) and progesterone, LH, and FSH levels were measured during each cycle. A frequent sampling study (every 10 min for 4 h), followed by a classic GnRH test (100 microg, i.v.), was performed on day 11. Women with MCA were studied before, during NOMA, and after long-acting GnRH agonist administration. In women with FHA, pulsatile GnRH (20 microg s.c., every 90 min) was given for two cycles with or without NOMA (5 mg for 21 days). In all NC women, ovulation was suppressed by NOMA. Mean plasma LH levels, LH pulse frequency, and the LH response to exogenous GnRH were significantly decreased. In MCA, neither NOMA nor GnRH agonist modified multiple ovarian cysts on ultrasound or plasma E2, levels which remained elevated, ruling out a direct ovarian effect. In FHA, pulsatile GnRH administration recreated a normal ovulatory menstrual cycle. Addition of NOMA prevented the increase of plasma E2, decreased the amplitude of LH pulses, and prevented ovulation. In view of this unexpected action of NOMA at the pituitary level, seven samples of normal human female pituitaries were tested for the presence of progesterone receptor (PR) using a double labeling immunocytochemical technique. The presence of PR was detected in the seven human

  2. Pituitary dysfunction after traumatic brain injury: a clinical and pathophysiological approach.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Fatih; Schneider, Harald Jörn; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Masel, Brent E; Casanueva, Felipe F; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing public health problem worldwide and is a leading cause of death and disability. The causes of TBI include motor vehicle accidents, which are the most common cause, falls, acts of violence, sports-related head traumas, and war accidents including blast-related brain injuries. Recently, pituitary dysfunction has also been described in boxers and kickboxers. Neuroendocrine dysfunction due to TBI was described for the first time in 1918. Only case reports and small case series were reported until 2000, but since then pituitary function in TBI victims has been investigated in more detail. The frequency of hypopituitarism after TBI varies widely among different studies (15-50% of the patients with TBI in most studies). The estimates of persistent hypopituitarism decrease to 12% if repeated testing is applied. GH is the most common hormone lost after TBI, followed by ACTH, gonadotropins (FSH and LH), and TSH. The underlying mechanisms responsible for pituitary dysfunction after TBI are not entirely clear; however, recent studies have shown that genetic predisposition and autoimmunity may have a role. Hypopituitarism after TBI may have a negative impact on the pace or degree of functional recovery and cognition. What is not clear is whether treatment of hypopituitarism has a beneficial effect on specific function. In this review, the current data related to anterior pituitary dysfunction after TBI in adult patients are updated, and guidelines for the diagnosis, follow-up strategies, and therapeutic approaches are reported. PMID:25950715

  3. Pituitary: Non-Secretory Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... categories—tumor mass effects and hyposecretion effects. Tumor mass effects Visual field disturbances, most commonly loss of ... surgery. The goal is to completely remove the mass or cyst and preserve normal pituitary, brain, and ...

  4. Animal models of pituitary neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lines, K.E.; Stevenson, M.; Thakker, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary neoplasias can occur as part of a complex inherited disorder, or more commonly as sporadic (non-familial) disease. Studies of the molecular and genetic mechanisms causing such pituitary tumours have identified dysregulation of >35 genes, with many revealed by studies in mice, rats and zebrafish. Strategies used to generate these animal models have included gene knockout, gene knockin and transgenic over-expression, as well as chemical mutagenesis and drug induction. These animal models provide an important resource for investigation of tissue-specific tumourigenic mechanisms, and evaluations of novel therapies, illustrated by studies into multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), a hereditary syndrome in which ∼30% of patients develop pituitary adenomas. This review describes animal models of pituitary neoplasia that have been generated, together with some recent advances in gene editing technologies, and an illustration of the use of the Men1 mouse as a pre clinical model for evaluating novel therapies. PMID:26320859

  5. Identification of spectrin as a calmodulin-binding component in the pituitary gonadotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Wooge, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide which stimulates the release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) from the pituitary. Ca{sup 2+} fulfills the requirements of a second messenger for this system. Inhibition of calmodulin will inhibit GnRH stimulated LH release. The aim of the present studies has been to identify the locus of action of calmodulin within the pituitary. By use of an {sup 125}I-calmodulin gel overlayer assay, five major Ca{sup 2+}-dependent {sup 125}I-calmodulin labelled components of subunit M{sub r} > 205,000; 200,000; 135,000; 60,000; and 52,000 have been identified. This labeling was found to be phenothiazine-sensitive. Ca{sup 2+}-independent binding that was observed appears to be due to hydrophobic interactions of calmodulin with acid-soluble proteins, principally histones. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent calmodulin-binding components are localized primarily in the cytosolic fraction. Separation of dispersed anterior pituitary cells through a linear Metrizamide gradient yielded gonadotrope-enriched fractions, which were found to contain all five {sup 125}I-calmodulin binding components corresponding to the major bands in the pituitary homogenate. The calmodulin-binding component levels do not appear to be differentially regulated by steroids. The calmodulin binding component with a M{sub r} > 205,000 has been identified as spectrin. Spectrin-like immunoreactivity and {sup 125}I-calmodulin-binding activity in pituitary tissue homogenates co-migrated in various percentage acrylamide gels with avian erythrocyte spectrin. Spectrin was detected in a gonadotrope-enriched fraction by immunoblotting, and confirmed in gonadotropes by indirect immunofluorescence of cultured pituitary cells in which spectrin- and LH-immunoreactivity co-localized.

  6. GnRH decreases adiponectin expression in pituitary gonadotropes via the calcium and PKA pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonathan; Zheng, Weiming; Grafer, Constance; Mann, Merry Lynn; Halvorson, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    As endocrinologically active cells, adipocytes are capable of secreting various adipocytokines such as leptin, resistin, and adiponectin to impact metabolic function. Although adipocytes remain to be the primary site of synthesis and secretion, there is now growing evidence that supports the presence of adiponectin and its receptors within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, providing a possible link between obesity and abnormal reproductive physiology. It has been demonstrated that adiponectin may reduce gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion from the hypothalamus as well as modulate gonadal steroid hormone production. Furthermore, prior data indicate that adiponectin may play a role in decreasing luteinizing hormone secretion from pituitary gonadotropes. We aimed to identify the hormonal regulators of adiponectin and its receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, in pituitary gonadotropes using immortalized gonadotropic LβT2 cells and primary rat pituitary cells. Our study shows significant alterations in adiponectin expression across the estrous cycle. In addition, we present a novel finding that GnRH suppresses pituitary adiponectin expression via the calcium and protein kinase A intracellular pathways in both cultured rat primary pituitary cells and the LβT2 gonadotrope cell line. The GnRH did not alter expression of the adiponectin receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, in cultured gonadotropes. Expression of the adiponectin receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, was not altered by GnRH in cell culture but in vivo or in vitro. Our data suggest that gonadotrope function may be modulated by GnRH-mediated changes in adiponectin expression. PMID:23239819

  7. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Metallinou, Chryssa; Asimakopoulos, Byron; Schröer, Andreas; Nikolettos, Nikos

    2007-12-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a pivotal role in the physiology of reproduction in mammals. GnRH acts by binding to the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). In humans, only 1 conventional GnRH receptor subtype (type I GnRH receptor) has been found. In the human genome, 2 forms of GnRH have been identified, GnRH-I (mammal GnRH) and GnRH-II (chicken GnRH II). Both forms and their common receptor are expressed, apart from the hypothalamus, in various compartments of the human ovary. Gonadal steroids, gonadotropins, and GnRH itself controls the regulation of the GnRH/GnRHR system gene expression in the human ovary. The 2 types of GnRH acting paracrinally/autocrinally influence ovarian steroidogenesis, decrease the proliferation, and induce apoptosis of ovarian cells. In this review, the biology of GnRH/GnRHR system in humans, the potential roles of GnRH, and the direct effects of GnRH analogues in ovarian cells are discussed. PMID:18089592

  8. A Novel Model for Development, Organization, and Function of Gonadotropes in Fish Pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Matan; Biran, Jakob; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2014-01-01

    The gonadotropins follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are key regulators of the reproductive axis in vertebrates. Despite the high popularity of zebrafish as a model organism for studying reproductive functions, to date no transgenic zebrafish with labeled gonadotropes have been introduced. Using gonadotropin regulatory elements from tilapia, we generated two transgenic zebrafish lines with labeled gonadotropes. The tilapia and zebrafish regulatory sequences were highly divergent but several conserved elements allowed the tilapia promoters to correctly drive the transgenes in zebrafish pituitaries. FSH cells reacted to stimulation with gonadotropin releasing hormone by proliferating and showing increased transgene fluorescence, whereas estrogen exposure caused a decrease in cell number and transgene fluorescence. Transgene fluorescence reflected the expression pattern of the endogenous fshb gene. Ontogenetic expression of the transgenes followed typical patterns, with FSH cells appearing early in development, and LH cells appearing later and increasing dramatically in number with the onset of puberty. Our transgenic lines provide a powerful tool for investigating the development, anatomy, and function of the reproductive axis in lower vertebrates. PMID:25379037

  9. Pituitary function following treatment with reproductive toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.L.; Goldman, J.M.; Rehnberg, G.L.

    1986-12-01

    Appropriate regulation of reproductive processes are dependent upon the integrity of pituitary function. In this selected review, the authors evaluate the evidence that certain environmental compounds exert their effect on reproductive function via a direct action on the pituitary gland. They also discuss examples of changes in pituitary hormone secretion that occur in response to changes in neuronal or gonadal control of the pituitary. A limited number of studies suggest that measures of pituitary hormone secretion provide an early and sensitive measure of a compound's potential effects on the reproductive system. However, the most striking aspect of this area is the sparse and inconsistent information describing pituitary function following exposure to environmental pollutants.

  10. Kisspeptin-1 directly stimulates LH and GH secretion from goldfish pituitary cells in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Mar, Alan; Wlasichuk, Michael; Wong, Anderson O L

    2012-10-01

    It has been established that kisspeptin regulates reproduction via stimulation of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, which then induces pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) release. Kisspeptin also directly stimulates pituitary hormone release in some mammals. However, in goldfish, whether kisspeptin directly affects pituitary hormone release is controversial. In this study, synthetic goldfish kisspeptin-1((1-10)) (gKiss1) enhances LH and growth hormone (GH) release from primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells in column perifusion. gKiss1 stimulation of LH and GH secretion were still manifested in the presence of the two native goldfish GnRHs, salmon (s)GnRH (goldfish GnRH-3) and chicken (c)GnRH-II (goldfish GnRH-2), but were attenuated by two voltage-sensitive calcium channel blockers, verapamil and nifedipine. gKiss-induced increases in intracellular Ca(2+) in Fura-2AM pre-loaded goldfish pars distalis cells were also inhibited by nifedipine. These results indicate that, in goldfish, (1) direct gKiss1 actions on pituitary LH and GH secretion exist, (2) these actions are independent of GnRH and (3) they involve Ca(2+) signalling. PMID:22885559

  11. Delayed sequelae of pituitary irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, K.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.; Born, J.L.; Fabrikant, J.I.

    1984-01-01

    Since 1958, 781 patients at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have received helium-particle stereotactic radiosurgery to the adenohypophysis. Autopsy findings in 15 of these patients are reported. Ten patients received pituitary radiation (average dose, 116 Gy in six fractions) for progressive neovascularization retinopathy due to diabetes mellitus. Evidence of a time-dependent course of progressive fibrosis in their pituitary glands was found. Five patients were treated for eosinophilic adenomas. Although they had lower average doses of radiation (56 Gy in six fractions), their pituitary glands showed cystic cavitation of the adenomas. The adenomas thus appeared more radiosensitive than the normal pars anterior, which, in turn, was more radiosensitive than the adjacent neurohypophysis. No significant radiation changes were found in the surrounding brain or cranial nerves. The endocrine organs under pituitary control showed varying degrees of atrophy, and clinical tests revealed progressive hypofunction. It was concluded that charged-particle therapy produced a sharply delineated focal ral tests revealed progressive hypofunction. It was concluded that charged-particle therapy produced a sharply delineated focal radiation lesion confined to the pituitary gland but did not cause injury to the critical structures of the surrounding central nervous system.

  12. Causes of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism predict response to gonadotropin substitution in adults.

    PubMed

    Rohayem, J; Sinthofen, N; Nieschlag, E; Kliesch, S; Zitzmann, M

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell and Sertoli cell proliferation and maturation in human testes occur in three main waves, during the late fetal and early neonatal period and at early puberty. They are triggered by periods of increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. In hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), these processes are variably disturbed. The objective of this study was to explore whether success of gonadotropin replacement in HH men is predictable by the origin of HH, indicating time of onset and severity of GnRH/gonadotropin deficiency. The data of 51 adult HH patients who had undergone one cycle of hCG/FSH treatment were reviewed. Five groups were established, according to the underlying HH origin. Therapeutic success by final bi-testicular volumes (BTVs) final sperm concentrations (SC) and conception rates were compared and related to baseline parameters, indicative of the degree of HPG-axis disruption. Overall, BTVs rose from 13 ± 15 to 27 ± 15 mL, spermatogenesis was induced in 98%, with mean SCs of 15 ± 30 mill/mL, spontaneous pregnancies in 37% and additional 18% via intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Kallmann syndrome patients had the poorest responses (BTV: 16.9 ± 10 mL; SC: 3.5 ± 5.6 mill/mL), followed by patients with congenital/infancy-acquired multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) and patients with HH+absent puberty (BTV: 21 ± 14/24 ± 9 mL; SC: 5.5 ± 6.5/ 14.5 ± 23.8 mill/mL). HH men with pubertal arrest and with post-pubertally acquired MPHD had the best results (BTV: 36 ± 14/38 ± 16 mL; SC: 25.4 ± 34.2/29.9 ± 50.5 mill/mL). Earlier conception after 20.3 ± 11.5 months (vs. 43.1 ± 43.8; p = 0.047) of gonadotropin treatment with higher pregnancy rates (62% vs. 42%) was achieved in the two post-pubertally acquired HH subgroups, compared to the three pre-pubertally acquired. Therapeutic success was higher in patients without previously undescended testes, with higher baseline BTVs

  13. Rescue of Obesity-Induced Infertility in Female Mice due to a Pituitary-Specific Knockout of the Insulin Receptor (IR)

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Kathryn J.; Wu, Sheng; DiVall, Sara A.; Messmer, Marcus R.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Miller, Ryan S.; Radovick, Sally; Wondisford, Fredric E.; Wolfe, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Summary Obesity is associated with insulin resistance in metabolic tissues such as adipose, liver, and muscle, but it is unclear whether non-classical target tissues, such as those of the reproductive axis, are also insulin resistant. To determine if the reproductive axis maintains insulin sensitivity in obesity in vivo, murine models of diet-induced obesity with and without intact insulin signaling in pituitary gonadotrophs were created. Diet-induced obese wild type female mice (WT DIO) were infertile and experienced a robust increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) after gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) or insulin stimulation. By contrast, both lean and obese mice with a pituitary-specific knockout of the insulin receptor (PitIRKO) exhibited reproductive competency, indicating that insulin signaling in the pituitary is required for the reproductive impairment seen in diet-induced obesity and that the gonadotroph maintains insulin sensitivity in a setting of peripheral insulin resistance. PMID:20816095

  14. The genetics of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Vandeva, Silvia; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Daly, Adrian F; Tichomirowa, Maria; Zacharieva, Sabina; Beckers, Albert

    2010-06-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most frequent intracranial tumors with a prevalence of clinically-apparent tumors close to 1:1000 of the general population. They are clinically significant because of hormone overproduction and/or tumor mass effects in addition to the need for neurosurgery, medical therapies and radiotherapy. The majority of pituitary adenomas have a sporadic origin with recognized genetic mutations seldom being found; somatotropinomas are an exception, presenting frequent somatic GNAS mutations. In this and other phenotypes, tumorigenesis could possibly be explained by altered function of genes implicated in cell cycle regulation, growth factors or their receptors, cell-signaling pathways, specific hormonal factors or other molecules with still unclear mechanisms of action. Genetic changes, such as allelic loss or gene amplification, and epigenetic changes, usually by promoter methylation, have been implicated in abnormal gene expression, but alternative mechanisms may be present. Familial cases of pituitary adenomas represent 5% of all pituitary tumors. MEN1 mutations cause multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), while the Carney complex (CNC) is characterized by mutations in the protein kinase A regulatory subunit-1alpha (PRKAR1A) gene or changes in a locus at 2p16. Recently, a MEN1-like condition, MEN4, was found to be related to mutations in the CDKN1B gene. The clinical entity of familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) is characterized by genetic defects in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene in about 15% of all kindreds and 50% of homogenous somatotropinoma families. Identification of familial cases of pituitary adenomas is important as these tumors may be more aggressive than their sporadic counterparts. PMID:20833337

  15. Gonadotropins in European sea bass: Endocrine roles and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Mazón, María José; Molés, Gregorio; Rocha, Ana; Crespo, Berta; Lan-Chow-Wing, Olivier; Espigares, Felipe; Muñoz, Iciar; Felip, Alicia; Carrillo, Manuel; Zanuy, Silvia; Gómez, Ana

    2015-09-15

    Follicle stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are central endocrine regulators of the gonadal function in vertebrates. They act through specific receptors located in certain cell types found in the gonads. In fish, the differential roles of these hormones are being progressively elucidated due to the development of suitable tools for their study. In European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), isolation of the genes coding for the gonadotropin subunits and receptors allowed in first instance to conduct expression studies. Later, to overcome the limitation of using native hormones, recombinant dimeric gonadotropins, which show different functional characteristics depending on the cell system and DNA construct, were generated. In addition, single gonadotropin beta-subunits have been produced and used as antigens for antibody production. This approach has allowed the development of detection methods for native gonadotropins, with European sea bass being one of the few species where both gonadotropins can be detected in their native form. By administering recombinant gonadotropins to gonad tissues in vitro, we were able to study their effects on steroidogenesis and intracellular pathways. Their administration in vivo has also been tested for use in basic studies and as a biotechnological approach for hormone therapy and assisted reproduction strategies. In addition to the production of recombinant hormones, gene-based therapies using somatic gene transfer have been offered as an alternative. This approach has been tested in sea bass for gonadotropin delivery in vivo. The hormones produced by the genes injected were functional and have allowed studies on the action of gonadotropins in spermatogenesis. PMID:26002037

  16. Molecular cloning and gene expression of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S L; Chuang, H C; Nan, F H; Ruan, Y H; Kuo, C M

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) involved in the endocrine regulation of reproduction in the orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. The full-length cDNA encoding GnRH-R type I was successfully cloned from the pituitary by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) methods in the grouper. The complete GnRH-R type I cDNA is 1607 bp, which includes an open reading frame of 1092 bp encoding a protein of 364 amino acids, a seven-alpha helix transmembrane domain, a N-terminal extracellular domain, and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain. The expression of GnRH-R type I was found to be highest in the pituitary. An intramuscular injection of various GnRH types in vivo was attempted. The expression of GnRH-R type I was stimulated by a single injection of salmon GnRH, while in the case of chicken GnRH II treatment, the expression of GnRH-R type I was inhibited. This suggests that the action of chick GnRH II is probably enhanced through the GnRH receptor of different forms. Furthermore, none of them were expressed by an injection of seabream GnRH, and this is likely attributed to the injection dose being below the threshold level, and this remains to be further examined. In conclusion, GnRHs of various types are effective in stimulating the expression of gonadotropins through various forms of the GnRH-R, and multiple forms of the receptor gene likely exist in teleosts. PMID:17329139

  17. Dissecting the Roles of Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone in Mammals: Studies Using Pharmacological Tools and Genetically Modified Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Silvia; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Reproduction is essential for perpetuation of the species and, hence, is controlled by a sophisticated network of regulatory factors of central and peripheral origin that integrate at the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis. Among the central regulators of reproduction, kisspeptins, as major stimulatory drivers of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretion, have drawn considerable interest in the last decade. However, the dynamic, if not cyclic (in the female), nature of reproductive function and the potency of kisspeptins and other stimulatory signals of the HPG axis make tenable the existence of counterbalance inhibitory mechanisms, which may keep stimulation at check and would allow adaptation of reproductive maturation and function to different endogenous and environmental conditions. In this context, discovery of the gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in birds, and its mammalian homolog, RFRP, opened up the exciting possibility that this inhibitory signal might operate centrally to suppress, directly or indirectly, GnRH/gonadotropin secretion, thus reciprocally cooperating with other stimulatory inputs in the dynamic regulation of the reproductive hypothalamic–pituitary unit. After more than 15 years of active research, the role of GnIH/RFRP in the control of the HPG axis has been documented in different species. Yet, important aspects of the physiology of this system, especially regarding its relative importance and actual roles in the control of key facets of reproductive function, remain controversial. In the present work, we aim to provide a critical review of recent developments in this area, with special attention to studies in rodent models, using pharmacological tools and functional genomics. In doing so, we intend to endow the reader with an updated view of what is known (and what is not known) about the physiological role of GnIH/RFRP signaling in the control of mammalian reproduction. PMID:26779117

  18. Identification and localization of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) orthologs in the hypothalamus of the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans.

    PubMed

    Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Iwakoshi-Ukena, Eiko; Osugi, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) was discovered in 2000 as a novel hypothalamic neuropeptide that inhibited gonadotropin release in the Japanese quail. GnIH and its orthologs have a common C-terminal LPXRFamide (X=L or Q) motif, and have been identified in vertebrates from agnathans to humans, apart from reptiles. In the present study, we characterized a cDNA encoding GnIH orthologs in the brain of the red-eared slider turtle. The deduced precursor protein consisted of 205 amino-acid residues, encoding three putative peptide sequences that included the LPXRFamide motif at their C-termini. In addition, the precursor sequence was most similar to those of avian species. Immunoaffinity purification combined with mass spectrometry confirmed that three mature peptides were produced in the brain. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed that turtle GnIH-containing cells were restricted to the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Immunoreactive fibers were densely distributed in the median eminence. Thus, GnIH and related peptides may act on the pituitary to regulate pituitary hormone release in turtles as well as other vertebrates. PMID:26130239

  19. [Pituitary apoplexy in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Anna; Jarløv, Anne Elisabeth; Holm, Kirsten; Cleemann, Line

    2014-04-22

    Pituitary apoplexy occurs when a preexisting pituitary adenoma undergoes acute haemorrhage, infarct or both. The patho-genesis is not fully understood but macroadenomas and prolactinomas have been reported as being predisposed to apoplexy. Only a few cases are described in the paediatric population. We present a 17-year-old woman with secondary amenorrhoea, headache and blurred vision. An MRI showed a pituitary apoplexy in a preexisting macroadenoma. The majority of milder cases resolve spontaneously. Close monitoring of the pituitary function is important to detect pituitary insufficiency witch may need long-term hormone replacement therapy. PMID:25351468

  20. Pituitary function in patients with newly diagnosed untreated systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Koller, M; Templ, E; Riedl, M; Clodi, M; Wagner, O; Smolen, J; Luger, A

    2004-01-01

    Methods: 11 patients with SLE and 9 healthy controls were tested for their total anterior pituitary gland reserve by simultaneous injection of corticotropin-, growth hormone- (GH), thyrotropin-, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Serum concentrations of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), cortisol, GH, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), PRL, luteinising hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured at baseline and after injection. Baseline values of oestradiol, testosterone, and thyroxine were determined. Results: Basal and stimulated serum concentrations of ACTH, cortisol, GH, and PRL were similar in both groups. In contrast, despite similar basal thyroxine levels the TSH response to TRH was significantly higher in patients than in controls. LH and FSH levels in premenopausal female patients of both groups were identical. In contrast, two of the three male patients were hypogonadal without compensatory increases of basal LH and FSH levels, but they retained excessive stimulatory capacity in response to GnRH. Conclusion: No significant alteration of the HPA axis was found in patients with SLE, which is inadequate in view of the continuing inflammation. GH and PRL secretion were normal. The pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-gonadal axes were affected in patients with newly diagnosed, untreated SLE. PMID:15082470

  1. The Recreational Drug Ecstasy Disrupts the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Reproductive Axis in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Walker, Deena M.; Reveron, Maria E.; Duvauchelle, Christine L.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    Reproductive function involves an interaction of three regulatory levels: hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonad. The primary drive upon this system comes from hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretory cells, which receive afferent inputs from other neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system to result in the proper coordination of reproduction and the environment. Here, we hypothesized that the recreational drug ±-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; “ecstasy”), which acts through several of the neurotransmitter systems that affect GnRH neurons, suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) reproductive axis of male rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered saline or MDMA or saline either once (acute) or for 20 days (chronic), and were euthanized 7 days following last administration. We quantified hypothalamic GnRH mRNA, serum luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations, and serum testosterone levels, as indices of hypothalamic, pituitary, and gonadal functions, respectively. The results indicate that the hypothalamic and gonadal levels of the HPG axis are significantly altered by MDMA, with GnRH mRNA and serum testosterone levels suppressed in rats administered MDMA compared to saline. Furthermore, our finding that hypothalamic GnRH mRNA levels are suppressed in the context of low testosterone concentrations suggests that the central GnRH neurosecretory system may be a primary target of inhibitory regulation by MDMA usage. PMID:18309234

  2. Exogenous action of 5-lipoxygenase by its metabolites on luteinizing hormone release in rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Przylipiak, A; Kiesel, L; Habenicht, A J; Przylipiak, M; Runnebaum, B

    1990-02-12

    The stimulatory effect of exogenously administered potato 5-lipoxygenase (0.1-0.3 U/2 ml) on luteinizing hormone (LH) release was demonstrated in rat anterior pituitary cells in a superfusion system. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, abolished the effect of the enzyme on LH secretion. The secretory effect on LH after 5-lipoxygenase administration was biphasic and dependent on Ca2+ indicating that 5-lipoxygenase affects LH release through its oxygenation reaction. Another series of experiments demonstrated that activation of 5-lipoxygenase, expressed as production of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 (728 +/- 127 pg/10(6) cells and 178 +/- 23 pg/10(6) cells, respectively) occurs in rat pituitary cells after addition of Ca2+ ionophore A23187. However, LTB4 and LTC4 were not formed by pituitary cells that had previously been desensitized by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the physiological ligand of LH release. These results are consistent with a role of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites in the mechanism of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:2157615

  3. The progestin levonorgestrel disrupts gonadotropin expression and sex steroid levels in pubertal roach (Rutilus rutilus).

    PubMed

    Kroupova, H K; Trubiroha, A; Lorenz, C; Contardo-Jara, V; Lutz, I; Grabic, R; Kocour, M; Kloas, W

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the synthetic progestin levonorgestrel (LNG) on the reproductive endocrine system of a teleost fish, the roach (Rutilus rutilus). Pubertal roach were exposed for 28 days in a flow-through system to four concentrations of LNG (3, 31, 312, and 3124 ng/l). Both males and females treated with 3124 ng/l LNG exhibited the upregulated levels of vitellogenin and oestrogen receptor 1 mRNA in the liver. At the same concentration, LNG caused a significant upregulation of the mRNA expression of the gene encoding luteinising hormone β-subunit (lhβ) and the suppression of the mRNA expression of the gene encoding follicle-stimulating hormone β-subunit (fshβ) in the pituitary of both male and female roach. A lower LNG concentration (312 ng/l) suppressed mRNA expression of fshβ in males only. Females treated with 3124 ng/l LNG exhibited significantly lower plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and oestradiol (E2) concentrations, whereas their testosterone (T) level was higher compared with the control. Females exposed to 312 ng/l LNG presented significantly lower plasma E2 concentrations. Males exposed to ≥31 ng/l LNG exhibited significantly reduced 11-KT levels. As determined through a histological analysis, the ovaries of females were not affected by LNG exposure, whereas the testes of males exposed to 31 and 312 ng/l LNG exhibited a significantly higher percentage of spermatogonia B compared with the control. The results of the present study demonstrate that LNG disrupts the reproductive system of pubertal roach by affecting the pituitary gonadotropin expression and the sex steroid levels. This disruption was determined to occur in males after exposure to an environmentally relevant concentration (31 ng/l). Moreover, the highest tested concentration of LNG (3124 ng/l) exerted an oestrogenic effect on fish of both sexes. PMID:24893273

  4. The feedback regulation of pituitary GTH-II secretion in male African catfish (Clarias gariepinus): Participation of 11-ketotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R W; Paczoska-Eliasiewicz, H; Satijn, D G; Goos, H J

    1993-07-01

    11-ketotestosterone (OT) is a typical androgen of male teleost fish, but information on the question if it is involved in the feedback regulation of pituitary gonadotropin II (GTH-II) secretion is controversial. We have therefore studied the effects of OT on gonadotropin releasing-hormone (GnRH) stimulated GTH-II secretion in male African catfish Clarias gariepinus). In vivo experiments were carried out with intact and castrated fish. OT plasma levels were increased by implantation of silastic capsules containing 11-ketoandrostenedione (OA) which is converted to OT in both intact and castrated fish. When intact males received OA- or blank-capsules, treatment with salmon gonadotropin releasing-hormone analogue (Des-Gly(10)-D-Arg(6)-sGnRH-NEt; 0.2 μg sGnRHa/kg body weight) elevated the plasma GTH-11 levels in both groups. However, the levels were about 2 times higher in blank- than in OA-implanted fish. When castrated fish received either blank-or OA-capsules, sGnRHa treatment led to plasma GTH levels significantly higher than in sham-operated fish. However, there was no difference between the blank- or OA-implanted castrates, though OA implantation led to a restoration of OT plasma levels. This suggests that replacement ofOT is insufficient to reverse castration-induced effects. In vitro experiments were carried out with pituitary tissue fragments using a static culture system. The tissue remained sensitive to sGnRHa (5 × 10(-9)M) for 4 days after the beginning of incubation. Preincubation of pituitary tissue for 24 hours with 25 ng OT/ml medium (80 nM) completely abolished the stimulatory effect of sGnRHa on GTH-II secretion. Tritiated OT was not metabolized by pituitary tissue during 6 hours of incubation. We conclude that 11-ketotestosterone, a quantitatively prominent and non-aromatizeable circulating androgen participates, at least in part by direct action on the pituitary, in the negative feedback regulation of GnRH-stimulated GTH-II secretion in male

  5. Management of nonfunctioning pituitary incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Galland, Françoise; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Cazabat, Laure; Boulin, Anne; Cotton, François; Bonneville, Jean-François; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Vidal-Trécan, Gwénaelle; Chanson, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Prevalence of pituitary incidentaloma is variable: between 1.4% and 27% at autopsy, and between 3.7% and 37% on imaging. Pituitary microincidentalomas (serendipitously discovered adenoma <1cm in diameter) may increase in size, but only 5% exceed 10mm. Pituitary macroincidentalomas (serendipitously discovered adenoma>1cm in diameter) show increased size in 20-24% and 34-40% of cases at respectively 4 and 8years' follow-up. Radiologic differential diagnosis requires MRI centered on the pituitary gland. Initial assessment of nonfunctioning (NF) microincidentaloma is firstly clinical, the endocrinologist looking for signs of hypersecretion (signs of hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly or Cushing's syndrome), followed up by systematic prolactin and IGF-1 assay. Initial assessment of NF macroincidentaloma is clinical, the endocrinologist looking for signs of hormonal hypersecretion or hypopituitarism, followed up by hormonal assay to screen for hypersecretion or hormonal deficiency and by ophthalmologic assessment (visual acuity and visual field) if and only if the lesion is near the optic chiasm (OC). NF microincidentaloma of less than 5mm requires no surveillance; those of≥5mm are not operated on but rather monitored on MRI at 6months and then 2years. Macroincidentaloma remote from the OC is monitored on MRI at 1year, with hormonal exploration (for anterior pituitary deficiency), then every 2years. When macroincidentaloma located near the OC is managed by surveillance rather than surgery, MRI is recommended at 6months, with hormonal and visual exploration, then annual MRI and hormonal and visual assessment every 6months. Surgery is indicated in the following cases: evolutive NF microincidentaloma, NF macroincidentaloma associated with hypopituitarism or showing progression, incidentaloma compressing the OC, possible malignancy, non-compliant patient, pregnancy desired in the short-term, or context at risk of apoplexy. PMID:26054868

  6. Characterization and steroidal regulation of gonadotropin beta subunits in the male leopard frog, Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihong; Kessler, Ann E; Tsai, Pei-San

    2007-01-01

    In ranid frogs, the secretion of gonadotropins (GtHs), luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), is potently regulated by gonadal steroids. To better understand the gonadal regulation of GtHs at the molecular level, we elucidated the full-length cDNA sequences of LH and FSH beta subunits from the leopard frog, Rana pipiens. The cDNAs for LHbeta and FSHbeta were 1084 and 667 bp in size excluding the poly (A) tail, and encoded proteins of 138 and 127 amino acids, respectively. Using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the messages for LHbeta and FSHbeta were found in the pituitary, but not in the brain, heart, kidney, or the liver. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed a significant elevation of FSHbeta, but not LHbeta, in mature male R. pipiens 21 days after gonadectomy (GDX). 17beta-estradiol implant for 21 days in GDX male frogs significantly suppressed the levels of both LHbeta and FSHbeta transcripts, whereas 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone implant suppressed only the latter. Together, these results laid the groundwork for investigating gonadal regulation of GtHbeta subunits in a ranid frog. Importantly, these data also revealed differential feedback effects of an androgen and an estrogen upon GtHbeta expression. PMID:16920113

  7. Androgen receptor repression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene transcription via enhancer 1.

    PubMed

    Brayman, Melissa J; Pepa, Patricia A; Mellon, Pamela L

    2012-11-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a major role in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and synthesis and secretion of GnRH are regulated by gonadal steroid hormones. Disruptions in androgen levels are involved in a number of reproductive defects, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Androgens down-regulate GnRH mRNA synthesis in vivo and in vitro via an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent mechanism. Methyltrienolone (R1881), a synthetic AR agonist, represses GnRH expression through multiple sites in the proximal promoter. In this study, we show AR also represses GnRH transcription via the major enhancer (GnRH-E1). A multimer of the -1800/-1766 region was repressed by R1881 treatment. Mutation of two bases, -1792 and -1791, resulted in decreased basal activity and a loss of AR-mediated repression. AR bound to the -1796/-1791 sequence in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, indicating a direct interaction with DNA or other transcription factors in this region. We conclude that AR repression of GnRH-E1 acts via multiple AR-responsive regions, including the site at -1792/-1791. PMID:22877652

  8. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone targeting for gonadotroph ablation: an approach to non-surgical sterilization.

    PubMed

    Struthers, R S

    2012-08-01

    Surgical sterilization is the mainstay of dog and cat population control, but its use is still often limited by the costs and effort involved, especially in developing countries. An ideal non-surgical sterilant that is safe, effective, permanent, administered as a single injection and capable of being manufactured inexpensively could have a significant impact on the world-wide dog and cat overpopulation problem. One approach towards developing such an agent is the targeting of pituitary gonadotrophic cells with cytotoxic agents using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). GnRH is a peptide that binds to high-affinity receptors selectively expressed on gonadotrophs and some types of cancers. Both small molecules and proteins have been conjugated to GnRH analogues to generate targeted cytotoxic and imaging agents. Although most of these efforts have focused on development of human cancer therapeutics, available reproductive studies in rats and dogs suggest that current compounds do not have sufficient therapeutic windows for complete gonadotroph ablation, in part owing to poor stability of peptide targeting sequences. The only reported longer-term study of gonadotroph ablation in dogs reported suppression of serum testosterone for 8 months, but endocrine function then recovered, raising important questions about the mechanism of reproductive suppression and its recovery. Although studies to date suggest that this is a potentially attractive approach to non-surgical sterilization, ideal agents are yet to be developed, and important mechanistic questions remain to be answered. PMID:22827376

  9. Enzymatic tracer damage during the gonadotropin releasing hormone radioimmunoassay: analytical and immunological assessment

    SciTech Connect

    O'Conner, J.L.; Lapp, C.A.; Clary, A.R.

    1985-09-23

    Hypothalamic supernatants from 60 day female rats were fractionated from Sephadex G-200 columns. The radioimmunoassay (RIA) for gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) detected an apparently cross-reacting high molecular weight substance. The substance caused apparent displacement of iodinated GnRH binding in dose response fashion; however, no biological activity was observed in pituitary cell cultures. In order to determine whether the depressed binding might be caused by enzymatic degradation of iodinated GnRH during the RIA incubation, iodinated GnRH was preincubated under RIA conditions with either buffer or increasing concentrations of the GnRH cross-reacting material. Aliquots were subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and the gels slices counted. Identical aliquots were subsequently used as iodinated hormone in the RIA of known quantities of synthetic GnRH. Tracer damage during the RIA-like preincubation period was reflected in the subsequent PAGE studies as decreased counts per minute in the intact GnRH peak and in the RIA studies as over-estimated quantification of the GnRH standards. This report describes such damage during the GnRH RIA and the data misinterpretations which result. 30 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  10. Molecular cloning and brain distribution of three types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone from mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, M; Aranishi, F; Shimizu, A

    2010-02-01

    Complementary DNAs encoding gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) precursors were cloned from the mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus brain, showing that this species has three GnRH forms, i.e. medaka Oryzias latipes GnRH (mdGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) and Atlantic salmon Salmo salar GnRH (sGnRH). The F. heteroclitus prepro GnRHs have common structural architectures of vertebrate GnRHs, consisting of the signal peptide, 10 amino acids of mature peptide, GKR sequence and GnRH-associated peptide (GAP). Phylogenetic analysis of fish prepro GnRHs showed that F. heteroclitus mdGnRH is a homologue of sbGnRHs and mdGnRHs of other acanthopterygian. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that mdGnRH was abundantly expressed in the olfactory bulb and in olfactory lobe areas and is expressed in the pituitary. The cGnRH-II was mainly expressed in the midbrain and interbrain areas, and the sGnRH was expressed not only in the olfactory bulb but also in other regions of the brain. These results suggest that the mdGnRH is involved in the stimulation of gonadotrophs in the pituitary, whereas cGnRH-II and sGnRH are involved in neurotransmission and neuromodulation. PMID:20738714

  11. Treatment situation of male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in pediatrics and proposal of testosterone and gonadotropins replacement therapy protocols.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Arisaka, Osamu; Ozono, Keiichi; Amemiya, Shin; Kikuchi, Toru; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Harada, Shohei; Miyata, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2015-04-01

    Male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (MHH), a disorder associated with infertility, is treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and/or gonadotropins replacement therapy (GRT) (TRT and GRT, together with HRT hormone replacement therapy). In Japan, guidelines have been set for treatment during adolescence. Due to the risk of rapid maturation of bone age, low doses of testosterone or gonadotropins have been used. However, the optimal timing and methods of therapeutic intervention have not yet been established. The objective of this study was to investigate the current situation of treatment for children with MHH in Japan and to review a primary survey involving councilors of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and a secondary survey obtained from 26 facilities conducting HRT. The subjects were 55 patients with MHH who reached their adult height after HRT. The breakdown of the patients is as follows: 7 patients with Kallmann syndrome, 6 patients with isolated gonadotropin deficiency, 18 patients with acquired hypopituitarism due to intracranial and pituitary tumor, 22 patients with classical idiopathic hypopituitarism due to breech delivery, and 2 patients with CHARGE syndrome. The mean age at the start of HRT was 15.7 yrs and mean height was 157.2 cm. The mean age at reaching adult height was 19.4 yrs, and the mean adult height was 171.0 cm. The starting age of HRT was later than the normal pubertal age and showed a significant negative correlation with pubertal height gain, but it showed no correlation with adult height. As for spermatogenesis, 76% of the above patients treated with hCG-rFSH combined therapy showed positive results, though ranging in levels; impaired spermatogenesis was observed in some with congenital MHH, and favorable spermatogenesis was observed in all with acquired MHH. From the above, we propose the establishment of a treatment protocol for the start low-dose testosterone or low-dose gonadotropins by dividing subjects into

  12. Treatment situation of male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in pediatrics and proposal of testosterone and gonadotropins replacement therapy protocols

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Naoko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Arisaka, Osamu; Ozono, Keiichi; Amemiya, Shin; Kikuchi, Toru; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Harada, Shohei; Miyata, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (MHH), a disorder associated with infertility, is treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) and/or gonadotropins replacement therapy (GRT) (TRT and GRT, together with HRT hormone replacement therapy). In Japan, guidelines have been set for treatment during adolescence. Due to the risk of rapid maturation of bone age, low doses of testosterone or gonadotropins have been used. However, the optimal timing and methods of therapeutic intervention have not yet been established. The objective of this study was to investigate the current situation of treatment for children with MHH in Japan and to review a primary survey involving councilors of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and a secondary survey obtained from 26 facilities conducting HRT. The subjects were 55 patients with MHH who reached their adult height after HRT. The breakdown of the patients is as follows: 7 patients with Kallmann syndrome, 6 patients with isolated gonadotropin deficiency, 18 patients with acquired hypopituitarism due to intracranial and pituitary tumor, 22 patients with classical idiopathic hypopituitarism due to breech delivery, and 2 patients with CHARGE syndrome. The mean age at the start of HRT was 15.7 yrs and mean height was 157.2 cm. The mean age at reaching adult height was 19.4 yrs, and the mean adult height was 171.0 cm. The starting age of HRT was later than the normal pubertal age and showed a significant negative correlation with pubertal height gain, but it showed no correlation with adult height. As for spermatogenesis, 76% of the above patients treated with hCG-rFSH combined therapy showed positive results, though ranging in levels; impaired spermatogenesis was observed in some with congenital MHH, and favorable spermatogenesis was observed in all with acquired MHH. From the above, we propose the establishment of a treatment protocol for the start low-dose testosterone or low-dose gonadotropins by dividing

  13. Advanced virtual endoscopic pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, André; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Forster, Marie-Thérèse; Mroz, Lukas; Wegenkittl, Rainer; Bühler, Katja

    2005-01-01

    Endoscopy has recently been introduced to endonasal transsphenoidal pituitary surgery as a minimally invasive procedure for the removal of various kinds of pituitary tumors. To reduce morbidity and mortality with this new technique, the surgeon must be well-trained and well-prepared. Virtual endoscopy can be beneficial as a tool for training, preoperative planning, and intraoperative support. This paper introduces STEPS, a virtual endoscopy system designed to aid surgeons in getting acquainted with the endoscopic view of the anatomy, the handling of instruments, the transsphenoidal approach, and challenges associated with the procedure. STEPS also assists experienced surgeons in planning a real endoscopic intervention by getting familiar with the individual patient anatomy, identifying landmarks, planning the approach, and deciding upon the ideal target position of the actual surgical activity. The application provides interactive visualization, navigation, and perception aids and the possibility of simulating the procedure, including haptic feedback and simulation of surgical instruments. PMID:16144247

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Perioperative Measurement of Basal Anterior Pituitary and Target Gland Hormones in Predicting Adrenal Insufficiency After Pituitary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Vatroslav; Kruljac, Ivan; Radosevic, Jelena Marinkovic; Kirigin, Lora Stanka; Stipic, Darko; Pecina, Hrvoje Ivan; Vrkljan, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The insulin tolerance test (ITT) is the gold standard for diagnosing adrenal insufficiency (AI) after pituitary surgery. The ITT is unpleasant for patients, requires close medical supervision and is contraindicated in several comorbidities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether tumor size, remission rate, preoperative, and early postoperative baseline hormone concentrations could serve as predictors of AI in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy of morning serum cortisol. This prospective study enrolled 70 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed pituitary adenomas. Thirty-seven patients had nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NPA), 28 had prolactinomas and 5 had somatotropinomas. Thyroxin (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) were measured preoperatively and on the sixth postoperative day. Serum morning cortisol was measured on the third postoperative day (CORT3) as well as the sixth postoperative day (CORT6). Tumor mass was measured preoperatively and remission was assessed 3 months after surgery. An ITT was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively. Remission was achieved in 48% of patients and AI occurred in 51%. Remission rates and tumor type were not associated with AI. CORT3 had the best predictive value for AI (area under the curve (AUC) 0.868, sensitivity 82.4%, specificity 83.3%). Tumor size, preoperative T4, postoperative T4, and TSH were also associated with AI in a multivariate regression model. A combination of all preoperative and postoperative variables (excluding serum cortisol) had a sensitivity of 75.0% and specificity of 77.8%. The predictive power of CORT3 substantially improved by adding those variables into the model (AUC 0.921, sensitivity 94.1%, specificity 78.3%, PPV 81.9%, NPV of 92.7%). In a subgroup analysis that included only female patients with NPA, LH had exactly the same predictive value as CORT3. The

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Perioperative Measurement of Basal Anterior Pituitary and Target Gland Hormones in Predicting Adrenal Insufficiency After Pituitary Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Vatroslav; Kruljac, Ivan; Radosevic, Jelena Marinkovic; Kirigin, Lora Stanka; Stipic, Darko; Pecina, Hrvoje Ivan; Vrkljan, Milan

    2016-03-01

    The insulin tolerance test (ITT) is the gold standard for diagnosing adrenal insufficiency (AI) after pituitary surgery. The ITT is unpleasant for patients, requires close medical supervision and is contraindicated in several comorbidities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether tumor size, remission rate, preoperative, and early postoperative baseline hormone concentrations could serve as predictors of AI in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy of morning serum cortisol. This prospective study enrolled 70 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed pituitary adenomas. Thirty-seven patients had nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NPA), 28 had prolactinomas and 5 had somatotropinomas. Thyroxin (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) were measured preoperatively and on the sixth postoperative day. Serum morning cortisol was measured on the third postoperative day (CORT3) as well as the sixth postoperative day (CORT6). Tumor mass was measured preoperatively and remission was assessed 3 months after surgery. An ITT was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively. Remission was achieved in 48% of patients and AI occurred in 51%. Remission rates and tumor type were not associated with AI. CORT3 had the best predictive value for AI (area under the curve (AUC) 0.868, sensitivity 82.4%, specificity 83.3%). Tumor size, preoperative T4, postoperative T4, and TSH were also associated with AI in a multivariate regression model. A combination of all preoperative and postoperative variables (excluding serum cortisol) had a sensitivity of 75.0% and specificity of 77.8%. The predictive power of CORT3 substantially improved by adding those variables into the model (AUC 0.921, sensitivity 94.1%, specificity 78.3%, PPV 81.9%, NPV of 92.7%). In a subgroup analysis that included only female patients with NPA, LH had exactly the same predictive value as CORT3. The addition

  16. Immunocytochemical and ultrastructural identification of pituitary cell types in the protogynous Thalassoma duperrey during adult sexual ontogeny

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parhar, I.S.; Nagahama, Y.; Grau, E.G.; Ross, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Protogynous wrasses (Thalassoma duperrey): females (F), primary males (PM) along with a few terminal-phase males (TM) and sex-changed males (SM), were used to characterize the topographical organization of the pituitary. In general, immunocytochemical and ultrastructural features of the adenohypophyseal cell types of the saddleback wrasse pituitary resemble those of other teleosts. In the rostral pars distalis (RPD), corticotropic cells were found bordering the neurohypophysis (NH) and surrounding the centroventrally located prolactin cells. Thyrotropic cells formed a small group in the anteriodorsal part of the rostral and proximal pars distalis (PPD). The somatotropic cells were distributed in large clusters, mostly organized in cell cords around the interdigitations of the NH of the dorsal PPD. Cells containing gonadotropin I?? subunit were localized in the dorsal parts of the PPD, in close association with somatotropic cells and gonadotropin II?? subunit containing cells were seen in the centroventral parts of the PPD and along the periphery of the pars intermedia (PI). The pars intermedia was composed of melanotropic cells and somatolactin cells that lined the neurohypohysis. Distinct ultrastructural differences in corticotropic and somatotropic cells were not observed between the four groups. In all groups, prolactin cells in the ventral-most RPD could be immature cells or actively secreting prolactin. Gonadotropic II cells of PM and F had relatively higher incidence of "nuclear budding" and cell organelles compared to TM and SM. Besides gonadotropic, the active melanotropic and somatolactin cells might be associated with some aspect(s) of reproduction.

  17. Human chorionic gonadotropin measurements in parathyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Mishaela R; Bilezikian, John P; Birken, Steven; Silverberg, Shonni J

    2010-01-01

    Objective Preoperatively, it is difficult to differentiate between parathyroid cancer (PtCa) and severe primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) due to a benign tumor. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a tumor marker in trophoblastic and nontrophoblastic cancers and hyperglycosylated hCG is increased in hCG-secreting malignancies. We investigated whether hCG can distinguish PtCa cancer from benign disease and add prognostic information. Design Observational study. Methods Measurement of urinary hCG (total and malignant isoforms) and serum malignant hCG in 8 subjects with PtCa and in 18 subjects with PHPT (measurement of urine in ten and serum in eight). Results Total urinary hCG was normal in the benign PHPT control subjects (range: 0–17 fmol/mg Cr; nl < 50). In the PtCa subjects, three had normal total urinary hCG levels and survived complication free for at least 2 years; three had persistently elevated total urinary hCG levels (range: 217–1986 fmol/mg Cr) and sustained hip fracture (n = 3) and died (n = 2) within 3 and 6 months respectively; two had a rise in total urinary hCG and had hip fracture (n = 1) and died (n = 2) within 4 and 10 months respectively. Elevated urinary hCG was of the malignant hyperglycosylated isoform. Serum malignant hyperglycosylated hCG values in all of the cancer patients exceeded the maximal serum malignant hCG level of the PHPT subjects with benign disease (3.77 pmol/l). Conclusion hCG, especially itshyperglycosylated isoform, might add diagnostic and prognostic information in PtCa. Further studies would help to elucidate the role of hCG as a potential tumor marker in this disease. PMID:18625691

  18. Gamma knife radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Ježková, Jana; Marek, Josef

    2016-09-01

    Pituitary adenomas are frequently occurring intracranial neoplasms. The aim of the treatment of pituitary adenomas is to normalize hormonal hypersecretion, to preserve the normal pituitary function, to reserve or treat impaired pituitary function and to control tumor growth and its mechanical effects on the surrounding structures. Treatment modalities include surgical, medical and radiation therapy. Radiosurgery is mainly used as a secondary line treatment after surgery for residual or recurrent tumors. The antiproliferative effect is achieved by LKG irradiation in more than 90% of patients. Regarding the functioning pituitary adenomas, the manifestation of the treatment effect is slow and depends mainly on the type of adenoma. Gamma knife irradiation is safe when the maximal doses to pituitary and infundibulum are respected. PMID:26899535

  19. Pituitary function following treatment with reproductive toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, R L; Goldman, J M; Rehnberg, G L

    1986-01-01

    Appropriate regulation of reproductive processes are dependent upon the integrity of pituitary function. In this selected review, we evaluate the evidence that certain environmental compounds exert their effect on reproductive function via a direct action on the pituitary gland. We also discuss examples of changes in pituitary hormone secretion that occur in response to changes in neuronal or gonadal control of the pituitary. A limited number of studies suggest that measures of pituitary hormone secretion provide an early and sensitive measure of a compound's potential effects on the reproductive system. However, the most striking aspect of this area is the sparse and inconsistent information describing pituitary function following exposure to environmental pollutants. PMID:3830104

  20. Dopamine inhibits somatolactin gene expression in tilapia pituitary cells through the dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Quan; Lian, Anji; He, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) is an important neurotransmitter in the central nervous system of vertebrates and possesses key hypophysiotropic functions. Early studies have shown that DA has a potent inhibitory effect on somatolactin (SL) release in fish. However, the mechanisms responsible for DA inhibition of SL gene expression are largely unknown. To this end, tilapia DA type-1 (D1) and type-2 (D2) receptor transcripts were examined in the neurointermediate lobe (NIL) of the tilapia pituitary by real-time PCR. In tilapia, DA not only was effective in inhibiting SL mRNA levels in vivo and in vitro, but also could abolish pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)- and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH)-stimulated SL gene expression at the pituitary level. In parallel studies, the specific D2 receptor agonists quinpirole and bromocriptine could mimic the DA-inhibited SL gene expression. Furthermore, the D2 receptor antagonists domperidone and (-)-sulpiride could abolish the SL response to DA or the D2 agonist quinpirole, whereas D1 receptor antagonists SCH23390 and SKF83566 were not effective in this respect. In primary cultures of tilapia NIL cells, D2 agonist quinpirole-inhibited cAMP production could be blocked by co-treatment with the D2 antagonist domperidone and the ability of forskolin to increase cAMP production was also inhibited by quinpirole. Using a pharmacological approach, the AC/cAMP pathway was shown to be involved in quinpirole-inhibited SL mRNA expression. These results provide evidence that DA can directly inhibit SL gene expression at the tilapia pituitary level via D2 receptor through the AC/cAMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:26970582

  1. Expression patterns of gonadotropin hormones and their receptors during early sexual differentiation in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongwei; Ijiri, Shigeho; Wu, Quan; Kobayashi, Tohru; Li, Shuang; Nakaseko, Taro; Adachi, Shinji; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2012-11-01

    In Nile tilapia, sex-specific expression of foxl2 and cyp19a1a in XX gonads and dmrt1 in XY gonads at 5-6 days after hatching (dah) is critical for differentiation of the gonads into either ovaries or testes. The factors triggering sexually dimorphic expression of these genes are unknown, and whether the gonadotropin hormones are involved in early gonadal sex differentiation of the Nile tilapia has been unclear. In the present study, we determined the precise timing of expression of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in the pituitary and that of their receptors (fshra and lhcgrbb) in the undifferentiated gonad in both XX and XY tilapia fry by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis. Expression of fshb mRNA and Fsh protein in the pituitary was detected from the first sampling day (3 dah) to 25 dah in both XX and XY tilapia larvae without sexual dimorphism and increased gradually after 25 dah in the pituitary. fshra mRNA was expressed beginning 5 dah and was present at significantly higher levels in XX gonads than in the XY gonads at 6-25 dah. These results indicate that the level of Fsh protein in the pituitary was not critical for differentiation of gonads into ovaries or testes, but the expression level of its receptor, fshra, in undifferentiated gonads appeared to be involved in determining gonadal sexual differentiation. Based on these observations, it is likely that in XX gonads, up-regulation of fshra may be necessary to induce cyp19a1a expression, which stimulates estradiol-17beta (E(2)) production and subsequent ovarian differentiation. On the other hand, lhb mRNA was not detected until 25 dah in the pituitaries of both sexes, and sexual dimorphism in lhcgrbb mRNA levels appeared later (10-25 dah) than that of fshra in the gonads, indicating the limited role of LH and lhcgrbb in gonadal differentiation of the Nile tilapia. PMID:23018182

  2. Development of a flatfish-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Fsh using a recombinant chimeric gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Verdura, Sara; Mazón, María José; Boj, Mónica; Zanuy, Silvia; Gómez, Ana; Cerdà, Joan

    2015-09-15

    In flatfishes with asynchronous and semicystic spermatogenesis, such as the Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis), the specific roles of the pituitary gonadotropins during germ cell development, particularly of the follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh), are still largely unknown in part due to the lack of homologous immunoassays for this hormone. In this study, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for Senegalese sole Fsh was developed by generating a rabbit antiserum against a recombinant chimeric single-chain Fsh molecule (rFsh-C) produced by the yeast Pichia pastoris. The rFsh-C N- and C-termini were formed by the mature sole Fsh β subunit (Fshβ) and the chicken glycoprotein hormone common α subunit (CGA), respectively. Depletion of the antiserum to remove anti-CGA antibodies further enriched the sole Fshβ-specific antibodies, which were used to develop the ELISA using the rFsh-C for the standard curve. The sensitivity of the assay was 10 and 50 pg/ml for Fsh measurement in plasma and pituitary, respectively, and the cross-reactivity with a homologous recombinant single-chain luteinizing hormone was 1%. The standard curve for rFsh-C paralleled those of serially diluted plasma and pituitary extracts of other flatfishes, such as the Atlantic halibut, common sole and turbot. In Senegalese sole males, the highest plasma Fsh levels were found during early spermatogenesis but declined during enhanced spermiation, as found in teleosts with cystic spermatogenesis. In pubertal males, however, the circulating Fsh levels were as high as in adult spermiating fish, but interestingly the Fsh receptor in the developing testis containing only spermatogonia was expressed in Leydig cells but not in the primordial Sertoli cells. These results indicate that a recombinant chimeric Fsh can be used to generate specific antibodies against the Fshβ subunit and to develop a highly sensitive ELISA for Fsh measurements in diverse flatfishes. PMID:25449660

  3. Biologically Active Chorionic Gonadotropin: Synthesis by the Human Fetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, W. G.; Kuhn, R. W.; Jaffe, R. B.

    1983-04-01

    The kidney, and to a slight extent the liver, of human fetuses were found to synthesize and secrete the α subunit common to glycoprotein hormones. Fetal lung and muscle did not synthesize this protein. Since fetal kidney and liver were previously found to synthesize β chorionic gonadotropin, their ability to synthesize bioactive chorionic gonadotropin was also determined. The newly synthesized hormone bound to mouse Leydig cells and elicited a biological response: namely, the synthesis of testosterone. These results suggest that the human fetus may participate in metabolic homeostasis during its development.

  4. Impact of food restriction on ovarian development, RFamide-related peptide-3 and the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in pre-pubertal ewes.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Song, H; Huang, M; Nie, H; Wang, Z; Wang, F

    2014-10-01

    RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3), the mammalian ortholog of gonadotropin-inhibiting hormone, has been implicated as a mediator between reproduction and energy balance. This study aimed to investigate the physiological effects of RFRP-3 on the process of ovarian development in food-restricted pre-pubertal ewes. The results showed that food restriction significantly inhibited the ovarian development and follicular growth. The data of qPCR in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis showed that food restriction not only upregulated RFRP-3 mRNA expression but also downregulated the mRNA expression of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone receptor, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR). Immunohistochemistry of RFRP-3 in the ovaries suggested that RFRP-3 may regulate the follicular development. These results suggested that the changes of RFRP-3 in response to food restriction might influence the HPO axis and inhibit ovarian development. PMID:25039406

  5. What Are the Key Statistics about Pituitary Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors for pituitary tumors? What are the key statistics about pituitary tumors? About 10,000 pituitary tumors ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

  6. A Computational Model of the Rainbow Trout Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Ovary-Liver Axis.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Kendall; Krone, Stephen M; Nagler, James J; Schultz, Irvin R

    2016-04-01

    Reproduction in fishes and other vertebrates represents the timely coordination of many endocrine factors that culminate in the production of mature, viable gametes. In recent years there has been rapid growth in understanding fish reproductive biology, which has been motivated in part by recognition of the potential effects that climate change, habitat destruction and contaminant exposure can have on natural and cultured fish populations. New approaches to understanding the impacts of these stressors are being developed that require a systems biology approach with more biologically accurate and detailed mathematical models. We have developed a multi-scale mathematical model of the female rainbow trout hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary-liver axis to use as a tool to help understand the functioning of the system and for extrapolation of laboratory findings of stressor impacts on specific components of the axis. The model describes the essential endocrine components of the female rainbow trout reproductive axis. The model also describes the stage specific growth of maturing oocytes within the ovary and permits the presence of sub-populations of oocytes at different stages of development. Model formulation and parametrization was largely based on previously published in vivo and in vitro data in rainbow trout and new data on the synthesis of gonadotropins in the pituitary. Model predictions were validated against several previously published data sets for annual changes in gonadotropins and estradiol in rainbow trout. Estimates of select model parameters can be obtained from in vitro assays using either quantitative (direct estimation of rate constants) or qualitative (relative change from control values) approaches. This is an important aspect of mathematical models as in vitro, cell-based assays are expected to provide the bulk of experimental data for future risk assessments and will require quantitative physiological models to extrapolate across biological scales. PMID

  7. A Computational Model of the Rainbow Trout Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Ovary-Liver Axis

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Kendall; Krone, Stephen M.; Nagler, James J.; Schultz, Irvin R.

    2016-01-01

    Reproduction in fishes and other vertebrates represents the timely coordination of many endocrine factors that culminate in the production of mature, viable gametes. In recent years there has been rapid growth in understanding fish reproductive biology, which has been motivated in part by recognition of the potential effects that climate change, habitat destruction and contaminant exposure can have on natural and cultured fish populations. New approaches to understanding the impacts of these stressors are being developed that require a systems biology approach with more biologically accurate and detailed mathematical models. We have developed a multi-scale mathematical model of the female rainbow trout hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary-liver axis to use as a tool to help understand the functioning of the system and for extrapolation of laboratory findings of stressor impacts on specific components of the axis. The model describes the essential endocrine components of the female rainbow trout reproductive axis. The model also describes the stage specific growth of maturing oocytes within the ovary and permits the presence of sub-populations of oocytes at different stages of development. Model formulation and parametrization was largely based on previously published in vivo and in vitro data in rainbow trout and new data on the synthesis of gonadotropins in the pituitary. Model predictions were validated against several previously published data sets for annual changes in gonadotropins and estradiol in rainbow trout. Estimates of select model parameters can be obtained from in vitro assays using either quantitative (direct estimation of rate constants) or qualitative (relative change from control values) approaches. This is an important aspect of mathematical models as in vitro, cell-based assays are expected to provide the bulk of experimental data for future risk assessments and will require quantitative physiological models to extrapolate across biological scales. PMID

  8. How to contribute to the progress of neuroendocrinology: New insights from discovering novel neuropeptides and neurosteroids regulating pituitary and brain functions.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Obtaining new insights by discovering novel neuropeptides and neurosteroids regulating pituitary and brain functions is essential for the progress of neuroendocrinology. At the beginning of 1970s, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was discovered in mammals. Since then, it was generally accepted that GnRH is the only hypothalamic neuropeptide regulating gonadotropin release in vertebrates. In 2000, however, gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), a novel hypothalamic neuropeptide that actively inhibits gonadotropin release, was discovered in quail. The follow-up studies demonstrated that GnIH acts as a new key player for regulation of reproduction across vertebrates. It now appears that GnIH acts on the pituitary and the brain to serve a number of behavioral and physiological functions. On the other hand, a new concept has been established that the brain synthesizes steroids, called neurosteroids. The formation of neurosteroids in the brain was originally demonstrated in mammals and subsequently in other vertebrates. Recently, 7α-hydroxypregnenolone was discovered as a novel bioactive neurosteroid inducing locomotor behavior of vertebrates, indicating that neurosteroidogenesis in the brain is still incompletely elucidated in vertebrates. At the beginning of 2010s, it was further found that the pineal gland actively produces neurosteroids. Pineal neurosteroids act on the brain to regulate locomotor rhythms and neuronal survival. Furthermore, the interaction of neuropeptides and neurosteroids is becoming clear. GnIH decreases aggressive behavior by regulating neuroestrogen synthesis in the brain. This review summarizes these new insights by discovering novel neuropeptides and neurosteroids in the field of neuroendocrinology. PMID:26145291

  9. Anatomy, Physiology, and Laboratory Evaluation of the Pituitary Gland.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gregory K; Payne, Spencer C; Jane, John A

    2016-02-01

    The pituitary gland functions prominently in the control of most endocrine systems in the body. Diverse processes such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, and water balance are tightly regulated by the pituitary in conjunction with the hypothalamus and various downstream endocrine organs. Benign tumors of the pituitary gland are the primary cause of pituitary pathology and can result in inappropriate secretion of pituitary hormones or loss of pituitary function. First-line management of clinically significant tumors often involves surgical resection. Understanding of normal pituitary physiology and basic testing strategies to assess for pituitary dysfunction should be familiar to any skull base surgeon. PMID:26614827

  10. Successful use of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog for the treatment of tertiary hypogonadism (GnRH deficiency) in a 5-year-old Belgian Blue bull.

    PubMed

    Contri, Alberto; Gloria, Alessia; Wegher, Laura; Carluccio, Augusto

    2012-01-01

    A bull was referred for a progressive oligoasthenotheratozoospermia that resulted in a unsuitable seminal quality for the cryopreservation. Breeding soundness evaluation results suggested gonadal dysfunction. Because of the lack of normal ranges for these hormones in the bull, in this study, the hypogonadism and the site of the dysfunction (hypothalamus) were diagnosed by the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test. The evaluation of pituitary and testicular responsiveness by a GnRH stimulating test revealed a responsiveness of the pituitary and testis, thus a secondary hypogonadism (hypothalamic hypogonadism) was postulated and a therapeutic approach based on the subcutaneous administration of GnRH analog was attempted. An increase in semen volume, concentration and sperm characteristics were detected 9 weeks after the start of the treatment, corroborating the hypothalamic origin of the disease and the useful of the GnRH therapy. PMID:22493993

  11. Evaluation of activity of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in postmenopausal women suffering from severe acute illness

    PubMed Central

    Raj, M. Neelima; Suresh, V.; Mukka, Arun; Reddy, Amaresh; Sachan, Alok; Mohan, Alladi; Vengamma, B.; Rao, P.V.L.N. Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Postmenopausal women constitute an ideal model for studying the extent of hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal (HPG) axis suppression in critical illness as the gonadotropins are normally high and non-cyclical in them. The objective was to assess the impact of acute severe illness in postmenopausal women on the HPG axis and the activities of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), the hypothalamo- pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axes; and levels of serum prolactin, by comparison between critically ill postmenopausal women and otherwise healthy postmenopausal women. Methods: Thirty five consecutive postmenopausal women older than 60 yr admitted to medical intensive care with a Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) more than 30 were included. On day five of their in-hospital stay, blood samples were collected for oestradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), cortisol, androstenedione, prolactin and thyroid profile. Thirty five apparently healthy postmenopausal women were selected as controls. Results: Levels of LH, FSH, thyrotropin, free thyroxin (fT4) and free tri-iodothyronine (fT3) were lower while oestradiol, cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone were higher among patients in comparison to healthy controls. Prolactin levels were similar in patients and controls. Among sick patients both FSH and fT4 showed a negative correlation (P<0.05) with the SAPS II score. Interpretation & conclusions: In critically ill postmenopausal women, paradoxically elevated oestrogen levels despite gonadotropin suppression suggests a non-ovarian origin. Prolactin remained unaltered in patients despite their illness, possibly reflecting atrophy of lactotrophs in menopause. PMID:26997016

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea in pituitary tumours1

    PubMed Central

    Cole, I E; Keene, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    Three cases of CSF rhinorrhoea due to pituitary tumours are reported and the literature reviewed. The treatment of choice appears to be trans-sphenoidal exploration of the pituitary fossa with insertion of a free muscle graft followed by radiotherapy. The probability of the tumour being a prolactin-secreting adenoma is discussed. PMID:7017123

  13. The Enigma behind Pituitary and Sella Turcica

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Umarevathi; Mahendra, Lodd; Rangarajan, Sumanth; Madasamy, Ramasamy; Ibrahim, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The pituitary gland's role as a functional matrix for sella turcica has not been suggested in orthodontic literature. This paper is an attempt to correlate the role of pituitary gland in the development of sella turcica. A case report of dwarfism associated with hypopituitarism is presented to highlight the above hypothesis. PMID:26199763

  14. Reversible suprasellar pituitary mass secondary to hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, J.A.; Lee, P.A.; Albright, A.L. Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA )

    1989-12-08

    Sellar enlargement and suprasellar extension of a pituitary mass, demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic scanning in three children with primary hypothyroidism, resolved after treatment with levothyroxine sodium. This condition, a logical consequence of the pathogenesis of primary hypothyroidism, must be considered in patients with pituitary and suprasellar masses.

  15. Human chorionic gonadotropin: Different glycoforms and biological activity depending on its source of production.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Thierry

    2016-06-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is the first hormonal message from the placenta to the mother. It is detectable in maternal blood two days after implantation and behaves like a super LH agonist stimulating progesterone secretion by the corpus luteum. In addition to maintaining the production of progesterone until the placenta itself produces it, hCG also has a role in myometrial quiescence and local immune tolerance. Specific to humans, hCG is a complex glycoprotein composed of two highly glycosylated subunits. The α-subunit is identical to the pituitary gonadotropin hormones (LH, FSH, TSH), contains two N-glycosylation sites, and is encoded by a single gene (CGA). By contrast, the β-subunits are distinct for each hormones and confer both receptor and biological specificity, although LH and hCG bind to the same receptor (LH/CG-R). The hCG ß-subunit is encoded by a cluster of genes (CGB) and contains two sites of N-glycosylation and four sites of O-glycosylation. The hCG glycosylation state varies with the stage of pregnancy, its source of production and in the pathology. It is well established that hCG is mainly secreted into maternal blood, where it peaks at 8-10weeks of gestation (WG), by the syncytiotrophoblast (ST), which represents the endocrine tissue of the human placenta. The invasive extravillous trophoblast (iEVT) also secretes hCG, and in particular hyperglycosylated forms of hCG (hCG-H) also produced by choriocarcinoma cells. In maternal blood, hCG-H is elevated during early first trimester corresponding to the trophoblastic cell invasion process and then decreases. In addition to its endocrine role, hCG has autocrine and paracrine roles. It promotes formation of the ST and angiogenesis through LH/CG-R but has no effect on trophoblast invasion in vitro. By contrast, hCG-H stimulates trophoblast invasion and angiogenesis by interacting with the TGFß receptor in a LH/CG-R independent signalling pathway. hCG is largely used in antenatal screening

  16. A case of pituitary abscess presenting without a source of infection or prior pituitary pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary abscess is a relatively uncommon cause of pituitary hormone deficiencies and/or a suprasellar mass. Risk factors for pituitary abscess include prior surgery, irradiation and/or pathology of the suprasellar region as well as underlying infections. We present the case of a 22-year-old female presenting with a spontaneous pituitary abscess in the absence of risk factors described previously. Her initial presentation included headache, bitemporal hemianopia, polyuria, polydipsia and amenorrhoea. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her pituitary showed a suprasellar mass. As the patient did not have any risk factors for pituitary abscess or symptoms of infection, the diagnosis was not suspected preoperatively. She underwent transsphenoidal resection and purulent material was seen intraoperatively. Culture of the surgical specimen showed two species of alpha hemolytic Streptococcus, Staphylococcus capitis and Prevotella melaninogenica. Urine and blood cultures, dental radiographs and transthoracic echocardiogram failed to show any source of infection that could have caused the pituitary abscess. The patient was treated with 6weeks of oral metronidazole and intravenous vancomycin. After 6weeks of transsphenoidal resection and just after completion of antibiotic therapy, her headache and bitemporal hemianopsia resolved. However, nocturia and polydipsia from central diabetes insipidus and amenorrhoea from hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism persisted. Learning points Pituitary abscesses typically develop in patients who have other sources of infection or disruption of the normal suprasellar anatomy by either surgery, irradiation or pre-existing pathology; however, they can develop in the absence of known risk factors. Patients with pituitary abscesses typically complain of headache, visual changes and symptoms of pituitary hormone deficiencies. As other pituitary neoplasms present with similar clinical findings, the diagnosis of pituitary abscess is often not

  17. Pituitary Involvement in Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    De Parisot, Audrey; Puéchal, Xavier; Langrand, Corinne; Raverot, Gerald; Gil, Helder; Perard, Laurent; Le Guenno, Guillaume; Berthier, Sabine; Tschirret, Olivier; Eschard, Jean Paul; Vinzio, Stephane; Guillevin, Loïc; Sève, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pituitary dysfunction is a rare manifestation of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) (Wegener). The main aim of this multicenter retrospective study was to describe the characteristics and outcomes of pituitary manifestations in patients with GPA included in the French Vasculitis Study Group database. Among the 819 GPA patients included in the database, 9 (1.1%) had pituitary involvement. The median age at diagnosis of GPA and pituitary involvement was 46 and 50.8 years, respectively. Pituitary involvement was present at onset of GPA in 1 case and occurred later in 8 patients after a median follow up of 58.5 months. When pituitary dysfunction occurred, 8 patients had active disease at other sites including ENT (n = 6), eye (n = 4), or central nervous system (n = 3) involvement. The most common hormonal dysfunctions were diabetes insipidus (n = 7) and hypogonadism (n = 7). Magnetic resonance imaging was abnormal in 7 patients. The most common lesions were an enlargement of the pituitary gland, thickening of the pituitary stalk, and loss of posterior hypersignal on T1-weighed images. All patients were treated with corticosteroid therapy and 8 patients received immunosuppressive agents for the pituitary involvement, including cyclophosphamide (n = 3), rituximab (n = 2), and methotrexate (n = 3). After a median follow-up of 9.2 years, GPA was in complete remission in 7 patients, but 8 patients were still under hormone replacement therapy. Among the 5 patients who had a subsequent MRI, 2 had complete resolution of pituitary lesions.By combining our study and the literature review, the frequency of hypogonadism and diabetes insipidus, among the patients with pituitary dysfunction, can be estimated at 78% and 71% respectively. Despite a high rate of systemic disease remission on maintenance therapy, 86% of the patients had persistent pituitary dysfunction. The patients who recovered from pituitary dysfunction had all been

  18. Pituitary stem cells: candidates and implications.

    PubMed

    Nassiri, Farshad; Cusimano, Michael; Zuccato, Jeff A; Mohammed, Safraz; Rotondo, Fabio; Horvath, Eva; Syro, Luis V; Kovacs, Kalman; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2013-09-01

    The pituitary is the master endocrine gland of the body. It undergoes many changes after birth, and these changes may be mediated by the differentiation of pituitary stem cells. Stem cells in any tissue source must display (1) pluripotent capacity, (2) capacity for indefinite self-renewal, and (3) a lack of specialization. Unlike neural stem cells identified in the hippocampus and subventricular zone, pituitary stem cells are not associated with one specific cell type. There are many major candidates that are thought to be potential pituitary stem cell sources. This article reviews the evidence for each of the major cell types and discuss the implications of identifying a definitive pituitary stem cell type. PMID:23423660

  19. Somatotroph pituitary tumors in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Langohr, I M; Garner, M M; Kiupel, M

    2012-05-01

    A series of 11 pituitary tumors in budgerigars were classified on the basis of their clinical, gross, microscopic, and immunohistochemical characteristics. Affected birds were young to middle-aged. Clinically, neurologic signs--including difficulties flying, ataxia, and blindness--were most commonly reported. Additional clinical signs included weight loss, abnormal feathers or molting, increased respiratory efforts, and exophthalmos. Nine birds were diagnosed with chromophobic pituitary adenomas, and 2 birds had chromophobic pituitary carcinomas. Only 1 tumor was delimited to the pituitary gland; the other 10 variably invaded the brain, skull, and retrobulbar space. Distant metastases were identified in 2 birds. All tumors were immunohistochemically strongly positive for growth hormone, consistent with the diagnosis of somatotroph tumors. The common occurrence and early onset may suggest a genetic predisposition of budgerigars to develop somatotroph pituitary tumors with a high incidence of local invasion and with metastatic potential. PMID:21900544

  20. Estradiol and its membrane-impermeable conjugate estradiol-BSA inhibit tamoxifen-stimulated prolactin secretion in incubated rat pituitaries.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, R; Bellido, C; Garrido-Gracia, J C; Alonso, R; Sánchez-Criado, J E

    2006-04-01

    In the absence of estrogen (E), the selective E receptor modulator tamoxifen (TX) has two agonist effects in the rat pituitary: induction of progesterone receptor (PR)-dependent GnRH self-priming in the gonadotrope, and stimulation of prolactin (PRL) secretion in the lactotrope. TX-induced gonadotropin (GnRH) self-priming is absent when 10(-8) M estradiol-17beta (E2) is added to the incubation medium of pituitaries from TX-treated rats. The present experiments investigated whether PR-independent PRL release into the incubation medium of pituitaries from TX-treated ovariectomized (OVX) rats was affected by E2, and the effect of different ER ligands (ICI182780, TX, estradiol-17alpha, E2 -BSA) on TX-stimulated PRL secretion. Moreover, the effect of E2 on TRH-stimulated PRL secretion in pituitaries collected from estradiol benzoate- and TX-treated OVX rats was studied. It was found that: i) incubation with E2 supressed the PRL releasing effect of injected TX; ii) whereas coincubation with the pure anti-E type II ICI182780 antagonized the inhibitory effect of E2, coincubation with the anti-E type I TX did not; iii) estradiol-17alpha lacked inhibitory action, whereas a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of both E2 and E2 -BSA was noticed; and iv) TRH stimulatory effect on PRL release in pituitaries from TX-treated rats was blocked by addition of E2 to the medium. Taken together, these data argue in favor of the presence of specific membrane recognition sites for E in the lactotrope involved in steroid-specific E2 inhibition of TX-stimulated PRL secretion. PMID:16595727

  1. Effects of alcohol feeding on androgen receptors in the rat pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.W.

    1987-10-26

    Specific binding of testosterone-1..beta..,2..beta..-/sup 3/H by cytosol from anterior pituitary gland of ethanol-fed, isocaloric control, and castrated control and ethanol-fed rats with or without testosterone treatment has been investigated by charcoal assay. The number of androgen binding sites was significantly reduced in alcohol-fed rats when compared to the isocaloric control value, with no significant change in Kd. Castration significantly increased the number of receptor sites in control rats and when castrated control animals were treated with testosterone the binding sites were decreased to the intact control level. In contrast, castration or testosterone given to castrated alcohol-fed rats did not alter alcohol-induced reduction of the receptor sites. The binding affinity (Kd) is identical in all groups. The concentration of serum luteinizing hormone (LH) was significantly lower in alcohol-fed rats when compared to that of normal controls. An increased serum LH level with a decreased testosterone level was noted in castrated control rats. However, castration of alcohol-fed rats had little or no effects on the concentrations of LH and testosterone. Administration of testosterone suppressed castration-induced high LH in control rats but alcohol induced reduction of LH level was not altered by this treatment. These findings indicate that alcohol exerts a suppressive effect on the content of androgen receptors and secretory functions of gonadotropins in the pituitary gland. 23 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  2. Early-Life Social Isolation Impairs the Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone Neuronal Activity and Serotonergic System in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Tomoko; Teo, Chuin Hau; Cham, Kai Lin; Idris, Marshita Mohd; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2015-01-01

    Social isolation in early life deregulates the serotonergic system of the brain, compromising reproductive function. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus are critical to the inhibitory regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal activity in the brain and release of luteinizing hormone by the pituitary gland. Although GnIH responds to stress, the role of GnIH in social isolation-induced deregulation of the serotonin system and reproductive function remains unclear. We investigated the effect of social isolation in early life on the serotonergic–GnIH neuronal system using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged GnIH transgenic rats. Socially isolated rats were observed for anxious and depressive behaviors. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined c-Fos protein expression in EGFP–GnIH neurons in 9-week-old adult male rats after 6 weeks post-weaning isolation or group housing. We also inspected serotonergic fiber juxtapositions in EGFP–GnIH neurons in control and socially isolated male rats. Socially isolated rats exhibited anxious and depressive behaviors. The total number of EGFP–GnIH neurons was the same in control and socially isolated rats, but c-Fos expression in GnIH neurons was significantly reduced in socially isolated rats. Serotonin fiber juxtapositions on EGFP–GnIH neurons were also lower in socially isolated rats. In addition, levels of tryptophan hydroxylase mRNA expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus were significantly attenuated in these rats. These results suggest that social isolation in early-life results in lower serotonin levels, which reduce GnIH neuronal activity and may lead to reproductive failure. PMID:26617573

  3. Pituitary abscess: an unusual presentation of "aseptic meningitis".

    PubMed

    Schwartz, I D; Zalles, M C; Foster, J L; Burry, V F

    1995-01-01

    Granulomatous inflammation of the pituitary and pituitary abscesses are rare entities. These conditions are found even more rarely in the pediatric aged population. We report a case of a radiographic and clinical, sterile pituitary abscess with non-caseating granulomatous inflammation in a girl who presented with hypopituitarism, meningeal irritation, and symptoms of pituitary apoplexy. PMID:7584709

  4. Defining Global Gene Expression Changes of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Female sGnRH-Antisense Transgenic Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Huang, Wei; Zhong, Chengrong; Luo, Daji; Li, Shuangfei; Zhu, Zuoyan; Hu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is critical in the development and regulation of reproduction in fish. The inhibition of neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) expression may diminish or severely hamper gonadal development due to it being the key regulator of the axis, and then provide a model for the comprehensive study of the expression patterns of genes with respect to the fish reproductive system. Methodology/Principal Findings In a previous study we injected 342 fertilized eggs from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) with a gene construct that expressed antisense sGnRH. Four years later, we found a total of 38 transgenic fish with abnormal or missing gonads. From this group we selected the 12 sterile females with abnormal ovaries in which we combined suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and cDNA microarray analysis to define changes in gene expression of the HPG axis in the present study. As a result, nine, 28, and 212 genes were separately identified as being differentially expressed in hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary, of which 87 genes were novel. The number of down- and up-regulated genes was five and four (hypothalamus), 16 and 12 (pituitary), 119 and 93 (ovary), respectively. Functional analyses showed that these genes involved in several biological processes, such as biosynthesis, organogenesis, metabolism pathways, immune systems, transport links, and apoptosis. Within these categories, significant genes for neuropeptides, gonadotropins, metabolic, oogenesis and inflammatory factors were identified. Conclusions/Significance This study indicated the progressive scaling-up effect of hypothalamic sGnRH antisense on the pituitary and ovary receptors of female carp and provided comprehensive data with respect to global changes in gene expression throughout the HPG signaling pathway, contributing towards improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and regulative pathways in the reproductive system of

  5. Pituitary carcinoma with endolymphatic sac metastasis.

    PubMed

    Balili, Irida; Sullivan, Steven; Mckeever, Paul; Barkan, Ariel

    2014-06-01

    Pituitary carcinoma is characterized by the presence of a metastatic lesion(s) in a location non-contiguous with the original pituitary tumor. The mechanism(s) of malignant transformation are not known. A 15 year-old male was diagnosed in 1982 with a pituitary macroadenoma and acromegaly (random GH 67 ng/ml and no suppression by oral glucose). His prolactin was normal between 18 and 23 ng/ml. Transcranial resection in July 1983 was followed by radiation therapy. The tumor was immunopositive for GH and prolactin. The proliferation MIB-1 index was 0-1%. With aqueous Octreotide 100 mcg 4× daily both GH and IGF-1 became normal. The patient was lost to follow-up and was treated by his local physician. In 2001, his IGF-1 level was 1271 ng/ml, and his random GH was 1.8-2.4 ng/ml by ILMA despite progressive increase in the dose of Sandostatin LAR to 140 mg/month in divided doses. Prolactin remained normal or minimally increased between 15 and 25 ng/ml. In 2009 he was diagnosed with the tumor in the location of left endolymphatic sac. Histological examination showed low grade pituitary carcinoma strongly immunopositive for prolactin but negative for GH. MIB-1 antibody labeled 0-5% cells. In 2012 endoscopic resection of the pituitary tumor remnant was attempted. Immunohistochemical stains were strongly immunopositive for both prolactin and GH, similar to his original pituitary tumor. The MIB-1 proliferation index was low from 0 to 1%. To our knowledge this is the first case of pituitary carcinoma in the endolymphatic sac region. The dichotomy between the cell population of the pituitary lesion (GH/prolactin producing) and the metastasis (purely prolactin-producing) may suggest that the metastatic pituitary lesion derived from a clone distinct from the original one. PMID:23645293

  6. Immunological properties of prolactin and studies on a gonadotropin binding inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.S.

    1985-01-01

    The physiological role of prolactin in horses has not yet been well defined. With the availability of highly purified ePRL for inducing antibody formation in rabbits and for radiolabeling with Na/sup 125/I, a very sensitive (0.4-0.6 ng/ml) and highly specific homologous RIA for ePRL was developed. A heterologous RIA using /sup 125/I-labeled ovine PRL and anti-ePRL antiserum was also developed and compared to the homologous RIA for ePRL. Of the two systems, it is concluded that this homologous RIA system is more suitable and more reliable for measuring prolactin concentration in horse serum samples. Until now, biochemical information on PRL has not been available for reptilian species. Sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) prolactin was purified from pituitary extracts by selective precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography and gel filtration. Similar to other species of PRL, sea turtle PRL is a 22,000-24,000 daltons protein and contains a high content of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, serine and leucine, the N-terminal amino acid residue. Gonadotropin (FSH) binding inhibitor was partially purified from sheep testes by ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion exchange chromatography. The FSH-BI (molecular weight: 50,000 daltons, estimated by gel filtration) contains a protein moiety necessary for binding inhibitory activity. The inhibition of the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ovine FSH to its receptor by the FSH-BI is not competitive. Both in vivo and in vitro biological studies of FSH-BI preparations in rats indicated various effects on FSH and LH activities at the gonadal level. These findings suggest a physiological role for FSH-BI in the regulation of reproduction.

  7. Binding properties of solubilized gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor: role of carboxylic groups

    SciTech Connect

    Hazum, E.

    1987-11-03

    The interaction of /sup 125/I-buserelin, a superactive agonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), with solubilized GnRH receptor was studied. The highest specific binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor is evident at 4/sup 0/C, and equilibrium is reached after 2 h of incubation. The soluble receptor retained 100% of the original binding activity when kept at 4 or 22/sup 0/C for 60 min. Mono- and divalent cations inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor. Monovalent cations require higher concentrations than divalent cations to inhibit the binding. Since the order of potency with the divalent cations was identical with that of their association constants to dicarboxylic compounds, it is suggested that there are at least two carboxylic groups of the receptor that participate in the binding of the hormone. The carboxyl groups of sialic acid residues are not absolutely required for GnRH binding since the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor was only slightly affected by pretreatment with neuraminidase and wheat germ agglutinin. The finding that polylysines stimulate luteinizing hormone (LH) release from pituitary cell cultures with the same efficacy as GnRH suggest that simple charge interactions can induce LH release. According to these results, the authors propose that the driving force for the formation of the hormone-receptor complex is an ionic interaction between the positively charged amino acid arginine in position 8 and the carboxyl groups in the binding site.

  8. Subcellular localization of pituitary enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    A cytochemical procedure is reported for identifying subcellular sites of enzymes hydrolyzing beta-naphthylamine substrates, and to study the sites of reaction product localization in cells of various tissues. Investigations using the substrate Leu 4-methoxy-8-naphthylamine, a capture with hexonium pararosaniline, and the final chelation of osmium have identified the hydrolyzing enzyme of rat liver cells; this enzyme localized on cell membranes with intense deposition in the areas of the parcanaliculi. The study of cells in the anterior pituitary of the rat showed the deposition of reaction product on cell membrane; and on the membranes of secretion granules contained within the cell. The deposition of reaction product on the cell membrane however showed no increase or decrease with changes in the physiological state of the gland and release of secretion granules from specific cells.

  9. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis.

    PubMed

    Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania M; Chiamolera, Maria I; Pazos-Moura, Carmen C; Wondisford, Fredic E

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis determines the set point of thyroid hormone (TH) production. Hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulates the synthesis and secretion of pituitary thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH), which acts at the thyroid to stimulate all steps of TH biosynthesis and secretion. The THs thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) control the secretion of TRH and TSH by negative feedback to maintain physiological levels of the main hormones of the HPT axis. Reduction of circulating TH levels due to primary thyroid failure results in increased TRH and TSH production, whereas the opposite occurs when circulating THs are in excess. Other neural, humoral, and local factors modulate the HPT axis and, in specific situations, determine alterations in the physiological function of the axis. The roles of THs are vital to nervous system development, linear growth, energetic metabolism, and thermogenesis. THs also regulate the hepatic metabolism of nutrients, fluid balance and the cardiovascular system. In cells, TH actions are mediated mainly by nuclear TH receptors (210), which modify gene expression. T3 is the preferred ligand of THR, whereas T4, the serum concentration of which is 100-fold higher than that of T3, undergoes extra-thyroidal conversion to T3. This conversion is catalyzed by 5'-deiodinases (D1 and D2), which are TH-activating enzymes. T4 can also be inactivated by conversion to reverse T3, which has very low affinity for THR, by 5-deiodinase (D3). The regulation of deiodinases, particularly D2, and TH transporters at the cell membrane control T3 availability, which is fundamental for TH action. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1387-1428, 2016. PMID:27347897

  10. Expression profiles of gonadotropins and their receptors during 17α-methyltestosterone implantation-induced sex change in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuesong; Liu, Xiaochun; Zhang, Haifa; Zhang, Yong; Li, Shuisheng; Sang, Qing; Wang, Qian; Luo, Wenna; Liu, Qizhi; Lu, Danqi; Meng, Zining; Lin, Haoran

    2011-06-01

    It is known that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis participates in the sex change of hermaphrodite teleosts, and gonadal steroid hormones mediate this physiological process. The secretion of gonadal steroids is directly regulated by signaling pathways involving gonadotropins (GtHs) and gonadotropin receptors (GtHRs) in teleosts. To gain insight into the involvement of GtH/GtHR systems in the sex change process, cDNAs encoding follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) were firstly isolated from gonads of orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides), a protogynous hermaphrodite fish. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that the expression of the FSHR was confined to the brain, pituitary gland, ovary, and testis, while the LHR was expressed only in the brain, ovary, and testis. Furthermore, the expression profiles of GtH subunits (FSHβ and LHβ) and their receptors were analyzed in parallel with the serum levels of estradiol-17β (E(2) ), testosterone (T), and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) during 17α-methyltestosterone (MT)-induced sex change. Quantitative real-time PCR determined that the abundances of FSHβ and FSHR were significantly inhibited after MT treatment for 2 and 4 weeks, but subsequently returned to the control level after 6 weeks. In contrast, the mRNA levels of LHβ and LHR were significantly elevated throughout the sex change process. During MT-induced sex change, serum concentrations of E(2) remained constant while T and 11-KT levels were significantly increased. Taken together, our results suggest that GtH/GtHR systems are involved in MT-induced sex change, and two signaling pathways may have distinct roles in modulating the variations of the corresponding steroid hormones in the orange-spotted grouper. PMID:21567650

  11. Cell Type-Specific Sexual Dimorphism in Rat Pituitary Gene Expression During Maturation.

    PubMed

    Bjelobaba, Ivana; Janjic, Marija M; Kucka, Marek; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2015-07-01

    The most obvious functional differences between mammalian males and females are related to the control of reproductive physiology and include patterns of GnRH and gonadotropin release, the timing of puberty, sexual and social behavior, and the regulation of food intake and body weight. Using the rat as the best-studied mammalian model for maturation, we examined the expression of major anterior pituitary genes in five secretory cell types of developing males and females. Corticotrophs show comparable Pomc profiles in both sexes, with the highest expression occurring during the infantile period. Somatotrophs and lactotrophs also exhibit no difference in Gh1 and Prl profiles during embryonic to juvenile age but show the amplification of Prl expression in females and Gh1 expression in males during peripubertal and postpubertal ages. Gonadotrophs exhibit highly synchronized Lhb, Fshb, Cga, and Gnrhr expression in both sexes, but the peak of expression occurs during the infantile period in females and at the end of the juvenile period in males. Thyrotrophs also show different developmental Tshb profiles, which are synchronized with the expression of gonadotroph genes in males but not in females. These results indicate the lack of influence of sex on Pomc expression and the presence of two patterns of sexual dimorphism in the expression of other pituitary genes: a time shift in the peak expression during postnatal development, most likely reflecting the perinatal sex-specific brain differentiation, and modulation of the amplitude of expression during late development, which is secondary to the establishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and -thyroid axes. PMID:26063874

  12. Research resource: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor-mediated signaling network in LbetaT2 cells: a pathway-based web-accessible knowledgebase.

    PubMed

    Fink, Marc Y; Pincas, Hanna; Choi, Soon Gang; Nudelman, German; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2010-09-01

    The GnRH receptor (GnRHR), expressed at the cell surface of the anterior pituitary gonadotrope, is critical for normal secretion of gonadotropins LH and FSH, pubertal development, and reproduction. The signaling network downstream of the GnRHR and the molecular bases of the regulation of gonadotropin expression have been the subject of intense research. The murine LbetaT2 cell line represents a mature gonadotrope and therefore is an important model for the study of GnRHR-signaling pathways and modulation of the gonadotrope cell by physiological regulators. In order to facilitate access to the information contained in this complex and evolving literature, we have developed a pathway-based knowledgebase that is web hosted. At present, using 106 relevant primary publications, we curated a comprehensive knowledgebase of the GnRHR signaling in the LbetaT2 cell in the form of a process diagram. Positive and negative controls of gonadotropin gene expression, which included GnRH itself, hypothalamic factors, gonadal steroids and peptides, as well as other hormones, were illustrated. The knowledgebase contains 187 entities and 206 reactions. It was assembled using CellDesigner software, which provides an annotated graphic representation of interactions, stored in Systems Biology Mark-up Language. We then utilized Biological Pathway Publisher, a software suite previously developed in our laboratory, to host the knowledgebase in a web-accessible format as a public resource. In addition, the network entities were linked to a public wiki, providing a forum for discussion, updating, and error correction. The GnRHR-signaling network is openly accessible at http://tsb.mssm.edu/pathwayPublisher/GnRHR_Pathway/GnRHR_Pathway_ index.html. PMID:20592162

  13. Plasma kisspeptin levels are elevated in cord blood and present sexual dimorphism in the adult population: relation with leptin, gonadotropins and anthropometrical data.

    PubMed

    Pita, Jimena; Rado-Peralta, Sandra; Gavela-Pérez, Teresa; Aragón, Isabel; Barrios, Vicente; Rovira, Adela; Argente, Jesús; Soriano-Guillén, Leandro

    2011-05-01

    Kisspeptin, the product of the hypothalamic KISS1 gene, is a main regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and could be a link between metabolism and reproduction through its interaction with leptin. Kisspeptin could be involved in gonadotropin regulation and responsive to leptin levels from the first stages of life, exhibiting, as does leptin, sexual dimorphism. To test our hypothesis, we have analyzed plasma kisspeptin levels and their possible relationship with gonadotropins and leptin in a cohort composed of newborns (n = 86) and adults (n = 55). Plasma kisspeptin, gonadotropin and leptin levels were measured by RIA and multiplexed bead immunoassays, respectively. We have built a multivariate linear regression model (analyzing kisspeptin and LH separately as dependent variables) by stepwise analysis, incorporating the variables that had shown significant correlation in the univariate analysis. Cord blood samples exhibited high kisspeptin levels 127.01(113-141.02 pmol/l), but these were not sexually dimorphic. The adult population exhibited sexual dimorphism (3.72(2.95-4.49) vs. 1.77(1.23-2.31)pmol/l women vs. men, p<0.05). Leptin levels showed sexual dimorphism in cord blood samples and also in the adult population. Furthermore, there was a significant interaction between LH and kisspeptin levels and kisspeptin was negatively correlated with age. The high kisspeptin levels observed in cord blood, with no sexual dimorphism, suggest a placental source. The sexual dimorphism exhibited in adulthood supports the notion that there are different sources and/or differential kisspeptin regulation between men and women. PMID:21295095

  14. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McLaughlin, John R.; Risch, Harvey A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C.; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Methods Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. Results We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p = 0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p = 0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p = 0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p = 0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p = 0.060, overall invasive). Conclusions Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. PMID:25528498

  15. Clinical and endocrine responses to pituitary radiotherapy in pediatric Cushing's disease: an effective second-line treatment.

    PubMed

    Storr, Helen L; Plowman, P Nicholas; Carroll, Paul V; François, Inge; Krassas, Gerasimos E; Afshar, Farhad; Besser, G Michael; Grossman, Ashley B; Savage, Martin O

    2003-01-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is considered first-line treatment for Cushing's disease (CD). Options for treatment of postoperative persisting hypercortisolemia are pituitary radiotherapy (RT), repeat TSS, or bilateral adrenalectomy. From 1983 to 2001, we treated 18 pediatric patients (age, 6.4-17.8 yr) with CD. All underwent TSS, and 11 were cured (postoperative serum cortisol, <50 nM). Seven (39%) had 0900-h serum cortisol of 269-900 nM during the immediate postoperative period (2-20 d), indicating lack of cure. These patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 12.8 yr; range, 6.4-17.8 yr; 4 prepubertal; 3 pubertal) received external beam RT to the pituitary gland, using a 6-MV linear accelerator, with a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 35 d. Until the RT became effective, hypercortisolemia was controlled with ketoconazole (dose, 200-600 mg/d) (n = 4) and metyrapone (750 mg-3 g/d) +/- aminoglutethimide (1 g/d) or o'p'DDD (mitotane, 3 mg/d) (n = 3). All patients were cured after pituitary RT. The mean interval from RT to cure (mean serum cortisol on 5-point day curve, <150 nM) was 0.94 yr (0.25-2.86 yr). Recovery of pituitary-adrenal function (mean cortisol, 150-300 nM) occurred at mean 1.16 yr (0.40-2.86 yr) post RT. At 2 yr post RT, puberty occurred early in one male patient (age, 9.8 yr) but was normal in the others. GH secretion was assessed at 0.6-2.5 yr post RT in all patients: six had GH deficiency (peak on glucagon/insulin provocation, <1.0-17.9 mU/liter) and received human GH replacement. Follow-up of pituitary function 7.6 and 9.5 yr post RT in two patients showed normal gonadotropin secretion and recovery of GH peak to 29.7 and 19.2 mU/liter. The seven patients were followed for mean 6.9 yr (1.4-12.0 yr), with no evidence of recurrence of CD. In conclusion, pituitary RT is an effective and relatively rapid-onset treatment for pediatric CD after failure of TSS. GH deficiency occurred in 86% patients. Long-term follow-up suggests some recovery of GH

  16. Er-Xian Decoction, a traditional Chinese herbal formula, intervening early in hypothalamic-pituitary axis of male rats with delayed puberty

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Li, LiHong; Jin, Xin; Fang, JianWei; Zhang, DongFang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Er-Xian Decoction (EXD) is one of the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) with unique effect on osteoporosis, menopausal syndrome and delayed puberty in China for many years. Objective: We aim to evaluate the potential activity of starting hypothalamic–pituitary–testicular (HPT) axis of male rats with delayed puberty. Materials and Methods: Delayed puberty model of male Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were established with soy isoflavones (90 mg·kg-1) and were treated by EXD extract at doses of 5, 10 g·kg-1 or Testosterone undecanoate (TU) for 8 weeks. Body weight, body length, testis weight, T, E2 and luteinizing hormone (LH) in serum, gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) in hypothalamus, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and LH in pituitary gland were determined by ELISA. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect LH in pituitary gland. Results: Soy isoflavones could significantly decrease body weight, body length, testicular organ coefficient T in serum, GnRH in hypothalamus, FSH and LH in pituitary gland. Both of EXD and TU could improve the condition. E2 and LH in serum of all groups were non-significance of difference (P > 0.05). The immunohistochemical results were well consistent with LH in pituitary gland. Conclusion: The results of the present research indicate that EXD extract is effective to start the HPT axis in puberty and can significantly improve sexual developmental inhibition caused by soy isoflavones. PMID:25422555

  17. Pattern of human chorionic gonadotropin binding in the polycystic ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Brawer, J.; Richard, M.; Farookhi, R. )

    1989-08-01

    The histologic evolution of polycystic ovaries in the estradiol valerate-treated rat coincides with the development of a unique plasma pattern of luteinizing hormone. To assess the role of luteinizing hormone in polycystic ovaries, it is necessary to evaluate the luteinizing hormone sensitivity of the specific tissues in the polycystic ovary. Therefore, we examined the pattern of luteinizing hormone binding sites in polycystic ovaries. Rats at 4 or 8 weeks after estradiol valerate treatment each received an intrajugular injection of iodine 125-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin. Some rats also received a 1000-fold excess of unlabeled human chorionic gonadotropin in the same injection. Ovaries were prepared for autoradiography. Dense accumulations of grains occurred over the theca of normal and atretic secondary follicles in all ovaries and over clusters of secondary interstitial cells. The iodine label was variable over the typically hypertrophied theca of precystic follicles. The theca of definitive cysts showed little or no label. These results indicate that cyst formation coincides with the loss of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin binding to the affected follicles.

  18. Prolonged gonadotropin stimulation is associated with decreased ART success

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Meleen; Zapantis, Athena; Taylor, Martina; Jindal, Sangita K.; Neal-Perry, Genevieve S.; Lieman, Harry J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether the duration of gonadotropin stimulation predicts the likelihood of live birth after ART. Methods All IVF or ICSI cycles using fresh autologous oocytes at our institution between January 2004 and December 2007 were analyzed. Results Out of 699 cycles resulting in oocyte retrieval, 193 produced a live birth (27.6%). Women who achieved a live birth had a significantly shorter stimulation phase (11.1 vs. 11.5 days, respectively). Multivariable analysis suggested that 13 days or longer of stimulation decreased the likelihood of a live birth by 53% as compared to cycles that were 10–12 days long (odds ratio [OR] 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.30–0.75) after adjustment for female age, maximum historical FSH, total dose of gonadotropin received, oocytes retrieved, embryos transferred, antagonist suppression and PCOS diagnosis. Conclusions Prolonged duration of gonadotropin stimulation is an independent negative predictor of ART success in our cohort. PMID:20821043

  19. Genetics Home Reference: familial isolated pituitary adenoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1,000 people. FIPA, though, is quite rare, accounting for approximately 2 percent of pituitary adenomas. More ... be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of ...

  20. [Pituitary abscess. A case report (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Guy, G; Jallet, G; Bigorgne, J C

    The case of a patient with apparently primitive pituitary abscess is presented along with a review of the current literature on the subject. Pituitary abscess is rare and should be suspected in patients with hypopituitarism or a febrile chiasma syndrome as well as in the presence of acute or chronic relapsing aseptic meningitis. Diagnosis is based upon radiologic examination particularly tomography of the sella turcica and computerized axial tomography. With early surgical treatment the prognosis is favourable resulting at times in partial or total correction of pituitary function. Twenty-six patients were studied. In twelve of these patients no origin of the abscess was found. Pituitary tumor was found in eight patients and sphenoidal sinusitis in six patients. PMID:6261360

  1. Making a Pituitary Gland in a Dish

    PubMed Central

    Tabar, Viviane

    2016-01-01

    The adenohypophysis secretes multiple hormones that control vital physiological functions. A recent article in Nature (Suga et al., 2011) describes a 3D protocol for the derivation of several endocrine pituitary cell types from mouse ESCs. PMID:22136918

  2. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... People with combined pituitary hormone deficiency may have hypothyroidism, which is underactivity of the butterfly-shaped thyroid gland in the lower neck. Hypothyroidism can cause many symptoms, including weight gain and ...

  3. Primary immune thrombocytopenia accompanied by pituitary apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takahiro; Mochinaga, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    An 83-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a severe headache and purpura. She had previously been diagnosed with idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) and achieved complete remission with steroid therapy. Steroid therapy had been completed one week prior to the current admission. The recurrence of severe thrombocytopenia (<1.0×10(4) platelets/μl) was detected and a CT scan revealed pituitary hemorrhage without pituitary adenoma. She received steroid therapy combined with intravenous immunoglobulin, which resulted in the amelioration of ITP and improvements in the pituitary hemorrhage. Intracranial hemorrhage, which is the most serious bleeding manifestation in ITP, is relatively uncommon. Pituitary apoplexy in ITP is extremely rare. PMID:27498733

  4. Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor neurons fire in synchrony with the female reproductive cycle

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Christian; Tong, Tong; Petitjean, Hugues; Blum, Thomas; Peron, Sophie; Mai, Oliver; Schmitz, Frank; Boehm, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) controls mammalian reproduction via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (hpg) axis, acting on gonadotrope cells in the pituitary gland that express the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). Cells expressing the GnRHR have also been identified in the brain. However, the mechanism by which GnRH acts on these potential target cells remains poorly understood due to the difficulty of visualizing and identifying living GnRHR neurons in the central nervous system. We have developed a mouse strain in which GnRHR neurons express a fluorescent marker, enabling the reliable identification of these cells independent of the hormonal status of the animal. In this study, we analyze the GnRHR neurons of the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus in acute brain slices prepared from adult female mice. Strikingly, we find that the action potential firing pattern of these neurons alternates in synchrony with the estrous cycle, with pronounced burst firing during the preovulatory period. We demonstrate that GnRH stimulation is sufficient to trigger the conversion from tonic to burst firing in GnRHR neurons. Furthermore, we show that this switch in the firing pattern is reversed by a potent GnRHR antagonist. These data suggest that endogenous GnRH acts on GnRHR neurons and triggers burst firing in these cells during late proestrus and estrus. Our data have important clinical implications in that they indicate a novel mode of action for GnRHR agonists and antagonists in neurons of the central nervous system that are not part of the classical hpg axis. PMID:26063780

  5. LPXRFa, the piscine ortholog of GnIH, and LPXRF receptor positively regulate gonadotropin secretion in Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Biran, Jakob; Golan, Matan; Mizrahi, Naama; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2014-11-01

    LPXRFamide (LPXRFa) peptides have been characterized for their ability to inhibit gonadotropin (GTH) release in birds and stimulate growth hormone (GH) release in frogs. However, their involvement in regulating the reproductive hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in mammals and fish is inconclusive. To study the role of LPXRFa peptides in the regulation of GTH secretion, we cloned tilapia LPXRFa and LPXRF receptor (LPXRF-R). Processing of the tilapia preproLPXRFa liberated three mature LPXRFa peptides that varied in size and post-translational modifications. Phylogenetic analysis of LPXRFa and the closely related RFamide peptide PQRFa showed clear clustering of each peptide sequence with its orthologs from various vertebrates. Signal-transduction analysis of the tilapia LPXRF-R in COS-7 cells showed clear stimulation of CRE-dependent luciferase activity, whereas the human NPFFR1 showed suppression of forskolin-induced CRE-dependent activity in this system. Administration of the tilapia pyroglutaminated LPXRFa-2 peptide to primary cell culture of tilapia pituitaries, or to reproductive female tilapia by ip injection, positively regulated both LH and FSH release in vivo and in vitro. Using double-labeled fluorescent in-situ hybridization and immunofluorescence, βLH cells were found to co-express both tilapia lpxrf and tilapia lpxrf-r mRNA, whereas some of the βFSH cells coexpressed only lpxrf-r mRNA. No coexpression of tilapia lpxrf-r was identified in GH-positive cells. These findings suggest that the LPXRFa system is a potent positive regulator of the reproductive neuroendocrine axis of tilapia. PMID:25144920

  6. The pituitary gland: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Solomon Alexander

    2007-01-01

    The functions of the pituitary gland as an important constituent of the endocrine system were not understood until the latter part of the nineteenth century and the first half of the 20th century. At one time, the pituitary was deemed to be the "leader of the endocrine orchestra," but more recent studies have shown that its secretions are influenced by external stimuli and that it is largely under the control of the hypothalamus. PMID:17690988

  7. 77 FR 55481 - Withdrawal of Approval of New Animal Drug Applications; Chorionic Gonadotropin; Naloxone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ...; Chorionic Gonadotropin; Naloxone; Oxymorphone; Oxytocin AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Pharmaceuticals hydrochloride) Inc., 100 Painters Injection. Dr., Chadds Ford, PA 19317. 046-822 VETOCIN...

  8. Genetic regulation of murine pituitary development

    PubMed Central

    Rizzoti, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress has been made recently in unravelling the embryonic events leading to pituitary morphogenesis, both in vivo and in vitro. This includes dissection of the molecular mechanisms controlling patterning of the ventral diencephalon that regulate formation of the pituitary anlagen or Rathke's pouch. There is also a better characterisation of processes that underlie maintenance of pituitary progenitors, specification of endocrine lineages and the three-dimensional organisation of newly differentiated endocrine cells. Furthermore, a population of adult pituitary stem cells (SCs), originating from embryonic progenitors, have been described and shown to have not only regenerative potential, but also the capacity to induce tumour formation. Finally, the successful recapitulation in vitro of embryonic events leading to generation of endocrine cells from embryonic SCs, and their subsequent transplantation, represents exciting advances towards the use of regenerative medicine to treat endocrine deficits. In this review, an up-to-date description of pituitary morphogenesis will be provided and discussed with particular reference to pituitary SC studies. PMID:25587054

  9. Interactions between protein kinase C and arachidonic acid in the gonadotropin response to salmon and chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone-II in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Chang, J P; Van Goor, F; Neumann, C M

    1994-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that, in goldfish, the gonadotropin (GTH) response to salmon GTH-releasing hormone (sGnRH) is partly mediated by arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism via the lipoxygenase enzyme system, whereas protein kinase C (PKC) participates in both sGnRH- and chicken (c)GnRH-II-induced GTH secretion. In this study, the interactions between AA- and PKC-dependent pathways in mediating the long-term GnRH stimulation of GTH release were further investigated using dispersed goldfish pituitary cell cultures in static incubation. Treatments with AA or the PKC activator tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) increased GTH release. The GTH responses to AA and TPA were additive. The lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguairetic acid (NDGA) and the PKC inhibitor H7 selectively reduced AA- and TPA-stimulated GTH release, respectively. These findings suggest that the GTH responses to stimulation by AA- and PKC-dependent signaling pathways are independent of one another. In other experiments, the GTH response to cGnRH-II was unaffected by NDGA but was abolished by H7. In contrast, sGnRH-induced GTH release was attenuated by NDGA and H7. Furthermore, in the presence of both NDGA and H7, the GTH response to sGnRH was abolished. These data suggest that sGnRH stimulation of GTH secretion involves both AA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms; in contrast, cGnRH-II action is not dependent on AA metabolism. The pathway by which AA might be mobilized in response to a GnRH challenge was also investigated by pharmacological manipulations. The diacylglcerol (DG) lipase inhibitor, U-57908, did not decrease sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-induced GTH secretion. On the other hand, the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitors, bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), chloroquine, and quinacrine, reduced sGnRH-elicited, but not cGnRH-II-stimulated GTH release. The addition of AA reversed the inhibitory action of BPB on sGnRH-elicited GTH release. In addition, the GTH response to AA was additive to the cGnRH-II-induced, but

  10. Abnormal pituitary development and function in three siblings of a Jamaican family: A new syndrome involving the Pit-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.C.; Schiavi, A.; Parks, J.

    1994-09-01

    In 1967 Mckusick et al. reported three siblings in Canada who had combine pituitary hormone deficiencies (CPHD). Since that report there have been several families with multiple affected members who share the common characteristics of autosomal recessive inheritance and clinical expression of pituitary deficiencies at an early age. We report here a CPHD family of Jamaican origin with three affected and two unaffected siblings. The affected siblings have evidence of severe growth failure, growth hormone deficiency, hypothyroidism and variable prolactin deficiency. Recently, in some families with CPHD a defect has been detected in the Pit-1 gene, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the differentiation of the pituitary and the production of growth hormone, TSH and prolactin. We are studying the Pit-1 gene in this family as a candidate gene that may explain the family phenotype. The Pit-1 gene has been analyzed in DNA extracted from blood. No gross deletion were detected in exons 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 using exon-specific PCR assay developed in our laboratory. Exon 1 is also currently being analyzed. Single stand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, a screening technique for point mutations within genes, is being used to identify putative base pair changes in the Pit-1 gene. The exon findings will be confirmed using standard DNA sequencing procedures. If a Pit-1 gene is detected, this family would provide a novel presentation, since gonadotropin deficiency appears to be present. Alternatively, this family may represent a mutation on another yet unknown factor involved in normal pituitary development.

  11. Review of outcomes after cessation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment of girls with precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Paul; Silverman, Lawrence A; Geffner, Mitchell E; Neely, E Kirk; Gould, Errol; Danoff, Theodore M

    2014-03-01

    Although gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) have been the standard of care of central precocious puberty (CPP) management for many years, there are still questions about the long-term consequences of treatment. With increased utilization of GnRHa treatment, it is now possible to assess posttreatment outcomes in the immediate posttreatment period and into adulthood. This literature review reports on the long-term effects of GnRHa therapy in girls with CPP after therapy has been discontinued. Published reports confirm the reversibility of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis suppression in females after cessation of GnRHa therapy, with the majority of patients achieving ovulatory menstrual cycles of normal timing and duration. GnRHa therapy does not appear to induce polycystic ovary syndrome or have long-term negative repercussions on either bone mineral density or body composition. Evidence is currently insufficient to identify agent-specific differences in outcomes, reproductive function, and health of offspring. PMID:24719967

  12. The enhancing effects of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seed on fertility potential, plasma gonadotropins and testosterone in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Parandin, Rahmatollah; Yousofvand, Namdar; Ghorbani, Rostam

    2012-01-01

    Background: The task force on plants for fertility regulation in men continued with its program to identify novel prototypes in plants alleged to have fertility regulating properties. Nigella Sativa seeds are frequently used in folk medicine in the Middle East and some Asian countries for the promotion of good health and treatment of many ailments. Objective: To evaluated the role of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa on fertility potential, Pituitary-testicular axis hormones and Testosterone in male rats. Materials and Methods: 24 male rats were randomly divided into 3 groups; control, group A and group B, each group comprising of 8 rats. Animals in control group received 1 ml of normal saline and treatment groups (A and B) received (gavage) graded doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seeds on a daily basis for 60 days. At the end of treatment period, fertility parameters such as body and reproductive organs weight, sperm motility, viability and count, epididymal sperm reserve (ESR), daily sperm production (DSP), blood testosterone concentration, Gonadotropins levels and fertility index were measured. Results: There was a significant difference in testes and epididymidis weight, sperm count, ESR, DSP, blood testosterone concentration, LH and fertility index in both the lower dose group and the higher group as compared to the control group. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seed especially in higher doses could increase fertility potential, LH and testosterone concentration in male rats. PMID:25246898

  13. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on the pituitary-gonad axis in the European eel, Anguilla anguilla (L.).

    PubMed

    Sébert, Marie-Emilie; Amérand, Aline; Vettier, Aurélie; Weltzien, Finn-Arne; Pasqualini, Catherine; Sébert, Philippe; Dufour, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    European silver eels are thought to undergo sexual maturation during their oceanic reproductive migration from the European continent to their spawning area in the Sargasso Sea. Tracking data and various anatomical and physiological features suggest that silver eels migrate in deep sea, leading us to hypothesise that high hydrostatic pressure (HP) influences the induction of eel reproduction. We subjected female and male silver eels to 101ATA for 3 and 7 weeks, respectively, in a hyperbaric chamber equipped with a freshwater recirculation system. In comparison with control eels kept at 1 ATA, HP effects were tested against the messenger RNA levels of pituitary gonadotropins (LHbeta, FSHbeta) using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The effects of HP on gonadal activity were estimated by measuring gonadosomatic index, oocyte diameter and plasma levels of vitellogenin (Vtg) and sex steroids (E(2), 11-KT). At the pituitary level, LHbeta expression tended to increase while FSHbeta expression decreased in both sex, leading to an increase in the LHbeta/FSHbeta ratio. This suggests a differential effect of HP on the expression of the two gonadotropins. In females submitted to HP, we observed a significant increase in oocyte diameter and plasma levels of 11-KT and E(2). A similar trend was observed for 11-KT plasma levels in males. In females, Vtg plasma levels also significantly increased, reflecting the stimulatory effect of sex steroids on hepatic vitellogenesis. Our results suggest that HP plays a specific and positive role in eel reproduction but additional environmental and internal factors are necessary to ensure complete sexual maturation. PMID:17324430

  14. Therapeutic Neuroendocrine Agonist and Antagonist Analogs of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides as Modulators of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis.

    PubMed

    Newton, Claire L; Anderson, Ross C; Millar, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive hormones play a role at all stages of life and affect most tissues of the body. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) synthesized in the hypothalamus stimulates the secretion of gonadotropins which in turn stimulate gonadal sex hormone production and gamete formation. This hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis has, therefore, been the target for the development of numerous drugs which regulate it at various points. These include sex steroid agonists and antagonists, inhibitors of sex steroid biosynthesis, and GnRH agonists and antagonists, which have found extensive applications in treating numerous conditions such as precocious puberty, delayed puberty, prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia, endometriosis, uterine fibroids and also in in vitro fertilization protocols. The novel neuroendocrine peptides, kisspeptin (KP) and neurokinin B (NKB), were recently discovered as upstream regulators of GnRH, and inactivating mutations of KP and NKB ligands or receptors result in a failure to progress through puberty. Agonists and antagonists of KP and NKB are being developed as more subtle modulators of the HPG axis. These new drugs offer additional and alternative therapeutic options in pediatric and adult hormone-dependent diseases. PMID:26684214

  15. Gonadotropin therapy in assisted reproduction: an evolutionary perspective from biologics to biotech

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rogério de Barros F.; Esteves, Sandro C.

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin therapy plays an integral role in ovarian stimulation for infertility treatments. Efforts have been made over the last century to improve gonadotropin preparations. Undoubtedly, current gonadotropins have better quality and safety profiles as well as clinical efficacy than earlier ones. A major achievement has been introducing recombinant technology in the manufacturing processes for follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and human chorionic gonadotropin. Recombinant gonadotropins are purer than urine-derived gonadotropins, and incorporating vial filling by mass virtually eliminated batch-to-batch variations and enabled accurate dosing. Recombinant and fill-by-mass technologies have been the driving forces for launching of prefilled pen devices for more patient-friendly ovarian stimulation. The most recent developments include the fixed combination of follitropin alfa + lutropin alfa, long-acting FSH gonadotropin, and a new family of prefilled pen injector devices for administration of recombinant gonadotropins. The next step would be the production of orally bioactive molecules with selective follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone activity. PMID:24714837

  16. 21 CFR 522.1083 - Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1083 - Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1083 - Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  19. Idiopathic Granulomatous Hypophysitis Mimicking Pituitary Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyi; Wang, Renzhi; Yang, Yi; Wu, Huanwen; Su, Changbao; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Lian, Wei; Xu, Zhiqin; Yao, Yong; Ren, Zuyuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic granulomatous hypophysitis (IGH) is a rare inflammatory disease of the pituitary that commonly presents with enlargement of the pituitary gland. Clinically and radiologically, IGH is a rare sellar entity easily to be misdiagnosed as a pituitary adenoma. Through such a case, we aim to present this rarity and emphasize the importance to correctly diagnose confusing pituitary lesions comprehensively by clinical presentations, radiological signs, and biopsy. We present an uncommon case of IGH in a 19-year-old man. The patient was admitted to the hospital with severe headache, vomiting, and vision's sharp decline. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a sellar lesion with obvious cystic change and ring enhancement. The disease course including diagnosis and treatment was presented and analyzed in detail. The pertinent literature is reviewed regarding this uncommon entity. The patient underwent surgical exploration and partial resection via the transsphenoidal approach. The pathologic findings suggested IGH giving no significant evidences of systemic granulomatous disease and venereal disease. Large dose methylprednisolone was then used. The pituitary function recovered, but there was no apparent improvement of his vision. IGH is a rarely occurred inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. It is difficult to diagnose preoperatively and is often misdiagnosed. Although rare, IGH should be kept in mind in terms of differential diagnosis of sellar region lesions. PMID:26181544

  20. The retinoblastoma gene in human pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, V.L.; Arnold, A.; Alexander, J.M.; Klibanski, A. )

    1993-09-01

    Functional inactivation of the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor gene is important in the pathogenesis of many human tumors. Recently, the frequent occurrence of pituitary tumors was reported in mice genetically engineered to have one defective RB allele, a genetic background analogous to that of patients with familial retinoblastoma. The molecular pathogenesis of human pituitary tumors is largely unknown, and the potential role of RB gene inactivation in these neoplasms has not been examined. Consequently, the authors studied 20 human pituitary tumors (12 clinically nonfunctioning tumors, 4 somatotroph adenomas, 2 prolactinomas, and 2 corticotrophy adenomas) for tumor-specific allelic loss of the RB gene using a highly informative polymorphic locus within the gene. Control leukocyte DNA samples from 18 of these 20 patients were heterozygous at this locus, permitting genetic evaluation of their paired tumor specimens. In contrast to the pituitary tumors in the mouse model, none of these 18 human tumors exhibited RB allelic loss. These findings indicate that RB gene inactivation probably does not play an important role in the pathogenesis of common types of human pituitary tumors. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Stellate Cell Networks in the Teleost Pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Matan; Hollander-Cohen, Lian; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2016-01-01

    The folliculostellate cells of the mammalian pituitary are non-endocrine cells that are implicated in long-distance communication and paracrine signaling, but to date, these cells have yet to be characterized in teleosts. We found that the stellate cells of the teleost pituitary share many common attributes with mammalian folliculostellate cells. By labeling of stellate cells in live preparations of tilapia pituitaries we investigated their distribution, association with other endocrine cells and their anatomical and functional coupling. In the pars intermedia, stellate cells were arranged around neuronal bundles and their processes extended into the pars distalis. Within the pars distalis, stellate cells formed close associations with FSH cells and, to a lesser degree, with GH and LH cells, suggesting differential paracrine regulation of the two gonadotrope populations. The production of follistatin by stellate cells further corroborates the notion of a paracrine role on FSH release. We also found stellate cells to form gap junctions that enabled dye transfer to neighboring stellate cells, implicating that these cells form a large-scale network that connects distant parts of the pituitary. Our findings represent the first wide-scale study of stellate cells in teleosts and provide valuable information regarding their functional roles in pituitary function. PMID:27086978

  2. Paediatric pituitary adenomas: a decade of change.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Federica; Storr, Helen L; Ghizzoni, Lucia; Ghigo, Ezio; Savage, Martin O

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas, although rare in the paediatric age range and mostly benign, represent very challenging disorders for diagnosis and management. The recent identification of genetic alterations in young individuals with pituitary adenomas has broadened the scope of molecular investigations and contributed to the understanding of mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Recent identification of causative mutations of genes such as GNAS, PRKAR1A, MEN1 and AIP has introduced the concept of molecular screening of young apparently healthy family members. Population-based studies have reported a significantly higher number of affected subjects and genetic variations than expected. Radiological techniques have advanced, yet many microadenomas remain undetectable on scanning. However, experience with transsphenoidal and endoscopic pituitary surgery has led to higher rates of cure. Prolactinomas, corticotroph and somatotroph adenomas remain the most prevalent, with each diagnosis presenting its own challenges. As paediatric pituitary adenomas occur very infrequently within the paediatric age range, paediatric endocrine units cannot provide expert management in isolation. Consequently, close co-operation with adult endocrinology colleagues with experience of pituitary disease is strongly recommended. PMID:24525527

  3. Interface between metabolic balance and reproduction in ruminants: focus on the hypothalamus and pituitary.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Iain J

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". The interface between metabolic regulators and the reproductive system is reviewed with special reference to the sheep. Even though sheep are ruminants with particular metabolic characteristics, there is a broad consensus across species in the way that the reproductive system is influenced by metabolic state. An update on the neuroendocrinology of reproduction indicates the need to account for the way that kisspeptin provides major drive to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons and also mediates the feedback effects of gonadal steroids. The way that kisspeptin function is influenced by appetite regulating peptides (ARP) is considered. Another newly recognised factor is gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH), which has a dual function in that it suppresses reproductive function whilst also acting as an orexigen. Our understanding of the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure has expanded exponentially in the last 3 decades and historical perspective is provided. The function of the regulatory factors and the hypothalamic cellular systems involved is reviewed with special reference to the sheep. Less is known of these systems in the cow, especially the dairy cow, in which a major fertility issue has emerged in parallel with selection for increased milk production. Other endocrine systems--the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, the growth hormone (GH) axis and the thyroid hormones--are influenced by metabolic state and are relevant to the interface between metabolic function and reproduction. Special consideration is given to issues such as season and lactation, where the relationship between metabolic hormones and reproductive function is altered. PMID:24568750

  4. Gonadotropins in doping: pharmacological basis and detection of illicit use

    PubMed Central

    Stenman, U-H; Hotakainen, K; Alfthan, H

    2008-01-01

    Parenteral administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or luteinizing hormone (LH) stimulates the production of testosterone in males and these gonadotropins can therefore be used by athletes to enhance muscle strength. However, they are more expensive and less efficient than testosterone and anabolic steroids. Therefore their main use is probably to stimulate gonadal testosterone production during and after self-administration of testosterone or anabolic steroids. A positive effect of hCG on muscle strength has not been demonstrated in women and elevated concentrations of hCG in females are often caused by pregnancy. The use of gonadotropins is therefore prohibited only in males but not in females. HCG occurs at low but measurable concentrations in plasma and urine of healthy males and can be measured by sensitive methods. However, the characteristics of the method to be used for doping control have not been defined. Virtually all commercially available hCG assays have been designed for determination of hCG in serum rather than urine, which is used for doping control. Methods based on mass spectrometric detection of fragments derived from hCG extracted from urine by immunoadsorption have been developed but their suitability for doping control remains to be determined. The concentrations of LH in serum and urine are variable and more then 10-fold higher than those hCG. It is therefore difficult to detect illicit use of LH. The characteristics and reference values for hCG and LH assays used in doping control and the cutoff values need to be defined. PMID:18414398

  5. Abnormal gonadotropin release and carbohydrate metabolism in morbid obese women.

    PubMed

    Sheu, W H; Lee, W J

    1997-12-31

    Obese women are associated with clinical symptoms suggestive of abnormal reproductive functions including irregular menses and infertility. Previous studies of gonadotropin release in obese women, basal or after luteal hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) stimulation, are controversial. Obese women are also often characterized by glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia which might relate to their excessive body fat. To understand the link between abnormal gonadotropin release, carbohydrate metabolism and percent body fat, we examined 17 premenopausal morbid obese women with body mass index (BMI) 38.7 +/- 1.6 Kg/m2 (mean +/- SEM) and 16 age-matched lean controls with BMI 19.7 +/- 0.6 Kg/m2. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide values were measured before and 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after a 75 gm oral glucose tolerant test (OGTT). Each individual also received LHRH test which involved determinations of serum LH and FSH values at basal, 15, 30 and 60 min after injection of LHRH for 0.1 mg intravenously. Women with morbid obesity had significantly greater responses of glucose, insulin and C-peptide values as compared with lean women (all p < 0.001, two-way ANOVA). Despite that basal concentrations were not different, serum LH, FSH and ratio of LH to FSH values in response to LHRH test showed significantly lesser increase in obese women than lean controls. Percent body fat, determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis, correlated positively with plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide responses to OGTT while negatively with ratio of LH to FSH responses (r = -0.418, p < 0.01) to LHRH test. Body mass index also correlated inversely with ratio of LH to FSH responses (r = -0.472, p < 0.01). In conclusion, morbid obese women had glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia and lower responses of serum LH and FSH values as compared with lean women. Excessive body fat play an important role in mediating these carbohydrate and gonadotropin abnormalities. PMID:9551249

  6. [Demonstration and evolution of chorionic gonadotropin in ewes].

    PubMed

    Lacroix, M C; Martal, J

    1979-02-26

    Occurrence of ovine Chorionic Gonadotropin (oCG) is demonstrated in placenta and amniotic fluid with the use of a radioreceptor assay (corpus luteum membranes) in ewes. Identification of oCG is possible as early as 15th day of pregnancy. It should be secreted at a constant rate, and its maximum concentration is recorded on the 130th day. This hormonal factor might be one of the major components accountable for high progesteronemia observed during the 100 last days of pregnancy. PMID:110484

  7. Differences in mGnRH and cGnRH-II contents in pituitaries and discrete brain areas of Rana rugulosa W. according to age and stage of maturity.

    PubMed

    Yuanyou, L; Haoran, L

    2000-02-01

    (1) In tadpoles, chicken-II gonadotropin-releasing hormone (cGnRH-II) could be measured in the brains before metamorphosis, but mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone (mGnRH) did not appear until the stage of metamorphosis, i.e. cGnRH-II appeared earlier than mGnRH during ontogenesis. (2) During the metamorphic climax, mGnRH content increased more rapidly than cGnRH-II; the content of mGnRH was about two times of that of cGnRH-II. (3) In juveniles and adults, the content of mGnRH and cGnRH-II, and the distribution pattern of mGnRH (but not cGnRH-II) in the brains and pituitaries changed with age and stages of gonadal development. mGnRH mainly distributed in the rostral brain areas, whereas cGnRH-II had a widespread distribution in the brain. (4) Both mGnRH and cGnRH-II were present in the pituitaries at each stage of maturity. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) content at sexually maturity was significantly higher than that at other stages of gonadal development, and the content of mGnRH was about 15-18 times of that of cGnRH-II. (5) These results suggest that both mGnRH and cGnRH-II are potentially involved in the direct regulation of pituitary gonadotropes, and mGnRH may be the major active form, cGnRH-II may also serve as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the brain. PMID:11790340

  8. Ovarian Hyper-Response to Administration of an GnRH-Agonist Without Gonadotropins

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Tae; Bae, Hyo Sook; Kim, Tak

    2011-01-01

    Several case reports have indicated that a small subgroup of patients may develop ovarian hyperstimulation following the administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) without gonadotropins. However, since only few such cases have been published, it is unclear what course to follow in subsequent cycles after ovarian hyperstimulation in the first cycle using only GnRHa. A 33-yr-old woman was referred to in vitro fertilization for oocyte donation. A depot preparation (3.75 mg) of tryptorelin without gonadotropins induced ovarian multifollicular enlargement with high estradiol level, and was followed by human chorionic gonadotropin administration and oocyte retrieval. In a subsequent cycle of the same patient, a low dose of tryptorelin (0.05 mg) did not induce ovarian hyperstimulation, and resulted in clinical pregnancy. This report shows potential management of ovarian hyperstimulation following the administration of GnRHa without gonadotropins. PMID:22022197

  9. What's New in Pituitary Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for pituitary tumors What’s new in pituitary tumor research and treatment? Research into ... of non-functioning adenomas, which may lead to new medical therapies for these tumors. Imaging tests such ...

  10. Polymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Norman; Medina-Garcia, Luis; Al Mohajer, Mayar; Zangeneh, Tirdad T

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s). Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli (E. coli) causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation. PMID:27006841

  11. Polymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Norman; Medina-Garcia, Luis; Al Mohajer, Mayar; Zangeneh, Tirdad T.

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s). Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli (E. coli) causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation. PMID:27006841

  12. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  13. Cre-mediated recombination in pituitary somatotropes

    PubMed Central

    Nasonkin, Igor O.; Potok, Mary Anne; Camper, Sally A.

    2009-01-01

    We report a transgenic line with highly penetrant cre recombinase activity in the somatotrope cells of the anterior pituitary gland. Expression of the cre transgene is under the control of the locus control region of the human growth hormone gene cluster and the rat growth hormone promoter. Cre recombinase activity was assessed with two different lacZ reporter genes that require excision of a floxed stop sequence for expression: a chick β-actin promoter with the CMV enhancer transgene and a ROSA26 knock-in. Cre activity is detectable in the developing pituitary after initiation of Gh transcription and persists through adulthood with high penetrance in Gh expressing cells and lower penetrance in lactotropes, a cell type that shares a common origin with somatotropes. This Gh-cre transgenic line is suitable for efficient, cell-specific deletion of floxed regions of genomic DNA in differentiated somatotropes and a subset of lactotrope cells of the anterior pituitary gland. PMID:19039787

  14. Cre-mediated recombination in pituitary somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, Igor O; Potok, Mary Anne; Camper, Sally A

    2009-01-01

    We report a transgenic line with highly penetrant cre recombinase activity in the somatotrope cells of the anterior pituitary gland. Expression of the cre transgene is under the control of the locus control region of the human growth hormone gene cluster and the rat growth hormone promoter. Cre recombinase activity was assessed with two different lacZ reporter genes that require excision of a floxed stop sequence for expression: a chick beta-actin promoter with the CMV enhancer transgene and a ROSA26 knock-in. Cre activity is detectable in the developing pituitary after initiation of Gh transcription and persists through adulthood with high penetrance in Gh expressing cells and lower penetrance in lactotropes, a cell type that shares a common origin with somatotropes. This Gh-cre transgenic line is suitable for efficient, cell-specific deletion of floxed regions of genomic DNA in differentiated somatotropes and a subset of lactotrope cells of the anterior pituitary gland. PMID:19039787

  15. The clinical features and management of pituitary apoplexy.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, M. H.; Belchetz, P. E.

    1977-01-01

    The clinical features and management of three patients presenting with pituitary apoplexy are described. They illustrate the difficulty of differentiating pituitary apoplexy from other acute neurologic conditions. One of the patients is the first reported case of pituitary apoplexy occurring in a histologically proved craniopharyngioma. Two of the cases reported were treated conservatively and recovered without seriouplexy as a neurosurgical emergency. The relationship between radiotherapy and pituitary apoplexy is discussed. PMID:876925

  16. Ectopic suprasellar pituitary adenoma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Caranci, F; Cirillo, L; Bartiromo, F; Ferraioli, M; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Esposito, F; Cappabianca, P; Brunetti, A; Elefante, R

    2007-01-31

    The occurrence of a pituitary adenoma located entirely outside the sella turcica, so-called ectopic adenoma, is extremely rare. We report a case of a non secreting-pituitary adenoma located above the diaphragma sellae, with no invasion into the sella turcica, confirmed at surgery. The tumor was initially treated unsuccessfully by operations via the transphenoidal route. After initial negative exploration by the transphenoidal route, the patient was successfully treated by an endoscopic endonasal transphenoidal approach extended to the tuberculum sellae and the posterior planum sphenoidale to access the suprasellar supraglandular region. A brief review of ectopic adenomas and a discussion of the preoperative diagnosis are presented. PMID:24351300

  17. The pituitary - Aging and spaceflown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Decrements in growth hormone (GH) release we observed in two spaceflight experiments and four tail-suspended rat studies mimic age-associated changes in the mammalian pituitary GH system seen by Meites and others. The spaceflight data suggest that formation of high molecular weight bioactive disulfide-linked aggregates of the 20 and 22K monomeric GH forms may be reduced in microgravity, thereby, reducing target tissue activity. Correlative studies to confirm spaceflight as a model for pituitary GH system aging should include: (1) investigation of mechanisms of intracellular hormone packaging, (2) consequences to biological activity of the hormone molecule, and (3) study of intracellular microtubule dynamics.

  18. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  19. Serotonin involvement in pituitary-adrenal function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Kellar, K. J.; Kent, D.; Gonzales, C.; Berger, P. A.; Barchas, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments clarifying the effects of serotonin (5-HT) in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system are surveyed. Lesion experiments which seek to determine functional maps of serotonergic input to areas involved in regulation are reported. Investigations of the effects of 5-HT levels on the plasma ACTH response to stress and the diurnal variation in basal plasma corticosterone are summarized, and the question of whether serotonergic transmission is involved in the regulation of all aspects of pituitary-adrenal function is considered with attention to the stimulatory and inhibitory action of 5-HT.

  20. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  1. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  4. GIANT PITUITARY ADENOMA WITH NORMAL VISION AND MISLEADING RADIOLOGICAL FINDINGS.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Muhammad; Raina, Umer Farooq; uz Zaman, Khaleeq; Tahir, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Giant pituitary adenomas are rare and present with visual loss. Giant pituitary adenoma has rarely been reported presenting with normal vision. We report Giant pituitary adenoma with Normal vision in a 35 years old patient presenting with adult onset epilepsy and headache. PMID:26721053

  5. Pituitary abscess: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Apostolos K A; Dimitropoulou, Fotini; Papatheodorou, Athanasios; Lyra, Stavroula; Seretis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary abscess is a rare life-threating entity that is usually misdiagnosed as a pituitary tumor with a definite diagnosis only made postoperatively. Over the last several decades, advances in healthcare have led to a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality due to pituitary abscess. We report a case of a 34-year-old woman who was admitted to our department for investigation of a pituitary mass and with symptoms of pituitary dysfunction, headaches and impaired vision. During her admission, she developed meningitis-like symptoms and was treated with antibiotics. She eventually underwent transsphenoidal surgery for excision of the pituitary mass. A significant amount of pus was evident intraoperatively; however, no pathogen was isolated. Six months later, the patient was well and had full recovery of the anterior pituitary function. Her menses returned, and she was only on treatment with desmopressin for diabetes insipidus that developed postoperatively. Learning points Pituitary abscess is a rare disease and the reported clinical features vary mimicking other pituitary lesions. The diagnosis of pituitary abscess is often very difficult to make and rarely included in the differential. The histological findings of acute inflammatory infiltration confirm the diagnosis of pituitary abscess. Medical and surgical treatment is usually recommended upon diagnosis of a pituitary abscess. PMID:27274845

  6. Pituitary tuberculoma: A consideration in the differential diagnosis in a patient manifesting with pituitary apoplexy-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Srisukh, Sasima; Tanpaibule, Tananun; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Boongird, Atthaporn; Wattanatranon, Duangkamon; Panyaping, Theerapol; Sriphrapradang, Chutintorn

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary tuberculoma is extremely rare, even in endemic regions of tuberculosis and much less frequently as a presentation of pituitary apoplexy. We describe a 25-year-old female presented with sudden onset of headache and vision loss of left eye which mimicking symptoms of pituitary apoplexy. MRI of the pituitary gland showed a rim-enhancing lesion at the intrasellar region extending into the suprasellar area, but absence of posterior bright spot with enhancement of the pituitary stalk. Pituitary hormonal evaluation revealed panhypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus. An urgent transphenoidal surgery of the pituitary gland was undertaken for which the histopathology showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with infarcted adjacent pituitary tissue. Despite negative fungal and AFB staining, pituitary tuberculoma was presumptively diagnosed based on imaging, pathology and the high incidence of tuberculosis in the country. After the course of anti-tuberculosis therapy, the clinical findings were dramatically improved, supporting the diagnosis. Pituitary tuberculoma is extremely rare in particular with an apoplexy-like presentation but should be one of the differential diagnosis list of intrasellar lesions in the patient presenting with sudden onset of headache and visual loss. The presence of diabetes insipidus and thickened with enhancement of pituitary stalk on MRI were very helpful in diagnosing pituitary tuberculosis. PMID:27516966

  7. New discoveries on the biology and detection of human chorionic gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Laurence A

    2009-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone comprising 2 subunits, alpha and beta joined non covalently. While similar in structure to luteinizing hormone (LH), hCG exists in multiple hormonal and non-endocrine agents, rather than as a single molecule like LH and the other glycoprotein hormones. These are regular hCG, hyperglycosylated hCG and the free beta-subunit of hyperglycosylated hCG. For 88 years regular hCG has been known as a promoter of corpus luteal progesterone production, even though this function only explains 3 weeks of a full gestations production of regular hCG. Research in recent years has explained the full gestational production by demonstration of critical functions in trophoblast differentiation and in fetal nutrition through myometrial spiral artery angiogenesis. While regular hCG is made by fused villous syncytiotrophoblast cells, extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells make the variant hyperglycosylated hCG. This variant is an autocrine factor, acting on extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells to initiate and control invasion as occurs at implantation of pregnancy and the establishment of hemochorial placentation, and malignancy as occurs in invasive hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma. Hyperglycosylated hCG inhibits apoptosis in extravillous invasive cytotrophoblast cells promoting cell invasion, growth and malignancy. Other non-trophoblastic malignancies retro-differentiate and produce a hyperglycosylated free beta-subunit of hCG (hCG free beta). This has been shown to be an autocrine factor antagonizing apoptosis furthering cancer cell growth and malignancy. New applications have been demonstrated for total hCG measurements and detection of the 3 hCG variants in pregnancy detection, monitoring pregnancy outcome, determining risk for Down syndrome fetus, predicting preeclampsia, detecting pituitary hCG, detecting and managing gestational trophoblastic diseases, diagnosing quiescent gestational trophoblastic

  8. Maximal expression of Foxl2 in pituitary gonadotropes requires ovarian hormones.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Maria K; Nilson, John H

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and activin regulate synthesis of FSH and ultimately fertility. Recent in vivo studies cast SMAD4 and FOXL2 as master transcriptional mediators of activin signaling that act together and independently of GnRH to regulate Fshb gene expression and female fertility. Ovarian hormones regulate GnRH and its receptor (GNRHR) through negative and positive feedback loops. In contrast, the role of ovarian hormones in regulating activin, activin receptors, and components of the activin signaling pathway, including SMAD4 and FOXL2, remains understudied. The widespread distribution of activin and many of its signaling intermediates complicates analysis of the effects of ovarian hormones on their synthesis in gonadotropes, one of five pituitary cell types. We circumvented this complication by using a transgenic model that allows isolation of polyribosomes selectively from gonadotropes of intact females and ovariectomized females treated with or without a GnRH antagonist. This paradigm allows assessment of ovarian hormonal feedback and distinguishes responses that are either independent or dependent on GnRH. Surprisingly, our results indicate that Foxl2 levels in gonadotropes decline significantly in the absence of ovarian input and independently of GnRH. Expression of the genes encoding other members of the activin signaling pathway are unaffected by loss of ovarian hormonal feedback, highlighting their selective effect on Foxl2. Expression of Gnrhr, a known target of FOXL2, also declines upon ovariectomy consistent with reduced expression of Foxl2 and loss of ovarian hormones. In contrast, Fshb mRNA increases dramatically post-ovariectomy due to increased compensatory input from GnRH. Together these data suggest that ovarian hormones regulate expression of Foxl2 thereby expanding the number of genes controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that ultimately dictate reproductive fitness. PMID:25955311

  9. Maximal Expression of Foxl2 in Pituitary Gonadotropes Requires Ovarian Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, Maria K.; Nilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and activin regulate synthesis of FSH and ultimately fertility. Recent in vivo studies cast SMAD4 and FOXL2 as master transcriptional mediators of activin signaling that act together and independently of GnRH to regulate Fshb gene expression and female fertility. Ovarian hormones regulate GnRH and its receptor (GNRHR) through negative and positive feedback loops. In contrast, the role of ovarian hormones in regulating activin, activin receptors, and components of the activin signaling pathway, including SMAD4 and FOXL2, remains understudied. The widespread distribution of activin and many of its signaling intermediates complicates analysis of the effects of ovarian hormones on their synthesis in gonadotropes, one of five pituitary cell types. We circumvented this complication by using a transgenic model that allows isolation of polyribosomes selectively from gonadotropes of intact females and ovariectomized females treated with or without a GnRH antagonist. This paradigm allows assessment of ovarian hormonal feedback and distinguishes responses that are either independent or dependent on GnRH. Surprisingly, our results indicate that Foxl2 levels in gonadotropes decline significantly in the absence of ovarian input and independently of GnRH. Expression of the genes encoding other members of the activin signaling pathway are unaffected by loss of ovarian hormonal feedback, highlighting their selective effect on Foxl2. Expression of Gnrhr, a known target of FOXL2, also declines upon ovariectomy consistent with reduced expression of Foxl2 and loss of ovarian hormones. In contrast, Fshb mRNA increases dramatically post-ovariectomy due to increased compensatory input from GnRH. Together these data suggest that ovarian hormones regulate expression of Foxl2 thereby expanding the number of genes controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that ultimately dictate reproductive fitness. PMID:25955311

  10. LH supplementation in mild stimulations cycles without pituitary suppression: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Paragona, Mizar; Rossini, Matteo; Dattilo, Maurizio; Stamm, Juerg

    2013-02-01

    A cohort of patients addressed to a mild stimulation protocol was retrospectively analysed aiming at evaluating the effect of a luteinizing hormone (LH) activity containing stimulation compared to a pure follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) drive in absence of any pituitary suppression. Due to a referral bias, the two groups (human FSH (hFSH) n = 210; hMG n = 105) were imbalanced for age with the hFSH group (mean age 38.4) being significantly older than the hMG group (mean age 36.8). But the clinical pregnancy rates (20%) did not differ between the groups. Secondary outcome variables showed a higher number of oocytes retrieved (3.02 vs. 2.31) and higher estradiol levels (1148 vs. 820) in the hMG/younger group whereas the fertilization rate (FR) was higher (54.8 vs. 63.8) in the FSH older/group. In spite of the LH content in the hMG product (~10 IU per vial), the LH concentration on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was higher, although non-significantly, in the hFSH group. We suppose hCG contained in hMG inhibited to some extent the natural release of LH from the non-suppressed pituitary. Concluding, the mild stimulation clinical pregnancy rates are satisfactory independently of the treatment choice. The hMG group showed a trend for a lower efficacy. This phenomenon might be limited to non suppressed cycles, but should be taken in due account also when designing full dose controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) treatments. PMID:23256611

  11. Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency not linked to gene for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in Brazilian kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Faraco, J.; Francke, U.; Toledo, S.

    1994-09-01

    Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency (FIGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in failure to develop secondary sexual characteristics. The origin is a hypothalamic defect resulting in insufficient secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (also called LHRH, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) and follicle-stimuating hormone (FSH). FIGD has been determined to be a separate entity from Kallmann syndrome which presents with hypogonadism as well as anosmia. The FIGD phenotype appears to be analogous to the phenotype of the hpg (hypogonadal) mouse. Because the hpg phenotype is the result of a structurally abnormal GnRH gene, we have studied the GnRH gene in individuals from a previously reported Brazilian FIGD family. An informative dimorphic marker in the signal peptide sequence of the GnRH gene allowed assessment of linkage between the disease gene and the GnRH locus in this pedigree. We have concluded that the GnRH locus is not linked to the disease-causing mutation in these hypogonadal individuals. Recent evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a role in the initiation of puberty. We hypothesize that mutations in NPY may result in failure to secrete GnRH. We have characterized three diallelic frequent-cutter restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the human NPY locus, and are currently using these markers to determine if the NPY gene is linked to, and possibly the site of the disease mutation in this kindred.

  12. An Indian family of hereditary pituitary dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Havaldar, P V

    1991-01-01

    Three girls and one boy out of six siblings born to parents of consanguineous marriage presented with pituitary dwarfism. Their parents were of normal height. All the affected children had features of classical isolated growth hormone deficiency. No hypoglycaemic attacks were noted. Three of them attained puberty at the age of 16 years. PMID:1721794

  13. Pituitary immunoexpression of ghrelin in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Rotondo, Fabio; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Syro, Luis V; Rotondo, Angelo; Kovacs, Kalman

    2012-12-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone, is known to occur in the normal anterior pituitary where its physiologic role is uncertain but may include promotion of appetite. We sought to investigate anticipated differences in adenohypophysial and neurohypophysial ghrelin immunoexpression between normal subjects and patients with anorexia nervosa who had succumbed to complications of the disease. We hypothesized that the glands of anorexia nervosa patients would show relative diminished action in ghrelin content. The study included 12 autopsy-derived pituitaries of anorexia nervosa and 10 control glands. The streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method and double immunohistochemical staining method were used to determine which cell types expressed both ghrelin and adenohypophysial hormones. Nontumorous control pituitaries were also obtained at autopsy. In anorexia nervosa and control adenohypophyses, ghrelin was mainly localized in somatotrophs and to a lesser extent in corticotrophs and gonadotrophs. Ghrelin accumulated within nerve fibers and Herring bodies in the neurohypophysis and pituitary stalk. In the controls, ghrelin expression was apparent in only a few cases. It was mild and only along few nerve fibers. In the adenohypophyses of anorexia nervosa patients, ghrelin was not depleted. It appears that in these patients, ghrelin is transported in excess from the hypothalamic neurohypophysial tract to the neurohypophysis. PMID:22081273

  14. Spinal metastases from pituitary hemangiopericytic meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Skultety, F.M.; Masih, A.S.; McComb, R.D.

    1987-10-01

    A rare, previously irradiated, recurrent malignant angioblastic meningioma of the pituitary, hemangiopericytic type, was locally controlled by a new endocurietherapy technique that allows delivery of very high (10,000 cGy), sharply localized irradiation. Rather than succumbing to the local tumor recurrence, as would otherwise be expected, the patient developed distant spinal metastases several years later.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Pituitary Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bonneville, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is currently considered a major keystone of the diagnosis of diseases of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal region. However, the relatively small size of the pituitary gland, its location deep at the skull base and the numerous physiological variants present in this area impede the precise assessment of the anatomical structures and, particularly, of the pituitary gland itself. The diagnosis of the often tiny lesions of this region--such as pituitary microadenomas--is then difficult if the MRI technology is not optimized and if potential artifacts and traps are not recognized. Advanced MRI technology can not only depict small lesions with greater reliability, but also help in the differential diagnosis of large tumors. In these, defining the presence or absence of invasion is a particularly important task. This review describes and illustrates the radiological diagnosis of the different tumors of the sellar region, from the common prolactinomas, nonfunctioning adenomas and Rathke's cleft cysts, to the less frequent and more difficult to detect corticotroph pituitary adenomas in Cushing's disease, and other neoplastic and nonneoplastic entities. Finally, some hints are given to facilitate the differential diagnosis of sellar lesions. PMID:27003878

  16. Differential expression of three types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone genes during the spawning season in grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles.

    PubMed

    Shahjahan, Md; Hamabata, Tomoko; Motohashi, Eiji; Doi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Hironori

    2010-05-15

    Grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles, has unique spawning behavior; spawning occurs on beach only for several days around new moon and full moon from spring to early summer. To investigate the role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the reproductive function, genes encoding three types of GnRHs, namely seabream GnRH (sbGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) and salmon GnRH (sGnRH), were cloned and changes in their mRNA amounts were examined over the spawning season. In addition, changes in the pituitary gonadotropin subunit mRNAs and the plasma steroid hormones were examined over the spawning season. Fishes were assessed at four reproductive stages, i.e., in December (early maturation), in April (maturing), in May (spawning), and in July (post-spawning). Moreover, spawning fish just after releasing eggs and sperm were taken at a spawning bed. The amounts of sbGnRH mRNA were substantially elevated in May and the spawning fish in both sexes, concomitant with considerable elevations of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone beta subunit mRNAs and plasma estradiol-17beta (E(2)) and testosterone (T) levels. There were strong positive correlations between the sbGnRH mRNA and the plasma E(2) and T levels over the spawning season in both sexes. The amounts of cGnRH-II mRNA showed no noticeable changes except for an increase in the post-spawning females. The amounts of sGnRH mRNA in the males were significantly increased in May, but they were low in the spawning males. In the females, sGnRH mRNA increased from the maturing stage and reached a maximum in the post-spawning stage, in which a positive correlation with the plasma cortisol levels was observed. These specific changes suggest that the expression of three types of GnRH genes is differentially regulated during the spawning season, and sex steroids may be important for the differential expression of GnRH genes. PMID:20138178

  17. Pituitary Stone or Calcified Pituitary Tumor? Three Cases and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chentli, Farida; Safer-Tabi, Amel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pituitary stone or pituitary calculus is a scientific enigma characterized by a large calcification in the pituitary sella. It can be discovered incidentally or in a patient with endocrine and/or neurological problems. Its mechanism is not understood. In this article, we described three patients harboring a large pituitary calcification. Case Presentation: The first case was observed in a 27-year-old woman who consulted for secondary amenorrhea. The second case concerned a woman who consulted for infertility, and the third one was observed in an 11-year and nine-month-old girl who was sent to our department for short stature. Clinical examination was normal in both adults. The pediatric case had dwarfism with lack of pubertal development. Hormonal assessment showed hyperprolactinemia in both women and thyrotroph and somatotroph deficits in the child. Radiologic exploration discovered pituitary calcifications measuring 10, 11, and 45 mm without any cystic or solid mass. Conclusions: Radiological findings pleaded for a pituitary stone, but calcified adenomas in women, and calcified craniopharyngioma in the pediatric case could not be excluded, as our three patients were not operated on. PMID:26401144

  18. Changes in brain seabream GnRH mRNA and pituitary seabream GnRH peptide levels during ovarian maturation in female barfin flounder.

    PubMed

    Amano, Masafumi; Pham, Ky Xuan; Amiya, Noriko; Yamanome, Takeshi; Yamamori, Kunio

    2008-09-01

    The pleuronectid barfin flounder Verasper moseri expresses three forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs), i.e., seabream GnRH (sbGnRH), salmon GnRH, and chicken GnRH-II. Among these, sbGnRH is the dominant form in the pituitary, indicating that sbGnRH regulates gonadal maturation. In order to clarify the physiological roles of sbGnRH during ovarian maturation in reared female barfin flounder, the changes in brain sbGnRH mRNA levels and pituitary sbGnRH peptide levels were examined by real-time quantitative PCR and time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay, respectively. The fish hatched in April 2002. The gonadosomatic index remained low until August 2004 and increased thereafter until April 2005 when the fish began to ovulate. The sbGnRH mRNA levels per brain increased significantly from April 2004 to April 2005. Pituitary sbGnRH peptide levels also increased significantly during this period. These results indicate that sbGnRH is involved in ovarian maturation and ovulation in the barfin flounder. PMID:18662692

  19. Nutrient restriction induces failure of reproductive function and molecular changes in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis in postpubertal gilts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dongsheng; Zhuo, Yong; Che, Lianqiang; Lin, Yan; Fang, Zhengfeng; Wu, De

    2014-07-01

    People on a diet to lose weight may be at risk of reproductive failure. To investigate the effects of nutrient restriction on reproductive function and the underlying mechanism, changes of reproductive traits, hormone secretions and gene expressions in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis were examined in postpubertal gilts at anestrus induced by nutrient restriction. Gilts having experienced two estrus cycles were fed a normal (CON, 2.86 kg/d) or nutrient restricted (NR, 1 kg/d) food regimens to expect anestrus. NR gilts experienced another three estrus cycles, but did not express estrus symptoms at the anticipated fourth estrus. Blood samples were collected at 5 days' interval for consecutive three times for measurement of hormone concentrations at the 23th day of the fourth estrus cycle. Individual progesterone concentrations of NR gilts from three consecutive blood samples were below 1.0 ng/mL versus 2.0 ng/mL in CON gilts, which was considered anestrus. NR gilts had impaired development of reproductive tract characterized by absence of large follicles (diameter ≥ 6 mm), decreased number of corepus lutea and atrophy of uterus and ovary tissues. Circulating concentrations of IGF-I, kisspeptin, estradiol, progesterone and leptin were significantly lower in NR gilts than that in CON gilts. Nutrient restriction down-regulated gene expressions of kiss-1, G-protein coupled protein 54, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, estrogen receptor α, progesterone receptor, leptin receptor, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone and insulin-like growth factor I in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis of gilts. Collectively, nutrient restriction resulted in impairment of reproductive function and changes of hormone secretions and gene expressions in hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis, which shed light on the underlying mechanism by which nutrient restriction influenced reproductive function. PMID:24728609

  20. Activity of the pituitary-gonadal axis is increased prior to the onset of spawning migration of chum salmon.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Takeshi A; Sato, Shunpei; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Makino, Keita; Hu, Weiwei; Jodo, Aya; Davis, Nancy D; Dickey, Jon T; Ban, Masatoshi; Ando, Hironori; Fukuwaka, Masa-Aki; Azumaya, Tomonori; Swanson, Penny; Urano, Akihisa

    2009-01-01

    The activity of the pituitary-gonadal axis (PG axis) in pre-migratory and homing chum salmon was examined because endocrine mechanisms underlying the onset of spawning migration remain unknown. Pre-migratory fish were caught in the central Bering Sea in June, July and September 2001, 2002 and 2003, and in the Gulf of Alaska in February 2006. They were classified into immature and maturing adults on the basis of gonadal development. The maturing adults commenced spawning migration to coastal areas by the end of summer, because almost all fish in the Bering Sea were immature in September. In the pituitaries of maturing adults, the copy numbers of FSHbeta mRNA and the FSH content were 2.5- to 100-fold those of the immature fish. Similarly, the amounts of LHbeta mRNA and LH content in the maturing adults were 100- to 1000-fold those of immature fish. The plasma levels of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and estradiol were higher than 10 nmol l(-1) in maturing adults, but lower than 1.0 nmol l(-1) in immature fish. The increase in the activity of the PG-axis components had already initiated in the maturing adults while they were still in the Gulf of Alaska in winter. In the homing adults, the pituitary contents and the plasma levels of gonadotropins and plasma sex steroid hormones peaked during upstream migration from the coast to the natal hatchery. The present results thus indicate that the seasonal increase in the activity of the PG axis is an important endocrine event that is inseparable from initiation of spawning migration of chum salmon. PMID:19088211

  1. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Therapy and Obesity in Girls

    PubMed Central

    Shiasi Arani, Kobra; Heidari, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depot preparations of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) are the gold standard drugs for the treatment of central precocious puberty. A concern about these drugs is obesity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) therapy on body mass index (BMI) in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP). Patients and Methods: The girls with onset of puberty before eight years of age or menarche before nine years of age were studied. The weight, height, BMI, and pubertal stage were determined before and at sixth and 12th months of treatment. The GnRHa (Triptorelin) was administered intramuscularly for patients with rapidly progressive forms of CPP. Patients with slowly progressive forms of CPP were considered as control group. Results: From 110 subjects with CPP, 46 girls (41.8%) were considered as intervention and 64 (58.2%) as control groups. The mean age at initial visit was 7.46 ± 1.03 years. The BMI standard deviation scores in both groups was not significantly different at sixth and 12th months of treatment compared with baseline (P = 0.257 and P = 0.839, respectively). The prevalence of obesity was not significantly different between study groups at baseline and at and sixth and 12th months of therapy (P = 0.11, P = 0.068, and P = 0.052, respectively). Conclusions: The GnRHa therapy has no effect on BMI and the prevalence of obesity. PMID:26401141

  2. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced Ca2+ transients in single identified gonadotropes require both intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed Central

    Shangold, G A; Murphy, S N; Miller, R J

    1988-01-01

    We examined the effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) on the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in single rat anterior pituitary gonadotropes identified by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay. Concentrations of GnRH greater than 10 pM elicited increases in [Ca2+]i in identified cells but not in others. In contrast, depolarization induced by 50 mM K+ increased [Ca2+]i in all cells. Ca2+ transients induced by GnRH exhibited a complex time course. After an initial rapid rise, the [Ca2+]i fell to near basal levels only to be followed by a secondary extended rise and fall. Analysis of the Ca2+ transients on a rapid time base revealed that responses frequently consisted of several rapid oscillations in [Ca2+]i. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ or addition of the dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blocker nitrendipine completely blocked the secondary rise in [Ca2+]i but had no effect whatsoever on the initial spike. Nitrendipine also blocked 50 mM K+-induced increases in [Ca2+]i in identified gonadotropes. The secondary rise induced by GnRH could be enhanced by a phorbol ester in a nitrendipine-sensitive fashion. Multiple spike responses to GnRH stimulation of the same cell could only be obtained if subsequent Ca2+ influx was permitted either by allowing a secondary rise to occur or by producing a Ca2+ transient by depolarizing the cells with 50 mM K+. It therefore appears that the response to GnRH consists of an initial phase of Ca2+ mobilization, probably mediated by inositol trisphosphate, and a subsequent phase of Ca2+ influx through nitrendipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels that may be activated by protein kinase C. The relative roles of these phases in the control of gonadotropin secretion are discussed. Images PMID:3045819

  3. Pubertal development in the male pig: effects of treatment with a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist on plasma luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and testosterone.

    PubMed Central

    Trudeau, V L; Meijer, J C; Erkens, J H; van de Wiel, D F; Wensing, C J

    1992-01-01

    The effects of a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist, [D-Trp6]-GnRH (GnRH-A) on developmental profiles of plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulation hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T), and pituitary responsiveness to exogenous GnRH were studied in male Dutch Landrace x Large White crossbred pigs from 1 to 30 wk of age. Group 1 control animals (control; n = 12) were injected subcutaneously in the neck with vehicle at 1 and 16 wk of age. Group 2 animals (early treatment; n = 10) were injected with 600 micrograms [D-Trp6]-GnRH at 1 wk and with vehicle at 16 wk. Group 3 animals (late treatment; n = 8) were injected with vehicle and 3 mg GnRH-A at 1 and 16 wk, respectively. Group 4 animals (early plus late treatment; n = 9) were injected at both 1 and 16 wk with GnRH-A. Blood was collected by brachiocephalic puncture at weekly or biweekly intervals, and through brachiocephalic cannulae, to determine longitudinal profiles of LH, FSH and T, and plasma gonadotropin responses to intravenous injection of GnRH (0.1 microgram/kg), respectively. In control animals, LH and FSH declined over the first 5 wk of postnatal life and peaked again at 10-14 wk. Levels of both hormones were basal from 18 to 30 wk. Plasma T was high in the first week, declined progressively over the next few weeks and remained low until 24 wk when a transient increment was noted. The LH and FSH responses to acute GnRH stimulation were similar at 7 and 14 wk and declined significantly at 23 wk of age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1534270

  4. Neonatal thymulin gene therapy in nude mice: Effects on the morphology of the pituitary corticotrope population.

    PubMed

    Martines, Eliana; Reggiani, Paula C; Schwerdt, José I; Goya, Rodolfo G; Cónsole, Gloria

    2011-04-01

    The integrity of the thymus during early life is necessary for a proper maturation of the neuroendocrine system, including the adrenal axis. The thymic metallopeptide thymulin seems to be a central physiologic mediator of thymus-pituitary communication. Furthermore, neonatal thymulin gene therapy has been shown to prevent the typical alterations of gonadotrophic cell number and morphology and serum gonadotropin levels in nude female mice. In the present study we assessed the impact of athymia and the effect of neonatal thymulin gene therapy on the corticotropic cell population in nude mice. The effect of thymulin administration to adult nudes on their hypothalamic content of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the adrenal content of corticosterone was also determined. We used an adenoviral vector expressing a synthetic gene for the thymic peptide thymulin (metFTS) termed RAd-FTS. On postnatal day 1 or 2, heterozygous (nu/+) and homozygous (nu/nu) pups of both sexes received a single bilateral i.m. injection of RAd-FTS or RAd-GFP, a control vector. On postnatal day 71, mice were bled and sacrificed, and their pituitaries were immediately dissected, fixed and immunostained for corticotropin. Morphometry was performed by means of an image-analysis system. The following parameters were calculated: volume density (VD: Σ cell area/reference area), cell density (CD: number of cells/reference area), and cell surface (CS: expressed in μm²). Serum thymulin levels were measured by a bioassay, and CRH as well as corticosterone were determined by IRMA and RIA, respectively. Neonatal thymulin gene therapy in the athymic mice restored their serum thymulin levels and increased corticotrope CD, VD and CS in both control and athymic mice. Athymic mice showed only a marginal reduction in corticotrope CD, VD and CS. In these mutants hypothalamic CRH content was slightly increased, whereas adrenal corticosterone tended to be lower. Thymulin administration to adult mice tended

  5. Purinergic Regulation of Hypothalamo-Pituitary Functions

    PubMed Central

    Stojilkovic, Stanko S.

    2009-01-01

    The hypothalamus controls the release of hormones by the pituitary and is involved in control of food and water intake, sexual behavior, reproduction, and daily cycles in physiological state and behavior, temperature regulation, and emotional responses. Adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) and its metabolic products contribute to these functions, acting as agonists for adenosine and P2Y receptors and two-transmembrane domain P2X receptor channels. This review summarizes the recent findings on purinergic receptor expression and their roles in signaling and cellular function in secretory and supporting cells of the hypothalamo-pituitary system. ATP secretion by these tissues, the enzymes involved in ATP hydrolysis, and the relevance of this pathway for sequential activation of receptors and termination of signaling is also discussed. PMID:19800813

  6. Preoperative volume determination for pituitary adenoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zukic, Dženan; Egger, Jan; Bauer, Miriam H. A.; Kuhnt, Daniela; Carl, Barbara; Freisleben, Bernd; Kolb, Andreas; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    The most common sellar lesion is the pituitary adenoma, and sellar tumors are approximately 10-15% of all intracranial neoplasms. Manual slice-by-slice segmentation takes quite some time that can be reduced by using the appropriate algorithms. In this contribution, we present a segmentation method for pituitary adenoma. The method is based on an algorithm that we have applied recently to segmenting glioblastoma multiforme. A modification of this scheme is used for adenoma segmentation that is much harder to perform, due to lack of contrast-enhanced boundaries. In our experimental evaluation, neurosurgeons performed manual slice-by-slice segmentation of ten magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cases. The segmentations were compared to the segmentation results of the proposed method using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). The average DSC for all datasets was 75.92%+/-7.24%. A manual segmentation took about four minutes and our algorithm required about one second.

  7. Functional and structural recovery of the injured spinal cord in rats treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Vallejo, Denisse; Quintanar-Stephano, Andrés; Hernández-Jasso, Irma; Jiménez-Hernández, Violeta; Ruiz-Ornelas, Jannet; Jiménez, Ismael; Quintanar, J Luis

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have shown that gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) have extra-pituitary roles, including neurotrophic effects. This study was to evaluate the effects of GnRH treatment on the spinal cord injury (SCI) of rats. Ovariectomized rats were divided into: sham SCI surgery (Sham), SCI treated with saline solution (SCI + SS), and SCI treated with GnRH (SCI + GnRH). The SCI was induced by compression. One day after the lesion, SCI + GnRH group was injected with GnRH (60 µg/kg/twice/day; i.m.) for 15 days and the other groups with saline solution. To kinematic gait analysis, length and velocity of the stride were measured. In spinal cord, axonal morphometry and spared white and gray matter were analyzed by histochemistry. Protein expression of spinophilin was evaluated by western blot. The results showed that, 5 weeks after the injury, the group of animals treated with GnRH, significantly increased the length and velocity of the stride compared to SCI + SS group and they were similar to Sham group. In spinal cord, GnRH treatment increased the number and caliber of nerve axons and in the case of white matter, spared tissue was significantly higher than those animals treated with saline solution. The expression of spinophilin in spinal cord of SCI + GnRH group was slightly increased with respect to those not treated. In conclusion, GnRH treatment improves recovery of gait and decreases histopathological damage in the injured spinal cord of rat. These findings suggest that GnRH acts as a neurotrophic factor and can be used as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of SCI. PMID:25618391

  8. Long-term, low-dose lead exposure alters the gonadotropin-releasing hormone system in the male rat.

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, Rebecca Z; Wang, Saixi; Wan, Yu-Jui Y; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Gentzschein, Elisabet; Chapin, Robert E

    2002-01-01

    Lead is a male reproductive toxicant. Data suggest that rats dosed with relatively high levels of lead acetate for short periods of time induced changes in the hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) at the molecular level, but these changes were attenuated with increased concentration of exposure. The current study evaluated whether exposure to low levels of lead acetate over longer periods of time would produce a similar pattern of adaptation to toxicity at the molecular and biologic levels. Adult 100-day-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were dosed with 0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.3% lead acetate in water. Animals were killed after 1, 4, 8, and 16 weeks of treatment. Luteinzing hormone (LH) and GnRH levels were measured in serum, and lead levels were quantified in whole blood. Hypothalamic GnRH mRNA levels were also quantified. We found no significant differences in serum LH and GnRH among the groups of animals treated within each time period. A significant dose-related increase of GnRH mRNA concentrations with lead dosing occurred in animals treated for 1 week. Animals treated for more than 1 week also exhibited a significant increase in GnRH mRNA, but with an attenuation of the increase at the higher concentrations of lead with increased duration of exposure. We conclude that the signals within and between the hypothalamus and pituitary gland appear to be disrupted by long-term, low-dose lead exposure. PMID:12204820

  9. Gonadotropin-regulated Testicular RNA Helicase (GRTH/DDX25), a Negative Regulator of Luteinizing/Chorionic Gonadotropin Hormone-induced Steroidogenesis in Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Masato; Villar, Joaquin; Tsai-Morris, Chon-Hwa; Dufau, Maria L.

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-regulated testicular RNA helicase (GRTH/DDX25) is a testis-specific gonadotropin-regulated RNA helicase that is present in Leydig cells (LCs) and germ cells and is essential for spermatid development and completion of spermatogenesis. Normal basal levels of testosterone in serum and LCs were observed in GRTH null (GRTH−/−) mice. However, testosterone production was enhanced in LCs of GRTH−/− mice compared with WT mice by both in vivo and in vitro human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation. LCs of GRTH−/− mice had swollen mitochondria with a significantly increased cholesterol content in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Basal protein levels of SREBP2, HMG-CoA reductase, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR; a protein that transports cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane) were markedly increased in LCs of GRTH−/− mice compared with WT mice. Gonadotropin stimulation caused an increase in StAR mRNA levels and protein expression in GRTH−/− mice versus WT mice, with no further increase in SREBP2 and down-regulation of HMG-CoA reductase protein. The half-life of StAR mRNA was significantly increased in GRTH−/− mice. Moreover, association of StAR mRNA with GRTH protein was observed in WT mice. Human chorionic gonadotropin increased GRTH gene expression and its associated StAR protein at cytoplasmic sites. Taken together, these findings indicate that, through its negative role in StAR message stability, GRTH regulates cholesterol availability at the mitochondrial level. The finding of an inhibitory action of GRTH associated with gonadotropin-mediated steroidogenesis has provided insights into a novel negative autocrine molecular control mechanism of this helicase in the regulation of steroid production in the male. PMID:21719703

  10. Outcomes of endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Dallapiazza, Robert F; Jane, John A

    2015-03-01

    Since the 1990s, endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas has increased in popularity. Outcomes of endoscopic surgery for clinically secretory adenomas are favorable, and results for nonfunctional tumors reveal high rates of complete resection, improvements in vision, and low rates of complications. This article discusses some of the recent studies reporting outcomes from endoscopic series for Cushing disease, acromegaly, prolactin-secreting tumors, and nonfunctioning macroadenomas. PMID:25732647

  11. Advances in trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Solari, D; Cavallo, L M; De Angelis, M; Villa, A; Somma, T; Esposito, F; Del Basso De Caro, M; Cappabianca, P

    2012-12-01

    Pituitary surgery is a continuous evolving speciality of the neurosurgeons' armamentarium, requiring precise anatomical knowledge, technical skills and integrated appreciation of the pituitary pathophysiology. Actually, it could be considered the result of a close cooperation between different specialists, i.e. the ophthalmologist, the neuroradiologist, the endocrinologist, the neurosurgeon, the pathologist, etc. In this teamwork environment each member plays his own role, offering his contribute to the final result; every effort is performed to provide patients with the best possible procedure, individually measured. The endoscopic pituitary surgery performed by means of a transsphenoidal approach perfectly fits this scenario, being though advocated as the result of an evolutionary process rather than a revolutionary one. The "pure" endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery - consisting of a whole procedure performed with the endoscope alone and without the use of any transsphenoidal retractor - offers some advantages due to the endoscope itself: a superior close-up view of the relevant anatomy, very important at the tumor/gland interface and an enlarged working angle are provided with an increased panoramic vision inside the surgical area. Results in terms of mass removal, relief of clinical symptoms, cure of the underlying disease and complication rate are similar to those reported in the major microsurgical series but patient compliance is by far better. PMID:23123578

  12. PITUITARY VOLUME IN SCHIZOPHRENIA SPECTRUM DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Romo-Nava, F.; Hoogenboom, W.S.; Pelavin, P. E.; Alvarado, J.L.; Bobrow, L.H.; MacMaster, F.P.; Keshavan, M.; McCarley, R.W.; Shenton, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is converging evidence supporting hyperactivity of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis in schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD), such as schizotypal personality disorder (SPD), first-episode schizophrenia (FESZ) and chronic schizophrenia (CHSZ). Such an aberrant HPA activity might have volumetric consequences on the pituitary gland. However, previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies assessing pituitary volume (PV) in SSD are conflicting. The main objective of this study was to examine further PV in SSD. Methods PV were manually traced on structural MRIs in 137 subjects, including subjects with SPD (n=40), FESZ (n=15), CHSZ (n=15), and HC (n=67). We used an ANCOVA to test PV between groups and gender while controlling for inter-subject variability in age, years of education, socioeconomic status, and whole brain volume. Results Overall, women had larger PV than men, and within the male sample all SSD subjects had smaller PV than HC, statistically significant only for the SPD group. In addition, dose of medication, illness duration and age of onset were not associated with PV. Conclusion Chronic untreated HPA hyperactivity might account for smaller PV in SPD subjects, whereas the absence of PV changes in FESZ and CHSZ patients might be related to the normalizing effects of antipsychotics on PV. SPD studies offer a way to examine HPA related alterations in SSD without the potential confounds of medication effects. PMID:23522905

  13. Pituitary Adenoma Volumetry with 3D Slicer

    PubMed Central

    Nimsky, Christopher; Kikinis, Ron

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we present pituitary adenoma volumetry using the free and open source medical image computing platform for biomedical research: (3D) Slicer. Volumetric changes in cerebral pathologies like pituitary adenomas are a critical factor in treatment decisions by physicians and in general the volume is acquired manually. Therefore, manual slice-by-slice segmentations in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, which have been obtained at regular intervals, are performed. In contrast to this manual time consuming slice-by-slice segmentation process Slicer is an alternative which can be significantly faster and less user intensive. In this contribution, we compare pure manual segmentations of ten pituitary adenomas with semi-automatic segmentations under Slicer. Thus, physicians drew the boundaries completely manually on a slice-by-slice basis and performed a Slicer-enhanced segmentation using the competitive region-growing based module of Slicer named GrowCut. Results showed that the time and user effort required for GrowCut-based segmentations were on average about thirty percent less than the pure manual segmentations. Furthermore, we calculated the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) between the manual and the Slicer-based segmentations to proof that the two are comparable yielding an average DSC of 81.97±3.39%. PMID:23240062

  14. Case of pituitary stalk transection syndrome ascertained after breech delivery.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Kaori; Hidaka, Takao; Ono, Yosuke; Kochi, Keiko; Yasoshima, Kuniaki; Arai, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Pituitary stalk transection syndrome (PSTS) is a rare complication that can accompany breech delivery. Early diagnosis of this syndrome is difficult, and it may cause a serious delay in the diagnosis. We present a case of PSTS ascertained after breech delivery. A 20-year-old woman presented with primary amenorrhea. The patient was born by breech delivery and had a history of treatment for pituitary dwarfism. Her laboratory findings showed pituitary hypothyroidism, and hormone replacement therapy was initiated. At 28 years old, she became pregnant and had a normal delivery at 38 weeks' gestation. One year after delivery, her thyroid hormone level changed. Laboratory test showed adrenocortical insufficiency, and magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary gland showed transection of the pituitary stalk and development of an ectopic posterior lobe. These findings were compatible with PSTS. When a patient who has been born by breech delivery presents with symptoms of pituitary deficiency, PSTS should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26631915

  15. Dioxin-induced retardation of development through a reduction in the expression of pituitary hormones and possible involvement of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor in this defect: A comparative study using two strains of mice with different sensitivities to dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Tomoki; Taura, Junki; Hattori, Yukiko; Ishii, Yuji; Yamada, Hideyuki

    2014-08-01

    We have previously revealed that treating pregnant rats with 2,3,7,8-tetracholorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) reduces the expression of gonadotropins and growth hormone (GH) in the fetal and neonatal pituitary. A change in gonadotropin expression impairs the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in perinatal pups, and imprint defects in sexual behavior after reaching maturity. In this study, we examined whether TCDD also affects the expression of gonadotropin and GH in mice using C57BL/6J and DBA/2J strains which express the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) exhibiting a different affinity for TCDD. When pregnant C57BL/6J mice at gestational day (GD) 12 were given oral TCDD (0.2–20 μg/kg), all doses significantly attenuated the pituitary expression of gonadotropin mRNAs in fetuses at GD18. On the other hand, in DBA/2J mice, a much higher dose of TCDD (20 μg/kg) was needed to produce a significant attenuation. Such reduction in the C57BL/6J strain continued until at least postnatal day (PND) 4. In agreement with this, TCDD reduced the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in C57BL/6J neonates at PND2 and 4, although the same did not occur in the fetal testis and ovary. Furthermore, TCDD reduced the perinatal expression of GH, litter size and the body weight of newborn pups only in the C57BL/6J strain. These results suggest that 1) also in mice, maternal exposure to TCDD attenuates gonadotropin-regulated steroidogenesis and GH expression leading to the impairment of pup development and sexual immaturity; and 2) Ahr activation during the late fetal and early postnatal stages is required for these defects. - Highlights: • The effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on mouse growth was studied. • TCDD reduced the levels of luteinizing hormone and growth hormone in perinatal pups. • Maternal exposure to TCDD also attenuated testicular steroidogenesis in pups. • The above effects of TCDD were more pronounced in C57BL/6J than in DBA/2J

  16. Impact of Food Restriction on the Expression of the Adiponectin System and Genes in the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Ovarian Axis of Pre-Pubertal Ewes.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Kuang, M; Nie, H; Bai, W; Sun, L; Wang, F; Mao, D; Wang, Z

    2016-10-01

    Adiponectin, a cytokine secreted typically by adipocytes, has been implicated as a molecular switch between female reproduction and energy balance. The present study was undertaken to investigate the expression of adiponectin system and patterns of genes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovary (HPO) axis of food-restricted pre-pubertal ewes. Eighteen 2-month-old female ewes were assigned to 3 groups after a pre-feeding ad libitum for 10 days (six in each group): the control group (C), the low-food-restricted group (LR) and the high-food-restricted group (HR), which were fed with 100%, 70% and 50% of ad libitum food intake, respectively. The hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary and serum were collected after food restriction for 2 months. Results by ELISA showed that food restriction increased serum adiponectin concentrations. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the gene transcriptions for adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) and 2 (AdipoR2) were enhanced in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis, while KISS-1/GPR-54 and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the hypothalamus and luteinizing hormone β-subunit (LHβ) and follicle-stimulating hormone β-subunit (FSHβ) in the pituitary were reduced after food restriction. Immunohistochemistry results demonstrated that AdipoR1 localized in the oocytes of follicles in the ovary. These results suggest that the alterations in the expression of adiponectin and its receptors in response to food restriction might negatively influence the HPO axis. PMID:27405252

  17. Epistaxis and pituitary apoplexy due to ruptured internal carotid artery aneurysm embedded within pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zesheng; Tian, Daofeng; Wang, Hongliu; Kong, Derek Kai; Zhang, Shenqi; Liu, Baohui; Deng, Gang; Xu, Zhou; Wu, Liquan; Ji, Baowei; Wang, Long; Cai, Qiang; Li, Mingchang; Wang, Junmin; Zhang, Aimin; Chen, Qianxue

    2015-01-01

    Epistaxis due to ruptured internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm embedded within a pituitary adenoma (PA) has seldom been reported in the literature. Here we want to elaborate the incidence, mechanisms, clinical manifestations, and treatment strategy for this condition. The first survived case of a patient with epistaxis and pituitary apoplexy due to ruptured aneurysm embedded within PA was reported and the literature was reviewed. A 53-year-old male patient presented to our institution with sudden onset epistaxis and progressive vision loss. Neurological examination revealed bilateral ptosis and dilated unresponsive pupils. A CT scan showed a large mass in the pituitary fossa with bony erosion. MRI revealed a large pituitary tumor and abnormal signal intensity in the tumor. No aneurysm was noted during the pre-operative MR angiography. Abundant arterial bleeding suddenly occurred during urgent transsphenoidal surgery. Digital subtraction angiography confirmed the presence of a 14 mm unexpected saccular aneurysm of right ICA in the cavernous sinus with the dome protruding into the sella turcica. Balloon test occlusion of the right ICA was undertaken and permanent occlusion was performed. The patient recovered well and received bromocriptine and thyroid hormone replacement therapy during the follow-up period. At 14-month followup, the patient had no neurological deficits, no features of ischaemia relating to the right ICA therapeutic occlusion. Our case indicated that epistaxis and pituitary apoplexy could be due to the rupture of an ICA aneurysm embedded in a PA. Clinical suspicion should remain high when evaluating any case of epistaxis and pituitary apoplexy. Optimal treatment should take into consideration individual features of the tumor, aneurysm, and patient. Making the correct diagnosis as well as identifying an appropriate management strategy is critical in the care of such patients. PMID:26823732

  18. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) receptor gene is expressed in the chicken ovary: potential role of GnIH in follicular maturation.

    PubMed

    Maddineni, Sreenivasa R; Ocón-Grove, Olga M; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Hendricks, Gilbert L; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2008-02-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), an RFamide peptide, has been found to inhibit pituitary LH secretion in avian and mammalian species. The gene encoding a putative receptor for GnIH (GnIHR) was recently identified in the chicken and Japanese quail brain and pituitary gland. GnIHR appears to be a seven-transmembrane protein belonging to a family of G-protein-coupled receptors. In the present study, we have characterized the expression of GnIHR mRNA in the chicken ovary and demonstrate that GnIHR may exert an inhibitory effect on ovarian follicular development. By RT-PCR, we detected GnIHR mRNA in the chicken testis and in the ovary, specifically both thecal and granulosa cell layers. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed greater GnIHR mRNA quantity in theca cells of prehierarchial follicles compared with that of preovulatory follicles. GnIHR mRNA quantity was significantly decreased in sexually mature chicken ovaries versus ovaries of sexually immature chickens. Estradiol (E(2)) and/or progesterone (P(4)) treatment of sexually immature chickens significantly decreased ovarian GnIHR mRNA abundance. Treatment of prehierarchial follicular granulosa cells in vitro with chicken GnIH peptide significantly decreased basal but not FSH-stimulated cellular viability. Collectively, our results indicate that the ovarian GnIHR is likely to be involved in ovarian follicular development. A decrease in ovarian GnIHR mRNA abundance due to sexual maturation or by E(2) and/or P(4) treatment would implicate an inhibitory role for GnIHR in ovarian follicular development. Furthermore, GnIH may affect follicular maturation by decreasing the viability of prehierarchial follicular granulosa cells through binding to GnIHR. PMID:18239054

  19. PRKAR1A and the evolution of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2010-09-15

    Carney complex (CNC) is an inherited tumor predisposition associated with pituitary tumors, including GH-producing pituitary adenomas and rare reports of prolactinomas. This disease is caused by mutations in PRKAR1A, which encodes the type 1A regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA. Loss of PRKAR1A causes enhanced PKA signaling, which leads to pituitary tumorigenesis. Mutations in the gene have not been detected in sporadic pituitary tumors, but there is some data to suggest that non-genomic mechanisms may cause loss of protein expression. Unlike CNC patients, mice heterozygous for Prkar1a mutations do not develop pituitary tumors, although complete knockout of the gene in the Pit1 lineage of the pituitary produces GH-secreting pituitary adenomas. These data indicate that complete loss of Prkar1a/PRKAR1A is able to cause pituitary tumors in mice and men. The pattern of tumors is likely related to the signaling pathways employed in specific pituitary cell types. PMID:20451576

  20. [Leptomeningeal Dissemination in Patients with Pituitary Metastasis from Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nakamasa; Mitsuya, Koichi; Harada, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Junichiro; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Nakasu, Yoko

    2016-05-01

    Pituitary metastases are uncommon complications of systemic cancer and account for only 1% of pituitary lesions. Breast cancer is one of the most common tumors to metastasize to the pituitary gland. A multidisciplinary approach that calls for close collaboration among oncologists, neurosurgeons, radiologists, and endocrinologists is mandatory for diagnosis and treatment of pituitary metastasis. From 2002 through 2013, 6 patients with pituitary metastases were treated at Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital. The patients' age at presentation ranged from 45 to 75 years(average 59 years). Five of 6 patients had symptoms: anterior pituitary insufficiency in 4, diabetes insipidus in 3, and visual deficits in 2 patients. Five patients had other metastases at the time of presentation. Local irradiation to the metastatic lesion was adopted in 4, and whole brain irradiation was in 2 patients. In all cases, local control was achieved after irradiation, however, the pituitary insufficiency did not recover. Two of 4 patients treated with local irradiation suffered from meningeal dissemination within 5 months after treatment, and died at 8 and 11 months after diagnosis of pituitary metastasis, respectively. The patients treated with whole brain irradiation had longer survival periods. Early diagnosis, endocrinological management, and radiation therapy improve the quality of life in patients suffering from pituitary metastasis. Whole brain irradiation may be favorable in order to prevent meningeal dissemination. PMID:27166841

  1. Evolution of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor and its ligand.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a neuropeptide inhibitor of gonadotropin secretion, which was first identified in the Japanese quail hypothalamus. GnIH peptides share a C-terminal LPXRFamide (X=L or Q) motif in most vertebrates. The receptor for GnIH (GnIHR) is the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor 147 (GPR147) that inhibits cAMP production. GPR147 is also named neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptor 1 (NPFFR1), because it also binds NPFF that has a C-terminal PQRFamide motif. To understand the evolutionary history of the GnIH system in the animal kingdom, we searched for receptors structurally similar to GnIHR in the genome of six mammals (human, mouse, rat, cattle, cat, and rabbit), five birds (pigeon, chicken, turkey, budgerigar, and zebra finch), one reptile (green anole), one amphibian (Western clawed flog), six fishes (zebrafish, Nile tilapia, Fugu, coelacanth, spotted gar, and lamprey), one hemichordate (acorn worm), one echinoderm (purple sea urchin), one mollusk (California sea hare), seven insects (pea aphid, African malaria mosquito, honey bee, buff-tailed bumblebee, fruit fly, jewel wasp, and red flour beetle), one cnidarian (hydra), and constructed phylogenetic trees by neighbor joining (NJ) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods. A multiple sequence alignment of the receptors showed highly conserved seven-transmembrane domains as well as disulfide bridge sites between the first and second extracellular loops, including the receptor of hydra. Both NJ and ML analyses grouped the receptors of vertebrates into NPFFR1 and NPFFR2 (GPR74), and the receptors of insects into the receptor for SIFamide peptides that share a C-terminal YRKPPFNGSIFamide motif. Although human, quail and zebrafish GnIHR (NPFFR1) were most structurally similar to SIFamide receptor of fruit fly in the Famide peptide (FMRFamide, neuropeptide F, short neuropeptide F, drosulfakinin, myosuppressin, SIFamide) receptor families, the amino acid sequences and the peptide coding

  2. A modified ultra-long pituitary downregulation protocol improved endometrial receptivity and clinical outcome for infertile patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    PubMed Central

    GONG, FEI; LI, XIHONG; ZHANG, SHUNJI; MA, HAINAN; CAI, SUFEN; LI, JUAN; LIN, GE; LU, GUANGXIU

    2015-01-01

    There are currently various protocols for in vitro fertilization (IVF). For patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), an optimized protocol for the downregulation of pituitary follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone via gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) remains a challenge. In the present study, the primary endpoint of an ultra-long and a conventional long GnRHa protocol for intracytoplasmic sperm injection/IVF treatments of patients with PCOS was retrospectively compared. In the modified ultra-long protocol group, endometrial thickness, morphology, and blood flow were significantly improved, as compared with in the conventional long protocol group. Furthermore, the serum progestogen (P) concentrations and P/estrogen (E2) [(Px1,000/E2)] ratio on the day of human chorionic gonadotrophin administration were significantly decreased in the modified ultra-long downregulation group, whereas the pregnancy and implantation rates were significantly higher. There were no significant differences in the average number of obtained oocytes, good quality embryo rates, cancel rates, fertilization rates, abortion rates, serious ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome incidences, ectopic pregnancy rates or gonadotropin (Gn) dosages between the two groups. These results suggest that the modified ultra-long protocol plus human menopausal Gn medication may be superior to the conventional long protocol, and may lead to improved implantation and pregnancy outcomes for infertile patients with PCOS. PMID:26640563

  3. Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meduri, G; Charnaux, N; Loosfelt, H; Jolivet, A; Spyratos, F; Brailly, S; Milgrom, E

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that human choriogonadotropin (hCG), in addition to its function in regulating steroidogenesis, may also play a role as a growth factor. Immunocytochemistry using two different monoclonal antibodies (LHR29 and LHR1055) raised against the human luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (LH/hCG) receptor allowed us to detect this receptor in breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, and ZR75) in individual cancer biopsies and in benign breast lesions. The receptor was also present in epithelial cells of normal human and sow breast. In the latter, its concentration increased after ovulation. The presence of LH/hCG receptor mRNA was confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR using primers extending over exons 2-4, 5-11, and 9-11. The proportion of LH/hCG-receptor positive cells and the intensity of the immunolabeling varied in individual biopsies, but there was no obvious correlation with the histological type of the cancer. These results are compatible with previous studies suggesting that during pregnancy, hCG is involved in the differentiation of breast glandular epithelium and that this hormone may play an inhibitory role in mammary carcinogenesis and in the growth of breast tumors. PMID:9041186

  4. Altered ovarian responsiveness to gonadotropins in neonatally irradiated immature rats

    SciTech Connect

    Freud, A.; Sod-Moriah, U.A.

    1988-01-01

    Female rats which were exposed to a single low dose of gamma irradiation (6R or 15R) at the age of 8 days produce smaller litters when mature than untreated controls. In order to study the possibility that such an impaired reproductive performance could result from a reduced ovulation rate, neonatally irradiated females were treated with PMSG (12 iu/rat) at the age of 26 days. Another group of rats, similarly treated, was further injected with hCG (5 iu/rat) 48 hours later. Animals were killed 48, 55, 60 and 72 hours after PMSG treatment or 72 and 120 after hCG injection. The results indicated that PMSG treatment increased the ovarian weight of non-irradiated controls as well as of irradiated rats and in all animals induced a proestrus like profile of LH. Only a combined treatment of PMSG and hCG resulted in ovulation and corpora lutea formation with significantly increased numbers of corpora lutea in the ovaries of the irradiated rats. The latter was associated with higher progesterone plasma levels not correlated to the number of corpora lutea. The gradual decrease in the number of ovarian binding sites for hCG with increased radiation dose and the increased association constant in the 15R group could not explain the increased sensitivity of the ovary to exogenous gonadotropins which results from neonatal exposure to low doses of gamma irradiation.

  5. Pharmacological Chaperones for Misfolded Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Conn, P. Michael; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Structural alterations provoked by mutations or genetic variations in the gene sequence of G protein-coupled receptors may lead to abnormal function of the receptor molecule and, ultimately, to disease. While some mutations lead to changes in domains involved in agonist binding, receptor activation or coupling to effectors, others may cause misfolding and lead to retention/degradation of the protein molecule by the quality control system of the cell. Several strategies, including genetic, chemical and pharmacological approaches have been shown to rescue function of trafficking-defective misfolded G protein-coupled receptors. Among these, pharmacological strategies offer the most promising therapeutic tool to promote proper trafficking of misfolded proteins to the plasma membrane. Pharmacological chaperones or “pharmacoperones,” are small compounds that permeate the plasma membrane, enter cells, and bind selectively to misfolded proteins and correct folding allowing routing of the target protein to the plasma membrane, where the receptor may bind and respond to agonist stimulation. In this review we describe new therapeutic opportunities based on misfolding of otherwise functional human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors. This particular receptor is highly sensitive to single changes in chemical charge and its intracellular traffic is delicately balanced between expression at the plasma membrane or retention/degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum; it is, therefore, a particularly instructive model to understand both protein routing and the molecular mechanisms whereby pharmacoperones rescue misfolded intermediates or conformationally defective receptors. PMID:21907908

  6. Transdermal iontophoresis of gonadotropin releasing hormone (LHRH) and two analogues.

    PubMed

    Miller, L L; Kolaskie, C J; Smith, G A; Rivier, J

    1990-06-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), as well as an antagonist [Ac-D2Nal,1 D4ClPhe,2 D3Pal,3 NicLys,5 DNicLys,6 ILys,8 DAla10] GnRH.HOAc (1) and a superagonist [DTrp6, Pro9-NHEt]GnRH (2), have been electrochemically driven across excised hairless mouse skin. Determined by HPLC analysis, the delivery rate from aqueous solution into isotonic saline at 0.5 mA cm-2 was as high as 19 nM cm-2 h-1 for 2. Because of its insolubility in water, analogue 1 could only be delivered from an acidic donor solution. Analogue 2 was also delivered in pulsatile fashion using current on/off cycles. For all three peptides, passive transport was negligible and stability is evident when in contact with the stratum corneum. Slow metabolism occurs when GnRH contacts the dermal side of hairless mouse skin. PMID:2203894

  7. Regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Helen H

    2007-09-01

    Reproductive function is influenced by several internal and external cues, which ultimately exert their effects on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron. As the final common pathway in the brain for regulating reproduction, GnRH neurons receive signals from multiple cell types, and alterations in GnRH production impact reproductive competence. Historically, the paucity of GnRH neurons and their scattered distribution in the brain have limited the study of GnRH gene expression. With transgenic technology, newer model systems (such as immortalized GnRH-expressing cell lines and GnRH-reporter gene transgenic mice) have been developed, making molecular studies possible. This article provides an update on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of GnRH gene expression, focusing on tissue-specific expression and transcriptional regulation. After an overview of GnRH gene structure, synthesis, and secretion, the model systems for studying GnRH neurons are examined. The molecular mechanisms that translate physiologic stimuli, such as nutritional status or stress, into changes in GnRH expression will be reviewed, concentrating on the regulatory regions within the GnRH gene promoter and the critical transcription factors. PMID:17710727

  8. Multiple Pituitary Adenomas: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Budan, Renata M.; Georgescu, Carmen E.

    2016-01-01

    PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science Core Collection databases were systematically searched for studies reporting synchronous double or multiple pituitary adenomas (MPA), a rare clinical condition, with a vague pathogenesis. Multiple adenomas of the pituitary gland are referred to as morphologically and/or immunocytochemically distinct tumors that are frequently small-sized and hormonally non-functional, to account for the low detection rate. There is no general agreement on how to classify MPA, various criteria, such as tumor contiguity, immunoreactivity, and clonality analysis are being used. Among the component tumors, prolactin (PRL)-immunopositive adenomas are highly prevalent, albeit mute in the majority of cases. The most frequent clinical presentation of MPA is Cushing’s syndrome, given the fact that in more than 50% of reported cases at least one lesion stains for adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). Plurihormonal hyperactivity may be diagnosed in a patient with MPA when more than one tumor is clinically active (e.g., ACTH and PRL) or in cases with at least one composite tumor (e.g., GH and PRL), to complicate the clinical scenario. Specific challenges associated with MPA include high surgical failure rates, enforcing second-look surgery in certain cases, and difficult preoperative neuroradiological imaging evaluation, with an overall sensitivity of only 25% for magnetic resonance imaging to detect distinct multiple tumors. Alternatively, minor pituitary imaging abnormalities may raise suspicion, as these are not uncommon. Postoperative immunohistochemistry is mandatory and in conjunction to electron microscopy scanning and testing for transcription factors (i.e., Pit-1, T-pit, and SF-1) accurately define and classify the distinct cytodifferentiation of MPA. PMID:26869991

  9. Nonfunctioning giant pituitary adenomas: Invasiveness and recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Landeiro, José Alberto; Fonseca, Elissa Oliveira; Monnerat, Andrea Lima Cruz; Taboada, Giselle Fernandes; Cabral, Gustavo Augusto Porto Sereno; Antunes, Felippe

    2015-01-01

    Background: We report our surgical series of 35 patients with giant nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (GNFPA). We analyzed the rule of Ki-67 antigen expression in predicting recurrence. Methods: Thirty-five patients were operated between 2000 and 2010. Suprassellar extension of the tumors were classified according to Hardy and Mohr based on magnetic resonance (MR) studies. Pituitary endocrine function and MR scans were assessed preoperatively and at 1, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Immunohistochemical studies were based in regard to the expression of the proliferative Ki-67 index and the hormonal receptor for luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, growth hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and prolactin. Tumors specimens were obtained from 35 patients with GNFPA. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was the approach of choice. Results: Thirty-five patients were submitted to 49 surgeries, 44 (89.8%) were transsphenoidal and 5 (10.2%) were transcranial. The most frequent preoperative complaints were visual acuity impairment and visual field defect in 25 (71.2%) and 23 (65.7%) cases, respectively. Improvement of visual acuitiy and visual field deficit after surgery was seen in 20 (80%) and 17 (73.9%) patients, respectively. Endocrinological deficits were encountered in 20 patients (57.1%). After surgery, 18 patients (51.4%) required hormonal replacement. Three patients had visual symptoms related to pituitary apoplexy and recovered after surgery. The Ki-67 labeling index (LI) ranged from <1% to 4.8%. The rate of recurrence in tumors with Ki-67 <3% was 7.7% (2 patients), Ki-67 >3% was present in 5 patients and the recurrence committed 3 patients. Conclusion: In our series, regardless the improvement of visual function and compressing symptoms, 5 patients with expression of Ki-67 LI more than 3% experienced a recurrence. PMID:26674325

  10. Hemostatic Disorders in Hormonally Active Pituitary Tumors.

    PubMed

    Świątkowska-Stodulska, R; Babińska, A; Mital, A; Stodulski, D; Sworczak, K

    2015-10-01

    Endocrinopathies encompass heterogeneous diseases that can lead to hemostasis disorders at various stages over their clinical course. Normal hemostasis requires an equilibrium between the processes of coagulation and fibrinolysis, which depend on multiple activators and inhibitors. To date, the influence of various hormonal disorders on the hemostatic system has been assessed many times. The aim of this review was to analyze hemostasis abnormalities that occur in patients with hormonally active pituitary tumors: corticotropinoma, somatotropinoma, prolactinoma, gonadotropinoma and thyrotropinoma. Authors discuss studies that examined coagulation and hemostasis parameters among patients with these tumors, as well as analyze antithrombotic prophylaxis approach for endogenous hypercortisolemia subjects in particular. PMID:26285071

  11. Duplication of the pituitary gland - plus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Debraj; Arora, Vijinder

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of the pituitary gland (DPG) is a very rare developmental anomaly that is often associated with other anomalies – the DPG-plus syndrome and occurs due to splitting of the rostral notochord and prechordal plate during blastogenesis. DPG with the constellation of associated anomalies as in our patient has not been reported previously. This article illustrates the importance of imaging the brain in all patients with obvious midline facial anomalies and the complementary role of MRI and CT in such cases. PMID:27081236

  12. Pituitary dysfunction in infective brain diseases

    PubMed Central

    Beatrice, Anne M.; Selvan, Chitra; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) are increasingly being recognized as important causes of hypopituitarism. Although tuberculosis is the most common agent involved, non-mycobacterial agents like viruses, bacteria, fungus, and protozoa are important causes in our country. Involvement post infections could be due to a strategically located tuberculoma, or pituitary abscess, or meningoencephalitis. Although it might not be reasonable to screen all patients with CNS infections for hypopituitarism, awareness of the possibility and clinical follow-up for suggestive symptoms is required. PMID:24910821

  13. Pituitary-ovarian-splenic axis in ovulation

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Oliver R.; Frazer, Michele L.; Ko, CheMyong

    2011-01-01

    Leukocytes are rapidly recruited to the preovulatory ovary and play a crucial role as facilitators of ovulation and luteal formation. In this article, recent findings on leukocyte trafficking to the ovary, as well as the physiological role of leukocytes in the ovary, will be summarized and discussed. We then explore the novel hypothesis that the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis might include the spleen as a reservoir of leukocytes by summarizing recent reports on this topic, both in the fields of immunology and reproductive biology. PMID:21600783

  14. Early pregnancy human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) isoforms measured by an immunometric assay for choriocarcinoma-like hCG.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, G; Birken, S; Kakuma, T; O'Connor, J F

    1999-04-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) exhibits molecular heterogeneity in both its protein and carbohydrate moieties. This communication describes changes in hCG isoforms detected directly in clinical samples. These isoforms, quantified in blood or urine specimens, show a progression of change throughout normal pregnancy. Early pregnancy produces a type of hCG that resembles, in terms of immunoreactivity, a major form of hCG excreted in choriocarcinoma. The isoforms predominate for the first 5-6 weeks of gestation and then diminish, being replaced with the hCG isoforms which predominate throughout the remainder of pregnancy. The alteration in hCG isoform content occurs in both blood and urine. The progression of isoforms is best delineated by calculating the change in the ratio of the two forms, as many hCG assays either do not detect or fail to discriminate among these isoforms. An analogous pattern of hCG isoforms was observed in patients with in vitro fertilization pregnancies. hCG isolated from the pituitary displayed binding characteristics similar to those of the hCG derived from normal pregnancy urine. The early pregnancy hCG isoforms appear to have a differential expression in normal pregnancy as opposed to pregnancies which will not carry to term, suggesting that a determination of the relative balance of hCG isoforms may have diagnostic application in predicting pregnancy outcome. PMID:10194533

  15. Dynamic computed tomography of the pituitary gland using a single slice scanner in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Del Magno, Sara; Grinwis, Guy C M; Voorhout, George; Meij, Björn P

    2016-08-01

    Selective removal of the pituitary adenoma has not been advocated in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism because the pituitary adenoma is usually not visualized on routine computed tomography (CT). Dynamic pituitary CT scanning is aimed at the detection of the pituitary flush and, indirectly, at the presence and position of the adenoma. The first aim of this retrospective study was to compare findings of a multiple slice dynamic scanning protocol with those of a single slice dynamic protocol using a single slice CT scanner. The second aim was to compare the CT findings with surgical findings, and surgical findings with histopathological findings. Computed tomography with single and multiple slice dynamic scanning protocols was performed in 86 dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism. Thirty dogs underwent transsphenoidal hypophysectomy and pituitary specimens were collected as tumor, normal, mixed and neurohypophyseal samples and processed for histology. The pituitary flush was not detected more frequent in multiple slice dynamic scanning series than in single slice dynamic scanning series. However, in non-enlarged pituitaries, the flush was seen significantly more frequently than in enlarged pituitaries. Prediction of the nature of the tissue during hypophysectomy by the surgeon was inconclusive. In conclusion, when using a single slice CT scanner, both single or multiple slice dynamic scanning protocols can be used for localization of the neurohypophyseal flush, and, indirectly, the adenoma. However, based on this study, the aim of surgery in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism remains total adenohypophysectomy, and when the neurophypophysis is recognized, it may be left in situ. PMID:27473973

  16. Cushing's Syndrome From Pituitary Microadenoma and Pulmonary Nodules.

    PubMed

    Tating, Dan Louie Renz P; Montevirgen, Natasha Denise S; Cajucom, Loyda

    2016-03-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a state of cortisol excess, possibly from a tumor in the pituitary gland, the adrenal gland, or an ectopic nonpituitary ACTH-secreting source. The first form, pituitary in origin, was originally described by Harvey Cushing, MD, and was labeled as Cushing's disease. Long-term therapy with glucocorticoids also can lead to iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome. PMID:26906124

  17. Pituitary Volume Prospectively Predicts Internalizing Symptoms in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipursky, Amy R.; Whittle, Sarah; Yucel, Murat; Lorenzetti, Valentina; Wood, Stephen J.; Lubman, Dan I.; Simmons, Julian G.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Early adolescence is a critical time for the development of both internalizing and externalizing disorders. We aimed to investigate whether pituitary volume, an index of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, represents a vulnerability factor for the emergence of internalizing and externalizing symptoms during adolescence…

  18. EFFECTS OF CAGING DENSITY ON PITUITARY AND TESTICLE RELATED RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of caging density on pituitary and testicle related responses

    A significant negative correlation between the incidence of testicular interstitial cell tumors (ICT) and of pituitary tumors (PT) in control male F344 rats is reported associated with the number of ani...

  19. TOXIC EFFECTS OF XENOBIOTICS ON THE PITUITARY GLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview provides a summary of adverse effects of xenobiotics upon the pituitary gland, an endocrine gland that plays an important role in the regulation of reproductive function. he most common histopathological pituitary lesions observed following exposure to drugs and che...

  20. Genetic Bases of Estrogen-Induced Pituitary Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Strecker, Tracy E.; Spady, Thomas J.; Schaffer, Beverly S.; Gould, Karen A.; Kaufman, Amy E.; Shen, Fangchen; McLaughlin, Mac T.; Pennington, Karen L.; Meza, Jane L.; Shull, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Estrogens stimulate proliferation and enhance survival of the prolactin (PRL)-producing lactotroph of the anterior pituitary gland and induce development of PRL-producing pituitary tumors in certain inbred rat strains but not others. The goal of this study was to elucidate the genetic bases of estrogen-induced pituitary tumorigenesis in reciprocal intercrosses between the genetically related ACI and Copenhagen (COP) rat strains. Following 12 weeks of treatment with the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES), pituitary mass, an accurate surrogate marker of absolute lactotroph number, was increased 10.6-fold in ACI rats and 4.5-fold in COP rats. Composite interval mapping analyses of the phenotypically defined F2 progeny from the reciprocal crosses identified six quantitative trait loci (QTL) that determine the pituitary growth response to DES. These loci reside on chromosome 6 [Estrogen-induced pituitary tumor (Ept)1], chromosome 3 (Ept2 and Ept6), chromosome 10 (Ept9), and chromosome 1 (Ept10 and Ept13). Together, these six Ept loci and one additional suggestive locus on chromosome 4 account for an estimated 40% of the phenotypic variance exhibited by the combined F2 population, while 34% of the phenotypic variance was estimated to result from environmental factors. These data indicate that DES-induced pituitary mass behaves as a quantitative trait and provide information that will facilitate identification of genes that determine the tumorigenic response of the pituitary gland to estrogens. PMID:15687265

  1. Expression studies of neuronatin in prenatal and postnatal rat pituitary.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Naoko; Higuchi, Masashi; Yoshida, Saishu; Yako, Hideji; Chen, Mo; Ueharu, Hiroki; Nishimura, Naoto; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-05-01

    The pituitary gland, an indispensable endocrine organ that synthesizes and secretes pituitary hormones, develops with the support of many factors. Among them, neuronatin (NNAT), which was discovered in the neonatal mouse brain as a factor involved in neural development, has subsequently been revealed to be coded by an abundantly expressing gene in the pituitary gland but its role remains elusive. We analyze the expression profile of Nnat and the localization of its product during rat pituitary development. The level of Nnat expression was high during the embryonic period but remarkably decreased after birth. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that NNAT appeared in the SOX2-positive stem/progenitor cells in the developing pituitary primordium on rat embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) and later in the majority of SOX2/PROP1 double-positive cells on E13.5. Thereafter, during pituitary embryonic development, Nnat expression was observed in some stem/progenitor cells, proliferating cells and terminally differentiating cells. In postnatal pituitaries, NNAT-positive cells decreased in number, with most coexpressing Sox2 or Pit1, suggesting a similar role for NNAT to that during the embryonic period. NNAT was widely localized in mitochondria, peroxisomes and lysosomes, in addition to the endoplasmic reticulum but not in the Golgi. The present study thus demonstrated the variability in expression of NNAT-positive cells in rat embryonic and postnatal pituitaries and the intracellular localization of NNAT. Further investigations to obtain functional evidence for NNAT are a prerequisite. PMID:26613603

  2. Effect of prenatal and neonatal exposure to lead on gonadotropin receptors and steroidogenesis in rat ovaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, J.P.; Barr, K.J.; Buckingham, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with lead chloride (20 or 200 ppm) or sodium chloride (controls) in their drinking water, either prior to pregnancy or during pregnancy and lactation, and female offspring were examined at weaning (21 d) or at 150 d. Other female rats were treated from d 21 to 35. Tissue (blood, kidney, bone) lead levels, body, ovary, and uterus weights, ovarian steroidogenesis, and gonadotropin (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone) levels, and gonadotropin-receptor binding were determined. Prenatal and/or postnatal exposure to lead at these levels (20 and 200 ppm) did not affect tissue weights but did cause a significant decrease in gonadotropin-receptor binding in the prepubertal, pubertal and adult females. Conversion of progesterone to androstenedione and dihydrotestosterone was significantly decreased in 21-d-old rats; in 150-d-old females, the prenatal and/or postnatal exposure to lead resulted in significantly increased conversion to the 5-alpha-reduced steroid, normally high during puberty. The results demonstrate that lead exposure prior to mating may affect gonadotropin-receptor binding in the offspring and that lead exposure (in utero, via mother's milk, or post weaning) may significantly alter steroid production and gonadotropin binding in ovaries of the prepubertal, pubertal, and adult female.

  3. Ghrelin suppresses the GnRH-induced preovulatory gonadotropin surge in dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Chouzouris, T M; Dovolou, E; Dafopoulos, K; Georgoulias, P; Vasileiou, N G; Fthenakis, G C; Anifandis, G; Amiridis, G S

    2016-10-01

    Ghrelin, a known growth hormone (GH) secretagogue, alters gonadotropin secretion in many species. Our objectives were to study the effects of ghrelin, on GH, LH, FSH secretion, and on luteal function of the ensuing estrous cycle in cattle. The estrous cycles of eight heifers were synchronized with progesteron releasing intravaginal device, and ovulation was induced with GnRH. Eight animals were treated with 1.5 μg kg(-1) bovine ghrelin (group Ghr, n = 4) or saline (group C, n = 4). Starting with the first ghrelin injection, 13 blood samples were collected over a 4-hour period for the determination of ghrelin, GH, LH, and FSH concentration. Progesterone levels were measured in samples collected every other day after estrus expression. Data were analyzed by repeated measures of ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post hoc testing and t test. In group Ghr, ghrelin concentration increased significantly 15 minutes after the first injection and remained in elevated levels until the 90th minute after the last injection. At the time of third ghrelin injection, GH was significantly higher in the Ghr group compared with C (17.1 ± 1.3 vs. 2.6 ± 0.3 ng mL(-1), P < 0.0001). Similar differences were found for the next three samples collected 15, 30, and 60 minutes later; no difference was evident after 90 minutes. In group Ghr, the area under the curve for LH and FSH were significantly reduced compared with the ones of group C (266 ± 10.3 vs. 331.9 ± 7.3, P = 0.007 and 102.3 ± 2.0 vs. 134.9 ± 5.5, P < 0.005 for LH and FSH respectively). At particular time points the concentration of the two gonadotrophins in group Ghr was significantly lower than those of group C (15, 30, 45, 75, and 90 and 60, 75, 90, 120, and 150 minutes after GnRH administration for LH and FSH respectively). The duration of the following estrous cycle was shorter (P = 0.004) in group Ghr (19.0 ± 0.4 days) compared with C (21.8 ± 0.5 days). In days 4, 6, 8, 10, and 14

  4. Pituitary apoplexy presenting as diabetic ketoacidosis: A great simulator?

    PubMed

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos R; Infante-Valenzuela, Adrian; Rodriguez-Velver, Karla; Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Rene; Villareal-Velazquez, Hector J

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a life-threatening illness due to acute infarction of the pituitary gland. The most common symptoms associated with pituitary apoplexy are headache, nausea, vomiting, visual impairment, hypopituitarism, and altered mental status. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a common acute complication of diabetes mellitus and is itself associated with similar symptoms. We present the case of a 38 year old woman, who presented with altered mental status and biochemical alterations suggestive of diabetic ketoacidosis who was found to have a pituitary apoplexy. The low frequency of this condition coupled with an acute and usually dramatic presentation that includes non-specific symptoms makes it a diagnostic challenge. Pituitary apoplexy can simulate a wide range of neurological conditions. PMID:26994379

  5. Diagnostic imaging of dopamine receptors in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W; Reijs, Ambroos E M; Feelders, Richard A; van Aken, Maarten O; Krenning, Eric P; van der Lely, Aart-Jan; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2007-04-01

    Dopamine D2 receptor scintigraphy of pituitary adenomas is feasible by single-photon emission computed tomography using (123)I-S-(-)-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-2-hydroxy-3-iodo-6-methoxybenzamide ((123)I-IBZM) and (123)I-epidepride. (123)I-epidepride is generally superior to (123)I-IBZM for the visualization of D2 receptors on pituitary macroadenomas. However, (123)I-IBZM and (123)I-epidepride scintigraphy are generally not useful to predict the response to dopaminergic treatment in pituitary tumour patients. These techniques might allow discrimination of non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas from other non-tumour pathologies in the sellar region. Dopamine D2 receptors on pituitary tumours can also be studied using positron emission tomography with (11)C-N-raclopride and (11)C-N-methylspiperone. PMID:17413189

  6. Research Advances in Pituitary Adenoma and DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen-Qing; Li, Yang; Li, Wei-Hua; Lou, Jia-Cheng; Zhang, Bo

    2016-08-01

    DNA methylation is closely related to the genesis and development of pituitary adenoma. Studies have shown that high methylation in the promoter region of potassium voltage-gated chanel,shaker related subfamily,beta member 2,O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase,echinoderm microtubule associated protein like 2 ,ras homolog family member D ,homeobox B1 ,NNAT, and P16 inhibits the expression of these genes and regulates of the proliferation of pituitary adenoma. DNA methylation is also closely related to invasive pituitary adenoma. Therefore,further study on molecular mechanism of DNA methylation of pituitary adenoma will offer a new strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of pituitary adenoma. PMID:27594164

  7. Pituitary hyperplasia: an uncommon presentation of a common disease

    PubMed Central

    Massolt, E T; Peeters, R P; Neggers, S J; de Herder, W W

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 21-year-old woman presented with amenorrhea, bilateral galactorrhea and fatigue. Visual acuity and visual fields were normal. Laboratory examination demonstrated hyperprolactinemia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pituitary showed a 19×17×12-mm sellar mass with supra- and parasellar extension, causing compression of the pituitary stalk and optic chiasm. Further examinations confirmed mild hyperprolactinemia, strongly elevated TSH (>500 mU/l), low free thyroxine (FT4), hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and secondary adrenal insufficiency. Hydrocortisone and l-T4 replacement therapy was started. Three months later, the galactorrhea had disappeared, thyroid function was normalized and MRI revealed regression of the pituitary enlargement, confirming the diagnosis of pituitary hyperplasia (PH) due to primary hypothyroidism. Subsequently, the menstrual cycle returned and the hypocortisolism normalized. This case demonstrates that severe primary hypothyroidism may have an unusual presentation and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pituitary enlargement associated with moderate hyperprolactinemia. Learning points One should always try to find one etiology as the common cause of all the clinical findings in a pathologic process.Amenorrhea, galactorrhea and fatigue may be the only presenting clinical manifestations of primary hypothyroidism.Not every patient with galactorrhea, hyperprolactinemia and a pituitary mass has a prolactinoma.Primary hypothyroidism should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia associated with pituitary enlargement and pituitary hormone(s) deficiency(ies).When PH due to primary hypothyroidism is suspected, thyroid hormone replacement should be started and only regression of pituitary enlargement on MRI follow-up can confirm the diagnosis.Examination of thyroid function in patients with a pituitary mass may avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:26279852

  8. Estradiol Upregulates c-FLIPlong Expression in Anterior Pituitary Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaita, G; Zárate, S; Ferraris, J; Gottardo, M F; Eijo, G; Magri, M L; Pisera, D; Seilicovich, A

    2016-04-01

    Anterior pituitary cell turnover depends on a tight balance between proliferation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that estrogens sensitize anterior pituitary cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli. c-FLIP (cellular-FLICE-inhibitory-protein) isoforms are regulatory proteins of apoptosis triggered by death receptors. c-FLIPshort isoform competes with procaspase-8 inhibiting its activation. However, c-FLIPlong isoform may have a pro- or anti-apoptotic function depending on its expression level. In the present study, we explored whether estrogens modulate c-FLIP expression in anterior pituitary cells from ovariectomized (OVX) rats and in GH3 cells, a somatolactotrope cell line. Acute administration of 17β-estradiol to OVX rats increased c-FLIPlong expression in the anterior pituitary gland without changing c-FLIPshort expression as assessed by Western blot. Estradiol in vitro also increased c-FLIPlong expression in anterior pituitary cells but not in GH3 cells. As determined by flow cytometry, the percentage of anterior pituitary cells expressing c-FLIP was higher than in GH3 cells. However, c-FLIP fluorescence intensity in GH3 cells was higher than in anterior pituitary cells. FasL increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive GH3 cells incubated either with or without estradiol suggesting that the pro-apoptotic action of Fas activation is estrogen-independent. Our results show that unlike what happens in nontumoral pituitary cells, estrogens do not modulate either c-FLIPlong expression or FasL-induced apoptosis in GH3 cells. The stimulatory effect of estradiol on c-FLIPlong expression could be involved in the sensitizing effect of this steroid to apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells. The absence of this estrogenic action in tumor pituitary cells could be involved in their tumor-like behavior. PMID:26566102

  9. Effect of Hypoxia on DDR1 Expression in Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shouchun; Zhang, Zhiwen; Xue, Jinghui; Guo, Xiaoming; Liang, Shuli; Liu, Aijun

    2015-01-01

    Background Pituitary adenoma is a common intracranial tumor in neurosurgery. Some pituitary adenomas have the characteristics of invasive growth make them unable to be removed completely by surgery leading to easy relapse. Discoidin domain receptor l (DDR1) is a new kind of tyrosine kinase receptor on the cell surface. DDR1 can be activated by tumor microenvironment signal in tumorigenesis, increasing MMP-2/9 expression and promoting the invasive ability of tumor cells. Anoxia can promote tumor growth and metastasis. This study investigated the impact of anoxic environment DDR1 expression in pituitary adenoma. Material/Methods A primary hypoxia pituitary adenoma cell model was established and treated with DDR1 inhibitor nilotinib. Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to detect DDR1 mRNA and protein expression. ELISA was used to detect MMP-2/9 changes. MTT method was used to detect pituitary adenoma cell proliferation. We used a transwell chamber to determine pituitary adenoma cell invasion ability. Results DDR1 mRNA and protein were significantly overexpressed under hypoxia (P<0.05). MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression was obviously increased in supernatant (P<0.05). Pituitary adenoma cell proliferation and invasive ability improved markedly under hypoxia (P<0.05). Nilotinib could reduce DDR1 expression, decrease MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and inhibit pituitary adenoma cells proliferation and invasion. Conclusions Hypoxia can increase DDR1 expression in pituitary adenoma cells, leading to improved MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion, and promoting pituitary adenoma cell proliferation and invasion. PMID:26286316

  10. Up-regulation of placental leptin by human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Maymó, Julieta L; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor; Dueñas, José L; Calvo, Juan Carlos; Varone, Cecilia L

    2009-01-01

    Leptin, the 16,000 molecular weight protein product of the obese gene, was originally considered as an adipocyte-derived signaling molecule for the central control of metabolism. However, leptin has been suggested to be involved in other functions during pregnancy, particularly in placenta, in which it was found to be expressed. In the present work, we have found that recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) added to BeWo choriocarcinoma cell line showed a stimulatory effect on endogenous leptin expression, when analyzed by Western blot. This effect was time and dose dependent. Maximal effect was achieved at hCG 100 IU/ml. Moreover, hCG treatment enhanced leptin promoter activity up to 12.9 times, evaluated by transient transfection with a plasmid construction containing different promoter regions and the reporter gene luciferase. This effect was dose dependent and evidenced with all the promoter regions analyzed, regardless of length. Similar results were obtained with placental explants, thus indicating physiological relevance. Because hCG signal transduction usually involves cAMP signaling, this pathway was analyzed. Contrarily, we found that dibutyryl cAMP counteracted hCG effect on leptin expression. Furthermore, cotransfection with the catalytic subunit of PKA and/or the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein repressed leptin expression. Thereafter we determined that hCG effect could be partially blocked by pharmacologic inhibition of MAPK pathway with 50 microM PD98059 but not by the inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway with 0.1 microm wortmannin. Moreover, hCG treatment promoted MAPK kinase and ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation in placental cells. Finally, cotransfection with a dominant-negative mutant of MAPK blocked the hCG-mediated activation of leptin expression. In conclusion, we provide some evidence suggesting that hCG induces leptin expression in trophoblastic cells probably involving the MAPK signal transduction

  11. Effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown on testosterone secretion in the boar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike the classical gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-I), the second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II; His5, Trp7, Tyr8) is a poor stimulator of gonadotropin secretion. In addition, GnRH-II is ubiquitously expressed, with transcript levels highest in tissues outside of the brain. A receptor speci...

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Signaling: Integrating Cyclic Nucleotides into the Network

    PubMed Central

    Perrett, Rebecca M.; McArdle, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the primary regulator of mammalian reproductive function in both males and females. It acts via G-protein coupled receptors on gonadotropes to stimulate synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropin hormones luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. These receptors couple primarily via G-proteins of the Gq/ll family, driving activation of phospholipases C and mediating GnRH effects on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion. There is also good evidence that GnRH causes activation of other heterotrimeric G-proteins (Gs and Gi) with consequent effects on cyclic AMP production, as well as for effects on the soluble and particulate guanylyl cyclases that generate cGMP. Here we provide an overview of these pathways. We emphasize mechanisms underpinning pulsatile hormone signaling and the possible interplay of GnRH and autocrine or paracrine regulatory mechanisms in control of cyclic nucleotide signaling. PMID:24312080

  13. Effects of aqueous extract from Asparagus officinalis L. roots on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormone levels and the number of ovarian follicles in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Karimi Jashni, Hojatollah; Kargar Jahromi, Hossein; Ghorbani Ranjbary, Ali; Kargar Jahromi, Zahra; Khabbaz Kherameh, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Asparagus is a plant with high nutritional, pharmaceutical, and industrial values. Objective: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of asparagus roots on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormones and oogenesis in female rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 adult female Wistar rats were divided into five groups, which consist 8 rats. Groups included control, sham and three experimental groups receiving different doses (100, 200, 400 mg/kg/bw) of aqueous extract of asparagus roots. All dosages were administered orally for 28 days. Blood samples were taken from rats to evaluate serum levels of Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), Luteinal hormone (LH), estrogen, and progesterone hormones. The ovaries were removed, weighted, sectioned, and studied by light microscope. Results: Dose-dependent aqueous extract of asparagus roots significantly increased serum levels of GnRH, FSH, LH, estrogen, and progestin hormones compared to control and sham groups. Increase in number of ovarian follicles and corpus luteum in groups treated with asparagus root extract was also observed (p<0.05). Conclusion: Asparagus roots extract stimulates secretion of hypothalamic- pituitary- gonadal axis hormones. This also positively affects oogenesis in female rats. PMID:27200420

  14. Identification of the link between the hypothalamo-pituitary axis and the testicular orphan nuclear receptor NR0B2 in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Vega, Aurélie; Martinot, Emmanuelle; Baptissart, Marine; De Haze, Angélique; Saru, Jean-Paul; Baron, Silvère; Caira, Françoise; Schoonjans, Kristina; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Volle, David H

    2015-02-01

    The small heterodimer partner (SHP, nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2; NR0B2) is an atypical nuclear receptor known mainly for its role in bile acid homeostasis in the enterohepatic tract. We previously showed that NR0B2 controls testicular functions such as testosterone synthesis. Moreover, NR0B2 mediates the deleterious testicular effects of estrogenic endocrine disruptors leading to infertility. The endocrine homeostasis is essential for health, because it controls many physiological functions. This is supported by a large number of studies demonstrating that alterations of steroid activity lead to several kinds of diseases such as obesity and infertility. Within the testis, the functions of the Leydig cells are mainly controlled by the hypothalamo-pituitary axis via LH/chorionic gonadotropin (CG). Here, we show that LH/CG represses Nr0b2 expression through the protein kinase A-AMP protein kinase pathway. Moreover, using a transgenic mouse model invalidated for Nr0b2, we point out that NR0B2 mediates the repression of testosterone synthesis and subsequent germ cell apoptosis induced by exposure to anti-GnRH compound. Together, our data demonstrate a new link between hypothalamo-pituitary axis and NR0B2 in testicular androgen metabolism, making NR0B2 a major actor of testicular physiology in case of alteration of LH/CG levels. PMID:25426871

  15. Sexually dimorphic effects of NMDA receptor antagonism on brain-pituitary-gonad axis development in the platyfish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Katherine M.; Miller, Shelly A.; Sower, Stacia A.; Schreibman, Martin P.

    2002-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR) is found in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of reproduction in several species of mammals and fishes. NMDAR is believed to affect reproductive development and function by regulating gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-producing cells. These pathways are likely to be sexually dimorphic, as are several other neurotransmitter systems involved in reproductive function. In this report, male and female platyfish received intraperitoneal injections of 0, 5, 10, 20, 40 or 60 microg/g body wt. of the non-competitive NMDAR antagonist MK-801. Injections began at 6 weeks of age and continued thrice weekly until control animals reached puberty, as evidenced by anal fin maturation. The percent of pubescent animals was significantly affected by sex and treatment, with fewer MK-801-injected females in puberty than control females at each dose (P<0.001), and fewer pubescent females than males at 10, 20 and 40 microg/g (P<0.05). There were no MK-801-related effects in males. Histological analyses revealed typical immature gonads and pituitary glands in treated females, and typical mature morphology in control females and all males. Immunocytochemical distribution of the R1 subunit of the NMDAR within the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis was limited to GnRH-containing brain cells in all animals; however, NMDAR1 distribution was in an immature pattern in treated females and a mature pattern in all others. Neural concentrations of GnRH were unaffected by MK-801 treatment in both sexes. These data suggest that in the platyfish, NMDAR influence on reproductive development is sexually dimorphic and occurs at, or above, the level of GnRH-containing cells of the BPG axis.

  16. Ovarian stimulation with human chorionic gonadotropin and equine chorionic gonadotropin affects prostacyclin and its receptor expression in the porcine oviduct.

    PubMed

    Małysz-Cymborska, I; Andronowska, A

    2015-10-01

    Prostaglandins are well-known mediators of crucial events in the female reproductive tract, eg, early embryo development and implantation. Prostacyclin (PGI2) is the most synthesized prostaglandin in the human oviduct during the postovulatory period, indicating its important role in supporting and regulating the oviductal environment. The present study was undertaken to determine the influence of insemination and ovarian stimulation with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)/equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) on PGI2 synthesis in the porcine oviduct on day 3 post coitus. Mature gilts (n = 25) were assigned into 2 experiments. In experiment I, gilts were divided into cyclic (control; n = 5) and inseminated (control; n = 5) groups. In experiment II, there were 3 groups of animals: inseminated (n = 5), induced ovulation/inseminated (750 IU eCG, 500 IU hCG; n = 5), and superovulated/inseminated (1,500 IU eCG, 1,000 IU hCG; n = 5) gilts. Parts of oviducts (isthmus and ampulla) were collected 3 days after phosphate-buffered saline treatment (cyclic gilts of experiment I) or insemination (all other groups). Expression of messenger RNA for PGI2 synthase (PGIS) and its receptor (IP) was measured by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT PCR) and protein levels using Western blots. Concentrations of the PGI2 metabolite 6-keto PGF1α were evaluated by enzyme immunoassay and localization of PGIS and IP in the oviductal tissues using immunohistochemical staining. Insemination by itself increased PGIS protein levels in the oviductal isthmus (P < 0.05) and IP protein expression in the ampulla (P < 0.05). The concentration of 6-keto PGF1α increased significantly in the oviductal ampulla after insemination (P < 0.05). Induction of ovulation decreased IP protein levels in the oviductal ampulla (P < 0.05), whereas superovulation reduced IP levels in both parts of the oviduct (P < 0.01). Synthesis of 6-keto PGF1α was reduced by induction of ovulation

  17. Role of Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Stimulation Test in Diagnosing Gonadotropin Deficiency in Both Males and Females with Delayed Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi-Hong; Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Lin; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Delayed puberty can result either from constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDP) or idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test has been generally accepted as a current method for diagnosing delayed puberty. The objective of this research was to assess the cut-off values and the efficacy of GnRH stimulation test in the diagnosis of delayed puberty in both males and females. Methods: A study of 91 IHH, 27 CDP patients, 6 prepubertal children, and 20 pubertal adults was undertaken. Blood samples were obtained at 0, 30, 60, and 120 min after GnRH administration and the levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured. For each parameter, the sensitivities and specificities were estimated, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed. Results: The ROC curves indicated that a serum basal LH <0.6 IU/L or peak LH <9.74 IU/L resulted in moderate sensitivity (73.8% or 80.0%) and specificity (90.9% or 86.4%) in the diagnosis of HH in males. Serum basal LH <0.85 IU/L or basal FSH <2.43 IU/L resulted in moderate sensitivity (80.0% or 100.0%) and specificity (75.0% or 50.0%) in the diagnosis of HH in females. Conclusions: Our data suggest that isolated use of the gonadorelin stimulation test is almost sufficient to discriminate between HH and CDP in males, but unnecessary in females. The most useful predictor is serum basal or peak LH to differentiate these two disorders in males, but serum basal LH or FSH in females. PMID:26365959

  18. Pituitary macroadenoma presenting with pituitary apoplexy, acromegaly and secondary diabetes mellitus - a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nganga, Hudson Kamau; Lubanga, Reuben Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are associated with significant morbidity. The usual symptoms on presentation are of endocrine dysfunction and mass effects. A 31-year-old African female presented with headache, irregular menses, blurring of vision in the right eye and complete loss of vision in the left eye for 1 year. She had coarse facial features, enlarged hands and feet. Her right eye had temporal hemianopia with decreased visual acuity and her left eye had no perception of light. Investigations revealed an elevated fasting blood sugar and an elevated prolactin and growth hormone level. A CT scan and MRI done showed a hemorrhagic pituitary macroadenoma. She was put on bromocriptine, ocreotide, analgesics and insulin. Thereafter, she underwent transphenoidal surgery, where near total resection of the tumor was achieved. Patient is doing well post-operatively. This case highlights the importance of the use of a high clinical index of suspicion and radiological findings in diagnosis. PMID:24062868

  19. Pituitary macroadenoma presenting with pituitary apoplexy, acromegaly and secondary diabetes mellitus - a case report.

    PubMed

    Nganga, Hudson Kamau; Lubanga, Reuben Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are associated with significant morbidity. The usual symptoms on presentation are of endocrine dysfunction and mass effects. A 31-year-old African female presented with headache, irregular menses, blurring of vision in the right eye and complete loss of vision in the left eye for 1 year. She had coarse facial features, enlarged hands and feet. Her right eye had temporal hemianopia with decreased visual acuity and her left eye had no perception of light. Investigations revealed an elevated fasting blood sugar and an elevated prolactin and growth hormone level. A CT scan and MRI done showed a hemorrhagic pituitary macroadenoma. She was put on bromocriptine, ocreotide, analgesics and insulin. Thereafter, she underwent transphenoidal surgery, where near total resection of the tumor was achieved. Patient is doing well post-operatively. This case highlights the importance of the use of a high clinical index of suspicion and radiological findings in diagnosis. PMID:24062868

  20. Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis in normal women by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Saketos, M; Sharma, N; Santoro, N F

    1993-12-01

    To determine whether cortisol has an effect on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function, we studied 11 eumenorrheic women in the early follicular phase of consecutive menstrual cycles by performing daytime 10-min blood sampling, one before and one during hydrocortisone administration. Daily blood sampling for gonadotropins and sex steroids was also performed. LH pulsations were determined by modification of a widely used threshold method and compared by paired t-testing. The LH interpulse interval was significantly prolonged (95 +/- 5 to 119 +/- 14 min; p = 0.001), and the mean LH pulse amplitude remained unchanged (1.3 +/- 0.1 and 1.5 +/- 0.2 mIU/ml) with glucocorticoid exposure. Mean estradiol was not altered (46 +/- 5 and 43 +/- 3 pg/ml), but mean LH and FSH from pooled serum aliquots were slightly but significantly reduced (2.6 +/- 0.2 to 2.2 +/- 0.2, 5.5 +/- 0.4 to 4.5 +/- 0.3 mIU/ml; p = 0.004, 0.012, respectively). Mean progesterone levels were also decreased (0.8 +/- 0.3 to 0.5 +/- 0.2 ng/ml; p = 0.011) in the presence of exogenous glucocorticoid. Twenty-four-hour urinary free cortisol levels confirmed a substantial increase in free cortisol excretion (74 +/- 10 to 305 +/- 50 micrograms/day; p = 0.001). These results demonstrate that cortisol can slow LH pulse frequency and, by inference, hypothalamic GnRH secretion, in a manner that appears independent of corticotropin releasing factor. Excess cortisol alone may therefore play a role in the development of stress-associated menstrual disturbances. PMID:8286608

  1. Influence of triphenyltin exposure on the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis in male Sebastiscus marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingbin; Zhang, Jiliang; Zuo, Zhenghong; Chen, Yixin; Wang, Xinhong; Huang, Xin; Wang, Chonggang

    2011-08-01

    Both triphenyltin (TPT) and tributyltin (TBT) have been used as ingredients of antifouling biocides. However, far fewer studies addressing the reproductive toxicity of TPT on fishes are available than for TBT. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of TPT at environmentally relevant concentrations on testicular development in male rockfish Sebastiscus marmoratus and to gain insight into its mechanism of action. After exposure for 48 days, the gonadosomatic index had decreased, and there was a reduced number of mature sperm and an abundance of the late stages of spermatocysts in the testes. Although the testosterone levels in the testes were elevated and the 17β-estradiol levels were decreased, spermatogenesis was suppressed. The activity of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (which is used as a Sertoli cell marker) was decreased after TPT exposure, and serious interstitial fibrosis was observed in the interlobular septa of the testes exposed to TPT. The increased expression of cGnRH-II (chicken-II type gonadotropin-releasing hormone) and sGnRH (salmon-type GnRH), and the decreased expression of LHβ (luteinizing hormone) in the fish brains were detected. The expression of FSHβ (follicle-stimulating hormone) was decreased at day 21, while was increased slightly at day 48. The changes of cGnRH-II, sGnRH, FSHβ and LHβ mRNA levels might have mainly resulted from the alteration of the sex steroids via feedback mechanisms. The decrease of the FSHβ mRNA might have been one of the reasons causing the dysfunction of Sertoli cells, which play a critical role during spermatogenesis. The results suggested that TPT could perturb the function of hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis, and inhibiting the spermatogenesis. PMID:21641294

  2. Pituitary volumes are changed in patients with conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Atmaca, Murad; Baykara, Sema; Mermi, Osman; Yildirim, Hanefi; Akaslan, Unsal

    2016-03-01

    Our study group previously measured pituitary volumes and found a relationship between somatoform disoders and pituitary volumes. Therefore, in conversion disorder, another somatoform disorder, we hypothesized that pituitary gland volumes would be reduced. Twenty female patients and healthy controls were recruited to the present investigation. The volumes of the pituitary gland were determined by using a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. We found that the pituitary gland volumes of the patients with conversion disorder were significantly smaller than those of healthy control subjects. In the patients with conversion disorder but not in the healthy control group, a significant negative correlation between the duration of illness and pituitary gland volume was determined. In summary, in the present study, we suggest that the patients with conversion disorder have smaller pituitary volumes compared to those of healthy control subjects. Further studies should confirm our data and ascertain whether volumetric alterations determined in the patients with conversion disorder can be changed with treatment or if they change over time. PMID:25877743

  3. The prevalence of hyperprolactinemia in non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fangfang; Huang, Yinxing; Ding, Chenyu; Huang, Guoliang; Wang, Shousen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of hyperprolactinemia in non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPMAs) is not well known, and hyperprolactinemia caused by a NFPMA is currently associated with diagnostic uncertainty. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of hyperprolactinemia in NFPMAs. Methods: A meta-analysis of all existing articles in PubMed was conducted. The search string was designed as “(non-functioning pituitary tumor OR non-functioning pituitary tumor OR non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas OR non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas OR non-functioning pituitary adenomas OR non-functioning pituitary adenomas) and hyperprolactinemia”. References of the articles found were also reviewed. Study selection and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. Data were analyzed with STATA 11.0 software (StataCorp LP, USA). The fixed effects model was used to evaluate these studies. Results: The search identified 57 published studies, seven of which were accepted for the final meta-analysis. The authors found an overall estimated 40.2% prevalence of (95% CI, 36.6%-43.7%) hyperprolactinemia in NFPMAs. Conclusions: Given the high frequency of hyperprolactinemia in NFPMAs, a diagnosis of NFPMA or prolactinoma should be made more carefully. PMID:26770524

  4. Pituitary Volumes Are Reduced in Patients with Somatization Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Hanefi; Sirlier, Burcu; Kayali, Alperen

    2012-01-01

    Objective Despite of the suggested physiological relationship between somatoform disorder and disturbances in HPA axis function no volumetric study of pituitary volumes in somatization disorder has been carried out. Therefore, we aimed to use structural MRI to evaluate the pituitary volumes of the patients with somatization disorder. Methods Eighteen female patients with somatization disorder according to DSM-IV and same number of healthy controls were included into the study. All subjects were scanned using a 1.5-T General Electric (GE; Milwaukee, USA) scanner. Pituitary volume measurements were determined by using manuallly tracings according to standard antomical atlases. Results It was found significantly smaller pituitary volumes of the whole group of somatization patients compared to healthy (t=-3.604, p=0.001). ANCOVA predicting pituitary volumes demonstrated a significant main effect of diagnostic group (F=13.530, p<0.001) but TBV (F=1.924, p>0.05) or age (F=1.159, p>0.05). It was determined that there was no significant correlation between smaller pituitary volumes and the duration of illness (r=0.16, p>0.05) in the patient group. Conclusion In conclusion, we suggest that the patients with somatization disorder might have significantly smaller pituitary volumes compared to healthy control subjects. PMID:22993528

  5. Development and sexual dimorphism of the pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Keshavan, Matcheri; Mirza, Yousha; Carrey, Normand; Upadhyaya, Ameet R.; El-Sheikh, Rhonda; Buhagiar, Christian J; Taormina, S. Preeya; Boyd, Courtney; Lynch, Michelle; Rose, Michelle; Ivey, Jennifer; Moore, Gregory J.; Rosenberg, David R.

    2007-01-01

    The pituitary gland plays a central role in sexual development and brain function. Therefore, we examined the effect of age and gender on pituitary volume in a large sample of healthy children and adults. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was conducted in one hundred and fifty four (77 males and 77 females) healthy participants. Males were between the ages of 7 to 35 years (16.91 ± 5.89 years) and females were 7 to 35 years of age (16.75 ± 5.75 years). Subjects were divided into subgroups of age (7 to 9, 10 to 13, 14 to 17, 18 to 21, 22 and older) and sex (male/female). Pituitary gland volume differed between sexes when comparing the age groups (F = 3.55, df = 2, 143, p = 0.03). Females demonstrated larger pituitary glands than males in the age 14 to 17 year old groups (p = 0.04). Young (19 years and under) and old (20 years and older) females demonstrated a correlation between pituitary volume and age. Males did not show this relationship. These findings provide additional evidence for gender differences in the normative anatomy of the pituitary and may have relevance for the study of various childhood onset neuropsychiatric disorders in which pituitary dysfunction has been implicated. PMID:17174342

  6. Development and sexual dimorphism of the pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Keshavan, Matcheri; Mirza, Yousha; Carrey, Normand; Upadhyaya, Ameet R; El-Sheikh, Rhonda; Buhagiar, Christian J; Taormina, S Preeya; Boyd, Courtney; Lynch, Michelle; Rose, Michelle; Ivey, Jennifer; Moore, Gregory J; Rosenberg, David R

    2007-02-13

    The pituitary gland plays a central role in sexual development and brain function. Therefore, we examined the effect of age and gender on pituitary volume in a large sample of healthy children and adults. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was conducted in one hundred and fifty four (77 males and 77 females) healthy participants. Males were between the ages of 7 to 35 years (16.91+/-5.89 years) and females were 7 to 35 years of age (16.75+/-5.75 years). Subjects were divided into subgroups of age (7 to 9, 10 to 13, 14 to 17, 18 to 21, 22 and older) and sex (male/female). Pituitary gland volume differed between sexes when comparing the age groups (F=3.55, df=2, 143, p=0.03). Females demonstrated larger pituitary glands than males in the age 14 to 17 year old groups (p=0.04). Young (19 years and under) and old (20 years and older) females demonstrated a correlation between pituitary volume and age. Males did not show this relationship. These findings provide additional evidence for gender differences in the normative anatomy of the pituitary and may have relevance for the study of various childhood onset neuropsychiatric disorders in which pituitary dysfunction has been implicated. PMID:17174342

  7. MR imaging analysis of posterior pituitary in patients with pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shousen; Lin, Kunzhe; Xiao, Deyong; Zhao, Lin; Qin, Yong; Wei, Liangfeng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to investigate posterior pituitary bright spot (PPBS) occurrence, distribution and its influencing factors by analyzing MRI-T1WI images in patients with pituitary adenoma (PA). Methods: A total of 123 cases of PA patients were enrolled in this study. PPBS occurrence, distribution and MR signal characteristics were studied. The relationship of PPBS with PA morphology, tumor size, tumor height and immunohistochemical types were explored. Results: Among the 123 case of PA patients enrolled in the study, 98 cases were PPBS (+) and 25 cases were PPBS (-). According to tumor morphology, PA was divided into hourglass type (43 cases), barrel type (63 cases) and wedge type (17 cases). Occurrence rate of PPBS (+) in barrel type was less than those in hourglass and wedge types (P < 0.05). Tumor volume and height in PPBS (+) group were less than these in PPBS (-) group (P < 0.05). PPBS signal size in wedge and barrel types were larger than that of hourglass type (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Sagittal MRI-T1WI images could well show posterior pituitary and PPBS (+) was related to tumor morphology, volume and height but had nothing to do with immunohistochemical types. PMID:26221310

  8. Equine Chorionic Gonadotropin and Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Stimulation Increase the Number of Luteinized Follicles and the Progesterone Level Compared with Cabergoline Stimulation in Anoestrus Bitches.

    PubMed

    Jurczak, A; Domosławska, A; Bukowska, B; Janowski, T

    2016-08-01

    In this study, ovarian morphologies and blood progesterone concentrations following oestrous induction in bitches were examined. Fifty-three clinically healthy anoestrus bitches received cabergoline at a daily dose of 5 μg/kg of body weight per os for 21 days (group I) or subcutaneous equine chorionic gonadotropin at a dose of 20 IU/kg of body weight for five consecutive days with an additional 500 IU s.c. per bitch of human chorionic gonadotropin on the last day of treatment (group II). Twenty bitches that spontaneously displayed oestrous signs were left untreated and served as controls (group III). The induced oestrous rates and ovulation rates in groups I and II were 60.0% vs 64.3% and 86.7% vs 83.3%, respectively. Morphological assessments of the ovarian structures after ovariohysterectomy revealed an increase in the number of luteinized follicles and cysts in group II compared with the two other groups (p < 0.001). In contrast, the numbers of corpora lutea and follicles were similar in all groups. In accordance with the above-mentioned alteration, the progesterone concentration in the gonadotropin group (II) was increased (p < 0.001) in the periovulatory period compared with the other two groups. During the entire sampling period, the progesterone profiles in the cabergoline (I) and control (III) groups were similar and typical of normally cycling bitches. In conclusion, gonadotropin treatment is associated with an increased progesterone level during the periovulatory period that probably originates from luteinized follicles, whereas cabergoline treatment induces cycles with both physiological progesterone concentrations and ovarian morphologies. PMID:27321641

  9. Electrophoretic separation of kidney and pituitary cells on STS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Barlow, G. H.; Cleveland, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Farrington, M. A.; Hatfield, J. M.; Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Specific secretory cells were separated from suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic cells and rat pituitary cells in microgravity conditions, with an objective of isolating the subfractions of kidney cells that produce the largest amount of urakinase, and the subfractions of rat pituitary cells that secrete growth hormones (GH), prolactin (PRL), and other hormones. It is inferred from the experimental observations that the surface charge distributions of the GH-containing cells differ from those of the PRL-containing cells, which is explained by the presence of secretory products on the surface of pituitary cells. For kidney cells, the electrophoretic mobility distributions in flight experiments were spread more than the ground controls.

  10. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The maintainance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro was studied. The primary approach was the testing of agents which may be expected to increase the release of the human growth hormone (hGH). A procedure for tissue procurement is described along with the methodologies used to dissociate human pituitary tissue (obtained either at autopsy or surgery) into single cell suspensions. The validity of the Biogel cell column perfusion system for studying the dynamics of GH release was developed and documented using a rat pituitary cell system.

  11. Separation of cells from the rat anterior pituitary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Hatfield, J. Michael

    1984-01-01

    Data concerned with analyzing the cellular organization of the rat anterior pituitary gland are examined. The preparation of the cell suspensions and the methods used to separate pituitary cell types are described. Particular emphasis is given to velocity sedimentation at unit gravity, density gradient centrifugation, affinity methods, fluorescence activated cell sorting, and density gradient and continuous-flow electrophoresis. The difficulties encountered when attempting to compare data from different pituitary cell separation studies are discussed, and results from various experiments are presented. The functional capabilities of the separated cell populations can be tested in various culture systems.

  12. Cellular and molecular specificity of pituitary gland physiology.

    PubMed

    Perez-Castro, Carolina; Renner, Ulrich; Haedo, Mariana R; Stalla, Gunter K; Arzt, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The anterior pituitary gland has the ability to respond to complex signals derived from central and peripheral systems. Perception of these signals and their integration are mediated by cell interactions and cross-talk of multiple signaling transduction pathways and transcriptional regulatory networks that cooperate for hormone secretion, cell plasticity, and ultimately specific pituitary responses that are essential for an appropriate physiological response. We discuss the physiopathological and molecular mechanisms related to this integrative regulatory system of the anterior pituitary gland and how it contributes to modulate the gland functions and impacts on body homeostasis. PMID:22298650

  13. Metabolic and renal clearance rates of purified human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed Central

    Wehmann, R E; Nisula, B C

    1981-01-01

    The metabolic clearance rate (MCR) and renal clearance rate (RCR) of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) were measured in healthy young men and women using techniques of continuous intravenous infusion and rapid intravenous injection of unlabeled, highly purified hCG. Seven subjects received 4 d of infusion at a rate of 0.2 microgram/min, followed by an additional 4 d of infusion at 0.8 microgram/min. Mean serum levels of hCG established at these rates of infusion were 61.1 +/- 3.3 and 237 +/- 16 ng/ml, respectively (mean +/- SEM). The MCR determined at the low infusion rate was not significantly different from that determined at the higher infusion rate (1.83 +/- 0.09 vs. 1.95 +/- 0.14 ml/min per m2). The mean MCR for all subjects was 1.88 +/- 0.08 ml/min per m2. The MCR was not significantly different between men amd women (2.04 +/- 0.13 vs. 1.76 +/- 0.07 ml/min per m2). The RCR also did not vary between low and high infusion rates (0.40 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.40 +/- 0.04 ml/min per m2). The mean RCR for all subjects was 0.40 +/- 0.02 ml/min per m2. There was no difference in RCR between men and women (0.42 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.39 +/- 0.03 ml/min per m2). Six subjects were given 1.0 mg of highly purified hCG by rapid intravenous injection. Initial serum levels of hCG were 300-400 ng/ml, and the subsequent disappearance curve was multiexponential over 8-10 d. The disappearance curve of hCG in each subject was fitted to a biexponential equation. The rapid component t1/2 was 5.97 +/- 0.63 h and the slow component t1/2 was 35.6 +/- 8.0 h. We conclude that the MCR of purified hCG in man is about 2 ml/min per m2 and the RCR is 0.4 ml/min per m2; these parameters are concentration independent and do not differ significantly between healthy young men and women. PMID:7251859

  14. Does lower dose of long-acting triptorelin maintain pituitary suppression and produce good live birth rate in long down-regulation protocol for in-vitro fertilization?

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Feng, Shu-Xian; Guo, Ping-Ping; He, Yu-Xia; Liu, Yu-Dong; Ye, De-Sheng; Chen, Shi-Ling

    2016-04-01

    The effects of pituitary suppression with one-third depot of long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist in GnRH agonist long protocol for in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) were investigated. A retrospective cohort study was performed on 3186 cycles undergoing IVF/ICSI with GnRH agonist long protocol in a university-affiliated infertility center. The pituitary was suppressed with depot triptorelin of 1.25 mg or 1.875 mg. There was no significant difference in live birth rate between 1.25 mg triptorelin group and 1.875 mg triptorelin group (41.2% vs. 43.7%). The mean luteinizing hormone (LH) level on follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) starting day was significantly higher in 1.25 mg triptorelin group. The mean LH level on the day of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) administration was slightly but statistically higher in 1.25 mg triptorelin group. There was no significant difference in the total FSH dose between the two groups. The number of retrieved oocytes was slightly but statistically less in 1.25 mg triptorelin group than in 1.875 mg triptorelin group (12.90±5.82 vs. 13.52±6.97). There was no significant difference in clinical pregnancy rate between the two groups (50.5% vs. 54.5%). It was suggested that one-third depot triptorelin can achieve satisfactory pituitary suppression and produce good live birth rates in a long protocol for IVF/ICSI. PMID:27072965

  15. [Primary Pituitary Malignant Lymphoma that was Difficult to Differentiate from Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenoma:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yuta; Sato, Taku; Jinguji, Shinya; Kishida, Yugo; Watanabe, Tadashi; Suzuki, Osamu; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Homma, Miyuki; Midorikawa, Sanae; Saito, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    We report a rare case of primary pituitary lymphoma in a 75-year-old immunocompetent woman. The patient was blind in the right eye and presented with visual disturbance in the left eye that started 2 months previously. She also exhibited right third and fifth cranial nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)revealed an intrasellar mass lesion with right cavernous sinus invasion and suprasellar extension with compression of the optic chiasm. The mass lesion was isointense on both T1WI and T2WI, and showed less enhancement than a normal pituitary gland on gadolinium-enhanced T1WI. We therefore suspected the tumor to be a nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma. The patient underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery. The tumor was firm and grayish, and had an ill-defined border along the normal pituitary gland. Histological examination revealed a malignant CD5-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. After surgery, the patient received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although the visual acuity of the right eye did not improved, other symptoms improved. At the 34-month follow-up, no recurrence was detected on serial MRI. Patients with primary pituitary lymphoma often exhibit ophthalmoplegia and/or panhypopituitarism more frequently than expected from radiological findings. In cases of pituitary tumors with atypical symptoms, a biopsy and general physical examination should be performed immediately to determine the diagnosis and perform adjuvant therapy even when the tumor is assumed as nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma from the image findings. PMID:27605481

  16. Fluoride Exposure, Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian Axis Hormones in Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming Xu; Zhou, Guo Yu; Zhu, Jing Yuan; Gong, Biao; Hou, Jia Xiang; Zhou, Tong; Duan, Li Ju; Ding, Zhong; Cui, Liu Xin; Ba, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fluoride exposure on the functions of reproductive and endocrine systems have attracted widespread attention in academic circle nowadays. However, it is unclear whether the gene-environment interaction may modify the secretion and activity of hypothalamus-pituitary- ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the influence of fluoride exposure and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphism on reproductive hormones in Chinese women. A cross sectional study was conducted in seven villages of Henan Province, China during 2010-2011. A total of 679 women aged 18-48 years were recruited through cluster sampling and divided into three groups, i.e. endemic fluorosis group (EFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG), and control group (CG) based on the local fluoride concentration in drinking water. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) were determined respectively and the FSHR polymorphism was detected by real time PCR assay. The results provided the preliminary evidence indicating the gene-environment interaction on HPO axis hormones in women. PMID:26464260

  17. A review of luteinising hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin when used in assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Ezcurra, Diego; Humaidan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropins extracted from the urine of post-menopausal women have traditionally been used to stimulate folliculogenesis in the treatment of infertility and in assisted reproductive technology (ART). Products, such as human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), consist not only of a mixture of the hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), but also other biologically active contaminants, such as growth factors, binding proteins and prion proteins. The actual amount of molecular LH in hMG preparations varies considerably due to the purification process, thus hCG, mimicking LH action, is added to standardise the product. However, unlike LH, hCG plays a different role during the natural human menstrual cycle. It is secreted by the embryo and placenta, and its main role is to support implantation and pregnancy. More recently, recombinant gonadotropins (r-hFSH and r-hLH) have become available for ART therapies. Recombinant LH contains only LH molecules. In the field of reproduction there has been controversy in recent years over whether r-hLH or hCG should be used for ART. This review examines the existing evidence for molecular and functional differences between LH and hCG and assesses the clinical implications of hCG-supplemented urinary therapy compared with recombinant therapies used for ART. PMID:25280580

  18. 21 CFR 862.1155 - Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system. 862.1155 Section 862.1155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1155 - Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system. 862.1155 Section 862.1155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1155 - Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) test system. 862.1155 Section 862.1155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  1. Ovarian refractoriness to gonadotropins in cases of inappropriate lactation: restoration of ovarian function with bromocryptine.

    PubMed

    Mroueh, A M; Siler-Khodr, T M

    1976-12-01

    In ten patients with amenorrhea-galactorrhea who had hyperprolactinemia, ovulation could not be induced clomiphene citrate or exogenous gonadotropins. Treatment with bromocryptine in eight of these patients resulted in suppression of PRL in all, cessation of galactorrhea and ovulation in seven and conception in five. PMID:1036743

  2. Metabolic status, gonadotropin secretion, and ovarian function during acute nutrient restriction of beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of acute nutritional restriction on metabolic status, gonadotropin secretion, and ovarian function of heifers was determined in 2 experiments. In Exp. 1, 14-mo-old heifers were fed a diet supplying 1.2 × maintenance energy requirements (1.2M). After 10 d, heifers were fed 1.2M or were res...

  3. Central and peripheral administration of kisspeptin activates gonadotropin but not somatotropin secretion in prepubertal gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role that kisspeptin might have in regulating the onset of puberty in large domestic animals is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that either central or peripheral infusion of kisspeptin would stimulate gonadotropin and growth hormone secretion in prepubertal gilts. In experiment 1, prepuberta...

  4. The Stimulatory Actions of Kisspeptin on Gonadotropin Secretion in Prepubertal Swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the effects of kisspeptin on gonadotropin secretion in prepubertal gilts were surgically fitted with a lateral intracerebralventricular (ICV) cannula using a steriotaxic procedure. Animals randomly received an ICV infusion of 150 ul sterile phosphate buffered (PBS) saline, or either 1...

  5. 77 FR 4227 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor Analog...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... regulations in 21 CFR 522.1083 are amended to reflect the approval. In accordance with the freedom of... CFR part 522 continues to read as follows: Authority: 21 U.S.C. 360b. 0 2. In Sec. 522.1083, revise paragraphs (c)(1) and (c)(3) to read as follows: Sec. 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor...

  6. In Vivo Evaluation of the Genotoxic Effects of Gonadotropins on Rat Reticulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Bulent; Koc, Onder; Ozdemirci, Safak; Topcuoglu, Ata; Ozdemir, Ozturk

    2011-01-01

    Background Gonadotropins, as ovulation-inducing drugs, have been used widely to treat infertility. An epidemiologic correlation between infertility therapy and ovarian cancer development has been reported. However, the effect of gonadotropins in the formation of reproductive tract cancers is controversial. Objective The aim of the study was to determine the in vivo genotoxic effects of gonadotropins on rat reticulocytes. Methods In this prospective, randomized, controlled study, rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 groups. The calculated rat doses of 0.65 human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), 0.95 hMG, 0.65 follitropin beta (FB), 0.95 FB, or normal saline (control group) were injected, respectively. These calculated rat doses (U/g) are based on average human gonadotropin doses of 150 and 225 IU/d for a 70-kg woman given in 2-mL saline (the control group received 2 mL of saline). Injections were administered once per day for 5 days, followed by 5 days of rest. Each treatment was repeated for 6 estrus cycles in the rats for a total of 12 estrus cycles. Six months after the last day of the 12th cycle, the rats were euthanized. Bone marrow tissues were removed, and pluripotent reticulocyte cells with micronuclei, nuclear buds, and binuclear abnormalities were analyzed using an in situ micronuclei assay under light microscopy. The proportion of micronucleated cells, cells with anaphase bridge, nuclear buds, and other nuclear abnormalities were measured. Results The number of cells with nuclear buds and binuclear abnormalities in the hMG 225 and FB 225 groups was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that from the hMG 150, FB 150, and control groups in the cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow stem cells. An increased rate of genotoxicity in all gonadotropin groups versus that of placebo was found. Conclusion In rats, the micronucleus genotoxicity assay suggests a dose-dependent gonadotropin effect on genomic instability in bone marrow stem cells in vivo. PMID:24648576

  7. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    A multiphase study was conducted to examine the properties of growth hormone cells. Topics investigated included: (1) to determine if growth hormone (GH) cells contained within the rat pituitary gland can be separated from the other hormone producing cell types by continuous flow electrophoresis (CFE); (2) to determine what role, if any, gravity plays in the electrophoretic separation of GH cells; (3) to compare in vitro GH release from rat pituitary cells previously exposed to microgravity conditions vs release from cells not exposed to microgravity; (4) to determine if the frequency of different hormone producing pituitary cell types contained in cell suspensions can be quantitated by flow cytometry; and (5) to determine if GH contained within the human post mortem pituitary gland can be purified by CFE. Specific experimental procedures and results are included.

  8. Delayed Puberty due to Pituitary Stalk Dysgenesis and Ectopic Neurohypophysis

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Ryu, Ohk Hyun; Suh, Sang Il; Kim, Nan Hee; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop

    2006-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is not a common cause of delayed puberty. A 22 year old man was referred to our clinic because of the absence of the development of secondary sexual characteristics. The patient had no complaints of physical discomfort. Random serum testosterone and luteinizing hormone level were obtained and found to be low. The combined pituitary function stimulation test revealed a partial hypopituitarism. A pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained and showed decreased pituitary stalk enhancement and ectopic neurohypophysis. Therefore, we conclude that the delayed puberty was a result of hypopituitarism due to pituitary stalk dysgenesis and ectopic neurohypophysis. The patient was started on hormone replacement therapy and gradually developed secondary sexual characteristics. PMID:16646569

  9. Response of silent corticotroph pituitary carcinoma to chemotherapy: case report.

    PubMed

    He, Lucy; Forbes, Jonathan A; Carr, Kevin; Highfield Nickols, Hilary; Utz, Andrea; Moots, Paul; Weaver, Kyle

    2016-06-01

    Silent pituitary corticotroph carcinomas are rare, with only six previously described cases in the literature. We report a patient with a silent pituitary corticotroph adenoma treated with multiple trans-sphenoidal resections. Twelve years after her initial presentation, she returned with leptomeningeal metastases to the posterior fossa, foramen magnum, and numerous other subarachnoid locations involving the spine. Histopathology obtained from the metastatic foci was identical to previous trans-sphenoidal specimens - consistent with the diagnosis of corticotroph pituitary carcinoma. A carboplatin and etoposide chemotherapy regimen successfully arrested disease progression and produced regression of multiple radiographically documented leptomeningeal deposits. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with silent pituitary carcinoma treated successfully with chemotherapy. PMID:27150544

  10. Pituitary duplication associated with oral dermoid and corpus callosum hypogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Hakan; Paker, Bilhan; Gunes, Nilufer; Emektar, Ali; Keceli, Merter; Kantarci, Mecit

    2004-12-01

    We report a case of pituitary duplication in a neonate girl whose magnetic resonance (MR) images showed unusual findings of hypogenesis of the corpus callosum and oral dermoid. Pituitary duplication is an extremely rare malformation, with only a few previously reported cases. It occurs most commonly in association with complicated midline and skull base anomalies. We present a case of this malformation with special emphasis on the hypogenesis of splenium of the corpus callosum and oral dermoid. PMID:15565346

  11. Serotonin and pituitary-adrenal function. [in rat under stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, P. A.; Barchas, J. D.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation is conducted to evaluate the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stress stimulus in the rat. In the investigation brain serotonin synthesis was inhibited with p-chlorophenylalanine. In other tests the concentration of serotonin was enhanced with precursors such as tryptophan or 5-hydroxytryptophan. On the basis of the results obtained in the study it is speculated that in some disease states there is a defect in serotonergic neuronal processes which impairs pituitary-adrenal feedback mechanisms.

  12. Gonadotropin ratio affects the in vitro growth of rhesus ovarian preantral follicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Young; Yun, Jun-Won; Kim, Jong Min; Park, Chung Gyu; Rosenwaks, Zev; Liu, Hung Ching; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Ku, Seung-Yup

    2016-04-01

    In vitro follicle growth (IVFG) strategy is critical in the fertility preservation of cancer survivors; however, its optimal protocol needs to be developed using primate models since the availability of human samples is limited. Only a few previous studies have reported the successful IVFG of rhesus monkey ovaries using low-dose follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (0.3 or 3 ng/mL) and long-term culture (up to 5 weeks) and it is still uncertain in regard to the optimal culture duration and effective dose of treated gonadotropins applicable to the IVFG of rhesus preantral follicles. Recently, we have reported that the FSH to luteinizing hormone (LH) ratio affects the in vitro growth of murine ovarian follicles. We aimed to investigate whether gonadotropin ratios affect the efficiency of rhesus follicular growth in vitro Ovaries were collected from six necropsied rhesus macaques (4-9 years) and preantral follicles were retrieved and cultured for 14 days using 200 mIU/mL FSH. The characteristics of follicular growth were compared between the FSH:LH=1:1 (n=24) and FSH:LH=2:1 (n=24) groups. High concentration gonadotropin treatment shortened the duration required for in vitro maturation of rhesus preantral follicles. The FSH:LH=2:1 group showed a faster follicular growth and enabled the acquisition of mature oocytes, although the expression of growth differentiation factor (GDF)-9 and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) did not differ significantly between the two groups. Taken together, high dose gonadotropin treatment can shorten the duration of IVFG and the gonadotropin ratio is important in the IVFG of rhesus monkey ovaries. PMID:26980777

  13. Gonadotropin ratio affects the in vitro growth of rhesus ovarian preantral follicles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon Young; Yun, Jun-Won; Kim, Jong Min; Park, Chung Gyu; Rosenwaks, Zev; Liu, Hung Ching; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Ku, Seung-Yup

    2016-01-01

    In vitro follicle growth (IVFG) strategy is critical in the fertility preservation of cancer survivors; however, its optimal protocol needs to be developed using primate models since the availability of human samples is limited. Only a few previous studies have reported the successful IVFG of rhesus monkey ovaries using low-dose follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (0.3 or 3 ng/mL) and long-term culture (up to 5 weeks) and it is still uncertain in regard to the optimal culture duration and effective dose of treated gonadotropins applicable to the IVFG of rhesus preantral follicles. Recently, we have reported that the FSH to luteinizing hormone (LH) ratio affects the in vitro growth of murine ovarian follicles. We aimed to investigate whether gonadotropin ratios affect the efficiency of rhesus follicular growth in vitro. Ovaries were collected from six necropsied rhesus macaques (4–9 years) and preantral follicles were retrieved and cultured for 14 days using 200 mIU/mL FSH. The characteristics of follicular growth were compared between the FSH:LH=1:1 (n=24) and FSH:LH=2:1 (n=24) groups. High concentration gonadotropin treatment shortened the duration required for in vitro maturation of rhesus preantral follicles. The FSH:LH=2:1 group showed a faster follicular growth and enabled the acquisition of mature oocytes, although the expression of growth differentiation factor (GDF)-9 and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) did not differ significantly between the two groups. Taken together, high dose gonadotropin treatment can shorten the duration of IVFG and the gonadotropin ratio is important in the IVFG of rhesus monkey ovaries. PMID:26980777

  14. Outcome After Pituitary Radiosurgery for Thalamic Pain Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Motohiro Chernov, Mikhail F.; Taira, Takaomi; Ochiai, Taku; Nakaya, Kotaro; Tamura, Noriko; Goto, Shinichi; Yomo, Shoji; Kouyama, Nobuo; Katayama, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoriko; Izawa, Masahiro; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes after pituitary radiosurgery in patients with post-stroke thalamic pain syndrome. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2006, 24 patients with thalamic pain syndrome underwent pituitary radiosurgery at Tokyo Women's Medical University and were followed at least 12 months thereafter. The radiosurgical target was defined as the pituitary gland and its connection with the pituitary stalk. The maximum dose varied from 140 to 180 Gy. Mean follow-up after treatment was 35 months (range, 12-48 months). Results: Initial pain reduction, usually within 48 h after radiosurgery, was marked in 17 patients (71%). However, in the majority of cases the pain recurred within 6 months after treatment, and at the time of the last follow-up examination durable pain control was marked in only 5 patients (21%). Ten patients (42%) had treatment-associated side effects. Anterior pituitary abnormalities were marked in 8 cases and required hormonal replacement therapy in 3; transient diabetes insipidus was observed in 2 cases, transient hyponatremia in 1, and clinical deterioration due to increase of the numbness severity despite significant reduction of pain was seen once. Conclusions: Pituitary radiosurgery for thalamic pain results in a high rate of initial efficacy and is accompanied by acceptable morbidity. It can be used as a primary minimally invasive management option for patients with post-stroke thalamic pain resistant to medical therapy. However, in the majority of cases pain recurrence occurs within 1 year after treatment.

  15. Effects of pergolide on diethylstilbestrol-induced rat pituitary hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, R. V.; Schmidt, K.; Nath, V.

    1985-01-01

    Hyperplastic anterior pituitary glands were produced in female rats by treatment with 10 mg of diethylstilbestrol in Silastic tubing. This led to increased numbers of immunoreactive prolactin cells and increased serum prolactin levels. After 6 weeks of diethylstilbestrol treatment, one group of rats was treated with daily injections of pergolide for 3 weeks. Pergolide produced a significant decrease in pituitary gland weight and in serum prolactin levels but did not change the percentage of prolactin cells significantly, compared with that of control rats. Ultrastructural studies showed a significant increase in the numbers of prolactin secretory granules and numerous large intracellular bodies with associated secretory granules in pituitaries from rats treated with pergolide. In one group of rats in which the diethylstilbestrol was discontinued for 3 weeks after 6 weeks of treatment there was a significant decrease in pituitary gland weight and serum prolactin and a significant decrease in the percentage of prolactin cells, compared with values in the rats treated with diethylstilbestrol for 9 weeks. These results indicate that pergolide causes decreased release of prolactin from secretory granules in anterior pituitary prolactin cells and an increase in the numbers of PRL secretory granules per cell but does not change the percentage of prolactin-producing pituitary cells after 3 weeks of treatment. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 1 p489-a Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:4073221

  16. Incidence of Pituitary Apoplexy and Its Risk Factors in Chinese People: A Database Study of Patients with Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuelan; Jiang, Cuiping; Zhang, Qiongyue; Jiang, Wenjuan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Haixia; Shou, Xuefei; Zhao, Yao; Li, Yiming; Li, Shiqi; Ye, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Background There are few studies of the incidence and clinical characteristics of pituitary apoplexy (PA) in pituitary adenoma patients, and the findings have been inconsistent. Objective The aim of the study was to retrospectively assess the incidence, clinical presentation, surgical management and postoperative complications of PA in pituitary adenoma patients. Methods A database was specifically designed to collect clinical, therapeutic, prognostic and histological information about pituitary adenoma patients. Using multivariate logistic regression, odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to identify associated factors. Results A total of 2021 pituitary adenoma patients were recruited. 97 (4.8%) patients had PA. The incidence of PA was 10.11% in patients with pituitary macroadenoma, and 0.36% in patients with microadenoma. Variables for the logistic regression model independently associated with PA were sex (male vs. female, OR = 2.54, 95% CI: 1.59~4.07), tumor type (negative staining vs. positive staining, OR = 2.04, 95% CI: 1.29~3.23), and tumor size (macroadenoma vs. microadenoma, OR = 26.46, 95% CI = 9.66~72.46). Headache, visual deterioration, and vomiting were the most common symptoms in patients with pituitary adenoma. Patients with and without PA had similar frequency of visual deterioration, head trauma, acromegalic appearance, galactorrhoea, cold intolerance and Cushingoid appearance, but headache, vomiting, ptosis, diplopia, fever and blindness were significantly more common in patients with PA. Pearson Chi-Square tests revealed a significant difference in surgical approach between patients with and without PA (95.88% vs. 85.57%, P = 0.01). Conclusion Our findings suggest that PA is not a rare event. Male sex, non-functioning tumor, and macroadenoma are associated with an increased risk of PA. Compared with pituitary adenoma patients without PA, patients with PA have more severe symptoms. PMID:26407083

  17. Changes in expression of genes encoding gonadotropin subunits and growth hormone/prolactin/somatolactin family hormones during final maturation and freshwater adaptation in prespawning chum salmon.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Takeshi; Kitahashi, Takashi; Taniyama, Shinya; Saito, Daisuke; Ando, Hironori; Urano, Akihisa

    2003-01-01

    The pituitary levels of mRNAs encoding gonadotropin (GTH) subunits (GTH alpha2 and IIbeta), prolactin (PRL), and somatolactin (SL) increased in chum salmon during the last stages of spawning migration. In the present study, changes in pituitary levels of mRNAs encoding GTH alpha2, Ibeta, and IIbeta; growth hormone (GH); PRL; and SL were examined in homing chum salmon of Sanriku stock to clarify whether the changes are associated with final maturation or freshwater (FW) adaptation. In 1993, fish were caught at four areas: off the coast of Sanriku (off-coast), the mouth of Otsuchi Bay (ocean), inside of Otsuchi Bay (bay), and the Otsuchi River (river). In addition, effects of hypoosmotic stimulation by transition from seawater (SW) to FW were examined in 1994 and 1995. The amounts of mRNAs were determined by dot-blot analyses or real-time polymerase chain reactions. The levels of GTH alpha2 and IIbeta mRNAs in the ocean, bay, and river fish were two to five times those in the off-coast fish, and the levels of SL mRNAs in the bay fish were two to four times those in the off-coast fish. The levels of GH and PRL mRNAs in the ocean and bay fish were significantly lower than those in the off-coast fish, and those in the river fish were three to five times those in the ocean and bay fish. In the SW-to-FW transition experiment in 1994, the levels of GTH alpha2, Ibeta, and IIbeta mRNAs transiently increased, whereas changes were insignificant in 1995. The levels of GH, PRL, and SL mRNAs increased in both SW and FW environments, and no apparent effects of SW-to-FW transition were observed. The present study suggests that in prespawning chum salmon, expression of genes encoding GTH alpha2, IIbeta, and SL elevates with final maturation regardless of osmotic environment. Hypoosmotic stimulation by transition from the SW-to-FW environment is not critical to modulate expression of genes for PRL. PRL gene expression can be elevated in SW fish that were sexually almost matured. PMID

  18. Expression pattern of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Yavropoulou, Maria P; Maladaki, Anna; Topouridou, Konstantina; Kotoula, Vasiliki; Poulios, Chris; Daskalaki, Emily; Foroglou, Nikolaos; Karkavelas, George; Yovos, John G

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of Wnt and Notch signaling in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas, but data are scarce regarding the role of Hedgehog signaling. In this study we investigated the differential expression of gene targets of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens from adult patients who underwent transphenoidal resection and normal human pituitary tissues that were obtained from autopsies were used. Clinical information and data from pre-operative MRI scan (extracellular tumor extension, tumor size, displacement of the optic chiasm) were retrieved from the Hospital's database. We used a customized RT(2) Profiler PCR Array, to investigate the expression of genes related to Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways (PTCH1, PTCH2, GLI1, GLI3, NOTCH3, JAG1, HES1, and HIP). A total of 52 pituitary adenomas (32 non-functioning adenomas, 15 somatotropinomas and 5 prolactinomas) were used in the final analysis. In non-functioning pituitary adenomas there was a significant decrease (approximately 75%) in expression of all Hedgehog related genes that were tested, while Notch3 and Jagged-1 expression was found significantly increased, compared with normal pituitary tissue controls. In contrast, somatotropinomas demonstrated a significant increase in expression of all Hedgehog related genes and a decrease in the expression of Notch3 and Jagged-1. There was no significant difference in the expression of Hedgehog and Notch related genes between prolactinomas and healthy pituitary tissues. Hedgehog signalling appears to be activated in somatotropinomas but not in non-functioning pituitary adenomas in contrast to the expression pattern of Notch signalling pathway. PMID:26620835

  19. Efficacy and Outcome Predictors of Gonadotropin Treatment for Male Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaoxiang; Mao, Jangfeng; Wu, Xueyan; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Xi; Huang, Bingkun; Zheng, Junjie; Nie, Min; Zhang, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gonadotropin induces masculinization and spermatogenesis in men with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH). However, large cohort studies for the efficacy and reliable predictors of this therapy need to be conducted. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of gonadotropin treatment in a large cohort of male CHH patients and analyze putative predictors for successful spermatogenesis. This retrospective study included 223 CHH azoospermic patients without puberty development treated between 2005 and 2014. All patients received combined human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG) and were followed up for >6 months (5109 person-months). Serum total testosterone level, testicular size, spermatogenesis, and pregnancy outcome were recorded at each visit. After gonadotropin therapy, testicular size was enlarged from 2.1 ± 1.6 to 8.1 ± 4.6 mL (P < 0.001) and serum total testosterone was elevated from 0.9 ± 0.5 to 15.1 ± 8.2 nmol/L (P < 0.001). Spermatogenesis (>0/mL) occurred at a median period of 15 months (95% confidence interval 13.5–16.5). Larger basal testicular volume (P = 0.012) and noncryptorchidism history (P = 0.028) are independent predictors for earlier sperm appearance. Sixty four percent (143/223) of patients succeeded in producing sperms and the average time for initial sperm detection was 14 ± 8 months. However, their sperm concentrations (11.7 [2.1, 24.4] million/mL) and sperm progressive motility (A + B 36.9% ± 20.2%) are significantly lower than World Health Organization standards. Of the 34 patients who desired for fathering children, 19 patients impregnanted their partners during the treatment. Gonadotropin therapy induces spermatogenesis in male CHH patients. A larger basal testicular size and noncryptorchidism history are favorable indicators for earlier spermatogenesis. PMID:26945370

  20. Establishment of a human nonluteinized granulosa cell line that transitions from the gonadotropin-independent to the gonadotropin-dependent status.

    PubMed

    Bayasula; Iwase, Akira; Kiyono, Tohru; Takikawa, Sachiko; Goto, Maki; Nakamura, Tomoko; Nagatomo, Yoshinari; Nakahara, Tatsuo; Kotani, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Hiroharu; Kondo, Mika; Manabe, Shuichi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2012-06-01

    The ovary is a complex endocrine organ responsible for steroidogenesis and folliculogenesis. Follicles consist of oocytes and two primary steroidogenic cell types, the granulosa cells, and the theca cells. Immortalized human granulosa cells are essential for researching the mechanism of steroidogenesis and folliculogenesis. We obtained granulosa cells from a 35-yr-old female and immortalized them by lentivirus-mediated transfer of several genes so as to establish a human nonluteinized granulosa cell line (HGrC1). We subsequently characterized HGrC1 and investigated its steroidogenic performance. HGrC1 expressed enzymes related to steroidogenesis, such as steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, CYP11A, aromatase, and gonadotropin receptors. Stimulation with FSH increased the mRNA levels of aromatase, which consequently induced the aromatization of androstenedione to estradiol. Activin A increased the mRNA levels of the FSH receptor, which were synergistically up-regulated with FSH stimulation. HGrC1 also expressed a series of ligands and receptors belonging to the TGF-β superfamily. A Western blot analysis showed that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4, BMP-6, and BMP-7 phosphorylated small mother against decapentaplegic (Smad)1/5/8, whereas growth differentiation factor-9 phosphorylated Smad2/3. BMP-15 and anti-Müllerian hormone phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 while also weakly phosphorylating Smad2/3. These results indicate that HGrC1 may possess the characteristics of granulosa cells belonging to follicles in the early stage. HGrC1 might also be capable of displaying the growth transition from a gonadotropin-independent status to gonadotropin-dependent one. PMID:22467494

  1. Factors Influencing Disconnection Hyperprolactinemia and Reversal of Serum Prolactin after Pituitary Surgery in a Non-Functioning Pituitary Macroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumran, Thinesh; Haspani, Saffari; Malin Abdullah, Jafri; Alias, Azmi; Ven, Fan Rui

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate factors influencing disconnection hyperprolactinemia, including tumour volume, degree of pituitary stalk displacement and extent of tumour growth based on a modified Wilson-Hardy classification in a non-functioning pituitary macroadenoma and to confirm reductions in serum prolactin levels after endoscopic transphenoidal surgery. Methods This prospective, descriptive study was conducted in the Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital Kuala Lumpur from Jan 1, 2011 to Jan 1, 2013. Forty patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were enrolled. All patients underwent endoscopic transphenoidal resection of non-functioning pituitary macroadenoma. Pituitary stalk angle, tumour volume and extent of tumour growth were measured from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) pre- and post-operatively. These variables were compared to serum prolactin levels measured pre and post operatively. SPSS 21 was used to perform statistical analyses. Results In 40 patients, the mean tumour volumes were 10.58 cm3 (SD 7.81) pre-operatively and 3.1 cm3 (SD 3.45) post-operatively. There was a 70% reduction in tumour volume post-operatively (P < 0.01). The mean serum prolactin was 457 mIU/L (SD 66.93) pre-operatively and 297 mIU/L (SD 6.73) post-operatively. There was a 65% reduction in prolactin serum levels after surgery (P < 0.01). The mean pituitary stalk angles were 93.45 ± 3.89 degrees pre-operatively and 51.45 ± 1.46 degrees post-operatively (P = 0.01). The mean pituitary stalk angle in the control group was 50.4 ± 8.80 degrees. Hence, there was a 98% reduction in pituitary stalk angle after surgery (P < 0.01). This study showed a linear correlation between the pre-operative and post-operative tumour volumes and serum prolactin levels (P = 0.01 pre-and post-operative) and between serum prolactin levels and pituitary stalk angle (P = 0.20 pre-operative; P = 0.01 post-operative). Conclusion Tumour volume and pituitary stalk angle displacement have positive

  2. Effects of inorganic and organic manganese supplementation on gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I and follicle-stimulating hormone expression and reproductive performance of broiler breeder hens.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingjing; Tian, Chuanhuan; Zhu, Yongwen; Zhang, Liyang; Lu, Lin; Luo, Xugang

    2014-04-01

    Manganese is an essential microelement. Manganese deficiency affects reproduction performance and reproductive hormones in layers. However, little is known about its effects and the possible mechanism in regulating reproduction in broiler breeder hens. In the current study, broiler breeder hens at peak production were fed with diets supplemented with 0, 120, or 240 mg of Mn/kg as MnSO4 or Mn proteinate for 13 wk. Manganese supplementation did not alter egg laying rate, egg weight, fertility, hatchability, or hatchling weight over a 13-wk trial period. However, 240 mg of Mn/kg supplementation significantly increased serum Mn (P < 0.05). Manganese supplements increased the eggshell breaking strength (P < 0.05) without affecting the eggshell thickness. There was no difference in serum cholesterol and estradiol. Expression of follicle-stimulating hormone) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) genes was significantly elevated by 240 mg of Mn/kg (P < 0.05). Furthermore, inorganic Mn supplementation doubled GnRH-I expression compared with supplementation with the organic form (P < 0.05), although serum Mn was comparable between these 2 supplements. No obvious difference was shown in gene expression of luteinizing hormone, prolactin, GnRH-I receptor, inducible NO synthase, and dopamine receptor D1 in the pituitary as well as tyrosine hydroxylase and inducible NO synthase in the hypothalamus. This suggests that dietary Mn supplementation could improve eggshell quality in the long term. The central mechanism of nontoxic high doses of Mn suggested the transcriptional activation of GnRH-I and follicle-stimulating hormone genes. The central effect of inorganic Mn activating GnRH-I genes compared with the reduced effect by organic Mn could possibly be due to a decreased capacity of the latter passing through the blood-brain barrier. PMID:24706974

  3. Development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) gonadotropin ß subunit mRNAs to support endocrine disruptor research.

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Degitz, Sigmund J.; Kahl, Michael D.; Korte, Joseph J.; Greene, Katie J.; Blake, Lindsey S.; Linnum, Ann; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-03-01

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are one of the most widely-used small fish models for regulatory ecotoxicology testing and research related to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In this study, we isolated and sequenced cDNAs for fathead minnow follicle-stimulating hormone-like and luteinizing hormone-like β (FSHβ and LHβ) and glycoprotein α (GPα) subunits. Quantitative real-time PCR assays for measuring gonadotropin (GtH) β subunit transcripts were developed and used to examine “baseline” transcript levels over a range of age classes and reproductive states encompassed in EDC testing. In females, FSHβ and LHβ transcripts were greater in 4-5 month old than in younger fish and were significantly correlated with one another across all age classes examined. In males, FSHβ transcripts were greatest in 2-3 month old fish and were inversely correlated with various measures of testis development including, gonadal-somatic index (GSI), and histological stage. Overall, the pattern of GtHβ expression over age classes associated with gonad development was similar to that reported for other asynchronous-spawning fish. Despite significant changes in female GSI, gonad stage, and plasma vitellogenin within 24 h of spawning, GtHβ transcript levels in fish that had spawned within the preceding 24 h were not significantly different from those in fish that were 2-3 days post-spawn and expected to spawn within the next 24 h based on spawning history. Results of this study provide insights related to the role of GtHs in fathead minnow reproductive development and function. Additionally they provide useful “baseline” data needed to design and interpret effective experiments for studying direct and indirect effects of EDCs on GtH subunit mRNA expression, which will facilitate a greater understanding of integrated system-wide responses of the fathead minnow brain-pituitary-gonadal axis to stressors including EDCs.

  4. Changes in plasma gonadotropin concentrations and urethral closure pressure in the bitch during the 12 months following ovariectomy.

    PubMed

    Reichler, Iris Margaret; Pfeiffer, Esther; Piché, Claude A; Jöchle, Wolfgang; Roos, Malgorzata; Hubler, Madeleine; Arnold, Susi

    2004-11-01

    Urinary incontinence due to acquired urethral sphincter incompetence is a common side effect of spaying, for which the underlying cause remains unknown. Spaying not only results in a significant reduction in the urethral closure pressure within 1 year but also in an increase in the plasma gonadotropin concentrations. To investigate the possible link between the post-ovariectomy changes in plasma gonadotropins and in urethral closure pressure, gonadotropin and urodynamic measurements were performed in 10 Beagle bitches before and for a period of 1 year after spaying. Plasma gonadotropin concentrations rose quickly after ovariectomy and peak levels were seen within 3-5 weeks, followed by a sharp drop until week 10. A steady increase was observed subsequently until week 42, when a plateau was reached. One year after spaying, the mean FSH concentration was 75.3 +/- 32.1 ng/ml, a 17-fold increase, and the LH was 8.3 +/- 3.8 ng/ml, an eightfold increase over the pre-spaying values. Ten months after spaying, the mean urethral closure pressure (9.7 cm H2O) was significantly reduced when compared to the mean pre-operative value of 15.4 cm H2O. However, there was no clear relationship between the gonadotropin concentrations and the urethral closure pressure. From these results it seems unlikely that chronically elevated gonadotropins are the underlying cause for reduced urethral closure pressure after spaying resulting in urinary incontinence. PMID:15451248

  5. Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenomas (FIPA) and the Pituitary Adenoma Predisposition due to Mutations in the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Daly, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most frequent intracranial tumors and occur with a prevalence of approximately 1:1000 in the developed world. Pituitary adenomas have a serious disease burden, and their management involves neurosurgery, biological therapies, and radiotherapy. Early diagnosis of pituitary tumors while they are smaller may help increase cure rates. Few genetic predictors of pituitary adenoma development exist. Recent years have seen two separate, complimentary advances in inherited pituitary tumor research. The clinical condition of familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) has been described, which encompasses the familial occurrence of isolated pituitary adenomas outside of the setting of syndromic conditions like multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Carney complex. FIPA families comprise approximately 2% of pituitary adenomas and represent a clinical entity with homogeneous or heterogeneous pituitary adenoma types occurring within the same kindred. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene has been identified as causing a pituitary adenoma predisposition of variable penetrance that accounts for 20% of FIPA families. Germline AIP mutations have been shown to associate with the occurrence of large pituitary adenomas that occur at a young age, predominantly in children/adolescents and young adults. AIP mutations are usually associated with somatotropinomas, but prolactinomas, nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas, Cushing disease, and other infrequent clinical adenoma types can also occur. Gigantism is a particular feature of AIP mutations and occurs in more than one third of affected somatotropinoma patients. Study of pituitary adenoma patients with AIP mutations has demonstrated that these cases raise clinical challenges to successful treatment. Extensive research on the biology of AIP and new advances in mouse Aip knockout models demonstrate multiple pathways by which AIP may contribute to tumorigenesis. This review assesses

  6. Mapping of corticotropic cells in the normal human pituitary.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, J; Guigard, M P; Fonlupt, P; Souchier, C; Girod, C

    1996-05-01

    We accomplished the first mapping of corticotropic cells in the whole human adult pituitary. Corticotropic cells were identified by immunocytochemistry (ICC) and quantified by image analysis on 12 pituitaries obtained from people who had died suddenly. An overall view of each pituitary was given by 15-21 sections (mean 18 sections) at 300-micron intervals on six slides. Each section was systematically treated by indirect immunoperoxidase using an anti-ACTH[17-39] polyclonal antiserum. All the measures were done with a x 6.3 objective lens, each field (0. 5 mm2) being considered as the unit area. The mean pituitary density (surface of labeled cells/total surface) of corticotropic cells (9.5 +/- 3.0% per 0. 5 mm2) is significantly higher in men (11.5 +/- 5.1%) than in women (7.0 +/- 1.3%). This difference is due to an inverse relationship between the corticotropic cell density and the weight of the pituitary, which is higher in women than in men. The mean diameter of corticotropic cells is 14.9 micron and their total number per pituitary is approximately 10(7) cells. We confirmed that the spatial distribution of corticotropic cells is nonuniform: they are mainly distributed in the anteromedian part of the anterior lobe. In addition, our results demonstrated that the inferior part of the pituitary contained three times more corticotropic cells than the superior part (mean density 18.0% vs 6.0%) and the anterior part twice as many as the posterior part (mean density 12.3% vs 6.8%). On the horizontal plane, the pituitary was divided into eight zones, in which the mean of area was 2.5-21.0%. The maximal cell density may reach 40-60%. The use of this map should help the pathologist to recognize if there is corticotropic hyperplasia in a small pituitary fragment surgically removed from a patient with Cushing's disease. On the basis of this study, we put forward some criteria for diagnosing corticotropic hyperplasia. PMID:8627004

  7. Gene expression profiling analysis of MENX-associated rat pituitary adenomas contributes to understand molecular mechanisms of human pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HONGZHI; XU, CHUAN; SUN, NINGYANG; ZHOU, YINTING; YU, XIAOFEI; YAN, XUE; ZHANG, QIUJUAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to screen potential genes associated with pituitary adenomas to obtain further understanding with regard to the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas. The microarray GSE23207 dataset, containing 16 pituitary adenoma samples from multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome-associated rats and 5 normal pituitary tissue samples, was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. The Linear Models for Microarray Data package was used to identify the differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) with the cut-off criteria of a |log2fold change (FC)|>1 and adjusted P-values of <0.05. The potential functions of the DEGs were predicted by functional and pathway enrichment analysis with the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Furthermore, the interaction associations of the up- and downregulated DEGs obtained from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes database were respectively revealed by the protein-protein interaction networks visualized with Cytoscape. A total of 391 upregulated and 238 downregulated DEGs in were screened in the pituitary adenoma samples. The upregulated DEGs with a higher degree in the protein-protein interaction network (e.g., CCNA2, CCNB1 and CDC20) were significantly involved in cell cycle and cell division. Notably, PTTG1 was enriched in every functional term. These DEGs interacted with each other. The downregulated DEGs (e.g., GABRA1, GABRA4 and GABRB1) also interacted with each other, and were relevant to neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction; the DEG POU1F1, interacting with POMC, was correlated with the development of the pituitary gland, adenohypophysis and endocrine system. Certain DEGs, including CCNB1, CCNA2, CDC20, GABRA1, GABRA4, GABRB1, POU1F1 and POMC, and particularly PTTG1, were shown to be closely involved in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas. PMID:26870179

  8. Three years prospective investigation of pituitary functions following subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Z; Tanriverdi, F; Dagli, A T; Selcuklu, A; Casanueva, F F; Unluhizarci, K; Kelestimur, F

    2013-03-01

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is known to be related to pituitary dysfuntion in retrospective and short-term prospective studies. We aimed to investigate pituitary functions in patients with SAH in longer follow-up periods to demonstrate if pituitary hormone deficiencies recover, persist or new hormone deficiencies occur. Twenty patients with SAH, who were followed up for 3 years, were included in the present study. Patients were evaluated with basal hormone levels and glucagon stimulation test (GST).Serum basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were found to be significantly elevated at 3rd year of SAH compared to 1st year. Other basal hormone levels at 3rd year did not show a significant change from the levels found at 1st year. One of the patients had ACTH deficiency at 1st year of SAH and recovered at 3rd year. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency, according to GST,was diagnosed in 4 patients. One patient with GH deficiency at first year was still deficient, 3 of them recovered and 3 patients were found to have new-onset GH deficiency 3 years after SAH. SAH is associated with anterior pituitary dysfunction and GH is the most frequently found deficient hormone in the patients. Although one year after SAH seems to be an appropriate time for the evaluation of pituitary functions, further follow-up may be required at least in some cases due to recovered and new-onset hormone deficiencies at 3rd year of SAH. PMID:22315089

  9. Pituitary tumors. Current concepts in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Aron, D C; Tyrrell, J B; Wilson, C B

    1995-01-01

    Diagnostic advances have resulted in earlier and more frequent recognition of pituitary tumors. Pituitary tumors cause problems owing to the hormones they secrete or the effects of an expanding sellar mass--hypopituitarism, visual field abnormalities, and neurologic deficits. Prolactin-secreting tumors (prolactinomas), which cause amenorrhea, galactorrhea, and hypogonadism, constitute the most common type of primary pituitary tumors, followed by growth hormone-secreting tumors, which cause acromegaly, and corticotropin-secreting tumors, which cause Cushing's syndrome. Hypersecretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone, the gonadotrophins, or alpha-subunits is unusual. Nonfunctional tumors currently represent only 10% of all clinically diagnosed pituitary adenomas, and some of these are alpha-subunit-secreting adenomas. Insights into the pathogenesis and biologic behavior of these usually benign tumors have been gained from genetic studies. We review some of the recent advances and salient features of the diagnosis and management of pituitary tumors, including biochemical and radiologic diagnosis, transsphenoidal surgery, radiation therapy, and medical therapy. Each type of lesion requires a comprehensive but individualized treatment approach, and regardless of the mode of therapy, careful follow-up is essential. Images PMID:7747500

  10. Overview of genetic testing in patients with pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Albert; Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F

    2012-04-01

    Clinically-relevant pituitary adenomas occur with a prevalence of one case per 1000-1300 of the general population. Although most are sporadic, there are several inherited conditions that incur an increased risk of developing a pituitary adenoma. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Carney complex (due to mutations in MEN1 and PRKAR1A, respectively) are established pituitary adenoma predisposition conditions, while multiple endocrine neoplasia type 4 (due to CDKN1B mutations) is an emerging rare condition. Familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) is a novel condition not associated with these multiple endocrine neoplasias. Mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein gene account for about 15% of FIPA kindreds and are associated with about 10-20% of macroadenomas that occur in children, adolescents and young adults. When treating a pituitary adenoma patient, relevant familial and clinical factors such as associated tumors or syndromic features should be assessed at the outset in order to guide the correct choice of genetic testing in appropriate individuals. PMID:22503805

  11. Corticosterone in ovo modifies aggressive behaviors and reproductive performances through alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdelkareem A; Ma, Wenqiang; Ni, Yingdong; Wang, Song; Zhao, Ruqian

    2014-05-01

    Exposure to excess glucocorticoids during embryonic development affects offspring reproduction and suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in mammals. However, whether corticosterone (CORT) causes similar effects in the chicken remains unclear. In the present study, we injected low (0.2μg) and high (1μg) doses of CORT in ovo before incubation and detected changes in aggressive behavior, tonic immobility (TI), reproductive performances, and HPG axis gene expression in posthatch chickens of different ages. High dose of CORT suppressed growth rate from 3 weeks of age, increased the frequency of aggressive behaviors, which was associated with elevated plasma CORT concentration. High-dose CORT significantly (P<0.05) down-regulated arginine vasotocin (AVT), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1), while significantly (P<0.05) up-regulated gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) and 11β-HSD1 mRNA expression in the hypothalamus. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and 20-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20-HSD) mRNA levels were not affected by CORT treatment. High-dose CORT significantly (P<0.05) reduced egg production and egg quality, which was associated with decreased ovary and oviduct weight. Moreover, CORT exposure significantly decreased (P<0.05) luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor mRNA abundance in theca cells of ovarian follicles 1 (F1), F2 and F3. In addition, yolk CORT concentration was significantly higher in eggs laid by hens prenatally exposed to high-dose CORT. Our findings suggest that in ovo administration of CORT programs the aggressive behaviors and reproductive functions in the chicken through alterations of HPG axis. PMID:24630043

  12. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Testicular Function in 8 Boys with Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita (AHC) Due to NR0B1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Galeotti, Caroline; Lahlou, Zineb; Goullon, Domitille; Sarda-Thibault, Hélène; Cahen-Varsaux, Juliette; Bignon-Topalovic, Joëlle; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken; Brauner, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Background Boys carrying mutations in the NR0B1 gene develop adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and impaired sexual development due to the combination of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and primary defects in spermatogenesis. Methods We analysed the evolution of hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular function of 8 boys with AHC due to NR0B1 mutations. Our objective was to characterize and monitor the progressive deterioration of this function. Results The first symptoms appeared in the neonatal period (n = 5) or between 6 months and 8.7 years (n = 3). Basal plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) concentrations increased in all boys, whilst cortisol levels decreased in one case. The natremia was equal or below 134 mmol/L and kaliemia was over 5 mmol/L. All had increased plasma renin. In 3 of 4 patients diagnosed in the neonatal period and evaluated during the first year, the basal plasma gonadotropins concentrations, and their response to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) test (n = 2), and those of testosterone were normal. The plasma inhibin B levels were normal in the first year of life. With the exception of two cases these concentrations decreased to below the normal for age. Anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations were normal for age in all except one case, which had low concentrations before the initiation of testosterone treatment. In 3 of the 8 cases the gene was deleted and the remaining 5 cases carried frameshift mutations that are predicted to introduce a downstream nonsense mutation resulting in a truncated protein. Conclusions The decreases in testosterone and inhibin B levels indicated a progressive loss of testicular function in boys carrying NR0B1 mutations. These non-invasive examinations can help to estimate the age of the testicular degradation and cryopreservation of semen may be considered in these cases as investigational procedure with the aim of restoring fertility. PMID:22761912

  13. Secondary treatment failure without anti-human chorionic gonadotropin antibody in a patient with Kallmann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, S; Yoshida, K; Ishizaka, K; Higashi, Y; Takagi, K; Oshima, H

    1998-07-01

    A 29-year-old man with Kallmann syndrome suddenly developed decreased semen volume, azoospermia, and facial hair loss after 11 years of successful human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) treatment. Anti-hCG antibody was not detected in the patient's serum. A high serum level of luteinizing hormone (LH) with nasal LH-releasing hormone analogue administration failed to increase serum testosterone to a sufficient level. Testosterone injection after cessation of hCG and hMG therapy was able to improve semen volume, but not azoospermia. Resumption of hCG and hMG therapy after 6 months cessation partially restored spermatogenesis. The secondary failure of hCG and hMG therapy suggests a decrease of testicular sensitivity to LH as well as hCG. PMID:9712456

  14. Treatment of canine pyometra with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist acyline: a case series.

    PubMed

    Batista, Pablo R; Blanco, Paula G; Gobello, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    To describe the effect of the third-generation gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist acyline in the treatment of 4 diestrous bitches with the cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra complex. The 4 bitches were treated with 330 μg/kg of subcutaneous acyline on day 0 and antibiotics, and followed up for 2 weeks. One closed-cervix case showed cervical dilatation 36 hours after treatment, and all the 4 animals showed resolution of clinical signs starting on day 3 posttreatment. Ultrasonographic uterine diameters and luminal contents decreased in the bitches having high progesterone serum concentrations before treatment but not in those with low levels. Serum progesterone importantly decreased from high to basal concentrations in the 3 "ultrasonographically cured" animals. No local or systemic side effects related to the treatment were observed. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist acyline may have a promising place for the medical treatment of cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra complex in dogs. PMID:26041594

  15. Exposure to bleached kraft pulp mill effluent disrupts the pituitary-gonadal axis of white sucker at multiple sites

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Kraak, G.J.; Munkittrick, K.R.; McMaster, M.E.; Portt, C.B.; Chang, J.P. )

    1992-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated reproductive problems in white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) exposed to bleached kraft pulp mill effluent (BKME) at Jackfish Bay on Lake Superior. These fish exhibit delayed sexual maturity, reduced gonadal size, reduced secondary sexual characteristics, and circulating steroid levels depressed relative to those of reference populations. The present studies were designed to evaluate sites in the pituitary-gonadal axis of prespawning white sucker affected by BKME exposure. At the time of entry to the spawning stream, plasma levels of immunoreactive gonadotropin (GtH)-II (LH-type GtH) in male and female white sucker were 30- and 50-fold lower, respectively, than the levels in fish from a reference site. A single intraperitoneal injection of D-Arg6, Pro9N-Et sGnRH (sGnRH-A, 0.1 mg/kg) increased plasma GtH levels in male and female fish at both sites, although the magnitude of the response was greatly reduced in BKME-exposed fish. Fish at the BKME site did not ovulate in response to sGnRH-A, while 10 of 10 fish from the reference site ovulated within 6 hr. Plasma 17 alpha,20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20 beta-P) levels were depressed in BKME-exposed fish and unlike fish at the reference site, failed to increase in response to sGnRH-A. Testosterone levels in both sexes and 11-ketostestosterone levels in males were elevated in fish from the reference site but were not further increased by GnRH treatment. In contrast, BKME-exposed fish exhibit a transitory increase in testosterone levels in response to the GnRH analog. In vitro incubations of ovarian follicles obtained from fish at the BKME site revealed depressed basal secretion of testosterone and 17,20 beta-P and reduced responsiveness to the GtH analog human chorionic gonadotropin and to forskolin, a direct activator of adenylate cyclase.

  16. Impact of gene polymorphisms of gonadotropins and their receptors on human reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Casarini, Livio; Santi, Daniele; Marino, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Gonadotropins and their receptors' genes carry several single-nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in endocrine genotypes modulating reproductive parameters, diseases, and lifespan leading to important implications for reproductive success and potential relevance during human evolution. Here we illustrate common genotypes of the gonadotropins and gonadotropin receptors' genes and their clinical implications in phenotypes relevant for reproduction such as ovarian cycle length, age of menopause, testosterone levels, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. We then discuss their possible role in human reproduction and adaptation to the environment. Gonadotropins and their receptors' variants are differently distributed among human populations. Some hints suggest that they may be the result of natural selection that occurred in ancient times, increasing the individual chance of successful mating, pregnancy, and effective post-natal parental cares. The gender-related differences in the regulation of the reproductive endocrine systems imply that many of these genotypes may lead to sex-dependent effects, increasing the chance of mating and reproductive success in one sex at the expenses of the other sex. Also, we suggest that sexual conflicts within the FSH and LH-choriogonadotropin receptor genes contributed to maintain genotypes linked to subfertility among humans. Because the distribution of polymorphic markers results in a defined geographical pattern due to human migrations rather than natural selection, these polymorphisms may have had only a weak impact on reproductive success. On the contrary, such genotypes could acquire relevant consequences in the modern, developed societies in which parenthood attempts often occur at a later age, during a short, suboptimal reproductive window, making clinical fertility treatments necessary. PMID:26370242

  17. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is required for normal gonadotropin responsiveness in the mouse ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Kimberly R.; Tomic, Dragana; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Babus, Janice K.; Roby, Katherine F.; Terranova, Paul F.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2007-08-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxicity of a variety of environmental chemicals. Although little is known about the physiological role of the AHR, studies suggest that it plays an important role in regulating ovulation because Ahr deficient (AhRKO) mice have a reduced number of ovulations compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The reasons for the reduced ability of AhRKO mice to ovulate are unknown. Normal ovulation, however, requires estrous cyclicity, appropriate luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels, and LH and FSH responsiveness. Thus, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ahr deletion regulates ovulation by altering cyclicity, FSH and LH levels, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr) and luteinizing hormone receptor (Lhcgr) levels and/or gonadotropin responsiveness. The data indicate that AhRKO and WT mice have similar levels of FSH and LH, but AhRKO mice have reduced Fshr and Lhcgr mRNA levels compared to WT mice. Furthermore, AhRKO ovaries contain fewer corpora lutea compared to WT ovaries after 5 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) treatment. Lastly, both AhRKO and WT mice ovulate a similar number of eggs in response to 5 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), but AhRKO mice ovulate fewer eggs than WT mice in response to 2.5 IU and 1.25 IU hCG. Collectively, these data indicate that AhRKO follicles have a reduced capacity to ovulate compared to WT follicles and that this is due to reduced responsiveness to gonadotropins. Thus, in addition to mediating toxicity of environmental chemicals, the Ahr is required for normal ovulation.

  18. Gamma scintigraphy using Tc-99m labeled antibody to human chorionic gonadotropin

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, R.T.; Lyster, D.M.; Alcorn, L.N.; Rhodes, B.A.; Breslow, K.; Burchiel, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    A case report is presented describing a 27-year-old woman with invasive trophoblastic hydatidiform mole metastatic to the lung. Gamma scintiscanning, using a polyclonal and monoclonal antibody specific to human chorionic gonadotropin, hCG, and labeled with Tc-99m, is described. The area of the primary lesion in the uterus was demonstrated with both antibodies tested without computer subtraction techniques; metastatic deposits in the lung were detected only with the aid of blood pool subtraction techniques.

  19. Partial hypopituitarism and hyperprolactinemia: successful induction of ovulation with bromocriptine and human menopausal gonadotropins.

    PubMed

    Dawood, M Y; Jarrett, J C; Choe, J K

    1982-10-01

    The case of a patient who developed partial hypopituitarism (hypogonadotropism and growth hormone deficiency) following transphenoidal removal of a prolactinoma is described. Hypogonadotropism persisted despite restoration of normoprolactinemia with bromocriptine therapy. Successful induction of ovulation with human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) and bromocriptine suppression of the hyperprolactinemia was carried out, resulting in a pregnancy. The pros and cons of operative and nonoperative management of hyperprolactinemia are discussed. PMID:6811337

  20. Functional anterior pituitary generated in self-organizing culture of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ozone, Chikafumi; Suga, Hidetaka; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Kadoshima, Taisuke; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Takata, Nozomu; Oiso, Yutaka; Tsuji, Takashi; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Anterior pituitary is critical for endocrine systems. Its hormonal responses to positive and negative regulators are indispensable for homeostasis. For this reason, generating human anterior pituitary tissue that retains regulatory hormonal control in vitro is an important step for the development of cell transplantation therapy for pituitary diseases. Here we achieve this by recapitulating mouse pituitary development using human embryonic stem cells. We find that anterior pituitary self-forms in vitro following the co-induction of hypothalamic and oral ectoderm. The juxtaposition of these tissues facilitated the formation of pituitary placode, which subsequently differentiated into pituitary hormone-producing cells. They responded normally to both releasing and feedback signals. In addition, after transplantation into hypopituitary mice, the in vitro-generated corticotrophs rescued physical activity levels and survival of the hosts. Thus, we report a useful methodology for the production of regulator-responsive human pituitary tissue that may benefit future studies in regenerative medicine. PMID:26762480

  1. Functional anterior pituitary generated in self-organizing culture of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ozone, Chikafumi; Suga, Hidetaka; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Kadoshima, Taisuke; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Takata, Nozomu; Oiso, Yutaka; Tsuji, Takashi; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Anterior pituitary is critical for endocrine systems. Its hormonal responses to positive and negative regulators are indispensable for homeostasis. For this reason, generating human anterior pituitary tissue that retains regulatory hormonal control in vitro is an important step for the development of cell transplantation therapy for pituitary diseases. Here we achieve this by recapitulating mouse pituitary development using human embryonic stem cells. We find that anterior pituitary self-forms in vitro following the co-induction of hypothalamic and oral ectoderm. The juxtaposition of these tissues facilitated the formation of pituitary placode, which subsequently differentiated into pituitary hormone-producing cells. They responded normally to both releasing and feedback signals. In addition, after transplantation into hypopituitary mice, the in vitro-generated corticotrophs rescued physical activity levels and survival of the hosts. Thus, we report a useful methodology for the production of regulator-responsive human pituitary tissue that may benefit future studies in regenerative medicine. PMID:26762480

  2. An unexpected reason for elevated human chorionic gonadotropin in a young woman. Cervical squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Aynur; Bozdag, Zehra; Tepe, Neslihan B; Ozcan, Husiyen C

    2016-08-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin has been used for decades, in addition to specific investigations, to detect pregnancy, trophoblastic tumors, as well as congenital defects. Rarely, it can be elevated in  non-trophoblastic tumors such as squamous cell cancers and germ cell tumors. A 33-year-old Asian Syrian female had irregular menses accompanied with feelings of heaviness in the vagina. In addition to routine investigations, we measured the serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) level (based on the patient's complaint of amenorrhea), which was 50.05 ml UI/ml. Cervical biopsy revealed a non-keratinized large cell squamous carcinoma. After excluding other causes, ß-hCG elevation was explained by the ectopic secretion of cancer cells line. Cervical biopsy was suggestive of large cell non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma and positive for human chorionic gonadotropin on immunohistochemistry. As a result, we manage the possibility of ectopic secretion of ß-HCG from non- trophoblastic disease. PMID:27464870

  3. Effect of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal on Sex Hormone and Gonadotropin Levels in Addicted Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati, Batool; Ghosian Moghaddam, Mohammad Hassan; Khalili, Mohsen; Enayati, Ehsan; Maleki, Maryam; Rezaeei, Saeedeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioid consumption has been widely increasing across the globe; how- ever, it can cause adverse effects on the body. Morphine, an opioid, can reduce sex hor- mones and fertility. Withania somnifera (WS) is a traditional herb used to improve sexual activities. This study strives to investigate the effect of WS on sex hormones and gonado- tropins in addicted male rats. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, forty-eight male National Maritime Research Institute (NMRI) rats were randomly divided into four groups: i. Control group, ii. WS-treated control group, iii. Addicted group, and iv. WS-treated addicted group. Wa- ter-soluble morphine was given to rats for 21 days to induce addiction, concurrently the treated groups (2 and 4) also received WS plant-mixed pelleted food (6.25%). At the end of the treatment, the sex hormone and gonadotropin levels of the rats’ sera were deter- mined in all the groups. Results Except for follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), morphine reduced most of the gonadotropin and sex hormone levels. Whereas WS caused a considerable increase in the hormones in the treated addicted group, there was only a slight increase in the treated control group. Conclusion WS increased sex hormones and gonadotropins-especially testosterone, es- trogen, and luteinizing hormone-in the addicted male rats and even increased the proges- terone level, a stimulant of most sex hormones in addicted male rats. PMID:27441058

  4. Gonadotropins regulate ovarian germ cell mitosis/meiosis decision in the embryonic chicken.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Mi, Yuling; Zhang, Caiqiao

    2013-05-01

    Gonadotropins are required for gametogenesis but in embryonic gonads this mechanism is not well understood. Here we use chicken embryos to investigate the mechanism that gonadotropins regulate the ovarian germ cell mitosis/meiosis decision. Treatment with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) delayed germ cell meiosis entry and promoted their proliferation. This action was blocked by an aromatase inhibitor. Treatment with luteinizing hormone (LH) accelerated germ cell meiosis entry and promoted transcription of 3βHSDII to increase progesterone (P4) production. In the cultured ovaries, P4 triggered meiotic initiation in germ cells. MiR181a, which acts to downregulate the NR6A1 transcript to inhibit the meiotic initiation, was upregulated by FSH and downregulated by LH. Collectively, gonadotropins regulate germ cells mitosis and meiotic initiation through steroid hormones and a miR181a-mediated pathway. In particularly, FSH delays germ cell meiosis entry and promotes cell proliferation via estrogen while LH accelerates the meiotic initiation via elevated P4 production. PMID:23422072

  5. Gonadotropin binding sites in human ovarian follicles and corpora lutea during the menstrual cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, K.; Kitayama, S.; Nakano, R.

    1987-05-01

    Gonadotropin binding sites were localized by autoradiography after incubation of human ovarian sections with /sup 125/I-labeled gonadotropins. The binding sites for /sup 125/I-labeled human follicle-stimulating hormone (/sup 125/I-hFSH) were identified in the granulosa cells and in the newly formed corpora lutea. The /sup 125/I-labeled human luteinizing hormone (/sup 125/I-hLH) binding to the thecal cells increased during follicular maturation, and a dramatic increase was preferentially observed in the granulosa cells of the large preovulatory follicle. In the corpora lutea, the binding of /sup 125/I-hLH increased from the early luteal phase and decreased toward the late luteal phase. The changes in 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in the corpora lutea corresponded to the /sup 125/I-hLH binding. Thus, the changes in gonadotropin binding sites in the follicles and corpora lutea during the menstrual cycle may help in some important way to regulate human ovarian function.

  6. mRNA expression pattern of gonadotropin receptors in bovine follicular cysts.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Belkis E; Diaz, Pablo U; Salvetti, Natalia R; Rey, Florencia; Ortega, Hugo H

    2014-12-01

    Follicular growth and steroidogenesis are dependent on gonadotropin binding to their receptors in granulosa and theca cells of ovarian follicles. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression patterns of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR) in ovarian follicular structures from cows with cystic ovarian disease (COD) as compared with those of regularly cycling cows. Relative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of FSHR mRNA in granulosa cells was highest in small antral follicles, then decreased significantly as follicles increased in size, and was lowest in cysts. FSHR mRNA was not detected in the theca cells of any follicular category, including cysts. LHCGR mRNA expression in granulosa cells was significantly higher in large antral follicles than in cysts, and not detected in granulosa cells of small and medium antral follicles. In theca cells, the expression level of LHCGR mRNA in medium antral follicles was higher than in small and large antral follicles, whereas that in follicular cysts it was similar to those in small and medium antral follicles, but higher than that in large antral follicles. Our findings provide evidence that there is an altered gonadotropin receptor expression in bovine cystic follicles, and suggest that in conditions characterized by altered ovulation, such as COD, changes in the signaling system of gonadotropins may play a fundamental role in their pathogenesis. PMID:25454493

  7. Comparative gene expression profiling in human cumulus cells according to ovarian gonadotropin treatments.

    PubMed

    Assou, Said; Haouzi, Delphine; Dechaud, Hervé; Gala, Anna; Ferrières, Alice; Hamamah, Samir

    2013-01-01

    In in vitro fertilization cycles, both HP-hMG and rFSH gonadotropin treatments are widely used to control human follicle development. The objectives of this study are (i) to characterize and compare gene expression profiles in cumulus cells (CCs) of periovulatory follicles obtained from patients stimulated with HP-hMG or rFSH in a GnRH antagonist cycle and (ii) to examine their relationship with in vitro embryo development, using Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Genes that were upregulated in HP-hMG-treated CCs are involved in lipid metabolism (GM2A) and cell-to-cell interactions (GJA5). Conversely, genes upregulated in rFSH-treated CCs are implicated in cell assembly and organization (COL1A1 and COL3A1). Interestingly, some genes specific to each gonadotropin treatment (NPY1R and GM2A for HP-hMG; GREM1 and OSBPL6 for rFSH) were associated with day 3 embryo quality and blastocyst grade at day 5, while others (STC2 and PTX3) were related to in vitro embryo quality in both gonadotropin treatments. These genes may prove valuable as biomarkers of in vitro embryo quality. PMID:24151596

  8. Modulatory Effect of Gonadotropins on Rats’ Ovaries after Nandrolone Decanoate Administration: A Stereological Study

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, Hossein; Mesbah, Fakhroddin; Talaei, Tahereh; Dehghani, Farzaneh; Mirkhani, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nandrolone decanoate (ND) is an anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) which influences the ovarian structure and function. We assessed the effects of ND on the ovarian volume, number of primordial follicles, and level of hormones and also evaluated the modulatory effects of gonadotropins on the histopathological changes imposed by the administration of ND. Methods: Six groups of Sprague-Dawley adult female rats (n=30) were used. The experimental rats were injected intraperitoneally with 3 and 10 mg/kg ND with or without human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG), 10 IU weekly for one month. The vehicle and control rats were administered olive oil and saline, respectively, for the same period of time. The ovarian volume and number of primordial follicles were estimated by stereological methods. Results: The results showed a decrease in the ovarian volume, number of primordial follicles, and level of gonadotropins in the ND-treated animals compared with the vehicle groups. In the rats treated with 3 mg/kg of ND with hMG, an increase in the ovarian volume and number of primordial follicles was shown as compared to the rats treated with the same dose of ND without hMG. Conclusion: ND exerted detrimental effects on the dimensions of the ovary, number of follicles, and level of sex hormones. However, hMG, prevented the harmful effects of ND (at least in a low dose) on the ovarian follicles. PMID:24453393

  9. Comparison of recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone (rhFSH), human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG) on semen parameters after varicocelectomy: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Amirzargar, Mohammad Ali; Yavangi, Mahnaz; Basiri, Abbass; Hosseini Moghaddam, Sayyed Mahdi; Babbolhavaeji, Hooshang; Amirzargar, Nasibeh; Amirzargar, Hossein; Moadabshoar, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Background: The most frequent physical finding in infertile men is varicocele, in which one of the mechanisms that can affect seminal parameters is oxidative stress. Objective: Our study aimed, for the first time, to compare the efficacy of recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (rhFSH), human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and human menopausal gonadotropin (HMG) on sperm parameters and fertility after varicocelectomy. Materials and Methods: 113 infertile men with varicocele were divided into four groups. Group A received HCG 5000 IU weekly, group B received HMG 75 IU three times a week, group C received rhFSH 75 IU three times a week and group D received no medical treatment after varicocelectomy. Results: After three months, in group A sperm morphology improved (p=0.007), causing a 32% pregnancy rate. In group B, sperm motility (p=0.023) and morphology (p=0.014) improved, causing a 57% pregnancy rate. In group C, all of the investigated semen parameters increased (p<0.05), causing a 62.5% pregnancy rate. Only rhFSH improved sperm concentrations to >20×106 mL (p=0.027). In group D, sperm morphology increased (p=0.038), but other parameters remained unchanged and no pregnancies occurred. Conclusion: It can be concluded that drugs can reduce induction time for spermatogenesis and fertility in comparison with varicocelectomy alone. For these purposes, rhFSH is more effective than other drugs. PMID:25246910

  10. Prepubertal increases in gonadotropin-releasing hormone mRNA, gonadotropin-releasing hormone precursor, and subsequent maturation of precursor processing in male rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dutlow, C M; Rachman, J; Jacobs, T W; Millar, R P

    1992-01-01

    Changes in gonadotropins and gonadal steroids during sexual maturation in rats and humans are well documented but little is known about hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) gene expression in relation to these events. This study measured hypothalamic proGnRH mRNA, GnRH precursor, and fully processed GnRH from postnatal day 8 until day 62 in male rats. GnRH precursor increased on day 22, reached a peak on day 24, declined on day 25 and returned to infantile levels by day 28. A secondary rise in precursor occurred at about day 40 when testosterone levels increased. GnRH mRNA increased on day 22 and remained elevated over the study period to day 26. GnRH increased on day 24 and remained at this level until a secondary rise occurred coincident with the testosterone rise at about day 40. The ratio of GnRH precursor to GnRH was high until day 24 and was low from day 26 onwards, reflecting a maturation of the processing enzyme system between these 2 d. Thus, an abrupt increase in GnRH gene transcription (mRNA) occurs early in juvenile male rats (day 22), well before the onset of puberty. An increase in GnRH precursor accompanies these early changes and this is followed by the maturation of processing as evidenced by the rapid decline of precursor and increase in GnRH from day 24 onward. Images PMID:1469100

  11. Non-functioning pituitary adenomas: growth and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Øystese, Kristin Astrid; Evang, Johan Arild; Bollerslev, Jens

    2016-07-01

    Pituitary adenomas (PAs) are common, comprising approximately one third of all intracranial tumors. Non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) are the most common PAs. Although usually benign, the NFPAs represent therapeutic challenges because of their location close to the optic chiasm and nerves, and the proximity to the pituitary gland. The therapeutic alternatives are surgery and radiation. To date there is no effective medical treatment. NFPAs are classified according to different modalities, but there are no reliable marker of aggressiveness to guide the clinician in monitoring the patient. More information on growth patterns with constituent biological markers are needed to tailor the care of this patient group. Studies characterizing the membrane receptors of NFPAs have shown promising results, which may give rise to the development of medical treatment. PMID:27066792

  12. Endothelin: A novel peptide in the posterior pituitary system

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizawa, Toshihiro; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Shinmi, Osamu; Kimura, Sadao; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Masaki, Tomoh; Uchiyama, Yasuo ); Giaid, A.; Gibson, S.J.; Polak, J.M. )

    1990-01-26

    Endothelin (ET), originally characterized as a 21-residue vasoconstrictor peptide from endothelial cells, is present in the porcine spinal cord and may act as a neuropeptide. Endothelin-like immunoreactivity has now been demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclear neurons and their terminals in the posterior pituitary of the pig and the rat. The presence of ET in the porcine hypothalamus was confirmed by reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay. Moreover, in situ hybridization demonstrated ET messenger RNA in porcine paraventricular nuclear neurons. Endothelin-like immunoreactive products in the posterior pituitary of the rat were depleted by water deprivation, suggesting a release of ET under physiological conditions. These findings indicate that ET is synthesized in the posterior pituitary system and may be involved in neurosecretory functions.

  13. Growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma with admixed gangliocytoma and ganglioglioma.

    PubMed

    Jukes, Alistair; Allan, Rodney; Rawson, Robert; Buckland, Michael E

    2016-09-01

    Pituitary adenomas are the most common tumours found in the sellar region and, when both functioning and non-functioning adenomas are combined, account for 7-15% of primary brain tumours in adults. Rarely, admixed or discrete groups of cells comprising two or more tumour subtypes are seen; the so-called 'collision tumour'. We present a case of a 54-year-old-woman with a growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma admixed with both ganglioglioma and gangliocytoma. The possible mechanisms by which this may occur include a pre-existing gangliocytoma promoting the development of pituitary adenoma by hypersecretion of releasing hormones or aberrant migration of hypothalamic neurons in early embryogenesis. PMID:27068013

  14. Ovarian Hyperstimulation Caused by Gonadotroph Pituitary Adenoma--Review.

    PubMed

    Halupczok, Jowita; Kluba-Szyszka, Anna; Bidzińska-Speichert, Bożena; Knychalski, Bartłomiej

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) occurs mostly as an iatrogenic complication of assisted reproductive technology. Gonadotroph pituitary adenomas are rarely associated with OHSS. To the authors' knowledge, to date only 30 cases of spontaneous ovarian stimulation associated with gonadotroph adenomas have been reported in women and only 2 in children. The most common symptoms in such cases included menstrual disturbances, abdominal or pelvic pain, abdominal distension and increased girth. Galactorrhea, nausea and vomiting were also reported. Neurological symptoms occurred when the size of the pituitary tumor reached at least 20 mm. Transvaginal ultrasound examination usually demonstrated enlarged multicystic ovaries. MRIs of the pituitary revealed macroadenomas up to 61 mm in maximum diameter. The hormonal profiles of the reported cases showed normal or elevated FSH levels, suppressed LH levels, elevated estradiol levels and supranormal concentrations of prolactin. Transsphenoidal surgery is the therapy of choice, however other treatment modalities can be utilized in selected cases. PMID:26469116

  15. [Intrasellar small TSH secreting pituitary adenomas, 2 case reports].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yoshikazu; Tominaga, Teiji; Ikeda, Hidetoshi

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenoma accounts for 1% of pituitary adenoma and often manifests as invasive macroadenoma. If the TSH value is not high enough to cause clinical symptoms presenting as inappropriate secretion of TSH, the tumor may be missed or misdiagnosed as Graves disease. Some of these patients receive inadequate treatment with the antithyroid agent, radioiodine treatment, and thyroidectomy. This tumor is also known as a tough and firm tumor because of the significant interstitial fibrosis. We report two cases of TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas which were comparatively small. Although a tough and difficult operation was expected, actual tumor dissection was easy and gross total removal was achieved within less than 3 hours. We discuss the relationship between the intraoperative findings and histopathology, as well as the ultrastructure and endocrinology. PMID:17633511

  16. Three-dimensional reconstruction and morphological characterization of pituitary macroadenomas

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lin; Jing, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Shang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim was to investigate the relationship between the tumor (clinicopathologic and radiological) characteristics and the morphological parameters of pituitary macroadenoma or giant adenoma patients using a three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed model. Material and methods Magnetic resoanance imaging (MRI) was performed preoperatively; tumor grade was determined by the Knosp-Steiner classification and tumor morphology by the SIPAP classification. Pituitary adenomas and adjacent structures were reconstructed three-dimensionally by volume rendering. Results Fifty-two and 6 patients underwent surgery via the transnasal transsphenoidal or pterional approach, respectively. Knosp-Steiner grades I to IV adenomas were observed in 5.2%, 25.9%, 22.4% and 46.6% of the patients, respectively. The 3D model was reconstructed in all cases with superb delineation of tumor morphology and the spatial relationship between the tumor and adjacent tissues. Pituitary adenomas were categorized into intrasellar (13.8%), suprasellar (20.7%), infrasellar (17.2%), and lobulated adenomas (48.3%). Suprasellar adenomas had the smallest (2.27 ±3.22 cm3) and lobulated adenomas the largest volume (24.61 ±30.50 cm3). Intrasellar adenomas were all functioning, while 75%, 60% and 60.7%, respectively, of suprasellar, infrasellar and lobulated adenomas were nonfunctioning, with a significant association between tumor morphology and secretory function (p = 0.005). Conclusions Three-dimensional reconstruction of pituitary macroadenomas offers a simplified morphological classification of pituitary adenomas and may be helpful for neurosurgeons to categorize and characterize pituitary adenomas. PMID:27279851

  17. Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Birrell, G; Lampe, A; Richmond, S; Bruce, S N; Gécz, J; Lower, K; Wright, M; Cheetham, T D

    2003-12-01

    We describe two brothers with Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and the 22A-->T (Lys8X) PHF6 mutation, who presented with the symptoms and signs of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. Biochemical investigations and radiology confirmed growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) as well as gonadotrophin deficiency. They were also found to have optic nerve hypoplasia. This family suggests that the BFL gene product may play an important role in midline neuro-development including the hypothalamo-pituitary axis. PMID:14714754

  18. An uncommon cause of recurrent pyogenic meningitis: pituitary abscess

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Rama; Bhansali, Anil; Dutta, Pinaki; Shanmugasundar, G; Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar; Upreti, Vimal; Das, Ashim

    2010-01-01

    The authors report a 36-year-old male who presented with headache and hypopituitarism, and MRI revealed a ring enhancing lesion with pituitary stalk thickening. During follow-up, he presented with recurrent pyogenic meningitis with persistence of the lesion, therefore a diagnosis of pituitary abscess was considered. He underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS) with evacuation of pus and received antibiotic treatment for the same. After this he remarkably improved and had no recurrence of symptoms. He is on levothyroxine, glucocorticoids and testosterone replacement therapy for his respective hormone deficits. PMID:22767626

  19. Intrasellar schwannoma mimicking pituitary adenoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Whee, Sung Mock; Lee, Jung Il; Kim, Jong Hyun

    2002-02-01

    Intrasellar location of schwannoma is extremely rare, although intracranial schwannomas account for up to 8% of all primary brain tumors. An unusual case of an intrasellar schwannoma radiographically and clinically simulating a pituitary adenoma is reported. A 39-yr-old man presented a 10-month history of visual disturbance and decreased libido. Neurological examination showed poor visual acuity of both eyes with bitemporal hemianopsia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a sellar tumor with suprasellar extension. Pituitary adenoma was considered as a preoperative diagnosis. The tumor was removed through a trans-sphenoidal approach. Microscopic examination of the tumor revealed schwannoma. PMID:11850608

  20. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Efforts were directed towards maintenance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro. The production of human growth hormone (hGH) by this means would be of benefit for the treatment of certain human hypopituitary diseases such as dwarfism. One of the primary approaches was the testing of agents which may logically be expected to increase hGH release. The progress towards this goal is summarized. Results from preliminary experiments dealing with electrophoresis of pituitary cell for the purpose of somatotroph separation are described.

  1. Partial pneumoencephalography in following-up pituitary tumours 1

    PubMed Central

    Olmsted, William W.; Wilson, Gabriel H.; Rand, Robert W.; Gartland, John P.

    1974-01-01

    The `limited' pneumoencephalogram has been used with excellent success at UCLA for the continuing follow-up of pituitary tumours. It is most useful in following nonsecretory adenomas since tumour regrowth can occur in the absence of clinical signs and symptoms. Total serial pneumoencephalography has not been accepted previously for follow-up of pituitary tumours since there is a significant morbidity. The `limited' pneumoencephalogram of the diseased area drastically reduces the morbidity of the procedure so that the patients are willing to undergo serial studies on an outpatient basis. Images PMID:4844132

  2. Modulating the pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1975-01-01

    Serotonin is believed to be a transmitter or regulator of neuronal function. A possible relationship between the pituitary-adrenal secretion of steroids and brain serotonin in the rat was investigated by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-hydroxy tryptamine (HT) levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. The approach was either to inhibit brain 5-HT synthesis with para-chlorophenyl alanine or to raise its level with precursors such as tryptophan or 5-hydroxy tryptophan.

  3. Influence of Stress-Induced Intermediates on Gonadotropin Gene Expression in Gonadotrope Cells

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Kellie M.; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive investigation, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms whereby stress impacts fertility remains elusive. Since the 1930s, when Hans Selye popularized studying adaptations to stress (Selye, 1937), we have learned that compensatory mechanisms involve a complex interplay of neural and hormonal processes that allow various body functions to adjust to stress, in a coordinated manner. In terms of reproduction, the adjustment to a stressor interferes with integrated functioning at multiple levels of regulation – the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary gland, gonads, and neural centers coordinating behavior. Various mediators are postulated to participate in reproductive suppression. These include catecholamines, cytokines, prostaglandins, endogenous opioid peptides, and hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This review focuses on one class of mediators, the glucocorticoids, and provides our views on the relevance and mode of action of this inhibitory intermediate within the anterior pituitary gonadotrope, as a potential cellular site whereby glucocorticoids contribute to stress-induced reproductive suppression. PMID:24012628

  4. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug... milligrams of standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of...

  5. A Patient Friendly Corifollitropin Alfa Protocol without Routine Pituitary Suppression in Normal Responders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huai-Ling; Lai, Hsing-Hua; Chuang, Tzu-Hsuan; Shih, Yu-Wei; Huang, Shih-Chieh; Lee, Meng-Ju; Chen, Shee-Uan

    2016-01-01

    The release of corifollitropin alfa simplifies daily injections of short-acting recombinant follicular stimulating hormone (rFSH), and its widely-used protocol involves short-acting gonadotropins supplements and a fixed GnRH antagonist regimen, largely based on follicle size. In this study, the feasibility of corifollitropin alfa without routine pituitary suppression was evaluated. A total of 288 patients were stimulated by corifollitropin alfa on cycle day 3 following with routine serum hormone monitoring and follicle scanning every other day after 5 days of initial stimulation, and a GnRH antagonist (0.25 mg) was only used prophylactically when the luteinizing hormone (LH) was ≧ 6 IU/L (over half of the definitive LH surge). The incidence of premature LH surge (≧ 10 IU/L) was 2.4% (7/288) before the timely injection of a single GnRH antagonist, and the elevated LH level was dropped down from 11.9 IU/L to 2.2 IU/L after the suppression. Two hundred fifty-one patients did not need any antagonist (87.2% [251/288]) throughout the whole stimulation. No adverse effects were observed regarding oocyte competency (fertilization rate: 78%; blastocyst formation rate: 64%). The live birth rate per OPU cycle after the first cryotransfer was 56.3% (161/286), and the cumulative live birth rate per OPU cycle after cyrotransfers was 69.6% (199/286). Of patients who did and did not receive GnRH antagonist during stimulation, no significant difference existed in the cumulative live birth rates (78.4% vs. 68.3%, p = 0.25). The results demonstrated that the routine GnRH antagonist administration is not required in the corifollitropin-alfa cycles using a flexible and hormone-depended antagonist regimen, while the clinical outcome is not compromised. This finding reveals that the use of a GnRH antagonist only occasionally may be needed. PMID:27100388

  6. Delayed adverse effects of neonatal exposure to polymeric nanoparticle poly(ethylene glycol)-block-polylactide methyl ether on hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis development and function in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rollerova, Eva; Jurcovicova, Jana; Mlynarcikova, Alzbeta; Sadlonova, Irina; Bilanicova, Dagmar; Wsolova, Ladislava; Kiss, Alexander; Kovriznych, Jevgenij; Kronek, Juraj; Ciampor, Fedor; Vavra, Ivo; Scsukova, Sona

    2015-11-01

    We studied delayed effects of neonatal exposure to polymeric nanoparticle poly(ethylene glycol)-block-polylactide methyl ether (PEG-b-PLA) on the endpoints related to pubertal development and reproductive function in female Wistar rats from postnatal day 4 (PND4) to PND 176. Female pups were injected intraperitoneally, daily, from PND4 to PND7 with PEG-b-PLA (20 or 40mg/kg b.w.). Both doses of PEG-b-PLA accelerated the onset of vaginal opening compared with the control group. In the low-dose PEG-b-PLA-treated group, a significantly reduced number of regular estrous cycles, increased pituitary weight due to hyperemia, vascular dilatation and congestion, altered course of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion, and increased progesterone serum levels were observed. The obtained data indicate that neonatal exposure to PEG-b-PLA might affect the development and function of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis (HPO), and thereby alter functions of the reproductive system in adult female rats. Our study indicates a possible neuroendocrine disrupting effect of PEG-b-PLA nanoparticles. PMID:26193689

  7. Effect of Soyabean Isoflavones Exposure on Onset of Puberty, Serum Hormone Concentration and Gene Expression in Hypothalamus, Pituitary Gland and Ovary of Female Bama Miniature Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Juexin; Zhang, Bin; Li, Lili; Xiao, Chaowu; Oladele, Oso Abimbola; Jiang, Guoli; Ding, Hao; Wang, Shengping; Xing, Yueteng; Xiao, Dingfu; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the effect of soyabean isoflavones (SIF) on onset of puberty, serum hormone concentration, and gene expression in hypothalamus, pituitary and ovary of female Bama miniature pigs. Fifty five, 35-days old pigs were randomly assigned into 5 treatment groups consisting of 11 pigs per treatment. Results showed that dietary supplementation of varying dosage (0, 250, 500, and 1,250 mg/kg) of SIF induced puberty delay of the pigs with the age of puberty of pigs fed basal diet supplemented with 1,250 mg/kg SIF was significantly higher (p<0.05) compared to control. Supplementation of SIF or estradiol valerate (EV) reduced (p<0.05) serum gonadotrophin releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone concentration, but increased follicle-stimulating hormone concentration in pigs at 4 months of age. The expression of KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor (KISS1), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta-5-delta-4 isomerase (3β-HSD) was reduced (p<0.01) in SIF-supplemented groups. Expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the pituitary of miniature pigs was reduced (p<0.05) compared to the control when exposed to 250, 1,250 mg/kg SIF and EV. Pigs on 250 mg/kg SIF and EV also showed reduced (p<0.05) expression of cytochrome P450 19A1 compared to the control. Our results indicated that dietary supplementation of SIF induced puberty delay, which may be due to down-regulation of key genes that play vital roles in the synthesis of steroid hormones. PMID:26580281

  8. Persistent GnRH receptor activation in pituitary αT3-1 cells analyzed with a label-free technology.

    PubMed

    Nederpelt, I; Vergroesen, R D; IJzerman, A P; Heitman, L H

    2016-05-15

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor is a drug target for certain hormone-dependent diseases such as prostate cancer. In this study, we examined the activation profiles of the endogenous ligand, GnRH and a well-known marketed analog, buserelin using a label-free assay in pituitary αT3-1 cells with endogenous GnRH receptor expression. This whole cell impedance-based technology allows for the real-time measurement of morphological cellular changes. Both agonists dose-dependently decreased the impedance as a result of GnRH receptor activation with potencies of 9.3 ± 0.1 (pEC50 value, buserelin) and 7.8 ± 0.06 (pEC50 value, GnRH). Subsequently, GnRH receptor activation was completely abolished with a selective Gαq inhibitor, thereby confirming the Gαq-coupling of the GnRH receptor in pituitary αT3-1 cells. Additionally, we observed continued responses after agonist stimulation of αT3-1 cells indicating long-lasting cellular effects. Wash-out experiments demonstrated that the long-lasting effects induced by GnRH were most likely caused by rebinding since over 70% of the original response was abolished after wash-out. In contrast, a long receptor residence time was responsible for the prolonged effects caused by buserelin, with over 70% of the original response remaining after wash-out. In summary, we validated that impedance-based label-free technology is suited for studying receptor-mediated activation in cell lines endogenously expressing the target of interest. Moreover, this real-time monitoring allows the examination of binding kinetics and its influence on receptor activation at a cellular level. PMID:26774084

  9. Functional Characteristics of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Megnis, Kaspars; Mandrika, Ilona; Petrovska, Ramona; Stukens, Janis; Rovite, Vita; Balcere, Inga; Jansone, Laima Sabine; Peculis, Raitis; Pirags, Valdis

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most common endocrine and intracranial neoplasms. Although they are theoretically monoclonal in origin, several studies have shown that they contain different multipotent cell types that are thought to play an important role in tumor initiation, maintenance, and recurrence after therapy. In the present study, we isolated and characterized cell populations from seven pituitary somatotroph, nonhormonal, and lactotroph adenomas. The obtained cells showed characteristics of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells as observed by cell morphology, cell surface marker CD90, CD105, CD44, and vimentin expression, as well as differentiation to osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. They are capable of growth and passaging under standard laboratory cell culture conditions and do not manifest any hormonal cell characteristics. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells are present in pituitary adenomas regardless of their clinical manifestation and show no considerable expression of somatostatin 1–5 and dopamine 2 receptors. Most likely obtained cells are a part of tissue-supportive cells in pituitary adenoma microenvironment. PMID:27340409

  10. Atrial natriuretic factor-like activity in rat posterior pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Gutkowska, J.; Debinski, W.; Racz, K.; Thibault, G.; Garcia, R.; Kuchel, O.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M.

    1986-03-05

    The presence of a biologically active peptide: Atrial Natriuretic Factor (ANF) has been demonstrated in rat and human circulation and ANF is considered now as a new hormone. ANF may be involved in body fluid regulation. A very sensitive radioimmunoassay for rat ANF allowed the authors to search for immunoreactive ANF (IR-ANF) in rat posterior pituitary. Serial dilutions of homogenates of rat posterior pituitary showed a good parallelism with a reference curve in a radioimmunoassay system. The IR-ANF was extracted from rat posterior pituitary homogenates by activated Vycor glass beads. The lyophilized extract was purified by HPLC on C/sub 18/ ..mu.. Bondapak column. The HPLC yielded two IR-ANF peaks. Both isolated ANF-like material showed biological activity. The IR-ANF eluted with 33% acetonitrile, inhibited ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion with a similar potency as synthetic (Arg 101 - Tyr 126) ANF (0.7 x 10/sup -10/M). A much less potent ANF-like material was found in the second peak eluted with 36% acetonitrile. They conclude that ANF-like material is present in rat posterior pituitary and this suggest a possible role in ANF on AVP secretion directly in situ.

  11. Functional Characteristics of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Pituitary Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Megnis, Kaspars; Mandrika, Ilona; Petrovska, Ramona; Stukens, Janis; Rovite, Vita; Balcere, Inga; Jansone, Laima Sabine; Peculis, Raitis; Pirags, Valdis; Klovins, Janis

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most common endocrine and intracranial neoplasms. Although they are theoretically monoclonal in origin, several studies have shown that they contain different multipotent cell types that are thought to play an important role in tumor initiation, maintenance, and recurrence after therapy. In the present study, we isolated and characterized cell populations from seven pituitary somatotroph, nonhormonal, and lactotroph adenomas. The obtained cells showed characteristics of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells as observed by cell morphology, cell surface marker CD90, CD105, CD44, and vimentin expression, as well as differentiation to osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. They are capable of growth and passaging under standard laboratory cell culture conditions and do not manifest any hormonal cell characteristics. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells are present in pituitary adenomas regardless of their clinical manifestation and show no considerable expression of somatostatin 1-5 and dopamine 2 receptors. Most likely obtained cells are a part of tissue-supportive cells in pituitary adenoma microenvironment. PMID:27340409

  12. Hyperprolactinemia Secondary to Allergic Fungal Sinusitis Compressing the Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Chapurin, Nikita; Wang, Cynthia; Steinberg, David M.; Jang, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aim to describe the first case in the literature of allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) presenting with hyperprolactinemia due to compression of the pituitary gland. Case Presentation. A 37-year-old female presented with bilateral galactorrhea and occipital headaches of several weeks. Workup revealed elevated prolactin of 94.4, negative pregnancy test, and normal thyroid function. MRI and CT demonstrated a 5.0 × 2.7 × 2.5 cm heterogeneous expansile mass in the right sphenoid sinus with no pituitary adenoma as originally suspected. Patient was placed on cabergoline for symptomatic control until definitive treatment. Results. The patient underwent right endoscopic sphenoidotomy, which revealed nasal polyps and fungal debris in the sphenoid sinus, consistent with AFS. There was bony erosion of the sella and clivus. Pathology and microbiology were consistent with allergic fungal sinusitis caused by Curvularia species. Prolactin levels normalized four weeks after surgery with resolution of symptoms. Conclusion. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery alone was able to reverse the patient's pituitary dysfunction. To our knowledge, this is the first case of AFS presenting as hyperprolactinemia due to pituitary compression. PMID:26998375

  13. Early effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary function

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, K.S.; Tse, V.K.; Wang, C.; Yeung, R.T.; Ma, J.T.; Ho, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary function was studied in 31 patients before and after cranial irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The estimated radiotherapy (RT) doses to the hypothalamus and pituitary were 3979 +/- 78 (+/- SD) and 6167 +/- 122 centiGrays, respectively. All patients had normal pituitary function before RT. One year after RT, there was a significant decrease in the integrated serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In the male patients, basal serum FSH significantly increased, while basal serum LH and testosterone did not change. Moreover, in response to LHRH, the integrated FSH response was increased while that of LH was decreased. Such discordant changes in FSH and LH may be explained by a defect in LHRH pulsatile release involving predominantly a decrease in pulse frequency. The peak serum TSH response to TRH became delayed in 28 patients, suggesting a defect in TRH release. Twenty-one patients were reassessed 2 yr after RT. Their mean basal serum T4 and plasma cortisol levels had significantly decreased. Hyperprolactinemia associated with oligomenorrhoea was found in 3 women. Further impairment in the secretion of GH, FSH, LH, TSH, and ACTH had occurred, and 4 patients had hypopituitarism. Thus, progressive impairment in hypothalamic-pituitary function occurs after cranial irradiation and can be demonstrated as early as 1 yr after RT.

  14. Genetic Regulation of Pituitary Gland Development in Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kelberman, Daniel; Rizzoti, Karine; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Robinson, Iain C. A. F.; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2009-01-01

    Normal hypothalamopituitary development is closely related to that of the forebrain and is dependent upon a complex genetic cascade of transcription factors and signaling molecules that may be either intrinsic or extrinsic to the developing Rathke’s pouch. These factors dictate organ commitment, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation within the anterior pituitary. Abnormalities in these processes are associated with congenital hypopituitarism, a spectrum of disorders that includes syndromic disorders such as septo-optic dysplasia, combined pituitary hormone deficiencies, and isolated hormone deficiencies, of which the commonest is GH deficiency. The highly variable clinical phenotypes can now in part be explained due to research performed over the last 20 yr, based mainly on naturally occurring and transgenic animal models. Mutations in genes encoding both signaling molecules and transcription factors have been implicated in the etiology of hypopituitarism, with or without other syndromic features, in mice and humans. To date, mutations in known genes account for a small proportion of cases of hypopituitarism in humans. However, these mutations have led to a greater understanding of the genetic interactions that lead to normal pituitary development. This review attempts to describe the complexity of pituitary development in the rodent, with particular emphasis on those factors that, when mutated, are associated with hypopituitarism in humans. PMID:19837867

  15. Hyperprolactinemia Secondary to Allergic Fungal Sinusitis Compressing the Pituitary Gland.

    PubMed

    Chapurin, Nikita; Wang, Cynthia; Steinberg, David M; Jang, David W

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aim to describe the first case in the literature of allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) presenting with hyperprolactinemia due to compression of the pituitary gland. Case Presentation. A 37-year-old female presented with bilateral galactorrhea and occipital headaches of several weeks. Workup revealed elevated prolactin of 94.4, negative pregnancy test, and normal thyroid function. MRI and CT demonstrated a 5.0 × 2.7 × 2.5 cm heterogeneous expansile mass in the right sphenoid sinus with no pituitary adenoma as originally suspected. Patient was placed on cabergoline for symptomatic control until definitive treatment. Results. The patient underwent right endoscopic sphenoidotomy, which revealed nasal polyps and fungal debris in the sphenoid sinus, consistent with AFS. There was bony erosion of the sella and clivus. Pathology and microbiology were consistent with allergic fungal sinusitis caused by Curvularia species. Prolactin levels normalized four weeks after surgery with resolution of symptoms. Conclusion. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery alone was able to reverse the patient's pituitary dysfunction. To our knowledge, this is the first case of AFS presenting as hyperprolactinemia due to pituitary compression. PMID:26998375

  16. Clinical Concerns about Recurrence of Non-Functioning Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Ho; Lee, Ju Hee; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Kim, Jong Hyun; Kong, Doo-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA) are clinically challenging because they present at a late stage with local mass effects or hypopituitarism. Surgery for non-functioning pituitary adenoma requires a special strategic approach for both minimal morbidity and radical resection. However, the clinical predictive factors associated with recurrence are limited. Here, we investigated optimal treatment of non-functioning pituitary adenoma. Methods We enrolled 289 patients who presented with non-functioning pituitary adenoma between January 2000 and January 2012 and who had received follow-up for at least one year for this retrospective study. Of these patients, 152 were male and 137 were female, with a median age of 51 years (range 15.79 years) and a median follow-up of four years (range 1.12.6 years). Characteristics of patients and tumors were reviewed with electronic medical records and radiologic images, retrospectively. Results Of the tumors, 193 were gross-totally resected, 53 were near-totally resected, and 43 were sub-totally resected. The extent of resection and adjuvant radiotherapy were both statistically significant prognostic factors of recurrence. Immunohistochemistry of tumor specimens did not yield consistent results. Conclusion With a high rate of recurrence, NFPA should be closely followed-up over a long-term period. Improvement of surgical techniques with advanced surgical equipment and adjuvant radiosurgery would lead to reduce the recurrence rate and improve patients' outcome. PMID:27195254

  17. Pituitary tumors following fallout radiation exposure. [Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W.H.; Harper, J.A.; Rittmaster, R.S.; Grimson, R.C.

    1984-08-03

    Two pituitary tumors were diagnosed in a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout in 1954. Endocrinologic findings in the exposed population, are reported and the possible relation of the tumors to radiation exposure and thyroid disease is discussed.

  18. The chronic syndromes after previous treatment of pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Romijn, Johannes A

    2016-09-01

    Ultimately, almost all patients who are appropriately treated for pituitary tumours enter a chronic phase with control or cure of hormonal excess, adequate treatment of pituitary insufficiency and relief of mass effects. This phase is associated with improvement of initial signs and symptoms, but also with the persistent consequences of the initial disease and associated treatments. Pituitary insufficiency is a common denominator in many of these patients, and is associated with a reduction in quality of life, despite adequate endocrine substitution. Hypothalamic dysfunction can be present in patients previously treated for visual impairments caused by large suprasellar adenomas, or craniopharyngiomas. In addition to hypopituitarism, these patients can have multisystem morbidities caused by altered hypothalamic function, including weight gain and disturbed regulation of sleep-wake cycles. Mortality can also be affected. Patients cured of Cushing disease or acromegaly have chronic multisystem morbidities (in the case of Cushing disease, also affecting mortality) caused by irreversible effects of the previous excesses of cortisol in Cushing disease and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 in acromegaly. In addition to early diagnosis and treatment of pituitary tumours, research should focus on the amenability of these chronic post-treatment syndromes to therapeutic intervention, to improve quality of life and clinical outcomes. PMID:27259177

  19. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Guaraldi, Federica; Grottoli, Silvia; Arvat, Emanuela; Ghigo, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A). The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data. PMID:26239463

  20. Disruptions in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in rat offspring following prenatal maternal exposure to lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Izvolskaia, Marina S; Tillet, Yves; Sharova, Viktoria S; Voronova, Svetlana N; Zakharova, Lyudmila A

    2016-03-01

    Postnatal treatment with bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) changes the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) surge in rats. Exposure to an immune challenge in the critical periods of development has profound and long-lasting effects on the stress response, immune, metabolic, and reproductive functions. Prenatal LPS treatment delays the migration of GnRH neurons associated with increased cytokine release in maternal and fetal compartments. We investigated the effects of a single maternal exposure to LPS (18 μg/kg, i.p.) on day 12 (embryonic day (E)12) of pregnancy on reproductive parameters in rat offspring. Hypothalamic GnRH content, plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and estradiol concentrations were measured in both male and female offsprings at different stages of postnatal development by RIA and ELISA (n = 10 each per group). Body weight and in females day of vaginal opening (VO) were recorded. In offspring exposed to LPS prenatally, compared with controls, body weight was decreased in both sexes at P5 and P30; in females, VO was delayed; hypothalamic GnRH content was decreased at postnatal days 30-60 (P30-P60) in both sexes; plasma LH concentration was decreased at P14-P60 in females; plasma concentrations of testosterone/estradiol were increased at P14 in females, and plasma estradiol was increased at P14 in males. Hence activation of the maternal immune system by LPS treatment at a prenatal critical period leads to decreased GnRH and LH levels in pre- and postpubertal life and sex steroid imbalance in the prepubertal period, and delayed sexual maturation of female offspring. PMID:26941006

  1. Isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    PU, JIUJUN; WANG, ZHIMING; ZHOU, HUI; ZHONG, AILING; JIN, KAI; RUAN, LUNLIANG; YANG, GANG

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of double or multiple pituitary adenomas have previously been reported in the literature; however, isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are even more rare. The present study reports a rare case of a 50-year-old female patient who presented with typical clinical features of Cushing's disease and was diagnosed with isolated double ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Endocrinological examination revealed an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma, and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a microadenoma with a lower intensity on the right side of the pituitary gland. The patient underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery, which revealed another pituitary tumor in the left side of the pituitary gland. The two, clearly separated, pituitary adenomas identified in the same gland were completely resected. Immunohistochemistry and pathology revealed that the clearly separated double pituitary adenomas were positive for ACTH, thyroid-stimulating, growth and prolactin hormones. Postoperatively, the levels of ACTH and cortisol hormone decreased rapidly. The case reported in the present study is considerably rare, due to the presence of a second pituitary adenoma in the same gland, which was not detected by preoperative MRI scan, but was noticed during surgery. Intraoperative evaluation may be important in the identification of double or multiple pituitary adenomas. PMID:27347184

  2. Pituitary carcinoma with intraspinal metastasis: report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin Qian; Fan, Tao; Zhao, Xin Gang; Liang, Cong; Qi, Xue Ling; Li, Jian Yi

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary carcinomas are rare malignant neoplasms with diagnostic and management challenges. Patients with pituitary carcinomas have extremely poor outcomes. In this report, the authors describe two cases of pituitary carcinomas with intraspinal metastasis (Case 1: 42-year-old man with a history of pituitary adenoma 16 years ago developed an intraspinal lesion at C4-C5; Case 2: 26-year-old women with a history of growth hormone-producing pituitary adenoma 9 years ago developed intraspinal lesion in the sacral canal). Both patients underwent spine surgery. The intraspinal lesions were confirmed as metastatic pituitary carcinomas based on the histomorphology and immunohistochemical stains. The authors reviewed the literature for the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of intraspinal metastasis from pituitary carcinomas. PMID:26464743

  3. Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma with metastasis to the pituitary gland: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Lau, G; Tan, S Y; Chiang, G; Poh, W T

    1998-01-01

    An unusual case of metastatic bronchioloalveolar carcinoma of the lung presented as a pituitary tumour in a young adult Chinese female, who subsequently died after having undergone trans-sphenoidal resection. Metastatic cancers of the pituitary are uncommon even in necropsy series and rarely give rise to clinical symptoms. This case draws attention to the fact that, although uncommon, pituitary metastases have been noted with increasing frequency and their distinction from primary pituitary tumours is often difficult. A metastatic pituitary tumour may be the initial presentation of an unknown primary malignancy, wherein the metastatic deposits may also be limited to the pituitary gland. Clinicians and pathologists alike should consider a metastatic lesion in the differential diagnosis of a non-functioning pituitary tumour. Images PMID:10070337

  4. GH and Pituitary Hormone Alterations After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Züleyha; Tanrıverdi, Fatih; Ünlühızarcı, Kürşad; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a crucially important public health problem around the world, which gives rise to increased mortality and is the leading cause of physical and psychological disability in young adults, in particular. Pituitary dysfunction due to TBI was first described 95years ago. However, until recently, only a few papers have been published in the literature and for this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism has been neglected for a long time. Recent studies have revealed that TBI is one of the leading causes of hypopituitarism. TBI which causes hypopituitarism may be characterized by a single head injury such as from a traffic accident or by chronic repetitive head trauma as seen in combative sports including boxing, kickboxing, and football. Vascular damage, hypoxic insult, direct trauma, genetic predisposition, autoimmunity, and neuroinflammatory changes may have a role in the development of hypopituitarism after TBI. Because of the exceptional structure of the hypothalamo-pituitary vasculature and the special anatomic location of anterior pituitary cells, GH is the most commonly lost hormone after TBI, and the frequency of isolated GHD is considerably high. TBI-induced pituitary dysfunction remains undiagnosed and therefore untreated in most patients because of the nonspecific and subtle clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism. Treatment of TBI-induced hypopituitarism depends on the deficient anterior pituitary hormones. GH replacement therapy has some beneficial effects on metabolic parameters and neurocognitive dysfunction. Patients with TBI without neuroendocrine changes and those with TBI-induced hypopituitarism share the same clinical manifestations, such as attention deficits, impulsion impairment, depression, sleep abnormalities, and cognitive disorders. For this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism may be neglected in TBI victims and it would be expected that underlying hypopituitarism would aggravate the clinical picture of TBI itself

  5. Effects of Carbenoxolone on the Canine Pituitary-Adrenal Axis

    PubMed Central

    Teshima, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Okusa, Tomoko; Nakamura, Yumi; Koyama, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Cushing’s disease caused by pituitary corticotroph adenoma is a common endocrine disease in dogs. A characteristic biochemical feature of corticotroph adenomas is their relative resistance to suppressive negative feedback by glucocorticoids. The abnormal expression of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11HSD), which is a cortisol metabolic enzyme, is found in human and murine corticotroph adenomas. Our recent studies demonstrated that canine corticotroph adenomas also have abnormal expression of 11HSD. 11HSD has two isoforms in dogs, 11HSD type1 (HSD11B1), which converts cortisone into active cortisol, and 11HSD type2 (HSD11B2), which converts cortisol into inactive cortisone. It has been suggested that glucocorticoid resistance in corticotroph tumors is related to the overexpression of HSD11B2. Therefore it was our aim to investigate the effects of carbenoxolone (CBX), an 11HSD inhibitor, on the healthy dog’s pituitary-adrenal axis. Dogs were administered 50 mg/kg of CBX twice each day for 15 days. During CBX administration, no adverse effects were observed in any dogs. The plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and serum cortisol and cortisone concentrations were significantly lower at day 7 and 15 following corticotropin releasing hormone stimulation. After completion of CBX administration, the HSD11B1 mRNA expression was higher, and HSD11B2 mRNA expression was significantly lower in the pituitaries. Moreover, proopiomelanocortin mRNA expression was lower, and the ratio of ACTH-positive cells in the anterior pituitary was also significantly lower after CBX treatment. In adrenal glands treated with CBX, HSD11B1 and HSD11B2 mRNA expression were both lower compared to normal canine adrenal glands. The results of this study suggested that CBX inhibits ACTH secretion from pituitary due to altered 11HSD expressions, and is potentially useful for the treatment of canine Cushing’s disease. PMID:26262685

  6. Evaluation of dual trigger with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and human chorionic gonadotropin in improving oocyte maturity rates: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Nalini; Sharma, Shilpa; Arora, Puneet Rana; Gupta, Shalu; Rani, Kumkum; Naidu, Padmaja

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mature oocytes are prerequisite for achieving the process of in vitro fertilization. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is the standard trigger used for stimulating ovulation but is associated with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger achieves oocyte maturation and lowers the incidence of OHSS, but it has limitations of higher pregnancy loss rate and miscarriage rates. Coadministration of both hormones is found to improve the pregnancy rates and the number of mature oocytes retrieved. We aimed to assess if the dual trigger is better than the conventional hCG in triggering oocyte maturation. METHODOLOGY: The study included 76 female patients aged 24–43 years who were randomly divided into two groups with 38 patients in each arm. The study included patients with antimullerian hormone (AMH) <4 ng/ml, antral follicle counts (AFCs)/ovary <12. The study excluded high responders-AMH >4 ng/ml and AFC/ovary >12 to avoid OHSS risk with hCG trigger. RESULTS: The study showed statistically insignificant differences between dual group versus hCG group in terms of the number of oocytes retrieved (10.0 ± 5.6 vs. 8.7 ± 5.0; P = 0.2816), the number of mature oocytes recovered (8.4 ± 5.0 vs. 7.2 ± 4.0; P = 0.2588), fertilization rate (5.9 ± 4.2 vs. 5.6 ± 3.3; P = 0.7390), and the number of usable embryos on day 3 (4.0 ± 3.0 vs. 4.0 ± 2.4; P = 0.8991). CONCLUSION: The dual trigger is equivalent to hCG in triggering oocyte maturation. PMID:27382235

  7. Gonadotropin-binding sites in the rhesus monkey ovary: role of the vasculature in the selective distribution of human chorionic gonadotropin to the preovulatory follicle

    SciTech Connect

    Zeleznik, A.J.; Schuler, H.M.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    These experiments were initiated to determine if differences exist in the vasculature of individual follicles in the rhesus monkey ovary during the late follicular phase of the menstrual cycle and to determine whether differences in vascularity result in differential exposure of certain follicles to gonadotropic hormones. The density of blood vessels within the thecal layer of the dominant follicle and other antral follicles was determined in ovaries from four animals removed on day 9 or 10 of the menstrual cycle. Blood vessels were identified using a histochemical stain for hemoglobin. Morphometric analysis indicated that the percentage of the thecal layer occupied by blood vessels in the dominant follicles (48%) was significantly greater (P less than 0.005) than that of other smaller antral follicles either within the same ovary as the dominant follicle (24%) or in the contralateral ovary (26%). To determine if differences in vascularity result in a differential supply of gonadotropins to the dominant follicle, we studied, by autoradiography, the in vivo and in vitro binding of (125I)hCG in four rhesus monkeys on day 9 of the menstrual cycle. Results of in vitro binding studies indicated that the thecal layer of virtually every antral follicle possessed hCG-binding sites. However, when (125I)hcg was injected iv into animals and allowed to distribute via the vasculature, the dominant follicle was heavily labeled while other smaller antral follicles accumulated little, if any, radioiodinated hCG. These observations indicate that increased vascularization of individual follicles results in preferential delivery of gonadotropins, and suggest that blood flow to individual follicles may play an instrumental role in the selective maturation of the preovulatory follicle in the rhesus monkey.

  8. Effects of progesterone inclusion in a gonadotropin-prostaglandin-gonadotropin programme on follicular dynamics and ovulation synchronisation of pasture-based dairy cows with anoestrous.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S K; Cockrem, J F; Parkinson, T J; Laven, R A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how the addition of a progesterone device to a gonadotropin-prostaglandin-gonadotropin (GPG) programme in dairy cows with postpartum anovulatory anoestrus affected ovarian follicular dynamics and the synchronisation of ovulation. Twenty-two dairy cows were randomly assigned to either GPG (Day 0: 100 μg GnRH, Day 7: 500 μg PGF2α, Day 9: 100 μg GnRH, Day 0-7: Day 10) or GPG with a progesterone device from Day 0 to 7 (GPG+P4). Ovarian follicular dynamics and ovulation synchronisation were studied using transrectal ultrasonography. Compared to the GPG+P4, GPG alone resulted in a relatively larger mean dominant follicle size and a higher mean peripheral oestradiol concentration (74.9 pg ∗ day vs. 60.6 pg ∗ day; P=0.002); however, there was much greater variation in follicle diameter in the group treated with GPG (7.8-22 mm vs. 10.8-17.5mm in GPG+P4) and this may, at least partly explain why only 7/11 cows in this group ovulated within 48 h of the Day 9 GnRH injection compared to 10/10 of the cows in the GPG+P4 group. These results suggest that differences in follicular dynamics between GPG and GPG+P4 programmes are not a key driver of the difference in conception rate, but further studies are required to better assess the role of ovulation synchronisation. PMID:26412544

  9. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown reduces testis size and decreases testosterone secretion during pubertal development in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second mammalian isoform of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-II) functions quite differently from the classical form (GnRH-I) as it is a poor stimulator of gonadotropin release. Unlike most species, a functional GnRHR-II has been identified in swine. Our laboratory detected GnRHR-IIs on Leyd...

  10. Gonadotropin-induced puberty does not impair reproductive performance of gilts over three parities.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, O H O; Martins, S M M K; Pinese, M E; Horta, F C; Rosseto, A C; Torres, M A; De Andrade, A F C; Muro, B B D; Marino, C T; Rodrigues, P H M; Moretti, A S

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reproductive performance of three parities of gilts treated or not treated with gonadotropin to induce puberty. Sixty gilts received 600 IU of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) followed by 2.5 mg of porcine luteinizing hormone (LH) 72 h later. Fifty-nine other gilts were exposed only to a mature boar for 15 min twice daily. Artificial insemination (AI) was performed at 0, 12 and 24 h after the detection of oestrus, and gestation was confirmed by ultrasound after 35 days. Sows were inseminated at the first post-weaning oestrus. The total numbers of piglets born, piglets born alive, stillborn, mummified foetuses, as well as pregnancy and farrowing rates were evaluated for each of the three parities. Culling rates, farrowing intervals and weaning-to-oestrous intervals (WEI) were also analysed. Mean age at puberty and oestrous manifestation were not significantly different between treatments (p = 0.0639; 179.20 ± 17.52 compared with 173.96 ± 16.94, 91.66% compared with 94.92%) across the experimental period. However, females that underwent puberty induction showed modest increases both in the number of total pigs born and in the number of piglets born alive. In conclusion, puberty induction through exogenous gonadotropin administration in field conditions did not induce a more concentrated first oestrous manifestation, but trended to a modest increase in the number of pigs born alive in the first parity and a reduced culling rate during the first gestation. PMID:25251704

  11. Effects of prolonging administration gonadotropin on unexpectedly poor ovarian responders undergoing in vitro fertilization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are still some patients who show poor response to ovarian stimulation prior to evidence of normal ovarian reserve in vitro fertilization. However, there are few studies about how to treat the unexpectedly ovarian poor responder in vitro fertilization. The main aim of this study evaluate the effect of prolonging administration follicle-stimulating hormone in woman with the unexpectedly ovarian poor responder in vitro fertilization on implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate. Methods 922 patients subjected to IVF were divided into two groups according to the predicted criterion of ovarian poor response. 116 patients predicted poor response received the short protocol (group C). The others received the long protocol, among the latter, there were 149 patients undergoing unexpectedly ovarian poor response (group B) and 657 patients exhibited normal ovarian response (group A). The doses of gonadotropin, duration of administration, implantation rate, clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate were recorded among three groups. Results The implantation rate of embryo, clinic pregnancy rate and delivery rate are similar between the group A and group B, while there are significant differences between the doses of gonadotropins (35.1 +/- 8.9 ampules vs.53.0 +/- 15.9 ampules) and the duration of administration (15.3 +/- 3.6D vs. 9.8 +/- 2.6D) of these two groups. There are no significant differences about clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate between group B and group C. Conclusion Prolonging administration gonadotropin on the unexpectedly poor ovarian responders does not lower live birth rate in vitro fertilization. PMID:20236519

  12. X-ring Turner's syndrome with combined immunodeficiency and selective gonadotropin defect.

    PubMed

    Donti, E; Nicoletti, I; Venti, G; Filipponi, P; Gerli, R; Spinozzi, F; Cernetti, C; Rambotti, P

    1989-04-01

    A rare association of chromosomal, immunological and endocrine defects is described in a young woman with short stature, recurrent pulmonary infections and primary amenorrhea. Cytogenetic studies showed a 45, X karyotype in 65% of peripheral blood lymphocytes and 46,Xr(X) (p22q27) karyotype in the remaining 35%. Severe immunodeficiency was revealed by phenotypical and functional studies and a selective gonadotropin defect was disclosed by endocrinological investigations. An attempt is made to explain the coexistence of the three abnormal pictures. PMID:2745937

  13. Clinical radioimmunodetection of cancer with radioactive antibodies to human chlorionic gonadotropin

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, D.M.; Kim, E.E.; DeLand, F.H.; Van Nagell, J.R. Jr.; Javadpour, N.

    1980-06-13

    Injection of iodine-131-labeled goat immunoglobulin G antibody to human chlorionic gonadotropin (hCG) into patients with hCG-secreting trophoblastic and germinal tumors permitted tumor detection and location by external gamma-ray scintigraphy. Excision of one of the metastatic tumors located by this method indicated a tumor/nontumor ratio of 39.29. The method appears to offer a new clinical tool for precisely locating hCG-producing tumors in the body, even when tumor identification by other clinical methods has failed.

  14. Gonadotropin hyperstimulation influences the 35S-methionine metabolism of mouse preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Wetzels, A M; Artz, M T; Goverde, H J; Bastiaans, B A; Hamilton, C J; Rolland, R

    1995-11-01

    The effects of gonadotropin stimulation on mouse embryo uptake and incorporation of 35S-methionine were studied. We found that the uptake of 35S-methionine was reduced in embryos of stimulated females in both the two-cell and the blastocyst developmental stage. The incorporation of 35S-methionine into protein was not statistically significantly different between the embryos of stimulated and those of unstimulated females. Qualitatively, protein synthesis was equal in both groups as determined with one-dimensional SDS-PAGE. The results are discussed and we conclude that mouse embryo viability in vivo is decreased by ovarian stimulation. PMID:8624434

  15. [Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia after spontaneous normalization of human chorionic gonadotropin in patient with partial hydatidiform mole].

    PubMed

    Matos, Michelle; Ferraz, Leda; Lopes, Patrícia de Fátima; Lozoya, Consuelo; Amim Junior, Joffre; Rezende-Filho, Jorge; Braga, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    We report here a case of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia after spontaneous normalization of human chorionic gonadotropin in a patient with a partial hydatidiform mole. This is the second occurrence of this event to be reported and the first one with proven immunohistochemical evidence. Besides showing the treatment for this pregnancy complication, this case report discusses the possibility of reducing the duration of post-molar follow-up, as well as strategies for early recognition of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia after spontaneous remission of molar pregnancy. PMID:26247255

  16. Effect of certain toxicants on gonadotropin-induced ovarian non-esterified cholesterol depletion and steroidogenic enzyme stimulation of the common carp Cyprinus carpio in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, D.; Guha, D.; Kumar, V. )

    1992-06-01

    Isolated ovarian tissues from the common carp, Cyprinus carpio were incubated in vitro to obtain a discrete effect of four common toxicants of industrial origin, namely phenol, sulfide, mercuric chloride and cadmium chloride, on gonadotropin-induced alteration of nonesterified and esterified cholesterol and steroidogenic enzymes, delta 5-3 beta-HSD and 17 beta-HSD activity. Stage II ovarian tissue containing 30-40% mature oocytes were shown to be most responsive to gonadotropins in depleting only nonesterified cholesterol moiety and stimulating the activity of both. Safe doses of above mentioned toxicants when added separately to stage II ovarian tissue with oLH (1 microgram/incubation) gonadotropin-induced depletion of nonesterified cholesterol and gonadotropin-induced stimulation of the activity of both enzymes was significantly inhibited. Esterified cholesterol remained almost unaltered. Findings clearly indicate the impairment of gonadotropin induced fish ovarian steroidogenesis by the four toxicants separately.

  17. Immunological characterization and distribution of three GnRH forms in the brain and pituitary gland of chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus).

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Sethu; Kitano, Hajime; Fujinaga, Yoichiro; Amano, Masafumi; Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Shimizu, Akio; Yoneda, Michio; Yamaguchi, Akihiko; Matsuyama, Michiya

    2009-12-01

    The presence of three gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) forms in the brain of the chub mackerel, Scomber japonicus, namely, salmon GnRH (sGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II), and seabream GnRH (sbGnRH), was confirmed by combined high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA). Immunocytochemical localization of the three GnRH forms in the brain was Investigated by using specific antisera, to elucidate possible roles of each GnRH form in reproduction in this species, and double immunolabeling was used to localize GnRH-ir (immunoreactive) fibers Innervating the pituitary. sGnRH-ir neurons were localized in the ventral olfactory bulb and terminal nerve ganglion region. Further, sGnRH-ir fibers were found in different regions of the brain, with prominent fibers running in parallel in the preoptic area (POA) without entering the pituitary. cGnRH-II-ir cell bodies were observed only in the midbrain tegmentum region, with a wide distribution of fibers, which were dense in the midbrain tegmentum and spinal cord. SbGnRH-ir cell bodies were localized in the nucleus preopticus of the POA, with fibers in the olfactory bulb, POA, and hypothalamus. Among the three GnRH forms, only SbGnRH-ir fibers innervated the pituitary gland from the preoptic-hypothalamic region, targeting follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing cells in the proximal pars distalis, as demonstrated by double immunocytochemistry. The localization of the GnRH-ir system was similar in male and female fish. These results demonstrate that multiple GnRH forms exist in the brain of the chub mackerel and suggest that they serve different functions, with SbGnRH having a significant role in reproduction in stimulating FSH- and LH-producing cells, and sGnRH and cGnRH-II serving as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators. PMID:19968470

  18. Identification of members of the Wnt signaling pathway in the embryonic pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Douglas, K R; Brinkmeier, M L; Kennell, J A; Eswara, P; Harrison, T A; Patrianakos, A I; Sprecher, B S; Potok, M A; Lyons, R H; MacDougald, O A; Camper, S A

    2001-11-01

    Prop1 is one of several transcription factors important for the development of the pituitary gland. Downstream targets of PROP1 and other critical pituitary transcription factors remain largely unknown. We have generated a partial expression profile of the developing pituitary gland containing over 350 transcripts, using cDNA subtractive hybridization between Prop1(df/df) and wild-type embryonic pituitary gland primordia. Numerous classes of genes including transcription factors, membrane associated molecules, and cell cycle regulators were identified in this study. Of the transcripts, 34% do not have sequence similarity to known genes, but are similar to ESTs, and 4% represent novel sequences. Pituitary gland expression of a number of clones was verified using in situ hybridization. Several members of the Wnt signaling pathway were identified in the developing pituitary gland. The frizzled2 receptor, Apc, beta-catenin, groucho, and a novel isoform of TCF4 (officially named Tcf7l2) were identified in developing pituitary libraries. Three N-terminal alternatively spliced Tcf7l2 isoforms are reported here, each of which lacks a DNA-binding domain. Functional studies indicate that these isoforms can act as endogenous inhibitors of Wnt signaling in some contexts. This is the first report of Tcf7l2 and Fzd2 expression in the developing pituitary. These molecules may be important in mediating Wnt signaling during pituitary ontogeny. We expect other transcripts from these libraries to be involved in pituitary gland development. PMID:11845287

  19. Pituitary apoplexy presenting as isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis : two case reports.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Jin; Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Tae-Sun; Seo, Bo-Ra

    2009-02-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome caused by an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic vascular accident involving a pituitary adenoma or an adjacent pituitary gland. Pituitary apoplexy may be associated with a variety of neurological and endocrinological signs and symptoms. However, isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis as the presenting sign of pituitary apoplexy is very rare. We describe two cases of pituitary apoplexy presenting as sudden-onset unilateral ptosis and diplopia. In one case, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the pituitary fossa with signs of hemorrhage, upward displacement of the optic chiasm, erosion of the sellar floor and invasion of the right cavernous sinus. In the other case, MRI showed a large area of insufficient enhancement in the anterior pituitary consistent with pituitary infarction or Sheehan's syndrome. We performed neurosurgical decompression via a transsphenoidal approach. Both patients showed an uneventful recovery. Both cases of isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis completely resolved during the early postoperative period. We suggest that pituitary apoplexy should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis and that prompt neurosurgical decompression should be considered for the preservation of third cranial nerve function. PMID:19274125

  20. Pituitary Tumors in Childhood: an update in their diagnosis, treatment and molecular genetics

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Margaret F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are rare in childhood and adolescence, with a reported prevalence of up to 1 per million children. Only 2 - 6% of surgically treated pituitary tumors occur in children. Although pituitary tumors in children are almost never malignant and hormonal secretion is rare, these tumors may result in significant morbidity. Tumors within the pituitary fossa are of two types mainly, craniopharyngiomas and adenomas; craniopharyngiomas cause symptoms by compressing normal pituitary, causing hormonal deficiencies and producing mass effects on surrounding tissues and the brain; adenomas produce a variety of hormonal conditions such as hyperprolactinemia, Cushing disease and acromegaly or gigantism. Little is known about the genetic causes of sporadic lesions, which comprise the majority of pituitary tumors, but in children, more frequently than in adults, pituitary tumors may be a manifestation of genetic conditions such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1), Carney complex, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA), and McCune-Albright syndrome. The study of pituitary tumorigenesis in the context of these genetic syndromes has advanced our knowledge of the molecular basis of pituitary tumors and may lead to new therapeutic developments. PMID:18416659

  1. Effects of daidzein on messenger ribonucleic Acid expression of gonadotropin receptors in chicken ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Liu, H Y; Zhang, C Q

    2008-03-01

    Effects of daidzein on expression of mRNA of gonadotropin receptors [follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR)] were evaluated in ovarian follicles of ISA laying hens that were 13 mo old in the postpeak period of egg laying. The hens were randomly allocated as control and daidzein-treated groups, with daidzein supplemented to the basal diet at the level of 10 mg/kg for 7 wk. The granulosa layers of preovulatory follicles (F1, F2, F3, F4, F5) and follicular layers of the small yellow follicle (SYF), large white follicle (LWF), and atretic follicle were collected. The mRNA expression of related genes was measured by semiquantitative reverse transcription PCR. Results showed that daidzein significantly increased the egg-laying rate (P < 0.05) and the number of SYF and LWF (P < 0.05). The relative abundance of the FSHR mRNA decreased in the granulosa layers from F5 to F1, but LHR mRNA displayed the opposite trend in developmental changes. Treatment with daidzein resulted in increased expression of FSHR mRNA in LWF, SYF, and granulosa layers of F4 to F2 and LHR mRNA in granulosa layers of F4 and F1 (P < 0.05). These results indicated that dietary supplementation of daidzein upregulated mRNA expression of gonadotropin receptors to improve follicle development in chicken developing follicles and laying performance after the peak laying period. PMID:18281582

  2. Multifollicular ovaries: clinical and endocrine features and response to pulsatile gonadotropin releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Franks, S; Polson, D W; Mason, H D; Abdulwahid, N; Tucker, M; Morris, D V; Price, J; Jacobs, H S

    By means of pelvic ultrasonography, a multifollicular ovarian appearance was observed in women with weight-loss-related amenorrhoea. Multifollicular ovaries (MFO) are normal in size or slightly enlarged and filled by six or more cysts 4-10 mm in diameter; in contrast to women with polycystic ovaries (PCO), stroma is not increased. Unlike PCO patients, women with MFO were not hirsute and serum concentrations of luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone were normal and decreased, respectively. The uterus was small indicating oestrogen deficiency. In MFO, treatment with gonadotropin releasing hormone (LHRH) induced ovulation in 83% of cycles and there were seven pregnancies in 8 women; in PCO, only 40% of cycles were ovulatory and there were eleven pregnancies (8 women) but six of these aborted. In MFO ovarian morphology reverted to normal in ovulatory cycles, whereas in PCO the polycystic pattern persisted despite the presence of a dominant follicle. MFO may represent a normal ovarian response to weight-related hypothalamic disturbance of gonadotropin control. PMID:2867389

  3. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone modulates cholesterol synthesis and steroidogenesis in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Fabiana; Sturli, Niccolò; Cungi, Maria Chiara; Morello, Matteo; Villanelli, Fabio; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Finocchi, Claudia; Peri, Alessandro; Serio, Mario; Danza, Giovanna

    2011-04-01

    Neurosteroids are involved in Central Nervous System development, brain functionality and neuroprotection but little is known about regulators of their biosynthesis. Recently gonadotropins, Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) and their receptors have been localized in different brain regions, such as hippocampus and cortex. Using human neuronal-like cells we found that GnRH up-regulates the expression of key genes of cholesterol and steroid synthesis when used in a narrow range around 1.0 nM. The expression of Hydroxysterol D24-reductase (seladin-1/DHCR24), that catalyzes the last step of cholesterol biosynthesis, is increased by 50% after 90 min of incubation with GnRH. StAR protein and P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) are up-regulated by 3.3 times after 90 min and by 3.5 times after 3 h, respectively. GnRH action is mediated by LH and 1.0 nM GnRH enhances the expression of LHβ as well. A two fold increase of cell cholesterol is induced after 90 min of GnRH incubation and 17β-estradiol (E2) production is increased after 24, 48 and 72 h. These data indicate for the first time that GnRH regulates both cholesterol and steroid biosynthesis in human neuronal-like cells and suggest a new physiological role for GnRH in the brain. PMID:21296663

  4. Prokaryotic adenylate cyclase toxin stimulates anterior pituitary cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, M.J.; Evans, W.S.; Rogol, A.D.; Weiss, A.A.; Thorner, M.O.; Orth, D.N.; Nicholson, W.E.; Yasumoto, T.; Hewlett, E.L.

    1986-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis synthesis a variety of virulence factors including a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin. Treatment of anterior pituitary cells with this AC toxin resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels that was associated with accelerated exocytosis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). The kinetics of release of these hormones, however, were markedly different; GH and prolactin were rapidly released, while LH and ACTH secretion was more gradually elevated. Neither dopamine agonists nor somatostatin changes the ability of AC toxin to generate cAMP (up to 2 h). Low concentrations of AC toxin amplified the secretory response to hypophysiotrophic hormones. The authors conclude that bacterial AC toxin can rapidly elevate cAMP levels in anterior pituitary cells and that it is the response that explains the subsequent acceleration of hormone release.

  5. Primary pituitary abscess in an adolescent boy: a rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Samik; Acharyya, Saugata; Acharyya, Kakoli

    2012-01-01

    Primary pituitary abscess is a rare clinical condition at a young age. It is characterised by atypical clinical features which makes the diagnosis difficult. Correct diagnosis and therapy are mandatory due to the potentially lethal outcome. We report the case of a 14–year-old healthy boy. The onset was acute with fever, gait imbalance, slurring of speech and amnesia. MRI brain revealed a hyperintense lesion in T2-weighted image (T2WI) in sellar and suprasellar region, which was hypointense in T1WI. After administration of contrast, there was peripheral rim enhancement suggesting pituitary abscess. The diagnosis was confirmed following evacuation of purulent material, during surgery, through a trans-sphenoidal approach. Postoperatively, the boy needed prolonged intensive care support. He was discharged on day 42 after surgery. Follow-up at 3 months revealed complete motor recovery. He required hormone replacement and was intermittently showing features suggestive of frontal lobe syndrome. PMID:23257693

  6. Pituitary adenomas: historical perspective, surgical management and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Theodros, Debebe; Patel, Mira; Ruzevick, Jacob; Lim, Michael; Bettegowda, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are among the most common central nervous system tumors. They represent a diverse group of neoplasms that may or may not secrete hormones based on their cell of origin. Epidemiologic studies have documented the incidence of pituitary adenomas within the general population to be as high as 16.7%. A growing body of work has helped to elucidate the pathogenesis of these tumors. Each subtype has been shown to demonstrate unique cellular changes potentially leading to tumorigenesis. Surgical advancements over several decades have included microsurgery and the employment of the endoscope for surgical resection. These advancements increase the likelihood of gross-total resection and have resulted in decreased patient morbidity. PMID:26497533

  7. Separation of cells from the rat anterior pituitary gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Hatfield, J. Michael

    1983-01-01

    Various techniques for separating the hormone-producing cell types from the rat anterior pituitary gland are examined. The purity, viability, and responsiveness of the separated cells depend on the physiological state of the donor, the tissue dissociation procedures, the staining technique used for identification of cell type, and the cell separation technique. The chamber-gradient setup and operation, the characteristics of the gradient materials, and the separated cell analysis of velocity sedimentation techniques (in particular Staput and Celsep) are described. Consideration is given to the various types of materials used in density gradient centrifugation and the operation of a gradient generating device. The use of electrophoresis to separate rat pituitary cells is discussed.

  8. Sustained remission of Cushing's disease with mitotane and pituitary irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schteingart, D.E.; Tsao, H.S.; Taylor, C.I.; McKenzie, A.; Victoria, R.; Therrien, B.A.

    1980-05-01

    Low doses of mitotane were given orally to 36 patients with Cushing's disease, concurrently with or after pituitary cobalt irradiation. Clinical and biochemical remission occurred in 29. The response to treatment occurred early in 17 patients and late in 12. The different pattern of response to mitotane was not related to the dose given or to its serum level. Early biochemical indicators of adrenal suppression with mitotane were a sharp decrease in adrenal response to the infusion of ACTH and in plasma levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Although mitotane was given together with pituitary irradiation, initial remission was due mainly to the adrenal effect of mitotane. Plasma ACTH levels were still elevated when cortisol had returned to normal. In seventeen of the 29 patients who responded to treatment drug therapy has been discontinued, and they remain in remission of Cushing's syndrome. Side-effects have been dose dependent, with anorexia, nausea, decreased memory, and gynecomastia in men being the commonest.

  9. Gonadal steroid hormones and the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Handa, Robert J; Weiser, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis represents a complex neuroendocrine feedback loop controlling the secretion of adrenal glucocorticoid hormones. Central to its function is the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) where neurons expressing corticotropin releasing factor reside. These HPA motor neurons are a primary site of integration leading to graded endocrine responses to physical and psychological stressors. An important regulatory factor that must be considered, prior to generating an appropriate response is the animal's reproductive status. Thus, PVN neurons express androgen and estrogen receptors and receive input from sites that also express these receptors. Consequently, changes in reproduction and gonadal steroid levels modulate the stress response and this underlies sex differences in HPA axis function. This review examines the make up of the HPA axis and hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and the interactions between the two that should be considered when exploring normal and pathological responses to environmental stressors. PMID:24246855

  10. Transsphenoidal pituitary resection with intraoperative MR guidance: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergolizzi, Richard S., Jr.; Schwartz, Richard B.; Hsu, Liangge; Wong, Terence Z.; Black, Peter M.; Martin, Claudia; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    1999-05-01

    The use of intraoperative MR image guidance has the potential to improve the precision, extent and safety of transsphenoidal pituitary resections. At Brigham and Women's Hospital, an open-bore configuration 0.5T MR system (SIGNA SP, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) has been used to provide image guidance for nine transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resections. The intraoperative MR system allowed the radiologist to direct the surgeon toward the sella turcica successfully while avoiding the cavernous sinus, optic chiasm and other sensitive structures. Imaging performed during the surgery monitored the extent of resection and allowed for removal of tumor beyond the surgeon's view in five cases. Dynamic MR imaging was used to distinguish residual tumor from normal gland and postoperative changes permitting more precise tumor localization. A heme-sensitive long TE gradient echo sequence was used to evaluate for the presence of hemorrhagic debris. All patients tolerated the procedure well without significant complications.

  11. Recurrent sterile meningitis caused by a pituitary abscess.

    PubMed

    Ford, J; Torres, L F; Cox, T; Hayward, R

    1986-10-01

    The case of a 21 year old woman who presented with recurrent sterile meningitis and bitemporal hemianopia is described. Computed tomographic scan showed a large low density ring enhancing lesion above and within the pituitary fossa which at operation and on histological examination was found to be compatible with an abscess. The visual field defect recovered completely and the scan appearances returned to normal postoperatively. PMID:3774724

  12. Flow cytometric immunofluorescence of rat anterior pituitary cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. Michael; Hymer, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    A flow cytometric immunofluorescence technique was developed for the quantification of growth hormone, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone producing cells. The procedure is based on indirect-immunofluorescence of intracellular hormone using an EPICS V cell sorter and can objectively count 50,000 cells in about 3 minutes. It can be used to study the dynamics of pituitary cell populations under various physiological and pharmacological conditions.

  13. Pulsatility of Hypothalamo-Pituitary Hormones: A Challenge in Quantification.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Daniel M; Veldhuis, Johannes D

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine systems control many of the most fundamental physiological processes, e.g., reproduction, growth, adaptations to stress, and metabolism. Each such system involves the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and a specific target gland or organ. In the quantification of the interactions among these components, biostatistical modeling has played an important role. In the present article, five key challenges to an understanding of the interactions of these systems are illustrated and discussed critically. PMID:26674550

  14. Co-existent eosinophilic gastroenteritis and hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Haeney, M. R.; Wilson, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    A case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 42-year-old man is described. The patient had diarrhoea, faecal blood loss, a protein-losing enteropathy, malabsorption of fat, xylose and vitamin B12. Co-existent hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus and hypothalamic dysfunction was demonstrated. Complete clinical recovery occurred with pituitary replacement therapy alone. The association of this endocrine abnormality with the picture of eosinophilic gastroenteritis has not previously been described. Images Fig. 1 PMID:882484

  15. Physiology of the Hypothalamic Pituitary Gonadal Axis in the Male.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Patricia Freitas; Corradi, Renato B; Greene, Loren Wissner

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone synthesis and male fertility are the results of the perfect coordination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. A negative feedback finely controls the secretion of hormones at the 3 levels. Congenital or acquired disturbance at any level leads to an impairment of reproductive function and the clinical syndrome of hypogonadism. In some cases, this condition is reversible. Once the diagnosis is made, testosterone replacement therapy is the standard therapy; however, novel therapies may improve spermatogenesis while elevating testosterone levels. PMID:27132572

  16. Feeding Frequency Affects Cultured Rat Pituitary Cells in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Salada, T.; Cenci, R.; Krishnan, K.; Mukai, C.; Nagaoka, S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, we describe the results of a rat pituitary cell culture experiment done on STS-65 in which the effect of cell feeding on the release of the six anterior pituitary hormones was studied. We found complex microgravity related interactions between the frequency of cell feeding and the quantity and quality (i.e. biological activity) of some of the six hormones released in flight. Analyses of growth hormone (GH) released from cells into culture media on different mission days using gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography yielded qualitatively similar results between ground and flight samples. Lack of cell feeding resulted in extensive cell clumping in flight (but not ground) cultures. Vigorous fibroblast growth occurred in both ground and flight cultures fed 4 times. These results are interpreted within the context of autocrine and or paracrine feedback interactions. Finally the payload specialist successfully prepared a fresh trypsin solution in microgravity, detached the cells from their surface and reinserted them back into the culture chamber. These cells reattached and continued to release hormone in microgravity. In summary, this experiment shows that pituitary cells are microgravity sensitive and that coupled operations routinely associated with laboratory cel1 culture can also be accomplished in low gravity.

  17. Dense calcification in a GH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ramez; Kalhan, Atul; Lammie, Alistair; Kotonya, Christine; Nannapanenni, Ravindra; Rees, Aled

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 30-year-old female presented with a history of secondary amenorrhoea, acromegalic features and progressive visual deterioration. She had elevated serum IGF1 levels and unsuppressed GH levels after an oral glucose tolerance test. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heterogeneously enhancing space-occupying lesion with atypical extensive calcification within the sellar and suprasellar areas. Owing to the extent of calcification, the tumour was a surgical challenge. Postoperatively, there was clinical, radiological and biochemical evidence of residual disease, which required treatment with a somatostatin analogue and radiotherapy. Mutational analysis of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene was negative. This case confirms the relatively rare occurrence of calcification within a pituitary macroadenoma and its associated management problems. The presentation, biochemical, radiological and pathological findings are discussed in the context of the relevant literature. Learning points Calcification of pituitary tumours is relatively rare.Recognising calcification in pituitary adenomas on preoperative imaging is important in surgical decision-making.Gross total resection can be difficult to achieve in the presence of extensive calcification and dictates further management and follow-up to achieve disease control. PMID:24683483

  18. Management of clinically non-functioning pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Raverot, Gerald; Castinetti, Frédéric; Cortet-Rudelli, Christine; Galland, Françoise; Salenave, Sylvie

    2015-07-01

    Clinically NFPA is currently the preferred term for designing all the pituitary adenomas which are not hormonally active (in other words, not associated with clinical syndromes such as amenorrhea-galactorrhea in the context of prolactinomas, acromegaly, Cushing's disease or hyperthyroidism secondary to TSH-secreting adenomas). They account for 15-30% of pituitary adenomas. Diagnosis is usually made either in the context of mass effect due to a macroadenoma or, increasingly, fortuitously during imaging performed for some unrelated purpose; the latter case is known as pituitary incidentaloma. Surgery is indisputably indicated in case of tumoral syndrome, but other aspects of NFPA (hormonal work-up, follow-up, and especially postoperative follow-up, management of remnant or recurrence, the special case of incidentaloma, or apoplexy) remain controversial. The French Endocrinology Society (SFE) therefore set up an expert working group of endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, ophthalmologists, neuroradiologists, pathologists and biologists to draw up guidelines, at the 2012 SFE Congress in Toulouse, France. The present article presents the guidelines suggested by this group of French-speaking experts. PMID:26072284

  19. Human Pituitary Adenoma Proteomics: New Progresses and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xianquan; Wang, Xiaowei; Cheng, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenoma (PA) is a common intracranial neoplasm that impacts on human health through interfering hypothalamus-pituitary-target organ axis systems. The development of proteomics gives great promises in the clarification of molecular mechanisms of a PA and discovery of effective biomarkers for prediction, prevention, early-stage diagnosis, and treatment for a PA. A great progress in the field of PA proteomics has been made in the past 10 years, including (i) the use of laser-capture microdissection, (ii) proteomics analyses of functional PAs (such as prolactinoma), invasive and non-invasive non-functional pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and tyrosine nitration, NFPA heterogeneity, and hormone isoforms, (iii) the use of protein antibody array, (iv) serum proteomics and peptidomics, (v) the integration of proteomics and other omics data, and (vi) the proposal of multi-parameter systematic strategy for a PA. This review will summarize these progresses of proteomics in PAs, point out the existing drawbacks, propose the future research directions, and address the clinical relevance of PA proteomics data, in order to achieve our long-term goal that is use of proteomics to clarify molecular mechanisms, construct molecular networks, and discover effective biomarkers. PMID:27303365

  20. Clinical Impact of the Current WHO Classification of Pituitary Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Saeger, W; Honegger, J; Theodoropoulou, M; Knappe, U J; Schöfl, C; Petersenn, S; Buslei, R

    2016-06-01

    WHO classifications should be used for comparing the results from different groups of pathologist and clinicians by standardized histopathological methods. Our present report describes the important parameters of pituitary adenoma pathology as demand of the WHO classification for correlation to endocrine data and prognosis. The combination of HE stain based structures with immunostainings for pituitary hormones allows subclassification of adenomas as the best method not only for correlations to clinical hyperfunctions but also for statements to the sensitivity of drug therapies (somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists). GH-, PRL- and ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas are further classified based on the size and number of their secretory granules by electron microscopy, or as is mostly the case nowadays by cytokeratin staining pattern, into densely and sparsely granulated. Granulation pattern may be considered for the prediction of treatment response in patients with GH-secreting adenomas, since the sparsely granulated subtype was shown to be less responsive to somatostatin analog treatment. For prognosis, it is important to identify aggressive adenomas by measurements of the Ki-67 index, of the number of mitoses, and of nuclear expression of p53. Among the criteria for atypical adenomas, high Ki-67 labeling index and invasive character are the most important adverse prognostic factors. Promising molecular markers have been identified that might supplement the currently used proliferation parameters. For defining atypical adenomas in a future histopathological classification system, we propose to provide the proliferative potential and the invasive character separately. PMID:26860936

  1. Cushing Disease After Treatment of Nonfunctional Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hongjuan; Tian, Rui; Wu, Huanwen; Xu, Jian; Fan, Hong; Zhou, Jian; Zhong, Liyong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We describe a very rare case of nonfunctional pituitary adenoma (NFPA) that exhibited corticotrophic activity after resection and radiotherapy. The possible mechanisms of the transformation from NFPA to Cushing disease (CD) are discussed. A 43-year-old man presented with impaired vision, bilateral frontal headaches, and hyposexuality. He had no symptoms suggestive of hypercortisolism, and 8 am plasma cortisol concentration was 67.88 ng/mL. Brain imaging revealed a 15 × 15 × 21-mm sellar mass suggestive of a macroadenoma. The tumor was resected by transsphenoidal surgery and identified by immunohistochemical analysis as a chromophobic adenoma that did not stain for pituitary hormones. The patient was treated with prednisone and levothyroxine replacement therapy. After a third recurrence, the patient presented with clinical features and physical signs of Cushing syndrome. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol concentrations were elevated, and there was a loss of circadian rhythms. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling after desmopressin showed the central–peripheral ACTH ratio was greater than 3:1. A repeat transsphenoidal resection was undertaken. Immunohistochemistry revealed ACTH positivity. Three months following surgery, imaging showed little residual tumor, but plasma ACTH remained elevated. He was referred for postoperative Gamma Knife radiotherapy. The immunological activity and biological features of the hormones secreted from a pituitary adenoma vary with time. Because long-term outcomes are unpredictable, postoperative follow-up is essential to detect postoperative transformation from NFPA to CD. PMID:26705201

  2. Effect of cancer treatment on hypothalamic-pituitary function.

    PubMed

    Crowne, Elizabeth; Gleeson, Helena; Benghiat, Helen; Sanghera, Paul; Toogood, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    The past 30 years have seen a great improvement in survival of children and young adults treated for cancer. Cancer treatment can put patients at risk of health problems that can develop many years later, most commonly affecting the endocrine system. Patients treated with cranial radiotherapy often develop dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. A characteristic pattern of hormone deficiencies develops over several years. Growth hormone is disrupted most often, followed by gonadal, adrenal, and thyroid hormones, leading to abnormal growth and puberty in children, and affecting general wellbeing and fertility in adults. The severity and rate of development of hypopituitarism is determined by the dose of radiotherapy delivered to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Individual growth hormone deficiencies can develop after a dose as low as 10 Gy, whereas multiple hormone deficiencies are common after 60 Gy. New techniques in radiotherapy aim to reduce the effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis by minimising the dose received. Patients taking cytotoxic drugs do not often develop overt hypopituitarism, although the effect of radiotherapy might be enhanced. The exception is adrenal insufficiency caused by glucocorticosteroids which, although transient, can be life-threatening. New biological drugs to treat cancer can cause autoimmune hypophysitis and hypopituitarism; therefore, oncologists and endocrinologists should be vigilant and work together to optimise patient outcomes. PMID:25873572

  3. Optic nerve hypoplasia: septo-optic-pituitary dysplasia syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Acers, T E

    1981-01-01

    Forty-five patients with the common clinical factor of optic nerve hypoplasia are analyzed regarding their clinical appearance, echographic and computed tomographic measurements of the optic nerves, and the correlation of anatomic size with visual function. Computed axial tomographic studies of the midline brain were performed on all 45 patients to determine the incidence of correlated structural defects, especially the septum pellucidum, and neuroendocrine dysfunction. Review of the spectrum of septo-optic-pituitary syndrome is separately developed to include historical background, embryogenesis, histopathology, and pathogenesis of the three major components of the syndrome. In summary, 45 patients had optic nerve hypoplasia, 32 with evidence of segmental or partial hypoplasia and 13 with evidence of complete or diffuse hypoplasia--the optic nerve hypoplasia syndrome. Twelve of these patients demonstrated absence of the septum pellucidum by computed axial tomography--the septo-optic dysplasia syndrome. Of these 12 patients with partial or complete absence of the septum pellucidum, six demonstrated evidence of pituitary hypofunction--the septo-optic-pituitary dysplasia syndrome. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 a FIGURE 3 b FIGURE 4 a FIGURE 4 b FIGURE 4 c FIGURE 4 d PMID:7043865

  4. Concurrent somatotroph and plurihormonal pituitary adenomas in a cat.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Mellora; FitzGerald, Louise; Kiupel, Matti

    2013-10-01

    An 8-year-old, male neutered, domestic longhair cat was referred for investigation of insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus. Routine haematology, serum biochemistry, urinalysis (including culture), total T4 and urine creatinine:cortisol ratio were unremarkable, but markedly increased insulin-like growth factor-1 concentration was identified and a pituitary mass was subsequently documented. The cat was treated conservatively with the dopamine agonist L-deprenyl and was re-presented 16 months later for worsening polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, marked lumbar muscle atrophy, development of a pendulous abdomen and marked thinning of the abdominal skin. Hyperadrenocorticism was diagnosed based on abdominal ultrasonography, dexamethasone suppression testing and endogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). The cat was treated with trilostane (30 mg q24h PO) and showed some clinical improvement, but developed an opportunistic fungal infection and skin fragility syndrome 4.5 months after commencing treatment, and was euthanased. A double-pituitary adenoma comprising a discrete somatotroph adenoma and a separate plurihormonal adenoma (positive immunoreactivity for ACTH, melanocyte-stimulating hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone) was identified on post-mortem examination. These two pituitary adenomas were suspected to have arisen as independent neoplastic entities with the plurihormonal tumour either being clinically silent at the initial presentation or having developed over the subsequent 16 months. PMID:23553410

  5. Electrophoretic separation of kidney and pituitary cells on STS-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Barlow, G. H.; Cleveland, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Farrington, M. A.; Hatfield, J. M.; Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Wilfinger, W.; Grindeland, R.; Lewis, M. L.

    A Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System (CFES) was used on Space Shuttle flight STS-8 to separate specific secretory cells from suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic kidney cells and rat pituitary cells. The objectives were to isolate the subfractions of kidney cells that produce the largest amounts of urokinase (plasminogen activator), and to isolate the subfractions of rat pituitary cells that secrete growth hormone, prolactin, and other hormones. Kidney cells were separated into more than 32 fractions in each of two electrophoretic runs. Electrophoretic mobility distributions in flight experiments were spread more than the ground controls. Multiple assay methods confirmed that all cultured kidney cell fractions produced some urokinase, and five to six fractions produced significantly more urokinase than the other fractions. Several fractions also produced tissue plasminogen activator. The pituitary cells were separated into 48 fractions in each of the two electrophoretic runs, and the amounts of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) released into the medium for each cell fraction were determined. Cell fractions were grouped into eight mobility classes and immunocytochemically assayed for the presence of GH, PRL, ACTH, LH, TSH, and FSH. The patterns of hormone distribution indicate that the specialized cells producing GH and PRL are isolatable due to the differences in electrophoretic mobilities.

  6. Clinicopathologic analysis of pituitary adenoma: a single institute experience.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hwa Jin; Kim, Hanna; Kwak, Yoon Jin; Seo, Jeong Wook; Paek, Sun Ha; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Yun, Jung Min; Kim, Da Seu Ran; Kang, Peter; Park, Peom; Park, Sung-Hye

    2014-03-01

    Pituitary adenoma (PA) is a common benign neuroendocrine tumor; however, the incidence and proportion of hormone-producing PAs in Korean patients remain unknown. Authors analyzed 506 surgically resected and pathologically proven pituitary lesions of the Seoul National University Hospital from 2006 to 2011. The lesions were categorized as: PAs (n = 422, 83.4%), Rathke's cleft cysts (RCCs) (n = 54, 10.6%), inflammatory lesions (n = 8, 1.6%), meningiomas (n = 4), craniopharyngiomas (n = 4), granular cell tumors (n = 1), metastatic renal cell carcinomas (n = 2), germinomas (n = 1), ependymomas (n = 1), and unsatisfactory specimens (n = 9, 1.8%). PAs were slightly more prevalent in women (M: F = 1:1.17) with a mean age of 48.8 yr (9-80 yr). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that prolactin-producing PAs (16.6%) and growth hormone-producing adenomas (9.2%) were the most common functional PAs. Plurihormonal PAs and nonfunctioning (null cell) adenomas were found in 14.9% and 42.4% of patients with PAs, respectively. The recurrence rate of PAs was 11.1%, but nearly 0% for the remaining benign lesions such as RCCs. 25.4% of patients with PAs were treated by gamma-knife after surgery due to residual tumors or regrowth of residual tumor. In conclusion, the pituitary lesions and the proportions of hormone-producing PAs in Korean patients are similar to those of previous reports except nonfunctioning (null cell) PAs, which are unusually frequent. PMID:24616591

  7. Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Amlashi, Fatemeh G; Tritos, Nicholas A

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate secretion of TSH was first described in 1960 in a patient with evidence of hyperthyroidism and expanded sella on imaging. It was later found that a type of pituitary adenoma that secretes TSH (thyrotropinoma) was the underlying cause. The objective of the present review article is to summarize data on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of thyrotropinomas. The prevalence of thyrotropinomas is lower than that of other pituitary adenomas. Early diagnosis is now possible thanks to the availability of magnetic resonance imaging and sensitive laboratory assays. As a corollary, many patients now present earlier in the course of their disease and have smaller tumors at the time of diagnosis. Treatment also has evolved over time. Transsphenoidal surgery is still considered definitive therapy. Meanwhile, radiation therapy, including radiosurgery, is effective in achieving tumor control in the majority of patients. In the past, radiation therapy was used as second line treatment in patients with residual or recurrent tumor after surgery. However, the availability of somatostatin analogs, which can lead to normalization of thyroid function as well as shrink these tumors, has led to an increase in the role of medical therapy in patients who are not in remission after pituitary surgery. In addition, dopamine agonists have shown some efficacy in the management of these tumors. Better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of thyrotropinomas may lead to rationally designed therapies for patients with thyrotropinomas. PMID:26792794

  8. Ion Channels and Signaling in the Pituitary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Tabak, Joël; Bertram, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Endocrine pituitary cells are neuronlike; they express numerous voltage-gated sodium, calcium, potassium, and chloride channels and fire action potentials spontaneously, accompanied by a rise in intracellular calcium. In some cells, spontaneous electrical activity is sufficient to drive the intracellular calcium concentration above the threshold for stimulus-secretion and stimulus-transcription coupling. In others, the function of these action potentials is to maintain the cells in a responsive state with cytosolic calcium near, but below, the threshold level. Some pituitary cells also express gap junction channels, which could be used for intercellular Ca2+ signaling in these cells. Endocrine cells also express extracellular ligand-gated ion channels, and their activation by hypothalamic and intrapituitary hormones leads to amplification of the pacemaking activity and facilitation of calcium influx and hormone release. These cells also express numerous G protein-coupled receptors, which can stimulate or silence electrical activity and action potential-dependent calcium influx and hormone release. Other members of this receptor family can activate calcium channels in the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to a cell type-specific modulation of electrical activity. This review summarizes recent findings in this field and our current understanding of the complex relationship between voltage-gated ion channels, ligand-gated ion channels, gap junction channels, and G protein-coupled receptors in pituitary cells. PMID:20650859

  9. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in the songbird hippocampus: regional and sex differences in adult zebra finches.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Nicolette; Ferris, Jennifer K; Arckens, Lutgarde; Bentley, George E; Soma, Kiran K

    2013-08-01

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) are vital to reproduction in all vertebrates. These neuropeptides are also present outside of the hypothalamus, but the roles of extra-hypothalamic GnRH and GnIH remain enigmatic and widely underappreciated. We used immunohistochemistry and PCR to examine whether multiple forms of GnRH (chicken GnRH-I (GnRH1), chicken GnRH-II (GnRH2) and lamprey GnRH-III (GnRH4)) and GnIH are present in the hippocampus (Hp) of adult zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Using immunohistochemistry, we provide evidence that GnRH1, GnRH2 and GnRH4 are present in hippocampal cell bodies and/or fibers and that GnIH is present in hippocampal fibers only. There are regional differences in hippocampal GnRH immunoreactivity, and these vary across the different forms of GnRH. There are also sex differences in hippocampal GnRH immunoreactivity, with generally more GnRH1 and GnRH2 in the female Hp. In addition, we used PCR to examine the presence of GnRH1 mRNA and GnIH mRNA in micropunches of Hp. PCR and subsequent product sequencing demonstrated the presence of GnRH1 mRNA and the absence of GnIH mRNA in the Hp, consistent with the pattern of immunohistochemical results. To our knowledge, this is the first study in any species to systematically examine multiple forms of GnRH in the Hp or to quantify sex or regional differences in hippocampal GnRH. Moreover, this is the first demonstration of GnIH in the avian Hp. These data shed light on an important issue: the sites of action and possible functions of GnRH and GnIH outside of the HPG axis. PMID:23727031

  10. An acute adrenal insufficiency revealing pituitary metastases of lung cancer in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Marmouch, Hela; Arfa, Sondes; Mohamed, Saoussen Cheikh; Slim, Tensim; Khochtali, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Metastases of solid tumors to the pituitary gland are often asymptomatic or appereas as with diabetes insipid us. Pituitary metastases more commonly affect the posterior lobe and the infundibulum than the anterior lobe. The presentation with an acute adrenal insufficiency is a rare event. A 69-year-old men presented with vomiting, low blood pressure and hypoglycemia. Hormonal exploration confirmed a hypopituitarism. Appropriate therapy was initiated urgently. The hypothalamic-pituitary MRI showed a pituitary hypertrophy, a nodular thickening of the pituitary stalk. The chest X Rays revealed pulmonary opacity. Computed tomography scan of the chest showed a multiples tumors with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Bronchoscopy and biopsy demonstrated a pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Hence we concluded to a lung cancer with multiple pituitary and adrenal gland metastases. This case emphasizes the need for an etiological investigation of acute adrenal insufficiency after treatment of acute phase. PMID:27200139

  11. [Pituitary abscess. Study of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Grosskopf, D; Chamouard, J M; Bosquet, F; Billet, R; Poisson, M; Buge, A

    1987-01-01

    The authors report one case of pituitary abscess; the diagnosis of which was particularly difficult due to its association to a multiple sclerosis that began twelve years before. A review of thirty-one pituitary abscess reported in the literature from 1970 to 1985 is made. Opto-chiasmatic compression is observed in fifty-five per cent of the cases, pituitary insufficiency in fifty-five per cent, and meningitis in sixty per cent of the cases. Although the characteristic association of meningitis and pituitary tumor symptoms occur in thirty per cent of the cases, the diagnosis is made at surgery. Pituitary adenoma and craniopharyngioma were the most frequent preoperative misdiagnosis for pituitary abscess. The extended use of cerebral C.T. Scan will allow an easier recognition of this rare entity. The discussion includes life and visual prognosis. The etiology remains unexplained in nearly half of the cases. PMID:3614500

  12. Sporadic Hemangioblastoma in the Pituitary Stalk: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun-Ill; Kim, Jae-Min; Choi, Kyu-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Hemangioblastomas in the pituitary stalk are especially rare. Most pituitary stalk hemangioblastomas reported in the literature were associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Here, we report only the 3rd case of sporadic pituitary stalk hemangioblastoma diagnosed in a 60-year-old woman. Despite the danger of potential complications due to excessive vascularity or proximity to important neural structures, the tumor in our case was successfully removed while preserving pituitary function. In this case, complete surgical excision was shown to be an effective treatment option for symptomatic pituitary stalk hemangioblastoma, and we suggest careful evaluation of any highly enhancing mass with a signal void in the pituitary stalk preoperatively, even if no VHL disease is evident. PMID:26180617

  13. An acute adrenal insufficiency revealing pituitary metastases of lung cancer in an elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Marmouch, Hela; Arfa, Sondes; Mohamed, Saoussen Cheikh; Slim, Tensim; Khochtali, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Metastases of solid tumors to the pituitary gland are often asymptomatic or appereas as with diabetes insipid us. Pituitary metastases more commonly affect the posterior lobe and the infundibulum than the anterior lobe. The presentation with an acute adrenal insufficiency is a rare event. A 69-year-old men presented with vomiting, low blood pressure and hypoglycemia. Hormonal exploration confirmed a hypopituitarism. Appropriate therapy was initiated urgently. The hypothalamic-pituitary MRI showed a pituitary hypertrophy, a nodular thickening of the pituitary stalk. The chest X Rays revealed pulmonary opacity. Computed tomography scan of the chest showed a multiples tumors with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Bronchoscopy and biopsy demonstrated a pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Hence we concluded to a lung cancer with multiple pituitary and adrenal gland metastases. This case emphasizes the need for an etiological investigation of acute adrenal insufficiency after treatment of acute phase. PMID:27200139

  14. A Novel Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone 1 (Gnrh1) Enhancer-Derived Noncoding RNA Regulates Gnrh1 Gene Expression in GnRH Neuronal Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Polly P.; Brusman, Liza E.; Iyer, Anita K.; Webster, Nicholas J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a neuropeptide released from a small population of neurons in the hypothalamus, is the central mediator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and is required for normal reproductive development and function. Evolutionarily conserved regulatory elements in the mouse, rat, and human Gnrh1 gene include three enhancers and the proximal promoter, which confer Gnrh1 gene expression specifically in GnRH neurons. In immortalized mouse hypothalamic GnRH (GT1-7) neurons, which show pulsatile GnRH release in culture, RNA sequencing and RT-qPCR revealed that expression of a novel long noncoding RNA at Gnrh1 enhancer 1 correlates with high levels of GnRH mRNA expression. In GT1-7 neurons, which contain a transgene carrying 3 kb of the rat Gnrh1 regulatory region, both the mouse and rat Gnrh1 enhancer-derived noncoding RNAs (GnRH-E1 RNAs) are expressed. We investigated the characteristics and function of the endogenous mouse GnRH-E1 RNA. Strand-specific RT-PCR analysis of GnRH-E1 RNA in GT1-7 cells revealed GnRH-E1 RNAs that are transcribed in the sense and antisense directions from distinct 5’ start sites, are 3’ polyadenylated, and are over 2 kb in length. These RNAs are localized in the nucleus and have a half-life of over 8 hours. In GT1-7 neurons, siRNA knockdown of mouse GnRH-E1 RNA resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Gnrh1 primary transcript and Gnrh1 mRNA. Over-expression of either the sense or antisense mouse GnRH-E1 RNA in immature, migratory GnRH (GN11) neurons, which do not express either GnRH-E1 RNA or GnRH mRNA, induced the transcriptional activity of co-transfected rat Gnrh1 gene regulatory elements, where the induction requires the presence of the rat Gnrh1 promoter. Together, these data indicate that GnRH-E1 RNA is an inducer of Gnrh1 gene expression. GnRH-E1 RNA may play an important role in the development and maturation of GnRH neurons. PMID:27389022

  15. Comparison of Detection of Normal Puberty in Boys by a Hormonal Sleep Test and a Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Test

    PubMed Central

    Bordini, Brian; Yu, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Context: The magnitude of sleep-related gonadotropin rise required to activate pubertal gonadal function is not established. Objective: Our objective was to determine the normal relationship between sleep-related pubertal hormone levels and pituitary-testicular responsiveness to a GnRH agonist (GnRHag) test across the pubertal transition. Design/Setting and Participants: We conducted a prospective study in a General Clinical Research Center with healthy 9- to 15-yr-old volunteer boys. Interventions: Interventions included overnight blood sampling followed by leuprolide acetate injection (10 μg/kg). Primary Outcome Variables: LH, FSH, and testosterone levels were evaluated. Results: LH levels during sleep and post-GnRHag rose steadily during the late prepubertal years. Sleep peak LH correlated highly with the LH response to GnRHag across groups (r = 0.913). A sleep peak LH level of at least 3.7 U/liter predicted pubertal testicular activation with 100% accuracy. LH of at least 14.8 and at least 19.0 U/liter 4 h after GnRHag, respectively, predicted puberty with 100% sensitivity/94% specificity and 100% specificity/94% sensitivity. Overweight pubertal boys had transiently prolonged responses to GnRHag. FSH rose during both waking and sleeping hours during the prepubertal years, and all pubertal boys had an FSH level of at least 0.9 U/liter awake and at least 1.2 U/liter asleep. Sleep LH was more closely related than FSH to testicular size. Conclusions: These data suggest that a critical LH level during sleep (≥3.7 U/liter) heralds the onset of pubertal virilization and that this level is predictable by LH of at least 14.8–19 U/liter 4 h after GnRHag. These data also suggest that LH stimulation of testicular androgen production plays a role in stimulating testicular tubule growth once a critical level of FSH is achieved. PMID:23043188

  16. Ovarian response to repeated administration of alternating exogenous gonadotropin regimens in the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) and tigrinus (Leopardus tigrinus).

    PubMed

    da Paz, Regina Celia Rodrigues; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Adania, Cristina Harumi; Barnabe, Valquíria Hippólito; Barnabe, Renato Campanarut

    2006-10-01

    Exogenous gonadotropins are used to stimulate ovarian follicular growth and ovulation in mammalian species, including wild cats. However, successes in application of assisted reproduction techniques in nondomestic felids have been sparse. Our objectives were to assess the effectiveness of alternating gonadotropin regimens on ovarian responses. Five adult female ocelots and four adult female tigrinus were treated four to six times, using alternating eCG/hCG and pFSH/pLH at 4-month intervals. Laparoscopies were done to assess follicular development and to collect oocytes from matures follicles. The average number of follicles and corpus luteum (CL) per stimulation was higher in ocelots (7.0 +/- 0.8; mean +/- S.E.M.) than in tigrinus (2.5 +/- 0.4; P < 0.05), but the percentage of mature oocytes did not differ between the two species (mean range, 54-55%). Within species, both gonadotropin regimens were equally effective in inducing follicular growth and oocyte maturation. The total number of ovarian structures and oocyte maturation percentages did not decrease in either species with sequential stimulations. In summary, female ocelots and tigrinus continued to respond to repeated alternating ovarian stimulation protocols. In conclusion, the use of alternating gonadotropin regimens may permit more intensive reproductive management in these endangered cats. PMID:16472853

  17. Effects of gonadotropin and testosterone treatments on plasma leptin levels in male patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozata, M; Ozisik, G; Caglayan, S; Yesilova, Z; Bingöl, N; Saglam, M; Turan, M; Beyhan, Z

    1998-05-01

    Since little is known about the effects of gonadotropin and testosterone treatment on leptin levels in male hypogonadism, we determined fasting plasma leptin levels before and 3 months after treatment in 21 patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH), 16 patients with Klinefelter's syndrome and 20 male controls. Patients with IHH were treated with hCG/human menopausal gonadotropin, whereas patients with Klinefelter's syndrome received T treatment. Plasma leptin levels were measured by an RIA with a sensitivity of 0.5 microg/L. Mean leptin levels in patients with IHH before treatment (9.23+/-4.09 microg/L) were not significantly different from those in patients with Klinefelter's syndrome (7.29+/-5.05 microg/L; z=-1.41; P=0.15). Leptin levels in both IHH and Klinefelter's syndrome groups were, however, significantly higher than in the normal men (3.91+/-1.67 microg/L) (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively). Mean leptin levels did not change significantly 3 months after the initiation of gonadotropin (11.6+/-6.44 microg/L) or T (8.32+/-5.17 microg/L) treatment in either IHH or Klinefelter's syndrome. Our study demonstrated that mean plasma leptin levels are not influenced by short-term gonadotropin or T treatment in male hypogonadism. PMID:9660087

  18. Anaesthetic management for caesarean section in a case of previously operated with residual pituitary tumour

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Prerana N; Sonawane, Darshana; Appukutty, Jithesh

    2011-01-01

    Successful anaesthetic management for caesarean section in a case with previous pituitary tumour resection, with residual tumour, is reported. The pituitary gland undergoes global hyperplasia during pregnancy. Functional pituitary tumours may exhibit symptomatic enlargement during pregnancy. Growth hormone secreting tumour is associated with acromegaly which has associated anaesthetic implications of difficult airway, systemic hypertension, and diabetes and electrolyte imbalance. Intracranial space occupying lesions can increase intra cranial pressure and compromise cerebral perfusion or cause herniation. We report management of this case. PMID:22223910

  19. Regulation of Baboon Fetal Pituitary Prolactin Expression by Estrogen1

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, Gerald J.; Lynch, Terrie J.; Davies, William A.; Albrecht, Eugene D.

    2009-01-01

    We previously showed that fetal adrenal fetal zone growth was increased and the number of follicles in the fetal ovary reduced in baboons in which estradiol was suppressed by treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole between mid and late gestation periods. Because adrenal/ovarian development was restored in animals treated with letrozole and estradiol, and both tissues express estrogen receptor, we proposed that estrogen regulates fetal adrenal/ovary development via a direct action. However, because prolactin can modulate fetal adrenal and adult pituitary/ovarian function, the current study determined whether estrogen action involved estradiol-regulated changes in fetal prolactin/luteinizing hormone (LH) expression. Fetal prolactin levels and the number of prolactin-positive fetal pituitary cells (per 0.37 mm2) were increased (P < 0.01) between mid (6 ± 1 ng/ml; 15.8 ± 2.4) and late (257 ± 28 ng/ml; 57.3 ± 5.1) gestation, reduced (P < 0.01) in late-gestation fetuses in which estradiol was suppressed (>95%) by letrozole (61 ± 11 ng/ml; 19.3 ± 2.0), and minimally but not significantly increased by letrozole and estradiol (99 ± 11 ng/ml; 32.7 ± 5.2). In contrast, the number of LH-positive fetal pituitary cells decreased (P < 0.01) between mid (48.8 ± 9.5) and late (17.4 ± 3.2) gestation, remained elevated (P < 0.01) in estrogen-suppressed animals (56.6 ± 5.1), and was partially but not significantly decreased by letrozole-estradiol (28.8 ± 5.2). We conclude that estrogen regulates fetal pituitary prolactin and LH expression and fetal prolactin levels. However, because prolactin and LH expressions in estrogen-suppressed fetuses were inversely related to previously demonstrated changes in adrenal/ovarian development, we propose that estrogen regulates the fetal ovary and adrenal gland directly and not via action on the fetal pituitary gland. PMID:19176882

  20. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging analysis of pituitary adenomas for near-real-time tumor delineation

    PubMed Central

    Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Norton, Isaiah; Olubiyi, Olutayo; Changelian, Armen N.; Machaidze, Revaz; Vestal, Matthew L.; Laws, Edward R.; Dunn, Ian F.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2015-01-01

    We present a proof of concept study designed to support the clinical development of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) for the detection of pituitary tumors during surgery. We analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI six nonpathological (NP) human pituitary glands and 45 hormone secreting and nonsecreting (NS) human pituitary adenomas. We show that the distribution of pituitary hormones such as prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in both normal and tumor tissues can be assessed by using this approach. The presence of most of the pituitary hormones was confirmed by using MS/MS and pseudo-MS/MS methods, and subtyping of pituitary adenomas was performed by using principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM). Our proof of concept study demonstrates that MALDI MSI could be used to directly detect excessive hormonal production from functional pituitary adenomas and generally classify pituitary adenomas by using statistical and machine learning analyses. The tissue characterization can be completed in fewer than 30 min and could therefore be applied for the near-real-time detection and delineation of pituitary tumors for intraoperative surgical decision-making. PMID:26216958